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Sample records for lateral lumbar disc

  1. Feasibility and Efficacy of Percutaneous Lateral Lumbar Discectomy in the Treatment of Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenjin; Sun, Bolin; Sheng, Qirui; Song, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yanbo; Wang, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous lateral lumbar discectomy (PLLD) in treating patients with lumber disc herniation. Methods. A total of 183 patients with lumbar disc herniation were recruited to receive PLLD surgery from April 2006 to October 2011. All the adverse effects were recorded during the follow-up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after PLLD. The clinical outcomes were determined by visual analog scale and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. Results. The surgery was performed successfully in all patients (102 males and 81 females aged from 21 to 66 years) with a mean 16.6-month follow-up (range from 26 to 65 months). No postoperative complications, including intestinal and vascular complications, nerve injuries, and postoperative infections, were associated with PLLD. At one month after surgery, visual analog scale (3.12±1.44 versus 6.76±2.31, P<0.05) was significantly lower than the baseline and was sustained until 24 months after surgery (3.25 ± 1.78 versus 6.76±2.31, P<0.05). Besides that, Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (25.25±3.21 versus 11.78±2.38, P<0.05) was increased when compared to the baseline. Conclusions. PLLD was a promising, mini-invasive, and effective treatment for lumber disc herniation. PMID:25695066

  2. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  3. Herniated lumbar disc

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgery for herniated lumbar disc? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 37 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdiscectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction. PMID:21711958

  4. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  5. A Modified Approach of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy (PELD) for Far Lateral Disc Herniation at L5-S1 with Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Chun, Eun Hee; Park, Hahck Soo

    2016-01-01

    Foraminal or extraforaminal Far Lateral Disc Herniations (FLDH) extending into or beyond the foraminal zone have been recognized as between 7-12% of all lumbosacral disc herniations. Conventional posterior laminectomy may not provide good access to a herniation that lies far lateral to the lateral margin of the pedicle. Use of the endoscopic technique through a percutaneous approach to treat such FLDH patients can decrease the surgical morbidity while achieving better outcomes. We made an effort to utilize the advantages of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and to determine the appropriate approach for FLDH at the level between the 5th Lumbar and first Sacral vertebrae(L5-S1). The authors present a case of an endoscopically resected lumbar extruded disc of the left extraforaminal zone with superior foraminal migration at the level of L5-S1, which had led to foot drop, while placing the endoscope in the anterior epidural space without facetectomy. PMID:26839673

  6. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  7. Intradural herniation of lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C J; Binet, E F; Kieffer, S A

    1978-12-01

    A case of intradural rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disc is reported, and the literature is reviewed. The majority of intradural disc herniations occur at the L4--5 level. These patients usually have neurologic deficits more severe than those found in the much more common extradural disc herniations. The myelographic picture varies from an irregularly marginated intradural lesion overlying the disc space to a complete block. The common factor allowing intradural disc herniation is probably dense adhesions between the dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament, preventing the more common lateral extradural disc herniation. Intradural disc herniation should be included in the differential diagnosis of lumbar intradural lesions causing nerve root or cauda equina compression. PMID:741242

  8. The importance of the anterior longitudinal ligament in lumbar disc arthroplasty: 36-Month follow-up experience in extreme lateral total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Current total disc replacement (TDR) for lumbar spine requires an anterior approach for implantation but presents inherent limitations, including risks to the abdominal structures, as well as resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament. By approaching the spine laterally, it is possible to preserve the stabilizing ligaments, which are a natural restraint to excessive rotations and translations, and thereby help to minimize facet stresses. This less invasive approach also offers a biomechanical advantage of placement of the device over the ring apophysis bilaterally; importantly, it also offers a greater opportunity for safer revision surgery, if necessary, by avoiding scarring of the anterior vasculature. We present the clinical and radiologic results of a lateral TDR device from a prospective single-center study. Methods A new metal-on-metal TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoatic approach (extreme lateral interbody fusion) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion) outcome assessments were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially up to a minimum of 36 months’ follow-up. Results Between December 2005 and December 2006, 36 surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age, 42.6 years). These included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, 3 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 (17) or L3-4 (1). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with mean blood loss of 60 mL and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative X-rays showed good device placement, with restoration of disc height, foraminal volume, and sagittal balance. All patients were up and walking within 12 hours of surgery, and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of those 9 were

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  10. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  11. The Surgical Treatment of Single Level Multi-Focal Subarticular and Paracentral and/or Far-Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniations: The Single Incision Full Endoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David L.; Han, Xiao; Yacob, Alem

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery for same level multi-focal extruded lumbar disc herniations is technically challenging and the optimal method controversial. The subarticular disc herniation may pose the most challenging subtype requiring partial or complete facetectomy with or without fusion. The far-lateral disc herniation, often treated using a Wiltse approach, can also be difficult to access especially in the obese patient. When both the subarticular and far-lateral subtypes are simultaneously present at the same level with or without a paracentral disc herniation, a total facetectomy and interbody fusion (TLIF) or a total disc replacement (TDR) may be necessary. Endoscopic surgical techniques may reduce the need for these more invasive methods. Methods Fifteen patients (6 male and 9 female) who had same level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) extruded disc herniations underwent single incision unilateral endoscopic disc excision by the same surgeon at a single institution. Patients were prospectively followed for an average of 15.3 months (range 14-18 months) and outcomes were evaluated radiographically and clinically (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results The mean operative time was 52 minutes with minimal blood loss in all cases. Fourteen of the 15 patients were discharged to home on the day of their surgery. The mean ODI and leg VAS scores improved from 22.9 ± 3.2 to 12.9 ± 2.7 (p < 0.005), and from 8.6 ± 1.6 to 2.1 + 0.4 (p < 0.005), respectively. Conclusions After an average of 15.3 months of follow-up, the clinical and radiographic results of full endoscopic surgical treatment of single level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) disc herniations are excellent. This study is a case series with mid-term follow-up (Level IV). Clinical Relevance Foraminal and extra-foraminal full endoscopic decompression appears to offer a safe minimally invasive solution to a complex

  12. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  15. Postero-Lateral Disc Prosthesis Combined With a Unilateral Facet Replacement Device Maintains Quantity and Quality of Motion at a Single Lumbar Level

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Aniruddh N.; Doarn, Michael C.; Gaskins, Roger B.; James, Chris R.; Cabezas, Andres F.; Castellvi, Antonio E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanically replacing one or more pain generating articulations in the functional spinal unit (FSU) may be a motion preservation alternative to arthrodesis at the affected level. Baseline biomechanical data elucidating the quantity and quality of motion in such arthroplasty constructs is non-existent. Purpose The purpose of the study was to quantify the motion-preserving effect of a posterior total disc replacement (PDR) combined with a unilateral facet replacement (FR) system at a single lumbar level (L4-L5). We hypothesized that reinforcement of the FSU with unilateral FR to replace the resected, native facet joint following PDR implantation would restore quality and quantity of motion and additionally not change biomechanics at the adjacent levels. Study Design In-vitro study using human cadaveric lumbar spines. Methods Six (n = 6) cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-S1) were evaluated using a pure-moment stability testing protocol (±7.5 Nm) in flexion-extension (F/E), lateral bending (LB) and axial rotation (AR). Each specimen was tested in: (1) intact; (2) unilateral FR; and (3) unilateral FR + PDR conditions. Index and adjacent level ROM (using hybrid protocol) were determined opto-electronically. Interpedicular travel (IPT) and instantaneous center of rotation (ICR) at the index level were radiographically determined for each condition. ROM, ICR, and IPT measurements were compared (repeated measures ANOVA) between the three conditions. Results Compared to the intact spine, no significant changes in F/E, LB or AR ROM were identified as a result of unilateral FR or unilateral FR + PDR. No significant changes in adjacent L3-L4 or L5-S1 ROM were identified in any loading mode. No significant differences in IPT were identified between the three test conditions in F/E, LB or AR at the L4-L5 level. The ICRs qualitatively were similar for the intact and unilateral FR conditions and appeared to follow placement (along the anterior-posterior (AP) direction) of

  16. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  17. Progression of a lumbar disc extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael S; Alitz, Curtis

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 34-year-old woman who was referred to a physical therapist for a chief complaint of progressively worsening right buttock pain with paresthesias of the right posterior thigh and calf. Prior magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed a large left paracentral disc extrusion at L5-S1. Following physical therapist intervention, the patient reported a new onset of left posterior thigh pain, with paresthesias of the dorsolateral aspect of the left foot. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed an increase in the size of the disc extrusion at L5-S1. PMID:25361862

  18. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  19. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  20. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  1. New Diagnostic Tool for Far Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniation : The Clinical Usefulness of 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Myelography Comparing with the Discography CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Gyu; Park, Jung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess the diagnostic and clinical value of a new technique (3-tesla magnetic resonance myelography, 3T MRM) as compared to computed tomographic discography (disco-CT) in patients with far lateral disc herniation. Methods We evaluated 3T MRM and disco-CT of 25 patients, whom we suspected of suffering from far lateral disc herniation. Using an assessment scale, 4 observers examined independently both 3T MRM and disco-CT images. We analyzed observer agreement and the accentuation of each image. Results We found complete matching, and observer agreement, between high resolution images of 3T MRM and disco-CT for diagnosing far lateral disc herniation. Conclusion We think noninvasive 3T MRM is an appropriate diagnostic tool for far lateral disc herniation as compared to disco-CT. PMID:23091667

  2. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  3. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  4. Prosthetic lumbar disc replacement for degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Arvind G; Diwan, Ashish D

    2005-12-01

    Mechanical articulated device to replace intervertebral disc as a treatment for low back pain secondary to disc degeneration has emerged as a promising tool for selected patients. The potential advantages are prevention of adjacent segment degeneration, maintenance of mobility as well as avoidance of all the complications associated with fusion. The short-term results have been comparable to that of fusion, a few mid-term results have shown mixed outcome, but information on long-term results and performance are not available at present. The rationale for lumbar disc arthroplasty, indications, contraindications, the various artificial devices in the market and the concepts intrinsic to each of them, basic technique of insertion, complications are discussed and a brief summary of our experience with one of the devices is presented. PMID:16565543

  5. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals. PMID:17767079

  6. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy. PMID:27534095

  7. Symptomatic Pneumocephalus after Lumbar Disc Surgery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Ismailoglu, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic pneumocephalus is frequently seen after traumatic fracture of the skull base bone. However, it has rarely been reported after spinal surgery and its mechanism has not been fully explained. In this paper, we present a 30 year old male patient who had lumbar discectomy due to a symptomatic midline lumbar disc herniation. He had developed symptomatic pneumocephalus after the lumbar disc surgery associated with application of a vacuum suction device. We present and discuss our patient in the light of the literatures.

  8. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  9. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  10. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  11. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  12. Two-level total lumbar disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Vommaro, Francesco; Parisini, Patrizio

    2009-01-01

    Total lumbar disc replacement (TDR) has been widely used as a treatment option for 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease. However, recent studies have presented conflicting results and some authors concluded that outcome deteriorated when disc replacement was performed bisegmentally, with an increase of complications for bisegmental replacements in comparison with monosegmental disc arthroplasty. The goal of the present retrospective study is to investigate results in a group of patients who have received bisegmental TDR with SB Charitè III artificial disc for degenerative disc disease with a minimum follow-up of 3 years, and to compare the results of 2-level disc replacement versus 1-level patients treated with the same prosthesis. A total of 32 patients had at least 3-years follow-up and were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 38.5 years. There were 11 males and 21 females. About 16 patients received 2-level TDR (SB Charitè III) and 16 received 1-level TDR (SB Charitè III). Both radiographic and functional outcome analysis, including patient’s satisfaction, was performed. There were no signs of degenerative changes of the adjacent segments in any case of the 2- or 1-level TDR. There was no statistically significant difference between 2- and 1-level TDR both at 12 months and at 3-years follow-up on functional outcome scores. There was a statistically insignificant difference concerning the patients satisfaction between 1- and 2-level surgeries at the last follow-up (P = 0.46). In the 2-level TDR patients, there were 5 minor complications (31.25%), whereas major complications occurred in 4 more patients (25%) and required a new surgery in 2 cases (12.5%). In the 1-level cases there were 2 minor complications (12.5%) and 2 major complications (12.5%) and a new revision surgery was required in 1 patient (6.25%). In conclusion, the use of 2-level disc replacement at last follow-up presented a higher incidence of complications than in cases

  13. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  14. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  15. [Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2014-12-10

    A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

  16. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  17. Intradural lumbar disc herniations: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J; Schattke, H H

    1995-09-01

    Intradural lumbar disc herniation is a rare pathological entity. Three new cases among a series of 5000 lumbar spine operations are added to the about 60 previous case reports in the literature. None of our patients had undergone lumbar spine surgery before. In one patient the location of the free disc fragment was medial within the dural sac; in two patients the free disc fragment had penetrated the dural sac from the axilla of the nerve root. Pathogenesis is discussed (congenital adhesions of the dura mater to the posterior longitudinal ligament at the lower lumbar spine; weakness of the dura mater ventrally and at the axilla of the nerve root). By multiplanar MRI, the free disc hernia within the dural sac may be shown preoperatively. PMID:8542333

  18. The effect of lumbar total disc replacement on the spinopelvic alignment and range of motion of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Soo; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Chang Seok; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2006-07-01

    A lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is a type of motion-preserving surgery, which aims to restore and maintain the normal range of motion (ROM) and the sagittal balance of the spine. However, little is known regarding how the spinopelvic alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine are influenced by the lumbar TDR with ProDisc. This study retrospectively analyzed the sagittal alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine in 26 consecutive patients who had undergone the TDR with ProDisc with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A standing lateral radiograph, which included the femoral heads and dynamic flexion-extension lateral radiographs of the spine were taken before surgery and at the follow-up visit. The radiological parameters included the sacral tilt, the pelvic tilt, and the lumbar lordosis. The segmental lordosis and ROM were also measured at each operative level. Nineteen patients underwent a single-level TDR and 7 patients underwent a double-level TDR. The mean lumbar lordosis increased significantly from 30.5 degrees to 40.8 degrees in all patients who underwent TDR without any significant changes in the sacral tilt and pelvic tilt at the latest follow-up (P<0.05). In the patients who underwent single-level TDR, the mean segmental lordosis at the L5-S1 and L4-5 operative levels increased significantly from 15.8 degrees to 23.2 degrees and from 14.1 degrees to 24.9 degrees, respectively. The mean ROM at L5-S1 and L4-5 increased significantly from 7.1 degrees to 11.2 degrees and from 11.4 degrees to 14.6 degrees, respectively. The sagittal balance and ROM of the lumbar spine improved significantly after the lumbar TDR. PMID:16825999

  19. Biomechanical comparison between lumbar disc arthroplasty and fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Jer; Hung, Chinghua

    2009-03-01

    The artificial disc is a mobile implant for degenerative disc replacement that attempts to lessen the degeneration of the adjacent elements. However, inconsistent biomechanical results for the neighboring elements have been reported in a number of studies. The present study used finite element (FE) analysis to explore the biomechanical differences at the surgical and both adjacent levels following artificial disc replacement and interbody fusion procedures. First, a three-dimensional FE model of a five-level lumbar spine was established by the commercially available medical imaging software Amira 3.1.1, and FE software ANSYS 9.0. After validating the five-level intact (INT) model with previous in vitro studies, the L3/L4 level of the INT model was modified to either insert an artificial disc (ProDisc II; ADR) or incorporate bilateral posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) cages with a pedicle screw fixation system. All models were constrained at the bottom of the L5 vertebra and subjected to 150N preload and 10Nm moments under four physiological motions. The ADR model demonstrated higher range of motion (ROM), annulus stress, and facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the non-modified INT model. At both adjacent levels, ROM and annulus stress were similar to that of the INT model and varied less than 7%. In addition, the greatest displacement of posterior annulus occurred at the superior-lateral region. Conversely, the PLIF model showed less ROM, less annulus stress, and no facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the INT model. The adjacent levels had obviously high ROM, annulus stress, and facet contact pressure, especially at the adjacent L2/3 level. In conclusion, the artificial disc replacement revealed no adjacent-level instability. However, instability was found at the surgical level, which might accelerate degeneration at the highly stressed annulus and facet joint. In contrast to disc replacement results, the posterior

  20. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  1. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    PubMed

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  2. Arterio-venous fistula following a lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaudzi, Thanyani V; Sikhosana, Mbokeleng H

    2011-11-01

    Vascular complications during posterior lumbar disc surgery are rare and its presentation with varicose veins is even rarer. A 23 year-old male patient presented with large varicose veins in right lower limb. He underwent a posterior lumbar spine discectomy surgery. He noticed mild swelling of the distal third right lower limb 3 months after index surgery and reported 6 months later when he developed varicose veins. Duplex Doppler confirmed varicose veins of the long saphenous vein and its tributaries with a patent deep venous system. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a large right common iliac artery (CIA) false aneurysm with an arteriovenous fistula between right common iliac vessels. He had a right CIA covered stent insertion with good results. Varicose veins were later managed with sapheno-femoral junction ligation and a below knee long saphenous vein stripping. At six month follow-up the lower limb swelling had completely recovered and duplex ultrasound did not show any recurrence of varicose veins. PMID:22144752

  3. [Endovascular repair of iliocaval arteriovenous fistula complicating lumbar disc surgery].

    PubMed

    Ben Jemaa, H; Maalej, A; Lazzez, K; Jemal, H; Karray, S; Ben Mahfoudh, K

    2016-05-01

    Vascular complications of lumbar disc surgery are rare. Few cases have been reported. Arteriovenous fistulas are the most common. They are due to anatomical relationships between the last lumbar vertebrae, the corresponding discs, and the iliac vessels; degenerative lesions of the intervertebral discs facilitate instrumental vessel perforation, and operative difficulty. Computed tomography is particularly accurate for making the diagnosis. Treatment strategies consist in surgery or endovascular management. Percutaneous endovascular treatment using a stent-graft is a reasonable option for treating arteriovenous fistula. We describe the case of a 50-year-old patient who developed an iliocaval arteriovenous fistula following lumbar disc hernia surgery. The lesion was excluded by a stent-graft. The postoperative period was uneventful. PMID:26920402

  4. [Acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation].

    PubMed

    Li, J S

    1989-08-01

    Five cases of acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation are reported. After protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc were treated by violent manipulation, the lumbo-leg pain were severe suddenly. The operations found that the annulus fibrosus had ruptured and the nerve root or cauda equina was constricted by the nucleus pulposus which had entered into the spinal canal. It must be emphasized that their is in danger of more damaging intervertebral disc degenerated by violent manipulation, then the adhesion of the nerve root will occur gradually. We don't suggest to make violent manipulation for the patient with the nerve root injured. We have acquired good results in treating protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc by combined therapy and they are introduced in this article. PMID:2620603

  5. Annulo-nucleoplasty using Disc-FX in the management of lumbar disc pathology: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aravind; Siddharth M, Shah; Sambhav P, Shah; Tan, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Background Back pain due to Lumbar Disc Disease is a major clinical problem. The treatment options range from physiotherapy to fusion surgery. A number of minimally invasive procedures have also been developed in the recent past for its management. Disc-FX is a new minimally invasive technique that combines percutaneous discectomy, nuclear ablation and annular modification. Literature on its role in the management of lumbar disc pathology is scarce. Methods We included 24 consecutive patients who underwent the Disc-FX for back pain due to lumbar disc pathology non-responsive to non-operative treatment for a period of at least 6 months. Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) these patients fell into 2 groups – those with degenerative disc disease (DDD) (n = 12) and those with a contained lumbar disc herniation (CLDH)(n = 12). They were evaluated using the Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores preoperatively and postoperatively. Results The mean age was 37.9 years (21-53 years). There were 17 males and 7 females. One patient in each subgroup was excluded from the final evaluation. Significant improvement was seen in all outcome measures. The overall rate of reintervention for persistent symptoms was 18.18% (4/22); in the CLDH subgroup, it was 36.36% (4/11). Conclusions and level of evidence Early results after the Disc-FX procedure suggest that it s a reasonable treatment option for patients with back pain due to lumbar disc disease, especially for those with DDD who fail conservative treatment. It could be an alternative to procedures like fusion or disc replacement. This study presents Level IV evidence. Clinical relevance We feel that our study establishes Disc-FX as a modality of treating symptomatic lumbar disc disease due to DDD. However, longer term prospective studies are needed to prove this and to evaluate its role in the treatment of patients with CLDH. PMID:25694914

  6. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  7. Minimally invasive redo discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Kogias, Evangelos; Franco Jimenez, Pamela; Klingler, Jan-Helge; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate which minimally invasive techniques have been used for discectomy in recurrent lumbar disc herniation (LDH), to present the success and complication rates and to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each technique. Discectomy for recurrent LDH is accompanied by a higher morbidity rate compared with primary LDH. Because of the limited operating field, the majority of surgeons have been discouraged from utilising a minimally invasive approach for revision surgery. Minimally invasive techniques have gained ground in the treatment of primary LDH and an increasing number of patients are expressing interest in such techniques for the treatment of recurrent LDH. Microendoscopic discectomy (MED), endoscopic transforaminal and interlaminar discectomy (ETD and EID) have been used for treatment of recurrent LDH. The reported success rate is 60-95%. Full endoscopic techniques, especially ETD, showed favourable results concerning dural tear rates but have a demanding learning curve. The limitations of ETD include dislocated disc fragments or concomitant lateral recess stenosis, and MED is more effective in these instances. All three techniques have a low delayed instability rate. MED, ETD and EID are safe and efficient treatment options for surgical management of recurrent LDH with good success and low complication rates. At the same time, they offer the advantages of minimally invasive access. PMID:26122379

  8. Relative Contribution of Upper and Lower Lumbar Spinal Segments to Flexion/Extension: Comparison between Normal Spines and Spines with Disc Disease in Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Malhar N.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To evaluate the contribution of upper and lower lumbar segments to flexion and extension of the lumbar spine in normal and diseased spines. Overview of Literature The specific contributions of upper and lower lumbar segments during flexion/extension have rarely been reported. Furthermore, no comparisons between the flexion/extension behaviors of normal and diseased spines have been reported until now. Methods Flexion and extension lateral radiographs of 52 adult, asymptomatic volunteers, and 67 adult patients with lumbar spine disc disease were measured using software for total lumbar lordosis, upper lumbar lordosis and lower lumbar lordosis and the intervertebral angles of all segments. Results In asymptomatic volunteers, the range of movement between flexion and extension was a mean of only 4.2° in the lower lumbar spine and a mean of 19.4° in the upper lumbar spine. In patients with disc degeneration, the range of movement between flexion and extension was an average 6.5° for lower lumbar spine and 15.6° for the upper lumbar spine. Conclusions The results showed that upper lumbar spine contributes more to the range of motion in flexion and extension than the lower lumbar spine in asymptomatic individuals without lumbar disc disease, as well as in patients with disc degeneration. PMID:26435797

  9. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  10. Relationship between physical work load and lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Matin, T; Ali, M I; Ali, M Y; Awwal, M A; Sakeb, N

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a disabling problem. This retrospective case control study was done to evaluate the possible relevance of physical work load with Lumbar Disc Herniation. We have performed this study in the Spinal Surgery Unit of Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2007 to June 2010 where 200 cases with Lumbar Disc Herniation and 200 control subjects matched by age, gender and area of residence were taken and analyzed. Chi-square test was computed for sex, area of residence, type of physical work and effort at work, whereas Odds ratio was computed for physical work load, stress at work and daily working period. The highest odds ratio (OR) was with the physical work load (OR: 03.48, CI: 01.84-06.59), hard work (OR: 03.14, CI: 01.74-05.65) and working period of >8 hours (OR: 01.34, CI: 0.75-02.38). Odds ratio for heavy load carrying at work was 03.48 and less job satisfaction or stress at work was 02.45. There was a statistically significant positive association between cumulative exposure of physical work load and lumbar disc herniation indicating an increased occurrence of herniation in heavy physical work load and occupation requiring harder efforts. PMID:23982545

  11. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  12. Early adolescent lumbar intervertebral disc injury: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the case of an adolescent male with lumbar intervertebral disc injury characterized by chronic low back pain (LBP) and antalgia. A 13-year-old boy presented for care with a complaint of chronic LBP and subsequent loss of quality of life. The patient was examined and diagnosed by means of history, clinical testing and use of imaging. He had showed failure in natural history and conservative management relief in both symptomatic and functional improvement, due to injury to the intervertebral joints of his lower lumbar spine. Discogenic LBP in the young adolescent population must be considered, particularly in cases involving even trivial minor trauma, and in those in which LBP becomes chronic. More research is needed regarding long-term implications of such disc injuries in young people, and how to best conservatively manage these patients. A discussion of discogenic LBP pertaining to adolescent disc injury is included. PMID:23621900

  13. [Minimally invasive surgery in treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Rotim, Krešimir; Sajko, Tomislav; Borić, Marta; Subašić, Ante

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. Besides conventional surgical techniques, in the last more than 30 years, different methods with minimal damage to neuromuscular spine structures are being developed and introduced, all having the purpose of reducing postoperative back pain. The advantages of the minimally invasive spine surgery include: possibility of performing procedures under local anaesthesia, reduced hospital stay, limited blood loss with consecutively reduced fibrous tissue development. Patients are capable of return to work and everyday activities early after surgery. From the economical point of view, this kind of treatment is considered to be a cost-effective intervention. Three methods that are being used for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation are: percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), microdiscectomy using tubular retractor system and selective endoscopic discectomy (SED). Conducted prospective studies have shown that minimally invasive methods are adequate alternative to classic surgical procedures. PMID:26065287

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Plasma Disc Coagulation Therapy for Lumbar Herniated Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Chul; Cho, Ki Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objective This is prospective study of clinical outcomes of percutaneous plasma disc coagulation Therapy (PDCT) in patients with herniated lumbar disc disease (HLD) to evaluate the safety and efficacy in its clinical application and usefulness as a reliable alternative to microscopic discectomy. Methods Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study from April 2006 to June 2010. All patients had one-level HLD. Disc degeneration was graded on routine T2-weighted magnetic resonance Image (MRI) using the Pfirrmann's grading system and all index levels were grade 3 and grade 4. Indications for surgery were radiculopathy caused by disc protrusion with soft consistency. MRI was done at one month after the procedure in all patients to check post-PDCT change. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using Visual Analog Scales (VAS) score and MacNab's criteria. Results This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our institution. The age of the study population ranged from 16 to 59 years with a mean age of 37.2 years. There were 29 males and 17 females in this study. The mean period of clinical follow-up was 21 months. The average preoperative VAS score for radiculopathy was 7.4±1.4, while the final follow-up VAS score was 1.4±0.7 (p<0.001). In MacNab's criteria, 41 patients (89.1%) had achieved favorable improvement (excellent and good) until later follow-up. There were one patient from infection and two patients who needed to convert to open discectomy. Conclusion PDCT is a safe and efficient treatment modality in a selective patient with HLD. PMID:22396836

  15. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  16. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  17. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  18. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  19. Lumbar intervertebral disc puncture under C-arm fluoroscopy: a new rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yang, Huilin; Huang, Yonghui; Wu, Yan; Sun, Taicun; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To establish a minimally invasive rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) to better understand the pathophysiology of the human condition. The annulus fibrosus of lumbar level 4-5 (L4-5) and L5-6 discs were punctured by 27-gauge needles using the posterior approach under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after disc puncture surgery to determine the degree of degeneration. All sixty discs (thirty rats) were punctured successfully. Only two of thirty rats subjected to the procedure exhibited immediate neurological symptoms. The MRI results indicated a gradual increase in Pfirrmann grade from 4 to 8 weeks post-surgery (P<0.05), and H&E staining demonstrated a parallel increase in histological grade (P<0.05). Expression levels of aggrecan, type II collagen (Col2), and Sox9 mRNAs, which encode disc components, decreased gradually post-surgery. In contrast, mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col1), an indicator of fibrosis, increased (P<0.05). The procedure of annular puncture using a 27-gauge needle under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance had a high success rate. Histological, MRI, and RT-PCR results revealed that the rat model of disc degeneration is a progressive pathological process that is similar to human IDD. PMID:24770648

  20. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    lumbar disc herniation. In this era, use of discectomy surgery increased rapidly. Even patients with very early symptoms were offered surgery. Later work, especially by Weber and Hakelius, showed that many patients with lumbar disc herniation would improve without surgical intervention. In the ensuing decades, the debate over operative indications and timing continued, reaching another pivotal moment with the 2006 publication of the initial results of Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial. PMID:24752913

  1. Dorsal Extradural Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Cauda Equina Syndrome : A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Arbatti, Nikhil J.

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old male presented with a rare dorsally sequestrated lumbar disc herniation manifesting as severe radiating pain in both leg, progressively worsening weakness in both lower extremities, and urinary incontinence, suggesting cauda equina syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested the sequestrated disc fragment located in the extradural space at the L4-L5 level had surrounded and compressed the dural sac from the lateral to dorsal sides. A bilateral decompressive laminectomy was performed under an operating microscope. A large extruded disc was found to have migrated from the ventral aspect, around the thecal sac, and into the dorsal aspect, which compressed the sac to the right. After removal of the disc fragment, his sciatica was relieved and the patient felt strength of lower extremity improved. PMID:20379476

  2. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  3. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  4. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Management of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with trans-pedicular screws fixation for management of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Overview of Literature Recurrent lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of surgical failure, occurring in 5%–11% of cases. The optimal technique for treatment is controversial. Some authors believe that repeated simple discectomy is the treatment of choice, but approach-related complications can be considerable. Other surgeons prefer more removal of posterior elements (as lamina and facet joints) with posterior fusion. Methods The study included 15 patients who presented with symptomatic recurrent lumbar disc herniation who underwent reoperation through posterior trans-pedicular screws and TLIF in our department from April 2008 to May 2010, with a 24-month follow-up. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale (JOA) was used for low back pain. The results of surgery were also evaluated with the MacNab classification. Results The mean JOA score showed significant improvement, increasing from 9.5 before surgery to 24.0 at the end of follow-up (p<0.001). Clinical outcome was excellent in 7 patients (46% of cases), good in 6 patients (40%) and fair in only 2 patients (14%). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between patients presenting with recurrent disc at the ipsilateral side and those at the contralateral side. Conclusions In spite of the small number of patients and the short follow-up period, the good clinical and radiological outcome achieved in this study encourage the belief that TLIF is an effective option for the treatment of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26949458

  5. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Yohan; Sandén, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied. PMID:19619332

  6. The Incidence of Potential Candidates for Total Disc Replacement among Lumbar and Cervical Fusion Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Bendo, John A.; Kim, Yong; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective chart review. Purpose To evaluate the incidence of potential total disc replacement (TDR) candidates among cervical and lumbar fusion patient populations using strict Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and with relative exclusion criteria removed. Overview of Literature Recent studies suggest that the potential percentage of patients that are candidates for TDR ranges from 0-5% in lumbar fusions and 43% in cervical fusions. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 280 consecutive patients who had lumbar (n = 174) and cervical (n = 106) fusion or TDR performed by one of four independent adult orthopaedic spine surgeons. Charts were screened for investigational device exemption (IDE) inclusion/exclusion criteria and later reanalyzed excluding relative exclusion criteria, such as history of chronic medical illness, twolevel disease (cervical cases), and history of prior fusion surgery in the anatomic region. Results Of the 174 lumbar surgeries, 10 were TDR with Prodisc-L and 164 were lumbar fusions. The most common TDR exclusion criteria were lytic spondylolisthesis or spinal stenosis (47.7% of patients) and more than 2 level degenerative disc disease (37.9%). 14.9% had no IDE exclusion criteria and would be considered candidates for TDR. After excluding the relative lumbar exclusion criteria, this percentage increased to 25.8%. Of the 106 cervical cases, 3 had a TDR with Prodisc-C and 103 had a cervical fusion. Twenty eight percent had no IDE exclusion criteria and would be considered candidates for cervical TDR. Conclusions A larger percentage of cervical fusion candidates are potential candidates for TDR (28%) than lumbar fusion candidates (14.9%) based on the strict IDE criteria. PMID:22164315

  7. Lumbar disc replacement in adolescents: An initial experience in two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kasliwal, Manish K.; Deutsch, Harel

    2012-01-01

    Management of painful lumbar disc degeneration is one of the most common conditions treated by spine surgeons. Several recent prospective multicenter trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of artificial lumbar disc replacement in treating discogenic lower back pain. Though data on the safety and effectiveness has gradually been accumulated in adults, there is a lack of published data on the effectiveness and feasibility of lumbar artificial disc replacement in adolescents. The authors share their initial clinical experience with lumbar disc replacement in a couple of adolescents. PMID:23248694

  8. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy. PMID:22123489

  9. Mechanical properties of human lumbar spine motion segments. Influence of age, sex, disc level, and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nachemson, A L; Schultz, A B; Berkson, M H

    1979-01-01

    The influences of age, sex, disc level, and degree of degenration on the mechanical behavior of 42 fresh cadaver lumbar motion segments are reported. The motions and intradiscal pressure changes that result from the application of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments; compression; and anterior, posterior, and lateral shears are described. The authors find that the mean behaviors of the different segment classes sometimes differ, but these differences are seldom pronounced. Scatter in the behavior of individual motion segments is pronounced, and very often overshadows any class differences. PMID:432710

  10. Heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Jun; Kang, Kyung-Jung; Shin, Seong-Kee; Chung, Sung-Soo; Lee, Chong-Suh

    2011-08-01

    The main goal of total disc replacement (TDR) is to preserve motion. Despite reports of good clinical outcomes, various degrees of heterotopic ossification after TDR have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and its clinical relevance of heterotopic ossification. We evaluated 65 consecutive patients (82 segments) with mean follow-up duration of 45 months (range, 12-88 months). Two kinds of prosthesis, ProDisc® for 75 segments (91.5%) and CHARITE™ for seven segments (8.5%), were used. Patients with heterotopic ossification were compared with those without heterotopic ossification with regard to segmental flexion-extension ROM, VAS and ODI. We analysed the occurrence site by nine zones. Heterotopic ossification was detected in 25 out of 82 segments (30.5%) at a mean follow-up of 17 months. According to McAfee's classification, there was Class-I heterotopic ossification in eight segments (9.8%), Class-II in 12 segments (14.6%), and Class-III in five segments (6.1%). There was no Class-IV heterotopic ossification. There were no significant differences in the segmental ROM, VAS and ODI between the patients with Class-I or Class-II heterotopic ossification and those without heterotopic ossification The segmental ROM in the patients with Class-III heterotopic ossification was significantly decreased compared with the patients without heterotopic ossification (p = 0.018). But VAS and ODI were not significantly different compared with those of patients with no heterotopic ossification. Most heterotopic ossification (82.5%) was detected in the anterior and posterior aspects. In conclusion, most of the heterotopic ossification (Classes I and II) did not affect segmental ROM and clinical outcomes such as pain or function. In Class-III heterotopic ossification segmental ROM was decreased, but it did not affect clinical outcomes. PMID:20652248

  11. Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs: Report of one illustrative case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qin; Hao, Xiaoning; Guo, Xinghua; Wang, Liping

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disease that induces back pain and radicular pain. The most efficient method for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation is still controversial. Spontaneous regression of LDH has been recognized with the advancement of radiological diagnostic tools and can explain the reason of spontaneous relief of symptoms without treatment. The proposed hypotheses are; dehydration, retraction of the disc to the hernia in the annulus fibrosis, enzymatic catabolism and phagocytosis. In this study, the case of a patient with huge lumbar disc hernia regressing by itself has been presented and the potential mechanisms of disc regression have been discussed. PMID:26907997

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of the human lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Marini, Giacomo; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Systems with a quasi-static response similar to the axial response of the intervertebral disc (i.e. progressive stiffening) often present complex dynamics, characterized by peculiar nonlinearities in the frequency response. However, such characteristics have not been reported for the dynamic response of the disc. The accurate understanding of disc dynamics is essential to investigate the unclear correlation between whole body vibration and low back pain. The present study investigated the dynamic response of the disc, including its potential nonlinear response, over a range of loading conditions. Human lumbar discs were tested by applying a static preload to the top and a sinusoidal displacement at the bottom of the disc. The frequency of the stimuli was set to increase linearly from a low frequency to a high frequency limit and back down. In general, the response showed nonlinear and asymmetric characteristics. For each test, the disc had different response in the frequency-increasing compared to the frequency-decreasing sweep. In particular, the system presented abrupt changes of the oscillation amplitude at specific frequencies, which differed between the two sweeps. This behaviour indicates that the system oscillation has a different equilibrium condition depending on the path followed by the stimuli. Preload and amplitude of the oscillation directly influenced the disc response by changing the nonlinear dynamics and frequency of the jump-phenomenon. These results show that the characterization of the dynamic response of physiological systems should be readdressed to determine potential nonlinearities. Their direct effect on the system function should be further investigated. PMID:25573099

  13. Obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse after lumbar microdiscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Syme, G; Swamy, GN; Nanjayan, S; Fowler, A; Calthorpe, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse (IDP) following lumbar microdiscectomy. Methods A retrospective review of case notes from 2008 to 2012 was conducted for all patients who underwent single level lumbar microdiscectomy performed by a single surgeon. All patients were followed up at two weeks and six weeks following surgery, and given an open appointment for a further six months. Results A total of 283 patients were available for analysis: 190 (67%) were in the non-obese group and 93 (32.9%) in the obese group. There was no statistical difference in postoperative infection, dural tear or length of stay between the non-obese and obese groups. Recurrent symptomatic IDP was seen in 27 patients (9.5%) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen (10.0%) were in the non-obese group and eight (8.6%) in the obese group (p>0.8). Conclusions In our study, obesity was not a predictor of recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy. Our literature review confirmed that this study reports the largest series to date analysing the relationship between obesity and recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy in the British population. PMID:24780673

  14. Total disc arthroplasty: consequences for sagittal balance and lumbar spine movement.

    PubMed

    Tournier, C; Aunoble, S; Le Huec, J C; Lemaire, J P; Tropiano, P; Lafage, V; Skalli, W

    2007-03-01

    This in vivo biomechanical study was undertaken to analyze the consequences for sagittal balance and lumbar spine movement in three different lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 105 patients underwent total disc replacement in three different centers. The Maverick prosthesis was used in 46 patients, the SB Charité device was used in 49 patients and the Prodisc device was utilized in 10 patients. The analysis was computer assisted, using Spineview and Matlab softwares. The intra and inter-observer reliability and measurement uncertainty was performed. The analysis of lateral X-ray films in flexion-extension allowed to measure the prosthesis positioning, the range of motion (ROM), the localization of the mean center of rotation (MCR), the vertebral translation and the disc height, for each prosthesis device. The sagittal balance was analyzed on a full spine film. The parameters studied were described by Duval-Beaupère. The results were compared to the data found in literature, and compared to 18 asymptomatic volunteers, and 61 asymptomatic subjects, concerning the sagittal balance. The prostheses allowed an improvement of the ROM of less than 2 degrees. The ROM of L5-S1 prostheses ranged from 11.6 to 15.6% of the total lumbar motion during flexion-extension. At L4-L5 level, the ROM decreased when there was an arthrodesis associated at the L5-S1 level. There was no difference of ROM between the three prostheses devices. The MCR was linked to the ROM, but did not depend on the prosthesis offcentering. The disc height improved for any prosthesis, and decreased in flexion or in extension, when the prosthesis was offcentered. An increase of translation indicated a minor increase of the ROM at L4-L5 level after Maverick or SB Charité implantation. The L5-S1 arthrodesis was linked with an increase of the pelvic tilt. The lumbar lordosis curvature increased between L4 and S1, even more when a prosthesis was placed at the L3-L4 level. Total disc arthroplasty is useful in

  15. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Shim, Chan Shik; Ahn, Yong; Choi, Young-Geun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation. Methods Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Results Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation. PMID:20062565

  16. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Arts, Mark P; Koes, Bart W; Berg, Annette A van den; van Buchem, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD). This treatment can be carried out in an outpatient setting and swift recovery and return to daily routine are suggested. Thus far, no randomized trial into cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus standard surgical procedure has been performed. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial, studying the cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus conventional open discectomy in patients with sciatica from lumbar disc herniation. Methods/design The study is a randomized prospective multi-center trial, in which two treatment strategies are compared in a parallel group design. Patients (age 18–70 years) visiting the neurosurgery department of the participating hospitals, are considered for inclusion in the trial when sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation has lasted more than 8 weeks. Patients with disc herniation smaller than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, without concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eligible for participation, and are randomized into one of two treatment arms; either Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression or conventional discectomy. The functional outcome of the patient, as assessed by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 8 weeks and 1 year after treatment, is the primary outcome measure. The secondary outcome parameters are recovery as perceived by the patient, leg and back pain, incidence of re-intervention, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absence of work and secondary costs. Discussion Open discectomy is still considered to be the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression has at least as much efficacy as the

  17. Disc Degeneration Assessed by Quantitative T2* (T2 star) Correlated with Functional Lumbar Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Mehta, Hitesh; Polly, David W.; Ellermann, Jutta; Nuckley, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Experimental correlation study design to quantify features of disc health, including signal intensity and distinction between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP), with T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and correlate with the functional mechanics in corresponding motion segments. Objective Establish the relationship between disc health assessed by quantitative T2* MRI and functional lumbar mechanics. Summary of Background Data Degeneration leads to altered biochemistry in the disc, affecting the mechanical competence. Clinical routine MRI sequences are not adequate in detecting early changes in degeneration and fails to correlate with pain or improve patient stratification. Quantitative T2* relaxation time mapping probes biochemical features and may offer more sensitivity in assessing disc degeneration. Methods Cadaveric lumbar spines were imaged using quantitative T2* mapping, as well as conventional T2-weighted MRI sequences. Discs were graded by the Pfirrmann scale and features of disc health, including signal intensity (T2* Intensity Area) and distinction between the AF and NP (Transition Zone Slope), were quantified by T2*. Each motion segment was subjected to pure moment bending to determine range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ), and bending stiffness. Results T2* Intensity Area and Transition Zone Slope were significantly correlated with flexion ROM (p=0.015; p=0.002), ratio of NZ/ROM (p=0.010; p=0.028), and stiffness (p=0.044; p=0.026), as well as lateral bending NZ/ROM (p=0.005; p=0.010) and stiffness (p=0.022; p=0.029). T2* Intensity Area was also correlated with LB ROM (p=0.023). Pfirrmann grade was only correlated with lateral bending NZ/ROM (p=0.001) and stiffness (p=0.007). Conclusions T2* mapping is a sensitive quantitative method capable of detecting changes associated with disc degeneration. Features of disc health quantified with T2* predicted altered functional mechanics of the lumbar spine better than

  18. The management of pain following laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G.

    1981-01-01

    Assessment of the results of laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions is unsatisfactory, but it seems that some degree of recurrent pain is virtually inevitable. The clinical features and incidence of the various painful syndromes seen in these patients, including one, the sacro-spinalis insertion syndrome, which has not previously been described, are outlined and the management of each is discussed with reference to two personal series, one of 98 patients consecutively undergoing laminectomy and the other of 35 patients referred because of recurrent pain following laminectomy. Finally, problems of prophylaxis are considered. PMID:6454375

  19. Alkaptonuria and lumbar disc herniation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Farzannia, Akbar; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Hadidchi, Shahram

    2003-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disease caused by deficiency of homogentisic acid oxidase and characterized by bluish-black discoloration of cartilages and skin (ochronosis). The authors report the cases of three patients with lumbar disc herniation who underwent discectomy and in whom the nucleus pulposus was discovered to be black. Alkaptonuria was diagnosed after discectomy. Discal herniation requiring surgery is unusual in alkaptonuria, with only a few reports. The symptoms in the three patients disappeared after surgery and no symptoms were demonstrated on follow-up examination. PMID:12546396

  20. A diffusion and T2 relaxation MRI study of the ovine lumbar intervertebral disc under compression in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Simon C.; Silva, Pujitha; Crozier, Stuart; Pearcy, Mark J.

    2004-08-01

    The ovine lumbar intervertebral disc is a useful model for the human lumbar disc. We present preliminary estimates of diffusion coefficients and T2 relaxation times in a pilot MRI study of the ovine lumbar intervertebral disc during uniaxial compression in vitro, and identify factors that hamper the ability to accurately monitor the temporal evolution of the effective diffusion tensor at high spatial resolution.

  1. Efficacy of percutaneous laser disc decompression on lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Longxi; Han, Zhengfeng; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Tongtong; Yin, Jian; Liang, Xibin; Guo, Han; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) on lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-two LSS patients were treated using pulsed Nd: YAG laser, of which 21 cases (11 males and 10 females with an average age of 64 years old) were followed up for 2 years. All of the 21 patients had intermittent claudication with negative straight leg raising test results. Fifteen patients suffered from anterior central disc herniation which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the posterior part; six patients suffered from posterior ligamentum flavum hypertrophy which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the anterior part. The efficacy was evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery on 21 patients using the performance evaluation criteria of the lumbago treatment by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA 29 scores). The fineness (i.e. excellent and good treatment outcome) rate 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the operation were 46.7%, 66.7%, 66.7%, 66.7% and 66.7%, respectively, in patients with severe anterior compression and 16.7%, 33.3%, 33.3%, 33.3% and 33.3%, respectively, in patients with severe posterior compression. PLDD had certain positive efficacy on the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, which was more significant on LSS dominated by the anterior compression than that by the posterior compression. PMID:23996073

  2. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D; Ostelo, Raymond W; van Royen, Barend J; Peul, Wilco C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the "gold standard" of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of "clinical success" (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of "clinical success" (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial, with a high

  3. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial

  4. The nerve supply of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Edgar, M A

    2007-09-01

    The anatomical studies, basic to our understanding of lumbar spine innervation through the sinu-vertebral nerves, are reviewed. Research in the 1980s suggested that pain sensation was conducted in part via the sympathetic system. These sensory pathways have now been clarified using sophisticated experimental and histochemical techniques confirming a dual pattern. One route enters the adjacent dorsal root segmentally, whereas the other supply is non-segmental ascending through the paravertebral sympathetic chain with re-entry through the thoracolumbar white rami communicantes. Sensory nerve endings in the degenerative lumbar disc penetrate deep into the disrupted nucleus pulposus, insensitive in the normal lumbar spine. Complex as well as free nerve endings would appear to contribute to pain transmission. The nature and mechanism of discogenic pain is still speculative but there is growing evidence to support a 'visceral pain' hypothesis, unique in the muscloskeletal system. This mechanism is open to 'peripheral sensitisation' and possibly 'central sensitisation' as a potential cause of chronic back pain. PMID:17905946

  5. Novel indication for posterior dynamic stabilization: Correction of disc tilt after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wayne K.; Palmer, Daniel Kyle; Jadhav, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Background The increase in total disc replacement procedures performed over the last 5 years has increased the occurrence of patients presenting with postoperative iatrogenic deformity requiring revision surgery. Proposed salvage treatments include device retrieval followed by anterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior fusion. We propose a novel approach for the correction of disc tilt after total disc replacement using a posterior dynamic stabilization system. Methods Pedicle screws can be inserted either in an open manner or percutaneously by standard techniques under fluoroscopy. The collapsed side is expanded, and the convex side is compressed. Universal spacers are placed bilaterally, with the spacer on the collapsed side being taller by 6 mm. Cords are threaded through the spacers and pulled into place with the tensioning instrument. Extra tension is applied to the convex side, and the wound is closed by standard techniques. Results Three patients presenting with tilted total disc replacement devices underwent corrective surgery with posterior dynamic stabilization. Radiographs confirmed correction of deformity in all cases. Conclusions/Level of Evidence This technical note presents a novel indication for posterior dynamic stabilization and describes its surgical application to the correction of disc tilt after total disc replacement. This is level V evidence. PMID:25802667

  6. Economic value of treating lumbar disc herniation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Scheverin, Nicolas; Righesso, Orlando; Teles, Alisson R; Gullo, Maria Carolina; Cheng, Joseph S; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Lumbar discectomy is one of the most common surgical spine procedures. In order to understand the value of this surgical care, it is important to understand the costs to the health care system and patient for good results. The objective of this study was to evaluate for the first time the cost-effectiveness of spine surgery in Latin America for lumbar discectomy in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for patients in Brazil. METHODS The authors performed a prospective cohort study involving 143 consecutive patients who underwent open discectomy for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Patient-reported outcomes were assessed utilizing the SF-6D, which is derived from a 12-month variation of the SF-36. Direct medical costs included medical reimbursement, costs of hospital care, and overall resource consumption. Disability losses were considered indirect costs. A 4-year horizon with 3% discounting was applied to health-utilities estimates. Sensitivity analysis was performed by varying utility gain by 20%. The costs were expressed in Reais (R$) and US dollars ($), applying an exchange rate of 2.4:1 (the rate at the time of manuscript preparation). RESULTS The direct and indirect costs of open lumbar discectomy were estimated at an average of R$3426.72 ($1427.80) and R$2027.67 ($844.86), respectively. The mean total cost of treatment was estimated at R$5454.40 ($2272.66) (SD R$2709.17 [$1128.82]). The SF-6D utility gain was 0.044 (95% CI 0.03197-0.05923, p = 0.017) at 12 months. The 4-year discounted QALY gain was 0.176928. The estimated cost-utility ratio was R$30,828.35 ($12,845.14) per QALY gained. The sensitivity analysis showed a range of R$25,690.29 ($10,714.28) to R$38,535.44 ($16,056.43) per QALY gained. CONCLUSIONS The use of open lumbar discectomy to treat LDH is associated with a significant improvement in patient outcomes as measured by the SF-6D. Open lumbar discectomy performed in the Brazilian supplementary health care system

  7. Comparative role of disc degeneration and ligament failure on functional mechanics of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Arin M; Shaw, Miranda N; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-07-01

    Understanding spinal kinematics is essential for distinguishing between pathological conditions of spine disorders, which ultimately lead to low back pain. It is of high importance to understand how changes in mechanical properties affect the response of the lumbar spine, specifically in an effort to differentiate those associated with disc degeneration from ligamentous changes, allowing for more precise treatment strategies. To do this, the goals of this study were twofold: (1) develop and validate a finite element (FE) model of the lumbar spine and (2) systematically alter the properties of the intervertebral disc and ligaments to define respective roles in functional mechanics. A three-dimensional non-linear FE model of the lumbar spine (L3-sacrum) was developed and validated for pure moment bending. Disc degeneration and sequential ligament failure were modelled. Intersegmental range of motion (ROM) and bending stiffness were measured. The prediction of the FE model to moment loading in all three planes of bending showed very good agreement, where global and intersegmental ROM and bending stiffness of the model fell within one standard deviation of the in vitro results. Degeneration decreased ROM for all directions. Stiffness increased for all directions except axial rotation, where it initially increased then decreased for moderate and severe degeneration, respectively. Incremental ligament failure produced increased ROM and decreased stiffness. This effect was much more pronounced for all directions except lateral bending, which is minimally impacted by ligaments. These results indicate that lateral bending may be more apt to detect the subtle changes associated with degeneration, without being masked by associated changes of surrounding stabilizing structures. PMID:26404463

  8. [Nerve root compression by gas containing lumbar disc herniation--case report].

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Hiroki; Nemoto, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Masahisa; Naitou, Satoko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Ukegawa, You

    2009-06-01

    The radiographic appearance of gas collection in the intervertebral disc represents the so-called "vacuum phenomenon." Incidence of the vacuum phenomenon on plain radiographs is reported to be 1-20%, whereas gas-containing disc herniations are rarely observed. We present a case report involving a patient with L4/5 gas-containing disc herniation, which was demonstrated by CT and MRI scans and was also surgically documented. A 48-year-old man with no previous back trauma presented with a 14-day history of left leg pain. On neurologic examination, the straight leg raising test was positive at 60degrees. Leg muscle strength was weak on the extensor hallucis longus. Sensory disturbances and abnormalities in deep-tendon reflexes were not observed. Lumbar roentogenograms showed "vacuum phenomenon" at L2/3, L4/5 and the L5/S disc space. MRI indicated a herniated disc at L4/5 displacing the dural sac and a focal low intensity in the lesion. Administration of an epidural block relieved the patient's symptoms. Ten months later, the patient reported a gradual return of similar left leg pain. His symptoms did not respond to conservative management. Lumbar spine films indicated abnormalities identical to the original results. MRI showed an enlarged area of low intensity with compression of the left L5 nerve root. In addition to recurrent pain, discography with metrizamide injections confirmed the presence of intradiscal gas and compression of the left L5 nerve root. During surgery, a gray-bluish air mass compressing the L5 nerve root was identified. Manipulation of the mass resulted in rupture and the release of gas. The displaced nerve root immediately relaxed to its normal position. Seven months after the operation, the patient remains free of pain. PMID:19526837

  9. Early failure of lumbar disc replacement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stieber, Jonathan R; Donald, Gordon D

    2006-02-01

    We report a case of a patient who underwent two-level lumbar total disc replacement at L4-L5 and L5-S1 with the ProDisc II prosthesis, who was diagnosed with early anterior migration of the caudally placed device with partial occlusion of the left common iliac vein. The device was explanted and revised to an anterior lumbar interbody fusion with posterior instrumented fusion. Despite the substantial experience with lumbar disc arthroplasty in Europe and the United States, there exist few reports of device explantation or revision. To our knowledge, early postoperative vascular complications, while discussed hypothetically, have not been reported. With implantation of the total disc replacement in proximity to the great vessels, the potential for vascular complications is clearly substantial. The technical aspects of the device explantation are discussed as well as issues pertinent to early failure. A literature review of device complications associated with lumbar total disc replacement is also presented. PMID:16462220

  10. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  11. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. PMID:27384734

  12. Biportal Endoscopic Spinal Surgery for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Je-Tea; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Young-Sang; Jang, Han-Jin; Yoo, Bang

    2016-01-01

    The major problems of revision surgery for recurrent lumbar disc herniation (LDH) include limited visualization due to adhesion of scar tissue, restricted handling of neural structures in insufficient visual field, and consequent higher risk of a dura tear and nerve root injury. Therefore, clear differentiation of neural structures from scar tissue and adhesiolysis performed while preserving stability of the remnant facet joint would lower the risk of complications and unnecessary fusion surgery. Biportal endoscopic spine surgery has several merits including sufficient magnification with panoramic view under very high illumination and free handling of instruments normally impossible in open spine surgery. It is supposed to be a highly recommendable alternative technique that is safer and less destructive than the other surgical options for recurrent LDH. PMID:27583117

  13. Biportal Endoscopic Spinal Surgery for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae-Jung; Jung, Je-Tea; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Young-Sang; Jang, Han-Jin; Yoo, Bang

    2016-09-01

    The major problems of revision surgery for recurrent lumbar disc herniation (LDH) include limited visualization due to adhesion of scar tissue, restricted handling of neural structures in insufficient visual field, and consequent higher risk of a dura tear and nerve root injury. Therefore, clear differentiation of neural structures from scar tissue and adhesiolysis performed while preserving stability of the remnant facet joint would lower the risk of complications and unnecessary fusion surgery. Biportal endoscopic spine surgery has several merits including sufficient magnification with panoramic view under very high illumination and free handling of instruments normally impossible in open spine surgery. It is supposed to be a highly recommendable alternative technique that is safer and less destructive than the other surgical options for recurrent LDH. PMID:27583117

  14. The natural history of lumbar disc herniation and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Benoist, Michel

    2002-03-01

    The majority of patients suffering from a radiculopathy caused by a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) heal spontaneously without surgery or chemonucleolysis. The clinical course of the radiculopathy varies as well as the efficacy of conservative treatment. In some patients the symptoms decline after a week or two; in others the pain may continue for many months or years. Despite an abundant literature there is still a controversy concerning the treatment of radiculopathies related to ruptured lumbar intervertebral discs. Obviously knowledge of the natural history of discal herniation, and of the mechanisms leading to the changes of the extruded discal tissue, would be of great help in planning the therapeutic procedure. The purpose of this article is to review the reliable data concerning the clinical and pathomorphological evolution and the biological mechanisms associated with the morphologic changes of discal herniation. PMID:12027305

  15. [The lumbar disc herniation - management, clinical aspects and current recommendations].

    PubMed

    Stienen, M N; Cadosch, D; Hildebrandt, G; Gautschi, O P

    2011-11-30

    Lumbar disc herniation has a high prevalence and strong social-medical impact. Patients suffer from lower back pain that radiates from the spine. Loss of sensation or paresis adds to the clinical picture. The diagnosis should be confirmed by imaging in patients considered for surgery. High remission rates initially warrant conservative treatment (adequate analgesia and physiotherapy) in many patients. If this treatment does not lead to significant alleviation within 5-8 weeks, surgery should be performed to reduce the risk of chronic nerve affection. Posterior interlaminar fenestration is the intervention primarily conducted for this diagnosis. A relapse in the same region occurs in up to 10% of patients after months through years, which sometimes necessitates a reoperation if symptoms are pertinent. PMID:22124958

  16. Lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction for the management of a patient with a lumbar herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Allison R; Hasson, Scott M

    2010-05-01

    Low back pain resulting from lumbar disc herniation is a common reason for referral for physical therapy. There is no evidence to support the management of lumbar disc herniation and derangement using mechanical traction combined with lumbar extension exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this case report was to describe and discuss the use of mechanical traction in conjunction with lumbar extension exercises for a patient with a lumbar herniated disc. The patient was a 49-year-old male referred to physical therapy with a medical diagnosis of a lumbar herniated disc at L5-S1 with compression of the L5 nerve root confirmed by MRI. The patient's chief complaint was pain over the left lumbosacral and central lumbar region with radiating pain into the left buttock accompanied by numbness and tingling in the left lower leg and foot. The patient was seen for a total of 14 visits. The first 5 days (2 weeks) of therapy consisted of lumbar extension exercises. For the following nine visits (over a 3-week period), mechanical traction was added as an adjunct to the extension exercises. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Back Pain Function Scale (BPFS), and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). Results from initial evaluation to discharge (Oswestry: 36% to 0%; BPFS: 33/60 to 57/60; NPRS: 7/10 to 0/10) demonstrated that the patient no longer experienced low back pain and improved in terms of functional status and pain-related disability. The patient no longer complained of numbness and tingling in the left lower extremity and the goals for the patient had been attained. The data from this case report suggests lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction facilitated the patient's improvement in pain and return to prior level of function. PMID:20397860

  17. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  18. Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: Current and Future Concepts of Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Fadi; Essig, David; Lebl, Darren R.; Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Cammisa, Frank P.; Girardi, Federico P.

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain as a result of degenerative disc disease imparts a large socioeconomic impact on the health care system. Traditional concepts for treatment of lumbar disc degeneration have aimed at symptomatic relief by limiting motion in the lumbar spine, but novel treatment strategies involving stem cells, growth factors, and gene therapy have the theoretical potential to prevent, slow, or even reverse disc degeneration. Understanding the pathophysiological basis of disc degeneration is essential for the development of treatment strategies that target the underlying mechanisms of disc degeneration rather than the downstream symptom of pain. Such strategies ideally aim to induce disc regeneration or to replace the degenerated disc. However, at present, treatment options for degenerative disc disease remain suboptimal, and development and outcomes of novel treatment options currently have to be considered unpredictable. PMID:22567411

  19. [Degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine Total disc replacement as an alternative to lumbar fusion?].

    PubMed

    Mayer, H M

    2005-10-01

    Spinal fusion is accepted worldwide as a therapeutic option for the treatment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. Because there are only few evidence-based data available supporting the usefulness of lumbar spinal fusion, its questionable benefit as well as the potential for complications are the reasons for an ongoing discussion. In recent years, total disc replacement with implants has emerged as an alternative treatment. Although early results are promising, there is still a lack of evidence-based data as well as of long-term results for this technology. This article gives a critical update on the implant systems currently in use (SB Charité, Prodisc II L, Maverick, Flexicore, Mobidisc), which all have to be considered as "first-generation" implants. Morphological and clinical sequelae of the different biomechanical properties, designs, and materials have not yet been sufficiently investigated. There is no international consensus on the indication spectrum and on the preoperative diagnosis of discogenic low back pain. The same is true for the (minimally invasive) surgical access strategies. Complication rates seem to be somewhat lower compared to spinal fusion techniques. There are no standardized revision concepts in cases of implant failure. Lumbar disc replacement has opened a new era in spinal surgery with a still unproven benefit for the patient. It is strongly recommended that these techniques should only be applied by experienced and well-trained spine surgeons. Until evidence-based data are available, all patients should be treated under scientific study conditions with close postoperative follow-up. PMID:16034627

  20. Effect of microgravity on the biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal intervertebral discs in mice.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeannie F; Hargens, Alan R; Cheng, Kevin K; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2014-09-22

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity has shown to have deleterious effects on the human spine, indicated by low back pain during spaceflight and increased incidence of post-spaceflight herniated nucleus pulposus. We examined the effect of microgravity on biomechanical properties of lumbar and caudal discs from mice having been on 15-day shuttle mission STS-131. Sixteen C57BL/C mice (spaceflight group, n=8; ground-based control group, n=8) were sacrificed immediately after spaceflight. Physiological disc height (PDH) was measured in situ, and compressive creep tests were performed to parameterize biomechanical properties into endplate permeability (k), nuclear swelling pressure strain dependence (D), and annular viscoelasticity (G). For caudal discs, the spaceflight group exhibited 32% lower PDH, 70% lower D and crept more compared to the control mice (p=0.03). For lumbar discs, neither PDH nor D was significantly different between murine groups. Initial modulus, osmotic pressure, k and G for lumbar and caudal discs did not appear influenced by microgravity (p>0.05). Decreases in both PDH and D suggest prolonged microgravity effectively diminished biomechanical properties of caudal discs. By contrast, differences were not noted for lumbar discs. This potentially deleterious interaction between prolonged weightlessness and differential ranges of motion along the spine may underlie the increased cervical versus lumbar disc herniation rates observed among astronauts. PMID:25085756

  1. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  2. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  3. Automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation with shape and appearance features from MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja'S.; Corso, Jason J.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2010-03-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a major reason for lower back pain (LBP), which is the second most common neurological ailment in the United States. Automation of herniated disc diagnosis reduces the large burden on radiologists who have to diagnose hundreds of cases each day using clinical MRI. We present a method for automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation using appearance and shape features. We jointly use the intensity signal for modeling the appearance of herniated disc and the active shape model for modeling the shape of herniated disc. We utilize a Gibbs distribution for classification of discs using appearance and shape features. We use 33 clinical MRI cases of the lumbar area for training and testing both appearance and shape models. We achieve over 91% accuracy in detection of herniation in a cross-validation experiment with specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 94%.

  4. Outcomes of conservative treatment for ruptured lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Fang-Da; Liu, Jin-Tao; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The authors set up a prospective study of the effect of conservative treatment on a ruptured lumbar disc herniation in 89 patients, between June 2008 and June 2010. Seventy-two patients (81%) improved, while the other 17 (19%) needed surgery. The JOA score (best possible result: 29) was found to be significantly improved in the 72 patients of the conservative group, at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years (t-test: p < 0.001). At final follow-up, after 2 years, 84.7% of the patients in the conservative group had a good or excellent result. However, if the 17 surgical cases were included, this proportion dropped to 68.5%. The volume of the protrusion decreased significantly in the 72 patients of the conservative group: from 1422.52 +/- 539.10 mm3 to 102735 +/- 585.51 mm3 (paired t-test: p < 0.001). There was a definite correlation, in the conservative group, between the final resorption rate on the one hand and the percentage of combined excellent and good results on the other hand (72 cases; Spearman rank correlation coefficient: r 0.01 = 0.470, p < 0.001). PMID:24563981

  5. Revision of a lumbar disc arthroplasty following late infection

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzo, Anthony M.

    2009-01-01

    Anterior removal of a lumbar total disc replacement implant is often a very technically demanding procedure. The anterior retroperitoneal anatomy is prone to scarring, limiting remobilization and making a direct anterior exposure above the L5–S1 level difficult if not impossible to achieve safely. Anterolateral approach strategies can be more safely achieved at L4–L5 and above, but may require vertebral osteotomy in order to remove a keeled prosthesis. Successful conversion to a fusion with implant removal can be achieved, even when osteotomy is needed for implant removal. This Grand Rounds case presentation involves an unusual late retroperitoneal abscess following two-level TDR with direct extension to one of the implants, and the subsequent nonoperative and operative management. Removal of a well-fixed keeled implant at the L4–L5 level following nonoperative treatment of a surrounding retroperitoneal abscess and conversion to fusion represents close to, if not a ‘worst-case’ scenario for revision TDR. However, with proper preoperative planning and surgical experience, a safe and successful procedure can be the end result. PMID:19937351

  6. Considerations for surgical treatment of patients with upper lumbar disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Ido, K; Shimizu, K; Tada, H; Matsuda, Y; Shikata, J; Nakamura, T

    1998-02-01

    Nine patients treated by surgery for upper lumbar disc herniations were reviewed. Of nine patients with upper lumbar disc herniations at the L1-L2 or L2-L3 level, five were treated by anterior procedures, whereas four underwent posterior procedures. Four of the five patients on whom anterior procedures were performed underwent additional spinal instrumentation using the Kaneda device and Z-plate system. Clinical symptoms improved in all nine patients. Confirmation of the type and level of disc herniation and increased thoracolumbar kyphosis must be taken into consideration when the optimal surgical procedure and spinal instrumentation method are selected. PMID:9493774

  7. Adolescent lumbar disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do martial artist: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniations are rare in children. The etiology and clinical picture may be different in children than in adults. Conservative management is the treatment of choice. Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art which is notorious for its high fast kicks. Tae Kwon Do will be an official Olympic sport in the year 2000. Low back pain is occasionally reported by Tae Kwon Do athletes but there are no reported cases in the literature on disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do athlete. A case report is presented to illustrate clinical presentation, diagnosis, radiological assessment and conservative management of lumbar disc herniation in children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  8. Percutaneous Disc Coagulation Therapy (PDCT) comparing with Automated Percutaneous Lumbar Discectomy (APLD) in Patients of Herniated Lumbar Disc Disease: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Cheon Wook; Lee, Joo Yong; Choi, Woo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Percutaneous techniques are rapidly replacing traditional open surgery. This is a randomized controlled trial study of clinical outcomes of Percutaneous Plasma Disc Coagulation Therapy (PDCT) in patients with HLD(herniated lumbar disc) as a new percutaneous access in comparison with Automated Percutaneous Lumbar Discectomy (APLD) in its clinical application and usefulness as a reliable alternative method. Methods The authors analyzed 25 patients who underwent PDCT randomized 1:1 to 25 who underwent APLD between June, 2010 and October, 2011. All patients had herniated lumbar disc diseases. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using Visual Analog Scales (VAS) score and MacNab's criteria. Results The age of the patients who underwent PDCT ranged from 29 to 88 years with a mean age of 51.8 years. The age of the APLD undergone patients' population ranged from 30 to 66 with a mean age of 46.0 years. The average preoperative VAS score in PDCT was 7.60 and 1.94 at 7months post-operatively, and in APLD was 7.32, and 3.53 at 7 months post-operatively (p<0.001). In Macnab's criteria, 20 patients (80%) had achieved favorable improvement (excellent and good) in PDCT group. In Macnab's criteria, 16 patients (64%) had achieved favorable improvement in APLD group (p<0.001). Conclusion PDCT can be considered a viable option as a new percutaneous access to herniated lumbar disc. PDCT showed to be more effective than APLD in this study, allowing stable decompression and safe minimally invasive operation to an area desired by the operator in lumbar disc herniation patients, although further long term clinical evaluations are still necessary. PMID:25983808

  9. Regional variations in the compressive properties of lumbar vertebral trabeculae. Effects of disc degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, T.S.; Hansson, T.H.; Abram, A.C.; Spengler, D.M.; Panjabi, M.M. )

    1989-09-01

    The compressive mechanical properties of human lumbar vertebral trabeculae were examined on the basis of anatomic origin, bone density, and intervertebral disc properties. Trabecular bone compressive strength and stiffness increased with increasing bone density, the latter proportional to strength and stiffness to the one-half power. Regional variations within each segment were found, the most prevalent differences occurring in regions of bone overlying the disc nucleus in comparison with bone overlying the disc anulus. For normal discs, the ratio of strength of bone overlying the disc nucleus to bone overlying the disc anulus was 1.25, decreasing to 1.0 for moderately degenerated discs. These results suggest that an interdependency of trabecular bone properties and intervertebral disc properties may exist.

  10. In vivo Loads in the Lumbar L3-4 Disc during a Weight Lifting Extension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge of in vivo human lumbar loading is critical for understanding the lumbar function and for improving surgical treatments of lumbar pathology. Although numerous experimental measurements and computational simulations have been reported, non-invasive determination of in vivo spinal disc loads is still a challenge in biomedical engineering. The object of the study is to investigate the in vivo human lumbar disc loads using a subject-specific and kinematic driven finite element approach. Methods Three dimensional (3D) lumbar spine models of three living subjects were created using MR images. A 3D finite element model of the L3-4 disc, including the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, was built for each subject. The endplate kinematics of the L3-4 segment of each subject during a dynamic weight lifting extension was determined using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. The endplate kinematics was used as displacement boundary conditions of the subject specific finite element model of the L3-4 disc to calculate the in-vivo disc forces and moments during the weight lifting activity. Findings During the weight lifting extension, the L3-4 disc experienced maximum shear load of about 230 N or 0.34 bodyweight at the flexion position and maximum compressive load of 1500 N or 2.28 bodyweight at the upright position. The disc experienced a primary flexion-extension moment during the motion which reached a maximum of 4.2 Nm at upright position with stretched arms holding the weight. Interpretation This study provided quantitative data on in vivo disc loading that could help understand intrinsic biomechanics of the spine and improve surgical treatment of pathological discs using fusion or arthroplasty techniques. PMID:24345591

  11. Target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daying; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xuexue; Sheng, Mulan

    2015-01-01

    Both target radiofrequency thermocoagulation and collagenase chemonucleolysis are effective micro-invasive therapy means for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In order to analyze the clinical effects of target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis on lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, the contents of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan were measured and the histological changes of nucleus pulposus was detected in the vitro experiments. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation reduced the hydrolyzation of herniated nucleus pulposus caused by collagenase, as well as the content of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, 236 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis. The efficiency was evaluated according to Macnab criteria, and the index of lumbar disc herniation (IDH) was compared pre-operation with 3 months post-operation. The post-operative good rate was 66.5% (157/236) at 2 weeks post-operation, and 88.1% (208/236) at 3 months post-operation. In the post-operative follow-up exam, 86.8% of the re-examined cases demonstrated smaller or ablated protrusion, with reduced IDH values from pre-operation, which was statistically significant. No serious complications were detected intra-operatively and post-operatively. In conclusion, target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis was an effective and safe method for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:25785026

  12. Adolescent prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc: Management strategies and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Pragyan; Thirupathi, Rajan Thanga; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Somanna, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LIVDH) is rare in children and adolescents when compared to adults. In literature, children generally constitute around 0.5–3% of surgically treated LIVDH. Though much rarer, they are less likely to respond to conservative treatment than adults. In this study, we analyze our experience in the management of adolescent LIVDH (ALIVDH) (age group 12–18 years) including the demographic, clinico-radiological features; surgical management strategies and outcome. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis constituted all patients between 12 and 18 years, who underwent surgery for LIVDH at our institute over a period of 15 years from January 1999 to June 2014. The records of these patients were retrieved, and demographic features, clinical picture, radiological features, operative findings, and postoperative events were evaluated. Follow-up data were obtained either through direct clinical evaluation or mailed self-report questionnaire and telephone conversations. The long-term outcome was analyzed by using standardized and condition specific outcome scales in addition to routine clinical follow-up evaluation. The long-term outcome was analyzed by using the short form-36 (SF-36). Results: There were a total of 32 patients (26 males, eight females) with an average age of 15.64 years. Trauma was a significant etiological factor 57.14% (n = 16/28). Vertebral anomalies were present in 35.7% (n = 10/28) cases. Majority had a neurological deficit at presentation (n = 20/28). The most commonly involved level was the L4–L5 level (n = 18/128) in this series. Multiple level disc degeneration was present in eight patients (28.6%). Immediate postoperative relief was achieved in all but one patient. At long-term follow-up twenty patients were pain-free (71.4%). At follow-up, the physical functioning scale of SF-36 was significantly lower in patients with gross motor deficit prior to surgery. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and

  13. Treatment of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation Using C-Arm Fluoroscopy Guided Target Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu-Li; Xu, Yong-Guang; Zhao, Xue-Jun; Song, Wen-Ge; Zheng, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of target percutaneous laser disc decompression (T-PLDD) for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Background data: PLDD using the Nd:YAG laser has been regarded as an effective alternative treatment for disc herniation. However, all the previous studies were concentrated on vaporizing the nucleus pulposus in the intervertebral space. We hypothesize that insertion of the needle into the extruded part of the nucleus pulposus will decrease its volume and provide superior clinical effects compared to therapies that decrease the volume of the intradiscal nucleus pulposus. Materials and methods: A total of 25 patients suffering from posterolateral extruded but nonsequestered lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated with T-PLDD. After treatment, the patients were followed up and the therapeutic effect was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months using the modified MacNab criteria. Results: The success rate was 80.0% (18 of 25), 88.0% (22 of 25), 92.0% (23 of 25), and 92.0% (23 of 25) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months respectively. No serious complications occurred in any of the patients. Furthermore, we did not observe any neurological sequelae. Conclusions: T-PLDD can significantly decrease pain and improve function of patients who have extruded but nonsequestered lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:22150064

  14. Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Näyhä, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood. Methods We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression. Results A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females. Conclusion Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males. PMID:23418543

  15. Epidural Fibrosis after Lumbar Disc Surgery: Prevention and Outcome Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Razek, Naglaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled study designed and conducted over 10 years from 2002 to 2012. Purpose The study aimed to monitor the effect of suction drains (SD) on the incidence of epidural fibrosis (EF) and to test, if the use of SD alone, SD with local steroids application, SD combined with fat grafts and local steroids application, or SD combined with fat grafts and without local steroids application, would improve outcome. Overview of Literature EF contributes to significant unsatisfactory failed-back syndrome. Efforts have been tried to reduce postoperative EF, but none were ideal. Methods Between September 2002 and 2012, 290 patients with symptomatic unilateral or bilateral, single-level lumbar disc herniation were included in the study. Two groups were included, with 165 patients in group I (intervention group) and 125 patients in group II (control group). Group I was subdivided into four subgroups: group Ia (SD alone), group Ib (SD+fat graft), group Ic (SD+local steroids), and group Id (SD+fat graft+local steroids). Results The use of SD alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Conclusions This study has clearly demonstrated the fact that the use of suction drainage alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome with respect to pain relief and functional outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by an MRI. A simple grading system of EF on MRI was described. PMID:26097652

  16. Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement compared with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Ting; Liu, Gabriel; Thambiah, Joseph; Wong, Hee Kit

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement (ADR) compared to that of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease (DDD) in an Asian population. METHODS This was a retrospective review of 74 patients who had surgery performed for discogenic lower backs that involved only the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. All the patients had lumbar DDD without radiculopathy or spondylolithesis, and concordant pain with discogram at the pathological level. The patients were divided into two groups – those who underwent ADR and those who underwent TLIF. RESULTS A trend suggesting that the ADR group had better perioperative outcomes (less blood loss, shorter operating time, shorter hospital stay and shorter time to ambulation) than the TLIF group was observed. However, a trend indicating that surgical-approach-related complications occurred more frequently in the ADR group than the TLIF group was also observed. The rate of revision surgery was comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that for the treatment of discogenic lower back pain, lumbar ADR has better perioperative outcomes and a similar revision rate when compared with TLIF. However, the use of ADR was associated with a higher incidence of surgical-approach-related complications. More studies with bigger cohort sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of ADR in lumbar DDD. PMID:25917472

  17. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration − the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval − the activL® Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL® Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL® Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL® Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date. PMID:27274317

  18. Microstructure-based fiber optic pressure sensor for measurements in lumbar intervertebral discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoejer, Svante; Krantz, Martin; Ekstroem, Lars; Kaigle, Allison; Holm, Sten

    1999-01-01

    A fiberoptic system with a microstructure sensor element was used for measuring lumbar intervertebral disc pressure in a porcine model. The fiberoptic pressure sensor was inserted in the disc using a guiding needle. A reference sensor was also introduced into the same area of an adjacent disc. The fiberoptic sensor detected pressures from 0.7-8 bar in the disc. Dynamic measurements were carried out at frequencies between 2 and 10 Hz. No phase lag was observed between the applied force and the measured pressures. Sensitivity, dynamic response and available pressure range are all important design characteristics for which this fiberoptic sensor has a competitive edge.

  19. Lumbar disc replacement: preliminary results with ProDisc II after a minimum follow-up period of 1 year.

    PubMed

    Tropiano, Patrick; Huang, Russel C; Girardi, Federico P; Marnay, Thierry

    2003-08-01

    Total disc replacement has the potential to replace fusion as the gold standard surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease. Potential advantages of disc replacement over fusion include avoidance of pseudarthrosis, postoperative orthoses, and junctional degeneration. After observing satisfactory clinical results at 7-11 years' follow-up with the ProDisc first-generation implant, a second-generation prosthesis was designed. This study is a prospective analysis of the early results of total disc replacement with the ProDisc II total disc prosthesis. Fifty-three patients had single-level or multilevel disc replacement and were evaluated clinically and radiographically preoperatively and at mean 1.4-year follow-up. There were clinically and statistically significant improvements in back and leg pain Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry disability scores that were maintained at final follow-up. The clinical results of patients with single- and multilevel surgery were equivalent. Satisfactory results were achieved in 90% of patients who had previous lumbar surgery. Complications occurred in 9% of patients and included vertebral body fracture, transient radicular pain, implant malposition, and transient retrograde ejaculation. Three patients (6%) required reoperation to address complications. No mechanical failure of the implants or loosening was observed, and the prostheses retained motion. Randomized, prospective, long-term studies will be necessary to compare the effectiveness of arthrodesis with total disc replacement. PMID:12902952

  20. Treatment of cauda equina syndrome caused by lumbar disc herniation with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Dou, Qingyu; Hu, Shuai; Liu, Jiaxiang; Kong, Qingquan; Zeng, Jiancheng; Song, Yueming

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by disc herniation. 16 patients with CES caused by LDH at the early and middle stages of Shi's classification were selected as the objects of study, who underwent PELD. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Macnab criteria and the visual analogue scale (VAS). The VAS for leg pain and back pain significantly decreased from preoperative scores of 7.67 ± 1.23 and 7.52 ± 1.42, respectively, to postoperative scores of 1.71 ± 0.53 and 3.18 ± 0.72. Thirteen patients showed favorable results. Complications included one patient of motor weakness, and one patient developed an ipsilateral recurrent herniation who finally acquired satisfactory result after reoperation. Hence, PELD could be used as an alternative surgical method for the treatment of CES in properly selected cases and appropriate patient selection and a reasonable surgical approach will give rise to better outcomes. PMID:26292929

  1. Transdural approach for calcified central disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Jung-Kil; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Yeon-Seong; Kim, Soo-Han

    2007-09-01

    Disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine (L1-2 and L2-3) have a frequency of 1 to 2% of all disc herniations. During posterior discectomy after laminectomy, significant manipulation of the exiting nerve root is unavoidable because of the narrow lamina and the difficulty in mobilizing the nerve root. The authors adopted a transdural approach in patients with calcified central disc herniation at the L1-2 level to reduce the risk of nerve root injury. Four patients suffering from radiating pain together with back pain were treated using the transdural approach. Preoperative neuroimaging studies revealed severe central disc herniation with calcification at the L1-2 level. After laminectomy or laminotomy, the incised dura mater was tacked, and the cauda equina rootlets were gently retracted. An intentional durotomy was performed over its maximal bulging of the ventral dura. After meticulous dissection of dense adhesions between the disc herniation and the dural sac, adequate decompression with removal of calcified disc fragments and osteophytes was accomplished. Clinical symptoms improved in all patients. Postoperative permanent cerebrospinal fluid leakage and pseudomeningocele were not observed, and no patient had a progressive lumbar deformity at an average follow-up of 53 months. Transient mild motor weakness and sensory change were observed in two patients postoperatively; however, these symptoms resolved completely within 1 week. The posterior transdural approach offers an alternative in central calcified upper lumbar disc herniation when root retraction is dangerous. PMID:17877277

  2. Short aggrecan gene repetitive alleles associated with lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients.

    PubMed

    Eser, O; Eser, B; Cosar, M; Erdogan, M O; Aslan, A; Yıldız, H; Solak, M; Haktanır, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a possible association between aggrecan gene polymorphism and lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients. One hundred 20-30-year-old patients with or without low back pain were selected for the study. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients. The patient group had low back pain clinically and degenerative disc disease radiographically. The control group included patients with and without low back pain: all were negative radiographically for degenerative disc disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from all participants. A PCR assay were used to evaluate variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of aggrecan gene alleles to determine if there was any correlation with degenerative disc disease. Significant associations were found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and severe disc degeneration. A significant association was also found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and multilevel disc herniation as well as extrusion and sequestration types of disc herniation. In Turkish population, short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene are associated with increased disc degeneration and disc herniation. PMID:21948754

  3. Lumbar total disc replacement using ProDisc II: a prospective study with a 2-year minimum follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Soo; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Chang Seok

    2006-08-01

    A lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is believed to be a promising substitute in the surgical treatment for lumbar degenerative disc disease. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 36 consecutive patients who underwent lumbar TDR using ProDisc II, and the factors associated with a better clinical outcome after a 2-year minimum follow-up. At the time of the latest follow-up, the success rate was 94% of 36 patients according to the criteria of the US Food and Drug Administration. Of the 10 patients unable to work preoperatively, 7 patients returned to work. Moreover, mean score on the visual analog scale for low back and leg pain improved significantly from 7.5 and 4.7 to 3.0 and 1.2, respectively (P<0.001). In addition, mean Oswestry disability index scores improved significantly from 69.2 to 21.0 (P<0.001). Mean disc height at the operative level increased significantly from 9.0 to 17.6 mm, and mean range of motion increased significantly from 9.7 to 12.7 degrees (P<0.01). Statistical analysis showed that the factors associated with a better clinical outcome were single level, and a higher postoperative segmental ROM at the operative level. At a minimum follow-up of 2 years, the lumbar TDR using ProDisc II showed excellent clinical and radiographic outcomes without any significant complication. However, future efforts need to be directed toward the evaluation of a larger number of patients with longer follow-up. PMID:16891976

  4. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a highly genetic condition partly mediated by disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Battié, Michele C; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Niemelainen, Riikka; Gill, Kevin; Levalahti, Esko; Videman, Tapio; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most commonly diagnosed spinal disorders in older adults. Although the pathophysiology of the clinical syndrome is not well understood, a narrow central canal or intervertebral foramen is an essential or defining feature. The aim of the present study was to estimate the magnitude of genetic versus environmental influences on central lumbar spinal stenosis and to investigate disc degeneration and stature or bone development as possible genetic pathways.Methods. A classic twin study with multivariate analyses considering lumbar level and other covariates was conducted. The study sample comprised 598 male twins (147 monozygotic and 152 dizygotic pairs), 35-70 years of age, from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. The primary phenotypes were central lumbar stenosis as assessed qualitatively on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitatively measured dural sac cross-sectional area. Additional phenotypes (to examine possible genetic pathways) included disc bulging and standing height, as an indicator of overall skeletal size or development.Results. The heritability estimate (h²) for qualitatively assessed central lumbar spinal stenosis on MRI was 66.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 56.8,74.5). The broad-sense heritability estimate for dural sac cross-sectional area was 81.2% (95% CI 74.5, 86.1),with a similar magnitude of genetic influences across lumbar levels (h²=72.4–75.6). The additive genetic correlation of quantitatively assessed stenosis and disc bulging was extremely high. There was no indication of shared genetic influences between stenosis and stature.Conclusion. Central lumbar spinal stenosis and associated dural sac dimensions are highly genetic, and disc degeneration (bulging) appears to be one pathway through which genes influence spinal stenosis. PMID:25155712

  5. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed spinal diseases. The symptoms these disorders cause are anticipated to increase as the population in Western countries ages. Purpose Compare back and leg pain alleviation in patients with LDD and a viscoelastic disc prosthesis documented in the SWISSspine registry versus patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion documented in the Spine Tango registry. Study Design Prospectively collected clinical and outcome data in two independent spine registries. Outcome Measures were back and leg pain relief on 0 to 10 numerical rating scales. Materials and Methods The analysis included a single surgeon series of 48 patients with viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR) from the SWISSspine registry which were compared to 131 patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) from the Spine Tango registry. Two linear multivariate regression models were built to assess the associations of patient characteristics with back and leg pain relief. The following covariates were included in the models: patient age and sex, disc herniation as additional diagnosis, number of treated segments, level of treated segment, treatment type (VTDR, ALIF), preoperative back and leg pain levels and follow-up interval. Results Both models showed VTDR to be associated with significantly higher back (2.76 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78 - 3.73; p < 0.001) and leg pain (2.12 points; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.13; p < 0.001) relief than ALIF. Other influential factors for higher back pain relief were female sex compared with male sex (1.03 additional points; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.78; p = 0.008), monosegmental surgery compared with bisegmental surgery (1.02 additional points; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.83; p = 0.014), and higher back pain at baseline (0.87 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative back pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03; p < 0.001). Other influential factors for leg pain relief were monosegmental surgery (0

  6. Acute Lumbar Burst Fracture Treated by Minimally Invasive Lateral Corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Thiago

    2013-01-01

    Burst fractures in acute spinal traumas are a difficult problem to solve. Different approaches and techniques have been utilized, but with high incidence of morbidity and mortality, besides unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results. Mini-open approaches recently emerged and have been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of several spinal conditions. Here we report a case of acute lumbar burst fracture at L2 treated by minimally invasive true lateral approach posteriorly instrumented with percutaneous pedicle screws. The minimum disruptive access in addition to a rigid construction allowed a lumbar corpectomy without the morbidity of standard open approaches, lowering surgery costs and accelerating the patient recovery with successfully clinical and radiological results. PMID:23634314

  7. Discography-induced acute lumbar disc herniation: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Ashley R; Hinman, Adrian; Lutz, Gregory; Farmer, James C

    2005-04-01

    The reported complication rate of provocative lumbar discography is low, ranging from 0-2.5%. We report five cases of acute lumbar disc herniation precipitated by discography, a previously unreported complication. The cases reported comprise of four men and one woman with ages ranging from 23-45 years. All developed an acute exacerbation of radicular leg pain following multilevel provocative lumbar discography. One patient developed an acute foot drop. Comparison of lumbar MRI scans before and after discography demonstrated either a new herniated disc fragment or an increase in size of a preexisting herniation in all cases. On review of each discogram study and pre-discogram MRI an annular tear or small disc herniation was noted in all cases. In each case the patients' symptoms failed to resolve necessitating surgical intervention in all cases. In conclusion, annular deficiency is an obvious predisposing factor to discogram related disc herniation. New onset or a persistent exacerbation of radicular symptoms following provocative discography merits further investigation. PMID:15800440

  8. Percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Yan, Min; Dai, Yi; Qiu, Weidong; Deng, Shuo; Gu, Xinzhu

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is usually managed with conservative treatment or surgery. However, conservative therapy seldom yields good results, and surgery is associated with multiple complications. This study aimed to assess bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. A total of 168 patients with lumbar disc herniation suitable for radiofrequency thermocoagulation were enrolled and randomized to monopolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (control group, n=84) or bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (experimental group, n=84) treatment groups. Ablation sites were targeted under CT scan guidance, and consecutive radiofrequency therapy was used. One and two probes were used for monopolar and bipolar thermocoagulation, respectively. Thermocoagulation was achieved at 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 60s each, 80°C for 90s, and 92°C for 100s. Symptoms and complications were evaluated using the modified Macnab criteria and Visual Analog Scale at 7, 30, and 180days postoperatively. At 180days, a significantly higher efficacy rate was obtained in the experimental group compared with control patients (91.6% versus 79.7%, P<0.05). No severe complications were occurred in either group. Targeted ablation via bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation is efficient for lumbar disc herniation treatment, and should be further explored for broad clinical application. PMID:27234606

  9. Spontaneous Regression of Lumbar Disc Herniation After Weight Loss: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Altiok, Inci Baltepe; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Cosar, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, and surgery for lumbar disc herniations have existed for over a century. However, during the last three decades, there have been many new developments in imaging techniques, surgical procedures, physical medicine, and rehabilitation. In light of this, the most effective and appropriate treatment is controversial. Spontaneous regression of sequestrated, extruded, or protruded disc herniation has often been reported in the literature, although it is still a rare phenomenon. After a thorough review of the literature, we did not find any case report about this phenomenon after weight loss. In this report, though, we present a recent case about spontaneous regression of extruded disc herniation following weight loss. PMID:26242347

  10. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  11. T2* mapping of ovine intervertebral discs: Normative data for cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kolf, Anna-Katharina; Hesper, Tobias; Schleich, Christoph; Hosalkar, Harish S; Jankowiak, Silvia; Cacchi, Claudio; Antoch, Gerald; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    To obtain T2* values in histologically evaluated healthy ovine intervertebral discs of the cervical and lumbar spine. Intervertebral discs of nine sheep and nine lambs underwent histological assessment with the modified Boos score for grading of disc degeneration. Discs with a score <10 points (maximum = 40 points) underwent T2* mapping (n = 64). Mid-sagittal T2* values were obtained in five regions: Anterior annulus fibrosus, anterior nucleus pulposus, central nucleus pulposus, posterior nucleus pulposus, and posterior annulus fibrosus. We noted a zonal T2* distribution with high values in the central nucleus and low T2* values in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus. The T2* values were higher in lamb than in sheep IVDs for both cervical and lumbar spine (p < 0.001). The T2* values were also higher in the cervical than in the lumbar spine (p = 0.029 for sheep and p < 0.001 for lamb IVDs). The T2* values obtained in these ovine intervertebral discs can serve as baseline values for future T2* measurements both in health and disease. PMID:26466861

  12. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  13. Lateral Pressure and VAS Pain Score Analysis for the Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure is a minimally invasive procedure that has become widely utilized. The LLIF procedure typically involves bending the table to access the disc spaces of interest due to anatomical constraints. It is unknown if this bending process is painful or what pressures are exhibited on the downside part of the body. The goal of the study was to determine whether sex, height, weight, body mass index, bed angle, or positioning relative to the break of the bed affects the downside skin pressures and VAS pain scores in awake volunteers. Methods Fifty-six volunteers were placed in the lateral decubitus position and pressure sensors were placed at the downside part of their anatomy (shoulder, T10 rib , iliac crest, and greater trochanter). The pressures were checked with the iliac crest or greater trochanter at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 degree bed angles. VAS scores were checked when the iliac crest or greater trochanter were at the maximum bed break angles. Results A significant positive association was found between increased bed angle and pressure at all five areas on the downside body locations (p<0.0001). The greatest pressures were located at the iliac crest and greater trochanter when these specific locations were centered over the break of the bed (p<0.0001). When the iliac crest was placed at maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI increased the VAS pain by 0.13 (p<0.0001)and men had 1.96 (p=0.0009)higher VAS scores then women. When the greater trochanter was placed at the maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI decreased VAS pain by 0.19 (p<0.0001) and women had 1.55 (p=0.0002)higher VAS pain scores then men. Conclusions In awake volunteers, the pressure at the iliac crest or greater trochanter at the break of the bed increases by increasing the bed angle. Women with a lower BMI had high VAS pain scores when their greater trochanter was at maximal bed break. Men with higher BMI had high VAS pain scores when

  14. Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Summary and background data: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients’ life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Methods: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Results: Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Conclusion: Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated

  15. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  16. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  17. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Harrison, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf. PMID:24294533

  18. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  19. Effects of psoralen on chondrocyte degeneration in lumbar intervertebral disc of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libin; Sun, Xiaohui; Geng, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    Discuss the internal mechanism of delaying degeneration of lumber intervertebral disc. The cartilage of lumbar intervertebral disc of SD rats was selected in vitro, then cultured by tissue explant method, and identified by HE staining, toluidine blue staining and immunofluorescence. The optimal concentration of psoralen was screened by cell proliferation assay and RT-PCR method. The cells in third generation with good growth situation is selected and placed in 6-well plate at concentration of 1×10(5)/well and its expression was tested. Compared to concentration of 0, the mRNA expression of Col2al (Collagen Ⅱ) secreted by was up regulated chondrocyte of lumbar intervertebral disc at the concentration of 12.5 and 25μM (P<0.0 or P<0.01). The aggrecan mRNA of psoralen group was higher than blank control group (P<0.01); compared with IL-1β induced group, the mRNA expression of Col2al was significantly increased but the mRNA expression of ADAMTS-5 was significantly decreased in psoralen group (P<0.01). These findings suggest that, psoralen can remit the degeneration of lumbar intervertebral disc induced by IL-1β to some extent, and affect the related factors of IL-1β signaling pathway. PMID:25796142

  20. Genotypic and Antimicrobial Characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes Isolates from Surgically Excised Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    Rollason, Jess; Albert, Hanne B.; Barnard, Emma; Worthington, Tony; Hilton, Anthony C.; Vernallis, Ann; Patrick, Sheila; Elliott, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38%) patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods, 52% of the isolates were type II (50% of culture-positive patients), while type IA strains accounted for 28% of isolates (42% patients). Type III (11% isolates; 21% patients) and type IB strains (9% isolates; 17% patients) were detected less frequently. The MIC values for all isolates were lowest for amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, rifampicin, tetracycline, and vancomycin (≤1mg/L). The MIC for fusidic acid was 1-2 mg/L. The MIC for trimethoprim and gentamicin was 2 to ≥4 mg/L. The demonstration that type II and III strains, which are not frequently recovered from skin, predominated within our isolate collection (63%) suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed. PMID:24066290

  1. Cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a prospective randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN51857546

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Thomeer, Ralph TWM

    2006-01-01

    Background Open discectomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with long-lasting sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Minimally invasive approaches such as microendoscopic discectomy have gained attention in recent years. Reduced tissue trauma allows early ambulation, short hospital stay and quick resumption of daily activities. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–70 years) presenting with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation lasting more than 6–8 weeks are included. Patients with disc herniation larger than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, or disc herniation less than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter with concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eliglible for participation. Randomisation into microendoscopic discectomy or conventional unilateral transflaval discectomy will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The length of skin incision is equal in both groups. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient, measured by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. We will also evaluate several other outcome parameters, including perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine kinase, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, open discectomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether

  2. Determination of the intervertebral disc space from CT images of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Å tern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc are among the most common causes of low back pain, where for individuals with significant symptoms surgery may be needed. One of the interventions is the total disc replacement surgery, where the degenerated disc is replaced by an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study we propose a method for the determination of the intervertebral disc space from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The first step of the proposed method is the construction of a model of vertebral bodies in the lumbar spine. For this purpose, a chain of five elliptical cylinders is initialized in the 3D image and then deformed to resemble vertebral bodies by introducing 25 shape parameters. The parameters are obtained by aligning the chain to the vertebral bodies in the CT image according to image intensity and appearance information. The determination of the intervertebral disc space is finally achieved by finding the planes that fit the endplates of the obtained parametric 3D models, and placing points in the space between the planes of adjacent vertebrae that enable surface reconstruction of the intervertebral disc space. The morphometric analysis of images from 20 subjects yielded 11:3 +/- 2:6, 12:1 +/- 2:4, 12:8 +/- 2:0 and 12:9 +/- 2:7 cm3 in terms of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral disc space volume, respectively.

  3. Indications for Lumbar Total Disc Replacement: Selecting the Right Patient with the Right Indication for the Right Total Disc

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary of Background Data As with any surgery, care should be taken to determine patient selection criteria for lumbar TDR based on safety and optimizing outcome. These goals may initially be addressed by analyzing biomechanical implant function and early clinical experience, ongoing evaluation is needed to refine indications. Objective The purpose of this work was to synthesize information published on general indications for lumbar TDR. A secondary objective was to determine if indications vary for different TDR designs. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify lumbar TDR articles. Articles were reviewed and patient selection criteria and indications were synthesized. Results With respect to safety, there was good agreement in the literature to exclude patients with osteopenia/osteoporosis or fracture. Risk of injury to vascular structures due to the anterior approach was often addressed by excluding patients with previous abdominal surgery in the area of disc pathology or increased age. The literature was very consistent on the primary indication for TDR being painful disc degeneration unresponsive to at least 6 months of nonoperative care. Literature investigating the impact of previous spine surgery was mixed; however, prior surgery was not necessarily a contra-indication, provided the patient otherwise met selection criteria. The literature was mixed on setting a minimum preoperative disc height as a selection criterion. There were no publications investigating whether some patients are better/worse candidates for specific TDR designs. Based on the literature a proposal for patient selection criteria is offered. Conclusions Several TDR indications and contra-indications are widely accepted. No literature addresses particular TDR design being preferable for some patients. As with any spine surgery, ongoing evaluation of TDR outcomes will likely lead to more detailed general and device design specific indications. PMID:25694946

  4. The value of accurate clinical assessment in the surgical management of the lumbar disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R S; Cadoux-Hudson, T A; Adams, C B

    1988-02-01

    One hundred patients with lumbar disc protrusions were studied. Thirty six "control" patients were admitted in the same time period with low back pain and sciatica but with subsequently "normal" myelograms and no surgery. The aim of this paper was to relate history and clinical signs to the myelograms and surgical findings. Ninety nine per cent of our patients presented with sciatica (controls 94%). The most frequently found sign in patients with a disc protrusion was reduction of ipsilateral straight leg raising (98%). However, 55% of controls also showed this sign. There were three signs that, when present, particularly indicated a disc protrusion; "crossed straight leg raising" (pain on contralateral straight leg raising), measured calf wasting and impaired ankle reflex: the latter being especially indicative of an L5-S1 disc protrusion. There were two further important signs, weakness of dorsiflexion of the foot and scoliosis of the lumbar spine. However, such signs occurred in about half the patients and so clinical diagnosis in the remaining half depended on obtaining a good history of sciatica, and paying due regard to severity of the pain, the mobility of the patient, the ability and desire to work and the overall personality. Satisfactory results of surgery simply depend on finding and removing a definite disc protrusion. Using these methods of selection, 98% have returned to their original employment, 86% within 3 months of the operation. For a patient with no abnormal signs and a normal myelogram, surgical treatment should not be advised. PMID:3346682

  5. The aging mouse partially models the aging human spine: lumbar and coccygeal disc height, composition, mechanical properties, and Wnt signaling in young and old mice

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Rhiannon; Harland, Robin A.; Bomar, Bradley A.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Murine lumbar and coccygeal (tail) regions of spines are commonly used to study cellular signaling of age-related disc diseases, but the tissue-level changes of aging intervertebral discs and vertebrae of each spinal region remain unclear. Furthermore, the impact of aging lumbar and coccygeal discs on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which is putatively involved in the catabolism of intervertebral discs, is also unclear. We compared disc/vertebrae morphology and mechanics and biochemical composition of intervertebral discs from lumbar and coccygeal regions between young (4–5 mo) and old (20–22 mo) female C57BL/6 mice. Center intervertebral disc height from both regions was greater in old discs than young discs. Compared with young, old lumbar discs had a lower early viscous coefficient (a measure of stiffness) by 40%, while conversely old coccygeal discs were stiffer by 53%. Biochemically, old mice had double the collagen content in lumbar and coccygeal discs of young discs, greater glycosaminoglycan in lumbar discs by 37%, but less glycosaminoglycan in coccygeal discs by 32%. Next, we compared Wnt activity of lumbar and coccygeal discs of 4- to 5-mo and 12- to 14-mo TOPGAL mice. Despite the disc-specific changes, aging decreased Wnt signaling in the nucleus pulposus from both spinal regions by ≥64%. Compared with young, trabecular bone volume/tissue volume and ultimate force were less in old lumbar vertebrae, but greater in old coccygeal vertebrae. Thus intervertebral discs and vertebrae age in a spinal region-dependent manner, but these differential age-related changes may be uncoupled from Wnt signaling. Overall, lumbar and coccygeal regions are not interchangeable in modeling human aging. PMID:24790018

  6. Dexamethasone in the management of symptoms due to herniated lumbar disc.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L N

    1975-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with radicular pain due to myelographically proven herniated lumbar intervertebral discs were treated with initially high but tapering doses of intramuscular dexamethasone for seven days. All patients had reflief of pain within 24-48 hours. Bed rest was eliminated as a significant factor in the improvement. Nine patients required surgery at the end of the hospital treatment period. Another 11 required surgery during the follow-up of 15 months. Review of work status and recurrent pain during the follow-up indicates that the non-surgically treated patients in this series fared better. It is concluded that nerve root inflammation is the immediate cause of radicular symptoms in case of ruptured lumbar disc and that treatment with dexamethasone gives prompt relief of pain and may avoid the need for surgery in most cases. Images PMID:1219086

  7. High Prevalence of Disc Degeneration and Spondylolysis in the Lumbar Spine of Professional Beach Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Külling, Fabrice A.; Florianz, Hannes; Reepschläger, Bastian; Gasser, Johann; Jost, Bernhard; Lajtai, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Beach volleyball is an intensive sport with high impact on the lumbar spine. Low back pain (LBP) is frequent among elite players. Increased prevalence of pathological changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lumbar spine of elite athletes has been reported. Hypothesis: There is an increased prevalence of disc degeneration and spondylolysis in the MRI of the lumbar spine of professional beach volleyball players. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-nine fully competitive professional male volleyball players (mean age, 28 years) completed outcomes questionnaires and underwent a complete clinical examination and an MRI of their lumbar spine. Results: Whereas 86% of players suffered from LBP during their career, the incidence of LBP in the last 4 weeks was 35%. Pain rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) averaged 3 points (range, 0-8). Twenty-three of 29 players (79%) had at least 1 degenerated disc of Pfirrmann grade ≥3. The most affected spinal levels were L4-5 in 14 (48%) and L5-S1 in 15 players (52%); both levels were involved in 5 players (17%). Six of 29 (21%) players showed a spondylolysis grade 4 according to the Hollenburg classification; there was evidence of spondylolisthesis in 2 players. There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities. Conclusion: In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%. Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population. Abnormal MRI findings did not correlate with LBP, thus MRIs have to be interpreted with caution. PMID:26535316

  8. Analysis of Internet Information on Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Belayneh, Rebekah; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-07-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a surgical technique that is being increasingly used. The authors' objective was to examine information on the Internet pertaining to the LLIF technique. An analysis was conducted of publicly accessible websites pertaining to LLIF. The following search engines were used: Google (www.google.com), Bing (www.bing.com), and Yahoo (www.yahoo.com). DuckDuckGo (www.duckduckgo.com) was an additional search engine used due to its emphasis on generating accurate and consistent results while protecting searchers' privacy and reducing advertisements. The top 35 websites providing information on LLIF from the 4 search engines were identified. A total of 140 websites were evaluated. Each web-site was categorized based on authorship (academic, private, medical industry, insurance company, other) and content of information. Using the search term lateral lumbar interbody fusion, 174,000 Google results, 112,000 Yahoo results, and 112,000 Bing results were obtained. DuckDuckGo does not display the number of results found for a search. From the top 140 websites collected from each website, 78 unique websites were identified. Websites were authored by a private medical group in 46.2% of the cases, an academic medical group in 26.9% of the cases, and the biomedical industry in 5.1% of the cases. Sixty-eight percent of websites reported indications, and 24.4% reported contraindications. Benefits of LLIF were reported by 69.2% of websites. Thirty-six percent of websites reported complications of LLIF. Overall, the quality of information regarding LLIF on the Internet is poor. Spine surgeons and spine societies can assist in improving the quality of the information on the Internet regarding LLIF. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e701-e707.]. PMID:27111081

  9. Surgery for lumbar disc herniation: Analysis of 500 consecutive patients treated in an interdisciplinary spine centre.

    PubMed

    Schmid, S L; Wechsler, C; Farshad, M; Antoniadis, A; Ulrich, N H; Min, K; Woernle, C M

    2016-05-01

    Surgical removal of a symptomatic herniated lumbar disc is performed either with or without the support of a microscope. Up to the time of writing, the literature has reported similar clinical outcomes for the two procedures. Five hundred consecutive patients, operated upon for primary single-level lumbar disc herniation in our University Spine Center between 2003-2011, with (n=275), or without (n=225), the aid of a microscope were included. Data were retrospectively analyzed, comparing the primary endpoint of clinical outcome and the secondary endpoints of complications, surgical time and length of hospitalization. Clinical outcomes and reoperation rates were comparable in both groups. Surgical time was significantly shorter with a mean time of 47minutes without use of the microscope compared to the mean time of 87minutes (p<0.001) with the use of the microscope. Mean length of hospitalization was shorter in those operated with the microscope (5.3days) compared to those without (6.1days, p=0.004). There was no difference in rates of complications. Microdiscectomy versus open sequestrectomy and discectomy for surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is associated with similar clinical outcomes and reoperation rates. Open sequestrectomy is associated with shorter operation times. Microdiscectomy is associated with shorter hospitalization stays. PMID:26778355

  10. A rare cause of ureteral injuries; simultaneous common iliac artery and ureter injury during posterior lumbar disc surgery

    PubMed Central

    Başer, Aykut; Alkış, Okan; Toktaş, Cihan; Zümrütbaş, Ali Ersin

    2016-01-01

    Major vascular injuries during lumbar disc surgery are rare but well-recognized complications. However, vascular injuries of the branches of the aorta and ureteral injuries are very rare. Although its incidence is not known definitely, it is estimated to be 1/1000. Ureteral injuries comprise less than 1% of all genitourinary traumas. In this article, we report clinical progress of a patient who had simultaneous internal iliac artery and ureteral injury during lumbar discectomy. The patient was managed with primary ureteroureterostomy. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported with simultaneous ureter and iliac artery trauma during lumbar disc surgery. PMID:27274898

  11. Functional results and the risk factors of reoperations after lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Kara, Bilge; Tulum, Zeliha; Acar, Umit

    2005-02-01

    Factors such as driving motor vehicles, sedentary occupations, vibration, smoking, previous full-term pregnancies, physical inactivity, increased body mass index (BMI), and a tall stature are associated with symptomatic disc herniations. Fitness and strength is postulated to protect an individual from disc rupture. The objective of our study was to determine the pain levels and differences of functional and economic situations of patients who had undergone one or more than one operation due to lumbar disc herniation and to put forward the effect of risk factors that may be potential, especially from the aspect of undergoing reoperation. Patients who had undergone one (n=46) or more than one operation (n=34) due to lumbar disc herniation were included in the study. It was a prospective study with evaluation on the day the patients were discharged and at second and sixth months after lumbar disc operation. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used in determining the functional disability associated with back pain; the Prolo Functional Economic Rating Scale (Prolo scale) was used in determining the effect of back pain on functional and economic situations. In the ODI measurements made in the postoperative second and sixth months, significant differences appeared in favor of patients who had undergone one operation (p<0.05). According to the Prolo scale, it was found that the economic situation was better in the sixth month and the functional situation was better in the second and sixth months in patients having undergone one operation (p<0.05). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the lack of regular physical exercise was a significant predictor for reoperation (OR, 4.595; CI, 1.38-15.28), whereas gender, age, BMI, occupation, or smoking did not indicate so much significance as regular exercise. PMID:15490256

  12. Outcome of nucleoplasty in patients with radicular pain due to lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Qassim, Abdulla; O’Sullivan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nucleoplasty (percutaneous lumbar disc decompression) is a minimally invasive procedure that utilizes radiofrequency energy as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, against open microdiscectomy, which would be the mainstay treatment modality. The literature reports a favorable outcome in up to 77% of patients at 6 months. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of nucleoplasty in the management of discogenic radicular pain. Materials and Methods: The medical notes of 33 patients, admitted for nucleoplasty between June 2006 and September 2007, were reviewed retrospectively. All had radicular pain, and contained herniated disc as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbosacral spine. Patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months post-procedure. The outcome measures employed in this study were satisfaction with symptoms and self-reported improvement. Results: Thirty-three cases were examined (18 males and 15 females). Twenty-seven procedures were performed with no complications and six were abandoned due to anatomical reasons. There were 18 and 15 cases of disc herniation at L5/S1 and L4/5 levels, respectively. Four weeks following the procedure, 13 patients reported improvement in symptoms, and 14 remained symptomatically the same and subsequently had open microdiscectomy. Conclusion: Nucleoplasty has been shown to be a safe and minimal-access procedure. Less than half of our selected cohort of patients reported symptomatic improvement at 1-month follow-up. We no longer offer this procedure to our patients. Possible reasons are discussed. PMID:23633860

  13. Comparison of Discectomy versus Sequestrectomy in Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jisheng; Hu, Yejun; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhu, Ting; Zheng, Huawei; Jing, Yibiao; Xu, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc removal is currently the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation. No consensus has been achieved whether aggressive disc resection with curettage (discectomy) versus conservative removal of the offending disc fragment alone (sequestrectomy) provides better outcomes. This study aims to compare the reherniation rate and clinical outcomes between discectomy and sequestrectomy by literature review and a meta-analysis. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed up to June 1, 2014. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical baseline characteristics, perioperative variables, complications, recurrent herniation rate and post-operative functional outcomes. Results Twelve eligible trials evaluating discectomy vs sequestrectomy were identified including one randomized controlled study, five prospective and six retrospective comparative studies. By contrast to discectomy, sequestrectomy was associated with significantly less operative time (p<0.001), lower visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back pain (p<0.05), less post-operative analgesic usage (p<0.05) and better patients’ satisfaction (p<0.05). Recurrent herniation rate, reoperation rate, intraoperative blood loss, hospitalization duration and VAS for sciatica were without significant difference. Conclusions According to our pooled data, sequestrectomy entails equivalent reherniation rate and complications compared with discectomy but maintains a lower incidence of recurrent low back pain and higher satisfactory rate. High-quality prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to firmly assess these two procedures. PMID:25815514

  14. Inflammatory Serum Protein Profiling of Patients with Lumbar Radicular Pain One Year after Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Moen, Aurora; Lind, Anne-Li; Thulin, Måns; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood; Røe, Cecilie; Gjerstad, Johannes; Gordh, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies suggest that lumbar radicular pain following disc herniation may be associated with a local or systemic inflammatory process. In the present study, we investigated the serum inflammatory protein profile of such patients. All 45 patients were recruited from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, during the period 2007-2009. The new multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) technology was used to analyze the levels of 92 proteins. Interestingly, the present data showed that patients with radicular pain 12 months after disc herniation may be different from other patients with regard to many measurable serum cytokines. Given a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.10 and 0.05, we identified 41 and 13 proteins, respectively, which were significantly upregulated in the patients with severe pain one year after disc herniation. On the top of the list ranked by estimated increase we found C-X-C motif chemokine 5 (CXCM5; 217% increase), epidermal growth factor (EGF; 142% increase), and monocyte chemotactic protein 4 (MCP-4; 70% increase). Moreover, a clear overall difference in the serum cytokine profile between the chronic and the recovered patients was demonstrated. Thus, the present results may be important for future protein serum profiling of lumbar radicular pain patients with regard to prognosis and choice of treatment. We conclude that serum proteins may be measurable molecular markers of persistent pain after disc herniation. PMID:27293953

  15. Inflammatory Serum Protein Profiling of Patients with Lumbar Radicular Pain One Year after Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Aurora; Lind, Anne-Li; Thulin, Måns; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood; Røe, Cecilie; Gordh, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies suggest that lumbar radicular pain following disc herniation may be associated with a local or systemic inflammatory process. In the present study, we investigated the serum inflammatory protein profile of such patients. All 45 patients were recruited from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, during the period 2007–2009. The new multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) technology was used to analyze the levels of 92 proteins. Interestingly, the present data showed that patients with radicular pain 12 months after disc herniation may be different from other patients with regard to many measurable serum cytokines. Given a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.10 and 0.05, we identified 41 and 13 proteins, respectively, which were significantly upregulated in the patients with severe pain one year after disc herniation. On the top of the list ranked by estimated increase we found C-X-C motif chemokine 5 (CXCM5; 217% increase), epidermal growth factor (EGF; 142% increase), and monocyte chemotactic protein 4 (MCP-4; 70% increase). Moreover, a clear overall difference in the serum cytokine profile between the chronic and the recovered patients was demonstrated. Thus, the present results may be important for future protein serum profiling of lumbar radicular pain patients with regard to prognosis and choice of treatment. We conclude that serum proteins may be measurable molecular markers of persistent pain after disc herniation. PMID:27293953

  16. Efficacy of a Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Patients Undergoing Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  17. Biomechanical effects of semi-constrained integrated artificial discs on zygapophysial joints of implanted lumbar segments

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, SHENG-NAI; YAO, QING-QIANG; WANG, LI-MING; HU, WEN-HAO; WEI, BO; XU, YAN; ZHANG, DONG-SHENG

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize the design and application of semi-constrained integrated artificial discs (SIADs) using a finite element (FE) analysis following implantation, wherein the zygapophysial joints of the segment were biomechanically reconstructed. An FE model of the L4–L5 segment was constructed. Variations in the stresses on the discs and zygapophysial joints were observed during 5° anteflexion, 5° extension and 5° rotation under the 400-N applied axial load. Stresses and load translation analyses of the discs and zygapophysial joints were conducted during anteflexion, extension and rotation under the 400-N applied axial load. Following implantation of the lumbar segments, the stresses on the SIAD zygapophysial joints were not significantly different from those of physiological discs during anteflexion, and these were both marginally greater compared with those of non-constrained artificial discs (NADs). During extension, the increase in the stress on the SIAD zygapophysial joints was less than that on NAD zygapophysial joints. Stresses on the NAD zygapophysial joints were higher than those on SIAD and physiological discs during rotation. The stress on the SIAD zygapophysial joints was not significantly different from that on physiological discs during rotation. For SIADs and NADs, the stresses on the zygapophysial joints and the displacements of the discs were greater compared with those of the physiological discs during extension. The SIADs affected the variations in the stresses on the implanted segment more than the NADs, and the SIADs protected the zygapophysial joints of the implanted segment to a higher degree than the NADs. PMID:24255672

  18. The effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression for the prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ming Wei; Liu, Wei; Feng, Wei; Ma, Nan

    2009-07-01

    Objective: to investigate the role of associated factors in the effectiveness of laser treatment for prolapsed lumber intervertebral disc. Method: 302 prolapsed lumber intervertebral discs in 212 patients were treated with percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Patients were followed up by 12month, the associated factors which affecting the effectiveness of treatment, ie age, duration of illness were analyzed. Results: Punctual Success rate was 100%. After 12 month's follow up, 86% successful outcomes were obtained, in which 93% successful outcomes were obtained in patients less than 50 years old, 92% successful outcomes was obtained in the patients whose duration of illness less than 1 year.

  19. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  20. Preoperative retrolisthesis as a risk factor of postdecompression lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shota; Tateishi, Kosuke; Hosono, Noboru; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT In this study, the authors aimed to identify specific risk factors for postdecompression lumbar disc herniation (PDLDH) in patients who have not undergone discectomy and/or fusion. METHODS Between 2007 and 2012, 493 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent bilateral partial laminectomy without discectomy and/or fusion in a single hospital. Eighteen patients (herniation group [H group]: 15 men, 3 women; mean age 65.1 years) developed acute sciatica as a result of PDLDH within 2 years after surgery. Ninety patients who did not develop postoperative acute sciatica were selected as a control group (C group: 75 men, 15 women; mean age 65.4 years). Patients in the C group were age and sex matched with those in the H group. The patients in the groups were also matched for decompression level, number of decompression levels, and surgery date. The radiographic variables measured included percentage of slippage, intervertebral angle, range of motion, lumbar lordosis, disc height, facet angle, extent of facet removal, facet degeneration, disc degeneration, and vertebral endplate degeneration. The threshold for PDLDH risk factors was evaluated using a continuous numerical variable and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The area under the curve was used to determine the diagnostic performance, and values greater than 0.75 were considered to represent good performance. RESULTS Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was the sole significant independent risk factor for PDLDH. The area under the curve for preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was 0.849; the cutoff value was estimated to be a retrolisthesis of 7.2% during extension. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed that bilateral partial laminectomy, performed along with the removal of the posterior support ligament, may not be suitable for lumbar spinal stenosis patients with preoperative retrolisthesis greater than 7.2% during extension. PMID:26654340

  1. Functional Outcome of Lumbar Discectomy by Fenestration Technique in Lumbar Disc Prolapse – Return to Work and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Umashankar, Mahesh Kotehal; Reddy, B.S. Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain affects every population and is one of world’s foremost debilitating conditions. Clinically significant sciatica due to lumbar disc prolapse occurs in 4-6% of population. Fenestration discectomy as a surgical procedure is less time consuming, with lesser blood loss, lesser post-operative complications and does not compromise with stability of spine when compared to laminectomy. Aim Present study was conducted to determine extent of functional recovery i.e. pain relief and return to work in patients with lumbar disc prolapse treated by fenestration technique. Materials and Methods From October 2010 to March 2012, 50 patients with signs and symptoms of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc who failed to respond to conservative treatment were operated for discectomy by fenestration technique and studied prospectively. Functional outcome was evaluated by ‘Back Pain Functional Score (BPFS)’ of Strafford et al., PROLO rating scale to determine preoperative functional and economical status and outcome at final follow up after 6 months. In order to identify physical signs from non organic signs Wadell’s score system was used. Result of surgery was evaluated with help of McNab’s criteria. Results In our study, according to Back Pain Functional Scale by Strafford et al., and PROLO scale, good results were found in 42 (84%) cases, fair result in 8 cases (16%) and none with poor results at follow up of six months. According to PROLO economical and functional scale, 84% cases were able to join their previous occupation at end of six months and 76% cases had complete pain relief. In our study, correlation of age and duration of symptoms to functional outcome was statistically significant (p=0.089 & p = 0.098+ respectively) showing more good results among patients with age less than 30 years and patients having duration of symptoms less than 6 months. Conclusion Functional outcome of fenestration technique in terms of return to work and

  2. Lumbar disk replacement with the ProDisc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mirovsky, Yigal; Shalmon, Ehud; Halpern, Zvi; Halperin, Nahum; Blankstein, Alexander; Peer, Amir

    2008-02-01

    Twenty-two ProDisc II prostheses (Spine Solutions, New York, New York) were implanted in 21 patients with degenerative disk disease at L5-S1 (19 disks) and L4-L5 (3 disks). After mean follow-up of 3.1 years (range, 17-49 months), pain intensity in all but 3 patients had improved from an average of 7.7 preoperatively to 4.6 postoperatively (P< .001) on a visual analog scale. Average Oswestry Disability Index score improved from 61 to 35 (P< .001). Radiographic reconstruction of the disk space height was achieved in all cases. Previous diskectomy at the implanted level and disk degeneration adjacent to previous fusion negatively influenced the results. PMID:19292209

  3. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  4. Is Surgical Drain Useful for Lumbar Disc Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho Seok; Kim, Woo Kyung; Son, Seong; Jeong, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical drains are commonly used after the spine surgeries for minimizing hematoma formation, which can delay wound healing and may become a source of fibrosis, infection, and pain. The drain, however, may provide a direct route for infection if it is contaminated. Our objective was to survey the relationship between surgical drains and infection. Methods The 70 patients who had undergone single-level lumbar discectomy from April 2011 to March 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient's medical chart and magnetic resonance image were thoroughly reviewed after all the patients had been divided into the drainage and the nondrainage groups. The amounts and durations of the surgical drains in the drainage group were analyzed. Additionally, the levels of C-reactive protein, rates of infection, scores of preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS), and lengths of hospital stay after operation were compared between the 2 groups. Results In this study, 70 patients were retrospectively analyzed; out of which, 42 and 28 patients were included in the drainage and the nondrainage groups, respectively. Two of the postoperative infection cases in the nondrainage group required to undergo repeated operations. The frequency of the postoperative infection cases was higher in the nondrainage group than in the drainage group; however, there was no significant statistical difference between the 2 groups (p=0.157). Conclusion Surgical drains did not elevate postoperative infection. Furthermore, drain tip cultures allowed us to detect postoperative infection at an early stage, and it led to faster initiation of antibiotics treatment. PMID:27123026

  5. Surgical discectomy for lumbar disc herniation: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Blamoutier, A

    2013-02-01

    Discectomy for lumbar discal herniation is the most commonly performed spinal surgery. The basic principle of the various techniques is to relieve the nerve root compression induced by the herniation. Initially, the approach was a unilateral posterior 5-cm incision: the multifidus was detached from the vertebra, giving access through an interlaminar space in case of posterolateral herniation; an alternative paraspinal approach was used for extraforaminal herniation. Over the past 30 years, many technical improvements have decreased operative trauma by reducing incision size, thereby reducing postoperative pain and hospital stay and time off work, while improving clinical outcome. Magnification and illumination systems by microscope and endoscope have been introduced to enable minimally invasive techniques. Several comparative studies have analyzed the clinical results of these various techniques. Although the methodology of most of these studies is debatable, all approaches seem to provide clinical outcomes of similar quality. At all events, minimally invasive techniques reduce hospital stay. While technical proficiency is essential, the final result depends on strict compliance with a prerequisite for surgical indication: close correlation between clinical symptoms and radiological findings. It is essential to discuss the risk/benefit ratio and explain the pros and cons of the recommended technique to the patient. PMID:23352565

  6. A review of current treatment for lumbar disc herniation in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongjun

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disorder among adults with degenerated lumbar intervertebral discs. However, its occurrence in childhood and adolescence is much less frequent mostly because children and adolescents tend to have a healthier lumbar spine as compared with adults. This difference indicates that children and adolescents are far from being just little adults. Over the years, there have constantly been published studies concerning this entity where the findings suggested that pediatric LDH is, in many ways, different from that in adults. To date, the prevalence, the etiological and the diagnostic features of pediatric LDH have been fully described in the literature whereas the characteristics regarding to the treatment is yet to be reviewed in details. The aim of the present review is to provide a collective opinion on the treatment of pediatric LDH as well as its outcome. It reviewed the relevant information available in the literature and compared the results among and within various treatments. It was found that pediatric patients responded less favorably to conservative treatment as compared with adults. In addition, the outcome of surgery remained to be satisfactory for at least 10 years after the initial operation, even though it appeared to deteriorate slightly. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first literature review focusing on the treatment of pediatric LDH. PMID:19890666

  7. Lumbar percutaneous KTP532 wavelength laser disc decompression and disc ablation in the management of discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martin; Goswami, Ankul

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the outcome of laser disc decompression and laser disc ablation in the management of painful degenerative disc disease with or without associated disc prolapse. Nonendoscopic percutaneous laser disc decompression was performed under x-ray control via the posterolateral approach with side-firing probes. All patients with chronic back pain who had reproduced pain during discography of a nature, pattern, and distribution similar to what they experienced normally were included in the study. Magnetic resonance which confirmed stenosis and sequestrated discs, and patients with acute neurological findings were excluded from the study. Laser disc decompression or ablation was done using the KTP532 wavelength. The functional outcome was assessed prospectively using the Oswestry Disability Index. Clinical benefit was considered significant in those patients with a percentage change in the index of > or =50% at review 3-9 years (mean, 5.33 years) following surgery. A total of 52% of patients demonstrated a sustained significant clinical benefit, with an additional 21% in whom functional improvement was noted. Cohort integrity was 67%. Long-term benefit of the laser disc ablation and decompression for discogenic pain suggests a mechanism other than principally mechanical as a cause of chronic back and sciatic pain. It may suggest that efficacy occurs by reduction in the intradiscal production of irritative products and by an effect upon discal and annular neoneuralization. The sustained nature of the benefit after long-term preoperative symptoms (mean, 4.7 years) rules out any placebo effect. Selection should be restricted to patients without significant lateral recess stenosis, retrolisthesis or olisthesis of > or =3 mm, significant dorsal or foraminal osteophytosis, extrusion, or sequestration. PMID:11902355

  8. Unloaded Treadmill Training Therapy for Lumbar Disc Herniation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Steve; Bettis, Brad; Herbertson, James

    1996-01-01

    The low back region is an area that is very susceptible to injury in athletes. Running is an activity that can be significantly affected by chronic overuse stress. The athlete presented in this case report suffered a herniation of the disc between L-4 and L-5 while training for and racing in a national championship marathon. The athlete was placed on a treatment program of heat, electrical muscle stimulation, and strength and flexibility exercises. The athlete also continued to train by unloaded treadmill training therapy. Unloaded treadmill training therapy produced an effect that reduced stress on injured joints and tissue. This enabled the athlete to maintain fitness while running pain-free on this specialized equipment. The athlete trained twice a week for 16 weeks and training runs ranged from 3 miles to a half-marathon (13.1 miles). Unloaded amounts decreased from 20 to 3 pounds. Training times improved at all distances and were maintained following resumption of normal training. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558374

  9. Inequality in leg length is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Kanat, Ayhan; Erkut, Adem; Ozdemir, Bulent; Batcik, Osman Ersagun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inequality in leg length may lead to to abnormal transmission of load across the endplates and degeneration lumbar spine and the disc space. There has been no study focusing on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and leg length discrepancy. This subject was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients with leg length discrepancy and low back pain (LBP) admitted to our department were respectivelly studied. Results: A total number of 39 subjects (31 women and eight men) with leg length discrepancy and LBP and 43 (25 females and 18 males) patients with LBP as a control group were tested. Occurrence of disc herniation is statistically different between patients with hip dysplasia and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a statistically significant association between leg length discrepancy and occurrence of LDH. The changes of spine anatomy with leg length discrepancy in hip dysplastic patients are of importance in understanding the nature of LDH. PMID:27217654

  10. Percutaneous laser lumbar disc decompression - mechanism of action, indications and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Barczewska, Monika; Sobieraj, Andrzej

    2004-06-30

    This article describes the development of minimally invasive methods in the treatment of lumbar discopathy, with particular attention to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). The authors discus the therapeutic operating mechanism of PLDD, emphasizing the importance of the thermal characteristics of laser light, which is responsible for the vaporization and ablation of a small amount of tissue from the nucleus pulposus. This causes a significant reduction in pressure in the closed structure of the disc, and consequently reduced compression exerted by the disk on the dural sac and the nerve roots. Improvement in the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid has also been observed on the level at which the operation is performed. On the basis of our own experience and the reports of other authors, we have specified indications and contra-indications for PLDD. Our conclusion is that PLDD is an effective treatment method for low back pain and ischialgia caused by protrusion or herniation of the nucleus pulposus, with elimination or significant reduction in symptoms in over 75% of those treated; reduction or resolution of neurological deficits that arise in the course of lumbar discopathy has also been observed. This method enables one-stage treatment of multi-level degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc. The only absolute contraindications for PLDD are the presence of sequestration, disturbances in blood coagulation, and bacterial infection. PMID:17675991

  11. Comparison of Two Methods of Epidural Steroid Injection in the Treatment of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Nejad, Ali; Shahsavarani, Shahram; Keikhosravi, Ehsan; Shahba, Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose We compared the effects of two methods of epidural steroid injection in patients with recurrent disc herniation. Overview of Literature To our knowledge, there is no previous report of such a comparison in these patients. Methods The study was performed with 30 patients with relapsed lumbar disc herniation whose pain was not relieved by conservative remedies. The patients were divided into two groups, each of 15 patients, and entered the study for caudal or transforaminal injections. The degree of pain, ability to stand and walk, and the Prolo function score were evaluated in both groups before the injection and 2 months and 6 months after the injection. Results The degrees of pain reduction in the caudal injection group in the second and sixth months were 0.6 and 1.63, respectively, and in the transforaminal injection group were 1.33 and 1.56, respectively. The difference between the two methods was not statistically significant. Similarly, no other evaluated criterion showed a significant difference between the methods. Conclusions In the current study, the caudal and transforaminal steroid injection methods showed similar outcomes in the treatment of relapsed lumbar disc herniation. However, more detailed patient categorizing may help in finding possible subgroups with differences. PMID:25346818

  12. The comparison of the efficacy of radiofrequency nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression in lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adakli, Barıs; Turhan, K. Sanem Cakar; Asik, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition causing medical, socioeconomic, and treatment difficulties. In our study, we aimed to compare early and long-term efficacy of lumbar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC) nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression (TDD) in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in whom previous conventional therapy had failed. The medical records of 37 patients undergoing TDD and 36 patients undergoing lumbar RFTC nucleoplasty were retrospectively examined and assigned to the Group D and Group N, respectively. In all patients Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Functional Rating Index (FRI) were recorded before treatment and after one, six and twelve months after the procedure. The North American Spine Society Satisfaction Scale (NASSSS) was also recoreded twelve months after the therapeutic procedure. Statistically significant postprocedural improvement in VAS and FRI was evident in both groups. VAS scores after one, six, and twelve month were slightly higher in Group N, compared to Group D. The overall procedure-related patient satisfaction ratio was 67.5% in the Group D, compared to 75% in the Group N. Regardless of the different mechanism of action, both methods are effective therapies for lumbar radiculopathy, with TDD showing long-term lower pain scores. PMID:26042514

  13. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  14. [Thoracic and thoraco-lumbar discs herniations: diagnosis and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Diop, A A; De Soultrait, F; Dagain, A; Hoffman, J J; Pernot, P H

    2005-01-01

    Summary Management of symptomatic thoracic disc hemiations is difficult because of their polymorphic symptomatology and hardness to join the intervertebral thoracic disc surgically. The objective of this study was first to show the difficult diagnosis of these discal herniations and their posterior approach particularities; secondly, to analyse our results and compare them with those of the literature. This retrospective study analyses a four patients series operated between January 1997 and march 2003 using intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials. All of them had before surgical management, a lumbar Xray or a MRI. The average postoperative follow-up was seven months. All patients were males with a mean age of 39.5 years old (extremes: 22-59). They had systematisation of their lumboradiculalgia, leading to an average delayed diagnosis of 10 months. The disc herniation was paramedian in three cases, median in one,. It was in T10-T11 in one case, in T11-T12 in two and in T12-L1 in one. All the patients were operated on with a posterior approach, recording the intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials. Disc herniation was resected in three cases. Functional results were satisfactory (no pains for three patients) in the follow-up period of seven months. Every patient presenting with an atypical lumboradiculalgia must have a spine MRI to diagnose the symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Surgery has good results if technical details are used respecting the threatened spinal cord. PMID:16295758

  15. Percutaneous Intradiscal Aspiration of a Lumbar Vacuum Disc Herniation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kevin I.; Hoffman, David C.; Herzog, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an 83-year-old gentleman presenting with acute low back pain and radicular left lower extremity pain after golfing. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a low-signal-density lesion compressing the L5 nerve. A computed tomography scan was then ordered, confirming an extra-foraminal disc protrusion at the L5–S1 level, containing a focus of gas that was compressing the left L5 nerve root and communicating with the vacuum disc at L5–S1. After a failed left L5 transforaminal epidural steroid injection, the patient was brought back for a percutaneous intradiscal aspiration of the vacuum disc gas. This resulted in immediate relief for the patient. A follow-up MRI performed 2 months after the procedure found an approximate 25% reduction in the size of the vacuum disc herniation. Six months after the procedure, the patient remains free of radicular pain. This case report suggests that a percutaneous aspiration of gas from a vacuum disc herniation may assist in the treatment of radicular pain. PMID:22294964

  16. Current Evidence of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniations.

    PubMed

    Quirno, Martin; Vira, Shaleen; Errico, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of new instrumentation and better imaging techniques that allowed less tissue trauma compared with traditional open procedures, while providing adequate or enhanced visualization of the pathologic site and based upon the successful experience of outpatient spine surgery to assist early ambulation, the trend and evolution toward ''minimal access'' or minimally invasive spine surgery began to develop with greater intensity. Many surgical techniques have flourished with the promise of delivering a safe and efficient alternative, including chemonucleolysis, manual percutaneous discectomy (MPD), automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy (APLD), and percutaneous lumbar laser discectomy (PLLD). Unfortunately, most of these techniques have been demonstrated to be inefficient with high complication rates. Only modifications of the original open discectomy in which direct visualization of the disc is obtained through either microscopic or endoscopic techniques have proven to be successful. This review outlines the historical journey that has inspired the development of these techniques and delineates the progressive clinical experience gained from their advent. PMID:26977554

  17. Dynamic and Static Overloading Induce Early Degenerative Processes in Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Schoorl, Tom; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; van Royen, Barend J.; Helder, Marco N.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical overloading of the spine is associated with low back pain and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. How excessive loading elicits degenerative changes in the IVD is poorly understood. Comprehensive knowledge of the interaction between mechanical loading, cell responses and changes in the extracellular matrix of the disc is needed in order to successfully intervene in this process. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether dynamic and static overloading affect caprine lumbar discs differently and what mechanisms lead to mechanically induced IVD degeneration. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured 7, 14 and 21 days under simulated-physiological loading (control), high dynamic or high static loading. Axial deformation and stiffness were continuously measured. Cell viability, cell density, and gene expression were assessed in the nucleus, inner- and outer annulus. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and collagen content. IVD height loss and changes in axial deformation were gradual with dynamic and acute with static overloading. Dynamic overloading caused cell death in all IVD regions, whereas static overloading mostly affected the outer annulus. IVDs expression of catabolic and inflammation-related genes was up-regulated directly, whereas loss of water and glycosaminoglycan were significant only after 21 days. Static and dynamic overloading both induced pathological changes to caprine lumbar IVDs within 21 days. The mechanism by which they inflict biomechanical, cellular, and extracellular changes to the nucleus and annulus differed. The described cascades provide leads for the development of new pharmacological and rehabilitative therapies to halt the progression of DDD. PMID:23638074

  18. Transforaminal endoscopic surgery for symptomatic lumbar disc herniations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nellensteijn, Jorm; Bartels, Ronald; Peul, Wilco; van Royen, Barend; van Tulder, Maurits

    2009-01-01

    The study design includes a systematic literature review. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery and to compare this with open microdiscectomy in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations. Transforaminal endoscopic techniques for patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations have become increasingly popular. The literature has not yet been systematically reviewed. A comprehensive systematic literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed up to May 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts and relevant full text articles for inclusion criteria. Included articles were assessed for quality and outcomes were extracted by the two reviewers independently. One randomized controlled trial, 7 non-randomized controlled trials and 31 observational studies were identified. Studies were heterogeneous regarding patient selection, indications, operation techniques, follow-up period and outcome measures and the methodological quality of these studies was poor. The eight trials did not find any statistically significant differences in leg pain reduction between the transforaminal endoscopic surgery group (89%) and the open microdiscectomy group (87%); overall improvement (84 vs. 78%), re-operation rate (6.8 vs. 4.7%) and complication rate (1.5 vs. 1%), respectively. In conclusion, current evidence on the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery is poor and does not provide valid information to either support or refute using this type of surgery in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations. High-quality randomized controlled trials with sufficiently large sample sizes are direly needed to evaluate if transforaminal endoscopic surgery is more effective than open microdiscectomy. PMID:19756781

  19. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration. A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case–control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed. The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05). One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  20. Utility of Discography as a Preoperative Diagnostic Tool for Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Dohzono, Sho; Hori, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Preoperative definitive diagnosis of intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is difficult despite the availability of various neuroradiological investigative tools. We present a case of ILDH diagnosed preoperatively by discography and computed tomography-discography (disco-CT).The patient was a 63-year-old man with acute excruciating right leg pain. Discography and disco-CT demonstrated leakage of the contrast medium into the intradural space. Based on these findings, a right L5 nerve root disturbance caused by ILDH was diagnosed. A right L5 hemi-laminectomy and a dorsal durotomy were performed. The herniated disc was carefully dissected and then completely removed. Three months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered. This report highlights the importance of making a definitive diagnosis of ILDH preoperatively for better surgical planning and improved clinical outcomes. Furthermore, discography and disco-CT are both useful preoperative diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of ILDH. PMID:27559461

  1. Utility of Discography as a Preoperative Diagnostic Tool for Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Dohzono, Sho; Hori, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative definitive diagnosis of intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is difficult despite the availability of various neuroradiological investigative tools. We present a case of ILDH diagnosed preoperatively by discography and computed tomography-discography (disco-CT).The patient was a 63-year-old man with acute excruciating right leg pain. Discography and disco-CT demonstrated leakage of the contrast medium into the intradural space. Based on these findings, a right L5 nerve root disturbance caused by ILDH was diagnosed. A right L5 hemi-laminectomy and a dorsal durotomy were performed. The herniated disc was carefully dissected and then completely removed. Three months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered. This report highlights the importance of making a definitive diagnosis of ILDH preoperatively for better surgical planning and improved clinical outcomes. Furthermore, discography and disco-CT are both useful preoperative diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of ILDH. PMID:27559461

  2. Dynamic Biomechanical Examination of the Lumbar Spine with Implanted Total Disc Replacement (TDR) Utilizing a Pendulum Testing System

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Alan H; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath; McDonnell, Matthew; Palumbo, Mark A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical cadaver investigation Objective To examine dynamic bending stiffness and energy absorption of the lumbar spine with and without implanted Total Disc Replacement (TDR) under simulated physiologic motion. Summary of background data The pendulum testing system is capable of applying physiologic compressive loads without constraining motion of functional spinal units (FSUs). The number of cycles to equilibrium observed under pendulum testing is a measure of the energy absorbed by the FSU. Methods Five unembalmed, frozen human lumbar FSUs were tested on the pendulum system with axial compressive loads of 181N, 282N, 385N, and 488N before and after Synthes ProDisc-L TDR implantation. Testing in flexion, extension, and lateral bending began by rotating the pendulum to 5° resulting in unconstrained oscillatory motion. The number of rotations to equilibrium was recorded and bending stiffness (N-m/°) was calculated and compared for each testing mode. Results In flexion/extension, the TDR constructs reached equilibrium with significantly (p<0.05) fewer cycles than the intact FSU with compressive loads of 282N, 385N and 488N. Mean dynamic bending stiffness in flexion, extension, and lateral bending increased significantly with increasing load for both the intact FSU and TDR constructs (p<0.001). In flexion, with increasing compressive loading from 181N to 488N, the bending stiffness of the intact FSUs increased from 4.0N-m/° to 5.5N-m/°, compared to 2.1N-m/° to 3.6N-m/° after TDR implantation. At each compressive load, the intact FSU was significantly more stiff than the TDR (p<0.05). Conclusion Lumbar FSUs with implanted TDR were found to be less stiff, but also absorbed more energy during cyclic loading with an unconstrained pendulum system. Although the effects on clinical performance of motion preserving devices are not fully known, these results provide further insight into the biomechanical behavior of this device under approximated

  3. Postoperative Clinical Outcome and Risk Factors for Poor Outcome of Foraminal and Extraforaminal Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Sik; Kang, Kyung Hee; Park, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Jae Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated postoperative outcomes in patients who have lumbar foraminal or extraforaminal disc herniation (FELDH) and suggested the risk factors for poor outcomes. Methods A total of 234 patients were selected for this study. Pre- and post-operative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Korean version Oswestry Disability Index (KODI) were evaluated and the changes of both score were calculated. Outcome was defined as excellent, good, fair, and poor based on Mcnab classification. The percentage of superior facetectomy was calculated by using the Maro-view 5.4 Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS). Results Paramedian lumbar discectomy was performed in 180 patients and combined lumbar discectomy was performed in 54 patients. Paramedian lumbar discectomy group showed better outcome compared with combined discectomy group. p value of VAS change was 0.009 and KODI was 0.013. The average percentage of superior facetectomy was 33% (range, 0–79%) and it showed negative correlation with VAS and KODI changes (Pearson coefficient : -0.446 and -0.498, respectively). Excellent or good outcome cases (Group I) were 136 (58.1%) and fair or poor outcome cases (Group II) were 98 (41.9%). The percentage of superior facetectomy was 26.5% at Group I and 42.5% at Group II. There was significant difference in superior facetectomy percentage between Group I and II (p=0.000). Conclusion This study demonstrated that paramedian lumbar discectomy with preservation of facet joints is an effective and good procedure for FELDH. At least 60% of facet should be preserved for excellent or good outcomes. PMID:26962420

  4. Biomechanical analysis of press-extension technique on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and staggered facet joint.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-Gen; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Zhong; Huang, Huan-Ming; Ning, Xi-Tao; Jiang, Neng-Yi; Pei, Jian-Wei; Huang, Qin; Wei, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new Chinese massage technique named "press-extension" on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation, and provides a biomechanical explanation of this massage technique. Self-developed biomechanical software was used to establish a normal L1-S1 lumbar 3D FE model, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Then graphic technique is utilized to build a degenerative lumbar FE model with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation. According to the actual press-extension experiments, mechanic parameters are collected to set boundary condition for FE analysis. The result demonstrated that press-extension techniques bring the annuli fibrosi obvious induction effect, making the central nucleus pulposus forward close, increasing the pressure in front part. Study concludes that finite element modelling for lumbar spine is suitable for the analysis of press-extension technique impact on lumbar intervertebral disc biomechanics, to provide the basis for the disease mechanism of intervertebral disc herniation using press-extension technique. PMID:27275119

  5. An In Vivo Model of Reduced Nucleus Pulposus Glycosaminoglycan Content in the Rat Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, John I.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Sen, Sounok; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo model resembling early stage disc degeneration in the rat lumbar spine. Objective Simulate the reduced glycosaminoglycan content and altered mechanics observed in intervertebral disc degeneration using a controlled injection of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). Summary of Background Data Nucleus glycosaminoglycan reduction occurs early during disc degeneration; however, mechanisms through which degeneration progresses from this state are unknown. Animal models simulating this condition are essential for understanding disease progression and for development of therapies aimed at early intervention. Methods ChABC was injected into the nucleus pulposus, and discs were evaluated via micro-CT, mechanical testing, biochemical assays, and histology 4 and 12 weeks after injection. Results At 4 weeks, reductions in nucleus glycosaminoglycan level by 43%, average height by 12%, neutral zone modulus by 40%, and increases in range of motion by 40%, and creep strain by 25% were found. Neutral zone modulus and range of motion were correlated with nucleus glycosaminoglycan. At 12 weeks, recovery of some mechanical function was detected as range of motion and creep returned to control levels; however, this was not attributed to glycosaminoglycan restoration, because mechanics were no longer correlated with glycosaminoglycan. Conclusion An in vivo model simulating physiologic levels of glycosaminoglycan loss was created to aid in understanding the relationships between altered biochemistry, altered mechanics, and altered cellular function in degeneration. PMID:18197098

  6. Does Vertebral Endplate Morphology Influence Outcomes in Lumbar Disc Arthroplasty? Part I: An Initial Assessment of a Novel Classification System of Lumbar Endplate Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Oetgen, Matthew E.; la Torre, Jorge J. Jaramillo-de; Bertagnoli, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Background The influence of lumbar endplate morphology on the clinical and radiographic outcomes of lumbar disc arthroplasty has not been evaluated to the best of our knowledge. Study Design and Objective In this observational study of 80 patients, the objective was to formulate a reproducible and valid lumbar endplate classification system to be used in evaluating lumbar total disc replacement patients. Methods A novel vertebral endplate morphology classification system was formulated after review of data related to 80 patients enrolled in a prospective, randomized clinical trial in conjunction with an application for a US Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption. Intraobserver and interobserver analyses of the classification system were performed on the same 80 patients utilizing the classification system. Results The initial review of the radiographs revealed 5 types of endplates: Type I (n = 82) flat endplates; Type II (n = 26) posterior lip; Type III (n = 5) central concavity; Type IV (n = 4) anterior sloping endplate; and Type V (n = 2) combination of Types I—IV. The intraobserver kappa was 0.66 and the interobserver kappa was 0.51. These kappa values indicate “substantial” to “moderate” reproducibility, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we propose a lumbar endplate classification system to be used in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing lumbar disc arthroplasty. The classification can function as a basis for comparison and discussion among arthroplasty clinicians, and serve as a possible exclusionary screening tool for disc arthroplasty. Special consideration should be given to Type II endplates to optimize proper positioning and functioning of a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Further outcome studies are warranted to assess the clinical significance of this classification system. The key points of our study are: (1) We present a novel lumbar vertebral endplate classification system; (2) Five types of

  7. Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest.

    PubMed

    Kordi, M; Belavý, D L; Armbrecht, G; Sheikh, A; Felsenberg, D; Trudel, G

    2015-09-01

    The adaptation and re-adaptation process of the intervertebral disc (IVD) to prolonged bedrest is important for understanding IVD physiology and IVD herniations in astronauts. Little information is available on changes in IVD composition. In this study, 24 male subjects underwent 60-day bedrest and In/Out Phase magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed to evaluate IVD shape and water signal intensity. Scanning was performed before bedrest (baseline), twice during bedrest, and three, six and twenty-four months after bedrest. Area, signal intensity, average height, and anteroposterior diameter of the lumbar L3/4 and L4/5 IVDs were measured. At the end of bedrest, disc height and area were significantly increased with no change in water signal intensity. After bedrest, we observed reduced IVD signal intensity three months (p=0.004 versus baseline), six months (p=0.003 versus baseline), but not twenty-four months (p=0.25 versus baseline) post-bedrest. At these same time points post-bedrest, IVD height and area remained increased. The reduced lumbar IVD water signal intensity in the first months after bedrest implies a reduction of glycosaminoglycans and/or free water in the IVD. Subsequently, at two years after bedrest, IVD hydration status returned towards pre-bedrest levels, suggesting a gradual, but slow, re-adaptation process of the IVD after prolonged bedrest. PMID:26350949

  8. Composite features for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation from lumbar MRI.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subarna; Alomari, Raja' S; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-01-01

    Lower back pain is widely prevalent in the world today, and the situation is aggravated due to a shortage of radiologists. Intervertebral disc disorders like desiccation, degeneration and herniation are some of the major causes of lower back pain. In this paper, we propose a robust computer-aided herniation diagnosis system for lumbar MRI by first extracting an approximate Region Of Interest (ROI) for each disc and then using a combination of viable features to produce a highly accurate classifier. We describe the extraction of raw, LBP (Local Binary Patterns), Gabor, GLCM (Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix), shape, and intensity features from lumbar SPIR T2-weighted MRI and also present a thorough performance comparison of individual and combined features. We perform 5-fold cross validation experiments on 35 cases and report a very high accuracy of 98.29% using a combination of features. Also, combining the desired features and reducing the dimensionality using LDA, we achieve a high sensitivity (true positive rate) of 98.11%. PMID:22255478

  9. Association between ADAMTS-4 gene polymorphism and lumbar disc degeneration in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Wu, Nan; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Hao; Su, Xinlin; Liu, Zhenlei; Zuo, Yuzhi; Chen, Weisheng; Liu, Gang; Chen, Yixin; Ming, Yue; Yuan, Tangmi; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jun; Xia, Zenan; Wang, Shengru; Chen, Jia; Liu, Tao; Yang, Xu; Ma, Yufen; Zhang, Jianguo; Shen, Jianxiong; Li, Shugang; Wang, Yipeng; Zhao, Hong; Yu, Keyi; Zhao, Yu; Huang, Shishu; Weng, Xisheng; Qiu, Guixing; Wan, Chao; Zhou, Guangqian; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-05-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common health problem and many LBP are caused by lumbar disc degeneration (LDD). ADAMTS-4 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs-4), also known as aggrecanse-1, plays a core role in degeneration of extracellular matrix in LDD. To investigate the association between ADAMTS-4 genetic polymorphism and LDD, we genotyped SNPs in and around ADAMTS-4. We recruited 482 sporadic cases of LDD and 496 healthy controls from Chinese Han population. Five SNPs were selected and phenotyped by the Sequenom MassARRAY system. Allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic association was performed. Rs4233367 (c.1877 C>T), which located in exon of ADAMTS-4 showed significant association with LDD. The T allele conferred a lower risk of LDD with an OR of 0.69 and TT genotype is at nearly one-fifth of the risk compared to CC genotype. Other tested SNPs didn't show significant difference between the case and control groups. The SNP rs4233367 in the exon of ADAMTS-4 gene may be associated with lumbar disc degeneration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:860-864, 2016. PMID:26495885

  10. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lühmann, Dagmar; Burkhardt-Hammer, Tatjana; Borowski, Cathleen; Raspe, Heiner

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy) which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc by a posterolateral or

  11. Reliability of the modified Tufts Lumbar Degenerative Disc Classification between neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists.

    PubMed

    Burke, Shane M; Hwang, Steven W; Mehan, William A; Bedi, Harprit S; Ogbuji, Richard; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2016-07-01

    Cross-specialty inter-rater reliability has not been explicitly reported for imaging characteristics that are thought to be important in lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Sufficient cross-specialty reliability is an essential consideration if radiographic stratification of symptomatic patients to specific treatment modalities is to ever be realized. Therefore the purpose of this study was to directly compare the assessment of such characteristics between neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists. Sixty consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lumbago and appropriate imaging were selected for inclusion. Lumbar MRI were evaluated using the Tufts Degenerative Disc Classification by two neurosurgeons and two neuroradiologists. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using Cohen's κ values both within and between specialties. A sensitivity analysis was performed for a modified grading system, which excluded high intensity zones (HIZ), due to poor cross-specialty inter-rater reliability of HIZ between specialties. The reliability of HIZ between neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists was fair in two of the four cross-specialty comparisons in this study (neurosurgeon 1 versus both radiologists κ=0.364 and κ=0.290). Removing HIZ from the classification improved inter-rater reliability for all comparisons within and between specialties (0.465⩽κ⩽0.576). In addition, intra-rater reliability remained in the moderate to substantial range (0.523⩽κ⩽0.649). Given our findings and corroboration with previous studies, identification of HIZ seems to have a markedly variable reliability. Thus we recommend modification of the original Tufts Degenerative Disc Classification by removing HIZ in order to make the overall grade provided by this classification more reproducible when scored by practitioners of different training backgrounds. PMID:27021223

  12. Interleukin-21 Is Associated with the Pathogenesis of Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huawei; Yao, Yu; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Feng; Jiang, Xingjie; Liu, Jinbao; Wang, Hua; Li, Yuqian; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation is an important reaction underlying lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Th17 cells play a critical role in immune activation. Interleukin (IL)-21 controls the functional activity of effector T-helper cells and the differentiation of Th17 cells, and promotes B-cell differentiation. It plays important roles in chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about relationship between IL-21 and LDH. This study was aimed to determine the association between IL-21 levels and pain scores in LDH patients compared to healthy controls.We enrolled 34 LDH patients and 20 healthy controls in this study. The LDH patients underwent surgery. Pain intensity was recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS) scores preoperatively. Serum IL-21 and IL-17 levels in the peripheral blood were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Disc tissue was examined using western blot and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine IL-21, IL-17, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, and using immunohistochemistry to assess IL-21 expression.LDH patients exhibited significantly higher levels of serum IL-21 and IL-17 than healthy controls. Moreover, higher expression of IL-21, IL-17, and COX-2 was found in the protein and mRNA levels in disc tissues from LDH patients than in normal disc tissues. Different parameters like VAS pain scores, IL-17, and COX-2 were positively correlated with the IL-21 levels. Enhanced production of IL-21 in disc tissues of LDH patients was also confirmed using immunohistochemical analyses.We concluded that inflammation was responsible for the pain associated with LDH, and that increased IL-21 expression may be associated with the pathogenesis of LDH. PMID:26742440

  13. Long-Term Effects of Segmental Lumbar Spinal Fusion on Adjacent Healthy Discs: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Gunti Ranga; Deb, Anindya; Kurnool, Goutham

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Experimental study. Purpose The aim of the study was to develop a finite element (FE) model to study the long-term effects of various types of lumbar spinal interventions on the discs adjacent to the fused segment. Overview of Literature Earlier FE studies have been limited to one particular type of fusion and comparative quantification of the adjacent disc stresses for different types of surgical interventions has not been reported. Methods A computer aided engineering (CAE) based approach using implicit FE analysis assessed the stresses in the lumbar discs adjacent to the fused segment following anterior and posterior lumbar spine fusions at one, two and three levels (with and without instrumentation). Results It was found that instrumentation and length of fusion were the most significant factors in increasing adjacent level stresses in the lumbar discs. Conclusions In the present study, a calibrated FE model that examined spinal interventions under similar loading and boundary conditions was used to provide quantitative data which would be useful for clinicians to understand the probable long-term effect of their choice of surgical intervention. PMID:27114758

  14. Nonmedical methods to relieve low back pain caused by lumbar disc herniation: a descriptive study in northeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cilingir, Dilek; Hintistan, Sevilay; Yigitbas, Cagla; Nural, Nesrin

    2014-06-01

    Low back pain due to the effects of lumbar disc herniation is a common complaint of patients who often subsequently seek help from medical professionals. It is also a significant health problem which is quite difficult to treat. This descriptive study was conducted to determine nonmedical methods used by patients with lumbar disc herniation to relieve low back pain; the patients' intensity of low back pain when they were admitted to the hospital was also explored. Ninety-two patients with lumbar disc herniation participated in this study, which was carried out at a university hospital in northeastern Turkey. Data were collected using a patient information form and the visual analog scale (VAS). When the patients were admitted to hospital, their mean VAS score was 6.56 ± 2.45. The study results showed that as a first choice nearly all of the patients (94.6%) with lumbar disc herniation preferred consulting with their physicians before to obtain relief for low back pain. However, in addition to seeing their physician, more than one-half of these patients (57.6%) also used nonmedical methods. The primary nonmedical methods were hot/cold compresses, wrapping various substances on the back, and herbal preparations. An increase in pain was noted by 17.0% of patients after using nonmedical methods. Findings indicated that more than two-thirds of patients experienced either no change or an increase in pain after using nonmedical methods to find relief. PMID:24882024

  15. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH.Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed.A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53-2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15-2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly.Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  16. Lumbar disc degeneration is linked to a carbohydrate sulfotransferase 3 variant

    PubMed Central

    Song, You-Qiang; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Miyake, Atsushi; Kao, Patrick Y.P.; Sze, Kit Ling; Yee, Anita; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Mikami, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Morio; Togawa, Daisuke; Kanayama, Masahiro; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Jiang, Qing; Wu, Chengai; Tian, Wei; Wang, Na; Leong, John C.Y.; Luk, Keith D.K.; Yip, Shea-ping; Cherny, Stacey S.; Wang, Junwen; Mundlos, Stefan; Kelempisioti, Anthi; Eskola, Pasi J.; Männikkö, Minna; Mäkelä, Pirkka; Karppinen, Jaro; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Kubo, Michiaki; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Kubo, Toshikazu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chan, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is associated with both genetic and environmental factors and affects many people worldwide. A hallmark of LDD is loss of proteoglycan and water content in the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. While some genetic determinants have been reported, the etiology of LDD is largely unknown. Here we report the findings from linkage and association studies on a total of 32,642 subjects consisting of 4,043 LDD cases and 28,599 control subjects. We identified carbohydrate sulfotransferase 3 (CHST3), an enzyme that catalyzes proteoglycan sulfation, as a susceptibility gene for LDD. The strongest genome-wide linkage peak encompassed CHST3 from a Southern Chinese family–based data set, while a genome-wide association was observed at rs4148941 in the gene in a meta-analysis using multiethnic population cohorts. rs4148941 lies within a potential microRNA-513a-5p (miR-513a-5p) binding site. Interaction between miR-513a-5p and mRNA transcribed from the susceptibility allele (A allele) of rs4148941 was enhanced in vitro compared with transcripts from other alleles. Additionally, expression of CHST3 mRNA was significantly reduced in the intervertebral disc cells of human subjects carrying the A allele of rs4148941. Together, our data provide new insights into the etiology of LDD, implicating an interplay between genetic risk factors and miRNA. PMID:24216480

  17. Lumbar disc degeneration is linked to a carbohydrate sulfotransferase 3 variant.

    PubMed

    Song, You-Qiang; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Ho, Daniel W H; Miyake, Atsushi; Kao, Patrick Y P; Sze, Kit Ling; Yee, Anita; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Mikami, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Morio; Togawa, Daisuke; Kanayama, Masahiro; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Jiang, Qing; Wu, Chengai; Tian, Wei; Wang, Na; Leong, John C Y; Luk, Keith D K; Yip, Shea-ping; Cherny, Stacey S; Wang, Junwen; Mundlos, Stefan; Kelempisioti, Anthi; Eskola, Pasi J; Männikkö, Minna; Mäkelä, Pirkka; Karppinen, Jaro; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Reilly, Paul F; Kubo, Michiaki; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Kubo, Toshikazu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chan, Danny

    2013-11-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is associated with both genetic and environmental factors and affects many people worldwide. A hallmark of LDD is loss of proteoglycan and water content in the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. While some genetic determinants have been reported, the etiology of LDD is largely unknown. Here we report the findings from linkage and association studies on a total of 32,642 subjects consisting of 4,043 LDD cases and 28,599 control subjects. We identified carbohydrate sulfotransferase 3 (CHST3), an enzyme that catalyzes proteoglycan sulfation, as a susceptibility gene for LDD. The strongest genome-wide linkage peak encompassed CHST3 from a Southern Chinese family–based data set, while a genome-wide association was observed at rs4148941 in the gene in a meta-analysis using multiethnic population cohorts. rs4148941 lies within a potential microRNA-513a-5p (miR-513a-5p) binding site. Interaction between miR-513a-5p and mRNA transcribed from the susceptibility allele (A allele) of rs4148941 was enhanced in vitro compared with transcripts from other alleles. Additionally, expression of CHST3 mRNA was significantly reduced in the intervertebral disc cells of human subjects carrying the A allele of rs4148941. Together, our data provide new insights into the etiology of LDD, implicating an interplay between genetic risk factors and miRNA. PMID:24216480

  18. Regional annulus fibre orientations used as a tool for the calibration of lumbar intervertebral disc finite element models.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The collagen network of the annulus fibrosus largely controls the functional biomechanics of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs). Quantitative anatomical examinations have shown bundle orientation patterns, possibly coming from regional adaptations of the annulus mechanics. This study aimed to show that the regional differences in annulus mechanical behaviour could be reproduced by considering only fibre orientation changes. Using the finite element method, a lumbar annulus was modelled as a poro-hyperelastic material in which fibres were represented by a direction-dependent strain energy density term. Fibre orientations were calibrated to reproduce the annulus tensile behaviours measured for four different regions: posterior outer, anterior outer, posterior inner and anterior inner. The back-calculated fibre angles and regional patterns as well as the global disc behaviour were comparable with anatomical descriptions reported in the literature. It was concluded that annulus fibre variations might be an effective tool to calibrate lumbar spine IVD and segment models. PMID:22224724

  19. The effect of compensating filter on image quality in lateral projection of thoraco lumbar radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, N. A. A.; Ali, M. H.; Nazri, N. A. Ahmad; Hamzah, N. J.; Awang, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this project was to study the effect of compensating filter on image quality in lateral projection of thoraco lumbar radiography. The specific objectives of this study were to verify the relationship between density, contrast and noise of lateral thoraco lumbar radiography using various thickness of compensating filter and to determine the appropriate filter thickness with the thoraco lumbar density. The study was performed by an X- ray unit exposed to the body phantom where different thicknesses of aluminium were used as compensating filter. The radiographs were processed by CR reader and being imported to KPACS software to analyze the pixel depth value, contrast and noise. Result shows different thickness of aluminium compensating filter improved the image quality of lateral projection thoraco lumbar radiography. The compensating filter of 8.2 mm was considered as the optimal filter to compensate the thoraco lumbar junction (T12-L1), 1 mm to compensate lumbar region and 5.9 mm to compensate thorax region. The addition of aluminium compensating filter is advantageous in terms of efficiency which saving radiograph film, workload of the radiographer and radiation dose to patient.

  20. Sensory nerve fibres from lumbar intervertebral discs pass through rami communicantes. A possible pathway for discogenic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Suseki, K; Takahashi, Y; Takahashi, K; Chiba, T; Yamagata, M; Moriya, H

    1998-07-01

    It has been thought that lumbar intervertebral discs were innervated segmentally. We have previously shown that the L5-L6 intervertebral disc in the rat is innervated bilaterally from the L1 and L2 dorsal root ganglia through the paravertebral sympathetic trunks, but the pathways between the disc and the paravertebral sympathetic trunks were unknown. We have now studied the spines of 17 rats to elucidate the exact pathways. We examined serial sections of the lumbar spine using immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide, a sensory nerve marker. We showed that these nerve fibres from the intervertebral disc ran through the sinuvertebral nerve into the rami communicantes, not into the corresponding segmental spinal nerve. In the rat, sensory information from the lumbar intervertebral discs is conducted through rami communicantes. If this innervation pattern applies to man, simple decompression of the corresponding nerve root will not relieve discogenic pain. Anterior interbody fusion, with the denervation of rami communicantes, may be effective for such low back pain. PMID:9699846

  1. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case. PMID:27549670

  2. A pilot study of the prevalence of lumbar disc degeneration in elite athletes with lower back pain at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Ong, A; Anderson, J; Roche, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the prevalence of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in elite athletes as compared with published literature of changes seen in non-athletes—that is, normal population. Methods: The lumbar spines of 31 Olympic athletes who presented to the Olympic Polyclinic with low back pain and/or sciatica were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Three criteria were looked at: (a) the loss of disc signal intensity; (b) the loss of disc height; (c) the presence of disc displacement. The results were then recorded and correlated with the lumbar levels. Results: The disc signal intensity was progressively reduced the more caudal the disc space. It was most common at the L5/S1 level, and, of the abnormal group, 36% (n = 11) showed the most degenerative change. Disc height reduction was also found to be most common at the L5/S1 level. However, the most common height reduction was only mild. A similar trend of increased prevalence of disc herniation was noted with more caudal levels. At the L5/S1 level, 58% were found to have an element of disc displacement, most of which were disc bulges. Compared with changes seen in the normal population (non-athletes) as described in the literature, disc degeneration defined by the above criteria was found to be significantly more severe in these Olympic athletes. Conclusions: Although the study was limited, the results suggest that elite athletes have a greater prevalence and greater degree of lumbar disc degeneration than the normal population. A more detailed follow up study should be considered to investigate which particular training activities have the most impact on the lumbar spine, and how to modify training methods so as to avoid the long term sequelae of degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:12782554

  3. Feasibility of using interstitial ultrasound for intradiscal thermal therapy: a study in human cadaver lumbar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Shu, Richard

    2005-06-01

    Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. In this study, interstitial ultrasound was evaluated for the potential to heat intradiscal tissue more precisely by directing energy towards the posterior annular wall while avoiding vertebral bodies. Two single-element directional applicator design configurations were tested: a 1.5 mm OD direct-coupled (DC) applicator which can be implanted directly within the disc, and a catheter-cooled (CC) applicator which is inserted in a 2.4 mm OD catheter with integrated water cooling and implanted within the disc. The transducers were sectored to produce 90° spatial heating patterns for directional control. Both applicator configurations were evaluated in four human cadaver lumbar disc motion segments. Two heating protocols were employed in this study in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either T = 52 °C, or T > 70 °C for the treatment period. These temperatures (thermal doses) are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of in-growing nociceptor nerve fibres and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of annular collagen in the high-temperature case. Steady-state temperature maps, and thermal doses (t43) were used to assess the thermal treatments. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability of controlling temperature distributions within selected regions of the disc and annular wall using interstitial ultrasound, with minimal vertebral end-plate heating. While directional heating was demonstrated with both applicator designs, the CC configuration had greater directional heating capabilities and offered better temperature control than the DC configuration, particularly during the high-temperature protocol. Further, ultrasound energy was capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to produce more

  4. Facet tropism: possible role in the pathology of lumbar disc herniation in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honggang; Zhou, Yue

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of facet tropism (FT) in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is ambiguous. The present study aimed to investigate the association between FT and LDH in adolescents. METHODS This study included 65 adolescents with LDH with 1- or 2-level LDH, or both. Facet angles were measured with MRI. FT was defined as asymmetry of 10° between the left and right side. The same levels of 30 healthy persons who had no lumbar lesions were used as controls. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. RESULTS FT was identified in 16 of 39 patients with LDH in L4-5 and in 3 of 30 controls (p = 0.006, OR 6.261, 95% CI 1.619-24.217). It was also identified in 12 of 27 patients with LDH in L5-S1 and in 4 of 30 controls (p = 0.017, OR 5.200, 95% CI 1.420-19.039). One patient had LDH in both L4-5 and L5-S1. CONCLUSIONS FT is associated with LDH in both L4-5 and L5-S1 levels in adolescents. PMID:26942268

  5. Comparison of open surgical discectomy versus plasma-laser nucleoplasty in patients with single lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Kouchakzadeh, Masih; Mirhosseini, Ahmad; Tabesh, Homayoun; Rezvani, Majid; Moayednia, Amir; Ganjeifar, Babak; Mahabadi, Amir; Yousefi, Elham; Kooshki, Ali Mehrabi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intervertebral disc herniation is a major cause of low back pain. Several treatment methods are available for lumbar disc herniation including Chemonucleolysis, open surgery, nucleoplasty, laser disc decompression, and intradiscal electrothermal therapy. The high prevalence of lumbar disc herniation necessitates a minimally invasive yet effective treatment method. In this study, we compared the outcomes of open surgery and nucleoplasty method in patients with single lumbar disc herniation. Materials and Methods: This study was a noninferiority randomized clinical trial conducted in one of the University Hospitals of Isfahan Medical University; The Alzahra Hospital. About 200 patients with the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation were recruited and were assigned to either the treatment or control groups using block randomization. One group received open surgery and the other group received nucleoplasty as the method of treatment. Patients were revisited at 14 days, 1, 2, 3 months, and 1-year after surgery and were assessed for the following variables: Lower back pain, lower limb pain, common complications of surgery (e.g., discitis, infection and hematoma) and recurrence of herniation. Results: The mean (standard deviation) severity of low back pain was reduced from 6.92 (2.5) to 3.43 (2.3) in the nucleoplasty group (P = 0.04) and from 7.5 (2.2) to 3.04 (1.61) in the discectomy group (P = 0.73). Between group difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.44), however, time and treatment interaction was significant (P = 0.001). The level of radicular pain evaluated 1 year after treatment was reduced from 8.1 (1.2) to 2.9 (1.2) (P = 0.004) and from 7.89 (2.1) to 3.6 (2.5) (P =0.04) in the discectomy and the nucleoplasty groups respectively, significant interaction between time and treatment options was observed (P < 0.001) while there was no significant difference between two treatment groups (P = 0.82). Conclusion: Our results show that while

  6. Early results of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) as a treatment of discopathic lumbar pain.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj, Andrzej; Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Barczewska, Monika; Konopielko, Marcin; Mazur, Dariusz

    2004-06-30

    Background. The purpose of this paper is to present the technique of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), give some indications for its use, and provide a preliminary evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of this procedure in the treatment of low back pain, based on the authors' own experience. Material and methods. We performed a prospective analysis of treatment outcome in 212 patients who received PLDD in our clinic between March 2003 and January 2004, and who reported for the planned follow-up examination. Results. In 79.2% of these cases we achieved resolution or significant reduction of pain, and this effect persisted throughout the observation period of 6 weeks post surgery. In 3.8% of our patients, transient improvement was followed by intensification of low back pain, associated with the appearance of the most common complication after PLDD: inflammation of the disk and adjacent fragments of the elastic lamina of the vertebral bodies. Conclusions. In most cases PLDD is not a genuine alternative to open surgery on lumbar discopathy. It is most often administered to patients who have chronic pain from a slight extrusion of the disc, typically not qualified for surgery as the treatment method of choice. All other patients, even with larger herniations, can be administered PLDD as a last attempt at minimally invasive treatment prior to surgery, provided there are no obvious features of disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament. PMID:17675983

  7. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Factors Which May Predict the Need for Surgery in Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Sadeghian, Homa

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case-control. Purpose Evaluate clinical and imaging factors which may predict the risk of failure of medical therapy in patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Overview of Literature LDH is a common cause of low back pain and radicular leg pain, with a generally favorable natural course. At present, however, it is not possible to identify patients who may be candidates for surgery in an early stage of their disease by means of clinical signs or diagnostic imaging criteria. Methods We designed a study investigating patients with untreated low back pain to assess the predictive value of demographic, clinical or imaging findings in identifying patients who finally would meet the classic current criteria for surgery. Results Among 134 patients, 80.6% were successfully treated with conservative therapy and 19.4% finally underwent surgery. Sex, occupation, involved root level, presence of Modic changes, osteophytes or annular tears were not significantly different between the 2 groups, while cerebrospinal fluid block, Pfirrmann's grade, location of herniation with regard to the midline, and type of herniation were significantly different. Anteroposterior fragment size was significantly higher and intervertebral foramen height and thecal sac diameters were significantly lower in the surgical group. Conclusions Although it is strongly recommended to practice conservative management at first for patients with LDH symptoms, the results of this study shows that higher Pfirrmann's grade, more laterally located discs, extrusion and protrusion herniation types, and larger fragments could predict the risk of conservative treatment failure. This way, unnecessarily prolonged conservative management (beyond 4-8 weeks) may be precluded. PMID:25187861

  8. Wear of the Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement investigated using an electro-mechanical spine simulator

    PubMed Central

    Moghadas, Parshia; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    The Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement was subjected to wear testing in an electro-mechanical spine simulator. Sinusoidally varying compression (0.6–2 kN, frequency 2 Hz), rotation (±2°, frequency 1 Hz), flexion–extension (6° to −3°, frequency 1 Hz) and lateral bending (±2°, frequency 1 Hz) were applied out of phase to specimens immersed in diluted calf serum at 37 °C. The mass of the ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene component of the device was measured at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 million cycles; its volume was also measured by micro-computed tomography. Total mass and volume losses were 60.3 ± 4.6 mg (mean ± standard deviation) and 64.6 ± 6.0 mm3. Corresponding wear rates were 12.0 ± 1.4 mg per million cycles and 12.8 ± 1.2 mm3 per million cycles; the rate of loss of volume corresponds to a mass loss of 11.9 ± 1.1 mg per million cycles, that is, the two sets of measurements of wear agree closely. Wear rates also agree closely with measurements made in another laboratory using the same protocol but using a conventional mechanical spine simulator. PMID:25834002

  9. Characteristics of Lumbar Disc Herniation With Exacerbation of Presentation Due to Spinal Manipulative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Liu, Yan-Xi; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article was to delineate the characteristics of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with exacerbation of symptoms caused by spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The main emphasis should be on the prevention of this condition by identifying relevant risk factors. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of a total number of 10 LDH patients with exacerbation of presentation after SMT were reviewed. All the patients underwent neurological and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Laminectomy and discectomy were performed, and follow-up was carried out in all patients. The duration of symptoms in the patients before SMT was 4–15 years. After the therapy, an acute exacerbation of back and radicular pain was observed within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that L4–L5 was the most frequently affected level observed (7 patients), and each patient had a large disc fragment in the spinal canal. The disc fragments were classified into 3 types according to their localizations. The time internal between the exacerbation of presentation and surgery was 23.1 days. No perioperative complications were noted. All the patients were relieved of radicular pain a few days after surgery. During postoperative follow-up, all patients regained the ability to walk; one patient received catheterization for 1 month and another for 6 months. Eight patients reported a complete resolution of presentation and the rest 2 patients were significantly improved. SMT should be prohibited in some LDH patients to prevent neurological damages, in whom there are 5 possible risk factors. Surgical results for these patients are encouraging. PMID:25816037

  10. Characteristics of lumbar disc herniation with exacerbation of presentation due to spinal manipulative therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Liu, Yan-Xi; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Hong-Wei

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this article was to delineate the characteristics of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with exacerbation of symptoms caused by spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The main emphasis should be on the prevention of this condition by identifying relevant risk factors. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of a total number of 10 LDH patients with exacerbation of presentation after SMT were reviewed. All the patients underwent neurological and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Laminectomy and discectomy were performed, and follow-up was carried out in all patients. The duration of symptoms in the patients before SMT was 4-15 years. After the therapy, an acute exacerbation of back and radicular pain was observed within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that L4-L5 was the most frequently affected level observed (7 patients), and each patient had a large disc fragment in the spinal canal. The disc fragments were classified into 3 types according to their localizations. The time internal between the exacerbation of presentation and surgery was 23.1 days. No perioperative complications were noted. All the patients were relieved of radicular pain a few days after surgery. During postoperative follow-up, all patients regained the ability to walk; one patient received catheterization for 1 month and another for 6 months. Eight patients reported a complete resolution of presentation and the rest 2 patients were significantly improved. SMT should be prohibited in some LDH patients to prevent neurological damages, in whom there are 5 possible risk factors. Surgical results for these patients are encouraging. PMID:25816037

  11. Stretching of the sciatic nerve; a means of relieving postoperative pain following removal of ruptured lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    ADAMS, J E; INMAN, V T

    1959-07-01

    Stretching the sciatic nerve for the relief of "sciatica" was frequently employed before 1900 and was subsequently abandoned, probably because it was done without sufficient scrutiny of the indications. The procedure has recently been employed in cases in which "sciatica" remains following the operative removal of ruptured intervertebral discs, and it has been instrumental in relieving postoperative "sciatica" when the cause was the formation of adhesions about the lumbar nerve roots. If the nerve root is compressed by recurrent disc protrusion or by adjacent bone, the manipulation usually increases the pain, a phenomenon that has been helpful from a diagnostic standpoint. PMID:13662862

  12. Prognostic Value of Impaired Preoperative Ankle Reflex in Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; EG, Hasankhani; Zare, Atefe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors exist influencing the outcome of surgical discectomy in the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between severity of preoperative impaired ankle reflex and outcomes of lumbar discectomy in the patients with L5-S1 LDH. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients (108 male and 73 female) who underwent simple discectomy in our orthopedic department from April 2009 to April 2013 and followed them up for more than one year. The mean age of the patients was 35.3±8.9 years old. Severity of reflex impairment was graded from 0 to 4+ and radicular pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaires, respectively. Subjective satisfaction was also evaluated at the last follow-up visit. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare qualitative variables. Results: Reflex impairment existed in 44.8% preoperatively that improved to 10% at the last follow-up visit. Statistical analyses could not find a significant relationship between the severity of impaired ankle reflex and sex or age (P=0.538 and P=0.709, respectively). There was a remarkable relationship between severity of reflex impairment and preoperative radicular pain or disability (P=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively). Kruskal-Wallis test showed that a more severity in ankle reflex impairment was associated with not only less improvement in postoperative pain and disability but also less satisfaction rate (P<0.001 in all three). Conclusions: In the patients with L5-S1 LDH, more severe ankle reflex impairment is associated with less improvement in postoperative pain, disability, and subjective satisfaction. PMID:26894219

  13. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression. PMID:18817014

  14. Little-known Swiss contributions to the description, diagnosis, and surgery of lumbar disc disease before the Mixter and Barr era.

    PubMed

    Stienen, Martin Nikolaus; Surbeck, Werner; Tröhler, Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of lumbar spine pathologies made substantial progress at the turn of the twentieth century. The authors review the original publication of Otto Veraguth in 1929 reporting on the successful resection of a herniated lumbar disc, published exclusively in the German language. His early report is put into the historical context, and its impact on the understanding of pathologies of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is estimated. The Swiss surgeon and Nobel Prize laureate Emil Theodor Kocher was among the first physicians to describe the traumatic rupture of the IVD in 1896. As early as 1909 Oppenheim and Krause published 2 case reports on surgery for a herniated lumbar disc. Goldthwait was the first physician to delineate the etiopathogenes is between annulus rupture, symptoms of sciatica, and neurological signs in his publication of 1911. Further publications by Middleton and Teacher in 1911 and Schmorl in 1929 added to the understanding of lumbar spinal pathologies. In 1929, the Swiss neurologist Veraguth (surgery performed by Hans Brun) and the American neurosurgeon Walter Edward Dandy both published their early experiences with the surgical therapy of a herniated lumbar disc. Veraguth's contribution, however, has not been appreciated internationally to date. The causal relationship between lumbar disc pathology and sciatica remained uncertain for some years to come. The causal relationship was not confirmed until Mixter and Barr's landmark paper in 1934 describing the association of sciatica and lumbar disc herniation, after which the surgical treatment became increasingly popular. Veraguth was among the first physicians to report on the clinical course of a patient with successful resection of a herniated lumbar disc. His observations should be acknowledged in view of the limited experience and literature on this ailment at that time. PMID:24074509

  15. Lateral bending of the lumbar spine during quadrupedalism in strepsirhines.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L J; Demes, B; Cooper, J

    2001-03-01

    Much research has been devoted to spinal kinematics of nonmammalian vertebrates, while comparatively little is known about the locomotor role of spinal movements in mammals, especially primates. This study, conducted at the Duke University Primate Center, examines the function of lateral spinal bending during quadrupedal walking among a diverse sample of strepsirhines. The taxa studied include Loris tardigradus (1), Nycticebus coucang (1), N. pygmaeus (1), Cheirogaleus medius (2), Varecia variegata (2), Eulemur fulvus (2), and a total sample size of 261 strides. Lateral bending varies among the taxa with respect to both magnitude and effects of velocity, and does not appear to be correlated with body size. In addition, the timing of lateral bending during a stride appears to differ from that reported for other (nonmammalian) tetrapods. On average, maximum lateral flexion occurs just after ipsilateral foot touchdown, which may be functionally associated with touchdown of the contralateral forelimb during diagonal sequence gait. For some of the taxa, lateral flexion coincides more closely with foot touchdown as velocity increases, suggesting a functional role in increasing hindlimb stride length. Both of these timing patterns contrast with those reported for lizards. Finally, although lorids as a group have been described as having a "sinuous" gait, this study shows more pronounced lateral flexion in Nycticebus than in Loris. PMID:11180987

  16. In vivo age- and sex-related creep of human lumbar motion segments and discs in pure centric tension.

    PubMed

    Kurutz, Marta

    2006-01-01

    In vivo creep of human lumbar motion segments and discs subject to pure centric tension is presented, in terms of aging, sex and disc level. Time-related elongations of segments L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 were measured during the usual 20 min long traction hydrotherapy of patients, by using a computerized subaqual ultrasound measuring method [Kurutz et al., 2002a. Orvosi Hetilap 143 (13), 673-684; Kurutz et al., 2003. Journal of Bioengineering and Biomechanics 5 (1), 67-92]. Elongation of segments was considered as a change of the distance between two adjacent spinous processes. Based on these experiments, in vivo creep of human lumbar FSUs was investigated in centric tension, in terms of sex, age and disc level. Three-parameter rheological models were used to determine viscoelastic tensile moduli of human lumbar FSUs and discs. From three time-related measured elongation values, in vivo damping constants with creep functions were calculated for each segment, in terms of sex, aging and disc level. It has been demonstrated that initial elastic elongations decrease, concerning stiffness increase with aging. Similarly, tensile creep elongations decrease, damping properties increase with aging. Former observations concerning the difference in deformation propagation of men and women in time, have been verified by means of creep analysis: although males have higher initial elastic deformability, due to a smaller damping of females, the deformation propagation of women overtakes men in creep process. This tendency is more significant with aging. Increasing damping was observed in distal direction, both for males and females. PMID:15925372

  17. A PHASED REHABILITATION PROTOCOL FOR ATHLETES WITH LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    VanGelder, Leonard H.; Vaughn, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Conservative non-surgical management of a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc (HLD) in athletes is a complex task due to the dramatic forces imparted on the spine during sport participation. The demands placed upon the athlete during rehabilitation and return to sport are unique not only from a sport specific perspective, but also regarding return to the sport strength and conditioning programs utilized for sport preparation. Many prescriptions fail to address postural and motor control faults specific to athletic development, which may prevent full return to sport after suffering a HLD or predispose the athlete to future exacerbations of a HLD. Strength exercises involving squatting, deadlifting, and Olympic power lifts are large components of the typical athlete's conditioning program, therefore some progressions are provided to address potential underlying problems in the athlete's technique that may have contributed to their HLD in the first place. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to propose a framework for rehabilitation that is built around the phases of healing of the disc. Phase I: Non-Rotational/Non-Flexion Phase (Acute Inflammatory Phase), Phase II: Counter rotation/Flexion Phase (Repair Phase), Phase III: Rotational Phase/Power development (Remodeling Phase), and Phase IV: Full return to sport. This clinical commentary provides a theoretical basis for these phases based on available literature as well as reviewing many popular current practice trends in the management of an HLD. The authors recognize the limits of any general exercise rehabilitation recommendation with regard to return to sport, as well as any general strength and conditioning program. It is vital that an individual assessment and prescription is made for every athlete which reviews and addresses movement in all planes of motion under all necessary extrinsic and intrinsic demands to that athlete. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175134

  18. Analysis of post-operative pain patterns following total lumbar disc replacement: results from fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations.

    PubMed

    Siepe, Christoph J; Korge, Andreas; Grochulla, Frank; Mehren, Christoph; Mayer, H Michael

    2008-01-01

    Although a variety of biomechanical laboratory investigations and radiological studies have highlighted the potential problems associated with total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), no previous study has performed a systematic clinical failure analysis. The aim of this study was to identify the post-operative pain sources, establish the incidence of post-operative pain patterns and investigate the effect on post-operative outcome with the help of fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations in patients from an ongoing prospective study with ProDisc II. Patients who reported unsatisfactory results at any of the FU-examinations received fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations as part of a semi-invasive diagnostic and conservative treatment program. Pain sources were identified in patients with reproducible (> or =2x) significant (50-75%) or highly significant (75-100%) pain relief. Results were correlated with outcome parameters visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the subjective patient satisfaction rate. From a total of 175 operated patients with a mean follow-up (FU) of 29.3 months (range 12.2-74.9 months), n = 342 infiltrations were performed in n = 58 patients (33.1%) overall. Facet joint pain, predominantly at the index level (86.4%), was identified in n = 22 patients (12.6%). The sacroiliac joint was a similarly frequent cause of post-operative pain (n = 21, 12.0%). Pain from both structures influenced all outcome parameters negatively (P < 0.05). Patients with an early onset of pain (< or =6 months) were 2-5x higher at risk of developing persisting complaints and unsatisfactory outcome at later FU-stages in comparison to the entire study cohort (P < 0.05). The level of TDR significantly influenced post-operative outcome. Best results were achieved for the TDRs above the lumbosacral junction at L4/5 (incidence of posterior joint pain 14.8%). Inferior outcome and a significantly higher incidence of posterior joint pain were observed

  19. Analysis of post-operative pain patterns following total lumbar disc replacement: results from fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Korge, Andreas; Grochulla, Frank; Mehren, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Although a variety of biomechanical laboratory investigations and radiological studies have highlighted the potential problems associated with total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), no previous study has performed a systematic clinical failure analysis. The aim of this study was to identify the post-operative pain sources, establish the incidence of post-operative pain patterns and investigate the effect on post-operative outcome with the help of fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations in patients from an ongoing prospective study with ProDisc II. Patients who reported unsatisfactory results at any of the FU-examinations received fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations as part of a semi-invasive diagnostic and conservative treatment program. Pain sources were identified in patients with reproducible (≥2×) significant (50–75%) or highly significant (75–100%) pain relief. Results were correlated with outcome parameters visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the subjective patient satisfaction rate. From a total of 175 operated patients with a mean follow-up (FU) of 29.3 months (range 12.2–74.9 months), n = 342 infiltrations were performed in n = 58 patients (33.1%) overall. Facet joint pain, predominantly at the index level (86.4%), was identified in n = 22 patients (12.6%). The sacroiliac joint was a similarly frequent cause of post-operative pain (n = 21, 12.0%). Pain from both structures influenced all outcome parameters negatively (P < 0.05). Patients with an early onset of pain (≤6 months) were 2–5× higher at risk of developing persisting complaints and unsatisfactory outcome at later FU-stages in comparison to the entire study cohort (P < 0.05). The level of TDR significantly influenced post-operative outcome. Best results were achieved for the TDRs above the lumbosacral junction at L4/5 (incidence of posterior joint pain 14.8%). Inferior outcome and a significantly higher incidence of posterior joint

  20. Lumbar (Open) Microscopic Discectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common surgical treatment for ruptured or herniated discs of the lumbar spine. When the outer wall ... a slipped or bulging disc. (See discussion of herniated disc for more information.) Once the inner disc material ...

  1. Local Irrigation of the Surgical Field with Antibiotics in the End of Procedure Reduces the Infection Rate in Herniated Lumbar Disc Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kërveshi, Armend; Halili, Nehat; Kastrati, Bujar; Qosja, Faik; Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Reported rate of infections after lumbar discectomy is 1%–15 %. This complication may result in disability or even the death. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the rate of infection associated with lumbar discectomies when combined systemic and local antibiotic prophylaxis was employed. Patients and methods: In this retrospective study we analyzed all patients operated for herniated lumbar disc from 2009 -2012 in our institute. Beside of receiving systemic prophylaxis with 2g of Cefazoline, all patients had their operative field irrigated at the end of operation with Amikacin sulfate injection. Wound was considered infected when local and systemic signs of infection were revealed and were associated with elevated ESR, leukocytosis and elevated CRP. Assessment of infection is done by neurosurgeon during the hospitalization and later at outpatient’s clinic along postoperative course of three months. Results: A total of 604 patients were operated, of those 285 patients (47.2 %) females and 319 males (52.8 %), 12 patients were operated on two levels (1.98 %). Average patient age was 32.5 years (range 20–65 years) Localization of herniated disc was: in L/2-L/3 20 patients or 3.3 %, the L/3-L/4 level 42 patients or 7 % , the L/4 -L /5 262 patients or 43.3 % at the level L/V- S/1 280 patients or 46.3 %. Three patients (0.49%) developed wound infection, two of them superficial infection only with local signs: local pain, redness and leakage. They were treated with oral antibiotics. One with deep wound infection. He presented with local and systemic signs and treated with i.v antibiotics. All the cultures from wound swab revealed staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: Prophylaxis with systemic antibiotic (Cefazoline 2.0) intravenous administration 30 minutes before the incision and irrigation of operative field with local antibiotic Amikacine sulfate at the end of procedure reduces the infection rate in patients operated for herniated lumbar disc when

  2. Outcome of surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Strömqvist, F; Strömqvist, B; Jönsson, B; Gerdhem, P; Karlsson, M K

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is uncommon in youth and few cases are treated surgically. Very few outcome studies exist for LDH surgery in this age group. Our aim was to explore differences in gender in pre-operative level of disability and outcome of surgery for LDH in patients aged ≤ 20 years using prospectively collected data. From the national Swedish SweSpine register we identified 180 patients with one-year and 108 with two-year follow-up data ≤ 20 years of age, who between the years 2000 and 2010 had a primary operation for LDH. Both male and female patients reported pronounced impairment before the operation in all patient reported outcome measures, with female patients experiencing significantly greater back pain, having greater analgesic requirements and reporting significantly inferior scores in EuroQol (EQ-5D-index), EQ-visual analogue scale, most aspects of Short Form-36 and Oswestry Disabilities Index, when compared with male patients. Surgery conferred a statistically significant improvement in all registered parameters, with few gender discrepancies. Quality of life at one year following surgery normalised in both males and females and only eight patients (4.5%) were dissatisfied with the outcome. Virtually all parameters were stable between the one- and two-year follow-up examination. LDH surgery leads to normal health and a favourable outcome in both male and female patients aged 20 years or younger, who failed to recover after non-operative management. PMID:26637684

  3. Distribution pattern of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in males

    PubMed Central

    Nnamdi, Ibe Michael Onwuzuruike

    2013-01-01

    Background: The pattern of distribution of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs has been published, though scantily, especially in males. We decided to look at our own series, compare and contrast ours with some of those published. Materials and Methods: We treated 88 locations of this lesion in 68 males. The clinical features were those of lower back pains, with or without radiation into the lower extremities, sensory loss and paresis of the limbs. There was a case of loss of urinary bladder and ano-rectal control. All lesions were confirmed through cauda-equinograms and treated under general anaesthesia in knee-chest position (MECCA position). The patients were followed up for 3-6 months post-operatively. Results: There were 88 locations in 68 males of 21-70 years of age, with 29 prolapses occurring during the age range 31-40 years, while 54 locations were on the left and 48 at L4/5. The procedures were well tolerated by all patients and there were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: This lesion in our series occurred mostly on the left, at the L4/5 level and peaked at 31-40 years age range. The predictability of occurrence of this disease, using side, level and age is still not feasible in males from our series. PMID:24403714

  4. Efficacy of Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System (TESSYS) Technique in Treating Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhimin; Ha, Yoon; Yi, Seong; Cao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To compare efficacy and safety of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic spine system (TESSYS) and traditional fenestration discectomy (FD) in treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 106 LDH patients were divided into TESSYS group (n=48) and FD group (n=58). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), and modified MacNab criteria were used for efficacy evaluation. Post-operative responses were compared by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on detection of serum IL-6, CRP, and CPK levels. RESULTS In the TESSYS group, compared with the FD group, we observed, shorter incision length, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, lower hospitalization cost, shorter recovery time, lower complication rate (all P<0.001), and lower VAS scores of lumbago and skelalgia at 3 days and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively (all P<0.05). At 24 and 48 h postoperatively, CRP level was remarkably higher in the FD group compared to the TESSYS group (P<0.001). Further, comparison of IL-6 levels at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively revealed significantly higher levels in the FD group than in the FESSYS group (all P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS TESSYS had clinical advantages over FD and entails less trauma and quicker postoperative recovery, suggesting that TESSYS is well tolerated by patients and is a better approach than FD in surgical treatment of LDH. PMID:26887645

  5. The outcome of lumbar disc herniation surgery is worse in old adults than in young adults.

    PubMed

    Strömqvist, Fredrik; Strömqvist, Björn; Jönsson, Bo; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - The outcome of surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has been thoroughly evaluated in middle-aged patients, but less so in elderly patients. Patients and methods - With validated patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and using SweSpine (the national Swedish Spine Surgery Register), we analyzed the preoperative clinical status of LDH patients and the 1-year postoperative outcome of LDH surgery performed over the period 2000-2012. We included 1,250 elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age) and 12,840 young and middle-aged patients (aged 20-64). Results - Generally speaking, elderly patients were referred for LDH surgery with worse PROM scores than young and middle-aged patients, they improved less by surgery, they experienced more complications, they had inferior 1-year postoperative PROM scores, and they were less satisfied with the outcome (with all differences being statistically significant). Interpretation - Elderly patients appear to have a worse postoperative outcome after LDH surgery than young and middle-aged patients, they are referred to surgery with inferior clinical status, and they improve less after the surgery. PMID:27391663

  6. Efficacy of Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System (TESSYS) Technique in Treating Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhimin; Ha, Yoon; Yi, Seong; Cao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare efficacy and safety of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic spine system (TESSYS) and traditional fenestration discectomy (FD) in treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material/Methods A total of 106 LDH patients were divided into TESSYS group (n=48) and FD group (n=58). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), and modified MacNab criteria were used for efficacy evaluation. Post-operative responses were compared by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on detection of serum IL-6, CRP, and CPK levels. Results In the TESSYS group, compared with the FD group, we observed, shorter incision length, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, lower hospitalization cost, shorter recovery time, lower complication rate (all P<0.001), and lower VAS scores of lumbago and skelalgia at 3 days and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively (all P<0.05). At 24 and 48 h postoperatively, CRP level was remarkably higher in the FD group compared to the TESSYS group (P<0.001). Further, comparison of IL-6 levels at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively revealed significantly higher levels in the FD group than in the FESSYS group (all P<0.001). Conclusions TESSYS had clinical advantages over FD and entails less trauma and quicker postoperative recovery, suggesting that TESSYS is well tolerated by patients and is a better approach than FD in surgical treatment of LDH. PMID:26887645

  7. Therapeutic effects of Chinese osteopathy in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Ping; Zhou, Wei; Wei, Jie; Li, Xi-De; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted in 72 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) patients and 40 asymptomatic subjects to evaluate the efficacy of Feng's spinal manipulation (FSM). FSM was performed twice a week for less than 20 days. Changes in the symmetrical index of spinal column (SISC) and quantified symptom index (QSI) before and after FSM in both groups were collected. The QSI consisted of the visual analogue scale (VAS), score of the Japanese Orthopedic Association, and straight leg raising test, for measurement of pain perception, dysfunction of lower limb extension or flexion, and symptomatic relief. A correlation analysis was conducted to compare the difference in protruded nucleus pulposus size using computerized projection grating profilometry, SISC, and QSI before and after the therapy. The results showed that the SISC and QSI significantly decreased after treatment in the LDH group (p < 0.01). The SISC before and after treatment was closely correlated with the improvement of QSI, although there was no change in protruded nucleus pulposus following the therapy. Among the five components in SISC, the LR was found to be an ideal indicator for evaluation of the real circumstances in LDH patients. Our data suggested that FSM achieved satisfactory therapeutic effects in relieving the symptom of LDH while no effects were observed in asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24117063

  8. Severe Impingement of Lumbar Disc Replacements Increases the Functional Biological Activity of Polyethylene Wear Debris

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ryan M.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla J.

    2013-01-01

    of particles in all three size ranges. In both cohorts, the functional biological activity correlated with the chronic inflammatory response, and the extent of rim penetration positively correlated with increasing particle size, number, and functional biological activity. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that severe rim impingement increases the production of biologically relevant particles from motion-preserving lumbar total disc replacement components. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:23780545

  9. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in Intervertebral Discs of Patients Undergoing Lumbar Microdiscectomy: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Manu N.; Ruzicka, Filip; Machackova, Tana; Jancalek, Radim; Smrcka, Martin; Schmitz, Jonathan E.; Hermanova, Marketa; Sana, Jiri; Michu, Elleni; Baird, John C.; Ahmed, Fahad S.; Maca, Karel; Lipina, Radim; Alamin, Todd F.; Coscia, Michael F.; Stonemetz, Jerry L.; Witham, Timothy; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Birkenmaier, Christof; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between intervertebral disc degeneration and chronic infection by Propionibacterium acnes is controversial with contradictory evidence available in the literature. Previous studies investigating these relationships were under-powered and fraught with methodical differences; moreover, they have not taken into consideration P. acnes’ ability to form biofilms or attempted to quantitate the bioburden with regard to determining bacterial counts/genome equivalents as criteria to differentiate true infection from contamination. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of P. acnes in patients undergoing lumbar disc microdiscectomy. Methods and Findings The sample consisted of 290 adult patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. An intraoperative biopsy and pre-operative clinical data were taken in all cases. One biopsy fragment was homogenized and used for quantitative anaerobic culture and a second was frozen and used for real-time PCR-based quantification of P. acnes genomes. P. acnes was identified in 115 cases (40%), coagulase-negative staphylococci in 31 cases (11%) and alpha-hemolytic streptococci in 8 cases (3%). P. acnes counts ranged from 100 to 9000 CFU/ml with a median of 400 CFU/ml. The prevalence of intervertebral discs with abundant P. acnes (≥ 1x103 CFU/ml) was 11% (39 cases). There was significant correlation between the bacterial counts obtained by culture and the number of P. acnes genomes detected by real-time PCR (r = 0.4363, p<0.0001). Conclusions In a large series of patients, the prevalence of discs with abundant P. acnes was 11%. We believe, disc tissue homogenization releases P. acnes from the biofilm so that they can then potentially be cultured, reducing the rate of false-negative cultures. Further, quantification study revealing significant bioburden based on both culture and real-time PCR minimize the likelihood that observed

  10. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A case-control study. Purpose To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Overview of Literature Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Methods Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. Results At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (p<0.001), 6 (0.021), and 12 (p<0.001) months after surgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (p<0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate that TPED led to satisfactory improvement in leg pain and daily living in PD patients a year after surgery. PMID:27559446

  11. A forward dynamics simulation of human lumbar spine flexion predicting the load sharing of intervertebral discs, ligaments, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Rupp, T K; Ehlers, W; Karajan, N; Günther, M; Schmitt, S

    2015-10-01

    Determining the internal dynamics of the human spine's biological structure is one essential step that allows enhanced understanding of spinal degeneration processes. The unavailability of internal load figures in other methods highlights the importance of the forward dynamics approach as the most powerful approach to examine the internal degeneration of spinal structures. Consequently, a forward dynamics full-body model of the human body with a detailed lumbar spine is introduced. The aim was to determine the internal dynamics and the contribution of different spinal structures to loading. The multi-body model consists of the lower extremities, two feet, shanks and thighs, the pelvis, five lumbar vertebrae, and a lumped upper body including the head and both arms. All segments are modelled as rigid bodies. 202 muscles (legs, back, abdomen) are included as Hill-type elements. 58 nonlinear force elements are included to represent all spinal ligaments. The lumbar intervertebral discs were modelled nonlinearly. As results, internal kinematics, muscle forces, and internal loads for each biological structure are presented. A comparison between the nonlinear (new, enhanced modelling approach) and linear (standard modelling approach, bushing) modelling approaches of the intervertebral disc is presented. The model is available to all researchers as ready-to-use C/C++ code within our in-house multi-body simulation code demoa with all relevant binaries included. PMID:25653134

  12. In silico evaluation of a new composite disc substitute with a L3-L5 lumbar spine finite element model.

    PubMed

    Noailly, Jérôme; Ambrosio, Luigi; Elizabeth Tanner, K; Planell, Josep A; Lacroix, Damien

    2012-06-01

    When the intervertebral disc is removed to relieve chronic pain, subsequent segment stabilization should restore the functional mechanics of the native disc. Because of partially constrained motions and the lack of intrinsic rotational stiffness ball-on-socket implants present many disadvantages. Composite disc substitutes mimicking healthy disc structures should be able to assume the role expected for a disc substitute with fewer restrictions than ball-on-socket implants. A biomimetic composite disc prototype including artificial nucleus fibre-reinforced annulus and endplates was modelled as an L4-L5 disc substitute within a L3-L5 lumbar spine finite element model. Different device updates, i.e. changes of material properties fibre distributions and volume fractions and nucleus placements were proposed. Load- and displacement-controlled rotations were simulated with and without body weight applied. The original prototype reduced greatly the flexibility of the treated segment with significant adjacent level effects under displacement-controlled or hybrid rotations. Device updates allowed restoring large part of the global axial and sagittal rotational flexibility predicted with the intact model. Material properties played a major role, but some other updates were identified to potentially tune the device behaviour against specific motions. All device versions altered the coupled intersegmental shear deformations affecting facet joint contact through contact area displacements. Loads in the bony endplates adjacent to the implants increased as the implant stiffness decreased but did not appear to be a strong limitation for the implant biomechanical and mechanobiological functionality. In conclusion, numerical results given by biomimetic composite disc substitutes were encouraging with greater potential than that offered by ball-on-socket implants. PMID:21380572

  13. An epidemiologic study of sports and weight lifting as possible risk factors for herniated lumbar and cervical discs. The Northeast Collaborative Group on Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Mundt, D J; Kelsey, J L; Golden, A L; Panjabi, M M; Pastides, H; Berg, A T; Sklar, J; Hosea, T

    1993-01-01

    The associations between participation in several specific sports, use of free weights, and use of weight lifting equipment and herniated lumbar or cervical intervertebral discs were examined in a case-control epidemiologic study. Specific sports considered were baseball or softball, golf, bowling, swimming, diving, jogging, aerobics, and racquet sports. Included in the final analysis were 287 patients with lumbar disc herniation and 63 patients with cervical disc herniation, each matched by sex, source of care, and decade of age to 1 control who was free of disc herniation and other conditions of the back or neck. Results indicated that most sports are not associated with an increased risk of herniation, and may be protective. Relative risk estimates for the association between individual sports and lumbar or cervical herniation were generally less than or close to 1.0. There was, however, a weak positive association between bowling and herniation at both the lumbar and cervical regions of the spine. Use of weight lifting equipment was not associated with herniated lumbar or cervical disc, but a possible association was indicated between use of free weights and risk of cervical herniation (relative risk, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 4.74). PMID:8291639

  14. Early neuromuscular customized training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Strömqvist, Björn

    2006-01-01

    A prospective and controlled study of training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The objective was to determine the effect of early neuromuscular customized training after LDH surgery. No consensus exists on the type and timing of physical rehabilitation after LDH surgery. Patients aged 15–50 years, disc prolapse at L4–L5 or L5–S1. Before surgery, at 6 weeks, 4, and 12 months postoperatively, the following evaluations were performed: low back pain and leg pain estimated on a visual analog scale, disability according to the Roland–Morris questionnaire (RMQ) and disability rating index (DRI). Clinical examination, including the SLR test, was performed using a single blind method. Consumption of analgesics was registered. Twenty-five patients started neuromuscular customized training 2 weeks after surgery (early training group=ETG). Thirty-one patients formed a control group (CG) and started traditional training after 6 weeks. There was no significant difference in pain and disability between the two training groups before surgery. Median preoperative leg pain was 63 mm in ETG and 70 mm in the CG. Preoperative median disability according to RMQ was 14 in the ETG and 14.5 in the CG. Disability according to DRI (33/56 patients) was 5.3 in the ETG vs. 4.6 in the CG. At 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months, pain was significantly reduced in both groups, to the same extent. Disability scores were lower in the ETG at all follow-ups, and after 12 months, the difference was significant (RMQ P=.034, DRI P=.015). The results of the present study show early neuromuscular customized training to have a superior effect on disability, with a significant difference compared to traditional training at a follow-up 12 months after surgery. No adverse effects of the early training were seen. A prospective, randomized study with a larger patient sample is warranted to ultimately demonstrate that early training as described is beneficial for patients undergoing LDH

  15. Early neuromuscular customized training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Millisdotter, Monica; Strömqvist, Björn

    2007-01-01

    A prospective and controlled study of training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The objective was to determine the effect of early neuromuscular customized training after LDH surgery. No consensus exists on the type and timing of physical rehabilitation after LDH surgery. Patients aged 15-50 years, disc prolapse at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Before surgery, at 6 weeks, 4, and 12 months postoperatively, the following evaluations were performed: low back pain and leg pain estimated on a visual analog scale, disability according to the Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ) and disability rating index (DRI). Clinical examination, including the SLR test, was performed using a single blind method. Consumption of analgesics was registered. Twenty-five patients started neuromuscular customized training 2 weeks after surgery (early training group = ETG). Thirty-one patients formed a control group (CG) and started traditional training after 6 weeks. There was no significant difference in pain and disability between the two training groups before surgery. Median preoperative leg pain was 63 mm in ETG and 70 mm in the CG. Preoperative median disability according to RMQ was 14 in the ETG and 14.5 in the CG. Disability according to DRI (33/56 patients) was 5.3 in the ETG vs. 4.6 in the CG. At 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months, pain was significantly reduced in both groups, to the same extent. Disability scores were lower in the ETG at all follow-ups, and after 12 months, the difference was significant (RMQ P=.034, DRI P=.015). The results of the present study show early neuromuscular customized training to have a superior effect on disability, with a significant difference compared to traditional training at a follow-up 12 months after surgery. No adverse effects of the early training were seen. A prospective, randomized study with a larger patient sample is warranted to ultimately demonstrate that early training as described is beneficial for patients undergoing LDH surgery

  16. Prevalence of Age-Related Changes in Ovine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, Jean-François; Bihin, Benoît; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Neveu, Fabienne; Clegg, Peter; Dugdale, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaoqing; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ovine models are used to study intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The objective of the current study was to assess the naturally occurring age-related changes of the IVD that can be diagnosed by CT and MRI in the lumbar spine of sheep. We used CT and T2-weighted MR images to score the IVD (L6S1 to L1L2) in 41 sheep (age, 6 mo to 11 y) that were euthanized for reasons not related to musculoskeletal disease. T2 mapping and measurement of T2 time of L6S1 to L2L3 were performed in 22 of the sheep. Degenerative changes manifested as early as 2 y of age and occurred at every IVD level. Discs were more severely damaged in older sheep. The age effect of the L6S1 IVD was larger than the average age effect for the other IVD. The current study provides evidence that lesions similar to those encountered in humans can be identified by CT and MRI in lumbar spine of sheep. Ideally, research animals should be assessed at the initiation of preclinical trials to determine the extent of prevalent degenerative changes. The ovine lumbosacral disc seems particularly prone to degeneration and might be a favorable anatomic site for studying IVD degeneration. PMID:27538861

  17. Cortisol awakening response and pain-related fear-avoidance versus endurance in patients six months after lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Sudhaus, Sigrid; Möllenberg, Thomas; Plaas, Heike; Willburger, Roland; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hasenbring, Monika

    2012-06-01

    Recent research indicates that stress-induced, prolonged deviations in basal adrenocortical activity might contribute to ongoing/recurrent pain following lumbar disc surgery. Further, fear-avoidance and endurance responses to pain (FAR and ER) are regarded as important risk factors for pain after surgery. In patients with non-specific low back pain, FAR appear to possibly increase pain-related arousal, whereas ER may have an arousal-lowering effect, indicated by adrenocortical activity. The current study explores the relationship between basal adrenocortical activity and FAR and ER. Thirty-six patients 6 months after lumbar disc surgery participated. Basal adrenocortical activity was assessed through the cortisol awakening response (CAR), using salivary samples collected on two consecutive days. FAR and ER were estimated using questionnaires. While the ER variables pain-persistence behavior and positive mood despite pain showed negative associations with the CAR, the FAR variables fear-avoidance beliefs and avoidance of social activity were positively correlated with it. Additionally, higher CAR levels were found in patients with high versus patients with low fear-avoidance beliefs and, conversely, in patients with low versus high positive mood and pain persistence. These results indicate that FAR may increase the individuals' level of pain-related stress among patients after disc surgery, while ER may lower it. PMID:22395425

  18. Consistency of lumbar discograms of the same disc obtained twice at a 2-week interval: influence of needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, T; Muro, T; Ito, S; Hattori, Y; Ozaki, S

    1998-01-01

    : Although numerous papers have emphasized the importance of accurate needle positioning in lumbar discography, no concrete evidence is available to support this contention, and no study has evaluated the image consistency of discography as influenced by this factor. By observing the consistency of two images in relation to needle tip position we aimed to clarify the importance of needle positioning in discography. One hundred and ninety-two patients (324 discs) receiving steroid intradiscal therapy in whom discography of the same disc was performed twice at a 2-week interval and in whom the needle tip position was within the acceptable range (as defined by us) were studied. The patients were divided into two groups: in group G, in whom the needle tip was within a limited range on both discograms, and group P, in whom the needle tip was in this range on only one discogram. Image consistency was compared roentgenographically in the two groups. The consistent image rate for the total number of discs was 48.5%, being significantly higher in group G (53.2%) than in group P (39.0%). The rates were lower in the nucleus pulposus and the posterior portion of the disc than in the other disc areas, but were significantly higher in group G (85. 4% and 75.0%, respectively, for these two areas). The necessity for accurate needle tip positioning was proved roentgenographically. PMID:9732558

  19. Total lumbar disc replacement in athletes: clinical results, return to sport and athletic performance

    PubMed Central

    Wiechert, Karsten; Khattab, Mohamed F.; Korge, Andreas; Mayer, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of total lumbar disc replacement (TDR) in predominantly young and active patients, no previous study has addressed possibilities, limitations and potential risks regarding athletic performance following TDR. Mechanical concerns remain and the implant’s resilience as regards its load-bearing capacity during sporting activities is unknown. Thirty-nine athletic patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this study. These patients participated in a large variety of different types of sport. Significant and lasting pain-relief was attained following TDR with a mean follow-up of 26.3 months (range 9–50.7 months; FU rate 97.4%). Sporting activity was resumed within the first 3 months (38.5%) to 6 months (30.7%) with peak performance being reached after 5.2 months. Thirty-seven patients (94.9%) achieved resumption of sporting activity. Athletic performance improved significantly in 33 patients (84.6%). Minor subsidence was observed in 13 patients (30%) within the first 3 months with no further implant migration thereafter in 12 patients. Participation in all types of sport recorded in this study was accessible for a high rate of patients up to the level of professional athletes as well as those participating in extreme sports. Preoperative participation in sport proved to be a strong positive predictor for highly satisfactory postoperative outcome following TDR. In a selected group of patients, however, preoperative inability to participate in sporting activities did not impair postoperative physical activity. Due to the young age of the patients and significant load increase exerted during athletic activities, persisting concerns regarding the future behaviour of the implant remain and will require longer follow-up, modified investigation techniques and larger patient cohorts. PMID:17205239

  20. Aquaporin 3 protects against lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huanxin; Jing, Yongbin; Xia, Jingjun; Wang, Xintao; You, Changcheng; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water channel which promotes glycerol permeability and water transport across cell membranes, is reduced in degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD) tissues. However, the role of AQP3 in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration has not recieved much scholarly attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of AQP3 on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in human nucleus pulposus cells (hNPCs) using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments, and to determine whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in the effect of AQP3 on IVD degeneration. hNPCs were transfected with the AQP3-pcDNA3.1 plasmid or AQP3 siRNA to overexpress or suppress AQP3. An MTT assay was performed to determine cell proliferation, and we found that AQP3 promoted hNPC proliferation. The expression of aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)4 and ADAMTS5 was detected using western blot analysis, to examine the effect of AQP3 on ECM degradation in hNPCs. The results revealed that AQP3 inhibited ECM degradation in hNPCs. In addition, we found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling was suppressed by AQP3. However, the effect of AQP3 on hNPC proliferation and ECM degradation was reversed by treatment with lithium chloride, a known activator of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests, we have reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AQP3 exerts protective effects against IVD degeneration, and these are effected, at least partially, through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26820815

  1. Correlations of O3 therapeutic targets and imaging localization in lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fenghe; Yin, Yanwei; Liu, Chuansheng; Yi, Yusheng; Yu, Junmin; Kou, Dewei; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate correlations between the effects of O3 target-injection treatment and imaging localization in lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion (LIDP). Methods: 164 LIDP patients were divided into 3 groups: group A, the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain a-b; group B, the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain c-d; group C: the protrusion located at level I-III, region 3-4, domain a-b. The patients were treated with LIDP O3-target treatment + blocking therapy with epidural anti-inflammatory analgesic liquid. Results: Among the 164 LIDP patients, 95 patients (57.93%) exhibited the significant effectiveness after the treatment; 64 cases (39.02%) exhibited the effectiveness. The results of functional improvements revealed that 50 cases (53.76%) of sagittal plane and 54 cases of horizontal plane (55.67%) in the group A, 33 cases (35.48%) and 31 cases (31.96%) in the group C respectively were significantly better than those in the group B (10 cases, 10.75%; 12 cases, 12.37%) (P < 0.05). The visual analogue scale (VAS) scores 1 week and 1 month after the treatment in the three groups were significantly decreased than those before the treatment (P < 0.05). The intergroup comparison revealed that the A group (1 week 2.28 ± 0.85, 1 month 1.21 ± 0.27) and C (2.79 ± 0.98, 1.38 ± 0.55) were significantly better than the B group (3.92 ± 1.14, 2.53 ± 0.51) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The O3 target-injection treatment exhibited the best effects in treating the LIDP patients with the protrusion located at level I-III, region 1-2, domain a-b. PMID:26309586

  2. Translaminar Microendoscopic Herniotomy for Cranially Migrated Lumbar Disc Herniations Encroaching on the Exiting Nerve Root in the Preforaminal and Foraminal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Osamu; Senba, Hideyuki; Kitamura, Takahiro; Komiya, Norihiro; Oga, Masayoshi; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Purpose The aim of this study was to describe translaminar microendoscopic herniotomy (TL-MEH) for cranially migrated lumbar disc herniations encroaching on the exiting nerve root in the preforaminal and foraminal zones and to report preliminary results of the procedure. Overview of Literature Conventional interlaminar approaches for preforaminal and foraminal lumbar disc herniations result in extensive removal of the lamina and facet joint to remove disc fragments safely. More destructive approaches increase the risk of postoperative segmental instability. Methods TL-MEH is a minimally invasive procedure for herniotomy via the translaminar approach using a microendoscopic technique. TL-MEH was performed in seven patients with a cranially migrated lumbar disc herniation encroaching on the exiting nerve root. The disc fragments were located in the preforaminal zone in four patients, and in the preforaminal and foraminal zones in three. Results All patients experienced immediate relief from symptoms after surgery and satisfactory results at the final follow-up. Surgical complications, such as a dural tear, nerve injury, and surgical site infection, were not investigated. Conclusions TL-MEH seemed to be an effective and safe alternative minimally invasive surgical option for patients with a cranially migrated lumbar disc herniation encroaching the exiting nerve root in the preforaminal and foraminal zones. PMID:24066214

  3. Efficacy of Epidural Steroid Injection in Management of Lumbar Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc: A Comparison of Caudal, Transforaminal and Interlaminar Routes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidural steroid is an important modality in the conservative management of prolapsed lumbar disc and is being used for over 50 years. However, controversy still persists regarding their effectiveness in reducing the pain and improving the function with literature both supporting and opposing them are available. Aim To study the efficacy of epidural steroid injection in the management of pain due to prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc and to compare the effectiveness between caudal, transforaminal and interlaminar routes of injection. Materials and Methods A total of 152 patients with back pain with or without radiculopathy with a lumbar disc prolapse confirmed on MRI, were included in the study and their pre injection Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Score was calculated. By simple randomization method (picking a card), patients were enrolled into one of the three groups and then injected methyl prednisone in the epidural space by one of the techniques of injection i.e. caudal, transforaminal and interlaminar. Twelve patients didn’t turn up for the treatment and hence were excluded from the study. Remaining 140 patients were treated and were included for the analysis of the results. Eighty two patients received injection by caudal route, 40 by transforaminal route and 18 by interlaminar route. Post injection JOA Score was calculated at six month and one year and effectiveness of the medication was calculated for each route. The data was compared by LSD and ANOVA method to prove the significance. Average follow-up was one year. Results At one year after injecting the steroid, all three routes were found to be effective in improving the JOA Score (Caudal route in 74.3%, transforaminal in 90% and interlaminar in 77.7%). Transforaminal route was significantly more effective than caudal (p=0.00) and interlaminar route (p=0.03) at both 6 months and one year after injection. No significant difference was seen between the caudal and interlaminar

  4. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration.A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case-control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed.The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05).One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  5. A prospective randomised study on the long-term effect of lumbar fusion on adjacent disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Shalabi, Adel; Yu, Yiang Xiao; Hedlund, Rune

    2009-08-01

    The existence and importance of an accelerated adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion have previously not been demonstrated by RCTs. The objectives of this study were, to determine whether lumbar fusion in the long term accelerates degenerative changes in the adjacent disc and whether this affects the outcome, by using a prospective randomised design. A total of 111 patients, aged 18-55, with isthmic spondylolisthesis were randomised to exercise (EX, n = 34) or posterolateral fusion (PLF, n = 77), with (n = 37) or without pedicle screw instrumentation (n = 40). The minimum 10 years FU rate was 72%, with a mean FU time of 12.6 years (range 10-17 years). Three radiographic methods of ASD quantification were used, i.e. two digital radiographic measurement methods and the semi quantitative UCLA grading scale. One digital measurement method showed a mean disc height reduction by 2% in the EX group and by 15% in the PLF group (p = 0.0016), and the other showed 0.5 mm more disc height reduction in the PLF compared to the Ex group (ns). The UCLA grading scale showed normal discs in 100% of patients in the EX group, compared to 62% in the PLF group (p = 0.026). There were no significant differences between instrumented and non-instrumented patients. In patients with laminectomy we found a significantly higher incidence of ASD compared to non laminectomised patients (22/47 vs. 2/16 respectively, p = 0.015). In the longitudinal analysis, the posterior and anterior disc heights were significantly reduced in the PLF group, whereas in the EX group only the posterior disc height was significantly reduced. Except for global outcome, which was significantly better for patients without ASD, the clinical outcome was not statistically different in patients with and without ASD. In conclusion, the long-term RCT shows that fusion accelerates degenerative changes at the adjacent level compared with natural history. The study suggests that not only fusion, but also

  6. Inclusion of Regional Poroelastic Material Properties Better Predicts Biomechanical Behavior of Lumbar Discs Subjected to Dynamic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jamie R.; Natarajan, Raghu N.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between repetitive lifting and the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure is difficult to study in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this investigation was to develop a three-dimensional poroelastic finite element model of a lumbar motion segment that reflects the biological properties and behaviors of in vivo disc tissues including swelling pressure due to the proteoglycans and strain dependent permeability and porosity. It was hypothesized that when modeling the annulus, prescribing tissue specific material properties will not be adequate for studying the in vivo loading and unloading behavior of the disc. Rather, regional variations of these properties, which are known to exist within the annulus, must also be included. Finite element predictions were compared to in vivo measurements published by Tyrrell et al., (Tyrrell et al., 1985) of percent change in total stature for two loading protocols, short-term creep loading and standing recovery and short-term cyclic loading with standing recovery. The model in which the regional variations of material properties in the annulus had been included provided an overall better prediction of the in vivo behavior as compared to the model in which the annulus properties were assumed to be homogenous. This model will now be used to study the relationship between repetitive lifting and disc degeneration. PMID:17156786

  7. Comparison Of Percutaneous Laser Discectomy With Other Modalities For The Treatment Of Herniated Lumbar Discs And Cadaveric Studies Of Percutaneous Laser Discectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, W. E.; Smith, Chadwick F.; Vangsness, Thomas; McEleney, Emmett T.; Yamaguchi, Ken; Bales, Peter

    1987-03-01

    Current modalities for treating a herniated lumbar disc include standard open discectomy, microsurgical discectomy, chemonucleoysis and percutaneous discectomy. The Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved percutaneous laser discectomy for clinical investigation. The investigators believe that percutaneous laser discectomy combines the efficacy of both chemonucleoysis and percutaneous discectomy with the safety of both open standard discectomy and microsurgical discectomy. The investigators removed two lumbar discs from a cadaveric spine and weighed each of them. The two lumbar discs weighed in the range of 13.654 grams and 15.713 grams, respectively. The investigators initiated several series of 10 firing cycles from a surgical carbon dioxide laser system. In each firing cycle the surgical carbon dioxide laser system delivered a beam of light energy having an output power of 18.0 watts at pulse duration of 0.045 second at the rate of 15 pulses per second for a period of 6 seconds and vaporized approximately 325 milligrams of disc material. Based on the findings of other investigators reported in the literature relating to percutaneous discectomy the investigators postulated that 10 to 20 firing cycles are required to vaporize 30 to 40% (2.4 to 6.4 grams) of the disc material. The investigators initiated two series of 10 firing cycles in order to perform laser discectomy in a third lumbar disc of the cadaveric spine in situ. The investigators harvested and then bisected the laser-treated third lumbar disc for gross review. Their gross findings indicated a high probability of success For percutaneous laser discectomy.

  8. Lumbar discogram resulting from lumbar interlaminar epidural injection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey; Kwa, Andre

    2004-06-01

    Lumbar discography is a diagnostic modality to determine whether the intervertebral disc is the cause of pain. The injection of radiopaque contrast into the nucleus pulposus of the disc can reveal the internal details of the disc. We describe a case of inadvertent lumbar discogram resulting from an attempted lumbar interlaminar epidural injection at L5-S1 under fluoroscopy. The patient did not have a postdural puncture headache or nerve root irritation. The potential triangle in the lateral aspect of spinal cord may be the explanation for this situation, because this triangle is composed of the exiting nerve root laterally, the lateral margin of the dura medially, and the pedicle as its base. The L5-S1 disc is located in the center of the triangle. In our case, the Tuohy needle was placed possibly in the center of the triangle, too laterally to puncture the dura. Hence, the patient did not suffer from postdural puncture headache. The needle was probably inferior to the nerve root, and no obvious nerve root trauma or irritation occurred. This potential triangle may provide alternative access for lumbar discography at the L5-S1 level. PMID:15261324

  9. Evaluation of Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy in Treatment of Obese Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Peng; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-Long; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Jia-Yue; Sun, Ya-Peng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (TED) in the treatment of obese patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 69 obese patients with LDH (35 males and 34 females; age range, 24 to 43 years; median age, 34 years) were included in this study. These patients had undergone TED from March 2011 to December 2015 in the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University. Their clinical and follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. The degree of pain and disability were measured on the basis of the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at 1 day before surgery, immediately after surgery, and 3 months after surgery. Neurologic functions were measured on the basis of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) system 1 day before surgery and 3 months after surgery. The MacNab score at last follow-up was recorded to evaluate the early clinical efficacy. Complications during and after the operation were recorded to evaluate the safety of surgery. RESULTS Two patients experienced abnormal sensations in the export nerve root zone postoperatively, which disappeared after 3 days of treatment with dehydration and administration of hormone (dexamethasone). Three cases of recurrence were observed at 6 months, 7 months, and 9 months postoperatively; they were scheduled to receive total laminectomy combined with bone grafting internal fixation. A total of 67 patients were followed up for 3-23 months and mean follow-up was 11.8 months. The VAS scores at postoperative 3 months and 1 year were significantly reduced compared to that before the operation, with significant differences between them (t=43.072, P<0.05; t=43.139, P<0.05). The JOA scores at last follow-up postoperatively was significantly higher than that before surgery (t=-60.312, P<0.05). At the last follow-up, 17 cases (25.3%) had excellent outcomes, 39 (58.2%) good, 7 (10.4%) fair, and 4 (5.9%) poor. Overall, 83.5% of patients had excellent or good rates

  10. Evaluation of Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy in Treatment of Obese Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-peng; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-long; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Jia-yue; Sun, Ya-peng

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (TED) in the treatment of obese patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material/Methods A total of 69 obese patients with LDH (35 males and 34 females; age range, 24 to 43 years; median age, 34 years) were included in this study. These patients had undergone TED from March 2011 to December 2015 in the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University. Their clinical and follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. The degree of pain and disability were measured on the basis of the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at 1 day before surgery, immediately after surgery, and 3 months after surgery. Neurologic functions were measured on the basis of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) system 1 day before surgery and 3 months after surgery. The MacNab score at last follow-up was recorded to evaluate the early clinical efficacy. Complications during and after the operation were recorded to evaluate the safety of surgery. Results Two patients experienced abnormal sensations in the export nerve root zone postoperatively, which disappeared after 3 days of treatment with dehydration and administration of hormone (dexamethasone). Three cases of recurrence were observed at 6 months, 7 months, and 9 months postoperatively; they were scheduled to receive total laminectomy combined with bone grafting internal fixation. A total of 67 patients were followed up for 3–23 months and mean follow-up was 11.8 months. The VAS scores at postoperative 3 months and 1 year were significantly reduced compared to that before the operation, with significant differences between them (t=43.072, P<0.05; t=43.139, P<0.05). The JOA scores at last follow-up postoperatively was significantly higher than that before surgery (t=−60.312, P<0.05). At the last follow-up, 17 cases (25.3%) had excellent outcomes, 39 (58.2%) good, 7 (10.4%) fair, and 4 (5.9%) poor. Overall, 83.5% of patients had excellent or good rates