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Sample records for lateral humeral condyle

  1. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral humeral condyle in a table tennis player.

    PubMed

    Pintore, E; Maffulli, N

    1991-08-01

    The case of a table tennis player suffering from intra-articular loose bodies of the elbow is reported. The patient developed the first signs of osteochondritis dissecans of the right lateral humeral condyle at age 16 but underwent surgery only 6 yr later. He has now resumed training and competition, despite some residual stiffness due to early osteoarthritis. This is the first case of osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow ascribed to this sport. It was probably due to repetitive valgus compressive stresses at the radiocapitellar joint during the forced movements imposed by high-level table tennis in a young athlete. PMID:1956260

  2. Humeral lateral condyle fractures in children: redefining the criteria for displacement.

    PubMed

    Bakarman, Khalid A; Alsiddiky, Abdul Monem M; Alzain, Kholoud O; Alkhawashki, Hazem M; Bin Nasser, Ahmed S; Alsaleh, Khalid A; Al-Jassir, Fawzi F; Zamzam, Mohamed M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to define paediatric lateral humeral condyle fractures prone to later displacement. The authors reviewed 106 children who were treated surgically for this fracture. There were 74 boys and 32 girls with an age range of 3-10 years. The study included 27 minimally displaced and 79 displaced fractures. The average follow-up was 50 months. Binary logistic regression model indicated that 6-8-year-old children with minimally displaced fractures and who underwent immediate surgery have a better chance for satisfactory results. The authors concluded that routine use of 2 mm displacement for treatment decisions should be changed to avoid delayed surgery. PMID:26986032

  3. Management of neglected lateral condyle fractures of humerus in children: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil; Qureshi, Nadeem Akhtar; Gupta, Neeraj; Verma, Indreshwar; Pandey, Devreshi Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Late presentation of humeral lateral condylar fracture in children is a surgical dilemma. Osteosynthesis of the fracture fragment or correction of elbow deformity with osteotomies and ulnar nerve transposition or sometimes both procedures combined is a controversial topic. We retrospectively evaluated open reduction and fixation cases in late presentation of lateral humeral condyle fracture in pediatric cases with regards to union and functional results. Materials and Methods: Twenty two pediatric (≤12 years) patients with fractures of lateral condyle presenting 4 weeks or more post injury between the study period of 2006 and 2010 were included. Multiple K-wires / with or without screws along with bone grafting were used. At final evaluation, union (radiologically) and elbow function (Liverpool Elbow Score, LES) was assessed. Results: There were 19 boys and 3 girls. Followup averaged 33 months. Pain (n=9), swelling (n=6), restriction of elbow motion (n=6), prominence of lateral condylar region (n=4), valgus deformity (n=4) were the main presenting symptoms. Ulnar nerve function was normal in all patients. There were nine Milch type I and 13 type II fractures. Union occurred in 20 cases. One case had malunion and in another case there was resorption of condyle following postoperative infection and avascular necrosis. Prominent lateral condyles (4/12), fish tail appearance (n=7), premature epiphyseal closure (n=2) were other observations. LES averaged 8.12 (range, 6.66-9.54) at final followup. Conclusions: There is high rate of union and satisfactory elbow function in late presenting lateral condyle fractures in children following osteosynthesis attempt. Our study showed poor correlation between patient's age, duration of late presentation or Milch type I or II and final elbow function as determined by LES. PMID:23325975

  4. Quantifying lateral femoral condyle ellipticalness in chimpanzees, gorillas, and humans.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Pfisterer, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    Articular surfaces of limb bones provide information for understanding animal locomotion because their size and shape are a reflection of habitual postures and movements. Here we present a novel method for quantifying the ellipticalness (i.e., departure from perfectly circular) of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC), applying this technique to hominid femora. Three-dimensional surface models were created for 49 Homo sapiens, 34 Pan troglodytes and 25 Gorilla gorilla femora. Software was developed that fit separate cylinders to each of the femoral condyles. These cylinders were constrained to have a single axis, but could have different radii. The cylinder fit to the LFC was allowed to assume an elliptical cross-section, while the cylinder fit to the medial condyle was constrained to remain circular. The shape of the elliptical cylinder (ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse) was recorded, and the orientation of the elliptical cylinder quantified as angles between the major axis of the ellipse and the anatomical and mechanical axes of the femur. Species were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc multiple comparisons tests. Confirming qualitative descriptions, human LFCs are more elliptical than those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Human femora exhibit a narrow range for the angle between the major axis of the elliptical cylinder and femoral axes. Conversely, the chimpanzee sample is bimodal for these angles, exhibiting two ellipse orientations, while Gorilla shows no preferred angle. Our results suggest that like modern human femora, chimpanzee femoral condyles have preferentially used regions. PMID:23042636

  5. Bilateral osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle following bilateral total removal of lateral discoid meniscus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Yoshida, Gen; Tomihara, Tomohiro; Matsuura, Takeshi; Satake, Shinji; Kaneda, Kunikazu; Shimada, Nagakazu

    2008-11-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the lateral femoral condyle sometimes occurs with a discoid lateral meniscus. Recently, it was reported that OCD of the lateral femoral condyle occurred after total removal of the lateral meniscus. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with bilateral OCD of the lateral femoral condyle following bilateral total removal for discoid lateral meniscus. Valgus deviation of the knee after total removal and increased sporting activity might have concentrated excessive stress on the lateral condyles in the standing position. As a result, bilateral OCD might have occurred. Drilling of the areas of OCD on the bilateral lateral femoral condyles was done and the patient wore inner wedge arch supports postoperatively. After 2 years, neither knee pain nor arthrosis has occurred so far, but long-term follow-up of this patient is considered to be necessary. PMID:17985146

  6. Meniscoplasty for stable osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle is relatively rare, and it is reported to often be combined with a discoid lateral meniscus. Given the potential for healing, conservative management is indicated for stable osteochondritis dissecans in patients who are skeletally immature. However, patients with osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus often have persistent symptoms despite conservative management. Case presentation We present the case of a seven-year-old Korean girl who had osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus, which healed after meniscoplasty for the symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus without surgical intervention for the osteochondritis dissecans. In addition, healing of the osteochondritis dissecans lesion was confirmed by an MRI scan five months after the operation. Conclusions Meniscoplasty can be recommended for symptomatic stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus when conservative treatment fails. PMID:21896174

  7. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, T; Shino, K; Hamada, M; Horibe, S

    1999-01-01

    Differences in the features of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) affecting the lateral and medial femoral condyles were investigated in 13 patients (14 knees) treated from 1991 to 1994. OCD affected the lateral femoral condyle in 6 knees (lateral group) and the medial condyle in 8 knees (medial group). The lateral group was younger (mean age, 14 v. 20 years). The radiological stage (Brückl) of the lateral group was stage 2 in 3 knees and stage 3 in 3. The lateral menisci were all discoid and the condylar articular surface of the lesions was normal in two knees, softened in 3 and detached in 1. The medial group comprised 1 knee in stage 2, 1 in stage 3, 1 in stage 4, and 5 in stage 5. The OCD lesion showed softening in 2 knees and detachment in 6. Repetitive abnormal stress on weaker osteochondral structures in the growing period produced by a discoid meniscus during growth may cause OCD of the lateral femoral condyle. PMID:10024029

  8. Arthroscopic Microfracture Technique for Cartilage Damage to the Lateral Condyle of the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Minami, Ginjiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the use of arthroscopic microfracture to treat a 10-year-old female patient with extensive damage to the cartilage of the lateral condyle of the tibia before epiphyseal closure, resulting in good cartilage recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a defect in part of the load-bearing surface of the articular cartilage of the condyle articular of the tibia. The patient was diagnosed with damage to the lateral condyle cartilage of the tibia following meniscectomy, and arthroscopic surgery was performed. The cartilage defect measured approximately 20 × 20 mm, and microfracture was performed. Arthroscopy performed four months postoperatively showed that the cartilage defect was completely covered with fibrous cartilage, and the patient was allowed to resume sports activities. Four years postoperatively, she has had no recurrence of pain or hydrarthrosis. PMID:26345523

  9. The far-lateral approach: destruction of the condyle does not necessarily result in clinically evident craniovertebral junction instability.

    PubMed

    Shiban, Ehab; Török, Elisabeth; Wostrack, Maria; Meyer, Bernhard; Lehmberg, Jens

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Far-lateral or extreme-lateral approaches to the skull base allow access to the lateral and anterior portion of the lower posterior fossa and foramen magnum. These approaches include a certain extent of resection of the condyle, which potentially results in craniocervical junction instability. However, it is debated what extent of condyle resection is safe and at what extent of condyle resection an occipitocervical fusion should be recommended. The authors reviewed cases of condyle resection/destruction with regard to necessity of occipitocervical fusion. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients in whom a far- or extreme-lateral approach including condyle resection of various extents was performed between January 2007 and December 2014. RESULTS Twenty-one consecutive patients who had undergone a unilateral far- or extreme-lateral approach including condyle resection were identified. There were 10 male and 11 female patients with a median age of 61 years (range 22-83 years). The extent of condyle resection was 25% or less in 15 cases, 50% in 1 case, and greater than 75% in 5 cases. None of the patients who underwent condyle resection of 50% or less was placed in a collar postoperatively or developed neck pain. Two of the patients with condyle resection of greater than 75% were placed in a semirigid collar for a period of 3 months postoperatively and remained free of pain after this period. At last follow-up none of the cases showed any clear sign of radiological or clinical instability. CONCLUSIONS The unilateral resection or destruction of the condyle does not necessarily result in craniocervical instability. No evident instability was encountered even in the 5 patients who underwent removal of more than 75% of the condyle. The far- or extreme-lateral approach may be safer than generally accepted with regard to craniocervical instability as generally considered and may not compel fusion in all cases with condylar resection of

  10. Lateral femoral condyle osteochondral fracture combined to patellar dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Callewier, A; Monsaert, A; Lamraski, G

    2009-02-01

    The authors report the case of an osteochondral fracture involving the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in a 23-year-old sportsman. The defect was concomitant to a lateral patellar dislocation involving a rare injury mechanism. Fixation of the osteochondral fragment was performed with bioabsorbable pins and healing was achieved within an acceptable time. Clinical and radiographic outcome at one year is highly satisfactory and bioabsorbable implant fixation reveals to be a worthwhile option in such a case. This rare lesion is diagnostically challenging and requires an adapted and prompt treatment. PMID:19251243

  11. Lateral Condyle Fracture of the Humerus in Children Treated with Bioabsorbable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tercier, Stéphane; Bregou-Bourgeois, Aline; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcome of lateral condyle fracture of the elbow in children treated with bioabsorbable or metallic material. From January 2008 to December 2009, 16 children with similar fractures and ages were grouped according to the fixation material used. Children were seen at 3, 6, and 12 months and more than 4 years (mean 51.8 months) postoperatively. The clinical results were compared using the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS). Radiographic studies of the fractured and opposite elbow were assessed at last follow-up control. Twelve children had a sufficient followup and could be included in the study. Seven could be included in the traditional group and 5 in the bioabsorbable group. At 12 months, the MEPS was 100 for every child in both groups. Asymptomatic bony radiolucent visible tracks and heterotopic ossifications were noted in both groups. There were no significant differences in terms of clinical and radiological outcome between the two groups. The use of bioabsorbable pins or screws is a reasonable alternative to the traditional use of metallic materials for the treatment of lateral condyle fracture of the elbow in children. PMID:24228016

  12. Late presentation of fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus in children

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Shyam K; Khare, Ghanshyam N

    2011-01-01

    Background: The current controversy regarding the management of fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus presenting between 3 to 12 weeks prompted us to evaluate our results of open reduction and internal fixation of such fractures. Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients operated between March 1995 and February 2001 qualified for this study. Five patients presented between 3–4 weeks, nine between 5–8 weeks and seven between 9–12 weeks post injury. Ten fractures were classified as stage II and eleven as stage III (Jacob et al. criteria). The mean age was 8 years (range: 4–14 years). All patients underwent surgery (open reduction and internal fixation with K-wires/screw, with or without bone grafting). The results were assessed by the modified criteria of Agarwal et al. after an average follow-up of 2.3 years. Results: Excellent to good results were observed in all the five patients presenting at 3–4 weeks post injury. In the patients presenting at 5–8 weeks, the results were excellent in one, good in four, fair in three, and poor in one patient. The fracture united in all cases; however, malunion was observed in four patients. The fractures that were operated at 9–12 weeks showed good results in one case, fair result in three cases, and poor result in three cases. Avascular necrosis of the lateral condyle in one patient, premature fusion in two patients, pin tract infection in three patients, and gross restriction of elbow movements in three patients were the major complications in this group. Accurate reduction was difficult as a result of new bone formation and remodeling at the fracture surfaces. Multiple incisions over the common extensor aponeurosis and bone graft supplementation were helpful for achieving acceptable reduction. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation is recommended in all cases of displaced fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus presenting at up to 12 weeks post injury. However, the results become

  13. Bilateral combined discoid lateral menisci and lateral femoral condyle osteochondritis dissecans lesions in a division I varsity athlete: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul; Keblish, David J

    2013-12-01

    Discoid menisci can be a source of pain for patients, and pose treatment challenges to the treating surgeon. Additional associated intra-articular pathology, specifically osteochondral defects, can further complicate the clinical picture. The incidence of lateral discoid meniscus is variable based on the population, with a range of 0.4 to 17%, with bilateral involvement in up to 19% of these cases. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is exceedingly rare, with an incidence of 0.015% in one study; however, some authors have suggested a correlation between the development of OCD and the presence of an unstable or torn lateral discoid meniscus. We present a case, the first to our knowledge, of bilateral lateral femoral condyle OCD in the presence of bilateral, asymptomatic, complete lateral discoid menisci. PMID:23288777

  14. Intercondylar notch width and inner angle of lateral femoral condyle as the risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury in female handball players in Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Miljko, Miro; Grle, Maki; Kozul, Slobodan; Kolobarić, Mladen; Djak, Ivana

    2012-03-01

    The principal purpose of this prospective study was to examine intercondylar notch size and the value of inner angle of lateral femoral condyle as the risk factors for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament ACL injury and than to correlate them to the physical values of the athletes such as body mass index (BMI), hight, wight, etc. There are indentified two type of risk factors, external include shoes-surface interaction, type of playing surface, weather conditions and internal include anatomic, neuromuscular, biomechanical and hormonal factors that may predispose female athlets to noncontact injury of ACL. Among anatomic factors, intercondylar notch stenosis and larger inner angle of lateral condyle of femur as the factors which can cause impigement of ACL, were related to an increased risk of injury of ACL. In this study were included 51 female athlete. In the study group there were 24 female handball players with ACL tear and in control group there were 27 female handball players without any type of injury of the knee, who are practicing handball on a daily basis for at least for two years. In the first step, were gathered clinical data performed by orthopaedic surgeon. In the second step, the femoral notch width and the inner angle of lateral condyle of femur were measured on coronal MR-images. Study has shown that value of inner angle of lateral condyle of femur was significantly higher in athletes with ACL tear compared to those without. Value of width of intercondylar notch was statisticaly smaller in athletes with ACL tear, compared to those without. In the conclusion the inner angle of lateral femoral condyle is better predicting factor for ACL tear in young female handball players compared to intercondylar notch width. PMID:22816220

  15. Massive osteochondritis of the lateral femoral condyle associated with discoid meniscus: management with meniscoplasty, rim stabilization and bioabsorbable screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Camathias, Carlo; Rutz, Erich; Gaston, Mark S

    2012-09-01

    Discoid menisci without tears and before surgical intervention may be an aetiological factor in the development of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). We present the case of a massive OCD lesion in the lateral femoral condyle of a 12-year-old boy who presented with relatively few symptoms despite the size of the lesion. This was treated with meniscoplasty and rim stabilization, which has become established as the gold standard treatment for symptomatic discoid menisci. This was combined with bioabsorbable screw fixation of the OCD lesion, resulting in rapid resolution of symptoms and a return to normal magnetic resonance image appearances after 6 months. It is likely that instability of discoid menisci is a key causal component when present concurrently with OCD lesions. Therefore, stabilization of this is required as well as saucerization of the meniscus. OCD lesions which are of a sufficient size such that if they became unstable or dislocated would result in a significant defect should also be stabilized. We believe that bioabsorbable screw fixation presents a good solution for fixation in these cases and this combination of treatment should result in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:21817923

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle in a patient affected by osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Persiani, Pietro; Di Domenica, Marica; Martini, Lorena; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Zambrano, Anna; Celli, Mauro; Villani, Ciro

    2015-11-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a very uncommon phenomenon in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). A 14-year-old boy, affected by OI and followed in our Center for Congenital Osteodystrophies, had a knee trauma and MRI indicated a hollowed area of 2.5×1.5 cm in the lateral femoral condyle, which was classified as grade III. The patient underwent surgery, performed as a one-step surgical treatment: the osteochondral fragment was removed, curettage of lesion's bottom was performed, and a biphasic scaffold was used to fill the defect, implanted with a press-fit technique. MRI at 12 and 24 months after surgery showed scaffold integration. At the final follow-up, the patient did not feel any pain or articular limitations. It is difficult to provide a guideline on osteochondritis dissecans in patients affected by OI because of the lack of literature reports on this rare disorder in a rare disease. According to our experience, in these patients, osteosynthesis of the bone fragment and the use of autograft are not recommended because of the patient's bone weakness and osteoporosis. Moreover, compared with two-step surgery, one-step surgery is preferred to reduce the risk related to anesthesia, often observed to be higher in these patients. PMID:25919806

  17. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  18. Late-diagnosed large osteochondral fracture of the lateral femoral condyle in an adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Enea, Davide; Busilacchi, Alberto; Cecconi, Stefano; Gigante, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    In this case report, we describe a large osteochondral fracture of the anterolateral femoral condyle in an adolescent athlete while dancing. At 3 months after the misdiagnosed injury, the condylar defect was covered by a layer of disorganized fibrous tissue rich in blood vessels. To achieve good repair, an accurate curettage of the fractured surfaces, a precise reduction, and a stable internal fixation of the fragments were performed. Two poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screws were used to obtain appropriate compression. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had resumed her previous dancing activity. An MRI scan showed no interruptions of the cartilage layer at the boundary with the healthy tissue, but cartilage thinning and extensive subchondral remodeling were detected. PMID:23511583

  19. The usefulness of MRI and arthroscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of soft-tissue injuries associated with split-depression fractures of the lateral tibial condyle.

    PubMed

    Parkkinen, M; Madanat, R; Mäkinen, T J; Mustonen, A; Koskinen, S K; Lindahl, J

    2014-12-01

    The role of arthroscopy in the treatment of soft-tissue injuries associated with proximal tibial fractures remains debatable. Our hypothesis was that MRI over-diagnoses clinically relevant associated soft-tissue injuries. This prospective study involved 50 consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment for a split-depression fracture of the lateral tibial condyle (AO/OTA type B3.1). The mean age of patients was 50 years (23 to 86) and 27 (54%) were female. All patients had MRI and arthroscopy. Arthroscopy identified 12 tears of the lateral meniscus, including eight bucket-handle tears that were sutured and four that were resected, as well as six tears of the medial meniscus, of which five were resected. Lateral meniscal injuries were diagnosed on MRI in four of 12 patients, yielding an overall sensitivity of 33% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11 to 65). Specificity was 76% (95% CI 59 to 88), with nine tears diagnosed among 38 menisci that did not contain a tear. MRI identified medial meniscal injuries in four of six patients, yielding an overall sensitivity of 67% (95% CI 24 to 94). Specificity was 66% (95% CI 50 to 79), with 15 tears diagnosed in 44 menisci that did not contain tears. MRI appears to offer only a marginal benefit as the specificity and sensitivity for diagnosing meniscal injuries are poor in patients with a fracture. There were fewer arthroscopically-confirmed associated lesions than reported previously in MRI studies. PMID:25452365

  20. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  1. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  2. Double crush syndrome due to plating of humeral shaft fracture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Chang, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Median nerve injury is rarely associated with the humeral shaft fracture. A Sixty two year old woman with a displaced humeral shaft fracture, developed a symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome after plating with a screw protruding medially. 16 months later, the implants were removed and the symptoms gradually improved without carpal tunnel release surgery. A double crush syndrome resulted due to the proximal compression by the medially protruding screw and the distal compression by carpal tunnel. The proximal decompression produced by removal of the screw led to relief of the symptoms. PMID:24741148

  3. HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Benegas, Eduardo; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo Amado; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Santis Prada, Flavia de; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Marchitto, Gustavo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Humeral shaft fractures (HSFs) represent 3% of the fractures of the locomotor apparatus, and the middle third of the shaft is the section most affected. In the majority of cases, it is treated using nonsurgical methods, but surgical indications in HSF cases are increasingly being adopted. The diversity of opinions makes it difficult to reach a consensus regarding the types of osteosynthesis, surgical technique and quantity and quality of synthesis materials that should be used. It would appear that specialists are far from reaching a consensus regarding the best method for surgical treatment of HSFs. We believe that less invasive methods, which favor relative stability, are the most appropriate methods, since the most feared complications are less frequent. PMID:27019833

  4. Correlation between anatomical parameters of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhaoxun; Chen, Jun; Qu, Lianjun; Cui, Yan; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Hongxin; Yang, Xiaoming; Guan, Qingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To obtain anatomical data on intertubercular sulcus of humerus, evaluate the correlation between intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, to guide the positioning of torsion angle of prosthesis during total shoulder arthroplasty and provide references for shoulder prosthesis design. Methods: Using a Siemens Ultrahigh speed 64- rows multi-slices spiral CT scanner and 20 dried adult humeral specimens (intact specimen, no fractures or pathological damage), of these, left lateral in 10 cases, right lateral in 10 cases, male or female all inclusive, specimens are all provided by Anatomy Department of Weifang Medical College, scan ranged from the highest point of humeral head to the distal ends of trochlea. And scanned data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There is a linear correlation between the distance from intertubercular sulcus to central axis line of humeral head, position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the beginning slice of intertubercular sulcus. There is a linear correlation between position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the slice of surgical neck. Conclusion: There is a linear correlation between position of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, in total shoulder arthroplasty, using intertubercular sulcus as anatomical landmark will help to accurately position torsion angle of individualized prosthesis. Position angle of intertubercular sulcus is an objective, flexible positioning indicator. PMID:26131058

  5. A partially duplicated discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Lee, Y T; Choi, C H; Kim, D W

    1998-01-01

    Partially duplicated discoid lateral meniscus has not been previously reported. We present a case of a partially duplicated discoid lateral meniscus with a peripheral tear of the meniscus and a concomitant cartilage lesion of the lateral femoral condyle. PMID:9681547

  6. Giant osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, MR Muthu; Loganathan, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondroma or osteocartilaginous exostosis is an exophytic lesion that arises from the cortex of the bone and is cartilage-capped. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle is extremely rare. The following is a case report of an osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle removed via extended preauricular approach to the temporomandibular joint. PMID:26980978

  7. Plating of proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Weier, Michael; Sandmann, Gunther; Ahrens, Philipp; Braun, Karl; Elser, Florian; Stöckle, Ulrich; Freude, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The optimal treatment for proximal humeral fractures is controversial. Few data exist concerning the influence of the surgical approach on the outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of proximal humeral fractures treated with locking plate fixation through a deltopectoral vs an anterolateral deltoid-splitting approach. Of 86 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 70 were available for follow-up examination. Thirty-three patients were treated through a deltopectoral approach and 37 through an anterolateral deltoid-splitting approach. In all cases, open reduction and internal fixation with a PHILOS locking plate (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) was performed. Clinical follow-up included evaluation of pain, shoulder mobility, and strength. Constant score and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score were assessed. A clinical neurological examination of the axillary nerve was also performed. Consolidation, reduction, and appearance of head necrosis were evaluated radiographically. After a mean follow-up of 33 months, Constant scores, DASH scores, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores showed no significant differences between the groups. Clinical neurologic examination of the axillary nerve revealed no obvious damage to the nerve in either group. Deltopectoral and anterolateral detoid-splitting approaches for plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures are safe and provide similar clinical outcomes. The results of this study suggest that the approach can be chosen according to surgeon preference. PMID:23127451

  8. History of femoral head fracture and coronal fracture of the femoral condyles.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Rammelt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The first known description of the coronal fracture of the lateral femoral condyle was published by Busch in 1869. Hoffa used Busch's drawing in the first edition of his book in 1888 and accompanied it only with one sentence. A full case history of this fracture pattern was described by Braun in 1891. However, Braun's article fell into oblivion and so the fracture was popularized only in the fourth edition of Hoffa's textbook, particularly thanks to the drawing, rather than the brief description. Therefore, a fracture of the posterior femoral condyle, or more specifically, of the lateral condyle, could properly be called "Busch-Hoffa fracture". Femoral head fracture was initially described by Birkett in 1869. Of essential importance in this respect were the publications by Christopher in 1924 and, particularly, Pipkin's study of 1957, including his classification that is still in use today. A historically correct eponym for a femoral head fracture would therefore be "Birkitt-Pipkin fracture". PMID:25787681

  9. Traumatic superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tabishur; Hashmi, Ghulam Sarwar; Ansari, Mohammad Kalim

    2016-05-01

    We describe what is to our knowledge the first report of a patient who presented with a superolateral dislocation of the mandible, in which the medial portion of the left condyle was fractured and the lateral fragment was hooked on the zygomatic arch without any other associated fracture. PMID:26305342

  10. The prevalence of humeral epicondylitis: a survey in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Peter G.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of all patients with humeral epicondylitis who presented over a two-year period in a group practice were examined to clarify the epidemiological features of this condition. In all 77 patients were seen. There was no observed difference in incidence between the sexes, lateral epicondylitis being more common than medial in both sexes. Medial epicondylitis is more common in the community than is generally recognized. Epicondylitis is a relapsing condition with a strong bias towards the 35-54 years age group. Analysis revealed no relationship between incidence and socioeconomic class. PMID:3440991

  11. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the...

  13. Extra Corporeal Fixation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy K, Vandana; Kengagsubbiah, Srivatsa; V, Sathyabhama; Priya, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Condylar fracture is the second most common site in the mandibular fractures. Motor vehicle accident and fall are the major causes of such fractures. Because of the anatomical weakness of the condyle and the shape of the condylar head the antero-medial dislocation of the condyle is common. Open reduction and closed reduction is always debatable. The open reduction will bring back the normal function much earlier than closed reduction. Medially dislocated condylar fracture fragments are always managed with open method. In superior or high condylar fractures,exact reduction with conventional open reduction can be difficult due to the limited surgical and visual fields. In such cases extracorporeal fixation of condyle using vertical ramus osteotomy may be better choice to achieve perfect alignment and absolute maintaince of vertical height of the ramus and facial symmetry. We here present a case of extracorporeal fixation of unilateral left high condylar fracture. PMID:25386546

  14. Osteochondroma of bilateral mandibular condyle: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondroma represents the largest group of benign tumors of bone, which usually develops in long bones and relatively uncommon in the craniofacial region. The condyle and coronoid tip are the most common sites of occurrence in the mandible, but both sides of condyle involved has never been reported. Here, we describe a case of osteochondroma arising from the bilateral mandibular condyle. PMID:25932269

  15. Reconstruction of humeral length and centering of the prosthetic head in hemiarthroplasty for proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Stefan H; Kääb, Max J; Kröning, Iris; Scheibel, Markus; Perka, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of humeral length in hemiarthroplasty for complex proximal humeral fractures is difficult because reliable surgical landmarks are missing or are destroyed by the fracture. The pectoralis major tendon is a reliable landmark to determine prosthetic height intraoperatively. This study analyzed the clinical outcome, reconstruction of humeral length, centering of the prosthetic head in the glenoid, and tuberosity positioning and healing, using the pectoralis major tendon as a reference intraoperatively. The study included 30 patients. In 21 patients (group 1), humeral length reconstruction was performed using the pectoralis major tendon as a reference; in 9 (group 2), this reference was not used. Patients underwent a clinical and radiologic evaluation at a mean of 22.7 months. Group 1 showed significantly better results in clinical and radiologic values, especially in anatomic reconstruction of humeral length, than group 2. Clinical outcome depended significantly on greater tuberosity healing and centering of the prosthetic head in the glenoid. PMID:18621554

  16. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: Resection and reconstruction using vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus.

    PubMed

    González-Otero, Sergio; Navarro-Cuéllar, Carlos; Escrig-de Teigeiro, Margarita; Fernández-Alba-Luengo, Javier; Navarro-Vila, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Osteochondroma is one of the most common benign bone tumours, although not in the craniofacial region. More than half of these appear in the coronoid process. It can appear on the mandibular condyle, especially in its medial half, and mainly affects women aged around forty years. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with pain of several months' duration in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and no other symptoms. Panoramic radiography showed an enlarged condyle with no subchondral cysts. Computed tomography showed a bony proliferation with benign signs and a scintigraphy revealed an increased uptake in the condyle. Due to the painful clinical symptoms, a surgical procedure using preauricular and retromandibular approaches was performed to excise the condyle. The resulting defect, which was 9 mm high, was reconstructed by means of a vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus and two miniplates for osteosynthesis. Almost two years later, the patient is symptom-free and has a normal opening with no malocclusion or deviation in the opening pattern. We present and discuss different reconstruction options after condylectomy. PMID:19333189

  17. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  18. [Tumors of the mandibular condyle (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Freidel, M; Beziat, J L; Bertoin, P; Bouvier, R; Dumas, P

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of tumors of the mandibular condyle are reported. One patient had metastases from a cutaneous melanoblastoma, another a benign osteochondroma, and the third a plasmocytosarcoma revealing the presence of Kahler disease. The authors emphasize the rare nature of these lesions, in spite of the technical advances made in the radiological and surgical exploration of the temporomandibular joint, and also the large variety of histological types reported in the literature. They discuss the main diagnostic features, especially in isolated lesions in patients with no relevant past history, and stress the importance of surgical biopsy. Therapy varies from surgical treatment in benign tumors, the prognosis being excellent, to usually palliative therapy in malignant lesions. PMID:6939076

  19. Humeral head translation after a suprascapular nerve block.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jun G; Kosek, Peter; Karduna, Andrew R

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common shoulder disorder. Abnormal superior translation of the humeral head is believed to be a major cause of this pathology. The first purpose of the study was to examine the effects of suprascapular nerve block on superior translation of the humeral head and scapular upward rotation during dynamic shoulder elevation. The secondary purpose was to assess muscle activation patterns during these motions. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the study. Using fluoroscopy and electromyography, humeral head translation and muscle activation were measured before and after a suprascapular nerve block. The humeral head was superiorly located at 60 degrees of humeral elevation, and the scapula was more upwardly rotated from 30 to 90 degrees of humeral elevation after the block. The differences were observed during midrange of motion. In addition, the deltoid muscle group demonstrated increased muscle activation after the nerve block. The study's results showed a compensatory increase in humeral head translation, scapular upward rotation, and deltoid muscle activation due to the nerve block. These outcomes suggest that increasing muscular strength and endurance of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles could prevent any increased superior humeral head translation. This may be beneficial in reducing shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tears over time. PMID:22927503

  20. Outcome of humeral shaft fractures treated by functional cast brace

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Jitendra Nath; Biswas, Prahas; Roy, Avik; Hazra, Sunit; Mahato, Somnath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional brace application for isolated humeral shaft fracture persistently yields good results. Nonunion though uncommon involves usually the proximal third shaft fractures. Instead of polyethylene bivalve functional brace four plaster sleeves wrapped and molded with little more proximal extension expected to prevent nonunion of proximal third fractures. Periodic compressibility of the cast is likely to yield a better result. This can be applied on the 1st day of the presentation as an outpatient basis. Comprehensive objective scoring system befitting for fracture humeral shaft is a need. Materials and Methods: Sixty six (male = 40, female = 26) unilateral humeral shaft fractures of mean age 34.4 years (range 11–75 years) involving 38 left and 28 right hands were included in this study during April 2008 to December 2012. Fractures involved proximal (n = 18), mid (n = 35) and distal (n = 13) of humerus. Transverse, oblique, comminuted and spiral orientations in 18, 35 and 13 patients respectively. One had segmental fracture and three had a pathological fracture with cystic bone lesion. Mechanisms of injuries as identified in this study were road traffic accidents 57.6% (n = 38), fall 37.9% (n = 25). 12.1% (n = 8) had radial nerve palsy 7.6% (n = 5) had Type I open fracture. Four plaster strips of 12 layers and 5–7.5 cm broad depending on the girth of arm were prepared. Arm was then wrapped with single layer compressed cotton. Lateral and medial strips were applied and then after molding anterior and posterior strips were applied in such a way that permits full elbow range of motion and partial abduction of the shoulder. Care was taken to prevent adherence of one strip with other except in the proximal end. Limb was then put in loose collar and cuff sling intermittently allowing active motion of the elbow ROM and pendular movement of the shoulder. Weekly tightening of the cast by fresh layers of bandage over the existing cast brace continued

  1. Distal Humeral Fixation of an Intramedullary Nail Periprosthetic Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Divecha, Hiren M.; Marynissen, Hans A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Distal humeral periprosthetic fractures below intramedullary nail devices are complex and challenging to treat, in particular due to the osteopenic/porotic nature of bone found in these patients. Fixation is often difficult to satisfactorily achieve around the intramedullary device, whilst minimising soft tissue disruption. Descriptions of such cases in the current literature are very rare. We present the case of a midshaft humeral fracture treated with a locking compression plate that developed a nonunion, in a 60-year old female. This went on to successful union after exchange for an intramedullary humeral nail. Unfortunately, the patient developed a distal 1/5th humeral periprosthetic fracture, which was then successfully addressed with a single-contoured, extra-articular, distal humeral locking compression plate (Synthes) with unicortical locking screws and cerclage cables proximally around the distal nail tip region. An excellent postoperative range of motion was achieved. PMID:23662231

  2. TMJ in facial class III deformity. Condyle/fossa relations

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; del Sol, Mariano; Fariña, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the joint space present in the TMJ of subjects diagnosed with Class III dentofacial deformity with an indication for orthognathic surgery. Fourteen subjects were recruited from the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Universidad de La Frontera, Chile. All subjects were admitted to the study after signing an informed consent and undergoing cephalometric analyses to define the severity of the deformity. Then, the joint space was analyzed, studying a cone beam CT image of the TMJ, which was evaluated in the coronal and sagittal views, defining the most anterior, median and posterior joint space (sagittal view), as well as the lateral, median and medial joint space (coronal view). The data were recorded in millimeters by an observer and data were analyzed after measuring the same parameter at three different times. A student’s t-test was used for the analyses. Differences observed in both joints were not greater than 0.2 mm with spaces between 2 mm and 1.5 mm, thereby establishing the homogeneity of the sample, which presented no significant differences between the two joint spaces (right and left). It can be concluded that the joint space is symmetrical in both condyles and that no important changes are present compared to the results indicated in the international literature. PMID:25356133

  3. TMJ in facial class III deformity. Condyle/fossa relations.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; Del Sol, Mariano; Fariña, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the joint space present in the TMJ of subjects diagnosed with Class III dentofacial deformity with an indication for orthognathic surgery. Fourteen subjects were recruited from the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Universidad de La Frontera, Chile. All subjects were admitted to the study after signing an informed consent and undergoing cephalometric analyses to define the severity of the deformity. Then, the joint space was analyzed, studying a cone beam CT image of the TMJ, which was evaluated in the coronal and sagittal views, defining the most anterior, median and posterior joint space (sagittal view), as well as the lateral, median and medial joint space (coronal view). The data were recorded in millimeters by an observer and data were analyzed after measuring the same parameter at three different times. A student's t-test was used for the analyses. Differences observed in both joints were not greater than 0.2 mm with spaces between 2 mm and 1.5 mm, thereby establishing the homogeneity of the sample, which presented no significant differences between the two joint spaces (right and left). It can be concluded that the joint space is symmetrical in both condyles and that no important changes are present compared to the results indicated in the international literature. PMID:25356133

  4. Osteochondroma of condyle: case discussion and review of treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Piyush; Deora, Shakti Singh; Kiran, Shital; Bargale, Seema Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms a synovial articulation between the condyle and the cranium. It is a complex joint and shows hinge and gliding movements. Unlike other articulating heads, condyle grows with intramembranous ossification. TMJ is subjected to excessive loads throughout life as it supports essential functions such as mastication, deglutition, speech and respiration. Traumatic, neoplastic or non-neoplastic pathologies sometimes necessitate joint replacement therapy. Osteochondroma is one such benign tumour originating from condyle which requires surgical replacement of condyle with prosthesis. Various replacement methods have been designed in the past. Alloplastic grafts have been successfully used in joint replacement surgeries like hip joint, knee joint, etc. This case discussion supports the use of titanium-made condylar prosthesis for long-term functional stability of TMJ. PMID:24496065

  5. Strain induced in the condyle by self-tapping screws in the Biomet alloplastic temporomandibular joint: a preliminary experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze how screws affect the strain concentration induced on the mandibular condyle during implantation, screwing, and drilling, as well as after condylar loading. A clean cadaveric mandible was analyzed experimentally in the intact state and was then implanted with a Biomet/Lorenz Microfixation temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant with seven bicortical self-tapping screws. The external surface of the mandible was instrumented with three strain gauges. A load of 500N on the TMJ was applied to the condyle before and after implantation. The results showed a strain concentration of -1500μɛ near the screws due to their implantation on the external surface of the mandible. The drilling process induced up to 80μɛ near the hole. The strain concentration did not change when there were more than six screws. Loading on the TMJ before and after implantation presented only a 10% difference in maximum principal strain. This study demonstrates the importance of the strain concentration induced by the screws. The process of implanting screws shows the importance of lateral surface preparation for a good fit in the condyle. Strain distribution after implantation and loading of the Biomet implant was found to be similar to that in the intact condyle. PMID:26194773

  6. Weight-bearing condyle motion of the knee before and after cruciate-retaining TKA: In-vivo surgical transepicondylar axis and geometric center axis analyses.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Dimitris; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Kwon, Young-Min; Rubash, Harry E; Li, Guoan

    2016-06-14

    An equal knee joint height during flexion and extension is of critical importance in optimizing soft-tissue balancing following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there is a paucity of data regarding the in-vivo knee joint height behavior. This study evaluated in-vivo heights and anterior-posterior (AP) translations of the medial and lateral femoral condyles before and after a cruciate-retaining (CR)-TKA using two flexion axes: surgical transepicondylar axis (sTEA) and geometric center axis (GCA). Eleven osteoarthritis (OA) knee patients were studied during a weight-bearing single leg lunge, using a validated dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS) based tracking technique. Eight healthy subjects were recruited as controls. The results demonstrated that following TKA, the medial and lateral femoral condyle heights were not equal at mid-flexion (15-45°, medial condyle lower then lateral by 2.4mm at least, p<0.01), although the knees were well-balanced at 0° and 90°. While the femoral condyle heights increased from the pre-operative values (>2mm increase on average, p<0.05), they were similar to the intact knees except that the medial sTEA was lower than the intact medial condyle between 0° and 90°. At deep flexion (>90°), both condyles were significantly higher (>2mm, p<0.01) than the healthy knees. Anterior femoral translation of the TKA knee was more pronounce at mid-flexion, whereas limited posterior translation was found at deep flexion. These data suggest that a well-balanced knee intra-operatively might not necessarily result in mid-flexion and deep flexion balance during functional weight-bearing motion, implying mid-flexion instability and deep flexion tightness of the knee. PMID:27166758

  7. Bony window approach for a traumatic bone cyst on the mandibular condyle: a case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) occurs preferentially on the mandibular symphysis and body, but rarely on the mandibular condyle. When TBC occurs in the condylar area, it can usually be related with or misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder. A 15-year-old female patient visited the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic with a 5-year history of pain and noise localized in the left temporomandibular joint. On imaging, a well demarked oval-shaped radiolucent lesion was observed on the left condyle head. The patient underwent cyst enucleation and repositioning of the bony window on the lateral cortex of the affected condyle head under the impression of subchondral cyst or TBC; however, no cystic membrane was found. The bone defect resolved and showed no recurrence on the serial radiographic postoperative follow-up for 43 months after surgery. PMID:27595088

  8. Bony window approach for a traumatic bone cyst on the mandibular condyle: a case report with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Keun; Lim, Jae-Hyung; Jeon, Kug-Jin; Huh, Jong-Ki

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) occurs preferentially on the mandibular symphysis and body, but rarely on the mandibular condyle. When TBC occurs in the condylar area, it can usually be related with or misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder. A 15-year-old female patient visited the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic with a 5-year history of pain and noise localized in the left temporomandibular joint. On imaging, a well demarked oval-shaped radiolucent lesion was observed on the left condyle head. The patient underwent cyst enucleation and repositioning of the bony window on the lateral cortex of the affected condyle head under the impression of subchondral cyst or TBC; however, no cystic membrane was found. The bone defect resolved and showed no recurrence on the serial radiographic postoperative follow-up for 43 months after surgery. PMID:27595088

  9. Computed tomographic study of the patterns of oesteoarthritic change which occur on the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi-Ji; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which parts of the articular surface of the mandibular condyle are involved in osteoarthritic (OA) change (the occurring pattern) and the relationship of these patterns to clinical signs and symptoms. The computed tomographic (CT) images and clinical records of patients with OA involvement of one or both of their temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were reviewed (OA changes confirmed by CT; 684 TMJs included). The condylar articular surface was divided into nine imaginary sections on the CT images: antero-medial (AM), antero-central (AC), antero-lateral (AL), centri-medial (CM), centri-central (CC), centri-lateral (CL), postero-medial (PM), postero-central (PC), and postero-lateral (PL) section. The occurring patterns were classified with hierarchical cluster analysis based on the distribution of the sections involved by OA changes. OA changes were observed the most frequently on the AC (62.4%) followed by the AM (55.0%), CC (48.2%), AL (43.0%), CL (43.3%), CM (33.3%), PC (28.9%), PL (25.3%), and PM (23.1%). The occurring patterns were classified into three types among which subjective joint pain (P < 0.001) and noise (P < 0.05) were more frequently reported in the entire-involved type followed by lateral- and antero-medial types in descending order, while no significant differences for age, gender, side, pain on palpation, clicking, crepitus, mouth opening range and craniomandibular index were observed. OA changes are more likely to occur on the anterior than the posterior and on the medial than the lateral surface of the mandibular condyle, while subjective joint pain and noise are more frequently reported with OA changes involving the lateral or entire part. Pain on palpation, noise, and mouth opening range were not related to the occurring pattern of OA changes. PMID:25240743

  10. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures. PMID:25534058

  11. Overexpression of Dlx2 leads to postnatal condyle degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Dandan; Lu, Jingting; Ouyang, Ningjuan; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-01-01

    Distal-less homeobox 2 (Dlx2), a member of the Dlx family of transcription factors, is important for the development of craniofacial tissues. Previous studies based on knock-out mutant mice revealed that Dlx2 primarily disturbed the development of tissues from maxillary arch. The present study used a transgenic mouse model to specifically overexpress Dlx2 in neural crest cells in order to investigate the role of Dlx2 overexpression in post-natal condyle in mice. The model was constructed and the phenotype observed using gross observation, micro-CT scan and histological examination. The model determined that overexpression of Dlx2 may lead to postnatal condyle malformation, subchondral bone degradation and irregular histological structure of the condylar cartilage. In addition, the expression of osteocalcin in the condyle region was markedly downregulated, whereas expression of msh homeobox 2 was upregulated. The results of the present study suggest that Dlx2 overexpression in cranial neural crest cells would disrupt the development of post-natal condyle, which demonstrates that the expression level and the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Dlx2 may be important in regulating the development of post-natal condyle in mice, and also offered a possible temporal-mandibular joint osteoarthritis model animal for future studies. PMID:27315306

  12. Conservative orthodontic treatment of mandibular bilateral condyle fracture.

    PubMed

    Gašpar, Goran; Brakus, Ivan; Kovačić, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is rare in children younger than the age of 5 years (range 0.6%-1.2%), and they can require different clinical treatment strategies compared with fractures in the adult population because of concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A 5-year-old girl with a history of falling from a bicycle 7 hours earlier was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Multislice computed tomographic examination demonstrated a bilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle neck associated with minimal fracture of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla. The multislice computed tomographic scan also demonstrated dislocation on the right condyle neck and, on the left side, a medial inclination of approximately 45 degrees associated with greenstick fracture of the right parasymphysis region. In this particular case, orthodontic rubber elastics in combination with fixed orthodontic brackets provided good results in the treatment of bilateral condyle neck fractures associated with greenstick fracture of parasymphysis. PMID:25098573

  13. True chondroma of the mandibular condyle: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Dhirawani, Rajesh B.; Anand, Kavneet; Lalwani, Gaurav; Pathak, Sanyog; Thakkar, Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    Chondroma of the mandibular condyle is a rare benign tumor, with just a handful of cases reported in the literature. Chondromas are rare in the maxillofacial region, but are quite common in the bones of the hands and feet. So far only eight cases of true chondroma have been reported. Here, we present a case of true chondroma of the mandibular condyle of the right side, for which condylectomy was done. No signs of recurrence are noted at 2 years follow-up. PMID:25593880

  14. Application of Additional Medial Plate in Treatment of Proximal Humeral Fractures With Unstable Medial Column

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; He, Jiliang; Wang, Fu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to use finite element analysis to compare the biomechanical characteristics after lateral locking plate (LLP) or LLP with a medial anatomical locking plate (LLP-MLP) fixation of proximal humeral fractures with an unstable medial column. First, a 3-dimensional, finite element analysis model was developed. Next, LLP and LLP-MLP implants were instrumented into the proximal humeral fracture models. Compressive and rotational loads were then applied to the humerus model to determine the biomechanical characteristics. Both normal and osteoporotic proximal humerus fractures were simulated using 2 internal fixation methods each under 7 loading conditions. To assess the biomechanical characteristics, the construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and stress distribution on the implants were recorded and compared. The LLP-MLP method provided both lateral and medial support that reduced the stress on the LLP and the amount of displacement in the fracture region. In contrast, the LLP method resulted in more instability in the medial column and larger magnitudes of stress. In osteoporotic bone, the LLP was more inclined to fail than LLP-MLP. The LLP-MLP method provides a strong support for the medial column and increases the stability of the region surrounding the fracture. PMID:26469918

  15. Intramedullary reaming for press-fit fixation of a humeral component removes cortical bone asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Chebli, Caroline; Mounce, Doug; Bertelsen, Alexander; Richardson, Michael; Matsen, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Periprosthetic humeral fractures are major complications of shoulder arthroplasty. Bone removal during surgical reaming is a risk factor for these fractures. Although it is recognized that the endosteal surface of the humerus is asymmetrical whereas the reamers are symmetrical, to our knowledge, the effect of cylindrical reaming on the pattern of cortical bone removal during reaming has not been previously studied. The medullary canals of 10 cadaveric humeri (mean age, 73 years) were reamed in a manner similar to that used during humeral arthroplasty. Cortical dimensions were obtained from computed tomography scans before and after reaming. In unreamed humeri, the anterior-posterior endocortical diameter was 20% smaller than the medial-lateral diameter. The average medial-lateral diameter (15.6 +/- 2.3 mm) was significantly greater than the anterior-posterior diameter (12.5 +/- 1.9 mm) at 13 cm distal to the tuberosity (P < .00005). Successive cylindrical reaming preferentially thinned the anterior and posterior cortices. This bone loss would not be apparent on anterior-posterior radiographs. Intramedullary reaming to obtain substantial cortical contact asymmetrically removes cortical bone in a manner that may increase the risk of periprosthetic fracture. PMID:18029200

  16. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. (1) Except as described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, a PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug... other mandibular condyle prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. (1) Except as described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, a PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug... other mandibular condyle prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  18. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Bifid Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Kolahi, Shirin; Panahi, Nazi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Differential diagnosis of bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is important, since it may play a role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions and joint symptoms. In addition, radiographic appearance of BMC may mimic tumors and/or fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and orientation of BMC based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on CBCT scans of paranasal sinuses of 425 patients. In a designated NNT station, all CBCT scans were evaluated in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to find the frequency of BMC. The condylar head horizontal angulations were also determined in the transverse plane. T-test was used to compare the frequency of BMC between the left and right sides and between males and females. Results: Totally, 309 patients with acceptable visibility of condyles on CBCT scans were entered in the study consisting of 170 (55%) females and 139 (45%) males with a mean age of 39.43±9.7 years. The BMC was detected in 14 cases (4.53%). Differences between males and females, sides and horizontal angulations of condyle of normal and BMC cases were not significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of BMC in the studied population was 4.53%. No significant difference was observed between males and females, sides or horizontal angulations of the involved and uninvolved condyles.

  19. Infection Necrosis After an Extracorporeal Reduction of a Condyle Fracture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Hyung Mook

    2016-05-01

    The authors experienced a patient of infection necrosis after an extracorporeal reduction of a condyle fracture and reconstructed it with an iliac bone graft.A 37-year-old man visited with a bilateral condyle fracture and a left para-symphyseal fracture. On the post-trauma third day, an intermaxillary fixation was applied using arch bars. On the post-trauma tenth day, an extracorporeal reduction was carried out. On postoperative day (POD) 7, the amount of the drain was 9 cc and the drain was removed. On POD 9, redness and a pus drain were observed on the operation site. On POD 18, growth of Streptococcus anginosus was observed in a thioglycolate broth. On POD 47, the infected condylar head was removed and reconstructed with an iliac bone graft. On the POD ninth week, the incisal opening was 24 mm.To prevent such infections, necrosis or absorption of reduced and a miniplate-fixed condyle head, the bony defect should be filled completely without exposing any medullary bone. Hematomas should be prevented using a large suction drain until the drain turns serous and eventually diminishes to zero. Finally, aseptic conditions are required in retrieving, assembling, and reinserting the extracorporeal reduced segment by changing the gloves and sufficient disinfectant irrigation. In case a pus discharge appears at the operation site, it would be wise to remove the fixed condyle, the infection source, and replace with healthy bone graft as soon as possible. PMID:27054427

  20. Bridging plate osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Belangero, William Dias

    2004-06-01

    This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medical Sciences and developed during November 2000 and July 2001 in the Orthopedic and Traumatology Department of UNICAMP. There were 15 patients, 11 males, age between 14 and 66 years. All fractures were unilateral. Of the 15 patients eight were polytraumatised, two of them had open fractures. The others had an isolated fracture of the humerus, of which one was open. None of the patients had previous lesions of the radial nerve, but in two patients there was a lesion of the brachial plexus. All of the patients underwent a bridging plate osteosynthesis of the humeral shaft fractures using only two small incisions proximal and distal to the fracture site. We used broad or narrow D.C.P. plates for large fragments mostly with 12 holes, fixed with two or three screws at each end. All cases united with an average time of 8-12 weeks, with the exception of one case with a grade III open fracture and a brachial plexus lesion on the same side. We had no major complications. All patients recovered good function of the limb without significant residual deformity. PMID:15135278

  1. Total Humeral Endoprosthetic Replacement following Excision of Malignant Bone Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Suhel; Moon, Bryan; Lin, Patrick; Satcher, Robert; Lewis, Valerae

    2016-01-01

    Humerus is a common site for malignant tumors. Advances in adjuvant therapies and reconstructive methods provide salvage of the upper limb with improved outcomes. Reports of limb salvage with total humeral replacement in extensive humeral tumors are sparse. We undertook a retrospective study of 20 patients who underwent total humeral endoprosthetic replacement as limb salvage following excision of extensile malignant tumor from 1990 to 2011. With an average followup of 42.9, functional and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Ten patients were still alive at the time of review. Mean estimated blood loss was 1131 mL and duration of surgery was 314 minutes. Deep infection was encountered in one patient requiring debridement while mechanical loosening of ulnar component was identified in one patient. Subluxation of prosthetic humeral head was noted in 3 patients. Mean active shoulder abduction was 12.5° and active flexion was 15°. Incompetence of abduction mechanism was the major determinant of poor active functional outcome. Mean elbow flexion was 103.5° with 30.5° flexion contracture in 10 patients with good and useful hand function. Average MSTS score was 71.5%. Total humeral replacement is a reliable treatment option in restoring mechanical stability and reasonable functional results without compromising patient survival, with low complication rate. PMID:27042158

  2. A novel approach to neoplasms medial to the condyle: a condylectomy with anterior displacement of the condyle.

    PubMed

    Ye, Z-X; Yang, C; Chen, M-J; Abdelrehem, A

    2016-04-01

    Resecting neoplasms involving the infratemporal space has a high risk of damaging critical nerves and vessels, in addition to joint form and function. The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel approach to lesions medial to the condyle, which comprises a condylectomy with anterior displacement of the condyle. The indications evaluated using digital surgical simulation, the critical surgical technique, and the preliminary clinical effects are presented here. Five cases underwent this approach between January 2006 and December 2014. The common characteristics of the five masses were (1) that they were non-malignant neoplasms involving the posterior-medial region of the condyle; (2) the upper and lower borders were between the skull base and the lingula, while the anterior border did not exceed the coronoid process. All masses were resected successfully with no damage to any critical nerves or vessels. The average follow-up period was 29.8 months (range 6-56 months). There was no recurrence, secondary deformity, or facial paralysis. The average mouth opening improved from an original 27mm to 34mm after surgery. The condyles were well fixed, with no resorption, as shown on computed tomography scans. PMID:26748864

  3. Management of Humeral Shaft Fractures; Non-Operative Versus Operative

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Functional humeral bracing remains the gold standard for treatment of humeral shaft fractures. There is an increasing trend in the literature to perform operative fixation of these fractures. Evidence Acquisition: The aim of this systematic review was to compare the level one evidence for the outcome of non-operative with operative management of humeral shaft fractures in adults. A comprehensive electronic literature search of Medline and PubMed was performed with specific inclusion criteria to identify randomized controlled trials. Results: In total, seventeen different studies were identified from the search terms and combinations used. Only one study met the inclusion criteria; however, this was a published study protocol of an ongoing trial currently being conducted. One additional published protocol for an ongoing trial was also identified, but this was for a prospective comparative observational study. Although this latter study may not be level one evidence, it would offer great insight into the functional outcome of humeral shaft fractures and economic implications of operative management, which is currently not addressed in the literature. Two retrospective comparative studies were also identified, one of which demonstrated a significantly lower rate of nonunion and malunion in those patients undergoing operative management. Conclusions: This systematic review demonstrated a deficiency in the current literature of level one evidence available for the management of humeral shaft fractures. The current ongoing randomized control trail would offer a greater insight into the management of humeral shaft fractures and help confirm or refute the current literature. If this randomized control trial affirms the reduction in the rate of nonunion with operative fixation, a cost economic analysis is essential. As it would seem to offer operative management to all patients may be over treatment and not to offer this at all would undertreat. PMID:26401493

  4. Management of a humeral shaft non-union after a Gustilo III C fracture.

    PubMed

    Conserva, Vito; Vicenti, Giovanni; Abate, Antonella; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

    2015-12-01

    A 25-year-old man was admitted to our Department with an open humeral shaft fracture (Gustilo III C); two large wounds were noticed with ulnar artery and median nerve completely dissected. Initial primary treatment included irrigation, debridement and fracture stabilization with a monolateral external fixator followed by vascular and nerve repair and wound closure. At 6 months follow up the patient was able to use his arm without any painful stimuli and a CT scan showed the presence of postero-medial callus formation. Consequently, the external fixator was removed and the patient was discharged to physiotherapy. After 7 months, the patient presented with severe pain and functional impairment with no history of trauma. X rays showed recent re-fracture on a background of oligotrophic nonunion. Revision surgery included debridement of the non-union bone edges, reaming of the medullary canal and insertion of a humeral nail. Six months later osseous healing was noted with complete restoration of shoulder and elbow movement and partial recovery of the median nerve. PMID:26738452

  5. Mandibular asymmetry: a three-dimensional quantification of bilateral condyles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The shape and volume of the condyle is considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the mandibular deviation. Curvature analysis is informative for objectively assess whether the shape of the condyles matches that of the glenoid fossa. In this study, a three-dimensional (3-D) quantification of bilateral asymmetrical condyles was firstly conducted to identify the specific role of 3-D condylar configuration for mandibular asymmetry. Methods 55 adult patients, 26 males (26 ± 5 yrs) and 29 females (26 ± 5 yrs), diagnosed with mandibular asymmetry were included. The examination of deviation of chin point, deviation of dental midlines, inclination of occlusal plane, and depth of the mandibular occlusal plane were conducted. After the clinical investigation, computed tomography images from the patients were used to reconstruct the 3-D mandibular models. Then the condylar volume, surface size, surface curvature and bone mineral density were evaluated independently for each patient on non-deviated and deviated sides of temporomandibular joint. Results Both the condylar surface size and volume were significantly larger on deviated side (surface size: 1666.14 ± 318.3 mm2, volume: 1981.5 ± 418.3 mm3). The anterior slope of the condyle was flatter (0.12 ± 0.06) and the posterior slope (0.39 ± 0.08) was prominently convex on the deviated side. The corresponding bone mineral density values were 523.01 ±118.1 HU and 549.07 ±120. 6 HU on anterior and posterior slopes. Conclusions The incongruence presented on the deviated side resulted in a reduction in contact areas and, thus, an increase in contact stresses and changes of bone density. All aforementioned results suggest that the difference existing between deviated and non-deviated condyles correlates with facial asymmetrical development. In mandibular asymmetry patients, the 3-D morphology of condyle on deviated side differ from the non-deviated side, which

  6. Occipital condyle to cervical spine fixation in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Kosnik-Infinger, Libby; Glazier, Steven S; Frankel, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Fixation at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) is necessary in a variety of pediatric clinical scenarios. Traditionally an occipital bone to cervical fusion is preformed, which requires a large amount of hardware to be placed on the occiput of a child. If a patient has previously undergone a posterior fossa decompression or requires a decompression at the time of the fusion procedure, it can be difficult to anchor a plate to the occipital bone. The authors propose a technique that can be used when faced with this difficult challenge by using the occipital condyle as a point of fixation for the construct. Adult cadaveric and a limited number of case studies have been published using occipital condyle (C-0) fixation. This work was adapted for the pediatric population. Between 2009 and 2012, 4 children underwent occipital condyle to axial or subaxial spine fixation. One patient had previously undergone posterior fossa surgery for tumor resection, and 1 required decompression at the time of operation. Two patients underwent preoperative deformity reduction using traction. One child had a Chiari malformation Type I. Each procedure was performed using polyaxial screw-rod constructs with intraoperative neuronavigation supplemented by a custom navigational drill guide. Smooth-shanked 3.5-mm polyaxial screws, ranging in length from 26 to 32 mm, were placed into the occipital condyles. All patients successfully underwent occipital condyle to cervical spine fixation. In 3 patients the construct extended from C-0 to C-2, and in 1 from C-0 to T-2. Patients with preoperative halo stabilization were placed in a cervical collar postoperatively. There were no new postoperative neurological deficits or vascular injuries. Each patient underwent postoperative CT, demonstrating excellent screw placement and evidence of solid fusion. Occipital condyle fixation is an effective option in pediatric patients requiring occipitocervical fusion for treatment of deformity and/or instability at

  7. Assessing the mobility of the mandibular condyle by sonography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Yu; Wu, Shyi-Kuen; Lu, Chuan-Chin; You, Jia-Yuan; Lai, Chung-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, the measurement of the maximal mouth opening was regarded as the mobility of the temporomandibular joint. The information, however, was not reliable. Sonography was often used to diagnose disc displacement in the temporomandibular joint and its validity was well established. The tool was also appropriate for measuring the outcome of temporomandibular disorders management. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine completely the reliability and error for evaluating the mobility of the mandibular condyle by sonography. In addition, the existing methods were modified to improve the repeatability. Patients and methods The reliability examinations included between-image and within-image explorations to represent the reliabilities of the image capturing and the mobility measuring, respectively. Sixty-two subjects were recruited to receive ultrasonic examination for condylar mobility. The images of the condyle in mouth closing and opening were captured and the horizontal displacement of the condyles was measured as the anterior translation of the condyle. To confirm that the probe did not move during mouth opening, a marker was placed between the skin and the ultrasonic probe as the landmark. Results The results demonstrated that the intrarater and interrater reliabilities in the within-image test were 0.986 and 0.970 and the reliabilities in the between-image test were 0.904 and 0.857, respectively. The standard errors of measurement in the within-image and between-image tests were 0.04 cm and 0.09 cm, respectively. Conclusion Sonography is a reliable tool to assess condylar mobility and can be used to measure the treatment outcome for temporomandibular disorders. PMID:25342888

  8. Osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Noboru; Ogawa, Kiyohisa; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 29-year-old man who had osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head is reported. Repetitive micro-trauma at a low elevated arm position was thought to have induced the osteochondral lesion. PMID:27186062

  9. A Rare Case Report of an Unusual Dislocation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Madan; Singh, Gaurav

    2016-06-01

    Several cases have been reported regarding superolateral, posterior, or superior dislocation of mandibular condyle. The anteromedial dislocation of fractured condyle is the most common among all. This article reports an unusual and unique case of dislocated fractured mandibular condyle wherein the fractured left condylar head was dislocated to the left anatomic angle of mandible. We have not found a single such case in the world English literature published till date. The presented case falls in the rarest of the rare category that will add to our previous knowledge about the types and extent of fracture dislocation of mandibular condyle. PMID:27162576

  10. Autograft Transfer from the Ipsilateral Femoral Condyle in Depressed Tibial Plateau Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, N.K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The rationale for operative treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures is anatomic reduction, stable fixation and grafting. Grafting options include autogenous bone graft or bone substitutes. Methods : The autograft group included 18 patients with depressed tibial plateau fractures treated with autogenous bone grafting from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation. According to Schatzker classification, there were 9 type II, 4 type III, 2 type IV and 3 type V lesions. The average time to union and the hospital charges were compared with the bone substitute group. The latter included 17 patients who had an excellent outcome following treatment of split and/or depressed lateral plateau fractures, using a similar surgical technique but grafting with bone substitutes (allografts). Results : Excellent clinical and radiological results were detected in the autograft group after an average follow-up of 28 months (range 12-37). The average time to union in the autograft group was 14 weeks (range 12-16), while in the bone substitute group it was 18 weeks (range 16-20). The mean total cost was 1276 Euros for the autograft group and 2978 Euros for the bone substitute group. Discussion : The use of autogenous graft from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation of depressed tibial plateau fractures provided enough bone to maintain the height of the tibial plateau and was not associated with any donor site morbidity. Using this method, the surgical time was not significantly elongated and the rehabilitation was not affected. It also exhibited faster fracture healing without postoperative loss of reduction and it was less expensive than the use of bone substitutes. PMID:25317215

  11. Correlation Between Asymmetric Resection of Posterior Femoral Condyles and Femoral Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Harun Reşit; Ök, Nusret; Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Semih; Kıter, Esat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Pertaining to peculiar designs of current knee prostheses, more bone is removed from posteromedial femoral condyle than posterolateral condyle to obtain desired femoral component rotation. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the asymmetry of the cuts and the femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. Methods: We built a model to simulate anterior chamfer cut (ACC) performed during total knee arthroplasty for measuring posterior condylar offset (PCO). Right knee axial MRI slices of a total 290 consecutive patients (142 male, 138 female, and mean age 31.39 ± 6.6) were examined. A parallel line to surgical transepiphyseal axis was drawn, and placed at the deepest part of trochlear groove. Posteromedial and posterolateral condylar offsets were measured by drawing perpendicular lines to ACC beginning from the intersection points of both anteromedial and anterolateral cortices to posterior joint line (PJL), respectively. Differences between posteromedial and posterolateral PCO were calculated, and femoral rotation angles (FRA) relative to PJL were measured. Results: The mean surgical FRA was 4.76 ± 1.16 degrees and the mean PCO differencesss- was 4.35 ± 1.04 mm for the whole group and there was no statistically significant difference between genders. There was a strong correlation between surgical FRA and PCO difference (p<0.0001, r=0.803). Linear regression analyses revealed that 0.8 mm of difference between the anteroposterior dimensions of medial and lateral PCO corresponds to 1 degree of surgical FRA (p<0.0001, R2=0.645). Conclusion: Correlation between the asymmetry of posterior chamfer cuts and achieved femoral component rotation can verify the accuracy of desired rotation, intraoperatively. However, further clinical investigations should be planned to test the results of our morphometric study.

  12. Management of Humeral and Glenoid Bone Loss in Recurrent Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, Jamie; Leiter, Jeff; Chahal, Jaskarndip; MacDonald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability and resultant glenoid and humeral head bone loss are not infrequently encountered in the population today, specifically in young, athletic patients. This review on the management of bone loss in recurrent glenohumeral instability discusses the relevant shoulder anatomy that provides stability to the shoulder joint, relevant history and physical examination findings pertinent to recurrent shoulder instability, and the proper radiological imaging choices in its workup. Operative treatments that can be used to treat both glenoid and humeral head bone loss are outlined. These include coracoid transfer procedures and allograft/autograft reconstruction at the glenoid, as well as humeral head disimpaction/humeroplasty, remplissage, humeral osseous allograft reconstruction, rotational osteotomy, partial humeral head arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty on the humeral side. Clinical outcomes studies reporting general results of these techniques are highlighted. PMID:25136461

  13. Humeral Retrotorsion in Collegiate Baseball Pitchers With Throwing-Related Upper Extremity Injury History

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Joseph B.; Oyama, Sakiko; Rucinski, Terri Jo; Creighton, R. Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Background: Collegiate baseball pitchers, as well as position players, exhibit increased humeral retrotorsion compared with individuals with no history of overhead sport participation. Whether the humeral retrotorsion plays a role in the development of throwing-related injuries that are prevalent in collegiate baseball pitchers is unknown. Hypotheses: Humeral retrotorsion will be significantly different in collegiate pitchers with throwing-related shoulder or elbow injury history compared with pitchers with no injury history. Humeral retrotorsion can also discriminate participants with and without shoulder or elbow injury. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Comparisons of ultrasonographically-obtained humeral retrotorsion were made between 40 collegiate pitchers with and without history of throwing-related shoulder or elbow injury. The ability of humeral retrotorsion to discriminate injury history was determined from the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve. Results: Participants with an elbow injury history demonstrated a greater humeral retrotorsion limb difference (mean difference = 7.2°, P = 0.027) than participants with no history of upper extremity injury. Participants with shoulder injury history showed no differences in humeral torsion compared with participants with no history of injury. Humeral retrotorsion limb difference exhibited a fair ability (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve = 0.74) to discriminate elbow injury history. Conclusions: Collegiate pitchers with a history of elbow injury exhibited a greater limb difference in humeral retrotorsion compared with pitchers with no history of injury. No differences in humeral retrotorsion variables were present in participants with and without shoulder injury history. Clinical Relevance: Baseball players with a history of elbow injury demonstrated increased humeral retrotorsion, suggesting that the amount of retrotorsion and the development of elbow injury

  14. Tuberculous osteomyelitis of mandibular condyle: A rare encounter.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Mohan, S; Lav, Rupali; John, Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), one of the oldest known microbial infectious diseases affecting humans has continued to burden our healthcare system over generations. Conventionally, primary TB usually manifests as a pulmonary infection. However, the last decade has witnessed increasing reports of extrapulmonary infections. It's often atypical clinical presentations require a high degree of clinical suspicion, especially in the developing countries with a high incidence of this infectious disease. In this report, we present one such case of tuberculous osteomyelitis of the mandibular condyle where the patient reported with the complaint of swelling on the left side of the face with no apparent systemic manifestation. PMID:27390500

  15. Motion of the Shoulder Complex During Multiplanar Humeral Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Paula M.; Phadke, Vandana; Braman, Jonathan P.; Hassett, Daniel R.; Cieminski, Cort J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many prior studies have evaluated shoulder motion, yet no three-dimensional analysis comparing the combined clavicular, scapular, and humeral motion during arm elevation has been done. We aimed to describe and compare dynamic three-dimensional motion of the shoulder complex during raising and lowering the arm across three distinct elevation planes (flexion, scapular plane abduction, and coronal plane abduction). Methods: Twelve subjects without a shoulder abnormality were enrolled. Transcortical pin placement into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus allowed electromagnetic motion sensors to be rigidly fixed. The subjects completed two repetitions of raising and lowering the arm in flexion, scapular, and abduction planes. Three-dimensional angles were calculated for sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic, and glenohumeral joint motions. Joint angles between humeral elevation planes and between raising and lowering of the arm were compared. Results: General patterns of shoulder motion observed during humeral elevation were clavicular elevation, retraction, and posterior axial rotation; scapular internal rotation, upward rotation, and posterior tilting relative to the clavicle; and glenohumeral elevation and external rotation. Clavicular posterior rotation predominated at the sternoclavicular joint (average, 31°). Scapular posterior tilting predominated at the acromioclavicular joint (average, 19°). Differences between flexion and abduction planes of humerothoracic elevation were largest for the glenohumeral joint plane of elevation (average, 46°). Conclusions: Overall shoulder motion consists of substantial angular rotations at each of the four shoulder joints, enabling the multiple-joint interaction required to elevate the arm overhead. Clinical Relevance: Improved knowledge of the normal motion of the shoulder during humeral elevation will improve the assessment of patients with shoulder motion abnormalities, planning for rehabilitation

  16. Posterior elbow release and humeral osteotomy for patients with arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-05-01

    Children with arthrogryposis often lack the ability to feed themselves, largely due to limited shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Patients who can achieve passive elbow flexion through a surgical release but who cannot externally rotate their shoulders are still unable to reach their mouths with their hands. Combining a posterior elbow capsular release with a simultaneous humeral osteotomy in these patients places the forearm and hand in a much better position for function with minimal additional surgical exposure. PMID:22483178

  17. Congenital deformities and developmental abnormalities of the mandibular condyle in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Hatta, Toshihisa

    2008-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) consists of the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence of the temporal bone. The morphological development of the TMJ during prenatal life lags behind other joints in terms of both the timing of its appearance and its progress. At birth, the joint is still largely underdeveloped. There are many causes of the various growth disturbances and abnormalities of the mandibular condyle and related structures. Growth disturbances in the development of the mandibular condyle may occur in utero late in the first trimester and may result in disorders such as aplasia or hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle. Meanwhile, hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is not visible at birth and seems to be gradually acquired during growth. In the present review article, the congenital abnormalities of the mandibular condyle are classified morphologically into three major groups and two subgroups from a clinical standpoint: (1) hypoplasia or aplasia of the mandibular condyle, including (i) primary condylar aplasia and hypoplasia, (ii) secondary condylar hypoplasia; (2) hyperplasia; and (3) bifidity. In addition, the molecular-based etiology of anomalies of the mandibular condyle is also discussed. PMID:18778456

  18. Chronic slipping of bilateral distal humeral epiphyses in a gymnastist.

    PubMed

    Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ichimaru, Kozo; Morihara, Toru; Ikeda, Takumi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    In children, fracture-separation of the epiphyseal plate near the elbow joint is a common occurrence. However, separation of the distal humeral epiphysis is very rare, and in most cases, it is caused by high-impact trauma. In all reported cases, there has been a clear mechanism of injury. We report a case of an 11-year-old male patient who sustained separation of the distal humeral epiphyses bilaterally after 2 years of gymnastics, without a clear mechanism of injury. This patient had been using the vault since he was 9 years old, although children of that age do not normally perform on the vault. When gymnasts place their hands on the vault with their elbows flexed and subsequently extend their elbows to push off, the biomechanical load is placed equally on the right and left arms. Consequently, this type of repeated stress induces injury to the epiphyseal cartilages bilaterally, resulting in chronic progression of separation of the distal humeral epiphyses. PMID:25438108

  19. Risk factors and predictors of mortality for proximal humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin WT; Manning, Paul A; Wallace, W Angus; Geoghegan, John M

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk factors for mortality after proximal humeral fracture, including socioeconomic status, are poorly defined. This retrospective review of prospectively collected data defines the epidemiology and predictors of mortality in association with proximal humeral fractures. Methods Patients who sustained proximal humeral fractures were identified from fragility fracture and trauma databases between May 2001 and September 2012. Results In total, 1880 patients with a mean age of 69 years and a male to female ratio of 2 : 3 were identified. Socioeconomic distribution is skewed towards the lowest and highest quintiles. Low-energy mechanisms caused 88% of fractures. Men sustain fractures when they are aged 10 years younger and via higher-energy mechanisms. In total, 536 patients (29%) died within the study period with a 1-year mortality of 9.8%, rising to 28.2% at 5 years. Female gender, increasing age, pathological fracture and increased number of co-morbidities were independent variables for increased mortality. Conclusions The present study, which was conducted over an 11-year period, is the first to combine the epidemiology and risk factors for mortality with socioeconomic rank. One-year mortality risk is twice that of the background matched population. Patient counselling with respect to increased mortality should be considered, especially in higher-risk elderly females with multiple co-morbidities.

  20. The application of the Risdon approach for mandibular condyle fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many novel approaches to mandibular condyle fracture have been reported, but there is a relative lack of reports on the Risdon approach. In this study, the feasibility of the Risdon approach for condylar neck and subcondylar fractures of the mandible is demonstrated. Methods A review of patients with mandibular condylar neck and subcondylar fractures was performed from March 2008 to June 2012. A total of 25 patients, 19 males and 6 females, had 14 condylar neck fractures and 11 subcondylar fractures. Results All of the cases were reduced using the Risdon approach. For subcondylar fractures, reduction and fixation with plates was done under direct vision. For condylar neck fractures, reduction and fixation was done with the aid of a trochar in adults and a percutaneous threaded Kirschner wire in children. There were no malunions or nonunions revealed in follow-up care. Mild transient neuropraxia of the marginal mandibular nerve was seen in 4 patients, which was resolved within 1–2 months. Conclusions The Risdon approach is a technique for reducing the condylar neck and subcondylar fractures that is easy to perform and easy to learn. Its value in the reduction of mandibular condyle fractures should be emphasized. PMID:23829537

  1. Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Carey, James L; Brown, Gregory A; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2016-09-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed the Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) document Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain the best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 64 patient scenarios and 12 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Lastly, a separate, multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:27479835

  2. Effect of surgical delay on bacterial colonization in proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Barbasetti di Prun, Nicola; Bellato, Enrico; Manino, Laura; Rossi, Roberto; Banche, Giuliana; Allizond, Valeria; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative infection is a severe complication after proximal humeral fracture surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to determine if the surgical delay could modify the number and type of bacteria on the surgical site. A two stages study was set up. In the first stage the effect of delay was simulated in 20 patients affected by proximal humeral fracture treated conservatively. In a second stage, the effect of delay was measured in 20 patients that underwent surgery. In stage 1, three skin culture swabs were taken in correspondence of the deltopectoral approach, the day of the fracture (day 0), the day after (day 1), and five days after fracture (day 5). In stage 2, skin swab cultures were taken the day of trauma and immediately before surgery and cultured on various media suitable for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The number of bacteria increased over the course of the study, from day 0 to day 5, both considering the total number of colony-forming units and individual species of pathogen bacteria. The second stage of the study confirmed these data. An increasing number of bacteria was observed in patients that underwent surgery later than 2 days from trauma. The delay of surgery increased bacterial colonization of the skin in the deltopectoral approach area including common pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Propionibacterium acnes. This might justify the correlation between delay to surgery and risk of infection. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:942-948, 2016. PMID:26580139

  3. Foramen magnum meningiomas: To drill or not to drill the occipital condyle? A series of 12 patients

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jose Carlos; Temponi, Vicente; Emmerich, João Cláudio; Pereira, Celestino Esteves; Gonçalves, Mariangela Barbi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the development of microsurgery and cranial base techniques, the surgical management of Foramen Magnum Meningiomas (FMM) continues to be a technical challenge to neurosurgeons. Controversy concerning the utility of systematic condyle drilling for approaching FMM has been raised. Our aim was to describe the surgical technique, analyze its safety, and the postoperative outcome in 12 consecutive FMM patients. Methods: From 1986 to 2011, 12 patients with FMM underwent operations in the Department of Neurosurgery at Servidores do Estado Hospital and in a private clinic. All patients were operated using a standard suboccipital craniectomy, preserving the occipital condyle, opening of the Foramen Magnum, and ipsilateral removal of the posterior arch of C1. Results: There was no operative mortality, nine patients achieved Glasgow Outcome Scale 4 or 5. Condylar resection was not deemed necessary in any case. Gross total resection was achieved in nine patients. After surgery, four patients developed lower cranial nerve weakness. There was no significant postoperative complication in the remaining patients. The average follow-up is 8.2 years. Conclusion The vast majority of FMM can be safely removed with a retrocondylar lateral suboccipital approach without condylar resection, using meticulous microsurgical techniques. PMID:23776759

  4. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as...

  6. Outcome of locking compression plates in humeral shaft nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Malhar N; Ravindranath, V Pratap; Ravishankar, MR

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nonunion of diaphyseal fractures of the humerus are frequently seen in clinical practice (incidence of up to 15% in certain studies) and osteosynthesis using dynamic compression plates, intra medullary nails and Ilizarov fixators have been reported previously. Locking compression plates (LCP) are useful in the presence of disuse osteoporosis, segmental bone loss and cortical defects that preclude strong fixation. We report a prospective followup study of the outcome of the use of LCP for humeral nonunion following failed internal fixation in which implants other than LCP had been used. Materials and Methods: Twenty four patients with nonunion of humeral shaft fractures following failed internal fixation were included in the study. The mean followup period was 3.4 years (range: 2.4 to 5.7 years) and the minimum followup period was 2 years. Mean age of the patients was 41.04 years (range: 24 to 57 years). All 24 patients underwent osteosynthesis using LCP and autologous bone grafting (cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft combined with or without fibular strut graft). Main outcome measurements included radiographic assessment of fracture union and pre and postoperative functional evaluation using the modified Constant and Murley scoring system. Results: 23 out of 24 fractures united following osteosynthesis. Average time to union was 16 weeks (range: 10 to 28 weeks). Complications included delayed union (n = 2), transient radial nerve palsy (n = 2) and persistent nonunion (n = 1). Functional evaluation using the Constant and Murley score showed excellent results in 11, good in 10, fair in two and poor outcome in one patient. Conclusions: Locking compression plating and cancellous bone grafting is a reliable option for achieving union in humeral diaphyseal nonunion with failed previous internal fixation and results in good functional outcome in patients with higher physiological demands. PMID:23682176

  7. Mosaic arthroplasty of the medial femoral condyle in horses - An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bodó, Gábor; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Hangody, László; Módis, László

    2014-06-01

    One Arabian and 5 Hungarian half-bred horses were used to study the macroscopic and microscopic survival of autologous osteochondral grafts in the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Grafts were harvested from the cranial surface of the medial femoral trochlea (MFT) under arthroscopic control. Three of them were transplanted into the weight-bearing surface of the contralateral MFC using an arthrotomy approach. Three months later this transplantation procedure was repeated on the opposite stifle joints in the same animals, but at that time transplantation was performed arthroscopically. Follow-up arthroscopy was carried out 12 months after the first operations, and biopsies were taken from both the recipient and the donor sites for histological examination. During follow-up arthroscopy, the transplanted areas looked congruent and smooth. Microscopically, the characteristics of hyaline cartilage were present in 5 out of the 10 biopsies examined; however, in the other half of biopsies glycosaminoglycan (GAG) loss and change in the architecture of the transplanted cartilage was observed. In a 16-year-old horse, all grafts broke during harvesting, and thus transplantation was not performed. No radiological signs of osteoarthritic changes were detected 9 to 12 months after the operations in the donor and recipient joints. Clinically, no lameness or effusion was present three months after the transplantations. PMID:24334083

  8. A New Device for Percutaneous Elevation of the Depressed Fractures of Tibial Condyles

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, V.S.; Kumar, Madhusudan; Murthy, G.V.S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Monocondylar tibia plateau fractures with non-comminuted fragments can be treated using percutaneous screws. Currently indirect methods of reduction are used and thus the technique is limited to fragments with less than 5 mm depression. The first author has designed a device for direct elevation and reduction of the fragments thus potentially expanding the indications of percutaneous screws to fragments with >5mm depression Technical Note: A total of ten cases were treated by this method of percutaneous elevation of the depressed fractures of lateral condyles of the Tibia using this device. Device was inserted through a bony window on the anteromedial surface of tibia. The inner piston of the device in slowly hammered inside thus elevating the depressed fragment. Elevation of fragment could be achieved in all the cases. The fractures were fixed with cancellous screws applied percutaneously. There were no cases with loss of fixation or subsidence of the fragment. All cases achieved radiological union and have good knee function at follow up Conclusion: The new device is able to elevate unicondylar tibia plateau fragments with no subsidence or loss of fixation in our series. A longer follow up in a larger sample will be needed to establish the technique.

  9. Osteonecrosis of the mandibular condyle as a precursor to osteoarthrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai-Yuan; Li, You-Wei; Zhang, Zhen-Kang; Ma, Xu-Chen

    2009-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the mandibular condyle is a rare condition characterized by a primary subchondral osseous breakdown of the condyle with secondary articular surface collapse. Despite these characteristics, it has proved to be difficult to diagnose. The present case of osteonecrosis of the mandibular condyle was initially diagnosed more than 2 years before. The diagnosis at that time was based on physical examination, plain film radiography, cone-beam computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and total body scintigraphy. The disease had progressed into severe osteoarthrosis at a 2-year follow-up using cone-beam computerized tomography. This report suggests that osteonecrosis may be a precursor of osteoarthrosis, and cone-beam computerized tomography may provide a sensitive radiographic technique for the diagnosis of osteonecrosis of mandibular condyle. PMID:19101480

  10. An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Green, C; Kelly, I P

    2012-06-01

    The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth. PMID:22525415

  11. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications. PMID:26992713

  12. An Unusual Disengagement of the Humeral Head Component after Hemiarthroplasty: A Case Report Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Cuneyd; Oken, Fuad; Yildirim, Ahmet Ozgur; Ucaner, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal humeral fractures account for 4% to 5% of all fractures. Complex proximal humeral fractures with displaced three- and four-part fragments, humeral head splits and fracture-dislocations are more difficult to treat. In older patients, because of poor bone quality, hemiarthroplasty is often the indicated treatment. Case Report: One such case of a 73-year-old woman is presented here. The patient presented with a four-part fracture of the proximal humerus, with displacement of the humeral head. Hemiarthroplasty was done in the right shoulder. At postoperative 20 days, during physical therapy, the humeral head component of the prosthesis disengaged and a second operation was necessary. A deltopectoral approach was repeated using the previous incision. The humeral stem was seen to be well-fixed into the bone so the humeral head was changed for a new one of the same size. At two years, the dominant right side had active, painless ROM. Conclusion: The management and two-year follow-up of this case is reported here, which was the first to occur at our institution. PMID:27298964

  13. Three-dimensional Humeral Morphological Alterations and Atrophy Associated with Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Frances T.; Brochard, Sylvain; Behnam, Abrahm J.; Alter, Katharine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) is a common birth injury, resulting in severe functional losses. Yet, little is known about how OBPP affects the 3D humeral morphology. Thus, the purpose of this study was to measure the 3D humeral architecture in children with unilateral OBPP. Methods Thirteen individuals (4F/9M, age=11.8±3.3 years, Mallet score=15.1±3.0) participated in this IRB-approved study. A three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo magnet resonance image set was acquired for both upper limbs (involved/non-involved). Humeral size, version, and inclination were quantified from 3D humeral models derived from these images. Results The involved humeral head was significantly less retroverted and in declination (medial humeral head pointed anteriorly and inferiorly), relative to the non-involved side. Osseous atrophy was present in all three dimensions and affected the entire humerus. The inter-rater reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.96–1.00). Discussion This study demonstrated that both humeral atrophy and bone shape deformities associated with OBPP are not limited to the axial plane, but are three-dimensional phenomena. Incorporating information related to these multiplanar, 3D, humeral deformities into surgical planning could potentially improve functional outcomes following surgery. The documented reduction in retroversion is an osseous adaptation, which may help maintain glenohumeral congruency by partially compensating for the internal rotation of the arm. The humeral head declination is a novel finding and may be an important factor to consider when developing OBPP management strategies, as it has been shown to lead to significant supraspinatus inefficiencies and increased required elevation forces. Level of evidence Anatomic Study, Imaging PMID:24291045

  14. Relationship between mandibular condyle and angle fractures and the presence of mandibular third molars

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Deuk-Hyun; Moon, Seong-Yong; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We retrospectively evaluated the impact of mandibular third molars on the occurrence of angle and condyle fractures. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective investigation using patient records and radiographs. The sample set consisted of 440 patients with mandibular fractures. Eruption space, depth and angulation of the third molar were measured. Results Of the 144 angle fracture patients, 130 patients had third molars and 14 patients did not. The ratio of angle fractures when a third molar was present (1.26 : 1) was greater than when no third molar was present (0.19 : 1; odds ratio, 6.58; P<0.001). Of the 141 condyle fractures patients, the third molar was present in 84 patients and absent in 57 patients. The ratio of condyle fractures when a third molar was present (0.56 : 1) was lower than when no third molar was present (1.90 : 1; odds ratio, 0.30; P<0.001). Conclusion The increased ratio of angle fractures with third molars and the ratio of condyle fractures without a third molar were statistically significant. The occurrence of angle and condyle fractures was more affected by the continuity of the cortical bone at the angle than by the depth of a third molar. These results demonstrate that a third molar can be a determining factor in angle and condyle fractures. PMID:25741462

  15. Influences of implant condyle geometry on bone and screw strains in a temporomandibular implant.

    PubMed

    Mesnard, M; Ramos, A; Simões, J A

    2014-04-01

    A 3D finite element model of an in vitro implanted mandible was analysed. The load point was placed on the condyle in three positions (inside the mouth, centred and outside) to simulate different contact points between the mandible condyle and the temporal bone. The strain fields in the condyle were assessed and detailed around the surgical screws. The temporomandibular implant studied here was modelled on a commercial device that uses four screws to fix it in vivo in a very similar position. The boundary conditions of the numerical model simulated a load on the incisors with a 15 mm mouth aperture. The same contact loads were applied to the two condyles. Numerical results were successfully obtained for the three different contact points: the inside contact produced lower strains on the condyle. The first screw created a critical strain distribution in the bone, just under the screw. The study shows that centred and inside contact induces lower strain distributions. This suggests that spherical condyle geometry should be applied in order to reduce the strains in fixation. As the top screw was observed to play the most critical role, the third screw is in fact unnecessary, since the lower strain distribution suggests that it will be loosened. PMID:23726645

  16. Changes in growth and morphology of the condyle following mandibular distraction in minipigs: Overloading or Underloading?

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Katherine L.; Sun, Zongyang; Egbert, Mark; Bakko, Daniel W.; Herring, Susan W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Loading of temporomandibular tissues during mandibular distraction may cause changes in condylar growth and cartilage thickness. This study examines the effects of distraction on the condyle in a large animal model by explicitly measuring growth and in vivo loading. Design: Unilateral mandibular distraction was carried out on twenty growing minipigs divided into three groups. One group underwent distraction but not consolidation, whereas the other two groups were allowed a period of consolidation of either one or two weeks. Animals received fluorochrome and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and masticatory strain was measured from the condylar neck. Condylar strain was also recorded in an age-matched sample of eight animals that received no distraction surgery. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to identify dividing prechondroblasts and histological analysis was used to measure mineral apposition rate, count dividing cells, and measure the thickness of condylar cartilage. Results: Strain magnitude, particularly compressive strain, was much larger on the non-distraction side compared to the distraction side condyle. Compared to normal loading levels, the distraction side condyle was underloaded whereas the condyle on the intact side was overloaded. Mineral apposition and cartilage thickness were greater on the distraction side condyle compared to the opposite side. Differences between the sides were most pronounced in the group with no consolidation and became progressively reduced with consolidation time. Conclusions: Increased mineralization and cartilage thickness on the distraction side condyle is associated with reduced, not increased loading, perhaps because of disruption of the distraction side masseter muscle. PMID:17573035

  17. Operative management of Hoffa fracture of the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ramji Lal; Gupta, Pratiksha

    2014-01-01

    Hoffa fracture is a rare injury consisting of unicondylar tangential posterior fracture of the distal femur and only very few cases have been reported in the literature. These fractures are due to high energy trauma and conservative treatment generally yields poor results, but rigid internal fixation allows early functional rehabilitation and decreases the incidence of complications. The purpose of the study was to prospectively analyse the clinico-radiological and functional outcome following open surgical treatment. From July 2005 to July 2010, 22 patients (14 males and 8 females) were recruited from Emergency and outpatient department having closed and open Hoffa fracture of the femoral condyle. All patients were operated under general or spinal anesthesia. Post-operatively, all the patients were followed for 12 months. Fractures were united in a mean time of 10 weeks (range from 6 - 16 weeks) depending on the type of fracture pattern. Fractures were reduced anatomically in all except in one patient. During follow-up, there were no losses of reduction or fixation. Full weight bearing were started in the mean time of 8.8 weeks. Mean duration of hospital stay were 9.8 days. Complications were stiffness and pain in one patient, collateral laxity in one patient and progression of arthritis in one patient. The results were excellent in 90.90% and good in 9.09% patients. Finally, we conclude that the early anatomical reduction and rigid fixation with screws provide best results and minimal complications. PMID:25130151

  18. Injectable biocomposites for bone healing in rabbit femoral condyle defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianheng; Mao, Kezheng; Liu, Zhengsheng; Wang, Xiumei; Cui, Fuzhai; Guo, Wenguang; Mao, Keya; Yang, Shuying

    2013-01-01

    A novel biomimetic bone scaffold was successfully prepared in this study, which was composed of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH), collagen and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAC). CSH/nHAC was prepared and observed with scanning electron microscope and rhBMP-2 was introduced into CSH/nHAC. The released protein content from the scaffold was detected using high performance liquid chromatography at predetermined time interval. In vivo bone formation capacity was investigated by means of implanting the scaffolds with rhBMP-2 or without rhBMP-2 respectively into a critical size defect model in the femoral condyle of rabbit. The releasing character of rhBMP-2 was that an initial burst release (37.5%) was observed in the first day, followed by a sustained release and reached 100% at the end of day 20. The CSH/nHAC showed a gradual decrease in degradation with the content of nHAC increase. The results of X-rays, Micro CT and histological observation indicated that more new bone was formed in rhBMP-2 group. The results implied that this new injectable bone scaffold should be very promising for bone repair and has a great potential in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24146770

  19. Closed reduction, open reduction, and endoscopic assistance: current thoughts on the management of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Haug, Richard H; Brandt, M Todd

    2007-12-01

    The management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. This is in part attributable to a misinterpretation of the literature from decades prior, a lack of uniformity of classification of the various anatomical components of the mandibular condyle, and a perceived potential to cause harm through the open approach based in part on the surgeon's lack of a critical examination of the literature. This review explores the key historical articles that deal with the management of mandibular condyle fractures, and those modern-day contributions that represent the state of the art. The authors' intention was to provide the reader with an objective summary of the management of this form of injury, to place its management into a modern-day perspective, and perhaps to minimize the perception of controversy. PMID:18090732

  20. Three dimensionality of gleno-humeral deformities in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Sylvain; Mozingo, Joseph D; Alter, Katharine E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that gleno-humeral deformity in children and adolescent with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is three-dimensional (3D). The study also compared the metrological properties of typical two-dimensional gleno-humeral measures to the newly developed 3D measures. Thirteen individuals (age = 11.8 ± 3.3 years) with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy participated in this IRB-approved study. 3D axial magnetic resonance images were acquired for both shoulders. Glenoid and humeral models were created in order to quantify 3D glenoid version, humeral head migration, and glenoid concavity. Two-dimensional (2D) measures were acquired as recommended in the literature. All measures were completed by two observers in this observer-blind study. Compared to the non-involved side, the glenoid was more retroverted (7.91°, p = 0.003) and inferiorly oriented (7.28°, p = 0.009). The humeral head was migrated more posteriorly (5.54 mm, p = 0.007), inferiorly (-3.96 mm, p = 0.013), and medially (-3.63 mm,p = 0.002). Eleven of the 13 glenoids were concave, based on the 3D glenoid models. The concurrent validity between three- and 2D measures were highly dependent of the parameter measured, the slice level used for the 2D analysis, and the presence/absence of pathology (0.63 < r < 0.91). The standard error of measurement for the 2D anterior-posterior version (>3°) was larger than that for the 3D measure of version (<1°) on the involved side. This study clearly demonstrated that the gleno-humeral deformation in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is 3D, emphasizing the need for 3D subject specific gleno-humeral shape analysis for follow-up and treatment plans in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. PMID:26363273

  1. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques for osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Brunner, U; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) is currently low and accounts for 0.6-2.4%. Due to an increase in the rate of primary implantations a quantitative increase of PHF is to be expected in the near future. The majority of PHF occur intraoperatively during implantation with an increased risk for cementless stems and when performing total arthroplasty. Additional risk factors are in particular female gender and the severity of comorbidities. In contrast, postoperative PHF mostly due to low-energy falls, have a prevalence between 0.6% and 0.9% and are significantly less common. The prognosis and functional outcome following revision by open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) essentially depend on a thorough assessment of the indications for revision surgery, the operative treatment and the pretraumatic functional condition of the affected shoulder. In the armamentarium of periprosthetic ORIF of the humerus cerclage systems and locking implants as well as a combination of both play a central role. In comminuted fractures with extensive defect zones, severely thinned cortex or extensive osteolysis a biological augmentation of the ORIF should be considered. In this context when the indications are correctly interpreted, especially in the case of a stable anchored stem, various groups have reported that a high bony union rate can be achieved. As the treatment of PHF is complex it should be performed in dedicated centers in order to adequately address potential comorbidities, especially in the elderly population. PMID:27008215

  2. Femoral/humeral strength in early African Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Lower-to-upper limb-bone proportions give valuable clues to locomotor behavior in fossil taxa. However, to date only external linear dimensions have been included in such analyses of early hominins. In this study, cross-sectional measures of femoral and humeral diaphyseal strength are determined for the two most complete early Homo erectus (or ergaster) associated skeletons--the juvenile KNM-WT 15000 and the adult KNM-ER 1808. Modern comparative samples include an adult human skeletal sample representative of diverse body shapes, a human longitudinal growth series, and an adult chimpanzee sample. When compared to appropriately age-matched samples, both H. erectus specimens fall very close to modern human mean proportions and far from chimpanzee proportions (which do not overlap with those of humans). This implies very similar mechanical load-sharing between the lower and upper limbs, and by implication, similar locomotor behavior in early H. erectus and modern humans. Thus, by the earliest Pleistocene (1.7 Ma), completely modern patterns of bipedal behavior were fully established in at least one early hominin taxon. PMID:17977577

  3. Validity of measuring humeral torsion using palpation of bicipital tuberosities

    PubMed Central

    Dashottar, Amitabh; Borstad, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude of humeral torsion (HT) affects the internal and external rotation range of motion at the shoulder. Currently imaging is required to quantify the HT angle, however, factors such as cost and non-availability of imaging to musculoskeletal clinicians limits its use. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of palpation of the bicipital tuberosities as an alternative to imaging for quantifying HT angles. The bicipital-forearm angle, an indirect measure of HT, was measured using palpation and real-time ultrasound imaging in 25 subjects. The agreement among the two methods was excellent with the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (3,k) = 0.92, and the mean difference between the two methods was −0.2° (SD 4.1°) with 95% limits of agreement of −8.3° to 7.9°. Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) among the two methods was 0.85. In a clinical setting, palpation appears to be a practical alternative to US imaging for measuring HT. PMID:22489871

  4. Humeral retroversion and shoulder rotational mobility in young handball practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Quadros, Gustavo Aguiar; Döhnert, Marcelo Baptista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the prevalence of humeral retroversion and rotational mobility (RHH) in young handball practitioners and non-practitioners. METHODS : This is a cross-sectional study performed with two groups: the handball group, with 14 female students practicing handball and the control group, with 13 young participants non-practicing pitch sports. RESULTS : The handball group presented full rotational movement (FRM) hi-gher than the control group in both the dominant shoulder (p=0.001) and the non-dominant shoulder (p=0.0001). The mobility of active and passive internal rotation was significantly higher in handball players in both shoulders. The handball group presented lower internal rotation range of motion for the dominant shoulder as compared to the non-dominant shoul-der (p=0.001). CONCLUSION : Young handball practitioners, des-pite skeletally immature, showed a higher MRT than the control group. The handball group showed loss of internal rotation (medial) on the dominant shoulder as compared to the non--dominant shoulder. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:27057141

  5. Iatrogenic Radial Nerve Palsy following Closed Reduction of a Simple Diaphyseal Humeral Fracture: Beware the Perfect X-Ray

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morgan; O'Neill, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Radial nerve injury is a recognised complication associated with humeral shaft fracture. A case of iatrogenic radial nerve injury is presented following fracture reduction. The relevant anatomy, challenges in management of humeral fractures with associated radial nerve injury, and the importance of detailed clinical assessment and documentation are discussed. PMID:27478658

  6. The impact of subsistence changes on humeral bilateral asymmetry in Terminal Pleistocene and Holocene Europe.

    PubMed

    Sládek, Vladimír; Ruff, Christopher B; Berner, Margit; Holt, Brigitte; Niskanen, Markku; Schuplerová, Eliška; Hora, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Analyses of upper limb bone bilateral asymmetry can shed light on manipulative behavior, sexual division of labor, and the effects of economic transitions on skeletal morphology. We compared the maximum (absolute) and directional asymmetry in humeral length, articular breadth, and cross-sectional diaphyseal geometry (CSG) in a large (n > 1200) European sample distributed among 11 archaeological periods from the Early Upper Paleolithic through the 20(th) century. Asymmetry in length and articular breadth is right-biased, but relatively small and fairly constant between temporal periods. Females show more asymmetry in length than males. This suggests a low impact of behavioral changes on asymmetry in length and breadth, but strong genetic control with probable sex linkage of asymmetry in length. Asymmetry in CSG properties is much more marked than in length and articular breadth, with sex-specific variation. In males, a major decline in asymmetry occurs between the Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic. There is no further decline in asymmetry between the Mesolithic and Neolithic in males and only limited variation during the Holocene. In females, a major decline occurs between the Mesolithic and Neolithic, with resulting average directional asymmetry close to zero. Asymmetry among females continues to be very low in the subsequent Copper and Bronze Ages, but increases again in the Iron Age. Changes in female asymmetry result in an increase of sexual dimorphism during the early agricultural periods, followed by a decrease in the Iron Age. Sexual dimorphism again slightly declines after the Late Medieval. Our results indicate that changes in manipulative behavior were sex-specific with a probable higher impact of changes in hunting behavior on male asymmetry (e.g., shift from unimanual throwing to use of the bow-and-arrow) and food grain processing in females, specifically, use of two-handed saddle querns in the early agricultural periods and one-handed rotary querns in

  7. An Unusual Metallic Foreign Body inside the Knee Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the knee joint are uncommon, particularly those not related to surgical procedures. In this paper, we present a case of an intraosseous metallic foreign body situated in the medial femoral condyle for one year, causing pain, which was removed with complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25506452

  8. Ectopic third molar in the mandibular condyle: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Martin, Fernando; Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Prats-Golczer, Victoria-Eugenia; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, therapeutic options, and surgical approaches for removal of ectopic third molars in the mandibular condyle. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on ectopic third molars in the mandibular condyle from 1980 to 2011. 14 well-documented clinical cases from the literature were evaluated together with a new clinical case provided by the authors, representing a sample of 15 patients. Results: We found a mean age at diagnosis of 48.6 years and a higher prevalence in women. In 14 patients, associated radiolucent lesions were diagnosed on radiographic studies and confirmed histopathologically as odontogenic cysts. Clinical symptoms were pain and swelling in the jaw or preauricular region, trismus, difficulty chewing, cutaneous fistula and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Treatment included conservative management in one case and in the other cases, surgical removal by intra- or extraoral approaches, the latter being the most common approach carried out. In most reported cases, serious complications were not outlined. Conclusions: The etiopathogenic theory involving odontogenic cysts in the displacement of third molars to the mandibular condyle seems to be the most relevant. They must be removed if they cause symptoms or are associated with cystic pathology. The surgical route must be planned according to the location and position of the ectopic third molar, and the possible morbidity associated with surgery. Key words:Third molar, ectopic tooth, condyle, mandible. PMID:22926463

  9. 78 FR 9010 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ..., 1993 (59 FR 65475; December 20, 1994). In response to a petition dated April 30, 1996 (FDA-1996-P-0253... malignant and benign tumors (63 FR 71743). In 2009, FDA published an order for the submission of information on mandibular condyle prostheses indicated for temporary reconstruction (74 FR 16214; April 9,...

  10. Non-union coronal fracture femoral condyle, sandwich technique : A case report.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Kousik; Raman, Rajeev; Vijay, R K; Maini, Lalit

    2015-03-01

    Coronal fractures of the femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) are rare injuries but can be managed with satisfactory outcome if properly treated. We discuss an unusual case of a young adult male presenting with 9 month old neglected Hoffa fracture with pain, stiffness and limitation of knee movement, managed with sandwich bone grafting technique.(1). PMID:26549953

  11. Non-union coronal fracture femoral condyle, sandwich technique : A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Kousik; Raman, Rajeev; Vijay, R.K.; Maini, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) are rare injuries but can be managed with satisfactory outcome if properly treated. We discuss an unusual case of a young adult male presenting with 9 month old neglected Hoffa fracture with pain, stiffness and limitation of knee movement, managed with sandwich bone grafting technique.1 PMID:26549953

  12. Humeral shaft fracture treatment in the elite throwing athlete: a unique application of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Davis, Shane M; Ho, Hoang-Anh; Fronek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Humeral shaft stress fractures are being increasingly recognized as injuries that can significantly impact throwing mechanics if residual malalignment exists. While minimally displaced and angulated injuries are treated nonoperatively in a fracture brace, the management of significantly displaced humeral shaft fractures in the throwing athlete is less clear. Currently described techniques such as open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis and rigid antegrade/retrograde locked intramedullary nailing have significant morbidity due to soft tissue dissection and damage. We present a case report of a high-level baseball pitcher whose significantly displaced humeral shaft stress fracture failed to be nonoperatively managed and was subsequently treated successfully with unlocked, retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing. The athlete was able to return to pitching baseball in one year and is currently pitching in Major League Baseball. We were able to recently collect 10-year follow-up data. PMID:24369515

  13. Iatrogenic brachial artery injury during anterolateral plating of humeral shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vishal; Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Meena, Umesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    There are several well defined indications for surgical management of humeral shaft fractures. Operative procedures on the humerus are associated with their own complications. Iatrogenic brachial artery injury as a complication of humeral shaft plating has not been reported previously. We report a case of a 48 years old female, who received operation at a district hospital and was referred to us when the surgeon could not palpate the pulse. CT angiogram showed that there was segmental non-opacification of the brachial artery. There was distal reformation and the thrombosis was decided to be managed conservatively. We believe that the arterial injury was a result of improper surgical technique and the segmental block might be due to improper use of plate holding forceps. This case report makes us aware of a rare complication of operative management of humeral shaft fractures and that basic principles of surgery must be always followed to prevent such injuries. PMID:24295587

  14. Experience Rate of Elbow Pain and Morphological Abnormality of Humeral Medial Epicondyle among Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Morihara, Toru; Kida, Yoshikazu; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; MInami, Masataka; Onishi, Okihiro; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the experience rate of elbow pain and to clarify the relationship between morphological abnormality of the humeral medial epicondyle and positions among baseball players in elementary school (ES), junior high school (JHS) and high school (HS). Methods: In this study, 4353 baseball players who participated in our medical screening (2008-2015) were enrolled. There were 1545 players from ES, 1934 players from JHS, and 874 players from HS. We asked them to answer the questionnaire to investigate the experience of elbow pain, and the position they played. Ultrasonography of the humeral medial epicondyle was examined and irregularity, fragmentation, and malunion of the humeral medial epicondyle. The results were analyzed statistically. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The experience rates of elbow pain among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 26.0%, 27.0%, and 68.3%. The rates of abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 18.2%, 36.3%, and 39.9% (Table 1). The experience rate of elbow pain among pitchers and catchers was significantly higher than the fielders in ES (Table 2), however, there were no significant differences between positions in JHS and HS (Table 3,4). According to the rate of morphological abnormalities of humeral medial epicondyle, pitchers and catchers were significantly higher than fielders in ES, while only pitchers were significantly higher than the fielders in JHS and HS (Table 2,3,4). Conclusion: The experience rate of elbow pain among baseball players rose as the age increased, and the rate in HS was almost 70%. The rates of morphological abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among pitchers and catchers were high and the tendency was observed from a young age. The primary prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball players of all ages should be considered.

  15. Segmentation of humeral head from axial proton density weighted shoulder MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Aysun; Sezer, Hasan Basri; Albayrak, Songul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of segmentation of axial MR proton density (PD) images of bony humeral head. PD sequence images which are included in standard shoulder MRI protocol are used instead of T1 MR images. Bony structures were reported to be successfully segmented in the literature from T1 MR images. T1 MR images give more sharp determination of bone and soft tissue border but cannot address the pathological process which takes place in the bone. In the clinical settings PD images of shoulder are used to investigate soft tissue alterations which can cause shoulder instability and are better in demonstrating edema and the pathology but have a higher noise ratio than other modalities. Moreover the alteration of humeral head intensity in patients and soft tissues in contact with the humeral head which have the very similar intensities with bone makes the humeral head segmentation a challenging problem in PD images. However segmentation of the bony humeral head is required initially to facilitate the segmentation of the soft tissues of shoulder. In this study shoulder MRI of 33 randomly selected patients were included. Speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) method was used to decrease noise and then Active Contour Without Edge (ACWE) and Signed Pressure Force (SPF) models were applied on our data set. Success of these methods is determined by comparing our results with manually segmented images by an expert. Applications of these methods on PD images provide highly successful results for segmentation of bony humeral head. This is the first study to determine bone contours in PD images in literature.

  16. Taxonomic identification of Lower Pleistocene fossil hominins based on distal humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional shape

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple hominin species during the Lower Pleistocene has long presented a challenge for taxonomic attribution of isolated postcrania. Although fossil humeri are well-suited for studies of hominin postcranial variation due to their relative abundance, humeral articular morphology has thus far been of limited value for differentiating Paranthropus from Homo. On the other hand, distal humeral diaphyseal shape has been used to justify such generic distinctions at Swartkrans. The potential utility of humeral diaphyseal shape merits larger-scale quantitative analysis, particularly as it permits the inclusion of fragmentary specimens lacking articular morphology. This study analyzes shape variation of the distal humeral diaphysis among fossil hominins (c. 2-1 Ma) to test the hypothesis that specimens can be divided into distinct morphotypes. Coordinate landmarks were placed on 3D laser scans to quantify cross-sectional shape at a standardized location of the humeral diaphysis (proximal to the olecranon fossa) for a variety of fossil hominins and extant hominids. The fossil sample includes specimens attributed to species based on associated craniodental remains. Mantel tests of matrix correlation were used to assess hypotheses about morphometric relationships among the fossils by comparing empirically-derived Procrustes distance matrices to hypothetical model matrices. Diaphyseal shape variation is consistent with the hypothesis of three distinct morphotypes (Paranthropus, Homo erectus, non-erectus early Homo) in both eastern and southern Africa during the observed time period. Specimens attributed to non-erectus early Homo are unique among hominids with respect to the degree of relative anteroposterior flattening, while H. erectus humeri exhibit morphology more similar to that of modern humans. In both geographic regions, Paranthropus is characterized by a morphology that is intermediate with respect to those morphological features that differentiate

  17. Taxonomic identification of Lower Pleistocene fossil hominins based on distal humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional shape.

    PubMed

    Lague, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple hominin species during the Lower Pleistocene has long presented a challenge for taxonomic attribution of isolated postcrania. Although fossil humeri are well-suited for studies of hominin postcranial variation due to their relative abundance, humeral articular morphology has thus far been of limited value for differentiating Paranthropus from Homo. On the other hand, distal humeral diaphyseal shape has been used to justify such generic distinctions at Swartkrans. The potential utility of humeral diaphyseal shape merits larger-scale quantitative analysis, particularly as it permits the inclusion of fragmentary specimens lacking articular morphology. This study analyzes shape variation of the distal humeral diaphysis among fossil hominins (c. 2-1 Ma) to test the hypothesis that specimens can be divided into distinct morphotypes. Coordinate landmarks were placed on 3D laser scans to quantify cross-sectional shape at a standardized location of the humeral diaphysis (proximal to the olecranon fossa) for a variety of fossil hominins and extant hominids. The fossil sample includes specimens attributed to species based on associated craniodental remains. Mantel tests of matrix correlation were used to assess hypotheses about morphometric relationships among the fossils by comparing empirically-derived Procrustes distance matrices to hypothetical model matrices. Diaphyseal shape variation is consistent with the hypothesis of three distinct morphotypes (Paranthropus, Homo erectus, non-erectus early Homo) in both eastern and southern Africa during the observed time period. Specimens attributed to non-erectus early Homo are unique among hominids with respect to the degree of relative anteroposterior flattening, while H. erectus humeri exhibit morphology more similar to that of modern humans. In both geographic regions, Paranthropus is characterized by a morphology that is intermediate with respect to those morphological features that differentiate

  18. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sérgio Flores; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos; Almeida, Solange Maria

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and/or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar's test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. PMID:24346048

  19. Humeral cross-sectional shape in suspensory primates and sloths.

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Ruff, Christopher B; Simons, Erin L R; Organ, Jason M

    2013-04-01

    Studies on the cross-sectional geometry of long bones in African apes have documented that shape ratios derived from second moments of area about principle axes (e.g., Imax /Imin ) are often correlated with habitual locomotor behaviors. For example, humeral cross-sections tend to appear more circular in more arboreal and forelimb suspensory chimpanzees compared with terrestrial quadrupedal gorillas. These data support the hypothesis that cross-sections that are more circular in shape are adapted for multidirectional loading regimes and bending moments encountered when using acrobatic locomotor behaviors. Whether a more circular humerus reflects greater use of forelimb suspension in other primates and nonprimate mammals is unknown. In this study, cross-sections at or near midshaft of the humerus were obtained from anthropoid primates that differ in their use of forelimb suspension, as well as from two genera of suspensory sloths. Imax /Imin ratios were compared within and between groups, and correlations were made with behavioral data. In broad comparisons, observed differences in morphology follow predicted patterns. Humeri of suspensory sloths are circular. Humeri of the more suspensory hominoids tend to be more circular than those of quadrupedal taxa. Humeri of the suspensory atelines are similar to hominoids, while those of Cebus are more like nonsuspensory cercopithecoids. There is, however, considerable overlap between taxa and within finer comparisons variation between species are not in the predicted direction. Thus, although Imax /Imin ratios of the humerus are informative for characterizing generalized locomotor modes (i.e., forelimb suspensory vs. quadrupedal), additional structural information is needed for more fine-grained assessments of locomotion. PMID:23408647

  20. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-01-01

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  1. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use without bone cement (§ 888.3027). (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use without bone cement (§ 888.3027). (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a...

  3. Treatment of Humeral Shaft Fractures: Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis Versus Open Reduction and Internal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Safdari, Farshad; Ashoori, Keyqobad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal technique for operative fixation of humeral shaft fractures remains controversial and warrants research. Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to compare the functional and clinical outcomes of conventional open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in patients with fractures in two-third distal humeral shaft. Patients and Methods: In the current prospective case-control study, 65 patients with humeral shaft fractures were treated using ORIF (33 patients) or MIPO (32 patients). Time of surgery, time of union, incidence of varus deformity and complications were compared between the two groups. Also, the university of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and Mayo Elbow performance score (MEPS) were used to compare the functional outcomes between the two groups. Results: The median of union time was shorter in the MIPO group (4 months versus 5 months). The time of surgery and functional outcomes based on the UCLA and MEPS scores were the same. The incidence of varus deformity was more than 5° and was higher and the incidence of nonunion, infection and iatrogenic radial nerve injury were lower in the MIPO group; however, the differences were not significant. Conclusions: Due to the shorter union time, to some extent less complication rate and comparable functional and clinical results, the authors recommend to use the MIPO technique in treating the mid-distal humeral shaft fracture. PMID:26543844

  4. [Treatment of humeral diaphyseal fractures in adults using centro-medullary pinning. Operative technic and indications].

    PubMed

    de la Caffinière, J Y; Kassab, G; Ould Ouali, A

    1988-01-01

    The ascending intramedullary "pinning" technique is known for twenty-five years. Theoretically successful for the diaphyseal humeral fractures in adults, it appeared until now with some disadvantages which limited its use. By adding some modifications, the authors show that this technique is worthwhile in dislocation fractures in adults. PMID:3253848

  5. Use of 2 column screws to treat transcondylar distal humeral fractures in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Paryavi, Ebrahim; O'Toole, Robert V; Frisch, Harold M; Andersen, Romney C; Eglseder, W Andrew

    2010-12-01

    We describe fixation of transcondylar distal humeral fractures with column screws in geriatric patients and review our initial results. We conducted a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database at a Level I trauma center. Six patients met inclusion criteria of age older than 65 years and treatment of minimally or nondisplaced transcondylar distal humeral fracture with column screws only. All were closed fractures with no associated nerve injuries. One patient was lost to follow-up. The mechanism of injury was low-energy fall for the 5 remaining patients (average age, 74 y; age range, 70 to 83 y; average follow-up duration, 10.6 wk). One patient had a traumatic brain injury and a contralateral metacarpal fracture that was treated with internal fixation. The remaining 4 patients sustained isolated distal humeral fractures. No complications were noted, and all fractures healed at an average radiographic union time of 7.2 weeks. Average range of motion was 22 degrees extension [95% CI (-1.47, 45.47)], 114 degrees flexion [95% CI (89.4, 138.6)], and 92 degrees arc of motion [95% CI (58.68, 125.38)]. Treatment of select transcondylar distal humeral fractures with column screws in geriatric patients provides an option for stable fixation that allows early range of motion with minimal surgical morbidity. PMID:21107215

  6. A Stochastic Analysis of Glenoid Inclination Angle and Superior Migration of the Humeral Head

    PubMed Central

    Flieg, Nicholas G.; Gatti, Christopher J.; Doro, Lisa Case; Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Carpenter, James E.; Hughes, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Superior glenoid inclination, which is a relatively upward facing of the glenoid in the plane of the scapula, has been associated with rotator cuff pathology. Increased glenoid inclination may cause superior humeral head migration, which can cause impingement of the supraspinatus tendon. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that inclination angle affects the probability of superior humeral head migration. Methods A three-dimensional model of the glenohumeral joint was developed in which muscle forces were modeled as random variables. Monte Carlo simulation was used to compute the probability that the glenohumeral reaction force was directed such that superior humeral head migration should occur. An electromyogram-driven model was used to estimate shoulder muscle forces in healthy volunteers performing arm elevation. Findings The model predicted that the probability of superior humeral head migration increased as glenoid inclination angle was increased. This finding was independent of the assumed shape of the muscle force probability distributions. Interpretation The results support the theory that glenoid inclination may be a risk factor for rotator cuff pathology. PMID:18280016

  7. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-06-18

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  8. Humeral Fractures in South-Eastern Australia: Epidemiology and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kara L; Bucki-Smith, Gosia; Morse, Amelia G; Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Kotowicz, Mark A; Moloney, David J; Sanders, Kerrie M; Korn, Sam; Timney, Elizabeth N; Dobbins, Amelia G; Pasco, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report the epidemiology and risk factors for humeral fractures (proximal humerus and shaft) among men and women residing in south-eastern Australia. Incident fractures during 2006 and 2007 were identified using X-ray reports (Geelong Osteoporosis Study Fracture Grid). Risk factors were identified using data from case-control studies conducted as part of the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Median age of fracture was lower in males than females for proximal humerus (33.0 vs 71.2 years), but not for humeral shaft (8.9 vs 8.5 years). For females, proximal humerus fractures occurred mainly in the 70-79 and 80+ years age groups, whereas humeral shaft fractures followed a U-shaped pattern. Males showed a U-shaped pattern for both proximal humerus and humeral shaft fractures. Overall age-standardised incidence rates for proximal humerus fractures in males and females were 40.6 (95% CI 32.7, 48.5) and 73.2 (95% CI 62.2, 84.1) per 100,000 person years, respectively. For humeral shaft fractures, the age-standardised rate was 69.3 (95% CI 59.0, 79.6) for males and 61.5 (95% CI 51.9, 71.0) for females. There was an increase in risk of proximal humerus fractures in men with a lower femoral neck BMD, younger age, prior fracture and higher milk consumption. In pre-menopausal women, increased height and falls were both risk factors for proximal humerus fractures. For post-menopausal women, risk factors associated with proximal humerus fractures included a lower non-milk dairy consumption and sustaining a prior fracture. Humeral shaft fractures in both sexes were sustained mainly in childhood, while proximal humerus fractures were sustained in older adulthood. The overall age-standardised rates of proximal humerus fractures were nearly twice as high in females compared to males, whereas the incidence rates of humeral shaft fractures were similar. PMID:26169198

  9. Osteochondroma (OC) of the Condyle of Left Mandible: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Kumar, Anoop N.; Alavi, Yasin A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondroma (OC) is one of the most common benign condylar tumours having both chondroma and osteoma. However, this tumour is most frequently found on the metaphyses of long bones and is unusual on the skull. When it affects the mandibular condyle, the cause could be due to trauma to the tempero mandibular joint (TMJ). Here, in this report we present a rare case of osteochondroma of left condyle region in a 36-year-old man. The patient had noticed pain in the left TMJ for six months. The lesion is surgically removed and histologically evaluated which composed of chondrocytes dispersed in hyaline matrix along with a rim of calcified bone at one end. PMID:25859534

  10. Use of anthropometric data from the medial tibial and femoral condyles to design unicondylar knee prostheses in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fu Bo; Ji, Xiao Feng; Zheng, Wen Xu; Lai, Ying; Cheng, Kai Liang; Feng, Jia Chun; Li, You Qiong

    2010-03-01

    Anthropometric data on medial tibial condyles and medial femoral condyles of 172 normal knees (94 male knees, 78 female knees) were obtained using three-dimensional computer tomographic measurements. In the medial tibial condyle, we measured the anteroposterior (AP) and widest dimension (WD), and compared the measurements with the similar dimensions of five tibial unicondylar knee prostheses conventionally used in China. In the femur, we used best-fit two-circular arcs to measure the morphology of the sagittal plane of the medial femoral condyle. We found that three of the prostheses showed WD overhang for all ranges of the AP dimension, while two of them showed WD underhang. We also found a progressive decrease in the condylar aspect ratio (WD/AP%) in parallel with an increase in the AP dimension in the medial tibial condyle. However, none of the conventional tibial prosthesis showed a similar change. Furthermore, males had larger values in aspect ratio than females with the same values for AP dimension. There were definite correlations between the radius of the curvature for the posterior part (R1) and distal part (R2) in the sagittal plane of medial femoral condyle. Both of these values were smaller than in the Caucasian population. Both radiuses of curvature for the posterior and distal components showed definite correlations with the AP dimension. The results of this study may provide guidelines for designing unicondylar knee prostheses suitable for the Chinese population. PMID:19629438

  11. Long-term results after non-plate head-preserving fixation of proximal humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bahrs, Christian; Rolauffs, Bernd; Weise, Kuno; Zipplies, Sebastian; Dietz, Klaus; Eingartner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate displaced proximal humeral fractures treated with a non-plate head-preserving fixation and to detect factors predicting functional outcome. After a median follow-up period of 79.7 months, 105 patients with nine A-fractures, 36 B-fractures and 60 C-fractures (nine two-part-fractures, 41 three-part fractures and 55 four-part fractures) were assessed. Functional outcome was measured based on the Constant and UCLA scores. Of all patients, 70–75% had excellent or good Constant and UCLA scores. In 74% a good or satisfactory quality of initial reduction fracture was achieved. About one-fifth (21%) of the fractures showed a secondary displacement. Twenty-seven percent of the patients had signs of humeral head necrosis and 22% had implant related problems. There were significant correlations between a high final score and young age, low AO fracture severity, good quality of fracture reduction and residual osseous deformity, absence of secondary fracture displacement, implant-related complications, shoulder arthrosis and humeral head necrosis at the time of follow-up. In conclusion, the non-plate head-preserving fixation of proximal humeral fractures is an alternative treatment for displaced proximal humeral fractures. Especially in severely displaced C-fractures in older patients, non-anatomical reduction leads to a high rate of secondary displacement, residual osseous deformity and only a fair shoulder function. For these cases alternative methods such as prosthetic replacement should be chosen. PMID:19705115

  12. Long-term results after non-plate head-preserving fixation of proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Bahrs, Christian; Badke, Andreas; Rolauffs, Bernd; Weise, Kuno; Zipplies, Sebastian; Dietz, Klaus; Eingartner, Christoph

    2010-08-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate displaced proximal humeral fractures treated with a non-plate head-preserving fixation and to detect factors predicting functional outcome. After a median follow-up period of 79.7 months, 105 patients with nine A-fractures, 36 B-fractures and 60 C-fractures (nine two-part-fractures, 41 three-part fractures and 55 four-part fractures) were assessed. Functional outcome was measured based on the Constant and UCLA scores. Of all patients, 70-75% had excellent or good Constant and UCLA scores. In 74% a good or satisfactory quality of initial reduction fracture was achieved. About one-fifth (21%) of the fractures showed a secondary displacement. Twenty-seven percent of the patients had signs of humeral head necrosis and 22% had implant related problems. There were significant correlations between a high final score and young age, low AO fracture severity, good quality of fracture reduction and residual osseous deformity, absence of secondary fracture displacement, implant-related complications, shoulder arthrosis and humeral head necrosis at the time of follow-up. In conclusion, the non-plate head-preserving fixation of proximal humeral fractures is an alternative treatment for displaced proximal humeral fractures. Especially in severely displaced C-fractures in older patients, non-anatomical reduction leads to a high rate of secondary displacement, residual osseous deformity and only a fair shoulder function. For these cases alternative methods such as prosthetic replacement should be chosen. PMID:19705115

  13. Minimal Invasive Percutaneous Osteosynthesis for Elderly Valgus Impacted Proximal Humeral Fractures with the PHILOS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Hu, Xiaochuan; Tang, Haochen; Yang, Guoyong; Xiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing concern about elderly valgus impacted proximal humeral fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment and clinical outcomes following minimal invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) with the proximal humeral internal locking system (PHILOS) for the treatment of elderly valgus impacted proximal humeral fracture. Between May 2008 and May 2012, 27 patients (average age 67.3, range 61-74) with valgus impacted proximal humeral fractures were enrolled in the study. The patients were treated with MIPPO using PHILOS-plate through the anterolateral delta-splitting approach. Rehabilitation exercises were done gradually. The NEER score and Constant-Murley score were used to evaluate shoulder function. All the patients were followed up by routine radiological imaging and clinical examination. There were 15 cases of II-part greater tuberosity fractures, 10 cases of III-part greater tuberosity fractures, and 2 cases of IV-part fractures according to the NEER classification. The surgery was successful in all patients with an average follow-up of 20.8 (range: 11-34) months. The fractures united in an average of 7.2 (6-14) weeks without implant loosening. According to NEER score, there were 17 excellent, 7 satisfactory, 2 unsatisfactory, and 1 poor. The mean Constant-Murley score was 89.4 ± 4.35. No complication including axillary nerve damage, postoperative nerve or vessel damage, infections, DVT, or death was observed. In conclusion, the MIPPO technique with the PHILOS through the anterolateral delta-splitting approach seems to be a safe and easy treatment for elderly valgus impacted proximal humeral fractures. A case-control study and longer follow-up time are needed. PMID:26693491

  14. Proliferative periostitis of the mandibular ramus and condyle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seok, Hyun; Kim, Seong-Gon; Song, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    Proliferative periostitis is a rare form of osteomyelitis that is characterized by new bone formation with periosteal reaction common causes of proliferative periostitis are dental caries, periodontitis, cysts, and trauma. While proliferative periostitis typically presents as a localized lesion, in this study, we describe an extensive form of proliferative periostitis involving the whole mandibular ramus and condyle. Because the radiographic findings were similar to osteogenic sarcoma, an accurate differential diagnosis was important for proper treatment. PMID:26339579

  15. Endoscope-Assisted Transoral Fixation of Mandibular Condyle Fractures: Submandibular Versus Transoral Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Na-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hwan; You, Hi-Jin; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, endoscope-assisted transoral approach for condylar fracture treatment has attracted much attention. However, the surgical approach is technically challenging: the procedure requires specialized instruments and the surgeons experience a steep learning curve. During the transoral endoscopic (TE) approach several instruments are positioned through a narrow oral incision making endoscope maneuvering very difficult. For this reason, the authors changed the entry port of the endoscope from transoral to submandibular area through a small stab incision. The aim of this study is to assess the advantage of using the submandibular endoscopic intraoral approach (SEI).The SEI approach requires intraoral incision for fracture reduction and fixation, and 4 mm size submandibular stab incision for endoscope and traction wires. Fifteen patients with condyle neck and subcondyle fractures were operated under the submandibular approach and 15 patients with the same diagnosis were operated under the standard TE approach.The SEI approach allowed clear visualization of the posterior margin of the ramus and condyle, and the visual axis was parallel to the condyle ramus unit. The TE approach clearly shows the anterior margin of the condyle and the sigmoid notch. The surgical time of the SEI group was 128 minutes and the TE group was 120 minutes (P >0.05). All patients in the TE endoscope group were fixated with the trocar system, but only 2 lower neck fracture patients in the SEI group required a trocar. The other 13 subcondyle fractures were fixated with an angulated screw driver (P <0.05). There were no differences in complication and surgical outcomes.The submandibular endoscopic approach has an advantage of having more space with good visualization, and facilitated the use of an angulated screw driver. PMID:27380571

  16. Proliferative periostitis of the mandibular ramus and condyle: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Hyun; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative periostitis is a rare form of osteomyelitis that is characterized by new bone formation with periosteal reaction common causes of proliferative periostitis are dental caries, periodontitis, cysts, and trauma. While proliferative periostitis typically presents as a localized lesion, in this study, we describe an extensive form of proliferative periostitis involving the whole mandibular ramus and condyle. Because the radiographic findings were similar to osteogenic sarcoma, an accurate differential diagnosis was important for proper treatment. PMID:26339579

  17. Effect of alendronate on endochondral ossification in mandibular condyles of growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Bradaschia-Correa, V.; Barrence, F.A.C.; Ferreira, L.B.; Massa, L.F.; Arana-Chavez, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of the calcified cartilage by bone tissue during the endochondral ossification of the mandibular condyle is dependent of the resorbing activity of osteoclats. After partial resorption, calcified cartilage septa are covered by a primary bone matrix secreted by osteoblasts. Osteoadherin (OSAD) is a small proteoglycan present in bone matrix but absent in cartilage during the endochondral ossification. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of alendronate, a drug known to inhibit bone resorption by osteoclasts, on the endochondral ossification of the mandibular condyle of young rats, by evaluating the distribution of osteoclasts and the presence of OSAD in the bone matrix deposited. Wistar newborn rats (n=45) received daily injections of alendronate (n=27) or sterile saline solution as control (n=18) from the day of birth until the ages of 4, 14 and 30 days. At the days mentioned, the mandibular condyles were collected and processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Specimens were also submitted to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) histochemistry and ultrastructural immunodetection of OSAD. Alendronate treatment did not impede the recruitment and fusion of osteoclasts at the ossification zone during condyle growth, but they presented inactivated phenotype. The trabeculae at the ossification area consisted of cartilage matrix covered by a layer of primary bone matrix that was immunopositive to OSAD at all time points studied. Apparently, alendronate impeded the removal of calcified cartilage and maturation of bone trabeculae in the mandibular ramus, while in controls they occurred normally. These findings highlight for giving attention to the potential side-effects of bisphosphonates administered to young patients once it may represent a risk of disturbing maxillofacial development. PMID:22688305

  18. Trabecular bone structure in the mandibular condyles of gouging and nongouging platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy M; Colbert, Matthew; Ketcham, Richard A; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2010-04-01

    The relationship between mandibular form and biomechanical function is a topic of significant interest to morphologists and paleontologists alike. Several previous studies have examined the morphology of the mandible in gouging and nongouging primates as a means of understanding the anatomical correlates of this feeding behavior. The goal of the current study was to quantify the trabecular bone structure of the mandibular condyle of gouging and nongouging primates to assess the functional morphology of the jaw in these animals. High-resolution computed tomography scan data were collected from the mandibles of five adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), saddle-back tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis), and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), respectively, and various three-dimensional morphometric parameters were measured from the condylar trabecular bone. No significant differences were found among the taxa for most trabecular bone structural features. Importantly, no mechanically significant parameters, such as bone volume fraction and degree of anisotropy, were found to vary significantly between gouging and nongouging primates. The lack of significant differences in mechanically relevant structural parameters among these three platyrrhine taxa may suggest that gouging as a habitual dietary behavior does not involve significantly higher loads on the mandibular condyle than other masticatory behaviors. Alternatively, the similarities in trabecular architecture across these three taxa may indicate that trabecular bone is relatively unimportant mechanically in the condyle of these primates and therefore is functionally uninformative. PMID:19918988

  19. Current concepts in the mandibular condyle fracture management part I: overview of condylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Young; Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-07-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture. PMID:22872830

  20. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory. PMID:26414648

  1. Ultrastructure of the articular surface of the condyle in temporomandibular arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Toller, P A; Wilcox, J H

    1978-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the surface of normal human mandibular condyles is described and compared with specimens from condyles in cases of degenerative joint disease (arthropathy). Normal surfaces exhibited a nearly structurless layer about 2 microns thick, which seemed to correspond with the lamina splendens of other joints. The underlying structure of dense interlacing bundles of collagen is described. Surfaces of all pathologic condyles showed loss of lamina splendens, alteration of collagen size, and evidence of dissociation of both the collagen and its surrounding ground substance. Deeper levels showed aggregations of bizarre structures, which the authors term "vermiform bodies," and which appear to be collections of abnormal amounts and types of elastic tissue. Its distribution suggests a stress elastosis, which may contribute to the loss of mechanical integrity of articular surfaces in arthropathy. The surface changes may be reflected at the clinical level as impairment of the normal low-friction qualities of joint components associated with limitation of movement and joint sounds. PMID:272604

  2. Facilitation of bone resorption activities in synovial lavage fluid patients with mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Takano, H; Takahashi, T; Nakata, A; Nogami, S; Yusa, K; Kuwajima, S; Yamazaki, M; Fukuda, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bone resorption effect of the mediators delivered in joint cavity of patients with mandibular condyle fractures by detecting osteoclast markers using cellular biochemistry methods, and by analysing bone resorption activities via inducing osteoclast differentiation of the infiltrated cells from arthrocentesis. Sixteen joints in 10 patients with mandibular condyle fractures were evaluated. The control group consisted of synovial fluid (SF) samples from seven joints of four volunteers who had no clinical signs or symptoms involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or disc displacement. We collected SF cells from all patients during therapeutic arthrocentesis. The infiltrating cells from TMJ SF were cultured, differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclast-like cells and examined bone resorption activities. We also investigated factors related to osteoclast induction of SF, using ELISA procedures. Osteoclast-like cells were induced from the SF cells obtained from all patients with condylar fractures. These multinucleated giant cells were positive for TRAP and actin, and had the ability to absorb dentin slices. The levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), soluble form of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (sRANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), in SF samples from the patients, were significantly higher than in the controls. These findings indicate that bone resorption activities in SF from patients with mandibular condyle fractures were upregulated and may participate in the pathogenesis and wound healing. PMID:26946239

  3. The Adequacy of Diagnosis and Treatment for Osteoporosis in Patients with Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae In; Choi, Jun Ha; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether physicians' practice was adequate for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with proximal humeral fracture over the age of 50 years, which is one of major osteoporotic fractures. Methods A retrospective nation-wide cohort study was performed using data collected in 2010 by the Korean Health Insurance Review Agency. The incidences of fractures around the hip, spine, and proximal humerus in patients more than 50 years of age, the frequencies of diagnostic bone density scan for osteoporosis, and the prescription for the osteoporosis medication were analyzed and compared. Results A search of database identified 48,351 hip fractures, 141,208 spine fractures, and 11,609 proximal humeral fractures in patients more than 50 years of age in 2010. Among these patients, 12,097 (25.0%) of hip fractures, 41,962 (29.7%) of spine fractures, and 1,458 (12.6%) of proximal humeral fractures underwent diagnostic bone density scan (p < 0.001); 4,773 (9.9%) of hip fractures, 27,261 (19.3%) of spine fractures, and 639 (5.5%) of proximal humeral fractures were managed with at least one medication approved for the treatment of osteoporosis (p < 0.001). Furthermore, 1,217 (2.5%) of hip fractures, 7,271 (5.2%) of spine fractures, and 188 (1.6%) of proximal humeral fractures received diagnostic bone density scans as well as osteoporosis medications (p < 0.001). Younger patients (50–69 years of age) were less likely to be evaluated and managed for osteoporosis relative to older patients (≥ 70 years of age) (p < 0.001); and men were less likely to be evaluated and managed for osteoporosis relative to women (p < 0.001). Conclusions Current physicians' practice pattern may be inadequate for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in patients of proximal humeral fractures over the age of 50 years. Additional study and educational programs are necessary to improve this care gap, beginning with physicians who are

  4. A case of delayed recurrent hemarthrosis after posterolateral reconstruction of the knee with a staple fixation at the lateral femoral epicondyle.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Yi, Seung Rim; Huh, Jung Kyu

    2008-11-01

    We present a case of delayed recurrent hemarthrosis after posterolateral reconstruction of the knee with staple fixation of the tendon graft at the lateral femoral condyle. A 20-year-old man had undergone a reconstructive surgery of the knee with allogeneic Achilles tendon aimed to reinforce lateral collateral ligament and popliteofibular ligament. At 4 months after surgery, recurrent swelling of the operated knee after minor exertion developed. The radiographs showed prominent staples at the lateral side of lateral femoral condyle. The arthroscopy revealed that the staples were salient intra-articularly at lateral gutter of the knee, and the adjacent lateral capsule seemed abraded, through which the longitudinal fibers of iliotibial band were seen. Iatrogenic iliotibial band syndrome owing to the prominent staple was speculated. The staples were removed under arthroscopic guidance, and there has been no recurrence thereafter. A staple fixation over bony prominence is not advisable and the interference screw might be a better alternative method of fixation. PMID:18365223

  5. Biomechanical benefits of anterior offsetting of humeral head component in posteriorly unstable total shoulder arthroplasty: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Min Mike; Chacon, Alexander C; Andrews, Seth H; Roush, Evan P; Cho, Edward; Conaway, William K; Kunselman, Allen R; Lewis, Gregory S

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of joint stability during total shoulder arthroplasty can be challenging in the face of severe glenoid retroversion. A novel technique of humeral head component anterior-offsetting has been proposed to address posterior instability. We evaluated the biomechanical benefits of this technique in cadaveric specimens. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in 14 cadaveric shoulders from 7 donors. Complementary shoulders were assigned to either 10° or 20° glenoid retroversion, with retroversion created by eccentric reaming. Two humeral head component offset positions were tested in each specimen: The anatomic (posterior) and anterior (reverse). With loads applied to the rotator cuff and deltoid, joint contact pressures and the force and energy required for posterior humeral head translation were measured. The force and energy required to displace the humeral head posteriorly increased significantly with the anterior offset position compared to the anatomic offset position. The joint contact pressures were significantly shifted anteriorly, and the joint contact area significantly increased with the anterior offset position. Anterior offsetting of the humeral head component increased the resistance to posterior humeral head translation, shifted joint contact pressures anteriorly, and increased joint contact area, thus, potentially increasing the joint stability in total shoulder arthroplasty with simulated glenoid retroversion. PMID:26356804

  6. Proximal humeral fractures: a biomechanical comparison of locking plate constructs in a cadaveric 3-part fracture model.

    PubMed

    Rose, David M; Sutter, Edward G; Mears, Simon C; Gupta, Rohit R; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to biomechanically compare, under cyclic loading conditions, fracture site motion, humeral head collapse, and intra-articular hardware penetration in simulated 3-part osteoporotic proximal humeral fractures stabilized with 1 of 2 locking-plate constructs. We performed fixation on simulated 3-part proximal humeral fractures in 10 pairs of cadaveric osteoporotic humeri with a Hand Innovations S3 Proximal Humerus Plate (S3 plate) or an LCP Proximal Humerus Plate (LCP plate; 1 each for each pair). The specimens were potted, mounted on a materials testing machine, and subjected to 5000 cycles of abduction in the scapular plane, loading through the supraspinatus tendon. Interfragmentary displacement at 2 virtual points (the most medial aspect of the calcar and the most superior aspect of the osteotomy line between the greater tuberosity and humeral head) was measured using an optical tracking system. Humeral head rotation was also measured. We used a generalized linear latent and mixed model to check for an effect of cyclic loading and treatment on the parameters of interest (significance, P < .05). After cyclic loading, the S3 plate humeri showed significantly greater displacement of the greater tuberosity fragment and rotation of the humeral head and a trend (not a significant difference) toward greater displacement at the calcar. No hardware penetration was noted for either repair. Although the S3 plate repairs resulted in significantly more fracture site motion, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the motion is clinically significant. PMID:23569665

  7. [Clinical experiences in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures with the Sarmiento brace].

    PubMed

    Kulenkampff, H A; Rustemeier, M

    1988-08-01

    13 humeral shaft fractures were treated by Sarmiento-brace. Fracture-bracing is a special conservative traumatological management, that permits early remedial gymnastics. Light weight, optimal cosmetic results and quickly rehabilitation of the injured arm are favorable. Cooperation in gymnastics and controls within short times by the doctor are necessary. All our patients of ages under 45 years achieved nearly normal articular function, that increases 95% in comparison to the opposite arm. External rotation and abduction of the shoulder decreased in elder persons. Loss of function could not be avoided completely in critical cases (upper and lower part of the humeral shaft). Side effects were swelling, angulation deficiencies up to 16 degrees and skin lesions. The rate of pseudarthrosis seems very small. In advanced cases of malignomas pathologic fractures were treated by bracing palliatively. Open fractures, vascular damage, nerve palsy, fractures that cannot be controlled by non operative means and multiple injured patients should be treated by operation. PMID:3176188

  8. Throwing in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic: inferences from an analysis of humeral retroversion.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Jill A; Churchill, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    When in evolutionary history did long-range projectile weapons become an important component of hunting toolkits? The archeological evidence for the development of projectile weaponry is complex and generally indirect, and has led to different conclusions about the origin and spread of this technology. Lithic evidence from the Middle Stone Age (MSA) has led some researchers to suggest that true long- range projectile weaponry developed in Africa perhaps as early as 80,000 years ago, and was part of the subsistence toolkit carried by modern humans who expanded out of Africa after 50,000 years ago. Alternatively, temporal patterns in the morphology of pointed lithics has led others to posit an independent, convergent origin of projectile weaponry in Africa, the Near East, and Europe during the interval between 50,000-40,000 years ago. By either scenario, projectile weapons would not have been a component of the hunting arsenal of Neandertals, but may have been in use by European early modern humans and thus, projectile technology may have entered into the competitive dynamics that existed between these two groups. The origins of projectile weapons can be addressed, in part, through analyses of the skeletal remains of the prehistoric humans who made and used them. Habitual behavior patterns--including those related to the production and use of technology--can be imprinted on the skeleton through both genetic and epigenetic pathways. Recent studies in the field of sports medicine indicate that individuals who engage in habitual throwing have increased humeral retroversion angles in their throwing arms and a greater degree of bilateral asymmetry in retroversion angles than do non-throwers. This contribution investigates humeral torsion through analysis of the retroversion angle in samples of Eurasian Neandertals, European early modern humans of the middle and late Upper Paleolithic, and comparative samples of recent humans. This analysis was conducted under the

  9. Flexible Intramedullary Nailing of Pediatric Humeral Fractures: Indications, Techniques, and Tips.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Derek M

    2016-06-01

    Most proximal and diaphyseal pediatric humeral fractures can be treated successfully by closed means; however, certain patient factors or fracture characteristics may make surgical stabilization with flexible intramedullary nails (FIN) a better choice. Common indications for FIN of pediatric humeral fractures include unstable proximal-third fractures in children nearing skeletal maturity, unstable distal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures, shaft fractures in polytraumatized patients or patients with ipsilateral both-bone forearm fractures (floating elbow), and prophylactic stabilization of benign diaphyseal bone cysts or surgical stabilization of pathologic fractures. FIN can be safely inserted in an antegrade or retrograde manner depending on the fracture location and configuration. Careful dissection at the location of rod insertion can prevent iatrogenic nerve injuries. Rapid fracture union and return to full function can be expected in most cases. Implant prominence is the most common complication. PMID:27152902

  10. Is MIPO in humeral shaft fractures really safe? Postoperative ultrasonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Belangero, William; Andrade, Kleber; Zuiani, Guilherme; Pratali, Raphael

    2009-12-01

    In the last few years there has been great interest in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. None of these studies showed the anatomical relationship between the radial nerve and the material of the implant in vivo. We performed postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of the distance between the radial nerve and the material implanted using the MIPO technique. Nineteen patients underwent postoperative ultrasound examinations. Group A comprised midshaft fractures and group B distal third fractures. The point of greatest proximity between the radial nerve and the implant was measured. In group A the distance was between 1.6 and 19.6 mm (mean: 9.3 mm) and in group B between 1.0 and 8.1 mm (mean: 4.0 mm). The ultrasound findings reveal that the radial nerve is quite close to the implant material, especially in the transition between the third and fourth quarters of the humeral shaft. PMID:18704415

  11. Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy after Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis of a Distal Humeral Shaft Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Bichsel, Ursina; Nyffeler, Richard Walter

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis is a widely used procedure for the treatment of fractures of the femur and the tibia. For a short time it is also used for the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. Among other advantages, the ambassadors of this technique emphasize the lower risk of nerve injuries when compared to open reduction and internal fixation. We report the case of secondary radial nerve palsy caused by percutaneous fixation of a plate above the antecubital fold. The nerve did not recover and the patient needed a tendon transfer to regain active extension of the fingers. This case points to the importance of adequate exposure of the bone and plate if a humeral shaft fracture extends far distally. PMID:26558125

  12. Pullulan/dextran/nHA Macroporous Composite Beads for Bone Repair in a Femoral Condyle Defect in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schlaubitz, Silke; Derkaoui, Sidi Mohammed; Marosa, Lydia; Miraux, Sylvain; Renard, Martine; Catros, Sylvain; Le Visage, Catherine; Letourneur, Didier; Amédée, Joëlle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The repair of bone defects is of particular interest for orthopedic, oral, maxillofacial, and dental surgery. Bone loss requiring reconstruction is conventionally addressed through bone grafting. Depending on the size and the location of the defect, this method has limits and risks. Biomaterials can offer an alternative and have features supporting bone repair. Here, we propose to evaluate the cellular penetration and bone formation of new macroporous beads based on pullulan/dextran that has been supplemented with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite in a rat model. Cross-linked beads of 300–500 µm diameters were used in a lateral femoral condyle defect and analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging, micro-computed tomography, and histology in comparison to the empty defects 15, 30, and 70 days after implantation. Inflammation was absent for both conditions. For empty defects, cellularisation and mineralization started from the periphery of the defect. For the defects containing beads, cellular structures filling out the spaces between the scaffolds with increasing interconnectivity and trabecular-like organization were observed over time. The analysis of calcified sections showed increased mineralization over time for both conditions, but was more pronounced for the samples containing beads. Bone Mineral Density and Bone Mineral Content were both significantly higher at day 70 for the beads in comparison to empty defects as well as compared with earlier time points. Analysis of newly formed tissue around the beads showed an increase of osteoid tissue, measured as percentage of the defect surface. This study suggests that the use of beads for the repair of small size defects in bone may be expanded on to meet the clinical need for a ready-to-use fill-up material that can favor bone formation and mineralization, as well as promote vessel ingrowth into the defect site. PMID:25330002

  13. Open vs. closed reduction combined with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Wen; Wei, Xiao-En; Kuang, Yong; Zheng, Yu-Xin; Gu, Xin-Feng; Zhan, Hong-Sheng; Shi, Yin-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Aim To explore a more effective surgical procedure, the outcomes of closed manipulative reduction (CMR) combined with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and conventional open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) for treating proximal humeral fractures were compared. Material and methods In a retrospective study of patients operated for humerus shaft fractures from April 2008 to July 2011, the outcomes of 33 patients treated with CMR/MIPO were compared with the outcomes of 42 patients treated with ORIF. The fractures were classified, and the incision length, blood transfusion, operating time, as well as the VAS (Visual Analog Scale) pain scores were analyzed. The neck-shaft angles of the proximal humerus were detected, and the postoperative function of the shoulder was evaluated. Results The mean values of incision length, blood transfusion, and VAS pain scores at the 1st and 3rd day after CMR/MIPO and operation time were lower than that of ORIF. The postoperative radiographs verified good position of all screws and satisfactory bone fracture reduction in both groups. Meanwhile, in the ORIF group, nonunion (three cases) and humeral head necrosis (four cases) were detected. Conclusions The MR/MIPO technique showed smaller incisions, easier operation, less blood transfusion and more effective recovery of shoulder joint function for treating proximal humeral fractures than ORIF. PMID:27266386

  14. Treatment of Intercondylar Humeral Fractures With 3D-Printed Osteosynthesis Plates.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Shao, Yinchu; Li, Hao; Zou, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy custom 3D-printed osteosynthesis plates in the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures.Thirteen patients with distal intercondylar humeral fractures were randomized to undergo surgery using either conventional plates (n = 7) or 3D-printed plates (n = 6) at our institution from March to October 2014. Both groups were compared in terms of operative time and elbow function at 6 month follow-up.All patients were followed-up for a mean of 10.6 months (range: 6-13 months). The 3D-printing group had a significantly shorter mean operative time (70.6 ± 12.1 min) than the conventional plates group (92.3 ± 17.4 min). At the last follow-up period, there was no significant difference between groups in the rate of patients with good or excellent elbow function, although the 3D-printing group saw a slightly higher rate of good or excellent evaluations (83.1%) compared to the conventional group (71.4%).Custom 3D printed osteosynthesis plates are safe and effective for the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures and significantly reduce operative time. PMID:26817880

  15. UPPER LIMB TRACTION DEVICE FOR ANTEROGRADE INTRAMEDULLARY LOCKED NAIL OF HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mário Chaves; Gomes, Felipe Antônio; Linhares, Daniel Campos; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, José Carlos Souza; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in adults are mostly treated surgically, usually by means of intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis. Some comminuted and/or highly deviated shaft fractures may present a veritable technical challenge. Fracture (or orthopedic) tables, which enable vertical, horizontal and rotational instrumental stabilization of the limb, greatly facilitate reduction and implant placement maneuvers and are widely used by orthopedic surgeons. Humeral shaft fractures are mostly treated nonsurgically. However, some cases with indications that are well defined in the literature require surgical treatment. They can be fixed by means of plates or intramedullary nails, using anterograde or retrograde routes. In the humerus, fracture reduction and limb stabilization maneuvers for implantation of intramedullary nails are done manually, usually by two assistants. Because muscle fatigue may occur, this option may be less efficient. The aim of this paper is to present an external upper-limb traction device for use in anterograde intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures that enables vertical, horizontal and rotational stabilization of the upper limb, in a manner similar to the device used for the lower limbs. The device is portable, of simple construction, and can be installed on any operating table equipped with side rails. It was used for surgical treatment of 29 humeral shaft fractures using an anterograde locked intramedullary nail. Our experience was extremely positive. We did not have any complications relating to its use and we believe that it notably facilitated the surgical procedures. PMID:27022560

  16. Treatment of Intercondylar Humeral Fractures With 3D-Printed Osteosynthesis Plates

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Shao, Yinchu; Li, Hao; Zou, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy custom 3D-printed osteosynthesis plates in the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures. Thirteen patients with distal intercondylar humeral fractures were randomized to undergo surgery using either conventional plates (n = 7) or 3D-printed plates (n = 6) at our institution from March to October 2014. Both groups were compared in terms of operative time and elbow function at 6 month follow-up. All patients were followed-up for a mean of 10.6 months (range: 6–13 months). The 3D-printing group had a significantly shorter mean operative time (70.6 ± 12.1 min) than the conventional plates group (92.3 ± 17.4 min). At the last follow-up period, there was no significant difference between groups in the rate of patients with good or excellent elbow function, although the 3D-printing group saw a slightly higher rate of good or excellent evaluations (83.1%) compared to the conventional group (71.4%). Custom 3D printed osteosynthesis plates are safe and effective for the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures and significantly reduce operative time. PMID:26817880

  17. Recession wedge osteotomy of the greater tuberosity for proximal humeral varus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Stephen K; Anderson, Lucas A; Marchese, Joseph W

    2011-05-01

    Proximal humeral varus has multiple etiologies and may lead to impingement and reduced shoulder range of motion, particularly abduction and forward elevation. Valgus osteotomies have been described at the level of the surgical neck yielding acceptable results. This article describes a case of a male electrician who was treated for symptoms associated with proximal humeral varus of the right shoulder. He underwent an osteotomy of the greater tuberosity designed to reduce impingement and improve range of motion. The patient had previously undergone two separate surgical procedures for a simple bone cyst, but continued to have reduced shoulder function secondary to a prominent greater tuberosity. Preoperative and follow-up radiographs, physical examinations, and shoulder function were retrospectively reviewed for 32 months. Following treatment, active forward elevation improved from 130° preoperatively to 170°, abduction from 90° to 170°, external rotation from 45° to 70°, and internal rotation from T10 to T7. The patient reported relief of pain, impingement-free range of motion, and full symmetric function equal to that of his contralateral shoulder. Radiographs demonstrated osteotomy union, improved greater tuberosity/acromial clearance, and no impingement with abduction. Postoperative stiffness was the only complication noted for which a shoulder manipulation was performed under anesthesia. Thus, recession wedge osteotomy of the prominent greater tuberosity may serve as a viable surgical approach to reducing impingement and improving clinical function in proximal humeral varus. PMID:21598883

  18. Anterior plating as a surgical alternative in the treatment of humeral shaft non-union.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Belangero, William; Medina, Giovanna; Pimenta, Ciro; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Mongon, Mauricio

    2010-10-01

    This study included 15 patients with humeral shaft fractures who had no clinical, radiological or bone scan signs of healing after eight months. The patients were followed for a mean of 35.8 months. No patient was lost to follow-up. Anterior plating of humeral shaft nonunion via an anterior approach was performed using a straight plate and compression for well-vascularised non-unions and wave plating with a tricortical graft for poorly vascularised non-unions. All non-unions healed within 6-18 weeks (mean, nine weeks) without local complication. One patient had a mild decrease in elbow and shoulder range of motion. No neurovascular injury was observed. Anterior plating is a simple, safe and effective treatment for humeral shaft non-union. As this approach avoids the need for radial nerve visualisation and extensive soft-tissue dissection, and the healing time is similar to that of other methods, we suggest this treatment as an alternative option. PMID:19730860

  19. Anterior plating as a surgical alternative in the treatment of humeral shaft non-union

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, William; Medina, Giovanna; Pimenta, Ciro; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Mongon, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    This study included 15 patients with humeral shaft fractures who had no clinical, radiological or bone scan signs of healing after eight months. The patients were followed for a mean of 35.8 months. No patient was lost to follow-up. Anterior plating of humeral shaft nonunion via an anterior approach was performed using a straight plate and compression for well-vascularised non-unions and wave plating with a tricortical graft for poorly vascularised non-unions. All non-unions healed within 6–18 weeks (mean, nine weeks) without local complication. One patient had a mild decrease in elbow and shoulder range of motion. No neurovascular injury was observed. Anterior plating is a simple, safe and effective treatment for humeral shaft non-union. As this approach avoids the need for radial nerve visualisation and extensive soft-tissue dissection, and the healing time is similar to that of other methods, we suggest this treatment as an alternative option. PMID:19730860

  20. Regional Variation of Bone Tissue Properties at the Human Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Gyoon; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kosel, Erin; Agnew, Amanda M.; McComb, David W.; Bodnyk, Kyle; Hart, Richard T.; Kim, Min Kyung; Han, Sang Yeun; Johnston, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bears different types of static and dynamic loading during occlusion and mastication. As such, characteristics of mandibular condylar bone tissue play an important role in determining the mechanical stability of the TMJ under the macro-level loading. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine regional variation of the elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic mechanical properties of human mandibular condylar bone tissue using nanoindentation. Cortical and trabecular bone were dissected from mandibular condyles of human cadavers (9 males, 54 to 96 years). These specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography to obtain bone tissue mineral distribution. Then, nanoindentation was conducted on the surface of the same specimens in hydration. Plastic hardness (H) at a peak load, viscoelastic creep (Creep/Pmax), viscosity (η), and tangent delta (tan δ) during a 30 second hold period, and elastic modulus (E) during unloading were obtained by a cycle of indentation at the same site of bone tissue. The tissue mineral and nanoindentation parameters were analyzed for the periosteal and endosteal cortex, and trabecular bone regions of the mandibular condyle. The more mineralized periosteal cortex had higher mean values of elastic modulus, plastic hardness, and viscosity but lower viscoelastic creep and tan δ than the less mineralized trabecular bone of the mandibular condyle. These characteristics of bone tissue suggest that the periosteal cortex tissue may have more effective properties to resist elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic deformation under static loading, and the trabecular bone tissue to absorb and dissipate time-dependent viscoelastic loading energy at the TMJ during static occlusion and dynamic mastication. PMID:25913634

  1. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with severe crowding and unilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi; Sato, Yasumori

    2016-06-01

    A 15-year-old girl who had a unilateral condylar fracture with severe crowding in both arches was treated with 4 premolar extractions followed by orthodontic therapy with a temporary skeletal anchorage device in the maxillary arch. The total active treatment time was 21 months. Her occlusion was significantly improved by orthodontic treatment, and the range of condylar movement was also improved. Posttreatment records after 30 months showed excellent results with a good stable occlusion. The remodeling process of the condyle was confirmed with cone-beam computed tomography images. PMID:27242001

  2. The medial-lateral force distribution in the ovine stifle joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R; Poepplau, Berry M; König, Christian; Ehrig, Rainald M; Zachow, Stefan; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the load distribution in the knee is essential for understanding the interaction between mechanics and biology in both the healthy and diseased joint. While the sheep stifle joint is a predominant model for better understanding regeneration after injury, little is known about the compartmental force distribution between the medial and lateral condyles. By including sheep specific anatomy and gait analyses, we used computational musculoskeletal analyses to estimate the medial-lateral joint contact force distribution in ovine stifle joints during walking by simplifying the system of equations into a 2D problem that was solved directly. Gait analysis was conducted using bone markers in three female Merino-mix sheep. Joint contact forces were computed with respect to the specific anatomy of the ovine tibia, resulting in low (<0.13 bodyweight) mean anteroposterior shear forces throughout the gait cycle, with mean peak contact forces perpendicular to the tibial plateau of 2.2 times bodyweight. The medial-lateral compartmental load distribution across the tibial condyles was determined and revealed loading predominantly on the medial condyle, bearing approximately 75% of the total load during phases of peak loading. By considering the anatomical characteristics of the ovine stifle joint, together with the dynamic forces during gait, this study provides evidence for predominantly medial loading in sheep, somewhat similar to the distribution reported in man. However, the exact conditions under which the loading in the ovine stifle joint is representative of the human situation will need to be elucidated in further studies. PMID:20957731

  3. Biomechanical Study of the Fixation Strength of Anteromedial Plating for Humeral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Shan, Lei; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws are the gold standard for the surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures, this study was to compare the mechanical properties of anteromedial, anterolateral, and posterior plating for humeral shaft fractures. Methods: A distal third humeral shaft fracture model was constructed using fourth-generation sawbones (#3404, composite bone). A total of 24 sawbones with a distal third humeral shaft fracture was randomly divided into three Groups: A, B, and C (n = 8 in each group) for anteromedial, anterolateral, and posterior plating, respectively. All sawbones were subjected to horizontal torsional fatigue tests, horizontal torsional and axial compressive fatigue tests, four-point bending fatigue tests in anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions and horizontal torsional destructive tests. Results: In the horizontal torsional fatigue tests, the mean torsional angle amplitude in Groups A, B, and C were 6.12°, 6.53°, and 6.81°. In horizontal torsional and axial compressive fatigue tests, the mean torsional angle amplitude in Groups A, B, and C were 5.66°, 5.67°, and 6.36°. The mean plate displacement amplitude was 0.05 mm, 0.08 mm, and 0.10 mm. Group A was smaller than Group C (P < 0.05). In AP four-point bending fatigue tests, the mean plate displacement amplitude was 0.16 mm, 0.13 mm, and 0.20 mm. Group B was smaller than Group C (P < 0.05). In ML four-point bending fatigue tests, the mean plate displacement amplitude were 0.16 mm, 0.19 mm, and 0.17 mm. In horizontal torsional destructive tests, the mean torsional rigidity in Groups A, B, and C was 0.82, 0.75, and 0.76 N·m/deg. The yielding torsional angle was 24.50°, 25.70°, and 23.86°. The mean yielding torque was 18.46, 18.05, and 16.83 N·m, respectively. Conclusions: Anteromedial plating was superior to anterolateral or posterior plating in all mechanical tests except in AP four-point bending fatigue tests compared to the

  4. Brief communication: bilateral aplasia of the condyles in a 1,400-year-old mandible from Israel.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Y; Arensburg, B

    2000-01-01

    A rare pathological mandible, manifesting bilateral absence of the condyles, is discussed. The pathology was identified as hemifacial microsomia. The mandible, dated to the Byzantine period in Israel, manifests bilateral aplasia of the condyles and extreme shortness, but normal width, of the body. The extremely well-developed coronoid process, the grooved masseter insertion area, and the manifestation of a medial pterygoid tubercle (MPT) suggest hypertrophy of the occlusal muscles. The presence of a large MPT is considered a Neanderthal autapomorphy. Studying the biomechanic forces acting on the deformed mandible in hemifacial microsomia patients may shed light on the mastication process in Neanderthals. PMID:10618592

  5. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle – Report of an atypical case and the importance of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Neelam N.; Gandhewar, Trupti M.; Kapoor, Prathmesh; Thomas, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondroma is a rare tumor of the mandibular condyle. Much confusion seems to exist in the literature in differentiating these tumors from chondromas as well as condylar hyperplasias. Due to considerable overlapping features between chondromas and condylar hyperplasia, it is likely to get misdiagnosed, thereby resulting in inadvertent errors in the treatment. A case report of a 35 year old male patient with mandibular deviation and malocclusion is presented here. He initially went unnoticed for features of an osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle but was subsequently treated for the same. PMID:25737946

  6. Bone SPECT in management of mandibular condyle hyperplasia. Report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dimonte, M; Inchingolo, F; Minonne, A; Arditi, G; Di Palma, G

    2004-05-01

    In the present paper we report the case of a 14-year-old girl suffering from condylar hyperplasia and enlargement of ipsilateral jaw body, stressing the importance of bone SPECT in the clinical management of this temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Condylar hyperplasia is an uncommon idiopathic monolateral disorder of jaw growth consistent with exuberant or persistent activity of the condyle nucleus finally involving sociopsychological aspects due to facial dysmorphism. Besides facial asymmetry our patient showed prognathism, malocclusion, worsening otalgia and headache. Conventional X-rays examinations and multislice spiral CT gave us important morphostructural information also thanks to 3D volume-rendered and virtual reconstructions, while bone SPECT by detecting an intense well focused (99m)Tc-MDP uptake allowed to achieve uninvasively the final diagnosis of primary condyle hyperplasia. In spite of the full imaging characterization of TMJ disorders, consensus on best timing and therapeutic approaches on condylar hyperplasia is yet to be reached. In the present case patient was first treated orthodontically, planning a "high" condylectomy intervention after at least 6 months. PMID:15263884

  7. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury. PMID:21862340

  8. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of surgically treated mandibular condyle fractures. A five years retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zrounba, Hugues; Lutz, Jean-Christophe; Zink, Simone; Wilk, Astrid

    2014-09-01

    Surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures is still controversial. Although it provides better outcome than closed treatment questions still remain about the surgical approach and the osteosynthesis devices to be used. Between 2005 and 2010, we managed 168 mandibular condyle fractures with open treatment. Two surgical approaches were used in this study, a pre-auricular and a high submandibular approach (one or the other or as a combined approach). Internal fixation was performed using TCP(®) plates (Medartis, Basel, Switzerland) or with two lag screws (15 and 17 mm). Delta plates were used in 15 cases (8.9%). We report the epidemiology of these fractures and the outcomes of the surgical treatment. We assessed the complications related to the surgical procedure and those related to the osteosynthesis material. The facial nerve related complication rate was very low and the osteosynthesis materials used proved to be strong enough to realize a stable fixation. The two approaches used in this study appeared to be safe with good aesthetic results. Most of the surgical procedure failures occurred in high subcondylar fractures especially when bilateral. PMID:24485271

  9. The frequency of bifid mandibular condyle in a Turkish patient population

    PubMed Central

    Miloglu, O; Yalcin, E; Buyukkurt, MC; Yilmaz, AB; Harorli, A

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and pattern of bifid mandibular condyles (BMCs). Methods A retrospective study was performed using panoramic radiographs from 10 200 patients undergoing dental treatment in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (Erzurum, Turkey) between 1996 and 2008. Results Of the 10 200 patients, 32 (0.3%) had BMCs, of whom 17 were female (53.1%) and 15 were male (46.9%). The age range of the patients with BMCs was 5 to 71 years (mean age 30.0±0.40). Of these 32 patients, 24 (75.0%) had unilateral and 8 (25.0%) had bilateral BMCs, none of the patients had a history of trauma. No symptoms associated with bifid condyles were observed in any of the patients with BMCs. Conclusions It is possible that BMC is a more frequent condition than is commonly perceived. However, because of the minimal symptoms associated with this condition, the authors believe that it will remain an incidental finding upon routine radiographic examination, rather than a clinical observation. Nevertheless, in symptomatic cases or in cases where surgical treatment is planned, panoramic radiographs should be supplemented with CT. PMID:20089743

  10. Shape and site dependent in vivo degradation of Mg-Zn pins in rabbit femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Tan, Moyan; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Ji, Weiping; Li, Jianan; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhao, Changli; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    A type of specially designed pin model of Mg-Zn alloy was implanted into the full thickness of lesions of New Zealand rabbits' femoral condyles. The recovery progress, outer surface healing and in vivo degradation were characterized by various methods including radiographs, Micro-CT scan with surface rendering, SEM (scanning electron microscope) with EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis) and so on. The in vivo results suggested that a few but not sufficient bridges for holding force were formed between the bone and the implant if there was a preexisting gap between them. The rapid degradation of the implantation in the condyle would result in the appearance of cavities. Morphological evaluation of the specially designed pins indicated that the cusp was the most vulnerable part during degradation. Furthermore, different implantation sites with distinct components and biological functions can lead to different degradation rates of Mg-Zn alloy. The rate of Mg-Zn alloy decreases in the following order: implantation into soft tissue, less trabecular bone, more trabecular bone, and cortical bone. Because of the complexities of in vivo degradation, it is necessary for the design of biomedical Mg-Zn devices to take into consideration the implantation sites used in clinics. PMID:24566138

  11. Shape and Site Dependent in Vivo Degradation of Mg-Zn Pins in Rabbit Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pei; Tan, Moyan; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Ji, Weiping; Li, Jianan; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhao, Changli; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    A type of specially designed pin model of Mg-Zn alloy was implanted into the full thickness of lesions of New Zealand rabbits’ femoral condyles. The recovery progress, outer surface healing and in vivo degradation were characterized by various methods including radiographs, Micro-CT scan with surface rendering, SEM (scanning electron microscope) with EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis) and so on. The in vivo results suggested that a few but not sufficient bridges for holding force were formed between the bone and the implant if there was a preexisting gap between them. The rapid degradation of the implantation in the condyle would result in the appearance of cavities. Morphological evaluation of the specially designed pins indicated that the cusp was the most vulnerable part during degradation. Furthermore, different implantation sites with distinct components and biological functions can lead to different degradation rates of Mg-Zn alloy. The rate of Mg-Zn alloy decreases in the following order: implantation into soft tissue, less trabecular bone, more trabecular bone, and cortical bone. Because of the complexities of in vivo degradation, it is necessary for the design of biomedical Mg-Zn devices to take into consideration the implantation sites used in clinics. PMID:24566138

  12. Ultrastructural characterization of the rabbit mandibular condyle following experimental induction of anterior disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, M; Ali, A M; Choi, W S; Larke, V

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that surgical induction of anterior disk displacement (ADD) in the rabbit craniomandibular joint (CMJ) leads to cellular and extracellular alterations consistent with osteoarthritis. Similar findings were also reported in human ADD as well as osteoarthritis of other joints. The purpose of this study was to further characterize these histopathological findings at the ultrastructural level. The right joint of 15 rabbits was exposed surgically and all discal attachments were severed except for the posterior attachment. The disk was then repositioned anteriorly and sutured to the zygomatic arch. The left joint served as a sham-operated control. Ten additional joints were used as nonoperated controls. Mandibular condyles were excised 2 weeks following surgery and processed for transmission electron microscopy. Experimental condyles showed neovascularization, fibrillation and vacuolation of the extracellular matrix and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells compared to controls. In addition, chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage showed an increase in the amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex suggesting an increase in protein synthesis. The presence of thick collagen fibers in osteoarthritic cartilage supports our previous immunohistochemical results of the presence of type I collagen instead of normally existing type II collagen. It was concluded that surgical induction of ADD in the rabbit CMJ leads to ultrastructural changes in the mandibular condylar cartilage consistent with degenerative alterations known to occur in osteoarthritis. PMID:10899715

  13. Treatment of a Femur Nonunion with Microsurgical Corticoperiosteal Pedicled Flap from the Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Guzzini, Matteo; Guidi, Marco; Civitenga, Carolina; Ferri, Germano; Ferretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The vascularized corticoperiosteal flap is harvested from the medial femoral condyle and it is nourished by the articular branch of the descending genicular artery and the superomedial genicular artery. This flap is usually harvested as a free flap for the reconstruction of bone defects at forearm, distal radius, carpus, hand, and recently at lower limb too. Case Report. A 50-year-old Caucasian man referred to our department for hypertrophic nonunion of the distal femur, refractory to the conservative treatments. The first surgical choice was the revision of the nail and the bone reconstruction with a corticoperiosteal pedicled flap from the medial femoral condyle. We considered union to have occurred 3.5 months after surgery when radiographs showed bridging of at least three of the four bony cortices and clinically the patient was able to walk with full weight bearing without any pain. At the last follow-up (25 months), the patient was completely satisfied with the procedure. Discussion. The corticoperiosteal flap allows a faster healing of fractures with a minimal morbidity at the donor site. We suggest that the corticoperiosteal pedicled flap graft is a reliable and effective treatment for distal femur nonunion. PMID:27064589

  14. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  15. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  16. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation. PMID:26652330

  17. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and pain in temporomandibular joints with and without degenerative changes of the condyle.

    PubMed

    Campos, M I G; Campos, P S F; Cangussu, M C T; Guimarães, R C; Line, S R P

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in 104 TMJs with and 58 without degenerative changes of the condyle, such as osteophytes, erosion, avascular necrosis, subcondral cyst and intra-articular loose bodies. TMJ images were also assessed for flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle and disc displacement. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and the presence of degenerative bony changes (p=0.00). Flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle showed no significant difference in relation to the presence or absence of degenerative bony changes. Retropositioning of the condyle was significantly associated to disc displacement with reduction (DDwR) (p=0.00), while condylar hypomobility was significantly more frequent in TMJ with DDwoR (p<0.05). Independent of the presence or type of DD, TMJ pain was more frequent in the presence of degenerative bony changes. When considering only DDwR, TMJ pain was significantly associated to a degenerative condition (p=0.03). When there were no degenerative bony changes, TMJ pain was significantly more frequent in DDwoR (p=0.04). Despite the present findings, the absence of symptoms in some patients with condylar bony changes suggests that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis should be established by evaluation of magnetic resonance images in association with clinical examination. PMID:18440778

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with unilateral dislocated condyle fracture after treatment with a mandibular repositioning splint: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kwantae; Choi, Woojin; Pae, Ahran; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2013-06-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a mandibular repositioning splint and the subsequent prosthodontic treatment of a unilateral dislocated condyle fracture for a patient whose injury resulted in significant mandibular deviation and malocclusion. The use of a mandibular repositioning splint considerably reduced the mandibular deviation, and a stable mandibular position was maintained with the definitive prosthesis. PMID:23763780

  19. Dominant-Limb Range-of-Motion and Humeral-Retrotorsion Adaptation in Collegiate Baseball and Softball Position Players

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E.; Oyama, Sakiko; Tatman, Justin; Myers, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Biomechanically, the motions used by baseball and softball pitchers differ greatly; however, the throwing motions of position players in both sports are strikingly similar. Although the adaptations to the dominant limb from overhead throwing have been well documented in baseball athletes, these adaptations have not been clearly identified in softball players. This information is important in order to develop and implement injury-prevention programs specific to decreasing the risk of upper extremity injury in softball athletes. Objective: To compare range-of-motion and humeral-retrotorsion characteristics of collegiate baseball and softball position players and of baseball and softball players to sex-matched controls. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratories and athletic training rooms at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Patients or Other Participants: Fifty-three collegiate baseball players, 35 collegiate softball players, 25 male controls (nonoverhead athletes), and 19 female controls (nonoverhead athletes). Intervention(s): Range of motion and humeral retrotorsion were measured using a digital inclinometer and diagnostic ultrasound. Main Outcome Measure(s): Glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, external-rotation gain, total glenohumeral range of motion, and humeral retrotorsion. Results: Baseball players had greater glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, total–range-of-motion, and humeral-retrotorsion difference than softball players and male controls. There were no differences between glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, total–range-of-motion, and humeral-retrotorsion difference in softball players and female controls. Conclusions: Few differences were evident between softball players and female control participants, although range-of-motion and humeral-retrotorsion adaptations were significantly different than baseball players. The throwing motions are similar between softball and baseball, but the

  20. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. PMID:25462474

  1. ANALYSIS ON THE VARIATION OF MEDIAL ROTATION VALUES ACCORDING TO THE POSITION OF THE HUMERAL DIAPHYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Cohen, Carina; Busin Giora, Taís Stedile; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Raia, Fabio; Pekelman, Hélio; Cymrot, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the validity of measurements of medial rotation (MR) of the shoulder, using vertebral levels, according to the variation in the position of the humeral diaphysis, and to test the bi-goniometer as a new measuring instrument. Methods: 140 shoulders (70 patients) were prospectively evaluated in cases presenting unilateral shoulder MR limitation. The vertebral level was evaluated by means of a visual scale and was correlated with the angle obtained according to the position of the humeral diaphysis, using the bi-goniometer developed with the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Mackenzie University. Results: The maximum vertebral level reached through MR on the unaffected side ranged from T3 to T12, and on the affected side, from T6 to the trochanter. Repositioning of the affected limb in MR according to the angular values on the normal side showed that 57.13% of the patients reached lower levels, between the sacrum, gluteus and trochanter. From analysis on the maximum vertebral level attained and the variation between the affected angle x (frontal plane: abduction and MR of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle x in MR, we observed that the greater the angle of the diaphyseal axis was, the lower the variation in the vertebral level attained was. From evaluating the linear correlation between the variables of difference in maximum vertebral level reached and variation in the affected angle y (extension and abduction of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle y in MR, we observed that there was no well-established linear relationship between these variables. Conclusion: Measurement of MR using vertebral levels does not correspond to the real values, since it varies according to the positioning of the humeral diaphysis. PMID:27047845

  2. Hoffa's fracture - lateral meniscus obstructing the fracture reduction - a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sumit Kumar; Jadaan, Mutaz; Rahall, Elias

    2015-02-01

    Hoffa's fracture is a coronal fracture of the posterior femoral condyle and is an unusual injury. It can be easily missed on plain radiographs. There is no dearth of literature on Hoffa's fracture, its various presentations, management and rehabilitation principles. The intra-articular nature of the fracture, vulnerable blood supply of the posterior femoral condyle, involvement of the weight bearing articular surface of the knee and the unstable fracture pattern necessitate the surgical management. We encountered an unusual case of Hoffa's fracture where the lateral meniscus was blocking the reduction of fractured fragments. The patient required mini arthrotomy to remove the meniscus from in between the bone fragments. The fracture was fixed with two anteroposterior screws and knee was immobilised in extension. A gentle knee range of movements was commenced after the wound had healed but weight bearing was delayed for 12 weeks. PMID:25554423

  3. Distal humeral plating of an intramedullary nail periprosthetic fracture using a miss-a-nail technique: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Corbett, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of distal humeral periprosthetic fractures is not widely described in the literature. We present a difficult clinical scenario of a 72-year-old man who sustained a displaced distal humeral periprosthetic fracture about a Polarus Plus intramedullary nail. In this case, stable fixation was achieved using bicondylar Acumed Mayo congruent Plates using a miss-a-nail technique. Four months following the post operative period, the patient regained satisfactory range of movement with full function and no further complications up to 18 months post fixation. Treatment of such complex periprosthetic fractures is technically achievable and with potentially good results. PMID:19829846

  4. Attrition tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii in relation to humeral head osteonecrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2013-01-01

    This case report identifies a 41-year-old male patient who developed anterior shoulder pain in the setting of humeral head osteonecrosis. As a consequence of the cartilage degeneration, multiple loose bodies formed and migrated into the bicipital tendon sheath, causing attrition tendinitis, which was a feature of the clinical presentation. The patient was treated by a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral joint debridement and open tenodesis of the biceps using a suture anchor. Follow-up revealed asymptomatic shoulder function by 18 months. This is the first report in the literature of bicipital tendinitis in the context of avascular necrosis of the shoulder. PMID:24063803

  5. Elbow hemiarthroplasty for the management of distal humeral fractures: current technique, indications and results.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Joideep; Watts, Adam C; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing recent interest in the use of elbow hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of distal humeral trauma in select patients. However, the current available evidence regarding outcome after elbow hemiarthroplasty is limited to case series and biomechanical data. Consequently, the procedure remains unfamiliar to many surgeons. The aim of the present review is to outline the evidence regarding elbow hemiarthroplasty and to use this, along with the author's experience, to better describe the indications, surgical technique and outcomes after this procedure. PMID:27583016

  6. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb.

    PubMed

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A; Danish, Qazi

    2016-09-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  7. [Destruction of the Humeral Head in Sensory Deficit due to the Spinal Hemorhagia. Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kříž, J; Mikeš, J

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the shoulder are a common complication in patients after spinal cord injury. The main cause is chronic overload to the shoulder joint due to manual wheelchair propulsion and transfers. Reduced shoulder function has a significant impact on all aspects of daily life. Shoulder arthroplasty in this group of patients is a challenging procedure because of the unique demand on the shoulder. This report presents the case of a wheelchair user who additionally experienced a complete loss of sensation around her shoulder. As a result of a repetitive strain during transfers from the wheelchair to the ground, the humeral head was destroyed. PMID:26787187

  8. Forequarter Amputation and Immediate Reconstruction with a Free Extended Humeral-Radial Forearm Flap

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Absalon; Sanchez, Jair; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Eliseo; Tamez, Juan Carlos; Rangel, Jesus María

    2015-01-01

    A forequarter amputation is a radical ablative surgical procedure that includes the entire upper extremity with its shoulder girdle. We present a 53-year-old woman with a solid slow growing tumor in her right shoulder of 15 x 20 cm in diameter. Resection and immediate reconstruction with a free radial forearm flap extended from the distal third of the arm to the midpalmar region, taking the humeral artery and the cephalic vein as a main peddicle. The final outcome is shown at six weeks after the surgery. PMID:26893993

  9. A review of current surgical practice in the operative treatment of proximal humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L. D.; Palmer, A. J. R.; Macnair, R. D.; Brewer, P. E.; Jayadev, C.; Wheelton, A. N.; Ball, D. E. J.; Nandra, R. S.; Aujla, R. S.; Sykes, A. E.; Carr, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The PROximal Fracture of the Humerus: Evaluation by Randomisation (PROFHER) trial has recently demonstrated that surgery is non-superior to non-operative treatment in the management of displaced proximal humeral fractures. The objective of this study was to assess current surgical practice in the context of the PROFHER trial in terms of patient demographics, injury characteristics and the nature of the surgical treatment. Methods A total of ten consecutive patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of a proximal humeral fracture from each of 11 United Kingdom hospitals were retrospectively identified over a 15 month period between January 2014 and March 2015. Data gathered for the 110 patients included patient demographics, injury characteristics, mode of surgical fixation, the grade of operating surgeon and the cost of the surgical implants. Results A majority of the patients were female (66%, 73 of 110). The mean patient age was 62 years (range 18 to 89). A majority of patients met the inclusion criteria for the PROFHER trial (75%, 83 of 110). Plate fixation was the most common mode of surgery (68%, 75 patients), followed by intramedullary fixation (12%, 13 patients), reverse shoulder arthroplasty (10%, 11 patients) and hemiarthroplasty (7%, eight patients). The consultant was either the primary operating surgeon or supervising the operating surgeon in a large majority of cases (91%, 100 patients). Implant costs for plate fixation were significantly less than both hemiarthroplasty (p < 0.05) and reverse shoulder arthroplasty (p < 0.0001). Implant costs for intramedullary fixation were significantly less than plate fixation (p < 0.01), hemiarthroplasty (p < 0.0001) and reverse shoulder arthroplasty (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Our study has shown that the majority of a representative sample of patients currently undergoing surgical treatment for a proximal humeral fracture in these United Kingdom centres met the inclusion criteria for the PROFHER trial

  10. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb

    PubMed Central

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A.

    2016-01-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  11. Giant cell tumor of the humeral head treated by denosumab: Implication to shoulder surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ka Hei; Lam, Albert Ying Lee; Ho, Kenneth Wai Yip; Shek, Tony Wai Hung

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is a benign bone tumor that is commonly encountered. The optimal treatment of a giant cell tumor which causes extensive bony destruction is controversial. Recent studies on the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand antagonist denosumab may offer a new treatment option for these patients. We presented a patient with giant cell tumor of the humeral head. He was initially treated with denosumab and subsequently with the operation. The shoulder joint was successfully salvaged. But there are potential difficulties that surgeons may face in patients treated with denosumab. PMID:26622131

  12. Elbow hemiarthroplasty for the management of distal humeral fractures: current technique, indications and results

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Adam C; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-01-01

    There has been a growing recent interest in the use of elbow hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of distal humeral trauma in select patients. However, the current available evidence regarding outcome after elbow hemiarthroplasty is limited to case series and biomechanical data. Consequently, the procedure remains unfamiliar to many surgeons. The aim of the present review is to outline the evidence regarding elbow hemiarthroplasty and to use this, along with the author’s experience, to better describe the indications, surgical technique and outcomes after this procedure.

  13. Comparison of Accuracy of Uncorrected and Corrected Sagittal Tomography in Detection of Mandibular Condyle Erosions: an Exvivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Asieh Zamani; Shirani, Amir Mansour; Hekmatian, Ehsan; Valiani, Ali; Ardestani, Pegah; Vali, Ava

    2010-01-01

    Background: Radiographic examination of TMJ is indicated when there are clinical signs of pathological conditions, mainly bone changes that may influence the diagnosis and treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the validity and diagnostic accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomographic images in the detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions. Methods Simulated lesions were created in 10 dry mandibles using a dental round bur. Using uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography techniques, mandibular condyles were imaged by a Cranex Tome X-ray unit before and after creating the lesions. The uncorrected and corrected tomography images were examined by two independent observers for absence or presence of a lesion. The accuracy for detecting mandibular condyle lesions was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, and validity values. Differences between the two radiographic modalities were tested by Wilcoxon for paired data tests. Inter-observer agreement was determined by Cohen's Kappa. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and validity were 45%, 85% and 30% in uncorrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively, and 70%, 92.5% and 60% in corrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between the accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions (P = 0.016). The inter-observer agreement was slight for uncorrected sagittal tomography and moderate for corrected sagittal tomography. Conclusion: The accuracy of corrected sagittal tomography is significantly higher than that of uncorrected sagittal tomography. Therefore, corrected sagittal tomography seems to be a better modality in detection of mandibular condyle erosions. PMID:22013461

  14. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles.

    PubMed

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-11-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ∼ 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those > 4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  15. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles

    PubMed Central

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-01-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ∼ 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those > 4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  16. Finite element analysis of patient-specific condyle fracture plates: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Peter; Parr, William C H; Chamoli, Uphar; Wroe, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Various patterns of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures have been proposed in the literature. This study investigates the stability of two patient-specific implants (PSIs) for the open reduction and internal fixation of a subcondylar fracture of the mandible. A subcondylar fracture of a mandible was simulated by a series of finite element models. These models contained approximately 1.2 million elements, were heterogeneous in bone material properties, and also modeled the muscles of mastication. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. The stability and von Mises stresses of the simulated condylar fracture reduced with each of the PSIs were compared. The most stable of the plate configurations examined was PSI 1, which had comparable mechanical performance to a single 2.0 mm straight four-hole plate. PMID:26000081

  17. Preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for extracorporeal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Rajasekhar; Devireddy, Sathya Kumar; Venkata, Kishore Kumar Rayadurgam; Kanubaddy, Sridhar Reddy; Nemaly, Chaithanyaa; Dasari, Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Free grafting or extracorporeal fixation of traumatically displaced mandibular condyles is sometimes required in patients with severe anteromedial displacement of condylar head. Majority of the published studies report the use of a submandibular, retromandibular or preauricular incisions for the access which have demerits of limited visibility, access and potential to cause damage to facial nerve and other parotid gland related complications. Purpose: This retrospective clinical case record study was done to evaluate the preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid (P-TMAP) approach for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures of the mandible. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study involved search of clinical case records of seven patients with displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures treated by open reduction and extracorporeal fixation over a 3-year period. The parameters assessed were as follows: a) the ease of access for retrieval, reimplantation and fixation of the proximal segment; b) the postoperative approach related complications; c) the adequacy of anatomical reduction and stability of fixation; d) the occlusal changes; and the e) TMJ function and radiological changes. Results: Accessibility and visibility were good. Accurate anatomical reduction and fixation were achieved in all the patients. The recorded complications were minimal and transient. Facial nerve (buccal branch) palsy was noted in one patient with spontaneous resolution within 3 months. No cases of sialocele or Frey's syndrome were seen. Conclusion: The P-TMAP approach provides good access for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of severely displaced condylar fractures. It facilitates retrieval, transplantation, repositioning, fixing the condyle and also reduces the chances of requirement of a vertical ramus osteotomy. It gives straight-line access to condylar head and ramus thereby permitting

  18. Effect of Field of View on Detection of Condyle Bone Defects Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Maleki, Fatemeh Hafez; Farhadian, Maryam; Dashti, Gholamreza; Ostovarrad, Farzane; Ranjzad, Hadi

    2016-05-01

    In maxillofacial imaging, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is currently the modality of choice for assessment of bony structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Factors affecting the quality of CBCT images can change its diagnostic accuracy. This study aimed to assess the effect of field of view (FOV) and defect size on the accuracy of CBCT scans for detection of bone defects of the TMJs. This study was conducted on 12 sound TMJs of 6 human dry skulls. Erosions and osteophytes were artificially induced in 0.5, 1, and 1.5-mm sizes on the anterior-superior part of the condyle; CBCT scans were obtained with 6, 9, and 12-inch FOVs by NewTom 3G CBCT system. Two maxillofacial radiologists evaluated the presence/absence and type of defects on CBCT scans. The Cohen kappa was calculated to assess intra- and interobserver reliability. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to compare the diagnostic accuracy of different FOVs.In comparison of 6- and 12-inch, 9- and 12-inch FOVs in detection of different sizes of erosive lesions, difference was significant (P <0.05), whereas difference between 6- and 9 inch just in 0.5-mm erosive lesion was significant (P = 0.04). In comparison of 6- and 12-inch FOVs in detection of different sizes of osteophyte lesion, difference was significant (P < 0.05), whereas between 6- and 9-inch FOVs statistically significant difference was not observed (P > 0.05). The highest and the lowest diagnostic accuracy of CBCT scans for condyle defects were obtained with 6-inch and 12-inch FOVs, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of CBCT scans increased with an increase in size of bone defects. PMID:27092920

  19. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE CORTICOPERIOSTEAL FLAP OF THE MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rômulo Guimarães; Bufáiçal, Henrique Gubert; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Souza, Fabiano Inácio de; Kuwae, Mário Yoshihide; Teixeira da Silva, João Alírio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to perform the anatomical study, in cadavers, of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle, based on the medial genicular artery, evaluating challenges in dissection and the topographic patterns. Materials and methods: fifteen limbs from eight cadavers were studied, ages ranging from 19 to 74 years old. They were placed at supine position, and a longitudinal incision on the medial face of the lower part of the thigh was performed, exposing medial vastus and sartorius muscles, with descendent genicular vessels being also exposed. The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee, the diameter of the vessel, the length of the pedicle, and the presence of the fasciocutaneous branch and its location were analyzed. Results: the distance between the origin of the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee ranged from 11.2cm to 14.5cm, with an average of 12.63cm. The mean artery diameter was 2.5mm (from 2.25mm to 2.75mm). The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the fasciocutaneous branch ranged from 1.0 to 1.5cm. The mean length of the vascular pedicle was 7.01cm, ranging from 5.6cm to 8.6cm. Conclusion: the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle of the knee is easy to dissect, presents a constant vascular pedicle, with average length of 7.0cm and diameter of 2.5mm, enabling it to be indicated for microsurgical transplants. PMID:27004187

  20. Viscoelastic properties of the pig temporomandibular joint articular soft tissues of the condyle and disc.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Shinoda, M; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained loading condition such as clenching could compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular soft tissues. However, there is still no clear understanding of how the TM joint articular tissues respond under compression. To answer this question, we performed in vitro indentation tests on fresh articular discs and cartilage-bone systems of the condyles of 10 Yorkshire pigs (aged 7 months) using a self-developed indentation tester. The indenter was 5 mm in diameter and was controlled by means of a computer-aided feedback mechanism. Bilateral condyles from the same mandible were uniformly prepared; one was used for measurements under sustained compression (SC) and the other for measurements under intermittent compression (IC). The displacements of the indenter induced by a SC of 10, 20, and 30 Newtons (N, units of force) for 10 min and by an IC, also of 10, 20, and 30 N, with one-second duration and two-second intervals for 10 min were measured by means of a displacement sensor with a resolution of 0.001 mm. From these data, the indentation curves of the articular discs and the cartilage-bone systems were calculated. Both the disc and the articular cartilage showed characteristic displacement vs. time curves-namely, an instantaneous deformation upon load application, followed by a time-dependent creep phase of asymptotically increasing deformation under constant load. However, the indentation curves of the two tissues were not identical: The deformation of the articular cartilage was dose-dependent, but that of the disc was not. Moreover, the articular cartilage deformed significantly less under IC than under SC. This difference was not found in the disc. It can be concluded that both the disc and the articular cartilage of the pig temporomandibular joint have viscoelastic properties against compression; however, the disc is stiffer than the articular cartilage. PMID:9372793

  1. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  2. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  3. The lateral impaction of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Scarlat, M M; Cuny, C; Goldberg, B A; Harryman, D T; Matsen, F A

    1999-01-01

    17 patients had radiographic demonstration of injury to the clavicle, scapula and ribs from an impact delivered to the lateral shoulder. The study included 13 males and 4 females whose ages ranged from 18 to 83 years (average 45 years). Most injuries were sustained in falls or motor vehicle accidents. Analysis of these cases suggests a biomechanical hypothesis concerning the transmission of the impact forces within the shoulder girdle. According to this hypothesis, the impaction force applied to the lateral shoulder is transmitted from outside inward following two paths. The anterior and superior path passes through the acromio-clavicular joint, the clavicle, the costo-clavicular joint and the sterno-clavicular joint. The posterior and inferior path is transmitted within the gleno-humeral joint, the scapula and the scapulo-thoracic joint. Major impacting force is required to disrupt the anterior and posterior arches of the shoulder girdle. When both of these supporting structures are damaged, the patient is at risk for more serious injuries, including disruption of the thorax, shoulder joint, brachial plexus and neck. PMID:10653299

  4. Combined displaced fracture of the lesser humeral tuberosity and the scapular spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Michael; Moro, Fabrizio; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combined displaced fractures of the lesser humeral tuberosity and the scapular spine are highly uncommon and have not been previously reported in literature. Case presentation The authors report a novel case of a 24 year-old male who sustained displaced fractures of the lesser humeral tuberosity and the scapular spine. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) was performed with a LCP T-plate for the lesser tuberosity and with a LCP Distal Humerus Plate for the scapular spine. At one year, both fractures healed in anatomical alignment and the patient achieved good range of motion and a Constant score of 94 points. Discussion While isolated fractures of the scapular spine and the lesser tuberosity can be treated conservatively, combination fractures as in the present case are highly unstable. While sufficient evidence is lacking to favor surgical treatment over conservative management, ORIF provided sufficient stability for early mobilization and led to good clinical results. Conclusion Based on the favorable outcome of our case, we provide useful recommendations for surgeons faced with similar injuries. PMID:26188980

  5. Effect of calcium triphosphate cement on proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jim; Feerick, Emer; McGarry, Patrick; FitzPatrick, David; Mullett, Hannan

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To measure the effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement on the loads at the implant-bone interface of a proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis using a finite element analysis. METHODS. Finite element models of a 3-part proximal humeral fracture fixed with a plate with and without calcium triphosphate cement augmentation were generated from a quantitative computed tomography dataset of an intact proximal humerus. Material properties were assigned to bone fragments using published expressions relating Young's modulus to local Hounsfield number. Boundary conditions were then applied to the model to replicate the physiological loads. The effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement was analysed. RESULTS. When the void was filled with calcium triphosphate cement, the pressure gradient of the bone surrounding the screws in the medial fracture fragment decreased 97% from up to 21.41 to 0.66 MPa. Peak pressure of the fracture planes decreased 95% from 6.10 to 0.30 MPa and occurred along the medial aspect. The mean stress in the screw locking mechanisms decreased 78% from 71.23 to 15.92 MPa. The angled proximal metaphyseal screw had the highest stress. CONCLUSION. Augmentation with calcium triphosphate cement improves initial stability and reduces stress on the implant-bone interface. PMID:24014777

  6. Medial Calcar Support and Radiographic Outcomes of Plate Fixation for Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Tsai, Yao-Hung; Yang, Tien-Yu; Shen, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Mel S.

    2015-01-01

    Plate fixation remains one of the most popular surgical procedures for treating proximal humeral fractures (PHFx); however, substantial rates of complications have been reported in the literature. The objectives of the study were to examine how medial calcar support (MCS) affects the radiographic outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting treatment failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 89 adult patients who had PHFx and were treated with plate fixation at our institution in 2007–2011. The enrolled patients were separated into two groups according to disruption of medial calcar. Our results revealed an increased rate of poor radiographic outcomes in patients with disrupted medial calcar. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head and redisplacement were the two radiographic outcomes which had a positive causality with disruption of medial calcar (P = 0.008 and 0.050, resp.). Deficient medial calcar, inadequate reduction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and chronic liver disease were all significant predictors for the development of osteonecrosis in patients after PHFx surgery. Inadequate reduction was also a predictor for redisplacement. We confirmed that the restoration of medial calcar as well as comorbid conditions plays key roles in treatment of patients having PHFx with disrupted medial calcar. PMID:25692132

  7. Primum non nocere: a case of a humeral fracture in a patient with fibrodysplasia progressiva ossificans.

    PubMed

    Yewlett, Alun; Kitson, Jeff; Redfern, Andrew; Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia progressiva ossificans (FPO) is an extremely rare condition characterized by abnormal heterotopic bone formation. The condition is eponymously known as 'stoneman' disease because patients can become effectively entombed within abnormal heterotopic bone. We present the first known case of a diaphyseal humeral fracture managed conservatively in an adult patient with this condition. This patient already had a pre-existing bony bar from a fusion mass involving the thoracic spine, scapula and ribs to her proximal humerus splinting the arm in a position of adduction with the palm of her hand facing towards her groin. This patient also suffered a concomitant unstable cervical spinal fracture for which full spinal precautions were needed. As a result of the rapid bone forming nature of her condition, the humeral fracture was placed in a position where the hand would face outwards to make perineal care and personal hygiene easier in that the fracture was expected to unite in this new position as a result of her FPO. PMID:27582999

  8. A Case of Bilateral Anterior Gleno-Humeral Dislocation following First Time Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Wheelton, Andrew; Dowen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a seizure has recently been demonstrated as being more common than previously believed with 44 cases in the literature. This case is unique as it was caused by a first time seizure and there was no associated fracture of the humerus. Case Report: A previously fit and well 32 year old man presented to the Emergency Department following a convulsive episode. On initial assessment he was drowsy and the focus of investigation was the cause of the seizure, he was prepared for transfer to the medical ward. As he became more alert he complained of bilateral shoulder pain. Further clinical exam highlighted he had reduced range of movement in the shoulder joint bilaterally with a symmetrical clinical appearance of gleno-humeral dislocation. Radiographs confirmed bilateral anterior gleno-humeral dislocations which were reduced under sedation uneventfully. Conclusion: Post ictal patients can be difficult to assess when drowsy. Although not all seizures require musculoskeletal examination attending medical staff should remain vigilant to the possibility of injury following seizure to afford prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27299040

  9. Hemiarthroplasty for irreparable distal humeral fractures: medium-term follow-up of 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Nestorson, J; Ekholm, C; Etzner, M; Adolfsson, L

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of performing an elbow hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of comminuted distal humeral fractures in the elderly patients. A cohort of 42 patients (three men and 39 women, mean age 72; 56 to 84) were reviewed at a mean of 34.3 months (24 to 61) after surgery. Functional outcome was measured with the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of movement. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (DASH) was used as a patient rated evaluation. Complications and ulnar nerve function were recorded. Plain radiographs were obtained to assess prosthetic loosening, olecranon wear and heterotopic bone formation. The mean extension deficit was 23.5° (0° to 60°) and mean flexion was 126.8° (90° to 145°) giving a mean arc of 105.5° (60° to 145°). The mean MEPS was 90 (50 to 100) and a mean DASH score of 20 (0 to 63). Four patients had additional surgery for limited range of movement and one for partial instability. One elbow was revised due to loosening, two patients had sensory ulnar nerve symptoms, and radiographic signs of mild olecranon wear was noted in five patients. Elbow hemiarthroplasty for comminuted intra-articular distal humeral fractures produces reliable medium-term results with functional outcome and complication rates, comparable with open reduction and internal fixation and total elbow arthroplasty. PMID:26430013

  10. Comparison of humeral rotation co-activation of breast cancer population and healthy shoulders.

    PubMed

    Brookham, Rebecca L; Dickerson, Clark R

    2016-08-01

    Upper limb morbidities are common amongst the breast cancer population (BCP) and have a direct impact on independence. Comparing muscle co-activation strategies between BCP and healthy populations may assist in identifying muscle dysfunction and promote clinical interpretation of dysfunction, which could direct preventative and therapeutic interventions. The purposes of this study were to define humeral rotation muscle co-activation of a BCP and to compare it with a previously defined co-activation relationship of a healthy population. Fifty BCP survivors performed 18 isometric internal and external rotation exertions at various postures and intensities. Surface and intramuscular electrodes recorded shoulder muscle activity. BCP co-activation was predicted at r(2)=0.77 during both exertion types. Humeral abduction angle and task intensity were important factors in the prediction of co-activation in both populations. Comparisons made between populations identified differing muscle strategies used by BCP to maintain postural control. Compared to healthy co-activation, the BCP demonstrated greater activation of internal (IR) and external rotator (ER) type muscles during their respective rotation type. The BCP demonstrated increased (⩾8.7%) activation of pectoralis major. This study has provided insight into how BCP muscles compensate during dysfunction. Continued advancement of this knowledge can provide more understanding of dysfunction, promote generation of evidence-based therapies, and can be useful in biomechanical modeling. PMID:26296634

  11. Dependency between treatment outcome in pseudarthrosis of the humeral shaft and the surgical technique applied.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Maciej; Baczkowski, Bogusław; Markowicz, Agnieszka; Pankowski, Rafał; Luczkiewicz, Piotr

    2005-08-30

    Background. Treatment of non-union has always been one of the most difficult problems in bone pathology. In the present study we compare outcomes using 9 different methods of non-union treatment. Material and methods. From 1976 to 2003, 70 patients with 85 cases of pseudoarthrosis in the humeral shaft were operated. During that period, 103 operations using 9 different methods were performed. The study group consisted of 17 females, 36 males and 17 children, ranging in age from 3 to 85 years. The operation techniques were compared based on the achievement of bone union and recovery of limb functional efficiency. Nonunion type was also taken into account. Results. A high percentage of bone union was obtained by using a perforated block of corticocancellous graft taken from the iliac crest. The most complete limb function recovery was achieved using this method, as well as Judet's decortication with cancellous grafting and firm osteosynthesis. Conclusions. In oligotrophic and non-viable humeral shaft non-union, the most effective method is pseudarthrosis excision, using a perforated block of corticocancellous graft from the iliac crest to fill the gap, and firm osteosynthesis. Judet's decortication with cancellous grafting and firm osteosynthesis secured good outcome in hypertrophic pseudarthrosis. PMID:17611455

  12. Intraosseous ganglion cyst of the humeral head in a competitive flat water paddler: case report

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Brad; Kissel, Jaclyn A.; Yedon, Dominique Forand

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present the diagnostic and clinical features of an intraosseous ganglion cyst of the humeral head of a female flat water canoe athlete. Clinical Features An 18-year old female flat water canoeist complaining of right shoulder pain following a strenuous paddling training camp. Intervention and outcome A trial of passive care was conducted, including soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, and rehabilitation. The patient seemed to be responding with treatment, but pain would always resume with paddling. A diagnostic ultrasound displayed mild thickening and effusion in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursae. Continued passive care was not able to resolve the symptoms and she underwent an MRI which revealed an intraosseus ganglion cyst subjacent to the lesser tuberosity and floor of the intertubercular groove. A subsequent MRA was ordered to assess the labrum, which was intact, but the cyst had progressed in size. She was referred to an orthopedic surgeon who performed surgery. Conclusion An IOG cyst within the humeral head is a rare, potentially painful condition that can mimic other pathologies including impingement and labral tear. It is important to be aware of the clinical features to obtain a prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this condition. PMID:22131566

  13. Primum non nocere: a case of a humeral fracture in a patient with fibrodysplasia progressiva ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Kitson, Jeff; Redfern, Andrew; Smith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia progressiva ossificans (FPO) is an extremely rare condition characterized by abnormal heterotopic bone formation. The condition is eponymously known as ‘stoneman’ disease because patients can become effectively entombed within abnormal heterotopic bone. We present the first known case of a diaphyseal humeral fracture managed conservatively in an adult patient with this condition. This patient already had a pre-existing bony bar from a fusion mass involving the thoracic spine, scapula and ribs to her proximal humerus splinting the arm in a position of adduction with the palm of her hand facing towards her groin. This patient also suffered a concomitant unstable cervical spinal fracture for which full spinal precautions were needed. As a result of the rapid bone forming nature of her condition, the humeral fracture was placed in a position where the hand would face outwards to make perineal care and personal hygiene easier in that the fracture was expected to unite in this new position as a result of her FPO.

  14. Is MIPO in humeral shaft fractures really safe? Postoperative ultrasonographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, William; Andrade, Kleber; Zuiani, Guilherme; Pratali, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years there has been great interest in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. None of these studies showed the anatomical relationship between the radial nerve and the material of the implant in vivo. We performed postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of the distance between the radial nerve and the material implanted using the MIPO technique. Nineteen patients underwent postoperative ultrasound examinations. Group A comprised midshaft fractures and group B distal third fractures. The point of greatest proximity between the radial nerve and the implant was measured. In group A the distance was between 1.6 and 19.6 mm (mean: 9.3 mm) and in group B between 1.0 and 8.1 mm (mean: 4.0 mm). The ultrasound findings reveal that the radial nerve is quite close to the implant material, especially in the transition between the third and fourth quarters of the humeral shaft. PMID:18704415

  15. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in the treatment of proximal humeral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Leung, F.; Chan, C. F.; Chow, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    The management of fractures of the proximal shaft of the humerus has been evolving since the development of new techniques and new implants in recent years. It seems that this kind of fracture has an increasing incidence in the older, osteoporotic population. In the last 2 years, we have operated on 17 patients, with an average age of 65, who had proximal humeral shaft fractures treated by minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique using the metaphyseal locking compression plate. Our study evaluated the surgical technique used and the outcome for these patients with regards to their range of movement and shoulder function. Our results showed that all the patients could achieve at least 140º of shoulder abduction in the first 6 months after the operation, except for three patients who had shoulder impingement. These patients had an average Constant score of 76.8. All fractures had bony union at 6 months, except one, which was probably due to poor reduction in the initial operation. Another complication that we encountered was radial nerve neuropraxia. The ways to prevent these complications are discussed. In conclusion, MIPO fixation using the metaphyseal locking compression plate is a good option for the management of proximal humeral shaft fractures. It provides early functional recovery, but we had to pay special attention to some of the surgical details in order to minimise complications. PMID:17033765

  16. Reliability and accuracy of digital templating for the humeral component of total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Shane M; Lane, Christianne J; Koonce, Ryan C; Hartman, Andrew P; Ball, Kenneth; Esch, James C

    2014-01-01

    Background This experimental study evaluated the interobserver reliability and accuracy of pre-operative digital templating for humeral head size, stem size and neck angle for total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods Twenty-five patients underwent a total shoulder arthroplasty with a single prosthesis. Four independent, blinded surgeons (two experienced shoulder surgeons and two PGY-6 fellows) used pre-operative radiographs and templating software to generate templates of the humeral head, stem and neck for each patient. Interobserver reliability was calculated using weighted kappa (κ) analysis. Accuracy was assessed by comparing templates to actual implant sizes. Results Interobserver reliability was fair to substantial (κ = 0.26 to 0.71) for head size, fair to substantial (κ = 0.39 to 0.72) for stem size and slight to fair (κ = 0.16 to 0.34) for neck angle. Templated head size, stem size and neck angle had accuracies of 53%, 77% and 68% within one size variation, respectively. Experience did not affect accuracy (p = 0.11 to 0.48). Conclusions Digital templating is not a useful guide for pre-operative surgical planning and should not be used to select a prosthesis.

  17. LCP metaphyseal plate fixation for fractures of the distal third humeral shaft using brachialis splitting approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Yang, Dae Suk; Chang, Shann Haw; Choy, Won Sik

    2016-03-01

    The authors retrospectively studied the clinical and radiographic outcomes of locking compressive plate (LCP) metaphyseal plate fixation through the anterolateral approach in patients treated surgically for unstable distal third humeral shaft fractures. Twenty seven patients were treated surgically with LCP metaphyseal plate using brachialis splitting methods through the anterolateral approach. The mean arc of elbow motion was 132.4° with a mean flexion of 133.5° and mean flexion contracture of 1.1°. Three patients had a slight elbow flexion contracture with loss of 5° (n=1), 10° (n=1), and 15° (n=1) of extension. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 92.6 points, which corresponded to excellent results in 26 shoulders and a good result in one. The mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score was 90.7 points, which corresponded to excellent results in 24 elbows, a good result in 2, and a fair result in 1. Treatment of distal third humeral shaft fracture using LCP metaphyseal plate through the anterolateral approach is an acceptable and alternative method that can provide good results. PMID:26984659

  18. Atypically thick and high location of the Wrisberg ligament in patients with a complete lateral discoid meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Kwon, Jong Won

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the relationship between a discoid lateral meniscus and a thickened Wrisberg ligament with a higher location on the medial femoral condyle.Between July 2002 and February 2006, 100 consecutive patients who had a complete lateral discoid meniscus and another 100 patients without a discoid lateral meniscus (control group) were included. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all of the magnetic resonance images, paying particular attention to the presence and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament and the location of the attachment of the Wrisberg ligament to the medial femoral condyle (types I, II, or III). We assumed that type I Wrisberg ligaments had a higher location.All 141 patients had a Wrisberg ligament (71%). There were 73 patients (73%) in the discoid group and 68 patients (68%) in the non-discoid group. The mean thickness of the Wrisberg ligament in the patients in the discoid and non-discoid groups was 2.1 mm (range, 0.4-4.7 mm; median, 2.1 mm) and 1.6 mm (range, 0.4-4.5 mm; median, 1.3 mm), respectively. The Wrisberg ligaments of the discoid group were thicker than the non-discoid group (p = 0.0002). The Wrisberg ligament was attached to the upper part of the medial femoral condyle in the discoid group more often than in the non-discoid group (p < 0.0001). PMID:18622609

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelet Gel Improve Bone Deposition within CAD-CAM Custom-Made Ceramic HA Scaffolds for Condyle Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Ciocca, L.; Donati, D.; Ragazzini, S.; Dozza, B.; Rossi, F.; Fantini, M.; Spadari, A.; Romagnoli, N.; Landi, E.; Tampieri, A.; Piattelli, A.; Iezzi, G.; Scotti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of a regenerative approach using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and CAD-CAM customized pure and porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds to replace the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. Methods. Pure HA scaffolds with a 70% total porosity volume were prototyped using CAD-CAM technology to replace the two temporomandibular condyles (left and right) of the same animal. MSCs were derived from the aspirated iliac crest bone marrow, and platelets were obtained from the venous blood of the sheep. Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Sheep were sacrificed 4 months postoperatively. The HA scaffolds were explanted, histological specimens were prepared, and histomorphometric analysis was performed. Results. Analysis of the porosity reduction for apposition of newly formed bone showed a statistically significant difference in bone formation between condyles loaded with MSC and condyles without (P < 0.05). The bone ingrowth (BI) relative values of split-mouth comparison (right versus left side) showed a significant difference between condyles with and without MSCs (P < 0.05). Analysis of the test and control sides in the same animal using a split-mouth study design was performed; the condyle with MSCs showed greater bone formation. Conclusion. The split-mouth design confirmed an increment of bone regeneration into the HA scaffold of up to 797% upon application of MSCs. PMID:24073409

  20. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Konarik, Marek; Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the “radial artery with high origin”). Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus. PMID:25428677

  1. Humeral Head Arthroplasty and Meniscal Allograft Resurfacing of the Glenoid: A Concise Follow-up of a Previous Report and Survivorship Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bois, Aaron J; Whitney, Ian J; Somerson, Jeremy S; Wirth, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    The two to five-year results of humeral head arthroplasty and lateral meniscal allograft resurfacing of the glenoid in patients fifty-five years of age or younger were previously reported by the senior author (M.A.W.). The purpose of the present study was to report the survival rate, clinical findings, and radiographic results of the original thirty shoulders (thirty patients) followed for a mean duration of 8.3 years (range, five to twelve years). The scores on the visual analog scale for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scoring system, and Simple Shoulder Test were significantly improved at the latest follow-up evaluation compared with the preoperative findings (p < 0.001). Radiographic indices of posterior subluxation did not significantly increase from the immediate postoperative imaging to the latest radiographs, while the glenohumeral joint space demonstrated a gradual decrease. Nine (30%) of thirty shoulders were known to have undergone a reoperation. The present study demonstrated that biological glenoid resurfacing combined with hemiarthroplasty can provide significant improvement in shoulder function and pain relief in young patients with glenohumeral arthritis; however, mid-term follow-up at a mean of over eight years demonstrated a high reoperation rate. PMID:26446964

  2. Humeral cortical thickness in female Bantu - its relationship to the incidence of femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, R.A.; Pogrund, H.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the humeral cortical thickness demonstrate that generalised osteoporosis in female Bantu commences in the fifth decade and gradually increases until, in the ninth decade, all subjects are osteoporotic. The combined cortical thickness (CCT) of the humerus in young adults is very similar to that found previously in a white London population and the loss of cortex with age is very similar. It is concluded that the known low incidence of femoral neck fracture in Bantu is not due to a lower incidence of generalised osteoporosis but to environmental factors. The chief environmental factor postulated is the greater amount of physical work performed by the Bantu. A more careful mode of walking is suggested as a subsidiary cause.

  3. Computed modeling of humeral mid-shaft fracture treated by bundle nailing.

    PubMed

    Obruba, Petr; Capek, Lukas; Henys, Petr; Kopp, Lubomir

    2016-10-01

    Elastic bundle nailing is a method for simple humeral mid-shaft fracture osteosynthesis. The aim of our subsequent numerical simulations was to find out torsional and bending stiffness of an elastic bundle nailed humerus. Parametrical 3D numerical model was developed. The diameter of nails was the varying parameter of 1.8, 2.5, 3 and 4 mm. From our results can be seen that the bending stiffness in bundle nailing technique does not depend on nail diameter. On the contrary the torsional stiffness does highly depend on nail diameter. The dependency of the maximal stress on a nail diameter during bending and torsion of the humerus is non-linear. It can be seen that the higher diameter is used the higher stress occurs. Achieved results allow us for the recommendation of optimal nail diameter for this method, which lies between 2 and 3 mm. PMID:26828368

  4. Use of a Proximal Humeral Locking Plate for Complex Ankle and Hindfoot Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shearman, Alexander D; Eleftheriou, Kyriacos Iordanis; Patel, Akash; Pradhan, Rajib; Rosenfeld, Peter Francis

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the ankle and hindfoot in the setting of major deformity is challenging and associated with substantial risks. Patients often have significant comorbidities that lead to unforgiving soft tissues, poor vascularity, and poor bone quality. This creates the high-risk scenario of poor wound healing and poor implant fixation. Complications can be devastating, leading to loss of the limb and sepsis. The use of locking plate technology might provide biomechanical and operative technique advantages in such patients. We retrospectively assessed the results of the modified use of the PHILOS(™) (Synthes(®), Zuchwil, Switzerland) proximal humeral locking plate in 21 patients (11 males, 10 females; mean age 56.1 years, range 25 to 74 years) who had undergone complex fusions, including tibiotalar (n = 4), tibiocalcaneal (n = 7), or tibiotalocalcaneal (n =10) fusions. The average follow-up period was 14.6 (median 10, range 6 to 49) months. Of the 21 fusions, 18 achieved union (85.7%) at an average period of 4.8 (median 4.3, range 3 to 12) months. The overall deep infection rate was 14.3%. Overall, 17 of the 21 patients (81%) were satisfied with the result (good to excellent), 1 reported the result was fair (4.8%), and 3 patients developed nonunion and were dissatisfied with the procedure (14.3%). The present study is the largest series to date of patients undergoing complex ankle and hindfoot arthrodesis with the use of a proximal humeral locking plate and confirms previous findings that the technique is reliable with union, satisfaction, and complication rates comparable to those of other techniques. PMID:26875767

  5. OSTEOCHONDRAL INTERFACE REGENERATION OF THE RABBIT MANDIBULAR CONDYLE WITH BIOACTIVE SIGNAL GRADIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, Nathan H.; Busaidy, Kamal; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Tissue engineering solutions focused on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have expanded in number and variety over the past decade to address the treatment of TMJ disorders. The existing literature on approaches for healing small defects in the TMJ condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, however, is sparse. The purpose of this study was thus to evaluate the performance of a novel gradient-based scaffolding approach to regenerate osteochondral defects in the rabbit mandibular condyle. MATERIALS AND METHODS Miniature bioactive plugs for regeneration of small mandibular condylar defects in New Zealand White rabbits were fabricated. The plugs were constructed from poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres with a gradient transition between cartilage-promoting and bone-promoting growth factors. RESULTS At six weeks of healing, results suggested that the implants provided support for the neo-synthesized tissue as evidenced by histology and 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging. CONCLUSION The inclusion of bioactive factors in a gradient-based scaffolding design is a promising new treatment strategy for focal defect repair in the TMJ. PMID:21470747

  6. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  7. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  8. Finite element analysis of three patterns of internal fixation of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Peter; Chamoli, Uphar; Parr, William C H; Clausen, Philip D; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The most stable pattern of internal fixation for fractures of the mandibular condyle is a matter for ongoing discussion. In this study we investigated the stability of three commonly used patterns of plate fixation, and constructed finite element models of a simulated mandibular condylar fracture. The completed models were heterogeneous in the distribution of bony material properties, contained about 1.2 million elements, and incorporated simulated jaw-adducting musculature. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. This model was considerably larger and more complex than previous finite element models that have been used to analyse the biomechanical behaviour of differing plating techniques. The use of two parallel 2.0 titanium miniplates gave a more stable configuration with lower mean element stresses and displacements over the use of a single miniplate. In addition, a parallel orientation of two miniplates resulted in lower stresses and displacements than did the use of two miniplates in an offset pattern. The use of two parallel titanium plates resulted in a superior biomechanical result as defined by mean element stresses and relative movement between the fractured fragments in these finite element models. PMID:22981343

  9. Dental panoramic image analysis for enhancement biomarker of mandibular condyle for osteoporosis early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Azhari; Juliastuti, E.; Septyvergy, A.; Setyagar, N. P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease characterized by low Bone Mineral Density (BMD). Currently, a BMD level is determined by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) at the lumbar vertebrae and femur. Previous studies reported that dental panoramic radiography image has potential information for early osteoporosis detection. This work reported alternative scheme, that consists of the determination of the Region of Interest (ROI) the condyle mandibular in the image as biomarker and feature extraction from ROI and classification of bone conditions. The minimum value of intensity in the cavity area is used to compensate an offset on the ROI. For feature extraction, the fraction of intensity values in the ROI that represent high bone density and the ROI total area is perfomed. The classification will be evaluated from the ability of each feature and its combinations for the BMD detection in 2 classes (normal and abnormal), with the artificial neural network method. The evaluation system used 105 panoramic image data from menopause women which consist of 36 training data and 69 test data that were divided into 2 classes. The 2 classes of classification obtained 88.0% accuracy rate and 88.0% sensitivity rate.

  10. Combination of microvascular medial femoral condyle and iliac crest flap for hemi-midface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, C; Hachleitner, J; Buerger, H; Gaggl, A

    2015-06-01

    In midface defects including the orbit (Brown class III and IV), no single flap can provide adequate reconstruction. In this technical note, the combination of vascularized iliac crest flap and vascularized medial femoral condyle flap (MFC) is described. The vascularized iliac crest flap is reported to be the gold standard for maxilla reconstruction. There is, however, no consensus on the best method for orbital and nasal wall reconstruction. The MFC flap can be harvested as a thin corticoperiosteal flap or as an osteomyocutaneous flap. Due to the periosteal blood supply, this flap can be customized for an individual defect of the upper hemi-midface. It is therefore of great benefit in orbital and nasal wall reconstruction. By combining the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) bone flap and the MFC flap, the best standard reconstruction technique of the hemi-maxilla can be combined with a new anatomical precise microvascular reconstruction technique of the orbit. A nearly symmetric midface appearance can be achieved. PMID:25835757

  11. Vascularity Visualized by Doppler Sonography as a Predictor of Healing Potential of the OCD of the Humeral Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yoshikazu; Morihara, Toru; Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; Onishi, Okihiro; MInami, Masataka; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The significance of vascularity visualized by Doppler sonography in osteochondritis dissecance (OCD) lesion of the humeral capitellum is unclear. The objectives of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the relationship between Doppler ultrasound (US) signals observed in OCD lesion of the humeral capitellum and X-ray stage; 2) to determine if the presence of Doppler US signals in OCD lesion of the humeral capitellum could be the predictor of healing potential. Methods: Fifty patients with OCD of the humeral capitellum treated conservatively were enrolled in this study. During the conservative treatment period, Doppler sonography was performed on affected elbow to assess the presence of vascularity in the OCD lesion (Figure 1), and radiographic examination were evaluated on the same day to determine the X-ray stage (stage I: radiolucent stage, stage II: fragmentation stage, and stage III: loose body stage) of the OCD lesion (Figure 2). Radiographic examination of the elbow was examined after 6 weeks to evaluate the healing of the lesion. If the size of the lesion decreased or new bone formations were observed around the fragments, the healing of the lesion was considered to be improve. The χ2 test was used to determine if the presence of Doppler US signals were related to X-ray stage and the improvement of the healing. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The Doppler US signals in OCD lesions were positive in 23 patients and negative in 27 patients. Of these patients, 19 were X-ray stage I, 17 were stage II, and 9 were stage III. The healing of OCD lesions improved in 78.2% for the positive Doppler US signal group, but only 18.5% for the negative Doppler US signal group (Figure 3). The presence of the Doppler US signal was significantly related to the improvement of healing (P = 0.00002). The Doppler US signal were positive in 78.9% for stage I, 36.4% for stage II, and 0.0% for stage III (Figure 4). The presence of

  12. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles. PMID:25219775

  13. Bilateral humeral lengthening in achondroplasia with unilateral external fixators: is it safe and does it improve daily life?

    PubMed

    Balci, H I; Kocaoglu, M; Sen, C; Eralp, L; Batibay, S G; Bilsel, K

    2015-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed in 18 patients with achondroplasia, who underwent bilateral humeral lengthening between 2001 and 2013, using monorail external fixators. The mean age was ten years (six to 15) and the mean follow-up was 40 months (12 to 104). The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score fell from 32.3 (20 to 40) pre-operatively to 9.4 (6 to 14) post-operatively (p = 0.037). A mean lengthening of 60% (40% to 95%) was required to reach the goal of independent perineal hygiene. One patient developed early consolidation, and fractures occurred in the regenerate bone of four humeri in three patients. There were three transient radial nerve palsies. Humeral lengthening increases the independence of people with achondroplasia and is not just a cosmetic procedure. PMID:26530664

  14. A Randomized Cadaver Study Comparing First-Attempt Success Between Tibial and Humeral Intraosseous Insertions Using NIO Device by Paramedics

    PubMed Central

    Szarpak, Lukasz; Truszewski, Zenon; Smereka, Jacek; Krajewski, Paweł; Fudalej, Marcin; Adamczyk, Piotr; Czyzewski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medical personnel may encounter difficulties in obtaining intravenous (IV) access during cardiac arrest. The 2015 American Heart Association guidelines and the 2015 European Resuscitation Council guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) suggest that rescuers establish intraosseous (IO) access if an IV line is not easily obtainable. The aim of the study was to compare the success rates of the IO proximal tibia and proximal humerus head access performed by paramedics using the New Intraosseous access device (NIO; Persys Medical, Houston, TX, USA) in an adult cadaver model during simulated CPR. In an interventional, randomized, crossover, single-center cadaver study, a semi-automatic spring-load driven NIO access device was investigated. In total, 84 paramedics with less than 5-year experience in Emergency Medical Service participated in the study. The trial was performed on 42 adult cadavers. In each cadaver, 2 IO accesses to the humerus head, and 2 IO accesses to the proximal tibia were obtained. The success rate of the first IO attempt was 89.3% (75/84) for tibial access, and 73.8% (62/84) for humeral access (P = 0.017). The procedure times were significantly faster for tibial access [16.8 (interquartile range, IQR, 15.1–19.9] s] than humeral access [26.7 (IQR, 22.1–30.9) s] (P < 0.001). Tibial IO access is easier and faster to put in place than humeral IO access. Humeral IO access can be an alternative method to tibial IO access. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02700867. PMID:27196493

  15. TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC HUMERAL FRACTURES AND COMPLICATIONS USING THE OSTEOLINE® EXTERNAL FIXATOR: A TREATMENT OPTION

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Marcos Coelho; de Azevedo, Gualter Maldonado; Hayashi, Alexandre Yoshio; Dourado Nascimento, Paulo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results obtained from treatment of humeral shaft fractures and their complications using the Osteoline® uniplanar external fixator. Methods: The radiographic and functional results from 78 patients with humeral shaft fractures treated using the uniplanar external fixation technique were retrospectively assessed. The patients' ages ranged from 23 to 71 years, with a mean of 47 years. Male patients predominated (79%). Out of the 78 patients, 45 presented open fractures, 14 presented pseudarthrosis and six presented synthesis failure. There were no losses during the follow-up and all the patients were discharged after fracture consolidation and functional recovery. The results were evaluated based on the studies by Catagni, as good, fair or poor. Results: Fracture consolidation was observed in 98% of the cases treated with uniplanar external fixation. Only one pseudarthrosis case required conversion to rigid internal fixation and autologous bone grafting. At the end of the treatment, all the patients were discharged with consolidated fractures, without pain, and good limb function. Conclusion: The external fixation described in this paper was shown to be an efficient and safe method for treating humeral shaft fractures and their complications. It preserved the local biological status and enabled passive and active movement immediately after surgery. PMID:27027026

  16. Mapping the Articular Contact Area of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon on the Humeral Head

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brent J.; Byram, Ian R.; Lathrop, Ray A.; Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB) in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P = 0.002) with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%). Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho = 1, P = 0.017) as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho = 0.97, P = 0.005). The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver. PMID:25210631

  17. Preliminary results from osteosynthesis using Ender nails by means of a percutaneous technique, in humeral diaphysis fractures in adults☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flávio de Oliveira; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; Correa, Guilherme de Almeida Sellos; Maia, Lucas Russo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the clinical and functional results from treatment of humeral diaphysis fractures using Ender nails. Methods Eighteen patients who underwent osteosynthesis of humeral diaphysis fractures using Ender nails were evaluated. In addition to the clinical and radiographic evaluations, patients with a minimum of one year of follow-up were assessed by means of the Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Mayo Clinic and Simple Shoulder Value (SSV) functional scores, and in relation to the degree of satisfaction with the final result. The fixation technique used was by means of an anterograde percutaneous route. Results All the patients achieved fracture consolidation, after a mean of 2.9 months (ranging from 2 to 4 months). The mean Constant score was 85.7 (ranging from 54 to 100) and the mean ASES score was 95.9 (ranging from 76 to 100). All the patients achieved the maximum score on the Mayo Clinic scale. Conclusion Fixation of humeral diaphysis fractures using Ender nails by means of a percutaneous technique was shown to be a method with promising preliminary results. PMID:26417566

  18. Evaluation of Tibial Condyle Fractures Treated with Ilizarov Fixation, A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy R, Sandeep; Shah, Harshad M; Golla, Dinesh Kumar; Ganesh D J, Niranthara; Kumar P, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tibial plateau fractures are associated with significant soft tissue injuries which increases the risks of complications and must be considered when managing tibial plateau fractures. Various modalities of treatment are available for treatment of these fractures but Ilizarov fixation has a special advantage over others. Review of literature shows many studies of Ilizarov fixation in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures with variable results. Aim of our study was to evaluate tibial condyle fractures treated by Ilizarov fixation. Materials and Methods: Study included 43 patients with Schatzker type II and above tibial plateau fractures treated by ilizarov fixation. Standard trauma evaluation, a meticulous musculoskeletal and neurologic examination was carried out. All patients underwent Ilizarov fixation by same team of surgeons. Clinicoradilogical assessment of the patients carried out at regular intervals. Results: Our study included 43 cases of tibial plateau of various types except type I. Mean time for radiological union was 24.51 wk (range 15 to 32 wk). Mean fixator period was 26.6 wk( 16-34 wk). The functional results were measured by Lyshom’s and Hohl and Luck score. The mean Lyshom’s score was at the end of one year was 82.16. At end of one year by Hohl and Luck grading 11 patients had fair, 23 had good and 9 had excellent results. Conclusion: High energy tibial plateau fractures can be definitively treated with Ilizarov external fixation. Treatment with this method gives good union rates and less risk of infection. Closed reduction, minimal soft tissue damage and early mobilization are the key to low complications. PMID:25584250

  19. Fractures of the occipital condyle clinical spectrum and course in eight patients

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Antonio; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Frangen, Thomas; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Kühne, Christian; Junge, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) are considered to be rare injuries. OCFs are now diagnosed more often because of the widespread use of computed tomography. Our aim is to report the incidence, treatment and long term outcome of 8 patients with OCFs. Materials and Methods: All patients presenting with multiple trauma from 1993 to 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Characteristics and course of the treatment were evaluated. Follow-up was performed after 11,7 years (range 5,9 to 19,3 years). Results: Nine cases of OCF in 8 patients were identified. All injuries resulted from high velocity trauma. The average scores on the ISS Scale were 39,6 (24-75) and 7,3 (3-15) on the GCS. According to Anderson's classification, 5 cases of Type III and 4 cases of Type I fractures were identified. According to Tuli's classification, 5 cases of Type IIA and 4 cases of Type I were found. Indications for immobilization with the halo-vest were type III injuries according to Anderson's classification or Tuli's type IIA injuries, respectively. Patients with Tuli's type I injuries were treated with a Philadelphia collar for 6 weeks. In one patient with initial complete tetraplegia and one with incomplete neurological deficits the final follow-up neurologic examination showed no neurological impairment at all (Frankel-grade A to E, respectively B to E). At follow-up, 3 patients were asymptomatic. Four patients suffered from mild pain when turning their head, pain medication was necessary in one case only. Discussion: OCF's are virtually undetectable using conventional radiography. In cases of high velocity, cranio-cervical trauma or impaired consciousness, high resolution CT-scans of the craniocervical junction must be performed. We suggest immobilization using a halo device for type III injuries according to Anderson's classification or Tuli's type IIa injuries, respectively. Patients with Tuli's type I injuries should be treated with a Philadelphia collar. PMID:24744561

  20. Developed Design for Humeral Head Replacement Using 3D Surface Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of dimensional and geometrical data on the humeral head replacement (HHR) objects is essential for solving the relevant designing problems in the physics of reverse engineering (RE). In this work, 2D-assessment for human humerus was performed using the computed tomography (CT) technique within the RE plan, after which the 2D images of humeral objects were converted into 3D images. The conversion was successful and indicated a clear difference in the 2D and 3D estimates of sizes and geometry of the humerus. The authors have analyzed and confirmed experimentally the statistical information on the relevant anatomical objects. The results of finite-element simulation of the compressive stresses affecting the geometry of 3D surface mapping were analyzed using SolidWorks software. For developing the biomechanical design of an HHR object suitable biomaterials were selected, and different metal-based biomaterials are discussed as applied at various loads. New methodology is presented for the size estimation of humeral head - both anatomical and artificial - in 3D-shape. A detailed interpretation is given for the results of CT D-measurements. Izmēru un ģeometrisko datu novērtējums, kas attiecas uz pleca kaula galviņas nomaiņas (PKGN) objektiem, nepieciešams, lai risinātu virkni reversīvās inženierijas (RI) problēmu. Šajā darbā cilvēka pleca kaula galviņas divdimensiju novērtējums tika veikts ar datortomogrāfijas palīdzību (RI) ietvaros, un pēc tam objekta divdimensiju attēlojums tika pārveidots trīsdimensiju. Pārveidojums bija sekmīgs, parādot pleca kaula galviņas izmēru un ģeometrijas atšķirības starp 2D un 3D novērtējumiem. Autori izanalizēja un eksperimentāli apstiprināja statistisko informāciju pēc dotā veida anatomiskiem objektiem. Saspiešanas sasprindzinājumi, kuri ietekmē trīsdimensiju virsmas attēlojuma ģeometriju, tika analizēti ar gala-elementu simulācijas metodi, lietojot programmu Solid

  1. Treatment of the humeral shaft fractures - minimally invasive osteosynthesis with bridge plate versus conservative treatment with functional brace: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Humeral shaft fractures account for 1 to 3% of all fractures in adults and for 20% of all humeral fractures. Non-operative treatment is still the standard treatment of isolated humeral shaft fractures, although this method can present unsatisfactory results. Surgical treatment is reserved for specific conditions. Modern concepts of internal fixation of long bone shaft fractures advocate relative stabilisation techniques with no harm to fracture zone. Recently described, minimally invasive bridge plate osteosynthesis has been shown to be a secure technique with good results for treating humeral shaft fractures. There is no good quality evidence advocating which method is more effective. This randomised controlled trial will be performed to investigate the effectiveness of surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures with bridge plating in comparison with conservative treatment with functional brace. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial aims to include 110 patients with humeral shaft fractures who will be allocated after randomisation to one of the two groups: bridge plate or functional brace. Surgical treatment will be performed according to technique described by Livani and Belangero using a narrow DCP plate. Non-operative management will consist of a functional brace for 6 weeks or until fracture consolidation. All patients will be included in the same rehabilitation program and will be followed up for 1 year after intervention. The primary outcome will be the DASH score after 6 months of intervention. As secondary outcomes, we will assess SF-36 questionnaire, treatment complications, Constant score, pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and radiographs. Discussion According to current evidence shown in a recent systematic review, this study is one of the first randomised controlled trials designed to compare two methods to treat humeral shaft fractures (functional brace and bridge plate surgery). Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN

  2. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A lateral orientation is a position away from the midline of the body. For instance, the arms are lateral to the ... ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the ...

  3. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD. PMID:7610780

  4. Conservative condylectomy alone for the correction of mandibular asymmetry caused by osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: a report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jae-Young; Jeong, Chan-Woo; Park, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience with conservative condylectomy for the correction of facial asymmetry in five patients with osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle. All five patients presented with malocclusion and facial asymmetry, which are common clinical findings of osteochondroma involving the mandibular condyle. We performed conservative condylectomy without additional orthognathic surgery for all five patients, preserving the vertical height of the condylar process as much as possible. Following surgery, intermaxillary traction using a skeletal anchorage system with rubber elastics was performed on all patients to improve occlusion, and, when necessary, additional minimal orthodontic treatment was performed. The mean follow-up period was 42 months. At the last follow-up visit, all patients exhibited satisfactory facial symmetry and remodeling of the remaining condyle, with stable health and no signs of recurrence. In conclusion, conservative condylectomy alone, without subsequent orthognathic surgery, is adequate for the restoration of facial symmetry and the preservation of vertical condylar height in select patients with condylar osteochondroma. PMID:26568928

  5. Radiographic knee dimensions in discoid lateral meniscus: comparison with normal control.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Moon, S H; Shin, S J

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the knee radiographs of 68 cases of arthroscopically proven discoid lateral meniscus, including 42 cases of complete type and 26 cases of incomplete type discoid lateral meniscus. Knee radiographs of 70 cases that had no arthroscopic evidence of pathology of the meniscus were used as controls. We excluded patients who had significant trauma history and who were under 16 years of age or over 60 years to avoid measuring radiographs of skeletally immature or degenerative knees. The absolute values and relative normalized values of specific knee dimensions, such as a squared-off appearance of the lateral femoral condyle, widened femorotibial joint space, cupping of the lateral tibial plateau, obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau articular surface, high fibular head, and hypoplasia of the lateral intercondylar spine, were compared between the patients with discoid lateral meniscus and the normal controls. Among those dimensions, high fibular head and widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space showed statistically significant differences between the discoid lateral meniscus group and normal control group. We suggest that these findings would be useful in screening lateral discoid meniscus on plain radiography. PMID:10882447

  6. Treatment of distal humeral fractures using conventional implants. Biomechanical evaluation of a new implant configuration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the face of costly fixation hardware with varying performance for treatment of distal humeral fractures, a novel technique (U-Frame) is proposed using conventional implants in a 180° plate arrangement. In this in-vitro study the biomechanical stability of this method was compared with the established technique which utilizes angular stable locking compression plates (LCP) in a 90° configuration. Methods An unstable distal 3-part fracture (AO 13-C2.3) was created in eight pairs of human cadaveric humeri. All bone pairs were operated with either the "Frame" technique, where two parallel plates are distally interconnected, or with the LCP technique. The specimens were cyclically loaded in simulated flexion and extension of the arm until failure of the construct occurred. Motion of all fragments was tracked by means of optical motion capturing. Construct stiffness and cycles to failure were identified for all specimens. Results Compared to the LCP constructs, the "Frame" technique revealed significant higher construct stiffness in extension of the arm (P = 0.01). The stiffness in flexion was not significantly different (P = 0.16). Number of cycles to failure was found significantly larger for the "Frame" technique (P = 0.01). Conclusions In an in-vitro context the proposed method offers enhanced biomechanical stability and at the same time significantly reduces implant costs. PMID:20684752

  7. Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the MTM-classification for proximal humeral fractures: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bahrs, Christian; Schmal, Hagen; Lingenfelter, Erich; Rolauffs, Bernd; Weise, Kuno; Dietz, Klaus; Helwig, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background A precise modular topographic-morphological (MTM) classification for proximal humeral fractures may address current classification problems. The classification was developed to evaluate whether a very detailed classification exceeding the analysis of fractured parts may be a valuable tool. Methods Three observers classified plain radiographs of 22 fractures using both a simple version (fracture displacement, number of parts) and an extensive version (individual topographic fracture type and morphology) of the MTM classification. Kappa-statistics were used to determine reliability. Results An acceptable reliability was found for the simple version classifying fracture displacement and fractured main parts. Fair interobserver agreement was found for the extensive version with individual topographic fracture type and morphology. Conclusion Although the MTM-classification covers a wide spectrum of fracture types, our results indicate that the precise topographic and morphological description is not delivering reproducible results. Therefore, simplicity in fracture classification may be more useful than extensive approaches, which are not adequately reliable to address current classification problems. PMID:18279527

  8. The effect of digitisation of the humeral epicondyles on quantifying elbow kinematics during cricket bowling.

    PubMed

    Eftaxiopoulou, Theofano; Gupte, Chinmay M; Dear, John P; Bull, Anthony M J

    2013-01-01

    In the sport of cricket the objective of the "no-ball" law is to allow no performance advantage through elbow extension during ball delivery. However, recently it has been shown that even bowlers with actions that are considered within the law show some elbow extension. The objective of this study was to investigate: [1] the effect of elbow orientation during anatomical landmark digitisation and [2] the choice of upper arm tracking cluster on the measurement of elbow angles during cricket bowling. We compared the mean elbow angles for four different elbow postures; with the joint flexed at approximately 130°, 90°, in full extension and with the elbow flexed with the humerus internally rotated, and two upper arm clusters in two different situations: [1] during a controlled movement of pure flexion-extension and [2] during cricket bowling. The digitised postures of the anatomical landmarks where the elbow was extended and at 90° of flexion were more repeatable than the other two postures. The recommendation of this study when analysing cricket bowling is to digitise the humeral epicondyles with the joint flexed at 90°, or in full extension, and to relate their positions to an upper arm cluster fixed close to the elbow. PMID:23879677

  9. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K.

    2016-01-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  10. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humeral shaft fractures: are results reproducible?

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Juan M.; Sandoval, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been advocated as a safe approach to humeral shaft fracture management. We evaluated the reproducibility of this technique in a regional hospital. Thirty-five patients underwent MIPO of humerus shaft fractures. Fifteen patients had an open fracture, six a preoperative radial nerve palsy, and nine a concomitant thoracic, musculoskeletal or vascular injury. At an average 12-month follow-up, 91% of fractures healed after a mean of 12 weeks (range, 8–16). Two infections occurred. Final alignment averaged 4° of varus (range, 5° of valgus to 20° of varus). Active elbow ROM averaged 114° (range, 60–135°) and was less than 100° in nine elbows. Five of six preoperative radial nerve injuries recovered spontaneously. Healing and infection rates in this study are consistent with those reported in the literature. Lower elbow ROM and higher fracture angulation at healing were nevertheless found. MIPO is technically demanding and requires adequate intraoperative imaging and surgical experience in order to obtain adequate fracture alignment. Brachialis muscle scarring and inadequate postoperative rehabilitation may be involved in limited elbow range of motion. PMID:19844708