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Sample records for lateral magma intrusion

  1. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially

  2. Space-geodetic evidence for multiple magma reservoirs and subvolcanic lateral intrusions at Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk

    2012-10-01

    Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements of the surface deformation at Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos (Ecuador), acquired between January 2003 and September 2010, we study the structure and the dynamics of the shallow magmatic system of the volcano. Through the analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the measured line-of-sight displacement we identify multiple sources of deformation beneath the summit and the southern flank. At least two sources are considered to represent permanent zones of magma storage given their persistent or recurrent activity. Elastic deformation models indicate the presence of a flat-topped magma reservoir at ˜1.1 km below sea level and an oblate-spheroid cavity at ˜4.9 km b.s.l. The two reservoirs are hydraulically connected. This inferred structure of the shallow storage system is in agreement with previous geodetic studies and previous petrological analysis of both subaerial and submarine lavas. The almost eight-year-long observation interval provides for the first time geodetic evidence for two subvolcanic lateral intrusions from the central storage system (in December 2006 and August 2007). Subvolcanic lateral intrusions could provide the explanation for enigmatic volcanic events at Fernandina such as the rapid uplift at Punta Espinoza in 1927 and the 1968 caldera collapse without significant eruption.

  3. Magma rheology variation in sheet intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; O'Driscoll, B.; Petronis, M. S.; Stevenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    transmitted into the inclusions during magma flow. We suggest that this represents a modification of the magma dynamics from Newtonian-like to Bingham-like behaviour. Furthermore, the spatial restriction of inclusions within the sheet intrusions suggest that subtle variations in magma rheology may partition apparently continuous intrusions, perhaps affecting lateral mixing and the longevity of discrete sheet segments. Detailed fabric analysis of other inclusion-free intrusions in the Ardnamurchan Central Complex supports this interpretation. Our results highlight that the crystalline cargo of a magma can result in temporal and spatial variations in magma rheology. This can partition coalesced magma bodies into ';zones' characterised by different magma properties, potentially affecting the location of magma flow pathways or even eruption sites.

  4. Magma mixing in a zoned alkalic intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.G.; Henry, C.D.; Barker, D.S.; Rubin, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Marble Canyon stock is unique among the alkalic intrusions of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province in being zoned from a critically silica-undersaturated rim of alkali gabbro (AG) to a silica-oversaturated core of quartz syenite (QS). Hybrid rocks of intermediate chemical and mineralogical compositions occur between the rim and core. Nepheline-syenite dikes occur only within the AG. Silica-rich dikes of quartz trachyte, pegmatite, and aplite cut the AG, QS, and hybrid rocks. Thermodynamic calculations of silica activity in the magmas illustrate the presence of two trends with decreasing temperature: a silica-poor trend from AG to nepheline syenite and a silica-rich trend from hybrid rocks to QS. Least-square modeling of rock and mineral compositions suggests 1) the nepheline syenites were derived by crystal-liquid fractionation from nearly solidified AG at the rim of the stock, 2) AG magma farther from the rim mixed with a small proportion of granitic magma, and 3) the mixture then differentiated to produce the hybrid rocks and QS. Zirconium dioxide inclusions in plagioclase crystals of the hybrid rocks and QS indicate that the AG magma contained some crystals before it mixed with the granitic magma. Two origins for the granitic magma are possible: 1) a late-stage differentiate of a mantle-derived hypersthene-normative magma and 2) melting of crustal material by the AG magma. Recognition of magma mixing might not have been possible if the AG had been hypersthene-normative.

  5. Magma mingling in the panozero sanukitoid intrusion, baltic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, H.

    2003-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Panozero pluton is a composite intrusion comprising magmas of sanukitoid affinity, intrusive into the ca. 2.75 Ga Segozero greenstone belt in western Karelia in the Baltic Shield. The intrusion is predominantly a monzonite, is elliptical in form (9 x 6 km) and is undeformed. Along the eastern margin of the intrusion a wide variety of cogenetic magmas have been mapped ranging in composition from biotite-hornblendites, through monzo-gabbro and monzonite to quartz-monzonite. The contact relationships between the different phases of the intrusion are complex and imply magma mingling and incomplete mixing between magma types. The monzogabbros show a gradational relationship with the monzodiorites, but occur as inclusions within, and contain inclusions of, the monzonite implying two coexisting melts. Similar relationships exist between the monzonite and quartz monzonite and in places there is a gneissose banding of the darker phase within the lighter phase. The quartz-syenite is intrusive into all earlier phases, although the latest phase is hornblendite. This is present as net veining in gabbro and as irregular veins, dykes and as irregularly shaped xenoliths in monzonite, quartz monzonite and syenite. The irregular form and deformed state of the hornblendite inclusions within the earlier magmas implies that the hornblendite was emplaced whilst the host magma was hot. Also developed along the eastern margin of the intrusion are breccia pipes. These are found in the monzodiorites, monzonites and in quartz monzonites. They contain elliptical fragments up to 20 cm long of hornblendite, tremolitite, epidotised amphibolite and in the monzodiorite euhedral feldspars with felsic reaction rims. The matrix of the breccias is often very similar to the composition of their host rock. Many of the fragments are thought to be derived from the adjacent greenstone belt. However, metabasaltic rocks are not recorded from this part of the greenstone belt and so may be derived

  6. Intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust facilitated by magma pulsing and dike-diapir interactions: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Paterson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a 2-D thermomechanical modeling study of intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust to explore the roles of multiple pulsing and dike-diapir interactions in the presence of visco-elasto-plastic rheology. Multiple pulsing is simulated by replenishing source regions with new pulses of magma at a certain temporal frequency. Parameterized "pseudo-dike zones" above magma pulses are included. Simulation results show that both diking and pulsing are crucial factors facilitating the magma ascent and emplacement. Multiple pulses keep the magmatic system from freezing and facilitate the initiation of pseudo-dike zones, which in turn heat the host rock roof, lower its viscosity, and create pathways for later ascending pulses of magma. Without diking, magma cannot penetrate the highly viscous upper crust. Without multiple pulsing, a single magma body solidifies quickly and it cannot ascent over a long distance. Our results shed light on the incremental growth of magma chambers, recycling of continental crust, and evolution of a continental arc such as the Sierra Nevada arc in California.

  7. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this paper, I present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in the analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  8. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  9. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  10. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S G; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth's crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  11. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics.

  12. Relationships between volcano gravitational spreading and magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcamp, Audray; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; James, Mike R.; Gailler, L. S.; Lebas, E.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano spreading, with its characteristic sector grabens, is caused by outward flow of weak substrata due to gravitational loading. This process is now known to affect many present-day edifices. A volcano intrusive complex can form an important component of an edifice and may induce deformation while it develops. Such intrusions are clearly observed in ancient eroded volcanoes, like the Scottish Palaeocene centres, or in geophysical studies such as in La Réunion, or inferred from large calderas, such as in Hawaii, the Canaries or Galapagos volcanoes. Volcano gravitational spreading and intrusive complex emplacement may act simultaneously within an edifice. We explore the coupling and interactions between these two processes. We use scaled analogue models, where an intrusive complex made of Golden syrup is emplaced within a granular model volcano based on a substratum of a ductile silicone layer overlain by a brittle granular layer. We model specifically the large intrusive complex growth and do not model small-scale and short-lived events, such as dyke intrusion, that develop above the intrusive complex. The models show that the intrusive complex develops in continual competition between upward bulging and lateral gravity spreading. The brittle substratum strongly controls the deformation style, the intrusion shape and also controls the balance between intrusive complex spreading and ductile layer-related gravitational spreading. In the models, intrusive complex emplacement and spreading produce similar structures to those formed during volcano gravitational spreading alone (i.e. grabens, folds, en échelon fractures). Therefore, simple analysis of fault geometry and fault kinetic indicators is not sufficient to distinguish gravitational from intrusive complex spreading, except when the intrusive complex is eccentric from the volcano centre. However, the displacement fields obtained for (1) a solely gravitational spreading volcano and for (2) a gravitational

  13. Mushy magma processes in the Tuolumne intrusive complex, Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memeti, V.; Paterson, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Debates continue on the nature of volcanic-plutonic connections and the mechanisms of derivation of large volcanic eruptions, which require large volumes of magma to be readily available within a short period of time. Our focus to understand these magma plumbing systems has been to study the nature of their mid-to upper crustal sections, such as the 1,000 km2, 95-85 Ma old Tuolumne intrusive complex in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA. The Tuolumne intrusive complex is a great example where the magma mush model nicely explains observations derived from several datasets. These data suggest that a magma mush body was present and may have been quite extensive especially at times when the Tuolumne intrusive complex was undergoing waxing periods of magmatism (increased magma input), which alternated with waning periods of magmatism (decreased magma addition) and thus a smaller mush body, essentially mimicking in style periodic flare-ups and lulls at the arc scale. During waxing stages, magma erosion and mixing were the dominant processes, whereas waning stages allowed mush domains to continue to undergo fractional crystallization creating additional compositional variations. Over time, the imprint left behind by previous waxing and waning stages was partly overprinted, but individual crystals successfully recorded the compositions of these earlier magmas. Waxing periods in the Tuolumne intrusive complex during which large magma mush bodies formed are supported by the following evidence: 1) Hybrid units and gradational contacts are commonly present between major Tuolumne units. 2) CA-TIMS U/Pb zircon geochronology data demonstrate that antecrystic zircon recycling took place unidirectional from the oldest, marginal unit toward the younger, interior parts of the intrusion, where increasing zircon age spread encompasses the entire age range of the Tuolumne. 3) The younger, interior units also show an increasing scatter and complexity in geochemical element and isotope

  14. Sequence of magma emplacement and sulfide saturation in the Gaojiacun-Lengshuiqing intrusive complex (SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Marian; Wilson, Allan H.; Yao, Yong; Chunnett, Gordon; Luo, Yaonan

    2010-08-01

    The Lengshuiqing area contains several small intrusions made up of peridotite ± quartz diorite ± granite spatially associated with the Gaojiacun pluton (gabbroids + peridotite + diorite). Ni-Cu sulfide ore occur at Lengshuiqing, hosted in peridotite. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating produced the ages of 803 ± 4.2 Ma (peridotite), 807 ± 2.6 Ma (oikocrystic hornblende gabbro), 809 ± 4.3 Ma (hornblende gabbronorites) for the Gaojiacun pluton and 807 ± 3.8 Ma (diorite, intrusion I), 817 ± 6.3 Ma (quartz diorite, intrusion II) and 817 ± 5 Ma (peridotite, intrusion 101) for Lengshuiqing. These ages suggest the emplacement of the Gaojiacun pluton later than the intrusions from Lengshuiqing. The olivine from Lengshuiqing does not contain sulfide inclusions and is relatively Ni-rich (1,150-1,550 ppm Ni), suggesting its crystallisation before the sulfide saturation that generated the Ni-Cu deposits. The olivine of the gabbros in the Gaojiacun pluton is Ni-poor (250-800 ppm), which indicates crystallisation from a severely metal-depleted magma after a sulfide saturation event. The olivine in the peridotites from the Gaojiacun pluton has 800-1,150 ppm Ni and contains sulfide inclusions. Moreover, geological evidence suggests the genesis of the peridotites from Gaojiacun in conduits that were ascending through the gabbroids. A sequence of at least three stages of magma emplacement is proposed: (1) Lengshuiqing; (2) gabbroids from Gaojiacun; (3) peridotites from Gaojiacun. Given the age differences, the intrusions at Lengshuiqing and the Gaojiacun pluton might have been produced by different magmatic events.

  15. Mafic intrusion remobilising silicic magma under El Hierro, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Laporte, D.; Marti, J.; Devouard, B.; Cluzel, N.

    2012-04-01

    elevated incompatible element concentrations and primitive mantle normalised spectra characteristic for the Canary Island basanites (e.g. La is of 100 times higher concentration than primitive mantle with important LREE enrichments). In contrast, the trace element composition of the alkali rhyolite shows surprisingly low concentrations for all elements except the most incompatible ones (such as Rb, Ba, K and Th). All other measured incompatible LILE, HFSE and REE have significantly lower concentration than the basanitic counterpart. This differences increase with the atomic number of the REE reaching maximum for the MREE and thus forming an intriguing U-shaped rhyolite spectra. Furthermore, unusual U-depletion is observed in the rhyolite. Other negative spikes, such as those for Sr and P, are readily accounted for by the removal of plagioclase and apatite during magma evolution from a basanite to a more evolved melt. The results obtained so far suggest an intrusion of gas-rich basanitic melt at the base of an evolved intrusion remobilising a stagnant phonolitic melt present as late differentiate in the crust. Interaction with old oceanic crust and the volcanic edifice can be quantified and shown to have modified the phonolite melt composition and produced the alkali rhyolitic composition of the white floating pumice. Extensive gas exsolution shortly before the melt-glass transition explains the foam texture and the low volatile concentrations in the quenched alkali rhyolite.

  16. The Growth of Magma Bodies by Amalgamation of Discrete Sheet Intrusions: Implications for the Formation of Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annen, C.

    2007-12-01

    Until recently, igneous bodies (plutons and magma chambers) were commonly considered to be approximately spherical bodies, rapidly emplaced into the crust. However, field, structural, geophysical, and geochronological studies indicate that many plutons are low aspect-ratio tabular bodies (sills) that are formed by the amalgamation of successive discrete magma pulses. The thermal evolution of an igneous body that grows by accretion of thin magma sheets is fundamentally different from the evolution of a rapidly emplaced magma sphere or of a single thick magma sill. In thin sheet intrusions, the heat loss is through the walls of the sheets and the temperatures within the intrusions do not depend on the volumes injected but on the one-dimension sheets emplacement rate. The first sheets injected in a cold crust rapidly cool down and solidify. The ability of successive intrusions to stay at high temperature and eventually build up a long-lived magma chamber is controlled by the emplacement rate. Heat transfer modeling applied in the context of a volcanic arc shows that average emplacement rates of at least several centimeters per year and an incubation time of tens thousands of years are needed for a persistent magma chamber to form. During the incubation time, the intrusions solidify and when a chamber of high melt fraction magma eventually grows, the volume of eruptible magma only form a small part of the total intruded volume. The emplacement rate of plutons is controversial. Geochronological data suggest that some plutons may be emplaced over millions years. For a pluton that is assembled at a slow rate of a few millimeters per year, millions of years are needed, over which kilometric thicknesses are intruded, before a volume of magma larger than the size of a single intrusion becomes mobile and eruptible. In many cases, volcanic products may come from a deep source without being associated with a long-lived upper crust magma chamber. If volcanism is associated with

  17. Seismogenic ';trapdoors' during magma intrusion at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. S.; Tarasewicz, J.; Brandsdottir, B.; Schonnman, C.

    2013-12-01

    Relocated earthquake hypocentres for >1000 microearthquakes that occurred prior to and during the 2010 fissure and summit eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland map out magma conduits from the upper mantle (30 km depth) to the surface. During the two weeks prior to the first, flank eruption, hypocentre locations lie predominantly in horizontally separated clusters at 3-4 km below sea level. They represent the filling with magma of an inflating sill beneath the eastern flank of the volcano, from which feeder dykes propagated laterally and vertically toward the flank eruption site three days prior to the eruption onset. The majority of events within some clusters of up to >100 earthquakes exhibit similar waveforms and identical patterns of P-wave first-motion polarities recorded across the monitoring network. In the clearest example, 104 out of 105 events in a single cluster appear to have the same source mechanism based on P-wave first-motion polarities and waveform similarity. These observations suggest that the clusters of similar events may comprise many earthquakes generated by source processes that have the same orientation of failure, perhaps even on the same rupture plane, in fixed locations that are repeatedly active. The epicentral clustering and similarity of source mechanisms suggest that much of the seismicity was generated at approximately static constrictions to magma flow in an inflating sill. These constrictions may act as a form of pressure valve or ';trapdoor' in the country rock, which ruptures when the melt pressure exceeds a critical level, then reseals after a pulse of melt has passed through. We infer that the magmatic intrusion causing the seismicity was likely to be a laterally inflating sill at 3-4 km depth, with seismogenic pinch-points occurring between aseismic compartments of the sill, or between adjacent magma lobes as they inflate. A second eruption followed from the summit, 8 km west of the first eruption site. During the

  18. Dykes, cups, saucers and sills: Analogue experiments on magma intrusion into brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, L.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2008-07-01

    Magma is transported in the crust by blade-like intrusions such as dykes, sills, saucers, and also collects in thicker laccoliths, lopoliths and plutons. Recently, the importance and great number of shallow (< 5 km) saucer-shaped intrusions has been recognized. Lopoliths and cup-shaped intrusions have also been reported in many geological contexts. Our field observations indicate that many intrusions, especially those emplaced into breccias or fractured rocks, have bulging, lobate margins and have shear faults at their bulbous terminations. Such features suggest that magma can propagate along a self-induced shear fault rather than a hydraulic tension-fracture. To investigate this we use analogue models to explore intrusion propagation in a brittle country rock. The models consist of the injection of analogue magma (honey or Golden syrup) in a granular material (sand or sieved ignimbrite) that is a good analogue for brittle or brecciated rocks. These models have the advantage (over other models that use gelatin) to well represent the properties of brittle materials by allowing both shear-faults and tension fractures to be produced at suitable stresses. In our experiments we mainly obtain vertical dykes and inverted-cone like structures that we call cup-shaped intrusions. Dykes bifurcate into cup-shaped intrusions at depths depending on their viscosity. All cup-shaped intrusions uplift a central block. By injecting against a vertical glass plate we obtain detailed observations of the intrusion propagation style. We observe that dykes commonly split and produce cup-shaped intrusions near the surface and that shear zone-related intrusions develop at the dyke tip. We conclude that many dykes propagate as a viscous indenter resulting from shear failure of host rock rather than tensional hydraulic fracturing of host rocks. The shear propagation model provides an explanation for the shape and formation of cup-shaped intrusions, saucer-sills and lopoliths.

  19. Lateral magma flow in sill-complexes: towards a paradigm shift in volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; Muirhead, J.; Karvelas, A.; Holford, S. P.; Jackson, C. A. L.; Bastow, I. D.; Schofield, N.; Stevenson, C.; McLean, C.; McCarthy, W.; Shtukert, O.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of magma plumbing systems controls the distribution of volcanism, thereby influencing continental break-up and passive margin evolution. However, delimiting the structure of entire plumbing systems is difficult because: (1) intrusion networks cannot be directly accessed at active volcanoes; (2) field outcrops are limited by exposure; and (3) the resolution of geophysical data imaging the sub-surface is restricted. As a result, models involving the vertical transfer of magma in dikes, which extend from a melt source to overlying reservoirs and eruption sites, dominate the volcanic literature. Whilst there is evidence supporting the existence of vertically stacked plumbing systems, we compile a series of field- and seismic reflection-based case studies documenting the importance of extensive lateral magma transport (up to 4100 km) within sill-complexes. Most of these sill-complexes are emplaced into sediment-filled rift basins (e.g., Rockall Basin, NE Atlantic; Ceduna Sub-basin, offshore southern Australia; Karoo Basin, South Africa). There is also evidence that some sill-complexes occur within crystalline, continental crust (e.g., in the Yilgarn Craton, Australia). The case studies presented demonstrate that sill-complex emplacement is largely controlled by host rock lithology and structure. Sill intrusion is accommodated through roof uplift or, alternatively, via non-brittle processes (e.g., porosity reduction induced by host rock fluidization) that may not deform the overburden. The full or partial accommodation of magma by space-making mechanisms other than roof uplift means that intruding magma volumes may be underestimated by or completely hidden from ground deformation analyses. We show that plumbing systems need not be vertically stacked. Magma can instead be transported within laterally extensive (up to 3 × 106 km2) sill-complexes, promoting the development of volcanoes that do not overlie the melt source.

  20. Zircon Saturation and the Viability of Magma Bodies During Intrusion of the Tuolumne Intrusive Series, Sierra Nevada Batholith, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Burgess, S.; Miller, C.; Miller, R.; Bergantz, G.

    2005-05-01

    The Tuolumne Intrusive Series (TIS) is a prime example of a zoned arc intrusion, and is one of a belt of large (>1000 km2) consanguineous, Cretaceous, zoned intrusions within the Sierra Nevada batholith. Past work linked the differentiation of the TIS with field petrology and modification of magma in situ in large reservoirs. New single-zircon geochronology and field studies show that the TIS was assembled from numerous magma inputs from 94-85 Ma, casting doubt on the existence of a large body of mobile magma during growth and emplacement [1], and calling into question where the bulk of the chemical differentiation occurred (exposure level or deep source). Zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrc; [2]) for the TIS are useful for understanding its assembly, particularly in combination with high precision, single zircon ages. The two largest units of the TIS (Half Dome and Cathedral Peak granodiorites) have low calculated Tzrc (Half Dome: 710-765°C, mean=740°C; Cathedral Peak: 715-780°C, mean=760°C), which implies complexities in how zircon ages are used to interpret the construction of the TIS: (1) at T's appropriate for anatexis, transport, and initial emplacement of granitoid magmas, source-derived zircons would be dissolved; zircons in TIS thus crystallized during post-emplacement conductive cooling upon reaching Tzrc, or were inherited late; (2) because Tzrc is not far above the solidus, appreciable age differences (several 105 yr?) might be produced by slow cooling of a large magma body that was open to heat input; heat added need only have been sufficient to maintain near-eutectic conditions, perhaps as persistent mush, but with net cooling (qout > qin), such that ages track the migration of the Tzrc isotherm during solidification; (3) reheating of any mush, or melting of intrusions associated with earlier inputs to T's >> Tzrc would dissolve older zircons on time scales of 104-105 years (e.g. [3]); this time scale sets a limit on the longevity of melt

  1. Evidence for the mixing of granitic and basaltic magmas in the Pleasant Bay layered intrusion, coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    The Pleasant Bay layered intrusion has the shape of a shallow basin about 200 km[sup 2] in area and crops out along the coast of Maine between Bar Harbor and Machias. This intrusion evolved as repeated replenishments of basaltic magma were emplaced into a silicic magma chamber (Wiebe, in press). These replenishments surged into the chamber through fractures, spreading laterally on a floor of silicic cumulates and beneath silicic magma. This produced a sequence of layers (up to 100 m thick) that grade from chilled basalt at the base to gabbroic, dioritic, or granitic emulates at the top. This study focuses on two layers, each of which grades from chilled gabbro at the base to quartz syenite at the top. Petrography and geochemistry suggest that mechanical mixing and other interactions between two stably stratified magmas were responsible for much of this variation. Plagioclase grains typically have corroded calcic cores (An[sub 52--56]) that decrease in size upward and sodic rims (An[sub 32--36]) that thicken upward. Larger plagioclase grains at higher levels often have K-spar cores. Scarce large zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals in the lower parts of the layers are often corroded. The apatites have dark pleochroic halos, suggesting they crystallized from a liquid enriched in U and Th. The silicic melt was likely the source of K and H[sub 2]O needed to crystallize hornblende and biotite. The large corroded zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals, as well as much of the hornblende, probably grew at an interface between separately convecting silicic and basaltic magmas.

  2. Reconciling Volatile Outputs with Heat Flow and Magma Intrusion Rates at the Yellowstone Magma-Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Hurwitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone hydrothermal system releases hundreds of millions of liters of water on a daily basis. Gigawatts of heat and kilotons of magmatic volatiles (CO2, S, Cl, F and He) are discharged by these waters. By quantifying the relative contributions of crustal, meteoric, and mantle-derived components, we can estimate the rate at which magma is fed to the crust from below (1). Combining isotopic studies with mass discharge rates of geothermal gases and aqueous dissolved solids, we recognize that over 20,000 tons of CO2 is released from basaltic magmas ponding beneath any silicic magma reservoir in the mid to shallow crust (1,2). In contrast, silicic magma provides significantly less volatiles than what emerges from the hydrothermal system. Estimates of heat flow range from ~3 to 8 GW (1,3,4), derived from satellite, surface geophysics and geochemical methods. Such values, combined with estimates from gas flux, imply prolific basalt intrusion rates between 0.05 and 0.3 cubic kilometers per year (1). Over the history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, a picture emerges where the lower crust is converted from Precambrian metasediments and silicic intrusions into a thick gabbroic batholith similar to that envisioned by some to reside beneath the Snake River Plain along the ancestral track of the Yellowstone Hot Spot (5). (1) Lowenstern and Hurwitz, 2008, Elements 4: 35-40. (2) Werner and Brantley, 2003, G-Cubed 4;7: 1061 (3) Vaughan and others, 2012, JVGR 233-234: 72-89. (4) Hurwitz and others, in press, JGR (5) Shervais and others, 2006, Geology 34:365-368.

  3. Segment linkage in Afar via magma intrusion: the birth of a transform fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronovitz, A. C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Campbell, E.; Keir, D. B.; Ayele, A.; Mitra, G.

    2007-12-01

    Both continental and oceanic rifts are segmented along their length, but the relation between transfer faults and transform faults linking segments remains unclear. How and when do transform faults initiate to link rift segments? Does magma intrusion achieve some of the strain transfer between segments? A temporary seismic array in the volcanically and seismically active Afar rift of Ethiopia provides insights into these two fundamental questions. We analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of earthquakes, and compare these to patterns in high-resolution satellite imagery and space geodetic data from the ongoing seismo-volcanic episode that began in 2005. We integrate these results to understand how stresses are transferred between ridge segments and how this possibly relates to the initiation of transform faults. Earthquake swarms from October 2005 to March 2006 form narrow bands coinciding with NW-SE striking fault zones linking the active Erta' Ale and Tat `Ale magmatic rift segments, and the Dabbahu and Alayta magmatic segments. Step over distances are ~15 km and ~20 km respectively. The time and spatial distribution of these seismic events as well as the correlation of events with magmatic centers suggests that earthquakes are triggered by magma intrusion. These patterns offer insight to magma accommodation along faults and between rift segments, suggesting magma intrusion facilitates transform fault initiation. We compare and contrast active structures during the 2005- 2006 episode with segment linkage patterns preserved in the rock record to understand transform evolution.

  4. Remobilization of silicic intrusion by mafic magmas during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Vlastelic, I.; Andreasen, R.; Bindeman, I.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moune, S.; Keiding, J. K.; Larsen, G.; Höskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, Th.

    2011-12-01

    Injection of basaltic magmas into silicic crustal holding chambers and subsequent magma mingling or mixing is a process that has been recognised since the late seventies as resulting in explosive eruptions. Detailed reconstruction and assessment of the mixing process caused by such intrusion is now possible because of the exceptional time-sequence sample suite available from the tephra fallout of the 2010 summit eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano in South Iceland. Fallout from 14 to 19 April contains three glass types of basaltic, intermediate, and silicic compositions recording rapid magma mingling without homogenisation, involving evolved FeTi-basalt and silicic melt with composition identical to that produced by the 1821-1823 AD Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption. The time-dependent change in the magma composition suggests a binary mixing process with changing end-member compositions and proportions. Beginning of May, a new injection of primitive basalt was recorded by deep seismicity, appearance of Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts together with high sulphur dioxide output and presence of sulphide crystals. Thus, the composition of the basaltic injection became more magnesian and hotter with time provoking changes in the silicic mixing end-member from pre-existing melt to the solid carapace of the magma chamber. Finally, decreasing proportions of the mafic end-member with time in the erupted mixed-magma demonstrate that injections of Mg-rich basalt was the motor of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption, and that its decreasing inflow terminated the eruption. Significant quantity of silicic magma is thus still present in the interior of the volcano. Our results show that detailed sampling during the entire eruption was essential for deciphering the complex magmatic processes at play, i.e. the dynamics of the magma mingling and mixing. Finally, the rapid compositional changes in the eruptive products suggest that magma mingling occurs on a timescale of a few

  5. Remanent and induced magnetic anomalies over a layered intrusion: Effects from crystal fractionation and magma recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Brown, Laurie L.; Robinson, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) norite - quartz mangerite layered intrusion is part of the early Neoproterozoic Rogaland Anorthosite Province intruded into the Fennoscandian shield in south Norway at ~ 930 Ma. The BKS is exposed over an area of 230 km 2 with a thickness of ~ 7000 m and is of economic interest for ilmenite, magnetite and apatite deposits. From the point of view of magnetic minerals, in the course of fractional crystallization and magma evolution, the ilmenite becomes less Fe 3+-rich reflected by a change from ilmenite with hematite exsolution to nearly pure ilmenite. Magnetite starts to crystallize relatively late in the intrusive history, but its crystallization is interrupted by influxes of more primitive magma. The variations in aeromagnetic and ground-magnetic anomalies measured over the BKS can be explained in terms of the measured magnetic properties of NRM, susceptibility, and hysteresis presented here, and in terms of mineralogy. Early layers in the intrusion contain hemo-ilmenite. As the magma evolved and magnetite started to crystallize, this caused a distinct change over the layering from remanence-controlled negative anomalies to induced positive anomalies. When new, more primitive magma was injected into the system, hemo-ilmenite returned as the major oxide and the resulting magnetic anomalies are again negative. The most dramatic change in the magnetic signature is in the upper part of the intrusion in MCU IVe, where magnetite became a well established cumulate phase as indicated by susceptibility, but its induced magnetization is overcome by large NRMs associated either with hemo-ilmenite, or with hemo-ilmenite and magnetite exsolved from pyroxenes. The average natural remanent magnetizations change from ~ 3 A/m in MCU IVd, to 15 A/m in MCU IVe, and back to 2 A/m in the overlying MCU IVf, producing a strong negative remanent anomaly that has been followed along strike for at least 20 km by ground-magnetic measurements. The highly varied

  6. Origin of postcollisional intrusions in NW Anatolia, Turkey: Implications for magma chamber processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aysal, Namık

    2013-04-01

    Post-collisional magmatic activities of NW Anatolia are represented by a series of granitic intrusions and volcanic successions in the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey. These plutonic rocks have distinct textures, chemical compositions and Sr-Nd isotope characteristics. They consist of coarse grained, equigranular and/or hypidiomorphic textured granite, gronodiorite, monzogranite, quartz-monzonite, pyroxene-monzonite and leucocratic alkali feldspar granites. These intrusions are composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene and biotite. However, leucocratic facies rocks contain tourmaline with minor amount of mafic minerals. Accessory phases are represented by zircon, apatite, monozite, magnetite, sphene and rarely allanite. ASI values of the plutonic rocks vary between 0.7 and 1.24. These intrusive rocks are therefore classified as metaluminous-peraluminous with I-type affinity. K2O contents show that the intrusive rock samples show calc-alkaline, high K-calc-alkaline and shoshonitic character. Initial 87Sr/86Sr(t) (0.69980-0.70835), 143Nd/144Nd(t) (0.51238-0.51247) isotope ratios and negative ɛNd(t) (-4.4 - -2.6) values imply that these intrusive rocks could have been derived from enriched mantle sources. N-MORB normalized spidergrams of NW Anatolian plutonic rocks display enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), light rare earth elements (LREE) and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE) indicating hydrous melting of a mantle wedge in a subduction zone and/or enrichment of the mantle source with an inherited subduction component from an ancient arc magmatism. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element spidergrams are indicative of the importance of plagioclase and amphibole fractionation. On tectonic discrimination diagrams, all granite samples fall into the volcanic arc granite, syn and post-collisional granite fields. The geochemical data also indicate that a number of magma chamber processes involving magma mixing, fractional

  7. Diabasic intrusion and lavas, segregation veins, and magma differentiation at Kahoolawe volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Bauer, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    A mafic sill-like intrusion, ~5 × 30 m, exposed along the eastern shoreline of Kahoolawe Island, Hawaii, represents tholeiitic magma emplaced as diabase among caldera-filling lavas. It differentiated from ~7.8 wt.% MgO to yield low-MgO (2.9 wt.%) vesicular segregation veins. We examined the intrusion for whole-rock and mineral compositions for comparison to Kahoolawe caldera-fill lavas (some also diabasic), to the Uwekahuna laccolith (Kilauea), and to gabbros, diabases, and segregations and oozes of other tholeiitic shield volcanoes (e.g., Mauna Loa and Kilauea lava lakes). We also evaluate this extreme differentiation in terms of MELTS modeling, using parameters appropriate for Hawaiian crystallization environments. Kahoolawe intrusion diabase samples have major and trace element abundances and plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine compositions in agreement with those in gabbros and diabases of other volcanoes. However, the intrusion samples are at the low-MgO end of the large MgO range formed by the collective comparative samples, as many of those have between 8 and 20 wt.% MgO. The intrusion's segregation vein has SiO2 53.4 wt.%, TiO2 3.2 wt.%, FeO 13.5 wt.%, Zr 350 ppm, and La 16 ppm. It plots in compositional fields formed by other Hawaiian segregations and oozes that have MgO <5 wt.%—fields that show large variances, such as factor of ~2 differences for incompatible element abundances accompanying SiO2 from ~49 to 59 wt.%. Our MELTS modeling assesses the Kahoolawe intrusion as differentiating from ~8 wt.% MgO parent magma beginning along oxygen buffers equivalent to FMQ and FMQ-2, having magmatic H2O of 0.15 and 0.7 wt.% (plus traces of CO2 and S), and under 100 and 500 bars pressure. Within these parameters, MELTS calculates that <3 wt.% MgO occurs at ~1,086 to 1,060 °C after ~48 to 63 % crystallization, whereby the lesser crystallization percentages and lower temperatures equate to higher magmatic H2O, leading to high SiO2, ~56-58 wt.%. To contrast

  8. Magma dynamics at the base of an evolving mafic magma chamber: Incompatible element evidence from the Partridge River intrusion, Duluth Complex, Minnesota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalokwu, Christopher I.; Ariskin, Alexei A.; Koptev-Dvornikov, Evgeny V.

    1996-12-01

    A characteristic feature of the Partridge River intrusion of the Keweenawan Duluth Complex is the approximately fivefold to ninefold increase in the concentrations of incompatible elements in the lower zone compared with cumulates stratigraphically higher. The concentrations of incompatible elements decrease from the lower zone upward to steady state values, which is ascribed to variations in the proportions of trapped liquid rather than variable degrees of fractional crystallization of a single parental magma. The calculated average composition of trapped liquid using our algorithm is similar to typical Keweenawan low-alumina, high Tisbnd P basalts associated with the Duluth Complex but is different from the leading edge ferrodioritic liquid quenched in the chilled margin of the intrusion. This difference suggests that the chilled margin does not represent the original (parental) magma composition from which the whole intrusion solidified, and that the enrichment of incompatible elements may be related to the local flotation of magmatic suspensions. To test the latter hypothesis numerically, we have used heat-mass transfer models, assuming a sheet-like magma chamber, to calculate the parameters of the model that best reproduce the observed distribution of incompatible elements in a mush zone at the base of the Partridge River intrusion. The results indicate that a mush zone enriched in the incompatible elements is produced if the velocity of movement of the lower solidification front into the magma body was less than the floating velocity of the bulk crystal mush. The dynamic parameters that best reproduce the observed distribution of incompatible elements include a magma emplacement pressure of 2 kbar, critical crystallinities of 50-68% in the mush zone from which the liquid is being expelled, and an emplacement temperature of ˜ 1160°C for the initial magma.

  9. An origin of marginal reversal of the Fongen-Hyllingen layered intrusion by prolonged magma emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V.; Latypov, R.

    2012-04-01

    The ~100 m thick marginal zone of the Fongen-Hyllingen Intrusion (FHI) consists of nonlayered, highly iron-enriched ferrodiorites that are overlain by a ~6 km thick layered sequence of gabbroic to dioritic rocks of the Layered Series. From the base upwards the marginal zone become more primitive as exemplified by a significant increase in whole-rock MgO, Mg-number, and normative An. The reverse trends are also evident from an upward increase in An-content of plagioclase (from ~30 to ~43 at.%) and Mg-number of amphibole (from ~9 to ~23 at.%) and clinopyroxene (from ~23 to ~37 at.%). The marginal zone is abruptly terminated at the contact with the overlying Layered Series as is evident from a step-like increase in Mg-number of mafic minerals and An-content of plagioclase, as well as a sharp increase in whole-rock MgO and Mg-number in overlying olivine gabbronorites of the Layered Series. Based on these features the marginal zone of the FHI can be interpreted as an aborted marginal reversal. Reverse trends in whole-rock and mineral compositions, as well as a sharp break in these parameters are indicative of its formation in an open system with the involvement of the prolonged emplacement of magma that became increasingly more primitive. Such development of the marginal reversal was interrupted by the emplacement of a major influx of more primitive magma that produced the Layered Series. The open system evolution of a basaltic magma chamber may represent a general mechanism for the origin of marginal reversals in mafic sills and layered intrusions.

  10. The magmatic plumbing of the submarine Hachijo NW volcanic chain, Hachijojima, Japan: long distance lateral magma transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Itoh, J.; Kawanabe, Y.; Tsujino, T.

    2005-12-01

    Recent geophysical observations on basaltic composite volcanoes in Izu-Bonin arc reveal the process of long distance lateral magma transport within the shallow middle crust. Such intrusion events sometimes caused flank fissure eruption and also triggered a formation of collapsed caldera (Miyakejima 2000). To clarify a long-distance magma transport system of the basaltic composite volcano in volcanic arc from geological and petrological aspects, we investigated a submarine volcanic chain (Hachijo NW chain) nested Hachijo Nishiyama volcano, a frontal composite volcano in the northern Izu arc. The volcanic chain extends 15 km from Hachijo-Nishiyama volcano and is composed of ridges and many small cones with basal diameters generally less than 2km. Dredge sampling recovered basaltic lavas and spatters. A diving survey using a ROV (Hyper Dolphin) revealed pillow lava flows on steep slopes and accumulation of spatters and agglutinates near the eruption center. Basalts from the Hachijo NW chain generally have more primitive composition (up to nearly 7% of MgO) compared to the basaltic rocks from the Nishiyama. The bulk magma composition of Hachijo NW chain is controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase while plagioclase accumulation was indicated by aluminum-rich character of the Nishiyama volcano and its subaerial satellite cones. Trace element ratios unaffected by melting or crystal fractionation (e.g., Nb/Zr) are not significantly different between the Nishiyama and the Hachijo NW chain. This implies that the sources of magma for these volcanic systems are basically identical. However, ratios affected by melting process are significantly different between the two. Hachijo NW chain shows lower LREE/HREE and Zr/Y, implying difference in degree of partial melting of the source. Other possible processes for producing these differences in trace element characteristics include crustal assimilation. These results obtained so far appear to

  11. The Torres del Paine intrusion as a model for a shallow magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Lukas; Bodner, Robert; Leuthold, Julien; Muntener, Othmar; Putlitz, Benita; Vennemann, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The shallow magmatic Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a series of sub-volcanic and plutonic igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. This trench-parallel belt is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. While volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area, and a second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, it peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. The spectacular cliffs of the Torres del Paine National park provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a very shallow magma chamber and the interaction with its host rocks. Intrusion depth can be estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages and granite solidus thermobarometry to 750±250 bars, corresponding to an intrusion depth of ca. 3km, ca. 500m above the base of the intrusion. Hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks agrees well with these estimates (Leuthold et al., 2014). The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (Michel et al., 2008) in 3 major, several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. Contacts are sharp between sheets, with the oldest sheet on the top and the youngest on the bottom (Michel et al., 2008). The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over ca. 50ka (Leuthold et al. 2012), constructed from the bottom up. Granitic and mafic sheets are themselves composed of multiple metric to decametric pulses, mostly with ductile contacts between them, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. The contact of the TPIC with the Cretaceous flysch sediments document intrusion mechanism. Pre-existing sub-horizontal fold axes are rotated in the roof of the TPIC, clearly demonstrating ballooning of the roof; no ballooning was observed in the footwall of the intrusion. Extension during ballooning of the roof is indicated by

  12. Time-resolved seismic tomography detects magma intrusions at Mount Etna.

    PubMed

    Patanè, D; Barberi, G; Cocina, O; De Gori, P; Chiarabba, C

    2006-08-11

    The continuous volcanic and seismic activity at Mount Etna makes this volcano an important laboratory for seismological and geophysical studies. We used repeated three-dimensional tomography to detect variations in elastic parameters during different volcanic cycles, before and during the October 2002-January 2003 flank eruption. Well-defined anomalous low P- to S-wave velocity ratio volumes were revealed. Absent during the pre-eruptive period, the anomalies trace the intrusion of volatile-rich (>/=4 weight percent) basaltic magma, most of which rose up only a few months before the onset of eruption. The observed time changes of velocity anomalies suggest that four-dimensional tomography provides a basis for more efficient volcano monitoring and short- and midterm eruption forecasting of explosive activity. PMID:16902133

  13. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2014-08-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, NE Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~ 350 (468-130) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~ 300 MPa) and very high pressures (> 700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process to intensify adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features, such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, imply final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  14. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, northeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, northeast Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~350 (130 to 468) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~300 MPa) and very high pressures (>700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process in intensifying adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, implies that final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  15. Rate of lateral magma transport in the Earth's crust beneath submarine volcanic arcs derived from earthquake swarm analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicak, A.; Vanek, J.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution deals with subduction-related submarine magmatism. We are offering a tool to contribute to delimitation of domains of current magma unrest at convergent plate margins and to understand better the behavior of magma in the lithospheric wedge above the subducting slab: a detailed analysis of teleseismic earthquake occurrence. A specific seismicity pattern has been observed beneath submarine portions of several volcanic arcs at convergent plate margins (Andaman Sea region, southern Ryukyu area). We have found three arguments that allowed us to interpret such a seismicity pattern as a magma-driven process: (i) clustering of medium-size earthquakes (M~5) in space and time in shallow earthquake swarms; (ii) rapid migration of seismic activity during the swarms (comparison of epicentral maps of individual stages of the swarm development showed consistently that earthquake epicenters migrate laterally at a rate of several hundred meters per hour); (iii) correlation of epicentral zones of the swarms with distinct seamounts and submarine ridges (current seismically active intrusions probably propagate along plumbing systems that served as conduits of magma to the surface in the past). The repeated occurrence of relatively strong, teleseismically recorded earthquake swarms thus probably reflects fluid and/or magma ascent through the plumbing system of the volcanic arc, points to brittle character of the lithospheric wedge at respective depths and favors the studied areas - the Andaman Sea region and the southern Ryukyu area - to be potential sites of submarine volcanic activity.. The study documents high accuracy of hypocenter parameter determinations published by data centers such as ISC and NEIC USGS, and the usefulness of the EHB relocation procedure.

  16. Melilitolite intrusion and pelite digestion by high temperature kamafugitic magma at Colle Fabbri, Spoleto, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, Francesco; Sharygin, Victor V.

    2009-10-01

    A subvolcanic body in Colle Fabbri (Umbria, Central Italy) intrudes sedimentary rocks and the overlaying extrusive breccia. The intrusive rock is melilitolite with essential leucite, kalsilite, and wollastonite plus accessory Ti-garnet, Ti-Al-Fe 3+-clinopyroxene, magnetite, perovskite, rankinite, Si-bearing apatite, Fe-Ni sulphides, and carbonate/zeolite. Bulk chemistry of melilitolite indicates a strong SiO 2-undersaturation, extremely high CaO composition, and strong initial potassic character. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios support a link with the source of kamafugites and carbonatites found in the same region. The igneous contact rock contains variable amounts of quenched clinopyroxene, anorthite, sanidine ± wollastonite, plus spinel and glass. Extremely high temperature melilitolite magma digested pelite country-rock, thus leading to a unique mineral composition. The homogenisation temperatures of mineral inclusions in contact rock demonstrate that crystallisation occurred well above 1230 °C. A large thermal aureole formed in a local clinker-like breccia, characterised by the association of felsic glass + indialite + tridymite ± Ti-magnetite, confirms high-temperature emplacement. Metasomatic/thermometamorphic phenomena favoured zone-specific mineralisation of hydrated Ca-silicates, hydrated complex sulphates and zeolites in breccias and encasing rocks.

  17. Development of a deep-crustal shear zone in response to syntectonic intrusion of mafic magma into the lower crust, Ivrea-Verbano zone, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snoke, A.W.; Kalakay, T.J.; Quick, J.E.; Sinigoi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1 to 1.5 km-thick, high-temperature shear zone is localized in wall rocks subparallel to the eastern intrusive contact of the Permian Mafic Complex of the Ivrea-Verbano zone (IVZ), Italy. The shear zone is characterized by concentrated ductile deformation manifested by a penetrative foliation subparallel to the intrusive contact and a northeast-plunging sillimanite lineation. Evidence of noncoaxial strain and transposition is widespread in the shear zone including such features as rootless isoclinal folds, dismemberment of competent layers, and scattered kinematic indicators. The metasedimentary rocks in the shear zone are migmatitic, and the accumulation of leucosome is variable within the shear zone. Near the intrusive contact with the Mafic Complex leucosome forms ~20 vol% of the wall rock, whereas leucosome concentrations may locally reach ~60 vol% of the wall rock near the outer limits of the shear zone. This variation in vol% leucosome suggests melt/magma migration from the inferred site of anatexis along the intrusive contact to lower-strain regions within and near the margins of the shear zone. The leucosome accumulations chiefly occur as layer-parallel concentrations, but are also folded and boudined, and locally are associated with tension gashes and fracture arrays. Networks of granitic dikes and small plutons in the eastern IVZ suggest that some magmas migrated out of the high-temperature shear zone. Some magma apparently migrated laterally along the strike of the shear zone and concentrated in areas of lower strain where the intrusive contact takes a major westward bend. The high-temperature shear zone is interpreted as a 'stretching fault' (or stretching shear zone) after Means [W.D. Means, Stretching faults, Geology 17 (1989) 893-896], whereupon the metasedimentary wall rocks and associated leucosome deformed synchronously with the multistage emplacement and deformation flow of the Mafic Complex. The recognition of a high-temperature shear zone

  18. Seismic Evidences of Magma Intrusion At Intermediate Depth Before The July-august 2001 Mt. Etna (italy) Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, E.; Alparone, S.; D'Amico, S.; Gambino, S.; Maiolino, V.; Spampinato, S.; Zuccarello, L.

    Several authors investigated the seismic behavior before Mt. Etna eruptions and some models were proposed in order to explain peculiar features of seismicity preceding flank eruptions. In particular, stress and strain fields seemed to modify their orienta- tion due to the action of magma overpressure. Recently, about 40 additional seismic stations boosted the Mt. Etna permanent network and enabled us to study in great de- tail the seismicity that occurred before the July-August 2001 eruption. More than 2600 earthquakes occurred over about 8 months prior to the seismic swarm that heralded the lateral eruption and they pointed out a change in the dynamic condition acting on the volcano starting from November 5, 2000. Seismicity in the November 2000 - June 2001 period was characterised by the occurrence of several relevant seismic swarms. The epicentres of events were spread over a wide area covering mostly the southern and eastern parts of the volcano and delineated two main alignments. A NNW-SSE epicentres alignment built up gradually and was composed of earthquakes occurred both clustered and sparsely in time. A clear NE-SW alignment was also defined mainly by the occurrence of a 4 days swarm. A peculiar feature of the earthquakes' spatial pattern was the depth distribution. Under the eastern part of the volcano seismicity was confined in the depth range 1 - 6 km b.s.l., in the western part hypocentres were distributed in two volumes under 5 km and upper 2 km b.s.l., respectively. This pat- tern defined two volumes affected by few earthquakes. These volumes correspond to crust portions where magma reservoirs were located by previous studies. On the basis of a fault plane solutions analysis, we observed relevant rotation of maximum compressive axis at very short distance, indicating a local stress source elongated in NNW-SSE direction at about 5 - 6 km depth under the summit craters. Analyses on the space distribution of b value outlined that the NNW-SSE epicentres

  19. Remanent and Induced Magnetic Anomalies over the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion: Effects from Crystal Fractionation and Magma Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S. A.; Brown, L. L.; Robinson, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) norite-quartz mangerite layered intrusion is part of the early Neoproterozoic Rogaland Anorthosite Province intruded into the Fennoscandian shield in south Norway at ~930 Ma. The BKS is exposed over an area of 230 km2 with a thickness of ~7000m and is of economic interest for hemo-ilmenite, magnetite and apatite deposits. From the point of view of magnetic minerals, in the course of fractional crystallization and magma evolution, the ilmenite becomes less Fe3+-rich reflected by a change from ilmenite with hematite exsolution to nearly pure ilmenite. Magnetite starts to crystallize relatively late in the intrusive history, but its crystallization is interrupted by influxes of more primitive magma containing hemo-ilmenite. The variations in aeromagnetic and ground-magnetic anomalies measured over the BKS can be explained in terms of the magnetic properties of NRM, susceptibility, and hysteresis. Magnetic properties are correlated with the oxide mineralogy and mineral chemistry. Early layers in the intrusion contain hemo-ilmenite. As the magma evolved and magnetite started to crystallize, this caused a distinct change over the layering from remanence-controlled negative anomalies to induced positive anomalies. When new, more primitive magma was injected into the system, hemo-ilmenite returned as the major oxide and the resulting magnetic anomalies are again negative. The most dramatic change in the magnetic signature is in the upper part of the intrusion in MCU IVe, where magnetite became a well established cumulate phase as indicated by susceptibility, but its induced magnetization is overcome by large NRM's associated either with hemo-ilmenite or with hemo-ilmenite and magnetite exsolved from pyroxenes. The average natural remanent magnetizations change from ~3 A/m in MCU IVd, to 15 A/m in MCU IVe, and back to 2 A/m in the overlying MCU IVf, producing a strong negative remanent anomaly that has been followed along strike for at least 20

  20. Sheared sheet intrusions as mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J.-L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-10-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement. We use 3-D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes. We assume that shear stress change on fractures results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Consequently, the largest flank displacement is induced by the longest, deepest sheared intrusion dipping closest to 45° in a host rock with the highest stress anisotropy. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, which can be used to bound the parameter space before it is explored through a formal inversion. Applying the decision tree to the 1.4 m coeruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward dipping subhorizontal normal fault.

  1. Open magma chamber processes in the formation of the Permian Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Wang, Christina Yan; Xing, Chang-Ming; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion of the 260-Ma Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) hosts the second largest Fe-Ti-(V) oxide deposit in the Panxi region, SW China. It is a ~ 1600-m-thick layered body intruded by slightly younger syenitic and granitic plutons. The intrusion includes the Lower and Upper Zones. Troctolite and olivine pyroxenite of the Lower Zone contains conformable oxide ore layers, whereas the Upper Zone consists of olivine gabbro and gabbro with abundant apatite in the higher level. The crystallization order of the silicates in the Baima intrusion is olivine → plagioclase → clinopyroxene. Fe-Ti oxides (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) crystallized after olivine, and possibly plagioclase. The oxide ores in the Lower Zone show slightly LREE enriched patterns with (La/Yb)N values between 2.0 and 6.4, and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*) of 1.0 to 2.7. In contrast, olivine gabbros in the Lower Zone display stronger LREE enrichments (La/YbN = 7.7-14.0) and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 2.8-3.3). Gabbros in the Upper Zone have REE profiles characterized by intermediate LREE enrichments with (La/Yb)N values of 3.2 to 11.2 and positive Eu anomalies of 2.1 to 3.0. Primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns are characterized by negative La-Ce, Th, Sm and positive Nb-Ta, Ba and Ti anomalies in oxide ores and negative Th-U, Zr-Hf and positive Ba, Sr and Ti anomalies in olivine gabbro and gabbro. Fo of olivine and An of plagioclase remain roughly constant from 0 to ~ 90 m in the Lower Zone, indicating that the magma chamber was continuously filled by compositionally similar magmas during the initial stage. Three magma replenishments occurred afterwards in the upper part of the Lower Zone and the Upper Zone based on compositional reversals of plagioclase, olivine and Sr isotope. Mass balance calculations show that the Baima parental magma can produce all oxide ores under closed system conditions. A wide range of An values of plagioclase

  2. Evidence for multiple pulses of crystal-bearing magma during emplacement of the Doros layered intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, T. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Doros Complex is a relatively small (maximum 3.5 km × 7.5 km) shallow-level, lopolithic, layered mafic intrusion in the early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. The stratigraphy broadly comprises a minor, fine-grained gabbroic sill and a sequence of primitive olivine-cumulate melagabbros, with a basal chilled margin, an intermediate plagioclase-cumulate olivine gabbro, and a sequence of mineralogically and texturally variable, intermediate, strongly foliated, plagioclase-, olivine- or magnetite-cumulate gabbros. An evolved syenitic (bostonite) phase occurs as cross-cutting dykes or as enclaves within the foliated gabbros. Major element modelling of the liquid line of descent shows that the spectrum of rock types, including the bostonite, is consistent with the fractionation of a basaltic parental magma that crystallised olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, K-feldspar and apatite. However, the stratigraphic succession does not correspond to a simple progressive differentiation trend but instead shows a series of punctuated trends, each defined by a compositional reversal or hiatus. Incompatible trace element concentrations do not increase upwards though the body of the intrusion. The major units show similar, mildly enriched rare earth element patterns, with minimal Eu anomalies. Back-calculation of the rare earth element concentrations of these cumulate rocks produces relatively evolved original liquid compositions, indicating fractionation of this liquid from a more primitive precursor. Based on combined field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we propose an origin for the Doros Complex by a minimum of seven closely spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas, each with phenocryst contents between 5% and 55%. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid model for the formation of layered mafic intrusions and suggest the presence of an underlying magmatic mush column, i.e., a large

  3. Sheared sheet intrusions as a mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J. L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-12-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement [Famin and Michon, 2010]. We use 3D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes (Figure). We assume that shear stress change on fractures which are not normal to a principal stress results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, thus limits to the parameter space which can be further explored through a formal inversion. Applying this procedure to the 1.4 m co-eruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward-dipping sub-horizontal normal fault.

  4. Formation of low-δ18O magmas of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion by addition of water derived from dehydration of foundered basaltic roof rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, Morten S.; Harris, Chris; Peate, David W.; Tegner, Christian; Wilson, J. Richard; Brooks, C. Kent

    2015-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq Intrusion in East Greenland is concentrically zoned from quartz nordmarkite (quartz syenite) at the margin, through pulaskite, to foyaite (nepheline syenite) in the centre, with no apparent intrusive contacts. The δ18O values of coexisting minerals are consistent with oxygen isotope equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Most of the intrusion formed from low-δ18O magma; magma δ18O values generally increased upwards from about 3.3 ‰ in the quartz nordmarkites to 5.6 ‰ in the foyaites. The lowest magma δ18O value of about -1.0 ‰ is from the upper part of the nordmarkites, where there is a high concentration of foundered basaltic xenoliths (stoped from the roof of the intrusion). The amphiboles in the syenites have δD values that range from those typical of hydrous mantle-derived minerals to much lower values (-86 to -157 ‰), as do whole-rock samples of xenolith and country rock (-125 to -148 ‰). The low magma δ18O and δD values are consistent with continuous incorporation, exchange and upward escape of low-δ18O and δD fluids released from stoped basaltic roof material. Mass balance suggests that the integrated amount of water involved was 7 wt% of the volume of the magma, but locally reached 30 wt% water. The requirement for large amounts of water with low δ18O value is satisfied only if the foundered basalt contained most of its water in cavities as opposed to hydrous minerals. Even with this requirement, the volume of stoped basalt would have been equal to the volume of the magma. Repeated recharge of the residual magma with progressively less contaminated silica undersaturated melt resulted in a gradual shift across the low-pressure thermal divide. Crystallisation was suppressed by the depression of the liquidus due to water saturation of the residual magma (pH2O ~1 kbar).

  5. Oligo-Miocene mafic intrusions of the San Juan Volcanic Field, southwestern Colorado, and their relationship to voluminous, caldera-forming magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan T.; Farmer, G. Lang

    2015-05-01

    The trigger(s) of ignimbrite flare-ups in continental environments and their connection to "high power" mantle-melting events are the subject of ongoing debate, often hampered by the relative scarcity of mantle-derived basalts compared to voluminous amounts of intermediate and silicic lavas, intrusions, and welded-tuffs. This study focused on locating and analyzing mafic magmas in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, the largest erosional remnant of the Oligocene Southern Rocky Mountain ignimbrite flare-up. The "flare-up in" the San Juan Volcanic Field (SJVF) has several potential explanations including: crustal anatexis or MASH processes from either an asthenospheric "high power" melting event triggered by rifting and/or lithospheric delamination or a lithospheric mantle "high power" event caused by exposure of Farallon metasomatism to the underlying asthenosphere. The required volumes of crustal melt (a column 34-45 km tall over an area of 10,000 km2) and crustal heterogeneity disqualify anatexis as a source of the SJVF. Basalt and basaltic andesite magmas of the SJVF have εNd (-6 to -8) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.705-0.706), high Ba concentrations (750-1500 ppm) with low Rb/Zr (0.25-0.5) compatible with a lithospheric basalt MASH model. An OIB-like basalt source would require nearly twice the crustal assimilation (50%+) and MASH zone thickness (∼17 km) to produce the isotopic ratios of intermediate to silicic SJVF rocks and could not produce their elevated Ba concentrations. The location of the SJVF may be controlled by its maximum distance of magma capture and lateral transport or by the underlying lithospheric mantle.

  6. Coronae as a result of giant magma intrusions in the lithosphere of Venus: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier; Polteau, Stephane; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2013-04-01

    Coronae on the surface of Venus are unique volcano-tectonic structures in the solar systems. Their circular morphology is associated with various topographic signatures, from bell-shape domes, flat-topped plateaus, to uplifted rings surrounding a subsided centre similar to caldera. Their extensive size and associated lava flows erupting from their periphery, indicate that they result from deep processes in the Venus mantle. Understanding their origin is thus essential for unraveling the dynamics of Venus through time. There are several scenarios explaining the formation of coronae, the most popular being the interaction between an upwelling mantle plume and the lithosphere, creating dynamic topography. In this contribution, we propose that coronae can result from the emplacement of giant magma intrusions below the Venus' lithosphere, on the basis of laboratory experiments. The experimental apparatus consists of a square box filled with compacted fine-grained silica flour (model crust), in which a low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) is injected at constant flow rate. The initial conditions are such that magma initially flows horizontally, forming a sill-like body, to simulate magmatic underplating. During the experiments, oil injection triggers deformation of the model surface, which is monitored periodically using a moiré projection device, producing time series topographic maps of the model surface. Our results show that the surface evolution of the models follows three stages: (1) initial bell-shaped doming occurs above the injection inlet, producing radial open fractures at the model surfaces; (2) the bell-shape dome evolves to a flat-topped plateau, at the rim of which the oil erupts; (3) after the injection stops, the centre of the plateau subsides, and a positive topographic ring surrounding a depression, like a caldera, remains. The collapse of the plateau also generates concentric extensional fractures at the rims of the caldera. After the dynamic

  7. Multiple magma evolution and ore-forming processes of the Hongge layered intrusion, SW China: Insights from Sr-Nd isotopes, trace elements and platinum-group elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mingyang; Tao, Yan; Song, Xieyan; Li, Yubang; Xiong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The Hongge layered intrusion (259 Ma), which is located in the inner zone of the Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP), is one of the most typical Fe-Ti-V ore deposits in the Pan-Xi area. Mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions of the ELIP have attracted a lot of attention lately because these intrusions host world class Fe-Ti-V oxide deposits plus interesting Cu-Ni-(PGE) mineralization which may have economic potential. This paper, reports new whole-rock major and trace element compositions, PGE abundances and Sr-Nd isotopic data for selected cumulate rocks and basalts. We use these data to investigate the nature of parental magmas and the controls on its evolution from the source mantle en route to the surface involving the Hongge ore-bearing intrusion. Two abrupt changes in Mt/Ilm and trace element ratios such as Ba/Th with depths in the Hongge layered intrusion indicate that this intrusion formed by at least two pluses of relatively primitive magma. The whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic data of basaltic and intrusive rocks plot in the region of Emeishan low-Ti basalts and the compositions of residual liquid (at ∼1260 °C and 1155 °C) calculated by MELTS are similar to our actual high-Ti (BFQ-2) and low-Ti (BC-1) basltic samples, indicate they are co-magmatic rather than derivation from a distinct source. Total PGE abundances in the Hongge samples are extremely low, ranging from 0.5 to 10 ppb. Sulfide-bearing rocks in the Hongge intrusion and the nearby coeval Banfangqing and Baicao basalts have similar mantle-like Pd/Pt ratios (2-6) and extremely high Cu/Pd ratios (3 × 104 to 4 × 105), indicating that sulfide segregation took place at depth prior to emplacement at Hongge and eruption in this region. Sulfide saturation in the Hongge magma may have resulted from such crustal contamination event. Crystallization of silicate minerals under the anhydrous magma, magma hydration plus Fe-Ti enrichments in the parental magma are three critical factors for the formation of Fe

  8. Gradual caldera collapse at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, regulated by lateral magma outflow.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan P; Halldórsson, Sæmundur A; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Cesca, Simone; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jarosch, Alexander H; Jónasson, Kristján; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Bagnardi, Marco; Parks, Michelle M; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Pálsson, Finnur; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Heimann, Sebastian; Reynolds, Hannah I; Dumont, Stéphanie; Bali, Eniko; Gudfinnsson, Gudmundur H; Dahm, Torsten; Roberts, Matthew J; Hensch, Martin; Belart, Joaquín M C; Spaans, Karsten; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur M; Drouin, Vincent; Dürig, Tobias; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Riishuus, Morten S; Pedersen, Gro B M; van Boeckel, Tayo; Oddsson, Björn; Pfeffer, Melissa A; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Burton, Mike R; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    Large volcanic eruptions on Earth commonly occur with a collapse of the roof of a crustal magma reservoir, forming a caldera. Only a few such collapses occur per century, and the lack of detailed observations has obscured insight into the mechanical interplay between collapse and eruption. We use multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data to show that the 110-square-kilometer and 65-meter-deep collapse of Bárdarbunga caldera in 2014-2015 was initiated through withdrawal of magma, and lateral migration through a 48-kilometers-long dike, from a 12-kilometers deep reservoir. Interaction between the pressure exerted by the subsiding reservoir roof and the physical properties of the subsurface flow path explain the gradual, near-exponential decline of both collapse rate and the intensity of the 180-day-long eruption. PMID:27418515

  9. Theoretical prediction of gold vein location in deposits originated by a wall magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pablo; Maass-Artigas, Fernando; Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2016-05-01

    The isotherm time-evolution resulting from the intrusion of a hot dike in a cold rock is analized considering the general case of nonvertical walls. This is applied to the theoretical prediction of the gold veins location due to isothermal evolution. As in previous treatments earth surface effects are considered and the gold veins are determined by the envelope of the isotherms. The locations of the gold veins in the Callao mines of Venezuela are now well predicted. The new treatment is now more elaborated and complex that in the case of vertical walls, performed in previous papers, but it is more adequated to the real cases as the one in El Callao, where the wall is not vertical.

  10. Nonexplosive and explosive magma/wet-sediment interaction during emplacement of Eocene intrusions into Cretaceous to Eocene strata, Trans-Pecos igneous province, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Befus, K.S.; Hanson, R.E.; Miggins, D.P.; Breyer, J.A.; Busbey, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Eocene intrusion of alkaline basaltic to trachyandesitic magmas into unlithified, Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) to Eocene fluvial strata in part of the Trans-Pecos igneous province in West Texas produced an array of features recording both nonexplosive and explosive magma/wet-sediment interaction. Intrusive complexes with 40Ar/39Ar dates of ~ 47-46??Ma consist of coherent basalt, peperite, and disrupted sediment. Two of the complexes cutting Cretaceous strata contain masses of conglomerate derived from Eocene fluvial deposits that, at the onset of intrusive activity, would have been > 400-500??m above the present level of exposure. These intrusive complexes are inferred to be remnants of diatremes that fed maar volcanoes during an early stage of magmatism in this part of the Trans-Pecos province. Disrupted Cretaceous strata along diatreme margins record collapse of conduit walls during and after subsurface phreatomagmatic explosions. Eocene conglomerate slumped downward from higher levels during vent excavation. Coherent to pillowed basaltic intrusions emplaced at the close of explosive activity formed peperite within the conglomerate, within disrupted Cretaceous strata in the conduit walls, and within inferred remnants of the phreatomagmatic slurry that filled the vents during explosive volcanism. A younger series of intrusions with 40Ar/39Ar dates of ~ 42??Ma underwent nonexplosive interaction with Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene mud and sand. Dikes and sills show fluidal, billowed, quenched margins against the host strata, recording development of surface instabilities between magma and groundwater-rich sediment. Accentuation of billowed margins resulted in propagation of intrusive pillows into the adjacent sediment. More intense disruption and mingling of quenched magma with sediment locally produced fluidal and blocky peperite, but sufficient volumes of pore fluid were not heated rapidly enough to generate phreatomagmatic explosions. This work suggests that

  11. Imaging of magma intrusions beneath Harrat Al-Madinah in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.; El-Masry, Nabil; Moufti, Mohamed Rashad; Kenedi, Catherine Lewis; Zhao, Dapeng; Zahran, Hani; Shawali, Jamal

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution tomographic images of the crust and upper mantle beneath Harrat Al-Madinah, Saudi Arabia, are obtained by inverting high-quality arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events recorded by newly installed borehole seismic stations to investigate the AD 1256 volcanic eruption and the 1999 seismic swarm in the study region. Our tomographic images show the existence of strong heterogeneities marked with low-velocity zones extending beneath the AD 1256 volcanic center and the 1999 seismic swarm area. The low-velocity zone coinciding with the hypocenters of the 1999 seismic swarm suggests the presence of a shallow magma reservoir that is apparently originated from a deeper source (60-100 km depths) and is possibly connected with another reservoir located further north underneath the NNW-aligned scoria cones of the AD 1256 eruption. We suggest that the 1999 seismic swarm may represent an aborted volcanic eruption and that the magmatism along the western margin of Arabia is largely attributed to the uplifting and thinning of its lithosphere by the Red Sea rifting.

  12. Zircon trace element, and O and Hf isotopic records of magma sources and pluton assembly in the Sierra Crest intrusions (Sierra Nevada batholith, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Lackey, J. S.; Davies, G. R.; Sendek, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Sierra Crest Intrusions of the Sierra Nevada Batholith are the last major magmatic pulse associated with the Cretaceous flare-up. They are characterized by long assembly times (several 106 years), and are normally zoned from marginal, horblende-biotite granodiorites to more felsic, K-feldspar megacrystic, biotite granodiorites. Combined trace element and O and Hf isotopes on zircon are presented from the major Sierra Crest Intrusions. Zircon saturation temperatures (TZrc,sat) are similar and low (ca. 700°C) for most of the individual units, but Ti-in-zircon temperatures (TZrn,Ti) and trace element ratios contrast strongly between outer marginal units and inner megacrystic units (low TZrn,Ti ≈ TZrc,sat, high Yb/Gd, low Th/U, high and similar Hf, and high Eu/Eu*). Zircon O and Hf isotopes vary markedly across the suite (ΔɛHf = 15; Δδ18O = 2.5‰). Individual intrusive suites (gabbro to high-silica granite) record variable O-Hf variations; no correlation (John Muir), subtle binary or ternary arrays (e.g., Whitney, Sonora), or bimodal distribution of values (Tuolumne). In some cases single hand samples (small-volume mafic or felsic units), may record the entire variability within a suite. Inner megacrystic units generally have lower ɛHf than outer marginal units. Whole rock geochemical data for the intrusive suites also show an increase in the "garnet signature" with time (higher Sr/Y and Dy/Yb). The isotopic data are consistent with variable mantle sources and progressively cooler, more water-rich magmatism with a simultaneous shift to greater crustal involvement, and deepening of the magma sources. Magmatic underplating and intraplating of mafic arc magmas produced increasing crustal assimilation but under PT conditions that allowed production of more felsic, zircon-saturated, magmas. The isotopic variability requires that plutons are amalgams of many magmas mixed at varying scales before final solidification.

  13. Time-space focused intrusion of genetically unrelated arc magmas in the early Paleozoic Ross-Delamerian Orogen (Morozumi Range, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, S.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Dini, A.; Petrelli, M.; Vezzoni, S.

    2015-09-01

    The growth of continental crust in accretionary orogenic belts takes place through repeated cycles of subduction-accretion of rock units from continental and oceanic magmatic arcs, supra-subduction zone backarcs and forearcs loaded with continent-derived materials. An ancient example relevant to magmatic arc accretion models is represented by the remnants of the Cambrian-Ordovician Ross Orogen in the Morozumi Range, Victoria Land (Antarctica). There, late Neoproterozoic phyllites host an intrusive complex which preserves a remarkably uncommon record of genetically unrelated magma pulses emplaced under a variable stress regime in a short time span: (1) a dominant K-feldspar-phyric granite, (2) fine-grained dioritic stocks and dykes, (3) a peraluminous granite; and (4) a tonalitic-granodioritic dyke swarm. Laserprobe U-Pb zircon dates cluster at late Cambrian times for all these units, yet they carry differential cargoes of relict cores. Unique geochemical-isotopic signatures for both the less evolved magmas (diorite and dyke tonalite) and the most acidic ones (granite and peraluminous granite) indicate that each one of them originated from distinct sources at depth. Additionally, field relationships and chemical evolutionary trends testify for a variety of shallow level open-system processes, such as magma mingling/mixing between diorite and main granite magmas, as well as progressive incorporation of the host schists by the dyke tonalite magma. In summary, crustal growth in the Morozumi intrusive complex was contributed by fresh mantle magma issuing from the metasomatised mantle wedge, while the production of other melts did recycle different crustal portions/layers: the main granite derived from Grenville-age granulitic lower crust; the peraluminous granite from late Proterozoic upper crust, and the tonalite magmas derived from subduction erosion-enriched subarc mantle and evolved by ingestion of local metasedimentary rocks. Overall, the Morozumi intrusive complex

  14. Development of a 3D numerical model to evaluate the Stromboli NW flank instability in relation to magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, T.; Merri, A.

    2009-04-01

    A stress-strain analysis of the Stromboli volcano was performed using a three-dimensional explicit finite difference numerical code (FLAC 3D, ITASCA, 2005), to evaluate the effects associated to the presence of magma pressure in magmatic conduit and to foresee the evolution of the magmatic feeding complex. The simulations considered both the ordinary state for the Stromboli, characterized by a partial fill of the active dyke with regular emission of gas and lava fountains and the paroxysmal conditions observed during the March 2007's eruptive crisis, with the magma level in the active dyke reaching the topographic surface along the Sciara del Fuoco depression. The modeling contributes to identify the most probable directions of propagation of new dikes, and the effects of their propagation on the stability of the volcano edifice. The numerical model extends 6 x 6 x 2.6 km3, with a mesh resolution of 100 m, adjusting the grid to fit the shape of the object to be modeled. An elasto-plastic constitutive law was adopted and an homogeneous Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion was chosen for the volcanic cone, assuming one lithotechnical unit (alternation of lava and breccia layers "lava-breccia unit"- Apuani et al 2005). The dykes are represented as discontinuities of the grid, and are modeled by means of interfaces. The magmatic pressure is imposed to the model as normal pressure applied on both sides of the interfaces. The magmastatic pressure was calculated as Pm=d•h, where d is the magma unit weight assumed equal to 25 KN/m3, and h (m) is the height of the magma column. Values of overpressure between 0 and 1 MPa were added to simulate the paroxysmal eruption. The simulation was implemented in successive stages, assuming the results of the previous stages as condition for the next one. A progressive propagation of the dike was simulated, in accordance with the stress conditions identified step by step, and in accordance with the evidences detected by in situ survey, and

  15. Estimation of Contaminant Subslab Concentration in Vapor Intrusion Including Lateral Source–Building Separation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Most current vapor-intrusion screening models employ the assumption of a subsurface homogenous source distribution, and groundwater data obtained from nearby monitoring wells are usually taken to reflect the source concentration for several nearby buildings. This practice makes it necessary to consider the possible influence of lateral source–building separation. In this study, a new way to estimate subslab (nonbiodegradable) contaminant concentration is introduced that includes the influence of source offset with the help of a conformal transform technique. Results from this method are compared with those from a three-dimensional numerical model. Based on this newly developed method, a possible explanation is provided here for the great variation in the attenuation factors of the soil vapor concentrations of groundwater-to-subslab contaminants found in the EPA vapor-intrusion database. PMID:24795543

  16. Multi-element variations in olivine as geochemical signatures of Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization in mafic magma systems—examples from Voisey's Bay and Pants Lake intrusions, Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulle, Florian; Layne, Graham D.

    2016-01-01

    gabbro (BG) and upper gabbro (UG) of the Pants Lake intrusion is fairly homogeneous (˜Fo60, ˜4300 ppm Mn, ˜460 ppm Zn, ˜340 ppm Ni, ˜50 ppm Cr), with a more evolved composition (˜2100 ppm Ca, ˜20 ppm Sc, ˜300 ppm Ti, ˜4 ppm Y) than the average olivine of the Voisey's Bay intrusion (˜570 ppm Ca, ˜6 ppm Sc, ˜65 ppm Ti, ˜0.3 ppm Y). Pants Lake olivine also commonly lacks the mutually Mn-Zn-rich signature of olivine from the basal breccia at Voisey's Bay that is characteristic of contamination of the parent magma by country rock gneiss, and there reflects a close proximity to massive sulfides. In conjunction with petrographic observation and the stratigraphic context, a multiple-element (V-Cr-Mn-Fe-Co-Ni-Zn) regression can be applied to calculate a lateral proximity of olivine to massive sulfide mineralization in the Eastern Deeps part of the Voisey's Bay intrusion, over a distance exceeding 150 m. The compositional variations in olivine from the economic Voisey's Bay intrusion (bimodal and primitive) and the mainly barren Pants Lake intrusion (homogeneous and evolved) provide potential as a regional-scale mineralogical fertility indicator for mafic intrusions with comparable types of sulfide mineralization.

  17. Role of the source to building lateral separation distance in petroleum vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Capobianco, Oriana; Baciocchi, Renato

    2016-06-01

    The adoption of source to building separation distances to screen sites that need further field investigation is becoming a common practice for the evaluation of the vapor intrusion pathway at sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Namely, for the source to building vertical distance, the screening criteria for petroleum vapor intrusion have been deeply investigated in the recent literature and fully addressed in the recent guidelines issued by ITRC and U.S.EPA. Conversely, due to the lack of field and modeling studies, the source to building lateral distance received relatively low attention. To address this issue, in this work we present a steady-state vapor intrusion analytical model incorporating a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability that accounts for lateral source to building separation. The developed model can be used to evaluate the role and relevance of lateral vapor attenuation as well as to provide a site-specific assessment of the lateral screening distances needed to attenuate vapor concentrations to risk-based values. The simulation outcomes showed to be consistent with field data and 3-D numerical modeling results reported in previous studies and, for shallow sources, with the screening criteria recommended by U.S.EPA for the vertical separation distance. Indeed, although petroleum vapors can cover maximum lateral distances up to 25-30m, as highlighted by the comparison of model outputs with field evidences of vapor migration in the subsurface, simulation results by this new model indicated that, regardless of the source concentration and depth, 6m and 7m lateral distances are sufficient to attenuate petroleum vapors below risk-based values for groundwater and soil sources, respectively. However, for deep sources (>5m) and for low to moderate source concentrations (benzene concentrations lower than 5mg/L in groundwater and 0.5mg/kg in soil) the above criteria were found extremely conservative as the

  18. Role of the source to building lateral separation distance in petroleum vapor intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verginelli, Iason; Capobianco, Oriana; Baciocchi, Renato

    2016-06-01

    The adoption of source to building separation distances to screen sites that need further field investigation is becoming a common practice for the evaluation of the vapor intrusion pathway at sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Namely, for the source to building vertical distance, the screening criteria for petroleum vapor intrusion have been deeply investigated in the recent literature and fully addressed in the recent guidelines issued by ITRC and U.S.EPA. Conversely, due to the lack of field and modeling studies, the source to building lateral distance received relatively low attention. To address this issue, in this work we present a steady-state vapor intrusion analytical model incorporating a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability that accounts for lateral source to building separation. The developed model can be used to evaluate the role and relevance of lateral vapor attenuation as well as to provide a site-specific assessment of the lateral screening distances needed to attenuate vapor concentrations to risk-based values. The simulation outcomes showed to be consistent with field data and 3-D numerical modeling results reported in previous studies and, for shallow sources, with the screening criteria recommended by U.S.EPA for the vertical separation distance. Indeed, although petroleum vapors can cover maximum lateral distances up to 25-30 m, as highlighted by the comparison of model outputs with field evidences of vapor migration in the subsurface, simulation results by this new model indicated that, regardless of the source concentration and depth, 6 m and 7 m lateral distances are sufficient to attenuate petroleum vapors below risk-based values for groundwater and soil sources, respectively. However, for deep sources (> 5 m) and for low to moderate source concentrations (benzene concentrations lower than 5 mg/L in groundwater and 0.5 mg/kg in soil) the above criteria were found extremely conservative as

  19. Sedimentation in Magma Chambers: Evidence From the Geochemistry, Microstructure and Crystallography of Troctolite and Gabbro Cumulates, Rum Layered Intrusion, Scotland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Ré, F. C.; Cheadle, M. J.; Swapp, S. M.; Coogan, L. A.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of igneous cumulates remains poorly understood. In particular, petrologists disagree about the relative importance of crystal accumulation by sedimentation or in-situ growth, partly because post-cumulus processes often overprint evidence for the primary mechanism. We address this problem with a detailed geochemical, microstructural and crystallographic study of gabbros and troctolites from the Eastern Layered Series of the Rum Layered Intrusion, NW Scotland. We collected samples, approximately every 50cm, through the complete 11m sequence of foliated gabbros and troctolites from Unit 9. The samples were quantitatively analyzed for crystal shape and size, shape preferred orientation (SPO), crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), modal mineralogy, and whole rock and mineral chemistry. We present the following results: Within cumulate layers just cm's apart, olivine crystal shape can vary from sub-equant to tabular, and crystal diameter can vary from 1-8mm. This suggests at least one olivine population was derived elsewhere in the magma chamber. Complex anorthite zoning is also consistent with an extended history of plagioclase crystal transport. A one-crystal thick olivine layer between feldspathic layers of differing grain size is interpreted to be a lag deposit. Two possible examples of cross bedding also exist. Taken together, these observations suggest sedimentation was the primary method of crystal accumulation. The data also provide constraints on post-cumulus processes. Complex plagioclase zoning suggests that processes of viscous compaction and/or recrystallization were not extensive. The preservation of magmatic and deformation twins and absence of a polygonal fabric support this conclusion. In addition, the CPO and SPO are the same. Lacking evidence for compaction and recrystallization lead us to believe similar CPO and SPO are the preserved artifact of a sedimentary foliation. Therefore, we conclude the gabbros and troctolites of Unit 9

  20. Petrogenetic connections between volcanic rocks and intrusive suites in the California arc - toward an integrated model for upper-crustal magma system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. P.; Riggs, N.; Walker, J. D.; Andrew, J.; Jacobson, C. E.; Miller, D. M.; Robert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic and clastic sedimentary rocks in deeply eroded, predominantly plutonic arcs provide records of arc development and the links between volcanic and plutonic processes. We are analyzing existing and new geochronologic and petrologic data from volcanic breccias, ignimbrites and intrusive suites in the Sierra Nevada and Mojave Desert sectors of the Mesozoic California arc, in an effort to construct an integrated volcano-plutonic model for silicic magmatism in arc upper crust. SIMS and TIMS U-Pb zircon ages, immobile element abundances in whole rocks, and trace element abundances in zircons allow us to interpret the magmatic heritage of ignimbrites and components of underlying granodioritic to granitic intrusive suites. Preliminary results suggest several conclusions: (1) first-order magma production was episodic, with plutonic, forearc and retro-arc detrital zircons defining three magmatic pulses of ~40-60 m.y. duration that are largely mimicked by the more limited record of zircons in ignimbrites; (2) in the Triassic and Jurassic, second-order pulses on 2-10 m.y. time scales are recorded in both the intrusive and ignimbrite records, suggesting that eruption of ignimbrites was synchronous at the shortest resolvable time scales with assembly of underlying incrementally emplaced intrusive suites; (3) ignimbrites range from dacite to rhyolite in bulk composition, and are petrographically similar to modern "monotonous intermediate" dacite or phenocryst-poor low-silica rhyolite; (4) these tuffs are as fractionated as intrusive rocks, and commonly, though not always, contain zircons with similarly complex, multi-stage growth histories. Thus ignimbrites and felsic granodiorites in this arc are complementary elements recording lengthy and episodic evolutionary histories in cool and hydrous upper-crustal arc magma systems.

  1. Petrogenesis of postcollisional magmatism at Scheelite Dome, Yukon, Canada: Evidence for a lithospheric mantle source for magmas associated with intrusion-related gold systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mair, John L.; Farmer, G. Lang; Groves, David I.; Hart, Craig J.R.; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The type examples for the class of deposits termed intrusion-related gold systems occur in the Tombstone-Tungsten belt of Alaska and Yukon, on the eastern side of the Tintina gold province. In this part of the northern Cordillera, extensive mid-Cretaceous postcollisional plutonism took place following the accretion of exotic terranes to the continental margin. The most cratonward of the resulting plutonic belts comprises small isolated intrusive centers, with compositionally diverse, dominantly potassic rocks, as exemplified at Scheelite Dome, located in central Yukon. Similar to other spatially and temporally related intrusive centers, the Scheelite Dome intrusions are genetically associated with intrusion-related gold deposits. Intrusions have exceptional variability, ranging from volumetrically dominant clinopyroxene-bearing monzogranites, to calc-alkaline minettes and spessartites, with an intervening range of intermediate to felsic stocks and dikes, including leucominettes, quartz monzonites, quartz monzodiorites, and granodiorites. All rock types are potassic, are strongly enriched in LILEs and LREEs, and feature high LILE/HFSE ratios. Clinopyroxene is common to all rock types and ranges from salite in felsic rocks to high Mg augite and Cr-rich diopside in lamprophyres. Less common, calcic amphibole ranges from actinolitic hornblende to pargasite. The rocks have strongly radiogenic Sr (initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.711-0.714) and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb from 19.2-19.7), and negative initial εNd values (-8.06 to -11.26). Whole-rock major and trace element, radiogenic isotope, and mineralogical data suggest that the felsic to intermediate rocks were derived from mafic potassic magmas sourced from the lithospheric mantle via fractional crystallization and minor assimilation of metasedimentary crust. Mainly unmodified minettes and spessartites represent the most primitive and final phases emplaced. Metasomatic enrichments in the underlying lithospheric mantle

  2. Evaluation of site-specific lateral inclusion zone for vapor intrusion based on an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Tang, Mengling; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jianjin; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Jing

    2015-11-15

    In 2002, U.S. EPA proposed a general buffer zone of approximately 100 feet (30 m) laterally to determine which buildings to include in vapor intrusion (VI) investigations. However, this screening distance can be threatened by factors such as extensive surface pavements. Under such circumstances, EPA recommended investigating soil vapor migration distance on a site-specific basis. To serve this purpose, we present an analytical model (AAMLPH) as an alternative to estimate lateral VI screening distances at chlorinated compound-contaminated sites. Based on a previously introduced model (AAML), AAMLPH is developed by considering the effects of impervious surface cover and soil geology heterogeneities, providing predictions consistent with the three-dimensional (3-D) numerical simulated results. By employing risk-based and contribution-based screening levels of subslab concentrations (50 and 500 μg/m(3), respectively) and source-to-subslab attenuation factor (0.001 and 0.01, respectively), AAMLPH suggests that buildings greater than 30 m from a plume boundary can still be affected by VI in the presence of any two of the three factors, which are high source vapor concentration, shallow source and significant surface cover. This finding justifies the concern that EPA has expressed about the application of the 30 m lateral separation distance in the presence of physical barriers (e.g., asphalt covers or ice) at the ground surface. PMID:26057584

  3. Interaction between felsic and mafic magmas in the Salmas intrusive complex, Northwestern Iran: Constraints from petrography and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Mitra; Rashidnejad-Omran, Nematollah; Dabiri, Rahim; Santos, José Francisco; Mata, João; Buchs, David; McDonald, Iain; Appel, Peter; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    The Salmas plutonic complex, in the northernmost part of Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran, provides evidence for magma interaction processes. The complex contains mafic-intermediate, hybrid and felsic rocks which intruded into the Paleozoic metamorphic complex. They show typical relationships described in many mafic-felsic mingling and mixing zones worldwide, such as mafic microgranular enclaves (in felsic and hybrid rocks), mafic sheets, and hybrid rocks. The mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) are characterized by fine-grained, equigranular and hypidiomorphic texture and some special types of microscopic textures, e.g., quartz xenocrysts, oscillatory-zoned plagioclase, small lath-shaped plagioclase in large plagioclase, spike zones in plagioclase and spongy-cellular plagioclase textures, rounded plagioclase megacrysts blade-shaped biotite, acicular apatite. The mafic sheets and MMEs in granites (MME-Gr), which indicated magma mingling structures, show ISr values and εNd(i) similar to diorites. The hybrid rocks and their mafic enclaves (MME-H) show isotope signatures similar to each other. Granites have isotope signatures [higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70788-0.71075) and lower εNd(i) (-2.4 to -4.2)] distinct to those of the all rock types and MMEs. Major, trace and REE modeling show that hybrid rocks are generated via 40-60% mixing of mafic (dioritic) and felsic (granitic) end-members. All the geochemical data suggest that underplating of dioritic magma, which has been produced by fractional crystallization of gabbros, under the lower crust caused its melting to make felsic (granitic) magma. Injection of dioritic magma into the base of the felsic magma chamber and a limited mixing of two end-members, the lower crust-derived magma and mantle-derived melts, formed hybrid magma and their enclaves. Injections of new mafic magma pulses into hybrid magma generated mafic enclaves into them. The injections of denser dioritic magma pulses into a felsic magma chamber and spreading

  4. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. PMID:11343114

  5. The Cretaceous Duimiangou adakite-like intrusion from the Chifeng region, northern North China Craton: Crustal contamination of basaltic magma in an intracontinental extensional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lebing; Wei, Junhao; Kusky, Timothy M.; Chen, Huayong; Tan, Jun; Li, Yanjun; Shi, Wenjie; Chen, Chong; Zhao, Shaoqing

    2012-03-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages, major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope compositions of the Duimiangou (DMG) quartz monzonite from the Chifeng region on the northern North China Craton (NCC) were studied to investigate its derivation, evolution and geodynamic significance. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) zircon U-Pb dating yields an emplacement age of 128 ± 1 Ma for this intrusion, with numerous Mesozoic inherited zircons clustering at 219 ± 12 Ma and 161 ± 3 Ma, along with some ancient zircons with ages of 2.5 Ga, 1.77 Ga and 324 Ma. Bulk-rock analyses show that this intrusion is characterized by variable SiO2 (63.4-69.4 wt.%), Al2O3 (14.5-16.3 wt.%), Na2O + K2O (8.01-8.95 wt.%), and Mg# (41.3-48.0). They are enriched in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements without significant Eu anomalies (mostly between 0.89-1.10), and depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements, with high Sr/Y (63.7-101.7) and (La/Yb)N (20.5-31.0) ratios. The DMG intrusion formed in an intracontinental extensional setting contemporaneous with the formation of pull-apart basins, metamorphic core complexes and intense magmatism, rather than in a convergent margin. It has homogeneous Sr ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7059-0.7066), Nd (εNd(t) = - 6.2 to - 7.2) and Pb ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 17.289-17.375, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.359-15.463, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.130-37.472) isotope compositions. Sr-Nd isotope modeling results, plus relatively young Nd model ages (1522-1618 Ma) and the presence of relict zircons, suggest that this intrusion could have originated from crustal contamination of newly formed basaltic melts derived from asthenospheric mantle, accompanied by fractional crystallization of K-feldspar, biotite, apatite, Fe-Ti oxides and minor hornblende and plagioclase. Thus, the DMG adakite-like intrusion may record the magmatic event associated with underplating of asthenospheric magma in an intracontinental extensional

  6. Crustal melting and magma mixing in a continental arc setting: Evidence from the Yaloman intrusive complex in the Gorny Altai terrane, Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Min; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Cai, Keda; Zhao, Guochun; Kulikova, Anna V.; Rubanova, Elena S.

    2016-05-01

    Granitoids and their hosted mafic enclaves may retain important information on crust-mantle interaction, and thus are significant for study of crustal growth and differentiation. An integrated petrological, geochronological and geochemical study on the granitoid plutons of the Yaloman intrusive complex from the Gorny Altai terrane, northwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, was conducted to determine their source nature, petrogenesis and geodynamics. Mafic enclaves are common in the plutons, and a zircon U-Pb age (389 Ma ± 4 Ma) indicates that they are coeval with their granitoid hosts (ca. 393-387 Ma). Petrographic observations reveal that these mafic enclaves probably represent magmatic globules commingled with their host magmas. The relatively low SiO2 contents (46.0-60.7 wt.%) and high Mg# (38.9-56.5) further suggest that mantle-derived mafic melts served as a crucial component in the formation of these mafic enclaves. The granitoid hosts, including quartz diorites and granodiorites, are I-type in origin, possessing higher SiO2 contents (60.2-69.9 wt.%) and lower Mg# (32.0-44.2). Their zircon Hf and whole-rock Nd isotopic compositions indicate that the magmas were dominated by remelting of Neoproterozoic (0.79-1.07 Ga) crustal materials. Meanwhile, the geochemical modeling, together with the common occurrence of igneous mafic enclaves and the observation of reversely zoned plagioclases, suggests that magma mixing possibly contributed significantly to the geochemical variation of the granitoid hosts. Our results imply that mafic magmas from the mantle not only provided substantial heat to melt the lower crust, but also mixed with the crust-derived melts to form the diverse granitoids. The oxidizing and water-enriched properties inferred from the mineral assemblages and compositions imply that the granitoid plutons of the Yaloman intrusive complex were possibly formed in a continental arc-related setting, which is also supported by their geochemistry. The

  7. The intrusion of new magma triggered the 2011-2012 unrest at Santorini: evidence from noble-gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Barberi, F.; Carapezza, M.; Di Piazza, A.; Francalanci, L.; Sortino, F.; D'Alessandro, W.

    2013-12-01

    Santorini is one of the most famous active volcanoes of the world for its catastrophic explosive eruption that occurred during the Minoan civilization. Since then the Kameni eruptive centers that formed within the caldera erupted repeatedly until 1950. In 2011-2012 the volcano has been characterized by a seismic unrest, that was unprecedented at Santorini at least since the 1950 eruption, and that led to fear for an imminent eruption. Because more than 100,000 visitors are present on the island during the tourist season, and considering the eruptive potential of Santorini, it is crucial to evaluate the hazard of this volcano, which depends on the type of magma actually present in the volcanic system. With the aim to address this question, this research shows the first comparison between noble-gas isotope composition of the present fumarolic gases with that of fluid inclusions hosted in enclaves contained in the 1570 and 1925 AD dacitic magmas erupted at Nea Kameni. These enclaves are a portion of mafic magma batches that replenished the shallow chamber of the plumbing system hosting cooler and more silicic melts. Their Sr-Nd isotope ratios are quite similar to those measured in the host dacitic rocks, implying a common parental magma. Therefore, the analyzed enclaves may be considered representative of the historic magma erupted at Nea Kameni which could be still present in the volcano plumbing system feeding the crater fumaroles. The 3He/4He ratios of enclaves, once corrected for air contamination (3.1-3.6 Ra), partially overlap those of the gases (3.5-4.0 Ra) collected from Nea and Palea Kameni. The range of 3He/4He ratios (3.1-4.0 Ra) is appreciably lower than typical arc volcanoes (R/Ra ~7-8), implying that a contamination by 4He-rich fluids occurred either directly in the mantle and/or in the plumbing system. Comparison of 3He/4He and 4He/40Ar* ratios measured in enclaves with those of gases, as well as long-term monitoring of R/Ra in the latters, coherently

  8. A Chill Sequence to the Bushveld Complex - Insight into the First Stages of Emplacement and the Parental Magmas to the World's Largest Layered Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.

    2012-04-01

    Evidence of the initial stages of magma emplacement in large mafic chambers is commonly lacking because of resorption of early-formed chills and complicated by the fact that the first magmas that entered the chamber were usually more evolved than the true parental magma. Deep drilling has revealed a rare occurrence of a chill sequence from the eastern Bushveld Complex at the base of a previously unrecognized thick succession of ultramafic rocks that forms part of the Lower Zone. The chill sequence (1.8 m thick) includes a true chill against quartzite floor rock, crystalline quench textured and orthopyroxene spinifex textured rocks. Importantly the chill composition represents a relatively evolved magma formed by the separation of high-Mg olivines prior to its emplacement, probably in a conduit or a pre-chamber. An overlying pyroxene dunite represents the extract that gave rise to the chill and was emplaced either as a crystal slurry derived from the feeder conduit or as the crystallization product from a slightly later influx of primitive magma of komatiitic composition. This highly-Mg rich pyroxene dunite most likely acted as a barrier to the thermal erosion of the chill sequence as the chamber filled. The olivine in the pyroxene dunite layer is the most primitive yet recorded for the Bushveld Complex at Mg# 0.915, and the cores of associated orthopyroxene are Mg# 0.93. Compositions of the orthopyroxene in the quench and spinifex textured units range from Mg# 0.91 to 0.72 and preserve cores close to the original liquidus as well as tracking the complete in-situ solidification process. Olivine contains abundant dendritic exsolution structures of Cr-spinel and Al-rich clinopyroxene indicating that they formed at high temperature from incorporation of Ca, Al and Cr into olivine, with little time to equilibrate before emplacement. Chromite in the section is the most primitive yet recorded for the Bushveld Complex. The komatiite magma that was initially emplaced into

  9. CO2-dependent fractional crystallization of alkaline silicate magmas and unmixing of carbonatites within the intrusive complexes of Brava Island (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, D.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mattsson, H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intrusive carbonatites often occur in intimate association with SiO2-undersaturated rocks such as melilitites, nephelinites, syenites and phonolites. The occurrence of carbonatites on five of the 10 main islands of the Cape Verde hotspot argues for a CO2-enriched mantle source. Whether alkali-poor carbonatites on the Cape Verdes directly represent small mantle melt fractions or form by extreme fractionation and/or liquid immiscibility from a CO2-rich silicate magma remains a matter of debate. This study focuses on the pyroxenites, nephelinites, ijolites, syenites, phonolites and carbonatites of the intrusive unit of Brava Island. This relative complete series allows for the deduction of a CO2-dependent fractionation pathway from the most primitive basanitic dikes towards phonolitic compositions through an ijolitic series. Major and trace element whole rock and mineral composition trends can be reproduced by fractionating a sequence of olivine, augite, perovskite, biotite, apatite, sodalite and FeTi-oxides, present as phenocrysts in the rocks corresponding to their fractionation interval. To reproduce the observed chemistry of the alkaline silicate rocks a total fractionation of ~87% is required. The melts evolve towards the carbonatite-silicate miscibility gap, an initial CO2 of 0.5 wt% would be sufficient to maintain CO2-saturation in the more evolved compositions. The modelled carbonatite compositions, conjugate to nepheline-syenites to phonolites, correspond well to the observed ones except for an alkali-enrichment with respect to the natural samples. The alkali-depleted nature of the small carbonatite intrusions and dikes on Brava is likely a consequence of fluid-release to the surrounding wall-rocks during crystallization, where fenitization can be observed. The trace element chemistry of primary carbonates and also cpx within both, the carbonatites and the associated silicate rocks, substantiates our fractionation model. Furthermore, carbonatite and silicate

  10. Dynamic model of intrusion of magma and/or magmatic fluids in the large-scale deformation source of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Luongo, Annamaria

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is located in a densely populated area close to Naples (Southern Italy). It is renowned as a site of continual slow vertical movements. After the last eruption in 1538, the caldera generally subsided until 1969 when minor uplift occurred. In the early 1970s this uplift became significant (~1.5 m max). A further large uplift episode occurred from 1982 to 1984 (~1.8 m max), and subsequently smaller uplift episodes have occurred since then. Amoruso et al. (2014a,b) have recently shown that the CF surface deformation field from 1980 to 2013 can be decomposed into two stationary parts. Large-scale deformation can be explained by a quasi-horizontal source, oriented NW to SE and mathematically represented by a pressurized finite triaxial ellipsoid (PTE) ~4 km deep, possibly related to the injection of magma and/or magmatic fluids from a deeper magma chamber into a sill, or pressurization of interconnected (micro)cavities. Residual deformation not accounted for by PTE is confined to the Solfatara fumarolic area and can be mathematically explained by a small (point) pressurized oblate spheroid (PS) ~2 km below the Solfatara fumarolic field, that has been equated with a poroelastic response of the substratum to pore pressure increases near the injection point of hot magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system. A satisfying feature of this double source model is that the geometric source parameters of each are constant over the period 1980-2013 with the exception of volume changes (potencies). Several papers have ascribed CF deformation to the injection of magmatic fluids at the base of the hydrothermal system. All models predict complex spatial and temporal evolution of the deformation pattern and consequently contrast with the observed deformation pattern stationarity. Also recently proposed dynamic models of sill intrusion in a shallow volcanic environment do not satisfy the observed CF deformation pattern stationarity. We have developed an

  11. Magma mixing in late-stage granitoids of the Pioneer intrusive complex, south central Idaho and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.J.; Geist, D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Eocene granitoids that intrude the Pioneer Mountain core complex, located approximately twenty miles northeast of Sun Valley, Idaho, grad west to east from mafic granodiorite to porphyritic quartz monzonite. The two main phases, porphyritic coarse-grained quartz monzonite and fine-grained granodiorite, exhibit field evidence suggestive of magma mixing as indicated by gradational contacts with swirling textures on scales from centimeters to tens of meters, and both phases are found as inclusion within each other. Generally, granodiorite intrudes quartz monzonite and may represent a late stage injection into the center of the semi-consolidated monzonitic magma. Petrological modeling indicates the hybrids are mixtures of the monzonite and granodiorite. Field and petrographic evidence suggest emplacement of the granitoids occurred before latest faulting, as demonstrated by a lack of contact metamorphic effects on the surrounding Paleozoic sediments. Moreover, the development of gneissic fabric, cataclastic and mylonitic fabrics, development of cross-cutting chlorite, epidote, and quartz veinlets, and brecciated fault contacts within the granitoids provide further support for Eocene emplacement prior to or contemporaneous with faulting. These observations provide additional constraints on the cessation of extensional tectonics in south central Idaho.

  12. Groundwater level changes in a deep well in response to a magma intrusion event on Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    On May 21, 2001, an abrupt inflation of Kilauea Volcano's summit induced a rapid and large increase in compressional strain, with a maximum of 2 ??strain recorded by a borehole dilatometer. Water level (pressure) simultaneously dropped by 6 cm. This mode of water level change (drop) is in contrast to that expected for compressional strain from poroelastic theory, and therefore it is proposed that the stress applied by the intrusion has caused opening of fractures or interflows that drained water out of the well. Upon relaxation of the stress recorded by the dilatometer, water levels have recovered at a similar rate. The proposed model has implications for the analysis of ground surface deformation and for mechanisms that trigger phreatomagmatic eruptions.

  13. Lateral variation of H2O/K2O ratios in Quaternary Magma of the Northeastern Japan arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, I.

    2012-12-01

    Water plays a fundamental role in the magma genesis beneath subduction zones. In order to estimate a spatial distribution of the density of water flux in the wedge mantle of the Northeastern Japan arc, this study examines a lateral variation of pre-eruptive bulk rock H2O/K2O contents among volcanoes located both in the frontal and in back arc settings. The analytical targets are the frontal volcanoes Nigorikawa (N42.12 E140.45), Zenikame (N41.74 E140.85), Adachi (N38.22 E140.65), and Nanashigure (N40.07 E141.11), and the back arc ones Hijiori (N38.61 E140.17) and Kanpu (N39.93 E139.88). The bulk magmatic H2O content (TH2O) is calculated from a mass balance of hydrogen isotopic ratios among three phases in a batch of magma; dissolved water in melt, excess H2O vapor, and hydrous phenocrysts such as amphiboles (Miyagi and Matsubaya, 2003). Since the amount of H2O in hydrous phenocryst is negligible, the bulk magmatic H2O content can be written as TH2O = (30 XD CD) / (15 - dT + dMW), where dMW is the measured hydrogen isotopic ratio of hydrous phenocrysts, XD is a melt fraction of magma, CD is a water concentration of the melt, and dT is hydrogen isotopic ratios of a bulk magma (assumed to be -50 per-mil). Both XD and CD are estimated from bulk rock chemistry of the sample using the MELTS program (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995). Hydrogen isotopic fractionation factors are assumed to be -15 and -30 per-mil for vapor and hydrous mineral, and vapor and silicate melt, respectively. There observed a clear difference among the H2O/K2O ratios of bulk magmas from the frontal and back arc volcanoes. For instance higher H2O/K2O wt ratios was observed in the frontal volcanoes (Nigorikawa 5.3, Zenikame 11-12, Adachi 8-10, and Nanashigure 4-18), while lower H2O/K2O wt ratios was observed in the back arc ones (Kanpu 0-2.5 and Hijiori 1.4). The lateral variation of H2O/K2O ratios infer the higher water flux through the frontal side of wedge mantle, which can be a potential cause of the

  14. Granite intrusion by externally induced growth and deformation of the magma reservoir, the example of the Plasenzuela pluton, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Antonio; Fernández, Carlos

    1998-09-01

    The Plasenzuela pluton in the Central Extremadura batholith in the southern Iberian Massif, is an example of permissive emplacement in relation to the tectonic development of extensional fractures in the upper continental crust. Paradoxically, this pluton has a concordant structural pattern which is classically attributed to diapirism or ballooning. This pattern consists of the following elements: (a) nearly elliptical shape in the horizontal section; (b) conformity of the pre-existing aureole structures to the shape of the pluton contacts; and (c) development of a crenulation cleavage, parallel to the contacts, in the vicinity of the pluton walls. All these features have been interpreted in many plutons as resulting from the pushing-aside of the country rock structures due to the expansion of the pluton. However, the detailed structural relationships in the aureole do not favour a forceful emplacement mechanism. By contrast, these relationships constitute prime evidence of permissive intrusion in extensional fractures. According to this interpretation, the concordant shape of the pluton was acquired by syn-plutonic opening of a mixed tensional-shear fracture, parallel to the main foliation in the host rocks, and by folding of the fracture walls together with the previous anisotropy of the country rocks. This is a growth-deformation process that can operate at local conditions in the upper continental crust giving rise to concordant syn-tectonic plutons.

  15. Construction of an Upper Crustal Reservoir by Lateral Magma Propagation: New insights from Geochronological Data of La Gloria Pluton, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, F. J.; Guillong, M.; Payacán, I. J.; Aravena, A.; Bachmann, O.; Parada, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    La Gloria Pluton (LGP) is a 10 Ma shallow elongated NNW reservoir of 17 km length and 4-6 km width as part of a NS trend of Miocene plutons in Central Chile. New LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages in zircons of La Gloria Pluton indicate that crystallization occurs mostly within an interval between 11.2 to 10 Ma, with southeastward decreasing ages. Zircon crystallization ages are consistently older at the boundaries of the pluton than at the center for a given cross-section. At regional scale the ages of LGP follows a plutonic trend of southward decreasing age: Estero Yerba Loca (10 Ma) and San Francisco Batholith (SFB), in the north; and Cerro Mesón Alto (12.5 Ma) and San Gabriel (SG; 13 Ma), in the south. Both regional and local (within-LGP) age trends suggest: 1) a progressive northward migration of the main deep magmatic source during the Miocene; and 2) a southeastward lateral propagation of the magma during the reservoir construction. The lateral propagation of the magma is also supported by subhorizontal mineral and magnetic lineations with a preferred NNW orientation within LGP. The within-pluton age distribution and internal configuration suggest incremental construction with horizontal propagation of magma within channels. Because the lateral migration of the magma play an important role on the thermal structure of the cooling pluton we perform numerical simulations that account for reheating caused by refilling along the axial core of the pluton . We speculate that pre-existing shallow crustal structures (faults and folds) would allow lateral magma canalization, particularly between the lower highly deformed volcanic Abanico Fm. and the less deformed overlaying volcanic Farellones Fm. The pluton distribution and internal organization in and around LGP suggest incremental construction with vertical and horizontal migration of magma within channels and reservoirs, yielding plutonic complexes with protracted ages and elongated geometries.

  16. Deformation of host rocks and flow of magma during growth of minette dikes and breccia-bearing intrusions near Ship Rock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, Paul T.; Pollard, David D.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a small group of minette dikes and plugs that crop out within a flat-lying sequence of siltstone and shale near Ship Rock, a prominent volcanic throat of tuff breccia in northwestern New Mexico. Seven dikes form a radial pattern about Ship Rock we describe in detail the northeastern dike, which has an outcrop length of about 2,900 m, an average thickness of 2.3 m, and a maximum thickness of 7.2 m. The dike is composed of 35 discrete segments arranged in echelon; orientation. of dike segments ranges systematically from N. 52? E. to N. 66? E. A prominent joint set strikes parallel to the segments and is localized within several tens of meters of the dike. Regional joint patterns display no obvious relation to dike orientation. Small offsets of segment contacts, as well as wedge-shaped bodies of crumpled host rock within segments mark the sites of coalescence of smaller segments during dike growth. Bulges in the dike contact, which represent a nondilational component of growth, indicate that wall rocks were brecciated and eroded during the flow of magma. Breccias make up about 9 percent of the 7,176-m 2 area of the dike, are concentrated in its southwest half, and are commonly associated with its thickest parts. We also describe three subcircular plugs; each plug is smaller than 30 m in diameter, is laterally associated with a dike, and contains abundant breccias. Field evidence indicates that these plugs grew from the dikes by brecciation and erosion of wallrocks and that the bulges in the contact of the northeastern dike represent an initial stage of this process. From continuum-mechanical models of host-rock deformation, we conclude that dike propagation was the dominant mechanism for creating conduits for magma ascent where the host rock was brittle and elastic. At a given driving pressure, dikes dilate to accept greater volumes of magma than plugs, and for a given dilation, less work is done on the host rocks. In addition, the pressure required

  17. Quantification of the Intrusion Process at Kïlauea Volcano, Hawai'I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. L.; Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Knowing the time between initial intrusion and later eruption of a given volume of differentiated magma is key to evaluating the connections among magma transport and emplacement, solidification and differentiation, and melt extraction and eruption. Cooling rates for two Kïlauea lava lakes as well as known parent composition and residence times for intrusions that resulted in fractionated lavas later erupted on the East Rift Zone in 1955 (34 years) and 1977 (22 years) allow intrusion dimensions to be calculated. We model intrusions beneath Kïlauea's East Rift Zone near their point of separation from the magma transport path at ~ 5 km depth using Jaeger's (1957) method calibrated against Alae and Makaopuhi lava lakes with wallrock temperatures above the curie point at 450-550°C. Minimum thicknesses of 50-70 meters are found for intrusions that fed the two fractionated lavas, as well as for long-lived magma bodies identified from geodetic monitoring during many East Rift eruptions. These intrusions began as dikes, but probably became sills or laccolithic bodies that remained near the transport path. Short-lived intrusions also arrested near the magma transport path, but that retain a dike geometry, are hypothesized to serve as a trigger for the small but discrete increments of seaward movement on Kïlauea's south flank that characterize slow-slip earthquakes. Two additional thoughts arise from the quantitative modeling of magma cooling. First, long-term heating of the wallrock surrounding the horizontal East Rift Zone transport path slows the rate of cooling within the conduit, possibly contributing to the longevity of the East Rift eruption that began in 1983. Second, the combined effects of heating of the wall rock and ever-increasing magma supply rate from the mantle may have forced breakdown and widening of the vertical transport conduit, which could explain the 5-15-km deep long-period earthquake swarms beneath Kīlauea's summit between 1987 and 1992.

  18. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: Evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle in a back-arc extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr-Ba abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 9.0, and ISr = 0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and amphibole, (2) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (3) the negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (4) the significant differences in the values of εHf(t) (- 9.5 to - 26) within different zircons from the same intrusion.

  19. Shallow lateral magma migration or not during the Bárðarbunga 2014 activity and preceding the Flæðahraun eruption: the geochemical perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, Olgeir

    2015-04-01

    Basaltic fissure eruptions several tens of km away from central volcanoes in Iceland are interpreted to reflect either lateral magma migration from a shallow magma chamber beneath the central volcano, or vertical dyke propagation from deep magma reservoir underlying large part of the fissure swarm. During the Krafla Fires (1975-1984) basalts emitted within the caldera of the central volcano and far away out on the fissure swarm have different composition. During the subglacial eruption at Gjálp (1996), halfway between Grímsvötn and Bárdarbunga, the erupted magma had identical isotope ratios as that of the former but different from that of the latter, despite earthquake originating at Bárdarbunga and propagation towards the eruption site at Gjálp. These geochemical fingerprints have been taken to indicate that lateral magma migration over tens of km was an unlikely process. The spectacular lateral migration of seismicity from 16 August to 29 August and associated ground deformation has been interpreted to reflect a lateral dyke injection over 45 km, from a shallow magma chamber beneath the Bárðarbunga central volcano to the eruption site forming the new Flæðahraun (Sigmundsson et al., 2015). The isotope ratio of Sr in Flæðahraun is identical to that of Holocene lavas and tephra produced at the Bárdarbunga Volcanic System confirming uniform Sr isotope ratios at a given volcanic system in Iceland. Thermodynamic equlibrium between mineral and magmatic liquid indicate that the first Flæðahraun olivine tholeiite originated from more than 10 km depth at a temperature of approximately 1180 °C. Basalt this hot is not likely to have been stored in a superficial magma chamber before migrating laterally at shallow depth over 40 km beneath a glacier covered surface. Basalts crystallizing at variable depth should have different trace element composition caused by evolving crystallizing mineral assemblage, where plagioclase proportions should increase with

  20. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, ChangJian

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model, and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle by subduction zone fluids in an extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a hydrous and high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, ɛNd(t)=-13.1 to -9.0, and ISr=0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and hornblende, (2) the increase in Ti and Al(IV) from hornblende cores to rims, and the overgrowths of high-Ca pyroxene around hornblende grains as well, indicative of episode of heating and rejuvenation of the magma chamber as a result of recharge of mafic magma, (3) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (4) negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (5) the significant differences in the values of ɛHf(t) (-9.5 to -26) within different zircons from the same intrusion. We propose that underplating of hydrous basaltic magma from the metasomatized lithospheric mantle in the lower crust resulted in partial melting of the lower crustal rocks (Precambrian TTG gneisses and amphibolite/granulite) under water-saturated conditions, during which plagioclase decomposed, leaving hornblende-rich restites and

  1. Late Triassic intrusive complex in the Jidong region, Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China: Geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages, Lu-Hf isotopes, and implications for magma mingling and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Dong, Yu; Xu, Wen-liang; Ji, Zheng; Yu, Jie-jiang

    2015-05-01

    Whole-rock major and trace element geochemistry together with zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotope compositions are reported for a Late Triassic intrusive complex in the Jidong region, Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China. Zircon U-Pb dating yields ages between 211 and 208 Ma for enclaves of microgranular diorite and quartz diorite, and between 211 and 209 Ma for the host granitoids. These ages correlate with a previously established intensive Late Triassic magmatic event along the eastern Asian margin. Field observations, together with petrographic features, geochemistry, and zircon Hf isotope data, preclude simple crystal fractionation or restite unmixing as a genetic link for the various rock types within the intrusive complex. The syenogranite suite has high SiO2 (75.5-76.3 wt.%) and low MgO (0.15-0.19 wt.%), and yields enriched LILE and LREE patterns. Most of the zircons in the syenogranites have two-stage model ages of 766 and 1461 Ma, together with positive εHf(t) values of + 0.6 to + 9.1. These results indicate that the granitoid magmas were generated by partial melting of Meso- to Neoproterozoic lower crust. The gabbro suite has a restricted range of SiO2 (46.1-51.9 wt.%) together with high Mg# values (49-70) and high concentrations of Ni, Co, and Cr. Zircons from two diorite samples have single-stage Hf model ages of 557-787 Ma and εHf(t) values of + 1.9 to + 8.3 that are consistent with the coeval gabbros previously studied in the Jidong region. These features, together with the observation that all the gabbros are enriched in LREE and LILE, suggest that the mafic magmas were derived from melting of depleted Neoproterozoic lithospheric mantle that had been metasomatized by slab-derived fluids. It is concluded that the dominant igneous suites within the Late Triassic intrusive complex formed by mingling/mixing of felsic and mafic magmas. The geochemical data, combined with regional geological investigations, indicate that the Late Triassic intrusive complex

  2. Underplating of basaltic magmas and crustal growth in a continental arc: Evidence from Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-Lu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Yang, Jin-Hui; Long, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Phanerozoic growth of continental crust has widely been considered as an important geological phenomenon and mainly occurs in an arc setting. However, the crustal growth models (mantle-derived basalt underplating or accretion of island or intra-oceanic arc complexes or oceanic plateau) have been disputed. Here we present new zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb age, whole-rock major and trace element, Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic data for Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in the Rena Co area in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for two granodiorite and three diorite samples and one granodiorite porphyry sample gives ages of ca. 150 Ma, ca. 112 Ma, respectively, indicating they were generated in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. All rocks are sub-alkaline in composition and belong to the high-K cal-alkaline series. The ~ 150 Ma diorites (SiO2 = 57.9-61.2 wt.%) exhibit relatively high MgO (3.13-3.88 wt.%) and Cr (52.4-282 ppm) contents and Mg# (47-51) values, similar to magnesian diorites. They are geochemically characterized by uniformly low εNd(t) (- 5.5 to - 5.2), high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7071 to 0.7078) and Th/La (0.22-0.32), and variable zircon εHf(t) (- 8.7 to + 4.8) values. They were probably generated by melting of oceanic sediment diapirs, followed by interaction with the surrounding mantle during the northward subduction of Bangong-Nujiang Oceanic lithosphere. The ~ 150 Ma granodiorites and ~ 112 Ma granodiorite porphyries are characterized by low MgO (< 3 wt.%) contents and Mg# (< 45) values, high Al2O3 (> 15% wt.%) and Sr (> 400 ppm) and low Y (< 18 ppm) and Yb (< 1.9 ppm) contents, and high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, which are similar to those of typical adakites. The granodiorites have low εNd(t) (- 7.6 to - 3.7) and zircon εHf(t) (- 9.8 to + 0.2) and high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7069 to 0.7086) values, and were likely produced by partial melting of a thickened and heterogeneous ancient lower continental crust. The relatively

  3. Evidence for multiple mechanisms of crustal contamination of magma from compositionally zoned plutons and associated ultramafic intrusions of the Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Nelson, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    Models of continental crustal magmagenesis commonly invoke the interaction of mafic mantle-derived magma and continental crust to explain geochemical and petrologic characteristics of crustal volcanic and plutonic rocks. This interaction and the specific mechanisms of crustal contamination associated with it are poorly understood. An excellent opportunity to study the progressive effects of crustal contamination is offered by the composite plutons of the Alaska Range, a series of nine early Tertiary, multiply intruded, compositionally zoned (peridotite to granite) plutons. Large initial Sr and Nd isotopic contrasts between the crustal country rock and likely parental magmas allow evaluation of the mechanisms and extents of crustal contamination that accompanied the crystallization of these ultramafic through granitic rocks. Three contamination processes are distinguished in these plutons. The most obvious of these is assimilation of crustal country rock concurrent with magmatic fractional crystallization (AFC), as indicated by a general trend toward crustal-like isotopic signatures with increasing differentiation. Second, many ultramafic and mafic rocks have late-stage phenocryst reaction and orthocumulate textures that suggest interaction with felsic melt. These rocks also have variable and enriched isotopic compositions that suggest that this felsic melt was isotopically enriched and probably derived from crustal country rock. Partial melt from the flysch country rock may have reacted with and contaminated these partly crystalline magmas following the precipitation and accumulation of the cumulus phenocrysts but before complete solidification of the magma. This suggests that in magmatic mush (especially of ultramafic composition) crystallizing in continental crust, a second distinct process of crustal contamination may be super-imposed on AFC or magma mixing involving the main magma body. Finally, nearly all rocks, including mafic and ultramafic rocks, have (87Sr

  4. Magma volumes and storage in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memeti, V.; Barnes, C. G.; Paterson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying magma volumes in magma plumbing systems is mostly done through geophysical means or based on volcanic eruptions. Detailed studies of plutons, however, are useful in revealing depths and evolving volumes of stored magmas over variable lifetimes of magma systems. Knowledge of the location, volume, and longevity of stored magma is critical for understanding where in the crust magmas attain their chemical signature, how these systems physically behave and how source, storage levels, and volcanoes are connected. Detailed field mapping, combined with single mineral geochemistry and geochronology of plutons, allow estimates of size and longevity of melt-interconnected magma batches that existed during the construction of magma storage sites. The Tuolumne intrusive complex (TIC) recorded a 10 myr magmatic history. Detailed maps of the major units in different parts of the TIC indicate overall smaller scale (cm- to <1 km) compositional variation in the oldest, outer Kuna Crest unit and mainly larger scale (>10 km) changes in the younger Half Dome and Cathedral Peak units. Mineral-scale trace element data from hornblende of granodiorites to gabbros from the Kuna Crest lobe show distinct hornblende compositions and zoning patterns. Mixed hornblende populations occur only at the transition to the main TIC. This compositional heterogeneity in the first 1-2 myr points to low volume magmatism resulting in smaller, discrete and not chemically interacting magma bodies. Trace element and Sr- and Pb-isotope data from growth zones of K-feldspar phenocrysts from the two younger granodiorites indicate complex mineral zoning, but general isotopic overlap, suggesting in-situ, inter-unit mixing and fractionation. This is supported by hybrid zones between units, mixing of zircon, hornblende, and K-feldspar populations and late leucogranites. Thus, magma body sizes increased later resulting in overall more homogeneous, but complexly mixing magma mushes that fractionated locally.

  5. Magma-mixing in the genesis of Hercynian calc-alkaline granitoids: an integrated petrographic and geochemical study of the Sázava intrusion, Central Bohemian Pluton, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoušek, Vojtěch; Braithwaite, Colin J. R.; Bowes, D. R.; Gerdes, Axel

    2004-10-01

    The Devonian-early Carboniferous (354.1±3.5 Ma: conventional zircon U-Pb age) Sázava intrusion (biotite-amphibole quartz diorite, tonalite and granodiorite) of the Central Bohemian Pluton (CBP) associated with bodies of (olivine, pyroxene-) amphibole gabbro, gabbrodiorite, (quartz) diorite and rare hornblendite, gives an opportunity for a comparative study of a rather shallow, calc-alkaline magma-mixing zone at two levels, separated by a vertical difference of approximately 1 km. The deeper section (Příbram) displays the direct evidence for the existence of a long-lived, periodically tapped and replenished, floored magma chamber (MASLI). The contacts between the subhorizontal sheet-like basic bodies and the surrounding, commonly cumulus-rich, Sázava granitoid, are arcuate, and cut by a series of veins and ascending pipes. Shallow-dipping swarms of strongly elongated and flow-aligned mafic microgranular enclaves (MME), concordant with the contacts of the basic bodies, are commonplace. The higher level (Teletín) section shows relatively independent basic intrusions, some of them distinctly hybrid in character and mainly of quartz dioritic composition, surrounded by relatively homogeneous, nearly cumulus-free Sázava tonalite rich in texturally variable MME. Larger quartz microdiorite bodies and the MME, both interpreted as hybrids, contain varying proportions of highly heterogeneous plagioclase megacrysts with complex zoning, particularly well shown by cathodoluminescence (CL). Most often the megacrysts have cores of labradorite-anorthite, partly resorbed and overgrown by andesine rims but some are strongly brecciated and fragments have been annealed by rim growth. Also characteristic are long prisms of apatite, oikocrysts of quartz and K-feldspar and zoned amphibole. The latter has brown pargasite and magnesiohastingsite cores, resorbed and overgrown by magnesiohornblende, compositionally similar to the amphibole in the Sázava tonalite. The brown cores are

  6. Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence for a stalled intrusion in 1975 and connection to a deep magma source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Evans, William C.; Poland, M.; Tucker, D.S.; Doukas, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term changes have occurred in the chemistry, isotopic ratios, and emission rates of gas at Mount Baker volcano following a major thermal perturbation in 1975. In mid-1975 a large pulse in sulfur and carbon dioxide output was observed both in emission rates and in fumarole samples. Emission rates of CO2 and H2S were ??? 950 and 112??t/d, respectively, in 1975; these decreased to ??? 150 and < 1??t/d by 2007. During the peak of the activity the C/S ratio was the lowest ever observed in the Cascade Range and similar to magmatic signatures observed at other basaltic-andesite volcanoes worldwide. Increases in the C/S ratio and decreases in the CO2/CH4 ratio since 1975 suggest a long steady trend back toward a more hydrothermal gas signature. The helium isotope ratio is very high (> 7??Rc/RA), but has declined slightly since the mid-1970s, and ??13C-CO2 has decreased by ??? 1??? over time. Both trends are expected from a gradually crystallizing magma. While other scenarios are investigated, we conclude that magma intruded the mid- to shallow-crust beneath Mount Baker during the thermal awakening of 1975. Since that time, evidence for fresh magma has waned, but the continued emission of CO2 and the presence of a long-term hydrothermal system leads us to suspect some continuing connection between the surface and deep convecting magma.

  7. Magma mixing in the genesis of the Kalatongke dioritic intrusion: Implications for the tectonic switch from subduction to post-collision, Chinese Altay, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2013-03-01

    The Kalatongke complex, located in south Chinese Altay of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), consists of the ~ 308 Ma dioritic suite intruded by the 287 Ma noritic suite. The noritic suite is composed of olivine norite and hornblende norite and hosts sulfide mineralization. The dioritic suite is composed of ferrodiorite, diorite and quartz diorite. Ferrodiorites have 43.6 to 51.8 wt.% SiO2, 8.2 to 12.1 wt.% Fe2O3T, 2.87 to 4.86 wt.% MgO, with Mg# ranging from 42 to 53. They have highly variable Al2O3 (17.4-20.7 wt.%), Na2O (2.78-4.50%), K2O (0.58-3.70%), Sr (280-1300 ppm) and Ba (219-3100 ppm). Diorites and quartz diorites have 15.2-19.6 wt.% Al2O3, 239-890 ppm Sr and170-1100 ppm Ba, 11.2-25.5 ppm Y and1.2-2.2 ppm Yb. All rocks have LREE enriched REE patterns and do not display Eu anomalies. They have primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns enriched in large ion lithosphile elements (LILE) (e.g. Ba and Sr) and depleted in Ti, Nb and Ta. Both ferrodiorites and diorites have relatively constant initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7037 to 0.7040 but highly variable ɛNd(t) values of + 4.5 to + 11.6, whereas quartz diorites have higher initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7056) and lower ɛNd(t) values (+ 0.5). Plagioclase from ferrodiorites, diorites and quartz diorites has similar initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7015 to 0.7055. The dioritic suite formed from a mixed magma of an evolved mantle-derived basaltic magma by partial melting of subduction-modified mantle source in response to slab breakoff and a crustal-derived granitic magma at ~ 308 Ma. Before mixing with granitic magmas, basaltic magmas underwent fractional crystallization of olivine to form ferrodiorite. The mixed magma also formed diorite and quartz diorite combining fractionation clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase. The noritic suite formed from a mantle-derived high-Mg magma in a post-collisional environment. Both the dioritic and noritic suites in Kalatongke suggest the switch from subduction to

  8. Effects of crustal-scale mechanical layering on magma chamber failure and magma propagation within the Venusian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; McGovern, Patrick J.; Grosfils, Eric B.; Galgana, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the connection between shallow subsurface magmatism and related surface expressions provides first-order insight into the volcanic and tectonic processes that shape a planet's evolution. When assessing the role of flexure, previous investigations assumed homogeneous host rock, but planetary lithospheres typically include crust and mantle material, and the mechanical response of a layered lithosphere subjected to flexure may influence both shallow magma reservoir failure and intrusion propagation. To assess the formation of giant radial dike systems, such as those observed on Venus, we create axisymmetric elastic finite element models of a spherical reservoir centered at the contact between stiff, dense mantle overlain by softer, lighter crust. We analyze magma chamber stability, overpressure at rupture, and resulting intrusion types for three distinct environments: lithostatic, upward flexure, and downward flexure. In the lithostatic case, reservoir failure at the crust-mantle contact favors lateral sill injection. In the flexure cases, we observe that failure location depends upon the crust/lithosphere thickness ratio and, at times, will favor radial dike intrusion. Specifically, upward flexure can promote the formation of giant radiating dike swarms, a scenario consistent with a plume-derived origin. Our results present a mechanical explanation for giant radial dike swarm formation, showing that both the stability of magma chambers on Venus and the type of intrusions that form are influenced by lithospheric layering. Furthermore, where dike swarms occur, our approach provides a powerful new way to constrain local crust/mantle layering characteristics within the lithosphere at the time the swarm was forming.

  9. The Sonju Lake layered intrusion, northeast Minnesota: Internal structure and emplacement history inferred from magnetic fabrics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maes, S.M.; Tikoff, B.; Ferre, E.C.; Brown, P.E.; Miller, J.D., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion (SLI), in northeastern Minnesota, is a layered mafic complex of Keweenawan age (1096.1 ?? 0.8 Ma) related to the Midcontinent rift. The cumulate paragenesis of the intrusion is recognized as broadly similar to the Skaergaard intrusion, a classic example of closed-system differentiation of a tholeiitic mafic magma. The SLI represents nearly closed-system differentiation through bottom-up fractional crystallization. Geochemical studies have identified the presence of a stratabound, 50-100 m thick zone anomalously enriched in Au + PGE. Similar to the PGE reefs of the Skaergaard intrusion, this PGE-enriched zone is hosted within oxide gabbro cumulates, about two-third of the way up from the base of the intrusion. We present a petrofabric study using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to investigate the emplacement and flow patterns within the Sonju Lake intrusion. Petrographic and electron microprobe studies, combined with AMS and hysteresis measurements indicate the primary source of the magnetic signal is pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite or titanomagnetite. Low field AMS was measured at 32 sites within the Sonju Lake intrusion, which provided information about primary igneous fabrics. The magnetic fabrics in the layered series of the Sonju Lake intrusion are consistent with sub-horizontal to inclined emplacement of the intrusion and show evidence that the cumulate layers were deposited in a dynamic environment. Well-aligned magnetic lineations, consistently plunging shallowly toward the southwest, indicate the source of the magma is a vertical sill-like feeder, presumably located beneath the Finland granite. The Finland granite acted as a density trap for the Sonju Lake magmas, forcing lateral flow of magma to the northeast. The strongly oblate magnetic shape fabrics indicate the shallowly dipping planar fabrics were enhanced by compaction of the crystal mush. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Eddy Flow during Magma Emplacement: The Basemelt Sill, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; Mirhadizadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system, Antarctica, forms part of the Ferrar dolerite Large Igneous Province. Comprising a vertical stack of interconnected sills, the complex provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral magma flow on a continental scale. The lowermost intrusion (Basement Sill) offers detailed sections through the now frozen particle macrostructure of a congested magma slurry1. Image-based numerical modelling where the intrusion geometry defines its own unique finite element mesh allows simulations of the flow regime to be made that incorporate realistic magma particle size and flow geometries obtained directly from field measurements. One testable outcome relates to the origin of rhythmic layering where analytical results imply the sheared suspension intersects the phase space for particle Reynolds and Peclet number flow characteristic of macroscopic structures formation2. Another relates to potentially novel crystal-liquid segregation due to the formation of eddies locally at undulating contacts at the floor and roof of the intrusion. The eddies are transient and mechanical in origin, unrelated to well-known fluid dynamical effects around obstacles where flow is turbulent. Numerical particle tracing reveals that these low Re number eddies can both trap (remove) and eject particles back into the magma at a later time according to their mass density. This trapping mechanism has potential to develop local variations in structure (layering) and magma chemistry that may otherwise not occur where the contact between magma and country rock is linear. Simulations indicate that eddy formation is best developed where magma viscosity is in the range 1-102 Pa s. Higher viscosities (> 103 Pa s) tend to dampen the effect implying eddy development is most likely a transient feature. However, it is nice to think that something as simple as a bumpy contact could impart physical and by implication chemical diversity in igneous rocks. 1Marsh, D.B. (2004), A

  11. Flow dynamics in mid-Jurassic dikes and sills of the Ferrar large igneous province and implications for long-distance magma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airoldi, Giulia M.; Muirhead, James D.; Long, Sylvan M.; Zanella, Elena; White, James D. L.

    2016-06-01

    Magma flow paths in sill-fed dikes of the Ferrar large igneous province (LIP), contrast with those predicted by classic models of dike transport in LIPs and magmatic rift settings. We examine anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) flow paths in dike networks at Terra Cotta Mountain and Mt. Gran, which intruded at paleodepths of ~ 2.5 and ~ 1.5 km. These intrusions (up to 30 m thick) exhibit irregular, interconnected dike-sill geometries and adjoin larger sills (~ 200-300 m thick) at different stratigraphic levels. Both shallowly dipping and sub-vertical magma flow components are interpreted from AMS measurements across individual intrusions, and often match macroscopic flow indicators and variations in dike attitudes. Flow paths suggest that intrusive patterns and magma flow directions depended on varying stress concentrations and rotations during dike and sill propagation, whereas a regional extensional tectonic control was negligible or absent. Unlike giant dike swarms in LIPs elsewhere (e.g., 1270 Ma MacKenzie LIP), dikes of the Ferrar LIP show no regionally consistent vertical or lateral flow patterns, suggesting these intrusion were not responsible for long-distance transport in the province. In the absence of regionally significant, colinear dike swarms, or observed intrusions at crustal depths ≥ 4 km, we suggest that long distance magma transport occurred in sills within Beacon Supergroup sedimentary rocks. This interpretation is consistent with existing geochemical data and thermal constraints, which support lateral magma flow for ~ 3,500 km across the Gondwana supercontinent before freezing.

  12. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  13. Constraints from sill intrusions and their deeper source magma chambers (seismic high velocity bodies) on the origins of volcanic rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic rifted margins are characterized by massive igneous activity originating from the rift margin, characterized by seaward dipping reflectors. These consist of basalt flows and associated magmatic products, from deep magma chambers imaged on seismic data as High Velocity Bodies (HVB) with seismic velocities between 7 and 7.5 km/s. The relationship between rifting and decompression melting have been well quantified, using the HVB's as constraints on magmatic production to match extension models. Crucial in this approach are the relationship between extension and mantle plumes, with HVB's generated by mantle plumes often indicative of velocities between 7.5 - 7.8 km/s. Here I address information that can be obtained from sill complexes in sedimentary basins associated with rifting, representing the earliest phase of magmatism. I use a simple crustal scale hydrostatic model for dikes while incorporating the presence of sills by calculating magmatic overpressures from differences in pressure gradients. It transpires that the presence of sills as observed on seismic reflection and outcrop data, can be predicted. Modelling further suggests that the source of these sill complexes are large magma chambers at or near the Moho, and equate to HVB's observed on seismic data. Utilizing simple mass balance calculations, the ratio of cumulate thickness (from HVB thickness) and expelled melt (from accumulated sill thicknesses) can be related to MgO content in expelled liquids, primary magma and cumulates. Higher MgO content translates in higher seismic velocities. Thus, HVB velocity can subsequently be used to discriminate between mantle plume, or shallow rift related melting. The theory is applied to various basins bordering the northern North Atlantic (Vøring Basin, Jameson Land Basin and Rockall Basin) and South Atlantic rifts (Namibia), associated with the Paleocene/Eocene Iceland mantle plume and the Early Cretaceous Tristan da Cunha mantle plume magmatism respectively.

  14. Evidence of magma intrusion at Fourpeaked volcano, Alaska in 2006-2007 from a rapid-response seismic network and volcanic gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardine, M.; West, M.; Werner, C.; Doukas, M.

    2011-01-01

    On September 17th, 2006, Fourpeaked volcano had a widely-observed phreatic eruption. At the time, Fourpeaked was an unmonitored volcano with no known Holocene activity, based on limited field work. Airborne gas sampling began within days of the eruption and a modest seismic network was installed in stages. Vigorous steaming continued for months; however, there were no further eruptions similar in scale to the September 17 event. This eruption was followed by several months of sustained seismicity punctuated by vigorous swarms, and SO2 emissions exceeding a thousand tons/day. Based on observations during and after the phreatic eruption, and assuming no recent pre-historical eruptive activity at Fourpeaked, we propose that the activity was caused by a minor injection of new magma at or near 5km depth beneath Fourpeaked, which remained active over several months as this magma equilibrated into the crust. By early 2007 declining seismicity and SO2 emission signaled the end of unrest. Because the Fourpeaked seismic network was installed in stages and the seismicity was punctuated by discrete swarms, we use Fourpeaked to illustrate quantitatively the efficacy and shortcomings of rapid response seismic networks for tracking volcanic earthquakes.

  15. Evidence of magma intrusion at Fourpeaked volcano, Alaska in 2006-2007 from a rapid-response seismic network and volcanic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, Matt; West, Michael; Werner, Cynthia; Doukas, Michael

    2011-03-01

    On September 17th, 2006, Fourpeaked volcano had a widely-observed phreatic eruption. At the time, Fourpeaked was an unmonitored volcano with no known Holocene activity, based on limited field work. Airborne gas sampling began within days of the eruption and a modest seismic network was installed in stages. Vigorous steaming continued for months; however, there were no further eruptions similar in scale to the September 17 event. This eruption was followed by several months of sustained seismicity punctuated by vigorous swarms, and SO 2 emissions exceeding a thousand tons/day. Based on observations during and after the phreatic eruption, and assuming no recent pre-historical eruptive activity at Fourpeaked, we propose that the activity was caused by a minor injection of new magma at or near 5 km depth beneath Fourpeaked, which remained active over several months as this magma equilibrated into the crust. By early 2007 declining seismicity and SO 2 emission signaled the end of unrest. Because the Fourpeaked seismic network was installed in stages and the seismicity was punctuated by discrete swarms, we use Fourpeaked to illustrate quantitatively the efficacy and shortcomings of rapid response seismic networks for tracking volcanic earthquakes.

  16. Experimental modelling of thin-skinned shortening around magmatic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Vendeville, Bruno

    1995-03-01

    Magmatic intrusions can trigger thin-skinned compression of the adjacent sedimentary cover by three processes: (a) gravity gliding away from the topographic dome resulting from the ascending magma; (b) fluid push from the rear resulting from forceful intrusion then lateral spreading of the magma; and (c) increased loading by volcanic accumulation. The applicability of the first two mechanisms, gravity gliding and fluid push, was tested using dynamically scaled experiments. Model results help to elucidate the kinematics and structural evolution of thrusts and folds formed by such processes and determine which geological parameters control the deformation style. The results show that the presence of a weak layer within the sedimentary overburden is essential to form thrust and fold belts around the intrusion. Experiments suggest that although gravity gliding can dominate the early stages of deformation, most of the deformation is caused by lateral spreading of the fluid magma pushing the adjacent sedimentary rocks. Models also suggest that true laccoliths can form only if the sedimentary section comprises a basal low-viscosity stratum. Comparison with natural examples allows the evaluation of the applicability of experimental results.

  17. Post-Emplacement Behaviour of Magma Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, A. M.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    For common crustal structures and melt compositions, basalts are buoyant in the lower crust and negatively buoyant in the upper crust. Intrusion and storage can occur at a depth or an interface where the density of magma becomes larger than that of the overlying rocks. After emplacement, magma density typically increases due to the formation of dense minerals. Fully solidified mafic bodies have bulk densities between 3000-3100 kg m-3 which are much higher than those of the continental rocks they intruded. This negative density contrast is much stronger than the positive one that drove magma ascent. We investigate the dynamical consequences of this marked buoyancy reversal using 3D laboratory experiments on viscous fluids and 2D numerical calculations with complex crustal rheologies. Material is emplaced at a density interface, such that its density is between those of the upper and lower layers. Its bulk density increases as temperature decreases and eventually exceeds that of the lower layer. We observe that the intrusion tends to spread laterally in an initial phase and to sag, and in some cases sink, in a later phase when its density exceeds that of the host. We identified two distinct instability modes. One consists of a single diapiric-like sinker and the other takes the form of spectacular nearly axisymmetric Rayleigh-Taylor-type downwellings. An intermediate mode consists of several long wavelength blobs which disrupt the initial symmetrical arrangement. The transition between the two modes is mainly determined by the aspect ratio of the intrusion at the onset of instability. Sagging can lead to full-fledged sinking to the base of the crust depending mainly on the temperature of country rocks. This proceeds over timescales that are relevant for true magmatic systems (in a range of a few kyr to a few Myr). At shallow crustal depths, cold temperatures and stiff country rocks are able to withstand the load of a large and dense intrusion. Significant post

  18. When Magma Might but Doesn't Erupt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhall, C.

    2008-12-01

    whammy. Magma can also enter relatively deformable structures, e.g., rift zones where it can move laterally more easily than it can ascend, or be slowed by layered soft and hard rock (Gudmundsson and Brenner, GRL 2004), increasing the chances of (a) and (b). Opportunities abound for ascending magma to stall; indeed, judging from the number of earthquake swarms and other potential indicators of magma ascent vs actual eruption, the majority of intrusions stall without erupting. Some patterns of unrest suggest that rising magma may abort before reaching the surface but these hints are non-unique. Low initial gas contents and slow rates of ascent increase chances of failure. Nishimura (GRL 2006) inferred that deformation will be constant (rather than accelerate) if magma nearing the surface has already been degassing. The same may hold for seismicity that's directly related to dike intrusion. Interpretation of degassing is tricky. Strong and constant or slowing gas emission that accompanies constant deformation increases the chance that degassing will freeze the magma before it can erupt. In contrast, strong and accelerating degassing that accompanies accelerating deformation may indicate a runaway approach to eruption, as may unusually low gas emission during accelerating deformation if the conduit is still plugged. Accelerated degassing can also occur when a dry chimney develops through water-saturated country rock, with or without deformation. Low (acid) gas emission by itself tells us little, as it can be scrubbed into groundwater. Those interpreting unrest need to consider all possible outcomes, including both total failure to erupt and the possibility that what looks like a failed eruption today may be on hold and may yet occur.

  19. Timing of magmatism following initial convergence at a passive margin, southwestern U.S. Cordillera, and ages of lower crustal magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of the Cordilleran magmatic arc in the southwestern United States is marked by intrusion of granitic plutons, predominantly composed of alkali-calcic Fe- and Sr-enriched quartz monzodiorite and monzonite, that intruded Paleoproterozoic basement and its Paleozoic cratonal-miogeoclinal cover. Three intrusive suites, recognized on the basis of differences in high field strength element and large ion lithophile element abundances, contain texturally complex but chronologically distinctive zircons. These zircons record heterogeneous but geochemically discrete mafic crustal magma sources, discrete Permo-Triassic intrusion ages, and a prolonged postemplacement thermal history within the long-lived Cordilleran arc, leading to episodic loss of radiogenic Pb. Distinctive lower crustal magma sources reflect lateral heterogeneity within the composite lithosphere of the Proterozoic craton. Limited interaction between derived magmas and middle and upper crustal rocks probably reflects the relatively cool thermal structure of the nascent Cordilleran continental margin magmatic arc. ?? 2006 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  20. Magma transfer at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) before the 1538 AD eruption

    PubMed Central

    Di Vito, Mauro A.; Acocella, Valerio; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Battaglia, Maurizio; Carandente, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Carlo; de Vita, Sandro; Ricciardi, Giovanni P.; Ricco, Ciro; Scandone, Roberto; Terrasi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Calderas are collapse structures related to the emptying of magmatic reservoirs, often associated with large eruptions from long-lived magmatic systems. Understanding how magma is transferred from a magma reservoir to the surface before eruptions is a major challenge. Here we exploit the historical, archaeological and geological record of Campi Flegrei caldera to estimate the surface deformation preceding the Monte Nuovo eruption and investigate the shallow magma transfer. Our data suggest a progressive magma accumulation from ~1251 to 1536 in a 4.6 ± 0.9 km deep source below the caldera centre, and its transfer, between 1536 and 1538, to a 3.8 ± 0.6 km deep magmatic source ~4 km NW of the caldera centre, below Monte Nuovo; this peripheral source fed the eruption through a shallower source, 0.4 ± 0.3 km deep. This is the first reconstruction of pre-eruptive magma transfer at Campi Flegrei and corroborates the existence of a stationary oblate source, below the caldera centre, that has been feeding lateral eruptions for the last ~5 ka. Our results suggest: 1) repeated emplacement of magma through intrusions below the caldera centre; 2) occasional lateral transfer of magma feeding non-central eruptions within the caldera. Comparison with historical unrest at calderas worldwide suggests that this behavior is common. PMID:27558276

  1. Magma transfer at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) before the 1538 AD eruption.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Mauro A; Acocella, Valerio; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Battaglia, Maurizio; Carandente, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Carlo; de Vita, Sandro; Ricciardi, Giovanni P; Ricco, Ciro; Scandone, Roberto; Terrasi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Calderas are collapse structures related to the emptying of magmatic reservoirs, often associated with large eruptions from long-lived magmatic systems. Understanding how magma is transferred from a magma reservoir to the surface before eruptions is a major challenge. Here we exploit the historical, archaeological and geological record of Campi Flegrei caldera to estimate the surface deformation preceding the Monte Nuovo eruption and investigate the shallow magma transfer. Our data suggest a progressive magma accumulation from ~1251 to 1536 in a 4.6 ± 0.9 km deep source below the caldera centre, and its transfer, between 1536 and 1538, to a 3.8 ± 0.6 km deep magmatic source ~4 km NW of the caldera centre, below Monte Nuovo; this peripheral source fed the eruption through a shallower source, 0.4 ± 0.3 km deep. This is the first reconstruction of pre-eruptive magma transfer at Campi Flegrei and corroborates the existence of a stationary oblate source, below the caldera centre, that has been feeding lateral eruptions for the last ~5 ka. Our results suggest: 1) repeated emplacement of magma through intrusions below the caldera centre; 2) occasional lateral transfer of magma feeding non-central eruptions within the caldera. Comparison with historical unrest at calderas worldwide suggests that this behavior is common. PMID:27558276

  2. Source mechanism of a very-long-period event at Mt Ontake, central Japan: Response of a hydrothermal system to magma intrusion beneath the summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Masaru; Okubo, Makoto; Kimata, Fumiaki; Ito, Yoshihiro; Obara, Kazushige

    2009-11-01

    A very-long-period (VLP) volcanic event, which occurred on 25 January 2007 beneath Mt Ontake, central Japan, was recorded by nearby broadband seismometers as well as the Japanese nationwide Hi-net and F-net seismic networks. The VLP waveforms show a pulse-like shape with a duration of approximately 1 min. The VLP event was accompanied by a burst sequence of long-period (LP) events. We carried out waveform inversion to determine the source mechanism and location of the VLP event. Our analysis indicates volumetric changes in an inclined crack (seismic moment of 10 14 Nm) at the VLP source, which is located at 0.6 km above sea level beneath the summit of Mt Ontake and above dikes determined from GPS data. The source-time functions of the VLP event showed a pulse-like triangular shape, indicating inflation followed by deflation of the crack at the source. We interpreted the result of the waveform inversion as follows. Gases released from the intruded magma heated an aquifer system beneath the summit of Mt Ontake. A break of unstable superheated water in a hydrothermal crack in the system caused vaporization of water and associated crack inflation, which was followed by discharge of steam from the crack resulting in its collapse. These processes caused the VLP event, which may have been a precursor of a small phreatic eruption that occurred in late March 2007.

  3. Differentiation and magma mixing on Kilauea's east rift zone: A further look at the eruptions of 1955 and 1960. Part II. The 1960 lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Helz, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    New and detailed petrographic observations, mineral compositional data, and whole-rock vs glass compositional trends document magma mixing in lavas erupted from Kilauea's lower east rift zone in 1960. Evidence includes the occurrence of heterogeneous phenocryst assemblages, including resorbed and reversely zoned minerals in the lavas inferred to be hybrids. Calculations suggest that this mixing, which is shown to have taken place within magma reservoirs recharged at the end of the 1955 eruption, involved introduction of four different magmas. These magmas originated beneath Kilauea's summit and moved into the rift reservoirs beginning 10 days after the eruption began. We used microprobe analyses of glass to calculate temperatures of liquids erupted in 1955 and 1960. We then used the calculated proportions of stored and recharge components to estimate the temperature of the recharge components, and found those temperatures to be consistent with the temperature of the same magmas as they appeared at Kilauea's summit. Our studies reinforce conclusions reached in previous studies of Kilauea's magmatic plumbing. We infer that magma enters shallow storage beneath Kilauea's summit and also moves laterally into the fluid core of the East rift zone. During this process, if magmas of distinctive chemistry are present, they retain their chemical identity and the amount of cooling is comparable for magma transported either upward or laterally to eruption sites. Intrusions within a few kilometers of the surface cool and crystallize to produce fractionated magma. Magma mixing occurs both within bodies of previously fractionated magma and when new magma intersects a preexisting reservoir. Magma is otherwise prevented from mixing, either by wall-rock septa or by differing thermal and density characteristics of the successive magma batches.

  4. Evidence for a new shallow magma intrusion at La Soufrière of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles). Insights from long-term geochemical monitoring of halogen-rich hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemant, B.; Komorowski, J. C.; Dessert, C.; Michel, A.; Crispi, O.; Hammouya, G.; Beauducel, F.; De Chabalier, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    -1977 crisis. The contrasting behaviours of S- and Cl-bearing species in fumarolic gas and in thermal springs suggest that the current activity is the result of a new magma intrusion which was progressively emplaced at shallow depth since ~ 1992. Although it might still be evolving, the characteristics of this new intrusion indicate that it has already reached a magnitude similar to the intrusion that was emplaced during the 1976-1977 eruptive crisis. The assessment of potential hazards associated with evolution of the current unrest must consider the implications of recurrent intrusion and further pressurisation of the hydrothermal system on the likelihood of renewed phreatic explosive activity. Moreover, the role of hydrothermal pressurisation on the basal friction along low-strength layers within the upper part of the edifice must be evaluated with regards to partial flank collapse. At this stage enhanced monitoring, research, and data analysis are required to quantify the uncertainties related to future scenarios of renewed eruptive activity and magmatic evolution.

  5. Shallow intrusive directions of sheeted dikes in the Troodos ophiolite: Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and structural data

    SciTech Connect

    Staudigel, H.; Gee, J.; Tauxe, L. ); Varga, R.J. )

    1992-09-01

    Sheeted dikes play a central role in the formation of oceanic crust. It is commonly assumed that sheeted dikes intrude vertically upward, from elongated mid-ocean ridge (MOR) magma chambers, but there are no direct observational data bearing on this hypothesis. This assumption contrasts with the intrusive behavior of subaerial volcanoes where magmas rise into shallow central magma chambers that laterally feed vertically oriented dikes. The authors have studied intrusive directions of sheeted dikes in a structural analogue to oceanic crust, the Troodos ophiolite. Structural and magnetic fabric data of 65 dikes provide consistent results and suggest a broad distribution of shallow (< 20[degree]) to nearly vertical, upward magma-transport directions. These data suggest that horizontal emplacement has to be considered for sheeted dikes at MORs, implying more centralized MOR plumbing systems than previously thought. Such plumbing systems provide ample opportunity for complex mixing, fractionation, and contamination of MOR lavas in magma chambers and tabular magma-storage volumes. Whether the MOR magma supply is linear or centralized also has a fundamental effect on crustal accretion processes and the geometry of hydrothermal convection systems.

  6. Magma energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal energy contained in magmatic systems represents a huge potential resource. In the US, useful energy contained in molten and partially-molten magma within the upper 10 km of the crust has been estimated at 5 to 50 x 10/sup 22/ J (50,000 to 500,000 Quads). The objective of the Magma Energy Extraction Program is to determine the engineering feasibility of locating, accessing, and utilizing magma as a viable energy resource. This program follows the DOE/OBES-funded Magma Energy Research Project that concluded scientific feasibility of the magma energy concept. A primary long-range goal of this program is to conduct an energy extraction experiment directly in a molten, crustal magma body. Critical to determining engineering feasibility are several key technology tasks: (1) Geophysics - to obtain detailed definition of potential magma targets, (2) Geochemistry/Materials - to characterize the magma environment and select compatible engineering materials, (3) Drilling - to develop drilling and completion techniques for entry into a magma body, and (4) Energy Extraction - to develop heat extraction technology.

  7. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  8. Mixing of rhyolite, trachyte and basalt magma erupted from a vertically and laterally zoned reservoir, composite flow P1, Gran Canaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundt, Armin; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich

    1992-10-01

    The 14.1 Ma composite welded ignimbrite P1 (45 km3 DRE) on Gran Canaria is compositionally zoned from a felsic lower part to a basaltic top. It is composed of four component magmas mixed in vertically varying proportions: (1) Na-rhyolite (10 km3) zoned from crystal-poor to highly phyric; (2) a continuously zoned, evolved trachyte to sodic trachyandesite magma group (6 km3); (3) a minor fraction of Na-poor trachyandesite (<1 km3); and (4) nearly aphyric basalt (26 km3) zoned from 4.3 to 5.2 wt% MgO. We distinguish three sites and phases of mixing: (a) Mutual mineral inclusions show that mixing between trachytic and rhyolitic magmas occurred during early stages of their intratelluric crystallization, providing evidence for long-term residence in a common reservoir prior to eruption. This first phase of mixing was retarded by increasing viscosity of the rhyolite magma upon massive anorthoclase precipitation and accumulation. (b) All component magmas probably erupted through a ring-fissure from a common upper-crustal reservoir into which the basalt intruded during eruption. The second phase of mixing occurred during simultaneous withdrawal of magmas from the chamber and ascent through the conduit. The overall withdrawal and mixing pattern evolved in response to pre-eruptive chamber zonation and density and viscosity relationships among the magmas. Minor sectorial variations around the caldera reflect both varying configurations at the conduit entrance and unsteady discharge. (c) During each eruptive pulse, fragmentation and particulate transport in the vent and as pyroclastic flows caused additional mixing by reducing the length scale of heterogeneities. Based on considerations of magma density changes during crystallization, magma temperature constraints, and the pattern of withdrawal during eruption, we propose that eruption tapped the P1 magma chamber during a transient state of concentric zonation, which had resulted from destruction of a formerly layered zonation

  9. Magma energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the potential magma resources in the US and worldwide, and possible ways of exploiting this resource. Two target sites for field experiments to characterize magma targets are identified: Long Valley Caldera and Coso Hot Springs. 11 refs. (ACR)

  10. Variations in magma supply and magma partitioning: the role of tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira

    1999-11-01

    Magma supply rates for 200 years at Krafla and Lakagigar, Iceland, and those for 150 years at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, are estimated roughly, based on their geophysical and geological observations. A diagram that relates erupted volumes to eruption intervals at volcanoes under various tectonic settings is represented. These results lead to a new model that a large volume (1-10 km 3) of magma is supplied intermittently at a long interval (10 2-10 4 years) beneath volcanoes in rift zones, while magma is supplied continuously with oscillations or fluctuations beneath intraplate volcanoes. Chemical data such as the MgO wt.% of lava may be one indicator in evaluating the magma supply rates of Hawaiian volcanoes. Systematic variation with time in magma partitioning within a volcano or to the surface is obtained in comparisons between among migration patterns of eruption sites, cumulative supplied volumes, and the volume ratios of erupted to supplied magma at Krafla and Kilauea. The variations suggest that a magma plumbing system may act under self-control (regulating) system through stress as one system. In response to a change in magma supply rate, the system partitions magma horizontally into dikes or vertically toward the surface. A large magma supply rate promotes the vertical extent of a crack to result in an eruption with a large volume ratio of erupted to supplied magma. This tendency is supported by field observations of flood basalts. The partitioned magma as dike intrusions suppresses magma supply partially in the shallow crust. Using analog experiments on liquid-filled cracks in gelatin, this paper demonstrates fundamental processes for magma partitioning on the effect of magma supply and stress change by the partitioned magma. A dynamical system of two differential equations on magma supply rate and stress around a magma plumbing system is proposed, to understand the qualitative variations in magma supply rate imposed by tectonic settings.

  11. Mafic intrusions triggering eruptions in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2012-04-01

    The last two eruptions in Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011, were both provoked by an intrusion of more mafic magma into pre-existing magmatic system. Injection into the latter volcano, which is located in the main rift-zone of the island, above the presumed centre of the mantle plume and is the most active volcano of Iceland, has been gradual since the last eruption in 2004. In contrast, at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, one of the least active volcano in Iceland and located at the southern part of a propagating rift-zone where extensional tectonics are poorly developed, mafic magma intrusion occurred over less than a year. Beneath Eyjafjallajökull, a silicic intrusion at approximately 6 km depth was recharged with mantle derived alkali basalt that was injected into residual rhyolite from the penultimate eruption in the years 1821-23. The resulting magma mingIing process was highly complex, but careful sampling of tephra during the entire eruption allows the dynamics of the mingling process to be unravelled. Short-lived disequilibria between the gaseous nuclide 210Po and the much less volatile nuclide 210Pb, suggest that basalt accumulated beneath the silicic intrusion over approximately 100 days, or from early January 2010 until the onset of the explosive summit eruption on 14 April. Due to the degassing, crystal fractionation modified the composition of the injected mafic magma producing evolved Fe-and Ti-rich basalt, similar in composition to that of the nearby Katla volcano. This evolved basalt was intruded into the liquid part of the silicic intrusion only a few hours before the onset of the explosive summit eruption. The short time between intrusion and eruption led to the production of very heterogeneous (of basaltic, intermediate and silicic composition) and fine-grained tephra during the first days of explosive eruption. The fine grained tephra resulted from combined effects of magma fragmentation due to degassing of stiff magma rich in

  12. Use of a Resin-Bonded Bridge to Replace a Congenitally Missing Lateral Incisor: Treatment of "Intrusion" of Teeth.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Paul S; Bahat, Oded; Froum, Stuart J; Daftary, Fereidoun; Rosenthal, Howard; Feldman, Sylvan

    2016-07-01

    Craniofacial growth is an important factor to consider when providing dental implant treatment for adolescents to replace missing teeth. Ongoing longitudinal observation has demonstrated that such tooth replacements may appear intruded over time, because there may be ongoing downward and anterior movement of both the alveolus and the teeth at a rate exceeding that of the dental implant, which acts like an ankylosed unit. This case reports on a 23.5-year-old female patient who, at age 16, had orthodontics completed and was left with a space where the maxillary right lateral incisor was congenitally missing with the hope of future restoration with a dental implant. A resin-bonded bridge had been placed to fill the space in the interim. After approximately 7.5 years, the bridge loosened and the patient sought an implant option as its replacement. Clinical images revealed that the bridge, which contained two bonded wings, may have limited physiologic growth, causing both the maxillary right central incisor and canine to appear intruded compared with the left central incisor and canine. This case illustrates, at the very least, that growth and development may not be complete in females aged 16 years and that the way in which a missing tooth is replaced must be carefully considered given the impact that ongoing growth and development may have on restorative care. Moreover, further growth and development may also impact adults. PMID:27548400

  13. Granitic magma emplacement and deformation during early-orogenic syn-convergent transtension: The Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří; Chadima, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The Late Devonian Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif, was emplaced as a subhorizontal sheeted sill pluton into a transtension zone. The transtensional setting is documented by strong constrictional fabric, corroborated by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), with variably developed subhorizontal magmatic to solid-state foliation suggesting vertical shortening. Intrusive contacts of the granitoids with metapelitic screens and tapered sill tips indicate that magma wedging was the dominant process of sill propagation. The sills exhibit two intrusive styles, ranging from thin lit-par-lit injections to widely spaced meter-thick sills. These two styles are interpreted as reflecting variable viscosities of intruding magma where low-viscosity magma percolated along foliation planes whereas high-viscosity magma produced more localized thicker sills. We propose that the magma/host rock system in transtension must have evolved from initial crack tip propagation and vertical expansion due to new magma additions through conduit flow to ductile thinning after the magma input had ceased. The sill emplacement and their subsequent deformation are then interpreted as recording early-orogenic syn-convergent sinistral transtension along the rear side of an upper-crustal wedge, which was extruded both upward and laterally in response to subduction and continental underthrusting.

  14. Hindered settling and the formation of layered intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Baur, Albrecht; Elburg, Marlina A.; Lindhuber, Matthias J.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Soesoo, Alvar; van Milligen, Boudewijn P.; Walte, Nicolas P.

    2015-04-01

    Layered intrusions are characterized by (often repetitive) layering on a range of scales. Many explanations for the formation of such layering have been proposed over the past decades. We investigated the formation of "mats" by hindered crystal settling, a model that was first suggested by Lauder (1964). The interaction of sinking and rising crystals leads to the amplification of perturbations in crystal density within a magma chamber, a process similar to the formation of traffic jams in dense traffic (Bons et al., 2015). Once these "crystal traffic jams" form they constitute a barrier for further settling of crystals. Between these barriers, the magma evolves in a semi-closed system in which stratification may develop by gravitational sorting. Barriers, and therefore layers, form sequentially during inward cooling of the magma chamber. Barring later equilibration, mineralogical and geochemical trends within the layers are repetitive, but with variations due to the random process of initial perturbation formation. Layers can form in the transition between two end-member regimes: (1) in a fast cooling and/or viscous magma crystals cannot sink or float a significant distance and minerals are distributed homogeneously throughout the chamber; (2) in a slow cooling and/or low-viscosity magma crystals can quickly settle at the top and bottom of the chamber and crystals concentrations are never high enough to form "traffic jams". As a result, heavy and light minerals get fully separated in the chamber. Between these two end members, crystals can sink and float a significant distance, but not the whole height of the magma chamber before entrapment in "traffic jams". We illustrate the development of layers with numerical models and compare the results with the layered nepheline syenites (kakortokites) of the Ilímaussaq intrusion in SW Greenland. References: Bons, P.D., Baur, A., Elburg, M.A., Lindhuber, M.J., Marks, M.A.W., Soesoo, A., van Milligen, B.P., Walte, N.P. 2015

  15. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  16. Magma Reservoirs Feeding Giant Radiating Dike Swarms: Insights from Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosfils, E. B.; Ernst, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of lateral dike propagation from shallow magma reservoirs is quite common on the terrestrial planets, and examination of the giant radiating dike swarm population on Venus continues to provide new insight into the way these complex magmatic systems form and evolve. For example, it is becoming clear that many swarms are an amalgamation of multiple discrete phases of dike intrusion. This is not surprising in and of itself, as on Earth there is clear evidence that formation of both magma reservoirs and individual giant radiating dikes often involves periodic magma injection. Similarly, giant radiating swarms on Earth can contain temporally discrete subswarms defined on the basis of geometry, crosscutting relationships, and geochemical or paleomagnetic signatures. The Venus data are important, however, because erosion, sedimentation, plate tectonic disruption, etc. on Earth have destroyed most giant radiating dike swarm's source regions, and thus we remain uncertain about the geometry and temporal evolution of the magma sources from which the dikes are fed. Are the reservoirs which feed the dikes large or small, and what are the implications for how the dikes themselves form? Does each subswarm originate from a single, periodically reactivated reservoir, or do subswarms emerge from multiple discrete geographic foci? If the latter, are these discrete foci located at the margins of a single large magma body, or do multiple smaller reservoirs define the character of the magmatic center as a whole? Similarly, does the locus of magmatic activity change with time, or are all the foci active simultaneously? Careful study of giant radiating dike swarms on Venus is yielding the data necessary to address these questions and constrain future modeling efforts. Here, using giant radiating dike swarms from the Nemesis Tessera (V14) and Carson (V43) quadrangles as examples, we illustrate some of the dike swarm focal region diversity observed on Venus and briefly explore some

  17. Death Valley bright spot: a midcrustal magma body in the southern Great Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    de Voogd, B.; Serpa, L.; Brown, L.; Hauser, E.; Kaufman, S.; Oliver, J.; Troxel, B.W.; Willemin, J.; Wright, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    A previously unrecognized midcrustal magma body may have been detected by COCORP deep seismic reflection profiles in the Death Valley region of the southern Great Basin. High-amplitude, relatively broad-band reflections at 6 s (15 km) are attributed to partially molten material within a subhorizontal intrusion. This bright spot extends laterally at least 15 km beneath central Death Valley. A moderately dipping normal fault can be traced from the inferred magma chamber upward to a 690,000-yr-old basaltic cinder cone. The fault zone is inferred to have been a magma conduit during the formation of the cinder cone. Vertical variations in crustal reflection character suggest that the Death Valley magma body may have been emplaced along a zone of decoupling that separates a faulted brittle upper crust from a more ductile and/or intruded lower crust. The Death Valley bright spot is similar to reflections recorded by COCORP in 1977 in the Rio Grande rift, where both geophysical and geodetic evidence support the inference of a tabular magma chamber at 20-km depth.

  18. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  19. Drilling investigations of a young magmatic intrusion beneath Inyo domes, Long Valley Caldera, California: The effects of pressure, volatiles, and thermal history on chemical heterogeneity in magma systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel T.A.

    1987-09-28

    Systematic chemical and mineralogical variability occurs in samples from drill holes through Obsidian Dome, the conduit to the dome, and a nearby associated feeder dike. The drill hole samples that occur at the margins of the conduit and most of the lower portion of the dome are high-Ba, low-silica rhyolites, with two populations of phenocrysts, and represent commingled magmas. Whereas samples from the dike and upper portions of the dome are low-Ba, higher silica rhyolites, and do not reflect commingled magmas, samples from the center of the conduit are low-Ba, higher silica rhyolites that are only slightly mixed. A major part of the variability within the drill core samples of the dome and conduit reflects the juxtaposition, and commingling of two distinct magmas during their passage throughout the conduit.

  20. Continental mantle signature of Bushveld magmas and coeval diamonds.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stephen H; Shirey, Steven B

    2008-06-12

    The emplacement of the 2.05-billion-year-old Bushveld complex, the world's largest layered intrusion and platinum-group element (PGE) repository, is a singular event in the history of the Kaapvaal craton of southern Africa, one of Earth's earliest surviving continental nuclei. In the prevailing model for the complex's mineralization, the radiogenic strontium and osmium isotope signatures of Bushveld PGE ores are attributed to continental crustal contamination of the host magmas. The scale of the intrusion and lateral homogeneity of the PGE-enriched layers, however, have long been problematical for the crustal contamination model, given the typically heterogeneous nature of continental crust. Furthermore, the distribution of Bushveld magmatism matches that of seismically anomalous underlying mantle, implying significant interaction before emplacement in the crust. Mineral samples of the ancient 200-km-deep craton keel, encapsulated in macrodiamonds and entrained by proximal kimberlites, reveal the nature of continental mantle potentially incorporated by Bushveld magmas. Here we show that sulphide inclusions in approximately 2-billion-year-old diamonds from the 0.5-billion-year-old Venetia and 1.2-billion-year-old Premier kimberlites (on opposite sides of the complex) have initial osmium isotope ratios even more radiogenic than those of Bushveld sulphide ore minerals. Sulphide Re-Os and silicate Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope compositions indicate that continental mantle harzburgite and eclogite components, in addition to the original convecting mantle magma, most probably contributed to the genesis of both the diamonds and the Bushveld complex. Coeval diamonds provide key evidence that the main source of Bushveld PGEs is the mantle rather than the crust. PMID:18548068

  1. Zircon SHRIMP U Pb ages and in-situ Hf isotopic analysis for the Mesozoic intrusions in South Taihang, North China craton: Evidence for hybridization between mantle-derived magmas and crustal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Tian, W.; Jahn, B. M.; Chen, Z. C.

    2008-04-01

    The North China craton (NCC) was stabilized in Paleo-Proterozoic times, and the eastern part of it was remobilized in the Mesozoic, as is indicated by the presence of voluminous Mesozoic magmas in eastern NCC. In particular, the lithospheric mantle beneath eastern NCC was significantly thinned during the intense Mesozoic tectono-magmatic activity, which makes the NCC different from most other ancient cratons. The Mesozoic magmas may thus provide crucial evidence regarding the processes that transformed the NCC from craton to a tectonically active region. The South Taihang magmatic complex lies in the western part of the Mesozoic magmatic zone in the NCC. The complex falls into three main plutonic rocks: the Hongshan syenite, the Xishu gabbroic diorite-monzonite and the Wu'an monzonitic rocks. Zircon U-Pb dating reveals that the three plutonic rocks were emplaced contemporaneously at ˜ 132 Ma. In-situ Hf isotopic analyses for the dated zircons indicate that the Hongshan syenites show homogeneous ɛHf( t) values (- 10 to - 13) which are slightly lower than those (- 9.0) for the enriched subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), as revealed by zircons from mafic rocks that originated from melting of SCLM. This suggests that the parental magma to the syenites was likely derived from melting of the enriched SCLM and contaminated slightly by old lower continental crustal material during ascent. The Xishu and Wu'an gabbroic diorites to monzonitic rocks, however, show significantly varied Hf isotopic compositions, with ɛHf( t) = - 9.2 to - 16 and - 15.5 to - 24, respectively. The wide range of ɛHf( t) values for a single sample suggests that the Xishu and Wu'an plutons formed through a process of hybridization between enriched mantle-derived mafic magma and crustal components in variable proportions. This is supported by the textural and compositional disequilibrium of plagioclase phenocrysts from the two plutons. The Wu'an monzonitic rocks show lower ɛHf( t) values

  2. Magma flow pattern in dykes of the Azores revealed by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M. A.; Geoffroy, L.; Pozzi, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The localization of magma melting areas at the lithosphere bottom in extensional volcanic domains is poorly understood. Large polygenetic volcanoes of long duration and their associated magma chambers suggest that melting at depth may be focused at specific points within the mantle. To validate the hypothesis that the magma feeding a mafic crust, comes from permanent localized crustal reservoirs, it is necessary to map the fossilized magma flow within the crustal planar intrusions. Using the AMS, we obtain magmatic flow vectors from 34 alkaline basaltic dykes from São Jorge, São Miguel and Santa Maria islands in the Azores Archipelago, a hot-spot related triple junction. The dykes contain titanomagnetite showing a wide spectrum of solid solution ranging from Ti-rich to Ti-poor compositions with vestiges of maghemitization. Most of the dykes exhibit a normal magnetic fabric. The orientation of the magnetic lineation k1 axis is more variable than that of the k3 axis, which is generally well grouped. The dykes of São Jorge and São Miguel show a predominance of subhorizontal magmatic flows. In Santa Maria the deduced flow pattern is less systematic changing from subhorizontal in the southern part of the island to oblique in north. These results suggest that the ascent of magma beneath the islands of Azores is predominantly over localized melting sources and then collected within shallow magma chambers. According to this concept, dykes in the upper levels of the crust propagate laterally away from these magma chambers thus feeding the lava flows observed at the surface.

  3. Emplacement of magma in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malthe-Sorenssen, A.; Planke, S.

    2002-12-01

    Sheet-like intrusive complexes are commonly present in sedimentary basins on rifted volcanic margins. Such sill complexes have important impact on petroleum maturation, migration and trapping. We are currently completing an integrated seismic, field and theoretical study on the petroleum implications of sill intrusions. One aspect of this study has been to get new understanding of the magma emplacement processes based on integrated numerical modeling and geophysical/geological mapping activities. Extensive sill complexes have been identified and mapped in the NE Atlantic and Karoo basins based on seismic, borehole, remote sensing and field data. Early Tertiary intrusive complexes are present in the Voring and More basins offshore mid-Norway. Similar sill complexes are exposed onshore in Cretaceous to Permian age sedimentary sequences on the conjugate central-east Greenland margin. A voluminous Jurassic age intrusive complex is well exposed in the Permian to Jurassic Karoo basin as the erosionally strong dolerites form an impressive mountainous landscape in large parts of South Africa. The sheet intrusions are found at paleodepths of 0-6 km. Deep intrusions are generally long and smooth, whereas shallow intrusions are rough, transgressive and commonly saucer-shaped. Saucer-shaped intrusions are present in unstructured basin segments. The diameter of the saucers increases with depth. Structured basin segments are characterized by a variety of sill complex geometries. The intrusions generally mimic the basin structure. In nature, magma is emplaced in internally pressurized, planar cracks. The emplacement process is controlled by the local stress field and complex interactions of buoyancy forces, host rock resistance to fracture, elastic deformation of country rock, magma hydrostatic pressure and fluctuating magma pressure, magma viscosity and weight of overburden. We have developed a discrete element model to study the emplacement process. Results from the modeling

  4. Geophysical observations of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 2. Constraints on the magma supply during November 1975-September 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Anderson, L.A.; Eaton, G.P.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Lipman, P.W.; Lockwood, J.P.; Okamura, R.T.; Puniwai, G.S.; Sako, M.K.; Yamashita, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Following a 22-month hiatus in eruptive activity, Kilauea volcano extruded roughly 35 ?? 106 m3 of tholeiitic basalt from vents along its middle east rift zone during 13 September-1 October, 1977. The lengthy prelude to this eruption began with a magnitude 7.2 earthquake on 29 November, 1975, and included rapid summit deflation episodes in June, July, and August 1976 and February 1977. Synthesis of seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, and electrical self-potential observations suggests the following model for this atypical Kilauea eruptive cycle. Rapid summit deflation initiated by the November 1975 earthquake reflected substantial migration of magma from beneath the summit region of Kilauea into the east and southwest rift zones. Simultaneous leveling and microgravity observations suggest that 40-90 ?? 106 m3 of void space was created within the summit magma chamber as a result of the earthquake. If this volume was filled by magma from depth before the east rift zone intrusive event of June 1976, the average rate of supply was 6-13 ?? 106 m3/month, a rate that is consistent with the value of 9 ?? 106 m3/month suggested from observations of long-duration Kilauea eruptions. Essentially zero net vertical change was recorded at the summit during the 15-month period beginning with the June 1976 intrusion and ending with the September 1977 eruption. This fact suggests that most magma supplied from depth during this interval was eventually delivered to the east rift zone, at least in part during four rapid summit deflation episodes. Microearthquake epicenters migrated downrift to the middle east rift zone for the first time during the later stages of the February 1977 intrusion, an occurrence presumably reflecting movement of magma into the eventual eruptive zone. This observation was confirmed by tilt surveys in May 1977 that revealed a major inflation center roughly 30 km east of the summit in an area of anomalous steaming and forest kill first noted in March 1976. ?? 1980.

  5. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio, water content and Fe3 +/Fe2 + in coexisting amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in volcanic rocks can provide insight into shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes such as vesiculation, and lava drainback with mixing into less devolatilized magma that erupts later in a volcanic sequence. We studied four ~ 35 ka and younger eruption sequences (i.e. Kings Creek, Lassen Peak, Chaos Crags, and 1915) at the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), California, where intrusion of crystal-rich silicic magma mushes by mafic magmas is inferred from the varying abundances of mafic magmatic inclusions (MMIs) in the silicic volcanic rocks. Types and relative proportions of reacted and unreacted hydrous phenocryst populations are evaluated with accompanying chemical and H isotope changes. Biotite phenocrysts were more susceptible to rehydration in older vesicular glassy volcanic rocks than coexisting amphibole phenocrysts. Biotite and magnesiohornblende phenocrysts toward the core of the Lassen Peak dome are extensively dehydroxylated and reacted from prolonged exposure to high temperature, low pressure, and higher fO2 conditions from post-emplacement cooling. In silicic volcanic rocks not affected by alteration, biotite phenocrysts are often relatively more dehydroxylated than are magnesiohornblende phenocrysts of similar size; this is likely due to the ca 10 times larger overall bulk H diffusion coefficient in biotite. A simplified model of dehydrogenation in hydrous phenocrysts above reaction closure temperature suggests that eruption and quench of magma ascended to the surface in a few hours is too short a time for substantial H loss from amphibole. In contrast, slowly ascended magma can have extremely dehydrogenated and possibly dehydrated biotite, relatively less dehydrogenated magnesiohornblende and reaction rims on both phases. Eruptive products containing the highest proportions of mottled dehydrogenated crystals could indicate that within a few days

  6. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, S. J.; Feeley, T. C.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio, water content and Fe3 +/Fe2 + in coexisting amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in volcanic rocks can provide insight into shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes such as vesiculation, and lava drainback with mixing into less devolatilized magma that erupts later in a volcanic sequence. We studied four ~ 35 ka and younger eruption sequences (i.e. Kings Creek, Lassen Peak, Chaos Crags, and 1915) at the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), California, where intrusion of crystal-rich silicic magma mushes by mafic magmas is inferred from the varying abundances of mafic magmatic inclusions (MMIs) in the silicic volcanic rocks. Types and relative proportions of reacted and unreacted hydrous phenocryst populations are evaluated with accompanying chemical and H isotope changes. Biotite phenocrysts were more susceptible to rehydration in older vesicular glassy volcanic rocks than coexisting amphibole phenocrysts. Biotite and magnesiohornblende phenocrysts toward the core of the Lassen Peak dome are extensively dehydroxylated and reacted from prolonged exposure to high temperature, low pressure, and higher fO2 conditions from post-emplacement cooling. In silicic volcanic rocks not affected by alteration, biotite phenocrysts are often relatively more dehydroxylated than are magnesiohornblende phenocrysts of similar size; this is likely due to the ca 10 times larger overall bulk H diffusion coefficient in biotite. A simplified model of dehydrogenation in hydrous phenocrysts above reaction closure temperature suggests that eruption and quench of magma ascended to the surface in a few hours is too short a time for substantial H loss from amphibole. In contrast, slowly ascended magma can have extremely dehydrogenated and possibly dehydrated biotite, relatively less dehydrogenated magnesiohornblende and reaction rims on both phases. Eruptive products containing the highest proportions of mottled dehydrogenated crystals could indicate that within a few days

  7. Volcanic Eruption and Intrusion Processes on 4 Vesta: A Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, K.; Wilson, L.

    2012-03-01

    A new analysis supports our earlier predictions of sizes of lava flows and pyroclast deposits on Vesta, but argues against a magma ocean, instead suggesting eruptions were fed by magma from large sill-like intrusions at the base of the lithosphere.

  8. Magmatic intrusions in the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Thorey, C.

    2015-10-01

    The lunar highlands are very old, with ages covering a timespan between 4.5 to 4.2 Gyr, and probably formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean. The lunar crust provides thus an invaluable evidence of the geological and magmatic processes occurring in the first times of the terrestrial planets history. According to the last estimates from the GRAIL mission, the lunar primary crust is particularly light and relatively thick [1] This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the dense primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basin: at least part of the crust must have been removed for the magma to reach the surface. However, the trajectory of the magma from the mantle to the surface is unknown. Using a model of magma emplacement below an elastic overlying layer with a flexural wavelength Λ, we characterize the surface deformations induced by the presence of shallow magmatic intrusions. We demonstrate that, depending on its size, the intrusion can show two different shapes: a bell shape when its radius is smaller than 4 times Λ or a flat top with small bended edges if its radius is larger than 4 times Λ[2]. These characteristic shapes for the intrusion result in characteristic deformations at the surface that also depend on the topography of the layer overlying the intrusion [3].Using this model we provide evidence of the presence of intrusions within the crust of the Moon as surface deformations in the form of low-slope lunar domes and floor-fractured craters. All these geological features have morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. Further more,at floor-fractured craters, the deformation is contained within the crater interior, suggesting that the overpressure at the origin of magma ascent and intrusion was less than the pressure due to the weight of the crust removed by

  9. Lunar magma transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    An outline of magma transport theory relevant to the evolution of a possible Lunar Magma Ocean and the origin and transport history of the later phase of mare basaltic volcanism is presented. A simple model is proposed to evaluate the extent of fractionation as magma traverses the cold lunar lithosphere. If Apollo green glasses are primitive and have not undergone significant fractionation en route to the surface, then mean ascent rates of 10 m/s and cracks of widths greater than 40 m are indicated. Lunar tephra and vesiculated basalts suggest that a volatile component plays a role in eruption dynamics. The predominant vapor species appear to be CO CO2, and COS. Near the lunar surface, the vapor fraction expands enormously and vapor internal energy is converted to mixture kinetic energy with the concomitant high-speed ejection of vapor and pyroclasts to form lunary fire fountain deposits such as the Apollo 17 orange and black glasses and Apollo 15 green glass.

  10. Taxonomy Of Magma Mixing I: Magma Mixing Metrics And The Thermochemistry Of Magma Hybridization Illuminated With A Toy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Schmidt, J.

    2013-12-01

    The rock record preserves abundant evidence of magma mixing in the form of mafic enclaves and mixed pumice in volcanic eruptions, syn-plutonic mafic or silicic dikes and intrusive complexes, replenishment events recorded in cumulates from layered intrusions, and crystal scale heterogeneity in phenocrysts and cumulate minerals. These evidently show that magma mixing in conjunction with crystallization (perfect fractional or incremental batch) is a first-order petrogenetic process. Magma mixing (sensu lato) occurs across a spectrum of mixed states from magma mingling to complete blending. The degree of mixing is quantified (Oldenburg et al, 1989) using two measures: the statistics of the segregation length scales (scale of segregation, L*) and the spatial contrast in composition (C) relative to the mean C (intensity of segregation, I). Mingling of dissimilar magmas produces a heterogeneous mixture containing discrete regions of end member melts and populations of crystals with L* = finite and I > 0. When L*→∞ and I→0 , the mixing magmas become hybridized and can be studied thermodynamically. Such hybrid magma is a multiphase equilibrium mixture of homogeneous melt, unzoned crystals and possible bubbles of a supercritical fluid. Here, we use a toy model to elucidate the principles of magma hybridization in a binary system (components A and B with pure crystals of α or β phase) with simple thermodynamics to build an outcome taxonomy. This binary system is not unlike the system Anorthite-Diopside, the classic low-pressure model basalt system. In the toy model, there are seven parameters describing the phase equilibria (eutectic T and X, specific heat, melting T and fusion enthalpies of α and β crystals) and five variables describing the magma mixing conditions: end member bulk compositions, temperatures and fraction of resident magma (M) that blends with recharge (R) magma to form a single equilibrium hybrid magma. There are 24 possible initial states when M

  11. Magma Plumbing and Emplacement Mechanisms within Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Nick; Magee, Craig; Holford, Simon; Jackson, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    In recent years our understanding of sub-volcanic magmatic plumbing systems has been revolutionised by the study of hydrocarbon industry 3D seismic reflection datasets from offshore sedimentary basins. In particular, 3D seismic reflection data has provided important insights into sheet intrusion geometry and emplacement mechanisms as well as linkages and magma flow between multiple intrusions within sill-complexes. However, even high-quality 3D seismic reflection datasets have a limit to what they can resolve; thus, to allow a better understanding of detailed emplacement mechanisms and to test the validity of subsurface-based interpretations, it is critical to bridge the resolution gap that exists between seismic and outcrop datasets. Magmatic sheet (sill) intrusions contribute significantly to the upper crustal magma transport network. The emplacement mechanism of the magmatic sheets controls the final geometry of the intrusions and the characteristics of host rock deformation. Previous observations have highlighted the preponderance of brittle structures (e.g. intrusive steps and broken brides) associated with shallow-level sheet intrusions. However, recent studies have suggested that non-brittle host rock behaviour also occurs, particularly related to the formation of magma fingers during shallow-level sill intrusion. Importantly, these structures can provide insights into emplacement style and magma flow directions. Here, we examine both brittle and non-brittle intrusion mechanisms and structures using both field- and 3D seismic-based observations from a series of widespread and variable magmatic systems. Non-brittle emplacement (i.e. magma finger and lobe development) appears to be primarily associated with viscous flow of the host rock during intrusion and is therefore intimately linked to the contemporaneous host rock rheology as well as magma dynamics. Purely brittle and non-brittle emplacement processes are found to be end members with many intrusions

  12. The differentiation of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, R. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    1987-04-01

    Previous interpretations of the Skaergaard Intrusion suggested that differentiation involved extreme iron-enrichment but no silica-enrichment until a very late stage. This model is difficult to reconcile with petrological and geochemical evidence, with the behaviour of tholeiitic volcanic suites and with phase equilibria. We propose that the Skaergaard magma evolved on a trend of pronounced silica-enrichment after cumulus magnetite appeared at the top of the Lower Zone. At that stage, the magma was of ferrobasaltic composition with close to 50% SiO2. The Middle and Upper Zones of the intrusion dominantly represent crystal accumulation during differentiation from ferrobasalt through iron-rich basaltic andesite and icelandite to rhyolite, a fractionation sequence common in tholeiitic volcanic provinces. This interpretation requires re-appraisal of the physical processes responsible for the differentiation. In particular, residual liquids became lower in density with fractionation and would have caused the Skaergaard magma chamber to have become compositionally zoned.

  13. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  14. Impact of Melt Segregation on Genesis of Intermediate and Silicic Magmas in Deep Crustal Hot Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, J.; Jackson, M.; Sparks, R. S.; Blundy, J.

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of a system in which hot magmatic sills are repeatedly intruded into cool country rock at depth in the crust is modelled in one dimension. The model couples that of Annen et al. (2002), describing heat transfer and phase change during repeated sill intrusions, with that of Jackson et al. (2003), describing heat transfer, phase change and associated buoyancy driven melt segregation and compaction of the solid matrix following a single sill intrusion. The aim of the work is to investigate the impact of melt segregation on melt fraction and composition during repeated sill intrusions in deep crustal hot zones. The model developed uses an enthalpy based method whilst solving for temperature. This allows complex melting behaviour, including isothermal and non-linear relations, to be parameterised and included. The emplacement of hot, mantle-derived basaltic sills causes the pre-existing country rock to warm, which allows later sills to remain partially molten over timescales which are long enough to facilitate melt segregation processes. At fast emplacement rates, a large partially molten zone is generated above the intrusions into which melt can percolate, leading to the generation of high porosity melt lenses which can mobilise and form magmas. At slower emplacement rates, the hot zone evolves differently depending upon whether the intruded sills accumulate by over- or under-accretion. Under-accretion of sills does not produce a large partially molten zone in the overlying country rock, so the melt is contained within the intrusion zone. Over-accretion continues to melt the overlying country rock for all emplacement rates. Two types of melt are present in the system, crustal melt formed via partial melting, and residual melt formed from the crystallisation of the intruded basalt. The mobilised magmas comprise varying degrees of crustal and residual melts which, alongside with temperature and depth of melting, will determine their composition. The process

  15. Temporal Evolution of Volcanic and Plutonic Magmas Related to Porphyry Copper Ores Based on Zircon Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, J. H.; Lee, R. G.; Wooden, J. L.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Porphyry Cu (Mo-Au) and epithermal Au-Ag ores are globally associated with shallow hydrous, strongly oxidized, and sulfur-rich arc intrusions. In many localities, long-lived magmatism includes evolution from early andesitic volcanic (v) and plutonic (p) rocks to later dacitic or rhyolitic compositions dominated by plutons. We compare zircon compositions from three igneous suites with different time spans: Yerington, USA (1 m.y., p>v), El Salvador, Chile (4 m.y., p>v), and Yanacocha, Peru (6 m.y., v>p). At Yerington granite dikes and ores formed in one event, at ES in 2 to 3 events spanning 3 m.y., and at Yanacocha in 6 events spanning 5 m.y. At both ES and Yanacocha, high-Al amphiboles likely crystallized at high temperature in the mid-crust and attest to deep magmas that periodically recharged the shallow chambers. At Yanacocha, these amphiboles contain anhydrite inclusions that require magmas were sulfur-rich and strongly oxidized (~NNO+2). The Ti-in-zircon geothermometer provides estimates of 920º to 620º C for zircon crystallization, and records both core to rim cooling and locally high temperature rim overgrowths. Ore-related silicic porphyries yield near-solidus crystallization temperatures of 750-650°C consistent with low zircon saturation temperatures. The latter zircons have large positive Ce/Ce* and small negative Eu/Eu*≥0.4 anomalies attesting to strongly oxidized conditions (Ballard et al., 2001), which we propose result from crystallization and SO2 loss to the magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid (Dilles et al., 2015). The Hf, REE, Y, U, and Th contents of zircons are diverse in the magma suites, and Th/U vs Yb/Gd plots suggest a dominant role of crystal fractionation with lesser roles for both crustal contamination and mixing with high temperature deep-sourced mafic magma. Ce/Sm vs Yb/Gd plots suggest that magma REE contents at <900°C are dominated by early crystallization of hornblende and apatite, and late crystallization (~<780°C) of titanite

  16. Comparative Magma Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether the Earth ever passed through a magma ocean stage is of considerable interest. Geochemical evidence strongly suggests that the Moon had a magma ocean and the evidence is mounting that the same was true for Mars. Analyses of martian (SNC) meteorites have yielded insights into the differentiation history of Mars, and consequently, it is interesting to compare that planet to the Earth. Three primary features of Mars contrast strongly to those of the Earth: (i) the extremely ancient ages of the martian core, mantle, and crust (about 4.55 b.y.); (ii) the highly depleted nature of the martian mantle; and (iii) the extreme ranges of Nd isotopic compositions that arise within the crust and depleted mantle. The easiest way to explain the ages and diverse isotopic compositions of martian basalts is to postulate that Mars had an early magma ocean. Cumulates of this magma ocean were later remelted to form the SNC meteorite suite and some of these melts assimilated crustal materials enriched in incompatible elements. The REE pattern of the crust assimilated by these SNC magmas was LREE enriched. If this pattern is typical of the crust as a whole, the martian crust is probably similar in composition to melts generated by small degrees of partial melting (about 5%) of a primitive source. Higher degrees of partial melting would cause the crustal LREE pattern to be essentially flat. In the context of a magma ocean model, where large degrees of partial melting presumably prevailed, the crust would have to be dominated by late-stage, LREE-enriched residual liquids. Regardless of the exact physical setting, Nd and W isotopic evidence indicates that martian geochemical reservoirs must have formed early and that they have not been efficiently remixed since. The important point is that in both the Moon and Mars we see evidence of a magma ocean phase and that we recognize it as such. Several lines of theoretical inference point to an early Earth that was also hot

  17. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  18. Fractionation and magma mixing within intruding dike swarm: evidence from the Miocene Shitara-Otoge igneous complex, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, Nobuo

    2000-05-01

    The analysis of intrusion pattern and petrological character of the central dike swarm in the Miocene igneous complex of the Shitara district, central Japan clarified that magma mixing between a strongly differentiated magma and a less-differentiated magma occurred within a dike swarm. The dike rocks have a wide compositional variation ranging from 5.5 to 0.7 wt.% MgO. They are divided into P1- and P2-types. The P2-type rocks provide many lines of evidence for magma mixing such as reversely zoned phenocrysts, bimodal composition distribution, and dissolution texture, whereas P1-type rocks do not. Phenocryst compositions of P2-type suggest that the magma mixing occurred between a less-fractionated phenocryst-poor magma and a strongly fractionated crystal-rich magma. Concentration ratios among incompatible elements show that the mixing end components were derived from a similar parental magma common to P1-type by fractional crystallization in a near closed system. The dikes with evidence for the magma mixing (P2-type) are distributed only in the southern marginal part of the dike swarm, whereas P1-type dikes do not show any such localization. The distribution and the intrusion direction of the dikes indicate a nearly horizontal outward flow of magmas in the southern part of the dike swarm and accompanied magma mixing in the dike during intrusion. The fractionated end component is inferred to be a product of crystal fractionation within small and ephemeral magma pockets in the dike swarm. Magma mixing is thought to have occurred when a newly intruded dike ruptured the magma reservoir. The frequency of magma mixing was controlled mainly by competition between the lifetime of ephemeral magma reservoir and frequency of dike intrusions. The condition of magma mixing was satisfied only in the southern part of the dike swarm affected by the preceding volcanic activities.

  19. Lateral variation in oxygen fugacity and halogen contents in early Cretaceous magmas in Jiaodong area, East China: Implication for triggers of the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Peng-Li; Wang, Xue; Zhong, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-04-01

    Pacific subduction has been suggested as the trigger of the destruction of the North China Craton, but evidence for it remains ambiguous. To further investigate this issue, we studied Wulian pyroxene monzonite (123 ± 1 Ma) in the west and Rushan gabbro-diorite (115 ± 1 Ma) in the east of the Sulu orogen, East China. The rocks of both locations are characterized by low TiO2 but high SiO2 and K2O, fractionated REE patterns with notable negative Ta-Nb-Ti anomalies, and by high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and strongly negative εNd (t) and εHf (t) values. These geochemical and isotopic characteristics can be interpreted to be formed by partial melting of enriched lithosphere mantle refertilized by recycled crustal materials that were associated with the Sulu orogeny. Oxygen fugacities of the Rushan gabbro-diorites, estimated based on magnetite-ilmenite equilibration, are significantly higher than those of Wulian pyroxene monzonite. This lateral difference is mirrored by lower F and F/Cl but higher Cl in biotite in the Rushan gabbro-diorite compared to Wulian pyroxene monzonite. All these data suggest a spatially heterogeneous Cretaceous mantle source in terms of halogens and water contents beneath the Sulu orogen, which was most likely caused by the subduction processes of the Pacific plate. H2O-rich fluid in the mantle beneath the east of the Sulu orogen closer to the mantle wedge was prominently from early dehydration of subducted slab at shallow depth, while F-bearing fluid to further west was released by dehydrated deeper slab or stagnant oceanic slab within the mantle transition zone.

  20. Igneous Structures, Magma Transport, and Crystallization in Simple and Complex Plumbing Systems of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srogi, L.; Martinson, P.; Willis, K. V.; Kulp, R.; Pollock, M.; Lutz, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies showing the importance of sills and sheets in crustal magmatic plumbing at rifted continental margins prompt re-examination of the Mesozoic Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, eastern North America. The Newark-Gettysburg Basins in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, contain Jurassic diabase (dolerite) intrusions and lava flows. Most intrusions are considered a single sheet or saucer sill. However, at the W end of the Newark Basin the Jacksonwald Syncline (JS) includes small plutons, sills, dikes, and a lava flow; and the Morgantown Pluton (MP) is a connected network of sills and inclined sheets with the 250-m-wide Birdsboro Dike forming the E side. After crystallization most intrusions were tilted or folded and dip/plunge toward the NW border faults. In the SE part of the MP, small magmatic pipes (originally vertical) and modal layering were tilted 20 degrees NNW, similar to plunge of the JS. If tilting was due to movement along the border faults then the basins expose cross-sections of a few kms from shallower (N/NW) to deeper (S/SE) crustal levels. There is a difference of 3.5-6 km in paleo-depth between basal S/SE units and upper N/NW units within JS, MP, and York Haven Sheet, consistent with estimated thicknesses of Triassic sedimentary rocks. Basal cumulus and upper Fe-rich and granophyric zones occur in most Newark-Gettysburg Basin intrusions implying similar magma transport and crystallization processes regardless of plumbing geometry. MELTS modeling of early orthopyroxene crystallization at high P suggests that opx-rich diabase marks magma feeder locations; at least 2 feeders at different emplacement levels occur in the MP. Modally-layered opx cumulus in the MP basal sill accumulated from dozens of m-scale magma pulses with lateral migration of most liquid. Distributions of distinctive phenocrysts provide insights into magma transport and crystal sorting. MP and JS chilled margins and lava flows have almost identical REE and other

  1. Evidence for magma convection to shallow depths during quiescent degassing of Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Mike, Burton; Giovanni, Salerno Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    degassing relative to HCl indicates a process of deep intrusion, in which magma rather than ascending to the shallow (~3 km depth) conduit is stored at depth where it may later erupt. On the contrary, reduced HCl degassing indicates a reduction in magma supply to the uppermost 500m of the magmatic system, which may occur during a shallow intrusion. Over the investigated period we observed both these processes, but overall the system remained very close to bulk degassing, suggesting that such intrusions are temporary deviations from a system which can efficiently degas essentially all the magma that enters the uppermost 4-5km of the feeding system.

  2. Magma paths at Piton de la Fournaise volcano: a synthesis of Hawaiian and Etnean rift zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Chaput, Marie; Famin, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    triggered by shallow sill intrusions below the east flank. We propose that the sub-vertical magma intrusions along the perpendicular summit rift zones, sill intrusions and subsequent magma injections along the outer rift zones are controlled by cycles of stress permutations. Recurrent dyke injections along the summit rift zone in an extensional stress field reduce the deviatoric stress until a switch of the axes of principal stresses and a sill intrusion. The related flank lateral destabilization restores the extensional stress field and initiates a new cycle of stress permutations. To sum up, rift zones of Piton de la Fournaise present strong geometrical and dynamical differences. On the one hand, the lower plumbing system feeds rift zones showing striking similarities to those developed in Hawaii during the alkaline postshield stage. On the other hand, the rift zones connected to upper plumbing system and the related volcano flank movement can be compared to the eruptive and east flank dynamics of Mount Etna.

  3. Granite provenance and intrusion in arcs: Evidence from diverse zircon types in Big Bear Lake Intrusive Suite, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. P.; Wooden, J. L.; Mueller, P. A.; Economos, R. C.

    2016-03-01

    Textural, geochemical and hafnium isotopic data from diverse zircon domains allow discrimination between source and emplacement-level processes in the formation of a large-volume calc-alkalic intrusion. The Big Bear Lake Intrusive Suite is composed of satellite plutons and a main intrusive mass zoned from mafic granodiorites at its margins to central biotite ± muscovite granites, and is estimated to be 7-10 km thick and have a volume of 3500-5100 km3. Zircons in the main intrusive mass and in the satellite plutons are composed of one or more of four domain types: (a) Archean to Proterozoic premagmatic domains and (b) Mesozoic premagmatic domains, both occurring as cores, which are overgrown by (c) luminescent early magmatic domains with low U + Th and relatively high estimated crystallization temperatures and (d) high U + Th main phase magmatic domains. U-Pb zircon geochronology indicates the main intrusive mass was emplaced 78-77 Ma, preceded by satellite plutons intruded 85-81 Ma. Zircon hafnium isotope ratios span 54 epsilon units, recording age and compositional diversity in magma sources and magma batches. We propose a model for assembly of the intrusive suite involving mixing between lithospheric mantle-derived magma and a hybrid lower crustal source, followed by incremental emplacement of magmas in the upper crust at ~ 0.003-0.005 km3 my- 1. This flux rate was sufficiently rapid to generate a large volume of mobile magma that underwent differentiation by limited and imperfect fractional crystallization to form the granodioritic margins and central granites. The estimated flux rate is several times higher than that estimated for other Cretaceous, incrementally emplaced intrusive suites in the California arc, indicating that both source-level and emplacement-level processes played roles in forming these intrusions.

  4. Reconstructing magma reservoir dynamics from field evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, R.; Muntener, O.; Ulmer, P.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructing the dynamics within magma reservoirs during and after emplacement greatly enhance our understanding of their formation and evolution. By determining the length and timescales over which magma remains mobile within magma reservoirs, fluxes of magma that is possibly extractable can be quantified, providing a link between plutonic and volcanic systems, and constraints on the likelihood of a pluton feeding volcanic eruptions. However, the general absence of marker beds and uncertainties regarding at which crystal fractions super-solidus foliation patterns are recorded make it difficult to reconstruct and quantify deformation inside plutons, especially the deformation that occurred at low crystal fractions. Here we present a case study of the Listino Ring Structure (LRS) of the Adamello Batholith in N-Italy, a 300-500 m-wide semi-circular zone of intensely foliated tonalite containing abundant evidence for magmatic deformation and magma mingling (Brack, 1984). The differences in the interaction between felsic and mafic magmas recorded in the form of mafic dikes, sheets and enclaves can be used to determine spatial and/or temporal differences of magma rheology during evolution of the reservoir. Detailed field mapping shows a clear difference in intrusion style between the southern and eastern sides of the LRS, as mafic magma intrudes into different felsic host magmas. An attempt is made to quantify these differences in terms of the physical state of the host magmas, using a variety of analyses pertaining to the breakup of mafic dikes into enclaves, the assimilation of phenocrysts from the host magma by the mafic magma, and the back-veining of mafic dikes and enclaves. The common component of these analyses is a parametrization of the phase petrology of the magmas as a function of temperature, which allows for the determination of melt fraction and composition at super-solidus conditions, from which physical properties such as density and viscosity can be

  5. Composite synvolcanic intrusions associated with Precambrian VMS-related hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Alan G.

    2003-06-01

    Large subvolcanic intrusions are recognized within most Precambrian VMS camps. Of these, 80% are quartz diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite composite intrusions. The VMS camps spatially associated with composite intrusions account for >90% of the aggregate sulfide tonnage of all the Precambrian, intrusion-related VMS camps. These low-alumina, low-K, and high-Na composite intrusions contain early phases of quartz diorite and tonalite, followed by more voluminous trondhjemite. They have a high proportion of high silica (>74% SiO2) trondhjemite which is compositionally similar to the VMS-hosting rhyolites within the volcanic host-rock successions. The quartz-diorite and possibly tonalite phases follow tholeiitic fractionation trends whereas the trondhjemites fall within the composition field for primitive crustal melts. These transitional M-I-type primitive intrusive suites are associated with extensional regimes within oceanic-arc environments. Subvolcanic composite intrusions related to the Archean Sturgeon Lake and Noranda, and Paleoproterozoic Snow Lake VMS camps range in volume from 300 to 1,000 km3. Three have a sill morphology with strike lengths between 15 and 22 km and an average thickness between 1,500 and 2,000 m. The fourth has a gross stock-like shape. The VMS deposits are principally restricted to the volcanic strata above the strike length of the intrusions, as are areally extensive, thin exhalite units. The composite intrusions contain numerous internal phases which are commonly clustered within certain parts of the composite intrusion. These clusters underlie eruptive centers surrounded by areas of hydrothermal alteration and which contain most of the VMS deposits. Early quartz-diorite and tonalite phases appear to have intruded in rapid succession. Evidence includes gradational contacts, magma mixing and disequilibrium textures. They appear to have been emplaced as sill-dike swarms. These early phases are present as pendants and xenoliths within later

  6. Fate of a perched crystal layer in a magma ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    The pressure gradients and liquid compressibilities of deep magma oceans should sustain the internal flotation of native crystals owing to a density crossover between crystal and liquid. Olivine at upper mantle depths near 250 km is considered. The behavior of a perched crystal layer is part of the general question concerning the fate of any transient crystal carried away from a cooling surface, whether this be a planetary surface or the roof of an intrusive magma body. For magma bodies thicker than a few hundred meters at modest crustal depths, the major cooling surface is the roof even when most solidification occurs at the floor. Importation of cool surroundings must also be invoked for the generation of a perched crystal layer in a magma ocean, but in this case the perched layer is deeply embedded in the hot part of the magma body, and far away from any cooling surface. Other aspects of this study are presented.

  7. Catastrophic erosion of Hellas basin rim on Mars induced by magmatic intrusion into volatile-rich rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Kargel, J.S.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Hare, T.M.; Hoffman, N.

    2002-01-01

    Malea and Hesperia Plana form large sectors of the rim of Hellas basin that display partly eroded volcanic shields and plains. These regions have topographic profiles that appear to be several hundred meters lower than those of adjacent rim sectors and lack prominent massifs of remnant basement that would be expected to stand above the lava plains. We interpret that before the volcanic edifices were constructed, these regions were denuded by an early stage of voluminous sill intrusion into friable, volatile-rich impact breccia. Magma-volatile interactions may have resulted in catastrophic generation of debris flows deposited into the adjacent basin, particularly if CO2 were involved. Later, lavas covered the eroded terrain; in turn, the lavas were eroded locally by volatile interactions. Across Mars, huge channel systems, erosional features in volcanic terranes, and vast layered deposits may be due to magma-volatile interactions.

  8. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]<150 ppm) and thus low calculated zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrnsat). Within the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak, TzrnTi values are predominantly at or below average Tzrnsat, and there is no apparent correlation between age and TzrnTi. At temperatures appropriate for granodiorite/tonalite melt generation (at or above biotite dehydration; >825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically <200 ppm and frequently 100-150 ppm for individual large intrusions or intrusive suites). We infer from this that [Zr] in anatectic melts is probably not limited by zircon supply and is primarily controlled by melting parameters. Comparison of the data from TIS with one of these intrusions, the smaller but otherwise

  9. Flexural Stresses and Reservoir Stability: Implications for Magma Propagation in the Lithosphere and the Formation of Giant Radial Dike Swarms on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Grosfils, E. B.; McGovern, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Giant radial fracture systems on Venus are prominent, widely distributed volcano-tectonic structures that record interactions between the lithosphere and subsurface magmatic processes, specifically the lateral transport of magma at shallow depths. Here we show that the interplay between flexural uplift and magma chamber pressurization can create stress conditions favoring the emplacement of radial dikes. We use elastic, gravitationally-loaded axisymmetric finite element models that incorporate depth-dependent lithostatic stresses and Winkler restoring forces at the base of the elastic lithosphere. To generate uplift, we apply buoyant (upward) loads at the base of a 20 km-thick lithosphere near the model center, with a maximum thickness of 5 km and 200 km in radius, using conical and disk load shapes. An overpressured spherical reservoir, emplaced in each model, is used to simulate magmatic inflation and determine reservoir failure patterns. Stress orientations predicted by our models are helping us understand how laterally spreading sub-lithosphere bodies flex the lithosphere, affect intrusion patterns (radial to circumferential faults/grabens), and influence both magma ascent and eruptive patterns. Loading due to a conical basal load produces a flexural stress state with high differential stresses in the extensional upper and compressional lower lithosphere, separated by a low-stress neutral plane. Principal stress alignments in the upper lithosphere favor the emplacement of laterally extensive radial intrusions. In contrast to this, sill formation is favored in the lower lithosphere. Magma reservoirs emplaced in the upper lithosphere or within the underlying zone of low differential stress fail at the crest, favoring the ascent of magma. Reservoirs emplaced in the lower lithosphere tend to fail near the midsection under conditions that will yield horizontal intrusions. In sharp contrast, disk-shaped or ellipsoidal uplift loads move the flexed part of the

  10. Ultrabasic breccias in layered intrusions - The Rhum complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two breccias in the southwest part of the ultrabasic Rhum complex are considered. Aspects of field relations are discussed along with questions regarding the petrography of the matrix. Attention is given to textures and chemical mineralogy, the mechanism of brecciation, matrix magmas, and the possible implications of the findings. It is concluded that the Harris Bay and Ard Mheall ultrabasic breccias formed by brecciation due to the intrusion of feldspathic peridotite magmas.

  11. A conduit-related genesis of the Lengshuiqing intrusive assemblage (Sichuan, SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Marian; Wilson, Allan H.; Yao, Yong; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Chunnett, Gordon; Luo, Yaonan; Mafurutu, Leonard; Phadagi, Rofhiwa

    2010-01-01

    Lengshuiqing is part of the late Proterozoic igneous province from the western margin of the Yangtze craton. The Lengshuiqing area comprises five ultramafic-mafic intrusions, emplaced in the late Proterozoic Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing contain cumulate ultramafic zones (peridotite + olivine pyroxenite), with cumulus olivine and Cr-spinel, and intercumulus pyroxenes, hornblende, phlogopite and plagioclase. Ni-Cu ore (pyrrhotite + pentlandite + chalcopyrite) is hosted in the ultramafic zones. Olivine-free diorite-quartz diorite ± gabbro and granite zones commonly occur above the ultramafic rocks. The genesis of the intrusions (conduit-related accumulation or differentiation from stagnant magma) was investigated. The amount of sulphides in the intrusions from Lengshuiqing is one order of magnitude bigger than the sulphides that can be dissolved by a volume of mafic magma similar with the volume of the intrusions. Most intrusions from Lengshuiqing have bulk composition (peridotite ± diorite ± granite) more magnesian (MgO = 21-22%; Mg# > 78) than the deduced composition of their parental magma (MgO = 9-11%; Mg# = 64-67). This indicates the accumulation of sulphide and mafic silicates from a volume of magma much bigger than the volume of the intrusions, which can be explained by the fractionation from magma ascending through the intrusions to shallower depths. A continuous supply and vent of magma is consistent with the lack of chilled margins, the melting of the wall rocks and the generation of high-temperature mineral assemblages (K-feldspar, diopside, and sillimanite) in the Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing are seen as microchambers on conduits draining olivine-, Cr-spinel-, and sulphide-bearing mafic magma from a larger staging chamber.

  12. Phenomena associated with magma expansion into a drift

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, E. S.

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant threats to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository has been identified as the possibility of intersection of the underground structure by a basaltic intrusion. Based on the geology of the region, it is assumed that such an intrusion would consist of an alkali basalt similar to the nearby Lathrop Wells cone, which has been dated at about 78 ka. The threat of radioactive release may be either from eruption through the surface above the repository of basalt that had been contaminated or from migration through ground water of radionucleides released as a result of damage to waste packages that interact with the magma. As part of our study of these threats, we are analyzing the phenomena associated with magma expansion into drifts in tuff. The early phenomena of the encounter of volatile-rich basaltic magma with a drift are discussed here.

  13. Magma energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Ortega, A.; Hickox, C.E.; Chu, T.Y.; Wemple, R.P.; Boehm, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which energy can be extracted from crustal magma bodies has an important influence on the economic viability of the magma energy concept. Open heat exchanger systems where fluid is circulated through solidified magma offer the promise of high energy extraction rates. This concept was successfully demonstrated during experiments in the molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. Ongoing research is directed at developing a fundamental understanding of the establishment and long term operation of open systems in a crustal magma body. These studies show that magma solidifying around a cooled borehole will be extensively fractured and form a permeable medium through which fluid can be circulated. Numerical modeling of the complete magma energy extraction process predicts that high quality thermal energy can be delivered to the wellhead at rates that will produce from 25 to 30 MW electric.

  14. Magma Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Ortega, A.; Hickox, C.E.; Chu, T.Y.; Wemple, R.P.; Boehm, R.F.

    1987-01-20

    The rate at which energy can be extracted from crustal magma bodies has an important influence on the economic viability of the magma energy concept. Open heat exchanger systems where fluid is circulated through solidified magma offer the promise of high energy extraction rates. This concept was successfully demonstrated during experiments in the molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. Ongoing research is directed at developing a fundamental understanding of the establishment and long term operation of open systems in a crustal magma body. These studies show that magma solidifying around a cooled borehole will be extensively fractured and form a permeable medium through which fluid can be circulated. Numerical modeling of the complete magma energy extraction process predicts that high quality thermal energy can be delivered to the wellhead at rates that will produce from 25 to 30 MW electric. 10 figs., 10 refs.

  15. Factors controlling the structures of magma chambers in basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The depths, vertical extents, and lateral extents of magma chambers and their formation are discussed. The depth to the center of a magma chamber is most probably determined by the density structure of the lithosphere; this process is explained. It is commonly assumed that magma chambers grow until the stress on the roof, floor, and side-wall boundaries exceed the strength of the wall rocks. Attempts to grow further lead to dike propagation events which reduce the stresses below the critical values of rock failure. The tensile or compressive failure of the walls is discussed with respect to magma migration. The later growth of magma chambers is accomplished by lateral dike injection into the country rocks. The factors controlling the patterns of growth and cooling of such dikes are briefly mentioned.

  16. Rift zones and magma plumbing system of Piton de la Fournaise volcano: How do they differ from Hawaii and Etna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Famin, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    On ocean basaltic volcanoes, magma transfer to the surface proceeds by subvertical ascent from the mantle lithosphere through the oceanic crust and the volcanic edifice, possibly followed by lateral propagation along rift zones. We use a 19-year-long database of volcano-tectonic seismic events together with detailed mapping of the cinder cones and eruptive fissures to determine the geometry and the dynamics of the magma paths intersecting the edifice of Piton de la Fournaise volcano. We show that the overall plumbing system, from about 30 km depth to the surface, is composed of two structural levels that feed distinct types of rift zones. The deep plumbing system is rooted between Piton des Neiges and Piton de la Fournaise volcanoes and has a N30-40 orientation. Above 20 km below sea level (bsl), the main axis switches to a N120 orientation, which permits magma transfer from the lithospheric mantle to the base of the oceanic crust, below the summit of Piton de la Fournaise. The related NW-SE rift zone is 15 km wide, linear, spotted by small to large pyroclastic cones and related lava flows and emits slightly alkaline magmas resulting from high-pressure fractionation of clinopyroxene ± olivine. This rift zone has low magma production rate of ~ 0.5-3.6 × 10- 3 m3s- 1 and an eruption periodicity of around 200 years over the last 30 ka. Seismic data suggest that the long-lasting activity of this rift zone result from regional NNE-SSW extension, which reactivates inherited lithospheric faults by the effect of underplating and/or thermal erosion of the mantle lithosphere. The shallow plumbing system (< 11 km bsl) connects the base of the crust with the Central Cone. It is separated from the deep plumbing system by a relatively large aseismic zone between 8 and 11 km bsl, which may represent a deep storage level of magma. The shallow plumbing system feeds frequent, short-lived summit and flank (NE and SE flanks) eruptions along summit and outer rift zones, respectively

  17. Mapping real time growth of experimental laccoliths: The effect of solidification on the mechanics of magmatic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, Ryan M.; Marsh, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of solidification front growth along the margins of magmas have been widely found to be fundamental in controlling magma transport and emplacement. In this vein, the role of solidification fronts in determining the basic growth mechanics of laccoliths are investigated here in a series of scaled experiments using two contrasting magma analogs, water and molten wax that are injected into a visco-elastic gelatin based crustal analog. In non-solidifying, water-style experiments, intrusion is a relatively simple process. In contrast, wax magma emplacement displays a vast palette of compelling behaviors: propagation can slow, stop, and reactivate, and the directionality of lateral growth becomes much more variable. Small flow deviations in water-based intrusions are likely the product of flow instabilities, the result of injecting a viscous fluid along an interface (similar to Hele-Shaw cell experiments). However, the much more complex emplacement style of the wax experiments is attributed to solidification at the leading edge of the crack. The overall effects of solidification during emplacement can be described by a non-dimensional parameter measuring the relative competition between the rates of crack propagation and solidification at the crack leading edge. In this context, laccolith growth mechanics can be separated into three distinctive characteristic stages. Namely, I: A thin pancake style sill initially emanating radially from a central feeder zone, II: As solidification stalls magma propagation at the leading edges, enhanced thickening begins, forming a true, low aspect ratio laccolith, and III: As stresses accumulate, tears and disruptions readily occur in the solidified margin causing fresh breakouts, thus reactivating lateral growth into new lobes. The competitive combination of these latter stages often leads to a characteristic pulsatile growth. The unexpected richness of these results promises to add fundamentally to the basic understanding

  18. Periodicity of Kı¯lauea's Dike Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Miklius, A.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic intrusions commonly occur in the rift zones of Kı¯lauea Volcano. Individual dike intrusions observed by geodetic methods are usually 5 to 10 km long, and can occur repeatedly in the same region. Five such intrusions in Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone, with inferred locations downrift of the bend where the NNW trending upper ERZ turns to the ENE trending ERZ, have occurred since the start of the ongoing ERZ eruption in 1983. The intrusions occur on one of two segments that correlate with seismic segments (Wright and Klein, USGS PP1806, 2014): Makaopuhi (1993 and 2007) and Nāpau (1983, 1997, and 2011). During each intrusion, the amount of dike opening was between 2 and 3 meters. Intrusions into the UERZ tend to be much smaller (~10 cm of dike opening) and occur more frequently. The time between ERZ intrusions for same-segment pairs are: 14.07 (1983-1997), 14.09 (1997-2011), and 13.95 (1993-2007) years, with the Nāpau segment becoming active about 3.5 years after the Makaopuhi segment in each case. The amount of modeled dike opening during each of these events roughly corresponds to the amount of seaward south flank motion and deep rift opening accumulated in the time between events, as was noted by Owen et al. (GRL, 2000) for the 1983 and 1997 intrusions. The recurrence interval of ~14 years appears to be unaffected by the magma surge of 2003-2007 (Poland et al., Nature, 2012), suggesting that flank motion, rather than magma supply, could be a controlling factor in the periodicity of intrusions. The long duration of the seismic catalog and the coincidence of repeated dike intrusions with the seismic segments suggest that on the timescale of decades, Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone segments are persistent rather than ephemeral features related to single intrusion events.

  19. Direct Observation of Rhyolite Magma by Drilling: The Proposed Krafla Magma Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Sigmundsson, F.; Papale, P.; Markusson, S.; Loughlin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Remarkably, drilling in Landsvirkjun Co.'s geothermal field in Krafla Caldera, Iceland has encountered rhyolite magma or hypersolidus rhyolite at 2.1-2.5 km depth in 3 wells distributed over 3.5 km2, including Iceland Deep Drilling Program's IDDP-1 (Mortensen, 2012). Krafla's most recent rifting and eruption (basalt) episode was 1975-1984; deformation since that time has been simple decay. Apparently rhyolite magma was either emplaced during that episode without itself erupting or quietly evolved in situ within 2-3 decades. Analysis of drill cuttings containing quenched melt from IDDP-1 yielded unprecedented petrologic data (Zierenberg et al, 2012). But interpreting active processes of heat and mass transfer requires knowing spatial variations in physical and chemical characteristics at the margin of the magma body, and that requires retrieving core - a not-inconceivable task. Core quenched in situ in melt up to 1150oC was recovered from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii by the Magma Energy Project >30 years ago. The site from which IDDP-1 was drilled, and perhaps IDDP-1 itself, may be available to attempt the first-ever coring of rhyolite magma, now proposed as the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP). KMDP would also include geophysical and geochemical experiments to measure the response of the magma/hydrothermal system to fluid injection and flow tests. Fundamental results will reveal the behavior of magma in the upper crust and coupling between magma and the hydrothermal system. Extreme, sustained thermal power output during flow tests of IDDP-1 suggests operation of a Kilauea-Iki-like freeze-fracture-flow boundary propagating into the magma and mining its latent heat of crystallization (Carrigan et al, EGU, 2014). Such an ultra-hot Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) might be developable beneath this and other magma-heated conventional hydrothermal systems. Additionally, intra-caldera intrusions like Krafla's are believed to produce the unrest that is so troubling in

  20. Oblique rift opening revealed by reoccurring magma injection in central Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Joël; Wang, Teng; Xu, Wenbin; Hensch, Martin; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-01-01

    Extension deficit builds up over centuries at divergent plate boundaries and is recurrently removed during rifting events, accompanied by magma intrusions and transient metre-scale deformation. However, information on transient near-field deformation has rarely been captured, hindering progress in understanding rifting mechanisms and evolution. Here we show new evidence of oblique rift opening during a rifting event influenced by pre-existing fractures and two centuries of extension deficit accumulation. This event originated from the Bárðarbunga caldera and led to the largest basaltic eruption in Iceland in >200 years. The results show that the opening was initially accompanied by left-lateral shear that ceased with increasing opening. Our results imply that pre-existing fractures play a key role in controlling oblique rift opening at divergent plate boundaries. PMID:27492709

  1. Oblique rift opening revealed by reoccurring magma injection in central Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Ruch, Joël; Wang, Teng; Xu, Wenbin; Hensch, Martin; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-01-01

    Extension deficit builds up over centuries at divergent plate boundaries and is recurrently removed during rifting events, accompanied by magma intrusions and transient metre-scale deformation. However, information on transient near-field deformation has rarely been captured, hindering progress in understanding rifting mechanisms and evolution. Here we show new evidence of oblique rift opening during a rifting event influenced by pre-existing fractures and two centuries of extension deficit accumulation. This event originated from the Bárðarbunga caldera and led to the largest basaltic eruption in Iceland in >200 years. The results show that the opening was initially accompanied by left-lateral shear that ceased with increasing opening. Our results imply that pre-existing fractures play a key role in controlling oblique rift opening at divergent plate boundaries. PMID:27492709

  2. Oblique rift opening revealed by reoccurring magma injection in central Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Joël; Wang, Teng; Xu, Wenbin; Hensch, Martin; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-08-01

    Extension deficit builds up over centuries at divergent plate boundaries and is recurrently removed during rifting events, accompanied by magma intrusions and transient metre-scale deformation. However, information on transient near-field deformation has rarely been captured, hindering progress in understanding rifting mechanisms and evolution. Here we show new evidence of oblique rift opening during a rifting event influenced by pre-existing fractures and two centuries of extension deficit accumulation. This event originated from the Bárðarbunga caldera and led to the largest basaltic eruption in Iceland in >200 years. The results show that the opening was initially accompanied by left-lateral shear that ceased with increasing opening. Our results imply that pre-existing fractures play a key role in controlling oblique rift opening at divergent plate boundaries.

  3. Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide mineralization of the Huangshannan mafic-untramafic intrusion, Eastern Tianshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, YongQiang; Ke, Junjun

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshannan Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposit, a new discovery from geological prospecting in Eastern Tianshan, is in a belt of magmatic Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposits along the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The host intrusion of the Huangshannan deposit is composed of a layered ultramafic sequence and a massive gabbro-diorite unit. The major sulfide orebodies occur mainly within websterite and lherzolite in the layered ultramafic sequence. In-situ zircon U-Pb dating analyses yielded a crystallization age of 282.5 ± 1.4 Ma, similar to the ages of the Permian Tarim mantle plume. Samples from the Huangshannan intrusion are characterized by nearly flat rare earth elements patterns, negative Zr, Ti and Nb anomalies, arc-like Th/Yb and Nb/Yb ratios, and significantly lower rare earth element and immobile trace element contents than the Tarim basalts. These characteristics suggest that the Huangshannan intrusion was not generated from the Tarim mantle plume. The primary magma for the Huangshannan intrusion and its associated sulfide mineralization were formed from different pulses of picritic magma with different degrees of crustal contamination. The first pulse underwent an initial removal of 0.016% sulfide in the deep magma chamber. The evolved magma reached sulfide saturation again in the shallow magma chamber and formed sulfide ores in lherzolite. The second pulse of magma reached a level of 0.022% sulfide segregation at staging chamber before ascending up to the shallow magma chamber. In the shallow conduit system, this sulfide-unsaturated magma mixed with the first pulse of magma and with contamination from the country rocks, leading to the formation of sulfide ores in websterite. The third magma pulse from the deep chamber formed the unmineralized massive gabbro-diorite unit of the Huangshannan intrusion.

  4. The age and origin of felsic intrusions of the Thetford Mines ophiolite, Quebec.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frankel, C.S.; Eaby, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This ophiolite was obducted in the early Ordovician during the closing of the proto-Atlantic. The tectonized peridotite of the lower unit of the ophiolite is intruded by felsic dykes and pods, including isolated lenses of massive rodingite, small bodies of strongly deformed diorite, and younger, less deformed monzonite. These intrusions are found only near the base of the ophiolite, and are considered to have been emplaced before the ophiolite reached its present position. The young group of intrusions consists of biotite-muscovite quartz monzonite and leuco-quartz monzonite. Analysed samples have high K2O, high (K2O X 100)/Na2O + K2O) ratios, and high initial Sr ratios, indicating that the magma source was continental and that these felsic rocks formed by partial melting of continental sediments. Whole-rock and mineral isochron ages suggest that the felsic intrusions are approx 456 + or - 4 m.y. old and that they were metamorphosed approx 418 + or - 7 m.y. ago. The detachment of the ophiolite occurred approx 491 + or - 3 m.y. ago. The felsic dykes were intruded approx 35 m.y. later, during the Taconic orogeny. The lengthy time between detachment and final nappe emplacement recorded by the felsic dykes may be a requirement for formation of abundant asbestiform chrysotile. Whole-rock analyses (16) and Rb, Sr and 87Sr/86Sr data from the Colline de Granite, King Mts., Vimy Ridge and Black Lake samples are presented.-P.Br.

  5. Mesoscale pervasive felsic magma migration: alternatives to dyking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Roberto F.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reviews the literature on dyking as a mechanism of felsic magma extraction from a source and transport to shallower crustal levels, and review the recent literature suggesting a range of alternative mechanisms of magma migration in hot crustal zones which produce mesoscale pervasive granite sheet intrusions. Recent papers have strongly favoured dyking as the main mechanism controlling magma migration. However, the initiation of dykes from a felsic magma source is fraught with difficulties, even when magma is immediately available for transportation, as in magma chambers. Within a partially molten source, magma may reside in a range of structures with a wide range of shapes, sizes and degrees of connectivity. Whereas the growth of individual dykes within a partially molten zone, and the self-propagation of large dykes into subsolidus crust, have both been studied in some detail, little attention has been given to the crucial intermediate step of the growth of a dyke network capable of producing wide crustal scale dykes. The rarity of granite dyke swarms suggests that, if dyking is the preferred mechanism of magma transport, felsic magma sources produce only few major transporting dykes during their lifetime. Alternatively, dyking is not an important mechanism. The parameters controlling the volume of the catchment drained by one such dyke, as well as other basic geometrical parameters controlling the structure of the dyke network within the source, are unknown. The ability of dyking to drain a partially molten source depends crucially on these variables and particularly on the horizontal permeability of the source. The slow velocity of viscous felsic magmas traveling in rock pores implies that magma drained during dyking is mostly that previously extracted from the pores, and resident in irregular magma bodies or dyke networks. The observation that large volumes of buoyant magma are commonly present in migmatite zones, and that dyking in these zones plays

  6. Effects of an extensional tectonic stress on magmatic reservoir failure and magma propagation within the Venusian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, N.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.; Grosfils, E. B.; Goldman, R. T.; Albright, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Failure of magmatic reservoirs and propagation of magmas is controlled in part by the state of stress within the lithosphere. Such stresses are induced by a range of loadings (e.g., gravitational and magmatic). Additional stresses can be introduced by flexural deformation of the lithosphere due to a large volcanic edifice or mantle plume loading, or as a consequence of the regional tectonic environment. Rifting environments, for instance are the results of extensional stresses at the surface of planets (e.g., Devana Chasma on Venus). The resulting stress field may influence the failure of a magmatic reservoir and the propagation of magmas. To explore this scenario, we created 3D elastic models of the Venusian lithosphere using COMSOL Multiphysics, in which an extensional stress was applied. The stress state was implemented through horizontal deformation created by orthogonal contraction and extension on the outer boundaries of the quarter symmetry model. A spherical reservoir is embedded within the lithosphere to represent a magma chamber. In these models, we analyzed magma reservoir stability at different depths, the amount of overpressure needed to reach failure, and the type of resulting intrusions within the 3D model for three distinct environments: 1- lithostatic; 2- upward flexure due to a rising mantle plume; and 3- downward flexure due to a basaltic shield volcano. Preliminary results show that as the extensional stress increases: magmatic reservoirs become unstable at shallow depth and the amount of overpressure needed to reach failure decreases. In addition, the failure location along the reservoir flank rotates to parallel the horizontal contraction, which favors the formation of lateral dikes along the magma reservoir flanks over vertical dikes at the summit.

  7. Magma transport and storage at Kilauea volcano, HI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    Thomas L. Wright and Fred W. Klein (USGS, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, Menlo Park, CA 94025; 410-516-7040, 650-329-4794) Seismic and deformation data between 1950 and the beginning of the Mauna Ulu eruption of 1969-1974 indicate (1) that summit inflation and deflation cycles are best matched by a magma reservoir beneath Kilauea's summit consisting of concatenated vertical plugs and (2) that magmas erupted at Kilauea's summit are also present beneath the east rift zone where they can cool and fractionate. Three "olivine-controlled" magmas fractionated by removal of olivine only and distinguished from each other by their major-oxide chemistry were erupted at Kilauea's summit within Halemaumau crater in 1952, 1961 and 1967-68. From 1955 to 1969, these three magmas were mixed with fractionated magmas stored beneath Kilauea's east rift zone to form "hybrid" eruptions. Two eruptions important to our interpretation occurred on the lower east rift zone 1n 1955 and 1960. Published mixing calculations show that the 1952 magma mixed with the fractionated 1955 magma in the latter part of the 1955 eruption and that the 1961 magma was intruded in 1955 to become the parent for fractionated magma later erupted in 1977 from the rift zone. The 1960 eruption began with magma hybridized in 1955, then was successively mixed with the remaining 1952 magma, 1961 magma and the 1967-68 magma. The latter two summit magmas were identified in hybrid eruptions from 1961-1965 and also as parents for fractionated magma present in fractionated and hybrid rift eruptions of 1968-69. The mixing in this period demonstrates that the 1952, 1961 and 1967-68 summit magmas appear in that order in hybrid eruptions on the east rift zone before they are erupted at the summit, traveled within the rift without appreciable cooling or mixing with each other, and were identified as eruption components for up to ~ 10 years. Volume calculations indicate that these magmas were stored prior to

  8. The characteristics of magma reservoir failure beneath a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Debra M.; Long, Sylvan M.; Grosfils, Eric B.

    2009-12-01

    Eruptions fed from subsurface reservoirs commonly construct volcanic edifices at the surface, and the growth of an edifice will in turn modify the subsurface stress state that dictates the conditions under which subsequent rupture of the inflating reservoir can occur. We re-examine this problem using axisymmetric finite element models of ellipsoidal reservoirs beneath conical edifices, explicitly incorporating factors (e.g., full gravitational loading conditions, an elastic edifice instead of a surface load, reservoir pressures sufficient to induce tensile rupture) that compromise previous solutions to illustrate why variations in rupture behavior can occur. Relative to half-space model results, the presence of an edifice generally rotates rupture toward the crest of a spherical reservoir, with increasing flank slope (for an edifice of constant volume) and larger edifices (or greater reservoir scaled depths) normally serving to enhance this trend. When non-spherical reservoirs are considered, the presence of an edifice amplifies previously identified half-space failure characteristics, shifting rupture to the crest more rapidly for prolate reservoirs while forcing rupture closer to the midpoint of oblate reservoirs. Rupture is always observed to occur in the σt orientation, and depending on where initial failure occurs rupture favors the initial emplacement of either lateral sills, circumferential intrusions or vertically ascending dikes. Ultimately, integration of our numerical model results with other information, for instance the sequence of intrusion/eruption events observed at a given volcano, can provide useful new insight into how a volcano's subsurface magma plumbing system evolved. We demonstrate this process through application of our model to Summer Coon, a well-studied stratocone on Earth, and Ilithyia Mons, a large conical shield volcano on Venus.

  9. Forward and Inverse Modeling of Magma Chamber Dynamics and Crystal Zoning Provides Insights into Rates and Processes Leading to Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Rodriguez, F.; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.; Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical and textural features of crystals provide unique constrains on the processes and rates that occur during the growth, replenishment and eruption of magma reservoirs. Recent studies that use different methods have highlighted that many eruptions are issued from reservoirs that may grow for up to hundreds of thousands years (e.g, U-Th series of mineral separates, zircon dating). In contrast, the effect of new magma injections (recharges) can influence the thermodynamic state of reservoirs on a much shorter scale. In extreme cases it can lead to remobilization of magmas over months (for small reservoirs) to thousands of years (for larger systems). Modeling of mineral zoning provides a lower bound estimate for the timescales associated with magma recharge because (a) they do not record dissolution/resorbtion of phases and (b) they only record the time at which a crystal reacts to a thermodynamic change, which does not necessarily equate with the timing of an intrusion. In open system reservoirs, magmas may experience significant thermal and compositional fluctuations over time, and so far, only simple cooling scenarios [1] have been considered. In particular, under what conditions does a recharge lead to an eruption? Can large recharge events be mostly recycled and partially involved in later eruptions? Here we combine new forward models of magma chamber replenishment and evolution [2] that track the thermodynamic evolution of shallow resevoir with crystal zoning models. We explore several scenarios of magma reservoir growth and evolution and compare them to the time scales obtained from the crystal zoning (e.g. thermal history and boundary condition changes with time). Inverse modeling of natural crystal zoning profiles from the silicic eruptions of Rabaul caldera in 1994 and 2006 allows us to distinguish between scenarios where inputs of fresh magma leads to eruption and recharges that are accommodated by the reservoir over longer time scales and are

  10. Forecasting magma-chamber rupture at Santorini volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-10-01

    How much magma needs to be added to a shallow magma chamber to cause rupture, dyke injection, and a potential eruption? Models that yield reliable answers to this question are needed in order to facilitate eruption forecasting. Development of a long-lived shallow magma chamber requires periodic influx of magmas from a parental body at depth. This redistribution process does not necessarily cause an eruption but produces a net volume change that can be measured geodetically by inversion techniques. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini’s shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  11. Forecasting magma-chamber rupture at Santorini volcano, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-01-01

    How much magma needs to be added to a shallow magma chamber to cause rupture, dyke injection, and a potential eruption? Models that yield reliable answers to this question are needed in order to facilitate eruption forecasting. Development of a long-lived shallow magma chamber requires periodic influx of magmas from a parental body at depth. This redistribution process does not necessarily cause an eruption but produces a net volume change that can be measured geodetically by inversion techniques. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011–2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini’s shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano. PMID:26507183

  12. Forecasting magma-chamber rupture at Santorini volcano, Greece.

    PubMed

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-01-01

    How much magma needs to be added to a shallow magma chamber to cause rupture, dyke injection, and a potential eruption? Models that yield reliable answers to this question are needed in order to facilitate eruption forecasting. Development of a long-lived shallow magma chamber requires periodic influx of magmas from a parental body at depth. This redistribution process does not necessarily cause an eruption but produces a net volume change that can be measured geodetically by inversion techniques. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano. PMID:26507183

  13. Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

  14. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Charles W; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed approximately 640,000 years ago when an explosive eruption ejected approximately 1,000 km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began approximately 16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from approximately 150,000 to approximately 70,000 years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of approximately 70 cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system. PMID:16511491

  15. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, C.W.; Thatcher, W.; Dzurisin, D.; Svarc, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed ???640,000 years ago when an explosive eruption ejected ???1,000 km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began ???16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from ???150,000 to ???70,000 years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of ???70 cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Magma flow-direction indicators in the diabase feeder dike to the first flood basalt in the Mesozoic Hartford basin, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Philpotts, A.R.; Asher, P.M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    Recent kinematic analysis has indicated that magma may have been emplaced horizontally rather than vertically in some large regional diabase dikes. Such analysis, however, has commonly relied on a single flow indicator, such as anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, which may reflect only late stage adjustments in a body of crystallizing magma. This study of kinematic indicators in a Mesozoic diabase dike in southern New England indicates that the direction of flow in large dikes may change during emplacement, and that a single flow indicator cannot give a complete picture of the flow history. The 250-km-long Higganum dike fed the first flood basalt in the Hartford basin of Connecticut. The margins of this dike contain 8 independent magma flow indicators, which involve the imbrication and deformation of phenocrysts, the shearing of felsic wisps, and the segregation of residual liquids. The felsic wisps, which were derived by partial melting of the wallrock, preserve the most complete record of flow in the dike. Early felsic liquids exchanged alkalis with the still largely molten diabase magma and consequently are K-poor; ones that entered after the diabase was largely solid are relatively K-rich. Most K-poor felsic wisps were deformed into recumbent folds by back-flowing magma. Later K-rich felsic streaks parallel the axial planes of these folds. The shear of magma past phenocrysts near the dike margins also caused K-rich felsic liquids to segregate in low-pressure zones on the opposing ends of these crystals. All of these flow indicators record a complex history of dike emplacement, with periods of upward intrusion always being followed by periods of back-flow.

  17. The thick and thin of magma in volcano-tectonics at various scales (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.; Delcamp, A.; Mathieu, L.; Lebas, E.; Troll, V.

    2009-12-01

    Magma plays an essential part in the structural development of any volcano. An analysis of eroded volcanoes shows clearly two end member types of intrusion: 1) thin blade-like dykes and 2) thick, bulbous intrusions. Combining several field examples and analogue modelling results we have generated to date, I explore here the role of these different types of intrusion in the deformation of volcanoes on a range of scales. As a smallest scale case study, I use the Lemptègy scoria cone (Chaine de Puys, France; radius = 0.5 km). An intermediate-scale example is the Puy de Sancy stratovolcano (France; radius = c. 8 km).My largest-scale examples are the volcanoes of Mull (Scotland; radius = 20 km) and La Réunion (Indian Ocean; radius = 100k m) , In all examples, the same types of intrusion appear in a characteristic distribution. These include a dense core intrusion and thin central dykes, and an outer set of bulbous or fatter intrusions and cryptodomes. Central conduit areas that were originally fully magma-filled are now preserved as rubble and magma blobs. Analogue experiments indicate that the differences in style of intrusion can be related to different magma viscosities, rates of intrusion, and durations of intrusion. Any model of the role of magma in active volcano-tectonics must take into account the range of possible intrusion types that may occur at the same time. To take a small-scale example, I return to the 1995 Cerro Negro eruption, where activity analogous to Lemptègy must have simultaneously involved thin dykes, bulbous intrusions and an open conduit. For a large-scale example, I take the recent activity at Piton de La Fournaise, where there is a suggestion that dykes and a small central intrusion were involved. I show that the shallow dykes are controlled by primary fracturing due to cooling and deposition. Finally, I suggest a framework for including magmatic intrusions in a generalised model of volcano tectonics, whereby the growth and spreading of

  18. The lateral extent of volcanic interactions during unrest and eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Juliet; Robertson, Elspeth; Cashman, Katharine

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions often occur simultaneously or tap multiple magma reservoirs. Such lateral interactions between magmatic systems are attributed to stress changes or hydraulic connections but the precise conditions under which coupled eruptions occur have yet to be quantified. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite data to analyse the surface deformation generated by volcanic unrest in the Kenyan Rift. We identify several magma sources located at depths of 2-5 km importantly, sources that are spaced less than about 10 km apart interact, whereas those spaced more than about 25 km apart do not. However, volcanoes up to 25 km apart have interacted in the geologic past. Thus, volcanic coupling is not simply controlled by the distance between the magma reservoirs. We then consider different tectonic settings globally, including intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii and Yellowstone, arc volcanism in Alaska and Chile, and other rift settings, such as New Zealand, Iceland and Afar. We find that the most closely spaced magmatic interactions are controlled by the extent of a shallow crystal mush layer, stress changes can couple large eruptions over distances of about 20-40 km, and only large dyke intrusions or subduction earthquakes could generate coupled eruptions over distances of about 50-100 km.

  19. Geophysical Evidence for the Locations, Shapes and Sizes, and Internal Structures of Magma Chambers beneath Regions of Quaternary Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, H. M.

    1984-04-01

    This paper is a review of seismic, gravity, magnetic and electromagnetic techniques to detect and delineate magma chambers of a few cubic kilometres to several thousand cubic kilometres volume. A dramatic decrease in density and seismic velocity, and an increase in seismic attenuation and electrical conductivity occurs at the onset of partial melting in rocks. The geophysical techniques are based on detecting these differences in physical properties between solid and partially molten rock. Although seismic refraction techniques, with sophisticated instrumentation and analytical procedures, are routinely used for detailed studies of crustal structure in volcanic regions, their application for magma detection has been quite limited. In one study, in Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., fan-shooting and time-term techniques have been used to detect an upper-crustal magma chamber. Attenuation and velocity changes in seismic waves from explosions and earthquakes diffracted around magma chambers are observed near some volcanoes in Kamchatka. Strong attenuation of shear waves from regional earthquakes, interpreted as a diffraction effect, has been used to model magma chambers in Alaska, Kamchatka, Iceland, and New Zealand. One of the most powerful techniques in modern seismology, the seismic reflection technique with vibrators, was used to confirm the existence of a strong reflector in the crust near Socorro, New Mexico, in the Rio Grande Rift. This reflector, discovered earlier from data from local earthquakes, is interpreted as a sill-like magma body. In the Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, mapping seismicity patterns in the upper crust has enabled the modelling of the complex magma conduits in the crust and upper mantle. On the other hand, in the Usu volcano, Japan, the magma conduits are delineated by zones of seismic quiescence. Three-dimensional modelling of laterally varying structures using teleseismic residuals is proving to be a very promising technique for detecting and

  20. Mechanics of two interacting magma-driven fractures: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Bunger, Andrew P.; Jeffrey, Robert G.

    2014-11-01

    To understand magma focusing from broad melting zones in the crust, propagation in brittle rocks of two interacting dikes ascending from a single deep source has been modeled using a time-dependent plane strain hydraulic fracturing model. The source is assumed to generate a constant influx rate to feed the dike growth, which is also aided by buoyancy effects. In contrast to uncoupled model results, the simultaneous parallel growth of two dikes to a certain distance is found to occur provided that the two dikes are initially of different heights, which might be produced either by previous magma intrusion or during nucleation. The shorter dike will chase the longer one and they can either progressively merge or continue subparallel growth at a reduced spacing, depending on the deviator stress between the vertical and horizontal stresses and the initial lateral separation, with parameters given in dimensionless forms. Numerical results reveal the mechanics for simultaneous ascents of two subparallel dikes, in that dike interaction can produce a low-stress field, which is just above the tip of the shorter dike, favorable to growth of the shorter dike. The energy analysis indicates that the energy required for two subparallel dikes is less than that for a single dike during the late-time buoyancy-viscosity propagation stage where considerable ascent occurs. This growth behavior might provide the mechanism for simultaneous, instead of sequential, growth of various dikes in a single set.

  1. Magma accumulation rates and thermal histories of plutons of the Sierra Nevada batholith, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jesse W.; Coleman, Drew S.; Gracely, John T.; Gaschnig, Richard; Stearns, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Zircon U-Pb geochronology results indicate that the John Muir Intrusive Suite of the central Sierra Nevada batholith, California, was assembled over a period of at least 12 Ma between 96 and 84 Ma. Bulk mineral thermochronology (U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar hornblende and biotite) of rocks from multiple plutons comprising the Muir suite indicates rapid cooling through titanite and hornblende closure following intrusion and subsequent slow cooling through biotite closure. Assembly of intrusive suites in the Sierra Nevada and elsewhere over millions of years favors growth by incremental intrusion. Estimated long-term pluton assembly rates for the John Muir Intrusive Suite are on the order of 0.001 km3 a-1 which is inconsistent with the rapid magma fluxes that are necessary to form large-volume magma chambers capable of producing caldera-forming eruptions. If large shallow crustal magma chambers do not typically develop during assembly of large zoned intrusive suites, it is doubtful that the intrusive suites represent cumulates left behind following caldera-forming eruptions.

  2. Magma Migration Through the Continental Crust - 3-D Seismic and Thermo-mechanical Constraints on Sites of Crustal Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M.; Wheeler, W.

    2002-12-01

    Current understanding of the processes and pathways by which magma travels from its mantle source, through the crust to the Earth's surface is limited by the lack of continuously exposed sections through "fossil" magmatic systems. We report results from a 50 x 30 km 3-D seismic reflection survey of part of the Voring rifted continental margin of Norway which provide the first detailed images of an entire crustal magmatic plumbing system, from a Moho-level magma chamber, through complexes of sills and dykes in the mid to upper crust, to lavas and vent fields extruded at the early Tertiary paleosurface. The Voring margin of Norway formed during a period of Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (Eocene) continental break-up when Greenland rifted away from Eurasia, resulting in the opening the NE Atlantic Ocean. Rifting was accompanied by widespread magmatic activity, inferred to be related to the impingement of the Iceland mantle plume on the base of the continental lithosphere. Regionally, magma migration occurred in at least two pulses: 62-59 Ma (main initial phase) and 57-54 Ma (continental break-up phase). Wide-angle seismic experiments indicate the presence of a laccolith-like "high-velocity body" (HVB) in the lower crust beneath most of the outer Voring Basin with P-wave velocities (Vp 7.1-7.4 km/s) characteristic of basaltic igneous rocks, overlying typical mantle rocks with Vp of over 8 km/s. The HVB locally reaches 8 km thickness and at break-up (54 Ma) measured 300 km x 500 km - corresponding to a volume of 450,000 cubic km of basaltic magma. It is interpreted as a magmatic underplate formed over a period of several million years as rising basaltic magmas ponded at the Moho at their level of neutral buoyancy. A laterally extensive sill complex (1000 m thick) occurs at the interface between thinned crystalline basement and the overlying Mesozoic sedimentary sequence. This is interpreted as one of the main intra-crustal magma storage reservoirs and is the most

  3. A cryptic record of magma mixing in diorites revealed by high-precision SIMS oxygen isotope analysis of zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, S. K.; Graham, C. M.; Gillespie, M. R.; Hinton, R. W.; Oliver, G. J. H.; EIMF

    2008-05-01

    High-precision in-situ ion microprobe (SIMS) oxygen isotope analysis of zircons from two diorite intrusions associated with the late Caledonian Lochnagar pluton in Scotland has revealed large differences in the degree of heterogeneity in zircon δ18O between the diorites. Zircon crystals from the Cul nan Gad diorite (CnG) show a unimodal distribution of oxygen isotope values ( δ18O = 6.0 ± 0.6‰ (2 σ)) and no or only minor grain-scale variation. Those from the Allt Darrarie diorite (AD1) show a large range in δ18O and an apparent bimodal distribution with modes of 6.6 ± 0.4‰ and 7.3 ± 0.4‰. Variations of up to 1.2‰ occur between and within grains; both an increase and decrease in δ18O with zircon growth has been observed. The δ18O composition of growing zircon can only change if open-system processes affect the magma composition, i.e. if material of contrasting δ18O composition is added to the magma. The variability in AD1 is interpreted to represent a cryptic record of magma mixing. A 'deep crustal hot zone' is a likely site for generation of the dioritic magmas which developed by mixing of residual melts and crustal partial melts or by melting of mafic lower crustal rocks. The overall small number of zircons with mantle-like δ18O values (5.3 ± 0.6‰ (2 σ)) in the Lochnagar diorites is largely the product of crustal differentiation rather than crustal growth. The δ18O of quartz from the CnG and AD1 diorites shows only minor variation (CnG: 10.9 ± 0.5‰ (2 σ), AD1: 11.7 ± 0.6‰ (2 σ)) within single populations, with no evidence of mixing. Quartz-zircon isotopic disequilibrium is consistent with later crystallisation of quartz from late magmatic fluids, and in case of the AD1 diorite after the inferred magma mixing from a homogenised, higher δ18O melt. High-precision SIMS oxygen isotope analysis of zircon provides a new approach to identifying and resolving previously undetected early-stage magma mixing and constraining the compositions

  4. Zircon reveals protracted magma storage and recycling beneath Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claiborne, L.L.; Miller, C.F.; Flanagan, D.M.; Clynne, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Current data and models for Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, United States) suggest relatively rapid transport from magma genesis to eruption, with no evidence for protracted storage or recycling of magmas. However, we show here that complex zircon age populations extending back hundreds of thousands of years from eruption age indicate that magmas regularly stall in the crust, cool and crystallize beneath the volcano, and are then rejuvenated and incorporated by hotter, young magmas on their way to the surface. Estimated dissolution times suggest that entrained zircon generally resided in rejuvenating magmas for no more than about a century. Zircon elemental compositions reflect the increasing influence of mafic input into the system through time, recording growth from hotter, less evolved magmas tens of thousands of years prior to the appearance of mafic magmas at the surface, or changes in whole-rock geochemistry and petrology, and providing a new, time-correlated record of this evolution independent of the eruption history. Zircon data thus reveal the history of the hidden, long-lived intrusive portion of the Mount St. Helens system, where melt and crystals are stored for as long as hundreds of thousands of years and interact with fresh influxes of magmas that traverse the intrusive reservoir before erupting. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  5. Formation of tectonic peperites from alkaline magmas intruded into wet sediments in the Beiya area, western Yunnan, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.-W.; Cai, X.-P.; Zhong, J.-Y.; Song, B.-C.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tertiary (3.78 Ma to 3.65 Ma) biotite-K-feldspar porphyritic bodies intrude Tertiary, poorly consolidated lacustrine sedimentary rocks in the Beiya mineral district in southwestern China. The intrusives are characterized by a microcrystalline and vitreous-cryptocrystalline groundmass, by replacement of some tabular K-feldspar phenocrysts with microcrystalline chlorite and calcite, and by Fe-rich rings surrounding biotite phenocrysts. Peculiar structures, such as contemporary contact faults and slickensides, ductile shear zones and flow folds, foliation and lineations, tension fractures, and banded and boudin peperites, are developed along the contact zones of the intrusives. These features are related to the forceful intrusion of the alkaline magmas into the wet Tertiary sediments. The partially consolidated magmas were deformed and flattened by continued forceful magma intrusion that produced boudinaged and banded peperites. These peperites characterized by containing oriented deformation fabrics are classified as tectonic peperites as a new type of peperite, and formation of these tectonic peperites was related to fracturing of magmas caused by forceful intrusion and shear deformation and to contemporary migration and injection of fluidized sediments along fractures that dismembered the porphyritic magma. Emplacement of the magma into the wet sediments in the Beiya area is interpreted to be related to a large pressure difference rather than to the buoyancy force. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamically-induced structures formation in congested magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.

    2008-12-01

    Crystal fabrics preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. Detailed field mapping, in combination with AMS studies, seem to provide the best available data for unravelling intrusion architecture on the decimetre scale. However, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The fancy that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely exclusively on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation of commonly observed igneous structures. Instead, using examples from mafic rocks where cooling has been rapid, the idea is put forward that in high Peclet number suspensions (where particle diffusion is negligible), shearing and non- Newtonian behaviour imparts a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Key to understanding the rheology, hence flow dynamics of congested magma, is the particle microstructure, a still poorly known essence of suspension flows. Where magma transport is continental in scale and long lived (e.g. Large Igneous Provinces), rotation of the earth may in theory endow a small but potentially measurable imprint on the preserved flow fabric.

  7. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women. PMID:23891994

  8. An Approach for Developing Site-Specific Lateral and Vertical Inclusion Zones within which Structures Should be Evaluated for Petroleum Vapor Intrusion due to Releases of Motor Fuel from Underground Storage Tanks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buildings may be at risk from Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) when they overlie petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the unsaturated zone or dissolved in groundwater. The U.S. EPA Office of Underground Storage Tanks (OUST) is preparing Guidance for Addressing Petroleum Vapor I...

  9. Watching magma from space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Mann, Dorte

    2000-01-01

    Westdahl is a broad shield volcano at the western end of Unimak Island in the Aleutian chain. It has apparently been dormant since a 1991-92 eruption and seismicity levels have been low. However, satellite radar imaging shows that in the years following 1992 the upper flanks of Westdahl have risen several centimeters, probably from the influx of new magma deep below its summit. Until now, deep magma reservoirs have been difficult to detect beneath most volcanoes. But using space geodetic technologies, specifically interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), we have discovered a deep magmatic source beneath Westdahl. 

  10. Earthquake swarms reveal submarine magma unrest induced by distant mega-earthquakes: Andaman Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Vaněk, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about earthquake-triggered magma intrusions or eruptions of submarine volcanoes. The analysis of teleseismic earthquake occurrence performed in this study offers a tool to address such enigmatic and inaccessible processes. In the past ten years, the Andaman Sea region repeatedly became a site of shallow earthquake swarms that followed distant mega-earthquakes by days to weeks. The MW 9.1 December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was followed by two earthquake swarms about 600 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 30 and 35 days, respectively. Earthquakes of one of these seismic episodes, the extensive January 2005 earthquake swarm, migrated laterally at a rate of about 0.25 km per hour during the swarm evolution. The strong Indian Ocean MW 8.6 and 8.2 April 11, 2012 earthquake doublet west of Northern Sumatra was followed by an earthquake swarm approximately 800 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 13 days. All the three swarms that followed the 2004 and 2012 mega-earthquakes occurred beneath distinct seamounts and seafloor ridges. Based on the observations of migration of earthquakes during the swarm and swarm occurrence beneath distinct highs at the seafloor, we conclude that these earthquake swarms probably resulted as a consequence of magma unrest induced by static and/or dynamic stress changes following the distant mega-earthquakes. Repeated occurrence of such a phenomenon suggests that the arc magma reservoirs beneath the Andaman Sea have recently reached some form of criticality and are vulnerable to even small stress changes. The Andaman seafloor could thus become a site of submarine volcanic eruptions in near future and deserves close attention of Earth scientists.

  11. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. 3D Visualization of "Frozen" Dynamic Magma Chambers in the Duluth Complex, Northeastern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. M.; Hauck, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Duluth Complex and associated intrusions of the Midcontinent Rift in northeastern Minnesota constitute one of the largest, semi-continuous, mafic intrusive complexes in the world, second only to the Bushveld Complex of South Africa. These rocks cover an arcuate area of over 5,000 square kilometers and give rise to two strong gravity anomalies (+50 & +70 mgal) that imply intrusive roots to more than 13 km depth. The geometry of three large mafic intrusions within the Duluth Complex have been modeled by the integration of field mapping and drill hole data with maps of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The igneous bodies include the South Kawishiwi, Partridge River, and Bald Eagle intrusions that collectively outcrop over an area of > 800 square kilometers. The South Kawishiwi and Partridge River intrusions host several billion tons of low-grade Cu-Ni-PGE mineralization near their base, while the geophysical expressions of the Bald Eagle intrusion have the same shape and dimensions as the "bulls eye" pattern of low velocity seismic reflection anomalies along the East Pacific Rise. These anomalies are interpreted to define regions of melt concentrations, i.e., active magma chambers. This suggests that the funnel-shaped Bald Eagle intrusion could be an example of a "frozen" dynamic magma chamber. In support of this analogy we note that the magmatic systems of intracontinental rifts, mid-ocean ridges, extensional regimes in back-arc environments, and ophiolites have a common characteristic: the emplacement of magma in extensional environments, and the common products in all four are varieties of layered intrusions, dikes and sills, and overlying volcanic rocks. 3D visualization of these intrusions is integral to the understanding of the Duluth Complex magmatic system and associated mineralization, and can be used as a proxy for study of similar systems, such as the Antarctic Ferrar dolerites, worldwide.

  13. Degassing of rhyolitic magma during ascent and emplacement

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Eichelberger, J.

    1988-06-10

    The degassing history of a rhyolitic igneous system was documented from analyses of drill core samples through the extrusive and intrusive portions of Obsidian Dome and of surface samples of associated tephra. The initial volatile composition of the Inyo magma was estimated to be 4.0 wt % H/sub 2/O, 500 ppm F, 800 ppm Cl, and 80 ppm S. Retained volatile contents of glassy and crystalline samples reflect the effects of decompression and second boiling. Decompression is rapid and involves loss of water-rich fluid until a close approach to lithostatic equilibrium is achieved. Second boiling is a slower process and produces a chlorine-rich fluid, some of which can be trapped during development of extremely fine crystallization textures. Nearly complete dewatering during decompression of surface-extruded magma strongly undercools the system (..delta..Tapprox. =175 /sup 0/C), suppressing crystallization and yielding glassy rhyolitic lava. Partial degassing of shallowly intruded magma permits pervasive crystallization even at high cooling rates. The subvolcanic intrusive regime is the zone of maximum volatile release because second boiling is incomplete in extrusives, and volatile-bearing crystalline phases are stable in magma crystallized at greater depth. copyright Amierican Geophysical Union 1988

  14. Dynamics of magma supply, storage and migration at basaltic volcanoes: Geophysical studies of the Galapagos and Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco

    Basaltic shields forming ocean island volcanoes, in particular those of Hawai'i and of the Galapagos Islands, constitute some of the largest volcanic features on Earth. Understanding subsurface processes such as those controlling magma supply, storage and migration at these volcanoes, is essential to any attempt to anticipate their future behavior. This dissertation presents a series of studies carried out at Hawaiian and Galapagos volcanoes. InSAR measurements acquired between 2003 and 2010 at Fernandina Volcano, Galapagos, are used to study the structure and the dynamics of the shallow magmatic system of the volcano (Chapter 3). Spatial and temporal variations in the measured displacements reveal the presence of two hydraulically connected areas of magma storage, and the modeling of the deformation data provides an estimate of their location and geometry. The same dataset also provides the first geodetic evidence for two subvolcanic sill intrusions (in 2006 and 2007) deep beneath the volcano's flank. The lateral migration of magma from the reservoirs during these intrusions could provide an explanation for enigmatic volcanic events at Fernandina such as the 1968 caldera collapse without significant eruption. Space-geodetic measurements of the surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina, reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from the shallow magma reservoir (Chapter 4). A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired 1-2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galapagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, but these new findings allow a reinterpretation of the internal structure and evolution of Galapagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields elsewhere on Earth and on other planets. A joint analysis of InSAR and groud-based microgravity data

  15. Magnetic fabric constraints of the emplacement of igneous intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Stephanie M.

    Fabric analysis is critical to evaluating the history, kinematics, and dynamics of geological deformation. This is particularly true of igneous intrusions, where the development of fabric is used to constrain magmatic flow and emplacement mechanisms. Fabric analysis was applied to three mafic intrusions, with different tectonic and petrogenetic histories, to study emplacement and magma flow: the Insizwa sill (Mesozoic Karoo Large Igneous Province, South Africa), Sonju Lake intrusion (Proterozoic Midcontinent Rift, Minnesota, USA), and Palisades sill (Mesozoic rift basin, New Jersey, USA). Multiple fabric analysis techniques were used to define the fabric in each intrusive body. Using digital image analysis techniques on multiple thin sections, the three-dimensional shape-preferred orientation (SPO) of populations of mineral phases were calculated. Low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements were used as a proxy for the mineral fabric of the ferromagnetic phases (e.g., magnetite). In addition, a new technique---high-field AMS---was used to isolate the paramagnetic component of the fabric (e.g., silicate fabric). Each fabric analysis technique was then compared to observable field fabrics as a framework for interpretation. In the Insizwa sill, magnetic properties were used to corroborate vertical petrologic zonation and distinguish sub-units within lithologically defined units. Abrupt variation in magnetic properties provides evidence supporting the formation of the Insizwa sill by separate magma intrusions. Low-field AMS fabrics in the Sonju Lake intrusion exhibit consistent SW-plunging lineations and SW-dipping foliations. These fabric orientations provide evidence that the cumulate layers in the intrusion were deposited in a dynamic environment, and indicate magma flowed from southwest to northeast, parallel to the pre-existing rift structures. In the Palisades sill, the magnetite SPO and low-field AMS lineation have developed orthogonal to

  16. Triggering of microearthquakes in Iceland by volatiles released from a dyke intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Hilary R.; White, Robert S.

    2013-09-01

    We suggest that carbon dioxide exsolved from a mid-crustal basaltic dyke intrusion in Iceland migrated upwards and triggered shallow seismicity by allowing failure on pre-existing fractures under the relatively low elastic stresses (100-200 kPa; 1-2 bar) generated by the dyke inflation. Intense swarms of microseismicity accompanied magmatic intrusion into a dyke at depths of 13-19 km in the crust of Iceland's Northern Volcanic Rift Zone during 2007-2008. Contemporaneously, a series of small normal earthquakes, probably triggered by elastic stresses imposed by the dyke intrusion, occurred in the uppermost 4 km of crust: fault plane solutions from these are consistent with failure along the extensional fabric and surface fissure directions mapped in the area, suggesting that the faults failed along existing rift zone fabric even though the mid-crustal dyke is highly oblique to it. Several months after the melt froze in the mid-crust and seismicity associated with the intrusion had ceased, an upsurge in shallow microseismicity began in the updip projection of the dyke near the brittle-ductile transition at 6-7 km depth below sea level. This seismicity is caused by failure on right-lateral strike-slip faults, with fault planes orientated 23 ± 3°, which are identical with the 24 ± 2° orientation in this area of surface fractures and fissures caused by plate spreading and extension of the volcanic rift zone. However, these earthquakes have T-axes approximately aligned with the opening direction of the dyke, and the right-lateral sense of failure is opposite that of regional strike-slip faults. We suggest that the fractures occurred along pre-existing weaknesses generated by the pervasive fabric of the rift zone, but that the dyke opening in the mid-crust beneath it caused right-lateral failure. The seismicity commenced after a temporal delay of several months and has persisted for over 3 yr. We propose that fluids exsolved from the magma in the dyke, primarily carbon

  17. Magma energy for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal energy contained in crustal magma bodies represents a large potential resource for the US and magma generated power could become a viable alternative in the future. Engineering feasibility of the magma energy concept is being investigated as part of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Program. This current project follows a seven-year Magma Energy Research Project where scientific feasibility of the concept was concluded.

  18. Self Sealing Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Lavallee, Yan

    2015-04-01

    During ascent of magma, pressure decreases and bubbles form. If the volume increases more rapidly than the relaxation timescale, the magma fragments catastrophically. If a permeable network forms, the magma degasses non-violently. This process is generally assumed to be unidirectional, however, recent studies have shown how shear and compaction can drive self sealing. Here, we additionally constrain skin formation during degassing and sintering. We heated natural samples of obsidian in a dry atmosphere and monitored foaming and impermeable skin formation. We suggest a model for skin formation that is controlled by diffusional loss of water and bubble collapse at free surfaces. We heated synthetic glass beads in a hydrous atmosphere to measure the timescale of viscous sintering. The beads sinter at drastically shorter timescales as water vapour rehydrates an otherwise degassed melt, reducing viscosity and glass transition temperatures. Both processes can produce dense inhomogeneities within the timescales of magma ascent and effectively disturb permeabilities and form barriers, particularly at the margins of the conduit, where strain localisation takes place. Localised ash in failure zones (i.e. Tuffisite) then becomes associated with water vapour fluxes and alow rapid rehydration and sintering. When measuring permeabilities in laboratory and field, and when discussing shallow degassing in volcanoes, local barriers for degassing should be taken into account. Highlighting the processes that lead to the formation of such dense skins and sintered infills of cavities can help understanding the bulk permeabilities of volcanic systems.

  19. Lithological controls on shallow-level magma emplacement (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Schofield, N.; Briggs, F.

    2013-12-01

    The emplacement of magma within the upper crust requires space to be generated by the deformation or assimilation of the host rock. Intrusion morphologies, magma reservoir locations and the architecture of interconnecting magma conduits are therefore strongly influenced by the behaviour of the host rock during emplacement. Importantly, monitoring host rock deformation affects (e.g., surface uplift) can provide invaluable insights into the potential timing, location and magnitude of future volcanic eruptions. This has led to significant advances in the inversion of host rock deformation patterns, acquired from geophysical and geodetic data, to elucidate sub-volcanic plumbing systems. However, the link between the shape and size of intrusion and the style and magnitude of the ground deformation is non-unique. While numerical and physical models have been developed to test plausible intrusion-deformation scenarios, they cannot explicitly incorporate complex host rock stratigraphies, temperature-driven intrusion-host rock interactions or brittle faulting. We advocate that three-dimensional seismic reflection data, which provide unparalleled images of entire volcanic plumbing systems, can be used to enhance our understanding of the intrusive networks and to test hypotheses concerning syn-emplacement host rock deformation. We use 3D seismic reflection data from the Exmouth Sub-basin, offshore NW Australia, to examine the link between a saucer-shaped sill and an overlying, dome-shaped fold developed at the contemporaneous palaeosurface. Our results highlight a disparity in size (e.g., areal coverage, thickness/amplitude) between the sill and fold, which we attribute to the initial accommodation of magma by fluid expulsion from the poorly consolidated claystone host rock, prior to a period of (forced) folding. This is supported by field observations, which indicate ';triggered' or ';thermal' fluidisation of the host rock may occur during sill emplacement. In such cases

  20. Budget of shallow magma plumbing system at Asama Volcano, Japan, revealed by ground deformation and volcanic gas studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Aoki, Yosuke; Shinohara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Multiple cycles of the intensive volcanic gas discharge and ground deformation (inflation and deflation) were observed at Asama Volcano, Japan, from 2000 to 2011. Magma budget of the shallow magma plumbing system was estimated on the basis of the volcanic gas emission rates and ground deformation data. Recent inflations observed in 2004 and 2008 were modeled as a dike intrusion to 2-3 km west of Asama Volcano. Previous studies proposed that magma ascends from a midcrustal magma reservoir to the dike and reaches the surface via a sinuous conduit which connects the dike to the summit. The intensive volcanic sulfur dioxide discharge of up to 4600 t/d at the volcano was modeled by magma convective degassing through this magma pathway. The volcano deflates as shrinkage of the magma in a reservoir by volcanic gas discharge. We estimated the volume change of the dike modeled based on the GPS observations, the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge, and the amount of degassed magma produced to calculate the magma budget. The results show that the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge was larger than the volume change of the dike during the inflation periods. This indicates that a significant volume of magma at least more than 2 times larger than the volume change of the dike was supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir to the dike. The volume decrease of the dike was comparable with the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge during the deflation periods. The long-term deflation trend of the dike and the volume of degassed magma (108-9 m3) suggest that the degassed magma produced is not stored in the dike and the magma is mainly supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir. In both periods, the volume of degassed magma produced was 1 order of magnitude larger than the volume change of the dike. This indicates that the actual volume of the magma supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir is up to 1 order of

  1. Magma energy: a feasible alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Colp, J.L.

    1980-03-01

    A short review of the work performed by Sandia Laboratories in connection with its Magma Energy Research Project is provided. Results to date suggest that boreholes will remain stable down to magma depths and engineering materials can survive the downhole environments. Energy extraction rates are encouraging. Geophysical sensing systems and interpretation methods require improvement, however, to clearly define a buried magma source.

  2. Episodic intrusion, internal differentiation, and hydrothermal alteration of the miocene tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Bacon, C.R.; John, D.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Miocene Tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier is composed of three broadly granodioritic plutons that are manifestations of ancestral Cascades arc magmatism. Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons have individually diagnostic characteristics, including texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry, and apparently lack internal contacts. New ion-microprobe U-Pb zircon ages indicate crystallization of the Stevens pluton ca. 19.2 Ma, Reflection-Pyramid pluton ca. 18.5 Ma, and Nisqually pluton ca. 17.5 Ma. The Stevens pluton includes rare, statistically distinct ca. 20.1 Ma zircon antecrysts. Wide-ranging zircon rare earth element (REE), Hf, U, and Th concentrations suggest late crystallization from variably evolved residual liquids. Zircon Eu/Eu*-Hf covariation is distinct for each of the Reflection-Pyramid, Nisqually, and Stevens plutons. Although most Tatoosh intrusive suite rocks have been affected by weak hydrothermal alteration, and sparse mineralized veins cut some of these rocks, significant base or precious metal mineralization is absent. At the time of shallow emplacement, each of these magma bodies was largely homogeneous in bulk composition and petrographic features, but, prior to final solidification, each of the Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons developed internal compositional variation. Geochemical and petrographic trends within each pluton are most consistent with differential loss of residual melt, possibly represented by late aplite dikes or erupted as rhyolite, from crystal-rich magma. Crystal-rich magma that formed each pluton evidently accumulated in reservoirs below the present level of exposure and then intruded to a shallow depth. Assembled by episodic intrusion, the Tatoosh intrusive suite may be representative of midsized composite plutonic complexes beneath arc volcanoes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  3. Rare earth mineralisation in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, A. S.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Goodenough, K. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Lacinska, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to growing global concerns about security of rare earth element (REE) supply, there is considerable interest in identifying new deposits and in understanding the processes responsible for their formation. Ongoing studies by BGS on potential indigenous resources have focused on the Caledonian alkaline intrusive complexes of north-west Scotland. The highest values of total rare earth oxide (TREO) have been found in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Complex in Sutherland. The Loch Loyal Syenite Complex comprises three intrusions: Ben Loyal, Beinn Stumanadh and Cnoc nan Cuilean. The Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, which covers an area of about 3 km2, can be subdivided into two zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone (MSZ) and a later Massive Leucosyenite Zone (MLZ). Evidence from field mapping and 3D-modelling suggests that the melasyenites were passively emplaced to form a lopolith concordant with the Moine and Lewisian country rocks. A later episode of leucosyenitic magmatism caused mixing and mingling with the melasyenite forming the MSZ. Continued intrusion of leucosyenite melts then formed the MLZ [1]. The melasyenites are enriched in TREO relative to the leucosyenites with average values of 3800 ppm and 1400 ppm respectively. The highest contents, up to 20 000 ppm TREO, are found in narrow biotite-magnetite-rich veins identified in a single stream section near the eastern margin of the intrusion. All lithologies are light rare earth element (LREE) dominated with high concentrations of Ba and Sr and low levels of Nb and Ta. Various REE-bearing minerals are present but allanite is dominant, being present in all major magmatic lithologies and the biotite-magnetite veins. Three generations of allanite have been identified: a late-magmatic phase rimming apatite; allanite micro veinlets cross-cutting the syenite; and a third phase only observed in the biotite-magnetite veins. TREO concentrations of the different allanite generations are similar, averaging 22%. The

  4. The Role of Spinel Minerals in Lunar Magma Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Staid, M.; Isaacson, P.; Petro, N. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), a NASA guest instrument on Chandrayaan-1, India’s first mission to the Moon, was designed to map the surface mineralogy of the Moon using reflected solar radiation at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, which contain highly diagnostic absorptions due to minerals. The M3 spectrometer has discovered several new and unexpected aspects of the geology and petrology of the Moon, some involving specific oxide phases. Spinel minerals, with the general formula, AB2O4, present clues as to the oxygen fugacity, the nature of magmatic systems, and their evolution, particularly during the early stages of crystallization. On the Moon, with its total lack of Fe3+ and minerals such as magnetite, observed spinels range between spinel, MgAl2O4; hercynite, FeAl2O4; Chromite, FeCr2O4; and ulvöspinel, Fe(FeTi)2O4. They manifest themselves in three distinctly different igneous rock types: highlands rocks of anorthosites/troctolites, gabbro-norites; mare basalts with various TiO2 contents; and basaltic pyroclastic volcanic glasses. Although spinels occur as minor minerals in the Apollo collection, unique rock types dominated by Mg-spinel (with olivine and pyroxene abundances below detection limits, assumed to be ~5%) have been identified by M3 on the Moon. Because the spinel-bearing rocks detected by M3 have no signature of a significant olivine component, they must be dominated by plagioclase and spinel. Pink Mg-spinels typically occur as a minor phase in troctolites (plagioclase + olivine), a highland rock formed after the initial Ferroan Anorthosite (FAN) crust, presumably by serial magmatism deep within the crust, with intrusion upward. FANs were formed by floatation of plagioclase in the lunar magma ocean (LMO), whereas spinels would sink due to their much higher density. Thus, a plagioclase-rich rock type with a strong Mg-spinel spectral signature would have to be part of later highland intrusives. The excess Mg-spinel could be the product of

  5. Carbon dioxide in magmas and implications for hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on the solubility, origin, abundance, and degassing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in magma-hydrothermal systems, with applications for those workers interested in intrusion-related deposits of gold and other metals. The solubility of CO2 increases with pressure and magma alkalinity. Its solubility is low relative to that of H2O, so that fluids exsolved deep in the crust tend to have high CO2/H2O compared with fluids evolved closer to the surface. Similarly, CO2/H2O will typically decrease during progressive decompression- or crystallization-induced degassing. The temperature dependence of solubility is a function of the speciation of CO2, which dissolves in molecular form in rhyolites (retrograde temperature solubility), but exists as dissolved carbonate groups in basalts (prograde). Magnesite and dolomite are stable under a relatively wide range of mantle conditions, but melt just above the solidus, thereby contributing CO2 to mantle magmas. Graphite, diamond, and a free CO2-bearing fluid may be the primary carbon-bearing phases in other mantle source regions. Growing evidence suggests that most CO2 is contributed to arc magmas via recycling of subducted oceanic crust and its overlying sediment blanket. Additional carbon can be added to magmas during magma-wallrock interactions in the crust. Studies of fluid and melt inclusions from intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks yield ample evidence that many magmas are vapor saturated as deep as the mid crust (10-15 km) and that CO2 is an appreciable part of the exsolved vapor. Such is the case in both basaltic and some silicic magmas. Under most conditions, the presence of a CO2-bearing vapor does not hinder, and in fact may promote, the ascent and eruption of the host magma. Carbonic fluids are poorly miscible with aqueous fluids, particularly at high temperature and low pressure, so that the presence of CO2 can induce immiscibility both within the magmatic volatile phase and in hydrothermal systems

  6. Magma deformation and emplacement in rhyolitic dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Ellen; Tuffen, Hugh; James, Mike; Wynn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Silicic eruption mechanisms are determined by the rheological and degassing behaviour of highly-viscous magma ascending within shallow dykes and conduits. However, we have little knowledge of how magmatic behaviour shifts during eruptions as dykes and conduits evolve. To address this we have analysed the micro- to macro-scale textures in shallow, dissected rhyolitic dykes at the Tertiary Húsafell central volcano in west Iceland. Dyke intrusion at ~3 Ma was associated with the emplacement of subaerial rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits following caldera formation[1]. The dykes are dissected to ~500 m depth, 2-3 m wide, and crop out in two stream valleys with 5-30 m-long exposures. Dykes intrude diverse country rock types, including a welded ignimbrite, basaltic lavas, and glacial conglomerate. Each of the six studied dykes is broadly similar, exhibiting obsidian margins and microcrystalline cores. Dykes within pre-fractured lava are surrounded by external tuffisite vein networks, which are absent from dykes within conglomerate, whereas dykes failed to penetrate the ignimbrite. Obsidian at dyke margins comprises layers of discrete colour. These display dramatic thickness variations and collapsed bubble structures, and are locally separated by zones of welded, brecciated and flow-banded obsidian. We use textural associations to present a detailed model of dyke emplacement and evolution. Dykes initially propagated with the passage of fragmented, gas-charged magma and generation of external tuffisite veins, whose distribution was strongly influenced by pre-existing fractures in the country rock. External tuffisites retained permeability throughout dyke emplacement due to their high lithic content. The geochemically homogenous dykes then evolved via incremental magma emplacement, with shear deformation localised along emplacement boundary layers. Shear zones migrated between different boundary layers, and bubble deformation promoted magma mobility. Brittle

  7. Deep magma transport at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Klein, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    The shallow part of Kilauea's magma system is conceptually well-understood. Long-period and short-period (brittle-failure) earthquake swarms outline a near-vertical magma transport path beneath Kilauea's summit to 20 km depth. A gravity high centered above the magma transport path demonstrates that Kilauea's shallow magma system, established early in the volcano's history, has remained fixed in place. Low seismicity at 4-7 km outlines a storage region from which magma is supplied for eruptions and intrusions. Brittle-failure earthquake swarms shallower than 5 km beneath the rift zones accompany dike emplacement. Sparse earthquakes extend to a decollement at 10-12 km along which the south flank of Kilauea is sliding seaward. This zone below 5 km can sustain aseismic magma transport, consistent with recent tomographic studies. Long-period earthquake clusters deeper than 40 km occur parallel to and offshore of Kilauea's south coast, defining the deepest seismic response to magma transport from the Hawaiian hot spot. A path connecting the shallow and deep long-period earthquakes is defined by mainshock-aftershock locations of brittle-failure earthquakes unique to Kilauea whose hypocenters are deeper than 25 km with magnitudes from 4.4 to 5.2. Separation of deep and shallow long-period clusters occurs as the shallow plumbing moves with the volcanic edifice, while the deep plumbing is centered over the hotspot. Recent GPS data agrees with the volcano-propagation vector from Kauai to Maui, suggesting that Pacific plate motion, azimuth 293.5?? and rate of 7.4 cm/yr, has been constant over Kilauea's lifetime. However, volcano propagation on the island of Hawaii, azimuth 325??, rate 13 cm/yr, requires southwesterly migration of the locus of melting within the broad hotspot. Deep, long-period earthquakes lie west of the extrapolated position of Kilauea backward in time along a plate-motion vector, requiring southwesterly migration of Kilauea's magma source. Assumed ages of 0

  8. Influence of substrate tectonic heritage on the evolution of composite volcanoes: Predicting sites of flank eruption, lateral collapse, and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro; Corazzato, Claudia; Kozhurin, Andrey; Lagmay, Alfredo F. M.; Pasquarè, Federico A.; Ponomareva, Vera V.; Rust, Derek; Tormey, Daniel; Vezzoli, Luigina

    2008-04-01

    This paper aims to aid understanding of the complicated interplay between construction and destruction of volcanoes, with an emphasis on the role of substrate tectonic heritage in controlling magma conduit geometry, lateral collapse, landslides, and preferential erosion pathways. The influence of basement structure on the development of six composite volcanoes located in different geodynamic/geological environments is described: Stromboli (Italy), in an island arc extensional tectonic setting, Ollagüe (Bolivia-Chile) in a cordilleran extensional setting, Kizimen (Russia) in a transtensional setting, Pinatubo (Philippines) in a transcurrent setting, Planchon (Chile) in a compressional cordilleran setting, and Mt. Etna (Italy) in a complex tectonic boundary setting. Analogue and numerical modelling results are used to enhance understanding of processes exemplified by these volcanic centres. We provide a comprehensive overview of this topic by considering a great deal of relevant, recently published studies and combine these with the presentation of new results, in order to contribute to the discussion on substrate tectonics and its control on volcano evolution. The results show that magma conduits in volcanic rift zones can be geometrically controlled by the regional tectonic stress field. Rift zones produce a lateral magma push that controls the direction of lateral collapse and can also trigger collapse. Once lateral collapse occurs, the resulting debuttressing produces a reorganization of the shallow-level magma migration pathways towards the collapse depression. Subsequent landslides and erosion tend to localize along rift zones. If a zone of weakness underlies a volcano, long-term creep can occur, deforming a large sector of the cone. This deformation can trigger landslides that propagate along the destabilized flank axis. In the absence of a rift zone, normal and transcurrent faults propagating from the substrate through the volcano can induce flank

  9. Evidence for crustal recycling during the Archean: The parental magmas of the stillwater complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1988-01-01

    The petrology and geochemistry of the Stillwater Complex, an Archean (2.7 Ga) layered mafic intrusion in the Beartooth Mountains of Montana is discussed. Efforts to reconstruct the compositions of possible parental magmas and thereby place some constraints on the composition and history of their mantle source regions was studied. A high-Mg andesite or boninite magma best matches the crystallization sequences and mineral compositions of Stillwater cumulates, and represents either a primary magma composition or a secondary magma formed, for example, by assimilation of crustal material by a very Mg-rich melt such as komatiite. Isotopic data do not support the extensive amounts of assimilation required by the komatiite parent hypothesis, and it is argued that the Stillwater magma was generated from a mantle source that had been enriched by recycling and homogenization of older crustal material over a large area.

  10. Controls on the explosivity of scoria cone eruptions: Magma segregation at conduit junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Azzopardi, B. J.; Cashman, K. V.

    2009-10-01

    Violent strombolian (transitional) eruptions are common in mafic arc settings and are characterized by simultaneous explosive activity from scoria cone vents and lava effusion from lateral vents. This dual activity requires magma from the feeder conduit to split into vertical and lateral branches somewhere near the base of the scoria cone. Additionally, if the flow is separated, gas and liquid (+ crystals) components of the magma may be partitioned unevenly between the two branches. Because flow separation requires bubbles to move independently of the liquid over time scales of magma ascent separation is promoted by low magma viscosities and by high magma H 2O content (i.e. sufficiently deep bubble nucleation to allow organization of the gas and liquid phases during magma ascent). Numerical modeling shows that magma and gas distribution between vertical and horizontal branches of a T-junction is controlled by the mass flow rate and the geometry of the system, as well as by magma viscosity. Specifically, we find that mass eruption rates (MERs) between 10 3 and 10 5 kg/s allow the gas phase to concentrate within the central conduit, significantly increasing explosivity of the eruption. Lower MERs produce either strombolian or effusive eruption styles, while MER > 10 5 kg/s prohibit both gas segregation and lateral magma transport, creating explosive eruptions that are not accompanied by effusive activity. These bracketing MER constraints on eruptive transitions are consistent with field observations from recent eruptions of hydrous mafic magmas.

  11. Detecting deep crustal magma movement: Exploring linkages between increased gas emission, deep seismicity, and deformation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C. A.; Poland, M. P.; Power, J. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Grapenthin, R.; Thelen, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    Typically in the weeks to days before a volcanic eruption there are indisputable signals of unrest that can be identified in geophysical and geochemical data. Detection of signals of volcanic unrest months to years prior to an eruption, however, relies on our ability to recognize and link more subtle changes. Deep long-period earthquakes, typically 10-45 km beneath volcanoes, are thought to represent magma movement and may indicate near future unrest. Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) exsolves from most magmas at similar depths and increases in CO2 discharge may also provide a months-to-years precursor as it emits at the surface in advance of the magma from which it exsolved. Without the use of sensitive monitoring equipment and routine measurements, changes in CO2 can easily go undetected. Finally, inflation of the surface, through use of InSAR or GPS stations (especially at sites tens of km from the volcano) can also indicate accumulation of magma in the deep crust. Here we present three recent examples, from Redoubt, Kilauea, and Mammoth Mountain volcanoes, where increases in CO2 emission, deep long-period earthquakes, and surface deformation data indicate either the intrusion of magma into the deep crust in the months to years preceding volcanic eruptions or a change in ongoing volcanic unrest. At Redoubt volcano, Alaska, elevated CO2 emission (~ 1200 t/d, or roughly 20 times the background emission) was measured in October, 2008, over 5 months prior to the first magmatic eruption in March, 2009. In addition to CO2 release, deep long-period earthquakes were first recorded in December, 2008, and a deep deformation signal was detected starting in May 2008, albeit retrospectively. At Kilauea, Hawaii, increases in CO2 emissions from the summit (up to nearly 25 kt/d, over three times the background emission) were measured mid-2004, roughly coincident with a change in deformation behavior from deflation to inflation. Nearly 3 years later, a change in eruptive activity occurred

  12. Draining mafic magma from conduits during Strombolian eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, F. B.; Kennedy, B.; Branney, M. J.; Vasseur, J.; von Aulock, F. W.; Lavallée, Y.; Kueppers, U.

    2014-12-01

    During and following eruption, mafic magmas can readily drain downward in conduits, dykes and lakes producing complex and coincident up-flow and down-flow textures. This process can occur at the top of the plumbing system if the magma outgases as slugs or through porous foam, causing the uppermost magma surface to descend and the magma to densify. In this scenario the draining volume is limited by the gas volume outgassed. Additionally, magma can undergo wholesale backflow when the pressure at the base of the conduit or feeder dyke exceeds the driving pressure in the chamber beneath. This second scenario will continue until pressure equilibrium is established. These two scenarios may occur coincidently as local draining of uppermost conduit magma by outgassing can lead to wholesale backflow because the densification of magma is an effective way to modify the vertical pressure profile in a conduit. In the rare case where conduits are preserved in cross section, the textural record of draining is often complex and great care should be taken in interpreting bimodal kinematic trends in detail. Lateral cooling into country rock leads to lateral profiles of physical and flow properties and, ultimately, outgassing potential, and exploration of such profiles elucidates the complexity involved. We present evidence from Red Crater volcano, New Zealand, and La Palma, Canary Islands, where we show that at least one draining phase followed initial ascent and eruption. We provide a rheological model approach to understand gravitational draining velocities and therefore, the timescales of up- and down-flow cycles predicted. These timescales can be compared with observed geophysical signals at monitored mafic volcanoes worldwide. Finally, we discuss the implications of shallow magma draining for edifice stability, eruption longevity and magma-groundwater interaction.

  13. Successive episodes of reactive liquid flow through a layered intrusion (Unit 9, Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, J.; Blundy, J. D.; Holness, M. B.; Sides, R.

    2014-07-01

    laterally through the remobilized cumulate pile and precipitating clinopyroxene en route. This process, called reactive liquid flow, is potentially important in open magma chambers.

  14. Number of Waste Package Hit by Igneous Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wallace

    2004-10-13

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to document calculations of the number of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Igneous activity is a disruptive event that is included in the TSPA-LA analyses. Two igneous activity scenarios are considered: (1) The igneous intrusion groundwater release scenario (also called the igneous intrusion scenario) considers the in situ damage to waste packages or failure of waste packages that occurs if they are engulfed or otherwise affected by magma as a result of an igneous intrusion. (2) The volcanic eruption scenario depicts the direct release of radioactive waste due to an intrusion that intersects the repository followed by a volcanic eruption at the surface. An igneous intrusion is defined as the ascent of a basaltic dike or dike system (i.e., a set or swarm of multiple dikes comprising a single intrusive event) to repository level, where it intersects drifts. Magma that does reach the surface from igneous activity is an eruption (or extrusive activity) (Jackson 1997 [DIRS 109119], pp. 224, 333). The objective of this analysis is to develop a probabilistic measure of the number of waste packages that could be affected by each of the two scenarios.

  15. Comparative Magma Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether the Earth ever passed through a magma ocean stop is of considerable interest. Geochemical evidence strongly suggests that the Moon had a magma ocean and the evidence is mounting that the same was true for Mars. Analyses of mar (SNC) meteorites have yielded insights into the differentiation history of Mars, and consequently, it is interesting to compare that planet to the Earth. Three primary features of An contrast strongly to those of the Earth: (1) the extremely ancient ages of the martian core, mantle, and crust (approx. 4.55 b.y.); (2) the highly depleted nature of the martian mantle; and (3) the extreme ranges of Nd isotopic compositions that arise within the crust and depleted mantle.

  16. Intrusive Images in Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, Chris R.; Gregory, James D.; Lipton, Michelle; Burgess, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Involuntary images and visual memories are prominent in many types of psychopathology. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, depression, eating disorders, and psychosis frequently report repeated visual intrusions corresponding to a small number of real or imaginary events, usually extremely vivid, detailed, and with highly distressing content. Both memory and imagery appear to rely on common networks involving medial prefrontal regions, posterior regions in the medial and lateral parietal cortices, the lateral temporal cortex, and the medial temporal lobe. Evidence from cognitive psychology and neuroscience implies distinct neural bases to abstract, flexible, contextualized representations (C-reps) and to inflexible, sensory-bound representations (S-reps). We revise our previous dual representation theory of posttraumatic stress disorder to place it within a neural systems model of healthy memory and imagery. The revised model is used to explain how the different types of distressing visual intrusions associated with clinical disorders arise, in terms of the need for correct interaction between the neural systems supporting S-reps and C-reps via visuospatial working memory. Finally, we discuss the treatment implications of the new model and relate it to existing forms of psychological therapy. PMID:20063969

  17. The Surtsey Magma Series

    PubMed Central

    Ian Schipper, C.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; White, James D.L.; Michael Palin, J.; Bush-Marcinowski, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The volcanic island of Surtsey (Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland) is the product of a 3.5-year-long eruption that began in November 1963. Observations of magma-water interaction during pyroclastic episodes made Surtsey the type example of shallow-to-emergent phreatomagmatic eruptions. Here, in part to mark the 50th anniversary of this canonical eruption, we present previously unpublished major-element whole-rock compositions, and new major and trace-element compositions of sideromelane glasses in tephra collected by observers and retrieved from the 1979 drill core. Compositions became progressively more primitive as the eruption progressed, with abrupt changes corresponding to shifts between the eruption’s four edifices. Trace-element ratios indicate that the chemical variation is best explained by mixing of different proportions of depleted ridge-like basalt, with ponded, enriched alkalic basalt similar to that of Iceland’s Eastern Volcanic Zone; however, the systematic offset of Surtsey compositions to lower Nb/Zr than other Vestmannaeyjar lavas indicates that these mixing end members are as-yet poorly contained by compositions in the literature. As the southwestern-most volcano in the Vestmannaeyjar, the geochemistry of the Surtsey Magma Series exemplifies processes occurring within ephemeral magma bodies on the extreme leading edge of a propagating off-axis rift in the vicinity of the Iceland plume. PMID:26112644

  18. The Surtsey Magma Series.

    PubMed

    Schipper, C Ian; Jakobsson, Sveinn P; White, James D L; Michael Palin, J; Bush-Marcinowski, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The volcanic island of Surtsey (Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland) is the product of a 3.5-year-long eruption that began in November 1963. Observations of magma-water interaction during pyroclastic episodes made Surtsey the type example of shallow-to-emergent phreatomagmatic eruptions. Here, in part to mark the 50(th) anniversary of this canonical eruption, we present previously unpublished major-element whole-rock compositions, and new major and trace-element compositions of sideromelane glasses in tephra collected by observers and retrieved from the 1979 drill core. Compositions became progressively more primitive as the eruption progressed, with abrupt changes corresponding to shifts between the eruption's four edifices. Trace-element ratios indicate that the chemical variation is best explained by mixing of different proportions of depleted ridge-like basalt, with ponded, enriched alkalic basalt similar to that of Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone; however, the systematic offset of Surtsey compositions to lower Nb/Zr than other Vestmannaeyjar lavas indicates that these mixing end members are as-yet poorly contained by compositions in the literature. As the southwestern-most volcano in the Vestmannaeyjar, the geochemistry of the Surtsey Magma Series exemplifies processes occurring within ephemeral magma bodies on the extreme leading edge of a propagating off-axis rift in the vicinity of the Iceland plume. PMID:26112644

  19. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2004-08-16

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  20. Time, space, and composition relations among northern Nevada intrusive rocks and their metallogenic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    duBray, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Importantly, modal composition, age, and geochemical characteristics of intrusions associated with large mineral deposits along the trends, are indistinguishable from non-mineralized intrusions in northern Nevada and thus do not identify intrusions associated with significant deposits. Moreover, intrusion age and composition show little correlation with mineral-deposit type, abundance, and size. Given the lack of diagnostic characteristics for intrusions associated with deposits, it is uncertain whether age, modal composition, and geochemical data can identify intrusions associated with mineral deposits. These findings suggest that associations between northern Nevada intrusions and mineral deposits reflect superimposition of many geologic factors, none of which was solely responsible for mineral-deposit formation. These factors might include intrusion size, efficiency of fluid and metal extraction from magma, prevailing redox and sulfidation conditions, or derivation of metals and ligands from host rocks and groundwater. The abundance and diversity of mineral deposits in northern Nevada may partly reflect geochemical inheritance, for example, along the mineral trends rather than the influence of petrologically unique magma or associated fluids.

  1. The oxidation state, and sulfur and Cu contents of arc magmas: implications for metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeremy P.

    2015-09-01

    Global data for measured Fe2O3/FeO ratios and Cu contents in unaltered volcanic and intrusive arc rocks indicate that, on average, they are slightly more oxidized than other magmas derived from depleted upper mantle (such as MORB), but contain similar Cu contents across their compositional ranges. Although Cu scatters to elevated values in some intermediate composition samples, the bulk of the data show a steady but gentle trend to lower concentrations with differentiation, reaching modal values of ~ 50-100 ppm in andesitic rocks. These data suggest that Cu is mildly compatible during partial melting and fractionation processes, likely reflecting minor degrees of sulfide saturation throughout the magmatic cycle. However, the volume of sulfides must be small such that significant proportions of the metal content remain in the magma during fractionation to intermediate compositions. Previous studies have shown that andesitic magmas containing ~ 50 ppm Cu can readily form large porphyry-type Cu deposits upon emplacement in the upper crust. A review of the literature suggests that the elevated oxidation state in the asthenospheric mantle wedge source of arc magmas (ΔFMQ ≈ + 1 ± 1) derives from the subduction of seawater-altered and oxidized oceanic crust, and is transmitted into the mantle wedge via prograde metamorphic dehydration fluids carrying sulfate and other oxidizing components. Progressive hydration and oxidation of the mantle wedge may take up to ~ 10 m.y. to reach a steady state from the onset of subduction, explaining the rarity of porphyry deposits in primitive island arcs, and the late formation of porphyries in continental arc magmatic cycles. Magmas generated from this metasomatized and moderately oxidized mantle source will be hydrous basalts containing high concentrations of sulfur, mainly dissolved as sulfate or sulfite. Some condensed sulfides (melt or minerals) may be present due to the high overall fS2, despite the moderately high oxidation

  2. Rift initiation with volatiles and magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, Cynthia; Muirhead, James; Roecker, Steve; Tiberi, Christel; Muzuka, Alfred; Ferdinand, Rrichard; Mulibo, Gabrile; Kianji, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    Rift initiation in cratonic lithosphere remains an outstanding problem in continental tectonics, but strain and magmatism patterns in youthful sectors of the East African rift provide new insights. Few teleseisms occur in the Eastern rift arm of the East African rift system, except the southernmost sector in northern Tanzania where extension occurs in Archaean lithosphere. The change in seismic energy release occurs over a narrow along-axis zone, and between sectors with and without volcanoes in the central rift valley. Are these differences in strain behavior indicative of along-strike variations in a) rheology; b) strain transfer from border faults to magma intrusion zones; c) dike vs fault slip; and/or d) shallow vs deep magma chambers? We present time-space relations of seismicity recorded on a 38-station array spanning the Kenya-Tanzania border, focal mechanisms for the largest events during those time periods, and compare these to longer-term strain patterns. Lower crustal seismicity occurs along the rift length, including sectors on and off craton, and those with and without central rift valley volcanoes, and we see no clear along-strike variation in seismogenic layer thickness. One explanation for widespread lower crustal seismicity is high gas pressures and volatile migration from active metasomatism of upper mantle and magma degassing, consistent with very high volatile flux along fault zones, and widespread metasomatism of xenoliths. Volatile release and migration may be critical to strength reduction of initially cold, strong cratonic lithosphere. Seismicity patterns indicate strain (and fluid?) transfer from the Manyara border fault to Gelai shield volcano (faulting, diking) via Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. Our focal mechanisms and Global CMTs from an intense fault-dike episode (2007) show a local, temporally stable, rotation from ~E-W extension to NE-SE extension in this linkage zone, consistent with longer term patterns recorded in vent and eruptive

  3. Stress control of deep rift intrusion at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Amelung, Falk; Yun, Sang-Ho; Walter, Thomas R; Segall, Paul; Kim, Sang-Wan

    2007-05-18

    Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, deforms by a combination of shallow dike intrusions in the rift zones and earthquakes along the base of the volcano, but it is not known how the spreading is accommodated in the lower part of the volcanic edifice. We present evidence from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for secular inflation of a dike-like magma body at intermediate depth in the southwest rift zone during 2002 to 2005. Magma accumulation occurred in a section of the rift zone that was unclamped by previous dikes and earthquakes, suggesting that stress transfer plays an important role in controlling subsurface magma accumulation. PMID:17510364

  4. Bro Intrusion Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Paxson, Vern; Campbell, Scott; leres, Craig; Lee, Jason

    2006-01-25

    Bro is a Unix-based Network Intrusion Detection System (IDS). Bro monitors network traffic and detects intrusion attempts based on the traffic characteristics and content. Bro detects intrusions by comparing network traffic against rules describing events that are deemed troublesome. These rules might describe activities (e.g., certain hosts connecting to certain services), what activities are worth alerting (e.g., attempts to a given number of different hosts constitutes a "scan"), or signatures describing known attacks or access to known vulnerabilities. If Bro detects something of interest, it can be instructed to either issue a log entry or initiate the execution of an operating system command. Bro targets high-speed (Gbps), high-volume intrusion detection. By judiciously leveraging packet filtering techniques, Bro is able to achieve the performance necessary to do so while running on commercially available PC hardware, and thus can serve as a cost effective means of monitoring a site’s Internet connection.

  5. Computer Intrusions and Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Examines some frequently encountered unsolicited computer intrusions, including computer viruses, worms, Java applications, trojan horses or vandals, e-mail spamming, hoaxes, and cookies. Also discusses virus-protection software, both for networks and for individual users. (LRW)

  6. Magma energy: engineering feasibility of energy extraction from magma bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1983-12-01

    A research program was carried out from 1975 to 1982 to evaluate the scientific feasibility of extracting energy from magma, i.e., to determine if there were any fundamental scientific roadblocks to tapping molten magma bodies at depth. The next stage of the program is to evaluate the engineering feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies and to provide insight into system economics. This report summarizes the plans, schedules and estimated costs for the engineering feasibility study. Tentative tasks and schedules are presented for discussion and critique. A bibliography of past publications on magma energy is appended for further reference. 69 references.

  7. Forecasting the path of a laterally propagating dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Hooper, Andrew; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of eruption forecasting is predicting the path of propagating dikes. We show how lateral dike propagation can be forecast using the minimum potential energy principle. We compare theory to observed propagation paths of dikes originating at the Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland, in 2014 and 1996, by developing a probability distribution for the most likely propagation path. The observed propagation paths agree well with the model prediction. We find that topography is very important for the model, and our preferred forecasting model considers its influence on the potential energy change of the crust and magma. We tested the influence of topography by running the model assuming no topography and found that the path of the 2014 dike could not be hindcasted. The results suggest that lateral dike propagation is governed not only by deviatoric stresses but also by pressure gradients and gravitational potential energy. Furthermore, the model predicts the formation of curved dikes around cone-shaped structures without the assumption of a local deviatoric stress field. We suggest that a likely eruption site for a laterally propagating dike is in topographic lows. The method presented here is simple and computationally feasible. Our results indicate that this kind of a model can be applied to mitigate volcanic hazards in regions where the tectonic setting promotes formation of laterally propagating vertical intrusive sheets.

  8. Magma Dynamics at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. Krier

    2005-08-29

    Small-volume basaltic volcanic activity at Yucca Mountain has been identified as one of the potential events that could lead to release of radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Release of material could occur indirectly as a result of magmatic dike intrusion into the repository (with no associated surface eruption) by changing groundwater flow paths, or as a result of an eruption (dike intrusion of the repository drifts, followed by surface eruption of contaminated ash) or volcanic ejection of material onto the Earth's surface and the redistribution of contaminated volcanic tephra. Either release method includes interaction between emplacement drifts and a magmatic dike or conduit, and natural (geologic) processes that might interrupt or halt igneous activity. This analysis provides summary information on two approaches to evaluate effects of disruption at the repository by basaltic igneous activity: (1) descriptions of the physical geometry of ascending basaltic dikes and their interaction with silicic host rocks similar in composition to the repository host rocks; and (2) a summary of calculations developed to quantify the response of emplacement drifts that have been flooded with magma and repressurized following blockage of an eruptive conduit. The purpose of these analyses is to explore the potential consequences that could occur during the full duration of an igneous event.

  9. [The spectrum studies of structure characteristics in magma contact metamorphic coal].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dun; Sun, Ruo-Yu; Liu, Gui-Jian; Yuan, Zi-Jiao

    2013-10-01

    The structural parameters evolution of coal due to the influence of intrusions of hot magma was investigated and analyzed. X-ray diffraction and laser confocal microscope Raman spectroscopy were used to test and analyze 4 coal samples undergoing varying contact-metamorphism by igneous magmas in borehole No. 13-4 of Zhuji coal mine, Huainan coalfield. The result showed that coal XRD spectrum showed higher background intensity, with the 26 degrees and 42 degrees nearby apparent graphite diffraction peak. Two significant vibration peaks of coal Raman spectra were observed in the 1 000-2 000 cm(-1) frequency range: broad "D" peak at 1 328-1 369 cm(-1) and sharp "G" peak at 1 564-1 599 cm(-1). With the influence of magma intrusion, the relationship between coal structural parameters and coal ranks was excellent. PMID:24409751

  10. Igneous intrusion models for floor fracturing in lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are primarily located near the maria and frequently contain ponded mare units and dark mantling deposits. Fracturing is confined to the crater interior, often producing a moat-like feature near the floor edge, and crater depth is commonly reduced by uplift of the crater floor. Although viscous relaxation of crater topography can produce such uplift, the close association of modification with surface volcanism supports a model linking floor fracture to crater-centered igneous intrusions. The consequences of two intrusion models for the lunar interior are quantitatively explored. The first model is based on terrestrial laccoliths and describes a shallow intrusion beneath the crater. The second model is based on cone sheet complexes where surface deformation results from a deeper magma chamber. Both models, their fit to observed crater modifications and possible implications for local volcanism are described.

  11. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Ward, L.; Fanning, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex. We have investigated the relationships between deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the Delamerian orogeny on Kangaroo Island. Several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt (D1-D4) and we describe how magma segregation, accumulation and extraction changes with deformation style. During an early upright folding event (D2), magma was channelled towards the hinge of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root that link towards a central axial planar channel, marking the main magma extraction paths. Extraction was associated with limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption. During a later deformation phase (D4), diatexites were sheared so that schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes. Foliations in the magmatic matrix and schollen asymmetry indicate dextral shearing. During flow, magma accumulated in shear planes, indicating a dilational component during shearing (transtension) and on strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned (post-D4), magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels, similar to those developed during folding. The funnel-shape networks are interpreted as magma extraction networks and indicate magma flow direction. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those developed during dewatering of soft sediments. The magmatic rocks from migmatites formed early, during folding, and formed late after deformation waned were dated. Both have two monazite (U-Pb, SHRIMP) age groups of ~490Ma and ~505-520Ma. The older sample has a well-defined peak at 505-510Ma and trails into the younger ages. The younger sample has the opposite, with few old spots and a well-defined young peak at ~490Ma. The age range indicates the duration of anatexis, and well-defined peaks are interpreted to mark the age of individual magma batch

  12. Isotopic variation in the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite, central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Chappell, B.W.; Peck, D.L.; Bateman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Granitoid rocks of the compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Toulumne Intrusive Suite in the central Sierra Nevada, California, have initial87Sr/86Sr values (Sri) and143Nd/144Nd values (Ndi) that vary from 0.7057 to 0.7067 and from 0.51239 to 0.51211 respectively. The observed variation of both Sri and Ndi and of chemical composition in rocks of the suite cannot be due to crystal fractionation of magma solely under closed system conditons. The largest variation in chemistry, Ndi, and Sri is present in the outer-most equigranular units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. Sri varies positively with SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Rb concentrations, and negatively with Ndi, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, FeO, CaO, MnO, P2O5, TiO2, and Sr concentrations. This covariation of Sri, Ndi and chemistry can be modeled by a process of simple mixing of basaltic and granitic magmas having weight percent SiO2 of 48.0 and 73.3 respectively. Isotopic characteristic of the mafic magma are Sri=0.7047, Ndi=0.51269 and ??18O=6.0, and of the felsic magma are Sri=0.7068, Ndi=0.51212 and ??18O=8.9. The rocks sampled contain from 50 to 80% of the felsic component. An aplite in the outer equigranular unit of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite apparently was derived by fractional crystallization of plagioclase and hornblende from magma with granudiorite composition that was a product of mixing of the magmas described above. Siliceous magmas derived from the lower crust, having a maximum of 15 percent mantle-derived mafic component, are represented by the inner prophyritic units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Viscosity of Campi Flregrei (Italy) magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiti, Valeria; Vetere, Francesco; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Behrens, Harald; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Freda, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Viscosity is an important factor governing both intrusive and volcanic processes. The most important parameters governing silicate melts viscosity are bulk composition of melt and temperature. Pressure has only minor effect at crustal depths, whereas crystals and bubbles have significant influence. Among compositional parameters, the water content is critical above all in terms of rheological behaviour of melts and explosive style of an eruption. Consequently, without an appropriate knowledge of magma viscosity depending on the amount of dissolved volatiles, it is not possible to model the processes (i.e., magma ascent, fragmentation, and dispersion) required to predict realistic volcanic scenarios and thus forecast volcanic hazards. The Campi Flegrei are a large volcanic complex (~150 km2) located west of the city of Naples, Italy, that has been the site of volcanic activity for more than 60 ka and represents a potential volcanic hazard owing to the large local population. In the frame of a INGV-DPC (Department of Civil Protection) project devoted to design a multidisciplinary system for short-term volcano hazard evaluation, we performed viscosity measurements, under dry and hydrous conditions, of primitive melt compositions representative of two Campi Flegrei eruptions (Minopoli-shoshonite and Fondo Riccio-latite). Viscosity of the two melts have been investigated in the high temperature/low viscosity range at atmospheric pressure in dry samples and at 0.5 GPa in runs having water content from nominally anhydrous to about 3 wt%. Data in the low temperature/high viscosity range were obtained near the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure on samples whose water contents vary from 0.3 up to 2.43 wt%. The combination of high- and low-viscosity data permits a general description of the viscosity as a function of temperature and water content using a modified Tamman-Vogel-Fulcher equation. logν = a+ --b--+ --d--×exp(g × w-) (T - c) (T - e) T (1) where

  14. Deformation Structures associated with the emplacement of high level intrusions: A study of Trachyte Mesa Intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I. R.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Jarvis, I.; Murphy, P.; Davidson, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Most studies of sill and laccolith complexes have focused on the internal architecture and thermal effects of these intrusions, while few have looked in detail at host rock deformation structures associated with their emplacement. Various sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms have been proposed (e.g. radial growth/ bulldozing, and two-stage growth), each with their own distinct deformation style. Compressional structures likely dominate during radial growth (bulldozing) emplacement, while extensional structures are more likely to form during two-stage growth emplacement. In this study we focus on deformation structures (faults, deformation bands and joints) associated with emplacement of Tertiary sills and laccolith intrusions in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Trachyte Mesa, the most distal satellite intrusion to the Mt. Hilliers intrusive centre, is an elongate (NE-SW) laccolith concordant with the Entrada sandstone it intrudes. The intrusion is comprised of multiple, stacked intrusive sheets. Two structural transects across the northwest lateral margin have identified distinct structural domains within the host rock that reflect both temporal and kinematic variations in deformation. Three deformation phases are identified, interpreted to be pre-, syn- and late-emplacement structures. A background set of deformation bands (phase 1), trending oblique to the intrusion margin, is apparent across the entire area. A second set of deformation bands (phase 2) overprint the early phase. These are characterised by conjugate deformation bands that parallel the intrusion margin, and increase in intensity and spacing towards the intrusion. Within this same zone a series of calcite filled normal faults, striking parallel and perpendicular to the intrusion margin, are apparent. Due to their spatial, kinematic and overprinting relationships we interpret these to be linked to the emplacement of the intrusive body. Overprinting all other structures, are two sets of tensile joints

  15. Seismic Tremors and Three-Dimensional Magma Wagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Bercovici, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tremor is a feature shared by many silicic volcanoes and is a precursor of volcanic eruption. Many of the characteristics of tremors, including their frequency band from 0.5 Hz to 7 Hz, are common for volcanoes with very different geophysical and geochemical properties. The ubiquitous characteristics of tremor imply that it results from some generation mechanism that is common to all volcanoes, instead of being unique to each volcano. Here we present new analysis on the magma-wagging mechanism that has been proposed to generate tremor. The model is based on the suggestion given by previous work (Jellinek & Bercovici 2011; Bercovici et.al. 2013) that the magma column is surrounded by a compressible, bubble-rich foam annulus while rising inside the volcanic conduit, and that the lateral oscillation of the magma inside the annulus causes observable tremor. Unlike the previous two-dimensional wagging model where the displacement of the magma column is restricted to one vertical plane, the three-dimensional model we employ allows the magma column to bend in different directions and has angular motion as well. Our preliminary results show that, without damping from viscous deformation of the magma column, the system retains angular momentum and develops elliptical motion (i.e., the horizontal displacement traces an ellipse). In this ''inviscid'' limit, the magma column can also develop instabilities with higher frequencies than what is found in the original two-dimensional model. Lateral motion can also be out of phase for various depths in the magma column leading to a coiled wagging motion. For the viscous-magma model, we predict a similar damping rate for the uncoiled magma column as in the two-dimensional model, and faster damping for the coiled magma column. The higher damping thus requires the existence of a forcing mechanism to sustain the oscillation, for example the gas-driven Bernoulli effect proposed by Bercovici et al (2013). Finally, using our new 3

  16. Geology, petrology and geochemistry of the "Americano do Brasil" layered intrusion, central Brazil, and its Ni-Cu sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E Silva, Jonas Mota; Ferreira Filho, Cesar Fonseca; Bühn, Bernhard; Dantas, Elton Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The "Americano do Brasil" Complex (ABC) is part of a cluster of coeval synorogenic mafic-ultramafic intrusions emplaced during the Brasiliano/Pan-African Orogenic Cycle in Brazil. The medium-sized ABC consists of interlayered dunite, peridotite, websterite, and gabbronorite. High Fo values of olivine (up to Fo88) and the crystallization sequence of the ABC (Ol + Chr ≥ Ol + Opx + Chr ≥ Cpx + Opx ≥ Opx + Pl + Cpx ≥ Opx + Pl + Cpx + Ilm + Mag) suggest crystallization from tholeiitic high-MgO parental magmas. Light rare earth element (REE)-enriched mantle-normalized REE profiles and ɛNd(T) values of +2.4 for cumulate rocks from the ABC suggest a depleted mantle source for the parental magma. The ABC Ni-Cu sulfide deposit (3.1 Mt at 1.12 wt.% Ni and 1.02 wt.% Cu) consists of three distinctively different orebodies (S1, S2, and G2). The S2 orebody, an unusual occurrence of stratiform massive sulfide hosted by dunite and peridotite in the interior of a layered intrusion, results from sulfides accumulated at the transient base of the magma chamber following a new influx of parental magma. The G2 orebody has an irregular and roughly cylindrical shape, consisting mainly of net-textured sulfides. The G2 orebody is hosted by peridotite and pyroxenite and located stratigraphically below the S1 orebody. S2 and G2 orebodies are characterized by low Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly below 0.4). The S1 orebody, hosted by websterite and gabbronorite in the more fractionated sequence of the ABC, is a cluster of several irregular discontinuous orebodies of Ni-Cu disseminated sulfides. The sulfides of the S1 orebody have high Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly between 0.5 and 0.8) and are highly depleted in PGE. The S1 orebody is interpreted to result from a later event of sulfide segregation in the magma chamber, possibly following the event that originated the G2 orebody. The bulk of δ34S values for sulfides of the ABC orebodies and their host rocks fall in the range of 0 ± 2‰. Higher

  17. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  18. The petrogenesis of late Neoproterozoic mafic dyke-like intrusion in south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Abu El-Ela, F. F.; Ren, M.

    2012-08-01

    New field, petrographical and geochemical studies are presented here for the late Neoproterozoic Rimm intrusion (˜15 km long) exposed in the southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt in the northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Field relations indicate that the Rimm intrusion is younger than the surrounding metamorphic rocks and calc-alkaline syn-tectonic granodiorite and it was not affected by regional metamorphism. The anorogenic peralkaline granite of Gebel Serbal crosscuts the Rimm intrusion. The Rimm intrusion is made up of several consanguineous rock types with gradational contacts. It is composed chiefly of pyroxene-hornblende gabbro, hornblende gabbro and minor quartz diorite. The chemical composition of the mafic minerals indicated that the studied rocks derived from calc-alkaline mafic magma. Geochemically, the studied rocks are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(Ce/Yb)N = 4.50-6.36]. Quartz diorite display slightly concave HREE pattern and slightly negative Eu-anomaly [(Eu/Eu*)n = 0.91] which may be the result of fractionation of amphibole and plagioclase from the source melt, respectively. The Rimm intrusion evolved from mafic mantle magma into different type rocks by fractional crystallization with minor crustal contamination. The initial magma corresponds to pyroxene-hornblende gabbro and the crystallization of hornblende was caused by slight H2O increase in magma after crystallization of near-liquidus clinopyroxene and Ca-rich plagioclase. Amphiboles geobarometer indicate that the gabbroic rocks of the Rimm intrusion crystallized at pressures between 4.8 and 6.4 Kb, while quartz diorite crystallized at 1.3-2.1 Kb. Crystallization temperatures range between 800 and 926 °C for the gabbros and between 667 and 784 °C for the quartz diorite. The Rimm intrusion represents a post-orogenic phase formed during the crustal thinning and extension of the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  19. Late Neoproterozoic post-collisional mafic magmatism in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: A case study from Wadi El-Mahash gabbroic intrusion in southeast Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. E. S.; Obeid, M. A.; Azer, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    Late Neoproterozoic gabbroic intrusion of Wadi El-Mahash lays in the northwestern sector of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) which is exposed in the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. It occurs as small undeformed mafic body intruding metamorphic rocks and truncated by alkali granites. Field relations, mineralogical characteristics and chemical data indicate that Wadi El-Mahash mafic intrusion is unmetamorphosed. The intrusion consists of medium- to coarse-grained gabbroic rocks. The medium-grained one (hornblende gabbro) formed nearly simultaneous with, or slightly later than, the coarse-grained rock (pyroxene-hornblende gabbro). Geochemically, the gabbroic samples are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(La/Yb)n = 4.52-6.35]. They show geochemical signature similar to other post-collisional gabbroic intrusions of south Sinai. The subduction-related geochemical characteristic of the gabbroic intrusion of Wadi El-Mahash can be explained by partial melting of a relatively enriched lithospheric mantle source following a previous subduction process in the ANS. The gabbroic rocks crystallized at pressures between 6.2 and 6.5 kbar (∼15-20 km depth) with crystallization temperature ranging from 750 to 970 °C. Lithospheric delamination model is suggested for the mafic magma of Wadi El-Mahash since delamination of lithospheric mantle allowed asthenosphere to rise rapidly causing partial melting and generating gabbroic melts. The produced melts then infiltrated the base of the crust to induce the post-collisional magmatism in south Sinai.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  1. Disclosing Multiple Magma Degassing Sources Offers Unique Insights of What's Behind the Campi Flegrei Caldera Unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.; Civetta, L.; Orsi, G.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Di Renzo, V.

    2013-12-01

    The definition of the structure and evolution of the magmatic system of Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc), Southern Italy, has been a fundamental tool for the assessment of the short-term volcanic hazard. The ensemble of geophysical and petrologic data show that the CFc magmatic system has been -and still is- characterized by two major reservoirs at different depths. From the deep one (around 8 km), less evolved magmas crystallize and degas, supplying fluids and magmas to the shallow (3-4 km) reservoirs. A thorough reconstruction of processes occurring in magma chamber/s prior and/or during the CFc eruptions has shown that magmas entering shallow reservoirs mixed with resident and crystallized batches. Also the 1982-85 unrest episode has been related to a magma intrusion of 2.1 x 10^7 m^3 at 3-4 km depth, on the basis of geophysical data (ground deformation, gravimetry, seismic imaging) and their interpretation. Thermodynamic evaluation of magma properties, at the time of emplacement, suggests for such an intrusion a bulk density of 2.000 kg/m^3 . Such a value testifies the high amount of exsolved volatiles within the system. The available record of geochemical and isotopic data on surface fumaroles, coupled with melt inclusion data, has already shown that dual (deep and shallow) magma degassing from such two reservoirs, as well as their interaction with the hydrothermal system, allows explaining the relevant fluctuations observed at crater fumaroles after the 1982-85 magma intrusion. An important role was played by the rapid crystallization (around 30 years) of the shallow magma, such that in the recent years gas discharges should be fuelled mostly by the deep magma. Such a process is well recorded in the fumarolic gas composition of the last ~10 years, but has to be reconciled with the unrest dynamics which took place after year 2000, characterized by a slow but continuous ground uplift. All geochemical indicators (major species and noble gases) point to three possible

  2. Petrogenesis of Mount Rainier andesite: magma flux and geologic controls on the contrasting differentiation styles at stratovolcanoes of the southern Washington Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, Thomas W.; Salters, V.J.M.; Larson, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    The dominant cause of magmatic evolution at Mount Rainier, however, is inferred to be a version of in situ crystallization-differentiation and mixing (Langmuir, 1989) wherein small magma batches stall as crustal intrusions and solidify extensively, yielding silicic residual liquids with trace element concentrations influenced by accessory mineral saturation. Subsequent magmas ascending through the intrusive plexus entrain and mix with the residual liquids and low-degree re-melts of those antecedent intrusions, producing hybrid andesites and dacites. Mount St. Helens volcanic rocks have geochemical similarities to those at Mount Rainier, and may also result from in situ differentiation and mixing due to low and intermittent long-term magma supply, accompanied by modest crustal assimilation. Andesites and dacites of Mount Adams isotopically overlap the least contaminated Mount Rainier magmas and derive from similar parental magma types, but have trace element variations more consistent with progressive crystallization-differentiation, probably due to higher magma fluxes leading to slower crystallization of large magma batches, allowing time for progressive separation of minerals from melt. Mount Adams also sits atop the southern projection of a regional anticlinorium, so Eocene sediments are absent, or are at shallow crustal levels, and so are cold and difficult to assimilate. Differences between southwest Washington stratovolcanoes highlight some ways that crustal geology and magma flux are primary factors in andesite generation.

  3. Simulation of Layered Magma Chambers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthorn, Richard Grant

    1991-01-01

    The principles of magma addition and liquid layering in magma chambers can be demonstrated by dissolving colored crystals. The concepts of density stratification and apparent lack of mixing of miscible liquids is convincingly illustrated with hydrous solutions at room temperature. The behavior of interstitial liquids in "cumulus" piles can be…

  4. Magma degassing triggered by static decompression at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Jeff, Sutton A.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    During mid-June 2007, the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, deflated rapidly as magma drained from the subsurface to feed an east rift zone intrusion and eruption. Coincident with the deflation, summit SO2 emission rates rose by a factor of four before decaying to background levels over several weeks. We propose that SO2 release was triggered by static decompression caused by magma withdrawal from Kīlauea's shallow summit reservoir. Models of the deflation suggest a pressure drop of 0.5–3 MPa, which is sufficient to trigger exsolution of the observed excess SO2 from a relatively small volume of magma at the modeled source depth beneath Kīlauea's summit. Static decompression may also explain other episodes of deflation accompanied by heightened gas emission, including the precursory phases of Kīlauea's 2008 summit eruption. Hazards associated with unexpected volcanic gas emission argue for increased awareness of magma reservoir pressure fluctuations.

  5. Dike intrusions during rifting episodes obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, L.; Rivalta, E.; Shuler, A.

    2014-01-01

    As continental rifts evolve towards mid-ocean ridges, strain is accommodated by repeated episodes of faulting and magmatism. Discrete rifting episodes have been observed along two subaerial divergent plate boundaries, the Krafla segment of the Northern Volcanic Rift Zone in Iceland and the Manda-Hararo segment of the Red Sea Rift in Ethiopia. In both cases, the initial and largest dike intrusion was followed by a series of smaller intrusions. By performing a statistical analysis of these rifting episodes, we demonstrate that dike intrusions obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes. We find that the dimensions of dike intrusions obey a power law analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter relation, and the long-term release of geodetic moment is governed by a relationship consistent with the Omori law. Due to the effects of magma supply, the timing of secondary dike intrusions differs from that of the aftershocks. This work provides evidence of self-similarity in the rifting process.

  6. Dike intrusions during rifting episodes obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    L., Passarelli; E., Rivalta; A., Shuler

    2014-01-01

    As continental rifts evolve towards mid-ocean ridges, strain is accommodated by repeated episodes of faulting and magmatism. Discrete rifting episodes have been observed along two subaerial divergent plate boundaries, the Krafla segment of the Northern Volcanic Rift Zone in Iceland and the Manda-Hararo segment of the Red Sea Rift in Ethiopia. In both cases, the initial and largest dike intrusion was followed by a series of smaller intrusions. By performing a statistical analysis of these rifting episodes, we demonstrate that dike intrusions obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes. We find that the dimensions of dike intrusions obey a power law analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter relation, and the long-term release of geodetic moment is governed by a relationship consistent with the Omori law. Due to the effects of magma supply, the timing of secondary dike intrusions differs from that of the aftershocks. This work provides evidence of self-similarity in the rifting process. PMID:24469260

  7. Dike intrusions during rifting episodes obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, L; Rivalta, E; Shuler, A

    2014-01-01

    As continental rifts evolve towards mid-ocean ridges, strain is accommodated by repeated episodes of faulting and magmatism. Discrete rifting episodes have been observed along two subaerial divergent plate boundaries, the Krafla segment of the Northern Volcanic Rift Zone in Iceland and the Manda-Hararo segment of the Red Sea Rift in Ethiopia. In both cases, the initial and largest dike intrusion was followed by a series of smaller intrusions. By performing a statistical analysis of these rifting episodes, we demonstrate that dike intrusions obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes. We find that the dimensions of dike intrusions obey a power law analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter relation, and the long-term release of geodetic moment is governed by a relationship consistent with the Omori law. Due to the effects of magma supply, the timing of secondary dike intrusions differs from that of the aftershocks. This work provides evidence of self-similarity in the rifting process. PMID:24469260

  8. Superheat in magma oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr

    1992-01-01

    The existence of 'totally molten' planets implies the existence of a superheat (excess of heat) in the magma reservoirs since the heat buffer (i.e., presence of crystals having high latent heat of fusion) does not exist in a large, completely molten reservoir. Any addition of impacting material results in increase of the temperature of the melt and under favorable circumstances heat is stored. The behavior of superheat melts is little understood; therefore, we experimentally examined properties and behavior of excess heat melts at atmospheric pressures and inert gas atmosphere. Highly siliceous melts (70 percent SiO2) were chosen for the experiments because of the possibility of quenching such melts into glasses, the slow rate of reaction in highly siliceous composition, and the fact that such melts are present in terrestrial impact craters and impact-generated glasses. Results from the investigation are presented.

  9. Mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical studies of the Limahe mafic-ultramatic intrusion and associated Ni-Cu sulfide ores, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yan; Li, Chusi; Song, Xie-Yan; Ripley, Edward M.

    2008-11-01

    The Limahe Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is hosted by a small mafic-ultramafic intrusion (800 × 200 × 300 m) that is temporally associated with the voluminous Permian flood basalts in SW China. The objective of this study is to better understand the origin of the deposit in the context of regional magmatism which is important for the ongoing mineral exploration in the region. The Limahe intrusion is a multiphase intrusion with an ultramafic unit at the base and a mafic unit at the top. The two rock units have intrusive contacts and exhibit similar mantle-normalized trace element patterns and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions but significantly different cumulus mineralogy and major element compositions. The similarities suggest that they are related to a common parental liquid, whereas the differences point to magma differentiation by olivine crystallization at depth. Sulfide mineralization is restricted to the ultramafic unit. The abundances of sulfides in the ultramafic unit generally increase towards the basal contacts with sedimentary footwall. The δ 34S values of sulfide minerals from the Limahe deposit are elevated, ranging from +2.4 to +5.4‰. These values suggest the involvement of external S with elevated δ 34S values. The mantle-normalized platinum-group element (PGE) patterns of bulk sulfide ores are similar to those of picrites associated with flood basalts in the region. The abundances of PGE in the sulfide ores, however, are significantly lower than that of sulfide liquid expected to segregate from undepleted picrite magma. Cr-spinel and olivine are present in the Limahe ultramafic rocks as well as in the picrites. Mantle-normalized trace element patterns of the Limahe intrusion generally resemble those of the picrites. However, negative Nb-Ta anomalies, common features of contamination with the lower or middle crust, are present in the intrusion but absent in the picrites. Sr-Nd isotopes suggest that the Limahe intrusion experienced higher degrees of

  10. Evolution of a magma-driven earthquake swarm and triggering of the nearby Oldoinyo Lengai eruption, as resolved by InSAR, ground observations and elastic modeling, East African Rift, 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, G.; Hamiel, Y.; Shamir, G.; Nof, R.

    2008-07-01

    An earthquake swarm struck the North Tanzania Divergence, East African Rift over a 2 month period between July and September 2007. It produced approximately 70 M > 4 earthquakes (peak magnitude Mw 5.9), and extensive surface deformation, concurrent with eruptions at the nearby Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. The spatial and temporal evolution of the entire deformation event was resolved by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations, owing to a particularly favorable acquisition programming of the Envisat and ALOS satellites, and was verified by detailed ground observations. Elastic modeling based on the InSAR measurements clearly distinguishes between normal faulting, which dominated during the first week of the event, and intermittent episodes of dike propagation, oblique dike opening and dike-induced faulting during the following month. A gradual decline in the intensity of deformation occurred over the final weeks. Our observations and modeling suggest that the sequence of events was initiated by pressurization of a deep-seated magma chamber below Oldoinyo Lengai which opened the way to lateral dike injection, and dike-induced faulting and seismicity. As dike intrusion terminated, silicate magma ascended the volcano conduit, reacted with the carbonatitic magma, and set off a major episode of explosive ash eruptions producing mixed silicate-carbonatitic ejecta. The rise of the silicate magma within the volcano conduit is attributed to bubble growth and buoyancy increase in the magma chamber either due to a temporary pressure drop after the termination of the diking event, or due to the dynamic effects of seismic wave passage from the earthquake swarm. Similar temporal associations between earthquake swarms and major explosive ash eruptions were observed at Oldoinyo Lengai over the past half century.

  11. Intrusive prospective imagery, posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Charlotte P; Picchioni, Marco M; Ellett, Lyn

    2015-12-30

    Trauma exposure and intrusive thoughts are commonly reported in both schizophrenia and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Information processing accounts suggest that intrusions occur in the two conditions as a result of insufficient state and/or trait contextual processing in long-term memory. Most research has focused on intrusions about past events, while growing evidence suggests that intrusions about prospective imagined events warrants further investigation. Prospective intrusive imagery has yet to be examined in psychotic disorders but could provide crucial information regarding the aetiology and maintenance of psychotic symptoms. The current study examines the role of prospective intrusive imagery, posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia. Fifty-seven participants (30 patients and 27 healthy controls) completed measures of trauma, PTSD, anxiety, general non-affective use of imagery, and intrusive prospective imagery. Patients reported significantly more intrusive prospective imagery relative to control participants but, importantly, not greater use of general non-affective imagery. Intrusive prospective imagery was associated with posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia. The findings are consistent with information processing models of intrusions and psychosis, and provide novel insights for theoretical accounts, clinical formulation and therapeutic targets for psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26619917

  12. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes: A new tool for estimating intrusive volumes and forecasting eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Randall; McCausland, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    We present data on 136 high-frequency earthquakes and swarms, termed volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity, which preceded 111 eruptions at 83 volcanoes, plus data on VT swarms that preceded intrusions at 21 other volcanoes. We find that VT seismicity is usually the earliest reported seismic precursor for eruptions at volcanoes that have been dormant for decades or more, and precedes eruptions of all magma types from basaltic to rhyolitic and all explosivities from VEI 0 to ultraplinian VEI 6 at such previously long-dormant volcanoes. Because large eruptions occur most commonly during resumption of activity at long-dormant volcanoes, VT seismicity is an important precursor for the Earth's most dangerous eruptions. VT seismicity precedes all explosive eruptions of VEI ≥ 5 and most if not all VEI 4 eruptions in our data set. Surprisingly we find that the VT seismicity originates at distal locations on tectonic fault structures at distances of one or two to tens of kilometers laterally from the site of the eventual eruption, and rarely if ever starts beneath the eruption site itself. The distal VT swarms generally occur at depths almost equal to the horizontal distance of the swarm from the summit out to about 15 km distance, beyond which hypocenter depths level out. We summarize several important characteristics of this distal VT seismicity including: swarm-like nature, onset days to years prior to the beginning of magmatic eruptions, peaking of activity at the time of the initial eruption whether phreatic or magmatic, and large non-double couple component to focal mechanisms. Most importantly we show that the intruded magma volume can be simply estimated from the cumulative seismic moment of the VT seismicity from: Log10 V = 0.77 Log ΣMoment - 5.32, with volume, V, in cubic meters and seismic moment in Newton meters. Because the cumulative seismic moment can be approximated from the size of just the few largest events, and is quite insensitive to precise locations

  13. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders. PMID:25911248

  14. Bro Intrusion Detection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-01-25

    Bro is a Unix-based Network Intrusion Detection System (IDS). Bro monitors network traffic and detects intrusion attempts based on the traffic characteristics and content. Bro detects intrusions by comparing network traffic against rules describing events that are deemed troublesome. These rules might describe activities (e.g., certain hosts connecting to certain services), what activities are worth alerting (e.g., attempts to a given number of different hosts constitutes a "scan"), or signatures describing known attacks or accessmore » to known vulnerabilities. If Bro detects something of interest, it can be instructed to either issue a log entry or initiate the execution of an operating system command. Bro targets high-speed (Gbps), high-volume intrusion detection. By judiciously leveraging packet filtering techniques, Bro is able to achieve the performance necessary to do so while running on commercially available PC hardware, and thus can serve as a cost effective means of monitoring a site’s Internet connection.« less

  15. Molar Intrusion in Open-bite Adults Using Zygomatic Miniplates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Eiman S; Abdallah, Essam Mohamed; El-Kenany, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes that arise after intrusion of the maxillary molars using zygomatic miniplates in adult skeletal anterior open bite patients. In addition to measuring the amount and rate of molar intrusion; with special emphasis on changes in the axial inclination of the intruded molars. The study group was composed of 13 anterior open bite patients (mean age 18 years, 8 months ± 2 years, 2 months) with posterior dentoalveolar excess. Mini-plates were placed in the zygomatic buttress bilaterally. The upper arch was segmentally leveled and a double Trans-Palatal Arch (TPA) was bonded. Closed NiTi coil spring was placed bilaterally between the book of the mini-plate just mesial and distal to the first molar buccal tube applying intrusive force of 450 gper side. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken before intrusion (T1: post upper segmental leveling) and after intrusion (T2). Comparison between means before and after the intrusion was done using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test (WSRT). Mandibular autorotation followed the molar intrusion, SNB and SN-Pog angles significantly increased while the ANB, MP-SN angle and N-S-Gn angle significantly decreased. The mean amount of accomplished molar intrusion was 3.1mm ± 0.74mm, with a rate of 0.36mm per month ± 0.08mm per month and a bite closure of 6.55mm ± 1.83mm. There was no significant buccal tip in the right and left molars upon intrusion. Conclusion: Miniplates zygomatic anchorage can be used effectively for skeletal open bite correction through posterior dento-alveolar intrusion. Intrusion of the posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage induced counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and, as a consequence, corrected the anteroposterior intermaxillary relationship with a dramatic improvement in the facial soft tissue convexity. PMID:26349291

  16. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, Pavlina; Weinberg, Roberto; Ward, Lindsay; Fanning, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex because of strong rheological contrast between layers with different melt contents and because of magma migration leading to volume changes. Migmatite deformation is intimately linked with magma extraction and the origin of granitoids. We investigate here the relationships between an evolving deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the ca. 500Ma Delamerian orogeny, exposed on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Here, several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt. During an early upright, non-cylindrical folding event, magma was channeled towards the hinge zones of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root zone that link up towards a central axial planar channel, forming the main magma extraction paths during folding. Extraction was associated with fold limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption by magma accumulation and transfer. During a later deformation phase, melt-rich diatexites were deformed, and schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes indicative of dextral shearing flow. During flow, magma accumulated preferentially along shear planes, indicating a dilatational component during shearing (transtension) and in strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned, magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to N-trending, steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels not associated to any deformational feature. The funnel-shape of these structures indicates the direction of magma flow. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those formed during dewatering of soft sediments. Despite a high degree of complexity, magma migration and extraction features record distinct responses to the evolving deformation which can be used to understand deformation, and nature and direction of melt extraction. The oldest and youngest magmatic rocks from migmatites were dated (U-Pb monazite, SHRIMP

  17. The Aurora volcanic field, California-Nevada: oxygen fugacity constraints on the development of andesitic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    1996-10-01

    oxidation process occurs, fractionation of titanomagnetite or hornblende cannot explain a calc-alkaline trend in which all erupted lavas have oxygen fugacites ≥ the Ni-NiO buffer. In contrast to fractional crystallization, closed-system equilibrium crystallization will produce residual liquids with an oxygen fugacity that is similar to that of the initial melt. However, the eruption of nearly aphryic lavas argues against tapping from a magma chamber during equilibrium crystallization, a process that requires crystals to remain in contact with the liquid. A preferred model involves the accumulation of basaltic magmas at the mantle-crust interface, which solidify and are later remelted during repeated intrusion of basalt. As an end-member case, closed-system equilibrium crystallization of a basalt, followed by equilibrium partial melting of the gabbro will produce a calc-alkaline evolved liquid (namely, high SiO2 and low FeOT/MgO) with a relative f O 2 (corrected for the effect of changing temperature) that is similar to that of the initial basalt. Differentiation of the Aurora magmas by repeated partial melting of previous underplates in the lower crust rather than by crystal fractionation in large, stable magma chambers is consistent with the low eruption rate at the Aurora volcanic field.

  18. Interaction between two contrasting magmas in the Albtal pluton (Schwarzwald, SW Germany): textural and mineral-chemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Lorenz; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor

    2016-07-01

    The magmatic evolution of the Variscan Albtal pluton, Schwarzwald, SW Germany, is explored using detailed textural observations and the chemical composition of plagioclase and biotite in both granite and its mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs). MMEs probably formed in a two-step process. First, mafic magma intruded a granitic magma chamber and created a boundary layer, which received thermal and compositional input from the mafic magma. This is indicated by corroded "granitic" quartz crystals and by large "granitic" plagioclase xenocrysts, which contain zones of higher anorthite and partly crystallized from a melt of higher Sr content. Texturally, different plagioclase types (e.g. zoned and inclusion-rich types) correspond to different degrees of overprint most likely caused by a thermal and compositional gradient in the boundary layer. The intrusion of a second mafic magma batch into the boundary layer is recorded by a thin An50 zone along plagioclase rims that crystallized from a melt enriched in Sr. Most probably, the second mafic intrusion caused disruption of the boundary layer, dispersal of the hybrid magma in the granite magma and formation of the enclaves. Rapid thermal quenching of the MMEs in the granite magma is manifested by An30 overgrowths on large plagioclase grains that contain needle apatites. Our results demonstrate the importance of microtextural investigations for the reconstruction of possible mixing end members in the formation of granites.

  19. Determining the Magma Genesis of Mo Porphyry Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, S.; Coleman, D. S.; Rosera, J.

    2015-12-01

    The high flux of magma associated with super eruptions is hypothesized to rebuild the deep crust, altering the source(s) of subsequent magmatism. Climax-type Mo deposits are commonly generated immediately after eruption of large ignimbrites within a volcanic field, and provide an opportunity to understand the evolution of magma sources following high flux events. The Questa caldera of the Latir volcanic field, NM exposes a 10 Ma long record of pre-, syn- and post-ignimbrite intrusive and extrusive rocks, and hosts the Questa Climax-type Mo deposit. New detailed geochronology and geochemistry from Questa (including extensive sampling of subsurface rocks in the mine) permit detailed reconstruction of the temporal evolution of magma sources through the waxing and waning stages of super eruption magmatism. Comparison of chemical and isotopic data waxing, ignimbrite, Mo-mineralizing and waning stage magmas reveals several patterns. Waxing and waning magmas (waxing: 29-25.7 Ma; waning: 24.5-19 Ma) have intermediate trace elements and radiogenic isotopes relative to other magmatism (87Sr/86Sri=0.7050 to 0.7070, ɛNd=-5.2 to -7.2). Ignimbrite magmatism (25.5 Ma) is depleted in incompatible elements, enriched in MREE and HREE's and has more evolved radiogenic isotopes (87Sr/86Sri=0.7095, ɛNd=-8.0). Molybdenum mineralizing magmas (24.9-24.5 Ma), are enriched in incompatible elements, depleted in MREE and HREE's and have distinct radiogenic isotopes (87Sr/86Sri=0.7055 to 0.7075, ɛNd=-4.2 to -5.7). We suggest the lower crustal source of magmas changed during ignimbrite generation, and as a result, subsequent mineralizing magmas incorporated more juvenile, mafic components. This mantle influence is the metallogenesis for Climax-type deposits and indicates that deep crustal hybridization, rather than upper crustal differentiation, is pivotal in their generation. These results indicate that a lower crustal source of magmatism for a volcanic field is altered due to super

  20. Ore formation in porphyry-type deposits during incrementally built magma chamber and fluid sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J. L.; Bachmann, O.; Huber, C.; Parmigiani, A.; Dufek, J.; Campos, E.

    2012-04-01

    Porphyry-type mineralizations are commonly associated with an underlying magma chamber from which a volatile phase exsolves from the crystallizing magma. We suggest a model of fluid sparging during multiple successive intrusions yielding metals concentration within the gas phase. Metals enrichment by 3-4 orders of magnitude takes place during the magmatic stage prior to hydrothermal effects, resulting from a competition between diffusion and advection of the volatile phase. The model explains why a single intrusion is not efficient enough to lead to economically viable ore deposit, though it also involves a gas phase percolating within a crystalline mush. During multiple intrusions, metals segregate from the new melt to the gas phase by diffusion, as long as the gas has not overcome a critical saturation level (about 20 % gas). Adding gas exsolved, about 4 % at each new magma recharge, overcomes this level. Then, the diffusion process switches toward advection, since the bubbles get interconnected, enhancing the transport of a gas phase enriched in metals. Once advected, the enriched gas phase turns into hydrothermal circulation during which metals condensate. Two non-dimensional numbers, Péclet and Stefan numbers, respectively rule diffusion and advection of elements while heat is lost through cooling. The model also examines the total duration of the process that re-establishes after 4-6 recharges in magma. It also provides an explanation why intrusions are barren or enriched, although they result from similar conditions of magma genesis. Development of a zoned alteration pattern may serve as a guide for prospection.

  1. Controls on magmatic PGE and Au mineralization in the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid; Tegner, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The Skaergaard Intrusion of East Greenland is the host for significant magmatic PGE and Au mineralization (the Platinova Reefs). It was formed from a single batch of magma that crystallized in its entirety as a closed system. Unlike all other examples of significant magmatic PGE and Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization, the Skaergaard rocks exhibit no evidence of crustal contamination, the major factor responsible for driving magmas to sulphide saturation and ore genesis. Although the Skaergaard rocks and mineralized zones have extremely low S contents, the mineralization is believed to be the product of late stage sulphide saturation of the magma. Three factors drove the magma to sulphide saturation, viz: (1) prolonged build up of S in the residual melt of the fractionating magma; (2) crystallization of magnetite which slowed down the build up of FeO in the fractionating magma; and (3) cooling of the magma against the walls of the intrusion. High quality PGE, Au, Cu, S, Se data and other geochemical data for samples from a detailed stratigraphic section through the Skaergaard intrusion are used to model these elements throughout its crystallization history, estimate their concentrations in the Skaergaard parental magma, and to establish the timing of sulphide saturation and the causes of PGE-Au mineralization. The model indicates that the parental magma contained 4.0 ppb Au, 18.7 ppb Pd, 9.0 ppb Pt, 95 ppb Se and 240 ppm Cu. The high Pd/Pt ratio indicates that the magma had undergone a significant amount of fractionation prior to entry into the Skaergaard magma chamber, consistent with the silicate mineralogy. A sharp increase in PGE contents (but not Cu or incompatible lithophile trace elements) 300m below the Platinova Reefs coincides with the first appearance of cumulus magnetite and marks the stratigraphic position at which tiny amounts of cumulus PGE-rich sulphides segregated from the magma. Although the S contents of all rocks below the Platinova Reefs are below the

  2. Digital mapping of accommodating structures and deformation associated with the emplacement of high level magmatic intrusions, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Davidson, J. P.; Murphy, P. J.; Jarvis, I.

    2012-12-01

    High-level sill and laccolith complexes form an important part of volcanic plumbing systems in which magma is emplaced as a series of sub-horizontal tabular sheet-like intrusions. Few studies of these intrusion types have looked in detail at the host rock, emplacement-related deformation structures, and how the additional volume of rock is accommodated within the crust, i.e. the 'space problem'. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the stages of emplacement (style of emplacement versus style of host rock deformation) and the internal textural evolution of Tertiary sills and laccoliths in the Henry Mountains, whilst also attempting to resolve the 'space problem'. Conventional field mapping, outcrop studies and detailed data collection of deformation structures has been combined with digital mapping using FieldMove™ and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in order to enable 3D modelling of the intrusive bodies and emplacement-related host rock deformation. Kinematic and geometrical studies of emplacement-related structures in the host rocks are supplemented by micro-scale textural and geochemical studies of deformed host rocks, plagioclase feldspar and amphibole phenocryst populations within the intrusions, and the intrusion-host rock contact zone. Fabric studies recognise micro-structural fabrics (associated with accommodating structures) from magmatic fabrics (associated with magma flow). Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies help constrain the crystal:molten rock ratio and mechanical properties of the intruding magma, in addition to helping identify individual magma pulses. Fieldwork to date has focused on two satellite intrusions to Mt. Hilliers: Trachyte Mesa (the most distal intrusion; simple geometries); and Maiden Creek (closer to Mt. Hilliers; more complex geometries) both of which are emplaced into the Jurassic Entrada Formation sandstone. Preliminary results highlight the importance of faults, fractures, deformation bands and newly

  3. Stoping & Screen Formation In The Wooley Creek Batholith And Andalshatten Pluton: Complex Pluton - Host Rock Interactions During Magma Emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinobu, A. S.; Hargrove, B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of xenoliths in plutons is often assumed to either be due to stoping or the formation of screens. Stoped blocks are defined as having undergone significant translation, rotation, and/or internal deformation while incorporated in the magma, while screens are considered to be relatively in situ. However, there remains much controversy as to 1) the relative spatial distribution of xenoliths/screens in plutons; 2) the degree to which xenoliths/screens may or may not have moved within the magma; 3) the extent of melting and assimilation xenoliths undergo; and 4) the mechanism by which xenoliths and screens are incorporated into plutons. We describe field and structural relations from the tilted Wooley Creek batholith (WCb) and the mid-crustal Andalshatten pluton (AHp). Both intrusions preserve xenoliths/screens of a variety of lithologies that correspond to the host rocks. The WCb is a 158-155 MA tilted intrusion emplaced into a series of accreted terranes in the Marble Mountains Wilderness, Klamath Mountains, CA. Previous work has demonstrated that the WCb is complexly zoned, and can be divided into three distinct structural units: a structurally deep unit ranging from gabbro to tonalite, a structurally shallow unit ranging from diorite to granite, and an intermediate unit of intensely deformed quartz diorite and tonalite. Numerous xenoliths of metric to centimetric scale occur in this intermediate zone, as well as in proximity to the pluton roof as exposed along the southern contact. While many of these xenoliths have internal structures that are discordant to those found in the host rock, others seem to maintain concordance with the regional bedding, and are identified as screens. In nearly all cases, xenoliths appear partially migmatitic, and veining of the host magma into them is common. The 442 Ma AHp is a large, predominantly granodioritic pluton in the Bindal Batholith. It intrudes four lithologically distinct and structurally complex nappes of the

  4. Intrusion Triggering of Explosive Eruptions: Lessons Learned from EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL 2010 Eruptions and Crustal Deformation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Hooper, A. J.; Arnadottir, T.; Pedersen, R.; Roberts, M. J.; Oskarsson, N.; Auriac, A.; Decriem, J.; Einarsson, P.; Geirsson, H.; Hensch, M.; Ofeigsson, B. G.; Sturkell, E. C.; Sveinbjornsson, H.; Feigl, K.

    2010-12-01

    Gradual inflation of magma chambers often precedes eruptions at highly active volcanoes. During eruptions, rapid deflation occurs as magma flows out and pressure is reduced. Less is known about the deformation style at moderately active volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, where an explosive summit eruption of trachyandesite beginning on 14 April 2010 caused exceptional disruption to air traffic. This eruption was preceded by an effusive flank eruption of olivine basalt from 20 March - 12 April 2010. Geodetic and seismic observations revealed the growth of an intrusive complex in the roots of the volcano during three months prior to eruptions. After initial horizontal growth, modelling indicates both horizontal and sub-vertical growth in three weeks prior the first eruption. The behaviour is attributed to subsurface variations in crustal stress and strength originating from complicated volcano foundations. A low-density layer may capture magma allowing pressure to build before an intrusion can ascend towards higher levels. The intrusive complex was formed by olivine basalt as erupted on the volcano flank 20 March - 12 April; the intrusive growth halted at the onset of this eruption. Deformation associated with the eruption onset was minor as the dike had reached close to the surface in the days before. Isolated eruptive vents opening on long-dormant volcanoes may represent magma leaking upwards from extensive pre-eruptive intrusions formed at depth. A deflation source activated during the summit eruption of trachyandesite is distinct from, and adjacent to, all documented sources of inflation in the volcano roots. Olivine basalt magma which recharged the volcano appears to have triggered the summit eruption, although the exact mode of triggering is uncertain. Scenarios include stress triggering or propagation of olivine basalt into more evolved magma. The trachyandesite includes crystals that can be remnants of minor recent intrusion of olivine basalt

  5. Spatial and temporal variations in magma-assisted rifting, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Julie V.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Gravley, Darren M.

    2010-02-01

    Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, is a NNE-trending rifting arc, active for ~ 2 Myr, with a 125-km-long central segment characterized by exceptionally voluminous rhyolite volcanism. The volcanic segmentation reflects along-axis variations in magmatism with implications for the thermal state of the crust and consequent rifting dynamics. Along the zone to the north and south of Central TVZ, the limbs of broad monoclines, disrupted to various degrees by normal faults, dip SE against major NW-facing fault zones. In these northern and southern segments, the loci of magmatism (shown by the position of volcanoes) and rifting (manifested by the distribution of seismicity and modern (< 61 ka) faulting in the Taupo Fault Belt (TFB)) coincide. Mantle-derived magmas are localized within the crust in a plexus of small bodies, dikes and sills, and dike-assisted rifting operates at times (but not always) as shown by the historic record. In contrast, throughout most of Central TVZ the loci of magmatism and tectonism (shown by the distribution of high-temperature geothermal systems and inferred from geophysical models and surface fault studies) are offset laterally and extensional strain appears to be partitioned accordingly. Geological, geophysical and geodetic studies indicate the following magma-assisted mechanisms of extension in Central TVZ: 1) mafic dike intrusion of length scale > 20 km and width > 1 m oriented perpendicular to the extension direction; 2) fault slips of < 2 m on structures along-strike from and coeval with silicic eruptions, some of which were triggered by mafic dike intrusion; 3) rifting episodes associated with regional-scale uplift, multi-fault rupture (slips < 2 m) and transient subsidence, arguably driven by changes in state at shallow depths. Volcanic studies of < 340 ka deposits demonstrate that an additional, but less frequent, mechanism involves temporally higher rates of fault slip with regional-scale collapse of rift basins in association

  6. The Magma Transport System of the Mono Craters, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    they also appear to derive from shallow depths (restricted to ~2 kbar). The intermediate batches though, only erupt at Domes 10-12, 14, 24 and 25. Temperatures for these range from 803-1107°C with pressures ranging from 2-10 kbar. Mafic magmas from the Mono Craters proper are even more spatially restricted, having erupted only at Domes 10, 12 and 14, with temperatures ranging from 843-1276°C and pressures ranging from as deep as 17 kbar to as shallow as 2 kbar. These results indicate that the magma plumbing system beneath the Mono Craters segregates into three different levels with contrasting degrees of lateral spatial continuity. We hypothesize that felsic magmas evolve and are stored at shallow depths within a quasi-continuous, or well-linked series of en echelon oriented dikes or chambers, which form as a response to regional transtensional stresses. In contrast, intermediate and mafic magmas are both deeper and spatially more restricted, and apparently do not infiltrate the more shallow brittle-deformed dike system that is so well exploited by felsic magmas. We surmise that this contrast in magma delivery may be controlled by density contrasts between magma and adjacent crust, where intermediate and mafic magmas, due to their greater density, are barred from rising upwards into a low density, brittle uppermost crust in which the en echelon dike-delivery system is mostly, or solely, developed.

  7. Estimates of volume and magma input in crustal magmatic systems from zircon geochronology: the effect of modelling assumptions and system variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Luca; Simpson, Guy; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Magma fluxes in the Earth's crust play an important role in regulating the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, the chemical evolution of magmatic systems and the distribution of geothermal energy and mineral resources on our planet. Therefore, quantifying magma productivity and the rate of magma transfer within the crust can provide valuable insights to characterise the long-term behaviour of volcanic systems and to unveil the link between the physical and chemical evolution of magmatic systems and their potential to generate resources. We performed thermal modelling to compute the temperature evolution of crustal magmatic intrusions with different final volumes assembled over a variety of timescales (i.e., at different magma fluxes). Using these results, we calculated synthetic populations of zircon ages assuming the number of zircons crystallising in a given time period is directly proportional to the volume of magma at temperature within the zircon crystallisation range. The statistical analysis of the calculated populations of zircon ages shows that the mode, median and standard deviation of the populations varies coherently as function of the rate of magma injection and final volume of the crustal intrusions. Therefore, the statistical properties of the population of zircon ages can add useful constraints to quantify the rate of magma injection and the final volume of magmatic intrusions. Here, we explore the effect of different ranges of zircon saturation temperature, intrusion geometry, and wall rock temperature on the calculated distributions of zircon ages. Additionally, we determine the effect of undersampling on the variability of mode, median and standards deviation of calculated populations of zircon ages to estimate the minimum number of zircon analyses necessary to obtain meaningful estimates of magma flux and final intrusion volume.

  8. Linking magnetic fabric and cumulate texture in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Driscoll, B.; Stevenson, C.; Magee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Research on the magnetic fabrics of igneous rocks, pioneered by Balsley and Buddington[1] and Khan[2], has greatly contributed to our understanding of magma dynamics in lava flows, sheet intrusions and plutons over the past five decades. However, considerably few magnetic fabric studies have focused on layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, particularly ';lopolithic' intrusions, despite the fact that such rocks may preserve a large range of small-scale kinematic structures potentially related to important magma chamber processes. This may be partly due to the fact that mafic-ultramafic cumulates commonly exhibit visible planar fabrics (mineral lamination), as well as compositional layering, in contrast to the frequent absence of such features in granite bodies or fine-grained mafic lava flows. Indeed, debates in the 1970s and 1980s on the development of layering and mineral fabrics in mafic-ultramafic intrusions, focused around the crystal settling versus in situ crystallisation paradigms, are classic in the subject of igneous petrology. Central to these debates is the notion that a wide range of magma chamber processes occur in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that are not frequently considered to occur in their relatively viscous granitic counterparts; in essence, the latter have historically been viewed as much more likely to ';freeze-in' a primary magma flow fabric whilst mafic-ultramafic intrusions are subjected to a more protracted solidification history. This wide array of potential initial sources for layering and mineral fabrics in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, together with the possible modification of textures at the postcumulus stage, demands a cautious application of any fabric analysis and presents a problem well-suited to interrogation by the AMS technique. The purpose of this contribution is to provide specific context on the application of AMS to elucidating the formation of cumulates in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions. Examples of AMS

  9. Heat transfer in magma in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Carrigan, C.R.; Wemple, R.P.

    1983-12-16

    Heat transfer rates in a basaltic magma were measured under typical magma chamber conditions and a numerical model of the experiment was used to estimate magma viscosity. The results are of value for assessing methods of thermal energy extraction from magma bodies in the upper crust as well as for modeling the evolutionary track of these systems. 13 references, 3 figures.

  10. Complexity on a small scale: Emplacement dynamics and evolution of the Doros layered mafic intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, Trishya; Ashwal, Lewis

    2014-05-01

    The Doros Complex in Namibia is a relatively small (~8 km x 4 km), shallow-level layered mafic intrusion that forms part of the ~132 Ma Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. It consists of a ~500 m-thick preserved sequence of roughly concordant, sill-like gabbro layers dipping in towards the centre of the intrusion, cut by syenitic (bostonite) dykes. The fundamental mineralogy is essentially the same throughout the main package (plagioclase + calcic clinopyroxene + oxy-exsolved Fe-Ti oxides ± olivine), and hence the layering is defined by variations in the modal proportions of these minerals, and in the mineral and rock textures. A detailed petrographic, whole-rock and mineral major and trace element, and Sr-, Nd- and Pb-isotopic study, combined with major element modelling, has shown that the stratigraphic order of appearance of cumulus minerals and overall trends in rock compositions are consistent with fractional crystallisation and accumulation from an uncontaminated basaltic parental magma. However, these data also reveal considerable complexity and stratigraphic trends in mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties incongruent with a simple progressive differentiation path. Based on a comprehensive set of field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we put forward a compelling argument in favour of an origin for the Doros intrusion by multiple, closely-spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas (magma mushes), rather than from the post-emplacement differentiation of a single batch of crystal-free melt. This evidence includes intrusive layer relations, textural evidence for primocrysts, disequilibrium features, and stratigraphic reversals in mineral and whole-rock chemistry and magnetic properties. At least seven distinct major injections of magma have been identified in the stratigraphy, as well as several smaller pulses. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid magma model for the formation of such

  11. Segmented lateral dyke growth in a rifting event at Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andrew; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Spaans, Karsten; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur María; Hensch, Martin; Einarsson, Páll; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Samsonov, Sergey; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís; White, Robert S; Ágústsdóttir, Thorbjörg; Greenfield, Tim; Green, Robert G; Hjartardóttir, Ásta Rut; Pedersen, Rikke; Bennett, Richard A; Geirsson, Halldór; La Femina, Peter C; Björnsson, Helgi; Pálsson, Finnur; Sturkell, Erik; Bean, Christopher J; Möllhoff, Martin; Braiden, Aoife K; Eibl, Eva P S

    2015-01-01

    Crust at many divergent plate boundaries forms primarily by the injection of vertical sheet-like dykes, some tens of kilometres long. Previous models of rifting events indicate either lateral dyke growth away from a feeding source, with propagation rates decreasing as the dyke lengthens, or magma flowing vertically into dykes from an underlying source, with the role of topography on the evolution of lateral dykes not clear. Here we show how a recent segmented dyke intrusion in the Bárðarbunga volcanic system grew laterally for more than 45 kilometres at a variable rate, with topography influencing the direction of propagation. Barriers at the ends of each segment were overcome by the build-up of pressure in the dyke end; then a new segment formed and dyke lengthening temporarily peaked. The dyke evolution, which occurred primarily over 14 days, was revealed by propagating seismicity, ground deformation mapped by Global Positioning System (GPS), interferometric analysis of satellite radar images (InSAR), and graben formation. The strike of the dyke segments varies from an initially radial direction away from the Bárðarbunga caldera, towards alignment with that expected from regional stress at the distal end. A model minimizing the combined strain and gravitational potential energy explains the propagation path. Dyke opening and seismicity focused at the most distal segment at any given time, and were simultaneous with magma source deflation and slow collapse at the Bárðarbunga caldera, accompanied by a series of magnitude M > 5 earthquakes. Dyke growth was slowed down by an effusive fissure eruption near the end of the dyke. Lateral dyke growth with segment barrier breaking by pressure build-up in the dyke distal end explains how focused upwelling of magma under central volcanoes is effectively redistributed over long distances to create new upper crust at divergent plate boundaries. PMID:25517098

  12. Magma storage prior to the 1912 eruption at Novarupta, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammer, J.E.; Rutherford, M.J.; Hildreth, W.

    2002-01-01

    New analytical and experimental data constrain the storage and equilibration conditions of the magmas erupted in 1912 from Novarupta in the 20th century's largest volcanic event. Phase relations at H2O+CO2 fluid saturation were determined for an andesite (58.7 wt% SiO2) and a dacite (67.7 wt%) from the compositional extremes of intermediate magmas erupted. The phase assemblages, matrix melt composition and modes of natural andesite were reproduced experimentally under H2O-saturated conditions (i.e., PH2O=PTOT) in a negatively sloping region in T-P space from 930 ??C/100 MPa to 960 ??C/75 MPa with fO2???N NO + 1. The H2O-saturated equilibration conditions of the dacite are constrained to a T-P region from 850 ??C/ 50 MPa to 880 ??C/25 MPa. If H2O-saturated, these magmas equilibrated at (and above) the level where coerupted rhyolite equilibrated (???100 MPa), suggesting that the andesite-dacite magma reservoir was displaced laterally rather than vertically from the rhyolite magma body. Natural mineral and melt compositions of intermediate magmas were also reproduced experimentally under saturation conditions with a mixed (H2O + CO2) fluid for the same range in PH2O. Thus, a storage model in which vertically stratified mafic to silicic intermediate magmas underlay H2O-saturated rhyolite is consistent with experimental findings only if the intermediates have XH2Ofl=0.7 and 0.9 for the extreme compositions, respectively. Disequilibrium features in natural pumice and scoria include pristine minerals existing outside their stability fields, and compositional zoning of titanomagnetite in contact with ilmenite. Variable rates of chemical equilibration which would eliminate these features constrain the apparent thermal excursion and re-distribution of minerals to the time scale of days.

  13. The variation of magma discharge during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    1981-12-01

    The rate at which basaltic magma is discharged varies substantially during many eruptions. An individual eruption has an eruption rate ( Qe), the volumetric rate of discharge averaged over the whole or a major part of an eruption, and an effusion rate ( Qf), the volumetric flux rate at any given time. In many examples Qf soon reaches a maximum value after a short period of waxing flow, partly because of magmatic expansion, and then falls more slowly in the later parts of the eruption. The release of elastic strain energy from stored magma and the sub-volcanic reservoir during eruption can produce an exponential form of such waning flow. Comparison of the eruption rates of the historic eruptions of Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Etna shows that for each volcano there is a trend of decreasing Qe with increasing duration of eruption. This relationship is not predicted by a simple elastic model of magma release. Two additional processes are invoked to explain the eruptive histories of these volcanoes: modification of the eruptive conduits, and the continued supply of magma from depth during eruption. Conduits evolving from dikes to plugs by wall-rock erosion or freezing of magma can result in increased early values of Qf and the maintenance of very low values of Qf values for long periods later in the eruption. Discharge variations during three specific eruptions are discussed in detail. Paricutin (1943-1952) had exponentially waning flow, with a time constant of about three years, that is consistent with a deep reservoir. The waning flow of Hekla's 1947-1948 eruption showed some of the characteristics of conduit modification, whilst the 1959 Kilauea Iki eruption is interpreted in terms of a closed system with varying magma rheology.

  14. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters

  15. On the role of diapirism in the, segregation, ascent and final emplacement of granitoid magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Roger

    1984-12-01

    Only bodies of magma with a high crystal content and partially molten (crustal) country rocks can ascend as diapirs; once such an envelope is pierced, the diapiric ascent of the pluton is arrested by the high viscosity of a solid aureole. Deformation by shortening of the carapace of these bodies may lead to the expulsion of a magma with a relatively low crystal content, which may then continue ascent via fractures and dykes. The details of the mechanisms of granitoid magma segregation are still unknown, but it appears that many magmas hegin their ascent through the crust as mushes with at least 50% melt, and that such magmas are rheologically able to ascend through a thickness of crust. This ascent mechanism explains the dearth of structures attributable to the ascent of granitoids, in contrast to the abundance of structures that developed during their final emplacement. When a magma becomes too crystalline (melt < 25%) to continue its ascent via dykes, it is immobilised. At approximately this stage, a hydrous magma may become saturated with water and release fluids into the aureole, making it particularly susceptible to deformation. Magma that continues to arrive at this level is also immobilised, and the pluton grows as a ballooning diapir. These characteristically deform themselves and their aureoles by bulk shortening. Magmas that are able to ascend to shallow depths, largely by virtue of lower water contents and higher initial temperatures, tend to become finally accommodated by such brittle processes as stoping and cauldron subsidence. High level intrusions lend to be tabular, are also fed by dykes or conduits, and assemble in tabular batholiths.

  16. Reconstructing Magma Degassing and Fragmentation: The 1060 CE Plinian Eruption of Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Crozier, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magma fragmentation during explosive volcanic eruptions occurs when the bubble overpressure exceeds some threshold. Because bubble coalescence and ensuing permeable outgassing allow partial release of bubble overpressure, high magma permeabil
ity is thought to adversely affect magma fragmentation and the ability of magma to erupt explosively. We used the Plinian phase of the 1060 CE Glass Mountain eruption of Medicine Lake Volcano, California, to show that this is not necessarily the case. We performed numerical modeling of eruptive magma ascent and bubble growth to predict the development of magma porosity, permeability, and the built-up of gas pressure inside bubbles. We explicitly took into account permeable outgassing in the model. We used the measured porosity and permeability of the Plinian pyroclasts, together with percolation modeling, to reconstruct the conditions for magma degassing and fragmentation. Our results show that the porosity and permeability of pyroclasts coincide with the conditions required for fragmentation of the erupting magma. The onset of fragmentation occurs when the decompression rate reaches about 2 MPa.s-1, corresponding to a constant melt viscosity of ˜107 Pa.s and a magma porosity of approximately 0.75, conditions met for a mass discharge rate of about 107 kg.s-1, a cross sectional area of about 2,000 m2, and at a depth of approximately 1 km. Pyroclasts formed from magma that fragmented over a depth range of several tens of meters, probably reflecting some degree of lateral variability in magma porosity in the conduit. The model also indicates that, even if the magma was highly permeable at the onset of fragmentation, permeable outgassing did not affect fragmentation. The transition to an effusive activity and the emission of obsidian after the Plinian phase of the Glass Mountain eruption is most probably due to a decrease in decompression rate.

  17. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2004-04-19

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The models are based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. The models described in this report constitute the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA (BSC 2004 [DIRS:167796]) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166296]). The technical work plan was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, Planning for Science Activities. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the following sections as they occur. The TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model assessments: (1) Mechanical and thermal impacts of basalt magma intrusion on the invert, waste packages and waste forms of the intersected emplacement drifts of Zone 1. (2) Temperature and pressure trends of basaltic magma intrusion intersecting Zone 1 and their potential effects on waste packages and waste forms in Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (3) Deleterious volatile gases, exsolving from the intruded basalt magma and their potential effects on waste packages of Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (4) Post-intrusive physical

  18. Evolution of Intrusions in Lunar Floor-Fractured Craters: Degassing, Solidification and Relationship to Tectonic and Volcanic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, L.; Head, J. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are a class of 170 craters characterized by their anomalously shallow, heavily fractured floors; associated floor morphologies include deposits of mare material, pyroclastic deposits, and vents. Floor-fractured craters are located in close proximity to surface mare deposits, and are also closely associated with both the interiors and edges of lunar basins. The interior volcanic features, in conjunction with the morphologic and morphometric characteristics of the craters, suggest a formation consistent with subcrater magmatic intrusion and sill formation. Morphometric data suggests that the areal extent of the intrusion mirrors the dimensions of the crater floor, and that the intrusion does not extend past the crater wall region. The intrusion thickness can be calculated by comparing the observed depth of the craters with the predicted depth of a crater of similar diameter, and the averaged intrusion thickness is ~ 1 km. Thus these intrusions represent large subsurface magmatic provinces. We investigate the evolution of these large magmatic intrusions with emphasis on how the degassing of the intrusion leads to pyroclastic eruptions in certain craters, and whether these eruptions utilize fractures created by the tectonic deformation of the crater floor, or if they instead form from subsidiary diking off of the intrusion. We also investigate the amount of volatiles necessary to produce the pyroclastic eruptions, considering both inherent volatiles in the magma, and volatiles generated by reactions during the shallow subsurface evolution of the magma. The craters Alphonsus and Humboldt serve as ideal study cases to compare and contrast floor morphology, fracture location, and observed volcanic deposits. The results of this analysis have importance for why pyroclastic eruptions occurred in certain locations, and it also has implications for the volatile budget of lunar magmas.

  19. Constraints on the formation of geochemically variable plagiogranite intrusions in the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Sarah; Haase, Karsten M.; Keith, Manuel; Beier, Christoph; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The geochemistry and petrology of tonalitic to trondhjemitic samples ( n = 85) from eight different plagiogranite intrusions at the gabbro/sheeted dyke transition of the Troodos Ophiolite were studied in order to determine their petrogenetic relationship to the mafic plutonic section and the lava pile. The plagiogranitic rocks have higher SiO2 contents than the majority of the glasses of the Troodos lava pile, but lie on a continuation of the chemical trends defined by the extrusive rocks, indicating that the shallow intrusions generally represent crystallised magmas. We define three different groups of plagiogranites in the Troodos Ophiolite based on different incompatible element contents and ratios. The first and most common plagiogranite group has geochemical similarities to the tholeiitic lavas forming the lavas and sheeted dyke complex in the Troodos crust, implying that these magmas formed at a spreading axis. The second plagiogranite group occurs in one intrusion that is chemically related to late-stage and off-axis boninitic lavas and dykes. One intrusion next to the Arakapas fault zone consists of incompatible element-enriched plagiogranites which are unrelated to any known mafic crustal rocks. The similarities of incompatible element ratios between plagiogranites, lavas and mafic plutonic rocks, the continuous chemical trends defined by plagiogranites and mafic rocks, as well as incompatible element modelling results, all suggest that shallow fractional crystallisation is the dominant process responsible for formation of the felsic magmas.

  20. Mineral-Scale and Regional Isotopic Heterogeneity within the Kiglapait Intrusion and Other Mafic Intrusions of the ca. 1.3 Ga Nain Plutonic Suite, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Morse, S. A.; Scoates, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    For years, stratigraphic variations in the radiogenic isotopic compositions of whole rocks from layered intrusions have been used to document compositional changes (e.g., magma recharge, mixing, contamination) associated with the filling, crystallization, and cooling of crustal magma chambers. However, recent studies are revealing pronounced isotopic disequilibrium or heterogeneity between minerals from many major layered intrusions, including Pb isotopes in coexisting plagioclase and sulfide from the Bushveld (Mathez & Waight, 2003, GCA) and the Stillwater (McCallum et al, 1999, CMP), Sr and Nd isotopes in whole rock, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene from the Skaergaard (McBirney & Creaser, 2003, JP), and Sr isotopes in single plagioclase crystals from the Rum layered intrusion (Tepley & Davidson, 2003, CMP). Except for the Stillwater intrusion, these isotopic variations are not related to low-temperature secondary alteration. Instead, slow cooling (105-106 years) of these large bodies from near-liquidus to subsolidus temperatures appears to allow for complex geochemical evolution of partially molten systems. Proterozoic anorthosite plutonic suites are especially attractive targets for investigating the significance and extent of isotopic differences between crystals, whole rocks, and different intrusions given their typically protracted emplacement histories, range of magma compositions, and slow cooling at mid-crustal depths. To this list of intrusions that record mineral-mineral isotopic disequilibrium, we can add the large 1308 Ma troctolitic Kiglapait layered intrusion in the Nain Plutonic Suite, Labrador. Plagioclase separates and whole rocks show significant differences in both measured and initial Pb isotopic compositions. Bulk mafics and separated minerals (apatite, magnetite, augite and olivine) give internal Pb-Pb and U-Pb isochron ages consistent with the crystallization age. Measured 206Pb/204Pb is highest in apatite (30-73), indicating that apatite is

  1. Magma transport and storage at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii II: 1952-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, F.; Wright, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    We trace the evolution of Kilauea between the Halemaumau eruptions of 1952 and 2008. The magma supply path from the mantle is defined by the distribution of earthquakes deeper than 20 km. We compared the accumulated moment release from deep magma supply, south flank and rift zone earthquakes. We identified every intrusion and eruption in time plots of summit tilt and seismic activity in all regions, and plotted the earthquake distribution for ~ 1 week covering the period prior to, during and following the event. The establishment and continued growth of modern seismic and geodetic networks allow us to define three types of intrusions. 'Normal' intrusions occur with or without eruption and are accompanied by sharp tilt deflation at Kilauea's summit. 'Inflationary' intrusions occur during periods of summit inflation accompanied by rift earthquake swarms in the near-summit parts of both rift zones. 'Slow' intrusions are defined by isolated swarms of south flank earthquakes distributed perpendicular to the rift zones. Magnitudes of inflation and deflation shown by the daily tilt record at Kilauea's summit are converted to volume using a factor determined by previous workers. Magma supply rates are determined by summation of the volumes in cubic kilometers of (1) net summit inflation (2) sharp summit deflation accompanying rift activity and (3) summit and long continuous rift eruptions, divided by the elapsed time in years. Eruption efficiency is calculated by comparing the volumes of rift eruption and summit deflation. In this study we have reached the following conclusions: 1) Magma supply rates have increased from the pre-1952 value of 0.062 km3/yr to 0.1 km3/yr during the Mauna Ulu eruption of 1969-74 to 0.2 km3/yr during much of the eruption that began in 1983. 2) Eruption efficiencies show cyclic increases with increased activity, culminating in an efficiency averaging 100% during episodes of high fountaining in the period 1983-86. 3) Some south flank earthquake

  2. Magma supply, storage, and transport at shield-stage Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 5 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Montgomery-Brown, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    Magma supply to Hawaiian volcanoes has varied over millions of years but is presently at a high level. Supply to Kīlauea’s shallow magmatic system averages about 0.1 km3/yr and fluctuates on timescales of months to years due to changes in pressure within the summit reservoir system, as well as in the volume of melt supplied by the source hot spot. Magma plumbing systems beneath Kīlauea and Mauna Loa are complex and are best constrained at Kīlauea. Multiple regions of magma storage characterize Kīlauea’s summit, and two pairs of rift zones, one providing a shallow magma pathway and the other forming a structural boundary within the volcano, radiate from the summit to carry magma to intrusion/eruption sites located nearby or tens of kilometers from the caldera. Whether or not magma is present within the deep rift zone, which extends beneath the structural rift zones at ~3-km depth to the base of the volcano at ~9-km depth, remains an open question, but we suggest that most magma entering Kīlauea must pass through the summit reservoir system before entering the rift zones. Mauna Loa’s summit magma storage system includes at least two interconnected reservoirs, with one centered beneath the south margin of the caldera and the other elongated along the axis of the caldera. Transport of magma within shield-stage Hawaiian volcanoes occurs through dikes that can evolve into long-lived pipe-like pathways. The ratio of eruptive to noneruptive dikes is large in Hawai‘i, compared to other basaltic volcanoes (in Iceland, for example), because Hawaiian dikes tend to be intruded with high driving pressures. Passive dike intrusions also occur, motivated at Kīlauea by rift opening in response to seaward slip of the volcano’s south flank.

  3. Magma Plumbing and Transport at Yellowstone--Implications from Geodesy and Geochemistry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C. W.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Surface deformation, thermal activity, and outgassing at the Yellowstone caldera are manifestations of a vigorous magmatic system that has been active for more than 2 million years. Viable models for Yellowstone's magma plumbing and transport system must account for: (1) high contemporary fluxes of heat and CO2; (2) ground deformation sources beneath each of two resurgent domes, and a third near the intersection of the north caldera rim and Norris-Mammoth corridor; (3) interplay among these sources, as suggested by the timing of major changes in deformation mode; (4) repeated cycles of uplift and subsidence and sudden changes from uplift to subsidence or vice versa; (5) spatial and temporal relationships between changes in deformation mode and earthquake swarms; and (6) lateral dimensions of all three deforming areas that indicate source depths in the range 5-15 km. Seismic tomography studies have imaged a partly molten silicic magma body in the upper crust beneath the caldera and a mantle feeder zone for mafic magma. A model in which surface displacements are caused primarily by variations in the flux of mafic magma into the crust satisfies known thermal, geochemical, and geodetic constraints. In the model, a conduit system centered beneath the northeast part of the caldera supplies basalt from a mantle source to an accumulation zone 5-10 km deep, perhaps at a rheological boundary beneath a crystal-rich rhyolite body remnant from past eruptions. Increases in magma flux favor surface uplift and decreases favor subsidence. A delicate equilibrium exists among the mass and heat flux from basaltic intrusions, heat and volatile loss from the rhyolite, and the overlying hydrothermal system. In the absence of basalt input, steady subsidence should occur as a result of fluid loss from the rhyolite, but if a self-sealing zone in the deep hydrothermal system prevents fluid escape the resulting pressure increase contributes to surface uplift. Such episodes end when the seal

  4. Magma supply dynamics at Westdahl volcano, Alaska, modeled from satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Masterlark, Timothy; Dzurisin, D.; Rykhus, Russ; Wicks, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A group of satellite radar interferograms that span the time period from 1991 to 2000 shows that Westdahl volcano, Alaska, deflated during its 1991-1992 eruption and is reinflating at a rate that could produce another eruption within the next several years. The rates of inflation and deflation are approximated by exponential decay functions having time constants of about 6 years and a few days, respectively. This behavior is consistent with a deep, constant-pressure magma source connected to a shallow reservoir by a magma-filled conduit. An elastic deformation model indicates that the reservoir is located about 6 km below sea level and beneath Westdahl Peak. We propose that the magma flow rate through the conduit is governed by the pressure gradient between the deep source and the reservoir. The pressure gradient, and hence the flow rate, are greatest immediately after eruptions. Pressurization of the reservoir decreases both the pressure gradient and the flow rate, but eventually the reservoir ruptures and an eruption or intrusion ensues. The eruption rate is controlled partly by the pressure gradient between the reservoir and surface, and therefore it, too, decreases with time. When the supply of eruptible magma is exhausted, the eruption stops, the reservoir begins to repressurize at a high rate, and the cycle repeats. This model might also be appropriate for other frequently active volcanoes with stable magma sources and relatively simple magma storage systems.

  5. Multiple mafic and felsic magma interaction as exhibited in the Dartmouth Pluton, Avalon zone, southeastern Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidzada, N.A.; Hermes, O.D.; Murray, D.P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Dioritic to quartz monzonitic rocks of the Dartmouth Pluton exhibit excellently preserved, diverse features produced by mingling and mixing of mafic and felsic magma during multiple events. The related mafic and hybridized intermediate composition rocks occur both as discrete outcrop-sized masses or as enclaves within quartz monzonite or early-stage mixed rocks. Enclaves are rounded, lack chilled margins, and in some cases exhibit cuspate margins; they range in size from 1m--<1cm. Outcrops dominated by dioritic rock consist of well developed mafic pillows with inter-pillow infillings of hybridized rock that had been subjected to magma mixing during or prior to the final mingling process. Dioritic rocks are fine-grained with sparse plagioclase phenocrysts; they contain small, darker-colored enclaves indicative of preceding magma interaction. Major and trace element variation diagrams for this suite of rocks exhibit general linear trends consistent with mixing processes. Overall, field, petrographic, and geochemical relationships in the Dartmouth Pluton demonstrate: (1) widespread mingling of mafic and felsic magma, (2) variable degrees of mafic and felsic magma mixing, and (3) multiple and repeated episodes of mafic and felsic magma interaction. Significantly, some spatially associated dioritic and granitic rocks, including a 595 Ma alkali feldspar granite formerly considered to be part of the Dartmount Pluton, are geochemically related. Field mapping demonstrates that rocks of the mixed suite are intrusive into these rocks, thus establishing a maximum age, but raising the questions that the suite may be considerably younger.

  6. Chemical and hydrogen isotope evidence for in situ dehydrogenation of biotite in silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Sharp, Z. D.

    1996-11-01

    To examine the potential for volatile fluxing of magma chambers by in situ degassing of hydrous minerals, we obtained complete chemical analyses for biotite separates from silicic lavas. The separates exhibit unusually low H2O contents that inversely correlate with host lava temperatures, high Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios that inversely correlate with host lava oxygen fugacities, and the highest δ D values yet reported for biotite from any silicic igneous rock (up to -19‰). These results are direct evidence for selective loss of protium (1H) from biotite during dehydrogenation in magma chambers heated from below by intrusion of mafic magma. The maximum PΔV energy generated from dehydrogenation alone can approach 2 × 103 joules per kilogram of magma. This finding provides support for the concept that injection of mafic magma coupled with sudden degassing of hydrous minerals in a volatile-rich magma chamber can increase pressure, and thus enhance the possibility of initiating a volcanic eruption.

  7. A new mode of inner volcano growth: The “flower intrusive structure”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro; Pasquarè, Federico A.

    2008-07-01

    A multiple-sill laccolith nested within a centrally-dipping sheet swarm is a recently discovered sub-volcanic structure, resembling a "flower" in section-view, which we have found in some eroded volcanoes in Iceland, suggesting that this structure can have some general relevance in deforming rock successions in volcanic areas. After a brief summary of the main characteristics of these examples, with details on Stardalur volcano, we present an evolutionary model to explain the whole structure. Both sills and sheets are fed by multiple pulses of magma following radial paths from a shallow chamber; the earlier vertical set of the radial sheets above the middle of the chamber are abruptly deflected into sills by the overlying lava succession. A proto-laccolith starts developing, composed of different, vertically stacked sills, originating from the central vertical feeder zone. Each sill contributes to the deformation of the overburden; room for intrusions is provided by the higher strain that can be attained by the widespread hyaloclastites and breccias which have a "softer" behaviour (with a lower Young's modulus) than the stiffer (higher Young's modulus) lava flows, combined with the doming of the overlying lavas. Later dikes get deflected outwards along the contact with the proto-laccolith and acquire a convex-upward shape, in cross-section.

  8. Homogeneous crystal-rich vs. zoned crystal-poor ignimbrites: how much strain accumulates in large magma reservoirs between a new magma recharge and eruption? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Bachmann, O.; Dufek, J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    , by an intrusion of magma) and eruption from the time to accumulate 5-10 convective overturns.

  9. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  10. Hybrid network intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, David

    2014-05-01

    We report on a machine learning classifier that can be used to discover the patterns hidden within large networking data flows. It utilizes an existing intrusion detection system (IDS) as an oracle to learn a faster, less resource intensive normalcy classifier as a front-end to a hybrid network IDS. This system has the capability to recognize new attacks that are similar to known attack signatures. It is also more highly scalable and distributable than the signature-based IDS. The new hybrid design also allows distributed updates and retraining of the normalcy classifier to stay up-to-date with current threats.

  11. Lunar floor-fractured craters as magmatic intrusions: Geometry, modes of emplacement, associated tectonic and volcanic features, and implications for gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, Lauren M.; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2015-03-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are a class of 170 lunar craters with anomalously shallow, fractured floors. Two end-member processes have been proposed for the floor formation: viscous relaxation, and subcrater magmatic intrusion and sill formation. Recent morphometric analysis with new Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and image (LROC) data supports an origin related to shallow magmatic intrusion and uplift. We find that the distribution and characteristics of the FFC population correlates strongly with crustal thickness and the predicted frequency distribution of overpressurization values of magmatic dikes. For a typical nearside lunar crustal thickness, dikes with high overpressurization values favor surface effusive eruptions, medium values favor intrusion and sill formation, and low values favor formation of solidified dikes concentrated lower in the crust. We develop a model for this process, make predictions for the morphologic, morphometric, volcanic, and geophysical consequences of the process and then compare these predictions with the population of observed floor-fractured craters. In our model, the process of magmatic intrusion and sill formation begins when a dike propagates vertically towards the surface; as the dike encounters the underdense brecciated region beneath the crater, the magmatic driving pressure is insufficient to continue vertical propagation, but pressure in the stalled dike exceeds the local lithostatic pressure. The dike then begins to propagate laterally forming a sill which does not propagate past the crater floor region because increased overburden pressure from the crater wall and rim crest pinch off the dike at this boundary; the sill then continues to inflate, further raising and fracturing the brittle crater floor. When the intrusion diameter to intrusion depth ratio is smaller than a critical value, the intrusion assumes a laccolith shape with a domed central region. When the ratio exceeds a critical value

  12. Magma storage of an alkali ultramafic igneous suite from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail K.; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jarosław; Manecki, Maciej; Farajewicz, Milena; Dwornik, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    An alkali mafic-ultramafic igneous suite of composite intrusions, lenses and associated greenstones are hosted by Neoproterozoic metasedimentary sequences in Chamberlindalen, Southwest Svalbard. This study focuses on the alkali igneous suite of Chamberlindalen with a view to determining the conditions of magma storage. The rocks from Chamberlindalen display cumulate textures, are highly magnesian and are classified as alkaline by the occurrence of kaersutite. They have textures that indicate cocrystallization of primary magmatic minerals such as diopside, kaersutite-ferrokaersutite and biotite-phlogopite in different proportions. The historic magma plumbing system for the alkaline cumulates has been reconstructed by thermobarometry. Diopside and kaersutite crystallization in the alkaline cumulates show a dominant level of magma storage between 30 and 50 km in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  13. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  14. Longitudinal Relations of Intrusive Parenting and Effortful Control to Ego-Resiliency during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Zoe E.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal relations among ego-resiliency (ER), effortful control (EC), and observed intrusive parenting were examined at 18, 30, and 42 months of age ("Ns" = 256, 230, and 210) using structural equation modeling. Intrusive parenting at 18 and 30 months negatively predicted EC a year later, over and above earlier levels. EC at…

  15. Parsing Aleutian Arc Magma Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The first-order subdivision of Aleutian arc magma compositions is based on SiO2, and the second-order subdivision is usually based on the change of FeOt/MgO as a function of SiO2, resulting in the additional twofold subdivision into (TH) and calcalkaline (CA) magmas. However, additional robust compositional variations exist. The two most important of these are (1) variation of the calcium number [Ca#; Ca/(Na+Ca)] as a function of SiO2, and (2) the Rate of Incompatible Trace-element Enrichment (RITE) at individual volcanic centers. Additionally, the data show that the low FeOt/MgO of CA andesite and dacite is more controlled by MgO excess than FeOt depletion. The Ca# of andesites and dacites is strongly bimodal. The low-Ca# group is "calc-alkalic", while the high-Ca# group is "calcic", using Peacock (1931) criteria. A continuum of Ca#s exists, but lavas intermediate between high-Ca# and low-Ca# are much less abundant. Ca#s merge below about 55% SiO2, and have a simple normal distribution. RITE, with rare but important exceptions, is generally constant at the temporal and spatial scale of a single volcano. Among high-RITE magmas LILE, LREE, HFSE, and Th increase ~3.5-fold, and HREE increase ~2.5-fold from basalt or basaltic-andesite through andesite to dacite. There is no strong indication that RITE is silica-dependant. High-RITE magmas develop a strong negative Eu anomaly, and are qualitatively compatible with an origin primarily involving fractionation of plagioclase-dominated mineral assemblages. Low-RITE magmas, in contrast, have nearly invariant REE and HFSE, and LILE and Th increase merely 1.5-fold over the same silica range. Low-RITE magmas are not compatible with fractionation of a plagioclase-dominant mineral assemblage. Alternative qualitatively plausible explanations (needing rigorous evaluation) include fractionation of an ultramafic mineral assemblage (Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic bodies may be a model; see USGS Prof Paper 1564); that low-RITE basaltic

  16. The Eagle and East Eagle sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Midcontinent Rift System, upper Michigan: Geochronology and petrologic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xin; Li, Chusi; Ripley, Edward M.; Rossell, Dean; Kamo, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    The Eagle and East Eagle intrusions are small, subvertical dike-like mafic-ultramafic bodies that cut Proterozoic sedimentary strata in the Baraga Basin in northern Michigan. The Eagle intrusion hosts a newly discovered magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE deposit. The nearby East Eagle intrusion also contains sulfide mineralization, but the extent of this mineralization has yet to be determined by further drilling. Both intrusions contain olivine-bearing rocks such as feldspathic peridotite, melatroctolite, and olivine melagabbro. Sulfide accumulations range from disseminated at both Eagle and East Eagle to semimassive and massive at Eagle. U-Pb baddeleyite dating gives a crystallization age of 1107.2 ± 5.7 Ma for the Eagle intrusion, coeval with eruption of picritic basalts at the base of the volcanic succession in the Midcontinent Rift System (MRS). The Fo contents of olivine cores in the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions vary between 75 and 85 mol %, higher than those of olivine in larger layered intrusions in the MRS such as the Duluth Complex. The FeO/MgO ratios and Al2O3 contents of the parental magmas for the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions inferred from olivine and spinel compositions are similar to those of picritic basalts in the base of the MRS volcanic succession. These petrochemical data suggest that the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions are the intrusive equivalents of high-MgO basalts that erupted in the early stages of continental magmatism associated with the development of the rift. Variations in mineral compositions and incompatible trace element ratios suggest that at least three major pulses of magmas were involved in the formation of low-sulfide rocks in the Eagle intrusion. Lower Fo contents of olivine associated with semimassive sulfides as compared to that of olivine in low-sulfide rocks suggest that the magma associated with the semimassive sulfide was more fractionated than the parental magmas of the low-sulfide rocks in the Eagle intrusion. Accumulation of

  17. The Topopah Spring Tuff: Evidence for dynamic withdrawal from a layered magma body

    SciTech Connect

    Schuraytz, B.C.; Vogel, T.A.; Younker, L.W.

    1987-08-15

    The Topopah Spring Tuff is a classic example of a compositionally zoned ash-flow sheet resulting from eruption of a compositionally zoned magma body. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of whole-rock tuff samples indicate that the base of the ash-flow sheet and the dominant volume of erupted material consist of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite, with a gradational transition into overlying crystal-rich quartz latite. Major and trace element analyses of glassy pumices and microprobe analyses of their oxide and silicate phenocrysts provide closer approximations to the chemical and thermal gradients within the magma body. The gradients inferred from these data indicate that the transition from high-silica rhyolitic to quartz latitic magma was abrupt, rather than gradational, with a distinct liquid-liquid interface separating the contrasting magmas. Observations are consistent with fluid dynamic models in which the angular velocity field developed near the entrance region of the vents results in simultaneous withdrawal of magma from a continually greater lateral and vertical extent within the chamber. The abrupt transition to chemically variable pumices, dominated by those of quartz latitic composition, implies that the interface between the magma layers remained relatively stable until drawdown breached the interface and preferentially erupted higher temperature, more mafic magma along with subordinate amounts of the incompletely exhausted high-silica rhyolitic magma.

  18. Buffered and unbuffered dike emplacement on Earth and Venus - Implications for magma reservoir size, depth, and rate of magma replenishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, J. W., III

    1993-01-01

    Models of the emplacement of lateral dikes from magma chambers under constant (buffered) driving pressure conditions and declining (unbuffered) driving pressure conditions indicate that the two pressure scenarios lead to distinctly different styles of dike emplacement. In the unbuffered case, the lengths and widths of laterally emplaced dikes will be severely limited and the dike lengths will be highly dependent on chamber size; this dependence suggests that average dike length can be used to infer the dimensions of the source magma reservoir. On Earth, the characteristics of many mafic-dike swarms suggest that they were emplaced in buffered conditions (e.g., the Mackenzie dike swarm in Canada and some dikes within the Scottish Tertiary). On Venus, the distinctive radial fractures and graben surrounding circular to oval features and edifices on many size scales and extending for hundreds to over a thousand km are candidates for dike emplacement in buffered conditions.

  19. Electrical Properties of Hydrous Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumonier, M.; Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles strongly affect physical and chemical properties of magmas which are major vectors of mass and heat transfer in the Earth's. In subduction zones, hydrated melts prevail during the entire course of differentiation from basalts, andesites, dacites to rhyolites. Several electrical surveys obtained by magneto telluric investigations are currently deployed at subduction zones. The electrical conductivity of hydrous melts is however poorly constrained: so far only three studies have experimentally addressed this topic. Here, we show in situ electrical impedance of natural dacites, andesites (from Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia) and basaltic magmas obtained with a 4-wire set up in a piston cylinder and internally heated pressure vessel. The range of temperature (500 to 1300°C), pressure (0.3 to 2 Gpa), and the various water contents and crystal fractions covers the respective ranges occurring at natural conditions. First results show that the conductivity increases with the temperature, the melt fraction, and a slightly decreases with the pressure and the crystal fraction. The compilation of these results with previous studies (rhyolitic, phonolitic and basaltic compositions) will lead to a general model of the electrical properties of magmas. Such a model will help in (i) interpreting the electrical signature of natural magmas and (ii) constraining their conditions (chemical composition, temperature, pressure, water content, melt fraction) from the source to the storage location.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Multicomponent Convection in a volatile-rich Replenished Magma Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, A.; Vassalli, M.; Papale, P.

    2005-12-01

    progressively more efficient dynamics. Lower CO2 contents produce the rise of a gas-rich plume along the chamber axis, and its subsequent lateral spreading. Higher CO2 contents can produce plumes detached from the chamber axis, and large vortexes which can involve the entire chamber, or be localized in its middle portion. A few hours of magma injection result in overall pressure increase of the order of 10 MPa, suggesting that wall fracturing and dyke propagation can be associated with convection in the magma chamber.

  1. Petrogenesis and metallogenesis of the Xinjie layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion, China: Modeling of recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Zhaochong; Li, Yongsheng; Santosh, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Xinjie layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the central Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP), SW China, hosts Fe-Ti-V oxide ore in the upper part and Ni-Cu-platinum-group element (PGE) sulfide deposits in the lower part. In this study, we use published Sr-Nd isotopic data to simulate and evaluate the energy-constrained recharge, assimilation, and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC) model with a view to track the petrogenesis and mineralization. In contrast to the energy-constrained assimilation fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model, the EC-RAFC modeling shows that the Xinjie intrusion may represent a shallow crustal magma chamber system, where it experienced the RAFC processes. In the early stage of the magmatic process (Tm = 1460 °C), a pulse of magma was injected into an actively evolving magma chamber. Minor melting (Ma∗ = 0.257) and assimilation of the wallrock (underlying Emeishan basalts) occurred when the temperature of magma (Tm = 1245 °C) decreased close to the equilibration temperature (Teq = 1165 °C). The mass-temperature plots indicate that fractional crystallization was significantly affected by the recharge and assimilation processes, whereas the contaminated magma recharge favored the early crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides as well as the formation of the PGE-bearing immiscible melt in the lower part of the intrusion. In contrast, the formation of the Fe-Ti oxides ores in the upper part occurred probably through fractional crystallization and/or immiscibility of the evolved Fe-Ti-rich magma, resulting in the paragenesis of Fe-Ti-V oxides and Ni-Cu-PGE sulfides in the Xinjie layered intrusion.

  2. Multiple intrusive events in the formation of granite plutons: Evidence from the Lee Vining Diorite, eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, T.C.; Furman, T. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Reid, J.B. Jr. . School of Natural Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Cretaceous Lee Vining Diorite (eastern Sierra Nevada) preserves important field, petrographic and geochemical evidence for complex intrusive events in a mesozonal magma body. The pluton comprises primarily light grey unfoliated quartz diorite, with color index varying between 10--50. A 1,400 m transect across the pluton yielded samples of (1) mafic diorite from a 300 m thick sill, (2) disaggregated basaltic dikes, (3) rounded mafic inclusions and (4) rounded hornblende-cumulate inclusions in addition to (5) quartz diorite of variable texture and color index. Internal intrusive contacts are observed in several places; the upper contact of the sill is indistinct locally, suggesting a low thermal contrast with host quartz diorite at the time of intrusion. Textural analysis of plagioclase crystals form throughout the pluton indicates a history of pervasive magma mixing. In each thin section, 20--90% of the plagioclase crystals are pitted or corroded, and up to 50% of these crystals are also completely zoned. Disequilibrium plagioclase crystals are not preferentially associated with mafic inclusion, but are distributed randomly within the pluton. Major and trace element analyses of over 40 samples taken along the transect show variations that cannot be explained through simple magma mixing or through progressive crystallization of a single magma body. The pluton is not zoned geochemically, but rather comprises small regions (< 200 m across) of uniform composition that are juxtaposed randomly. Chemical variations across the pluton likely result from both missing of small magma batches and fractional crystallization of mixed magmas. This interpretation is consistent with field and textural requirements for multiple intrusive episodes in the formation of the diorite pluton.

  3. Saltwater intrusion in coastal regions of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Paul M.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2010-02-01

    Saltwater has intruded into many of the coastal aquifers of the United States, Mexico, and Canada, but the extent of saltwater intrusion varies widely among localities and hydrogeologic settings. In many instances, the area contaminated by saltwater is limited to small parts of an aquifer and to specific wells and has had little or no effect on overall groundwater supplies; in other instances, saltwater contamination is of regional extent and has resulted in the closure of many groundwater supply wells. The variability of hydrogeologic settings, three-dimensional distribution of saline water, and history of groundwater withdrawals and freshwater drainage has resulted in a variety of modes of saltwater intrusion into coastal aquifers. These include lateral intrusion from the ocean; upward intrusion from deeper, more saline zones of a groundwater system; and downward intrusion from coastal waters. Saltwater contamination also has occurred along open boreholes and within abandoned, improperly constructed, or corroded wells that provide pathways for vertical migration across interconnected aquifers. Communities within the coastal regions of North America are taking actions to manage and prevent saltwater intrusion to ensure a sustainable source of groundwater for the future. These actions can be grouped broadly into scientific monitoring and assessment, engineering techniques, and regulatory approaches.

  4. On the Principles of Building a Layered Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    An accurate and realistic understanding of all magmatic processes involves knowing the combined physical and chemical fundamentals governing the overall process. Magmatic processes involve such a vast array of sub-processes (e.g., heat and mass transfer, crystal growth, slurry transport and sorting, annealing, resorbtion, etc.) that rarely is there any single feature or measurement that can be safely inverted to solve the problem. And each event as in the formation of an intrusion must at some level for heuristic purposes be defined as an isolated event. This is commonly done without much forethought, as is the absolutely critical assumption of the initial conditions defining the beginning of the event. Almost without exception, it is the initial conditions that determine the outcome of the entire process in all physical and biological systems. Automobile factories produce motorized vehicles not water melons or chimpanzees. Nucleosynthesis of H and He always gives the same set of elements. The initial conditions of the magma giving rise to the end product for mafic layered systems are especially difficult to discern and must be bounded by observing simpler, real time magmatic and volcanic processes. Initial conditions come from posing a series of questions: What was the style and duration of filling? What was the rate of influx and final volume of each delivery of magma? What was the compositional variation and phenocryst content of the individual magmatic deliveries? If phenocrysts are present, were they sorted prior to injection during ascension? What was the original and ongoing shape of the magmatic reservoir? A failure to appreciate or answer such basic questions leads to vastly untenable evolutionary scenarios. Unrealistic initial conditions necessarily lead to unrealistic magmatic scenarios. There are certain safe starting points. Eruptive and emplacement fluxes are limited. The larger an intrusion is the longer it took to build and the longer to build the

  5. Multiple Use of Magma Pathways: Mechanism for Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Reichardt, H.

    2010-12-01

    In the Karakoram Shear Zone, Ladakh, NW India, Miocene leucogranitic dykes form an extensive, varied and complex network, linking the Pangong Range anatectic terrane with leucogranites of the Karakoram Batholith. Water-fluxed Miocene anatexis occurs at upper amphibolite conditions, and was contemporaneous with shearing. The network is characterized by continuous and interconnected leucosomes and dykes, with only rare cross-cutting relationships, forming dyke swarms and more chaotic injection complexes where magmatic rocks cover up to 50% of the outcrop area. Despite this volume of magma, the system was always controlled by solid framework suggesting that it did not flow en masse and that the magma network was not all liquid simultaneously. Leucogranites in this network, carry an isotopic signature intermediate between the two main anatectic rocks in the source, suggesting efficient homogenization of the magmatic products. This meso- to macroscale complex network is also reflected at microscale. Microstructural observations indicate that these magmatic rocks consist dominantly of Qtz, Plg and Kfs in two very distinct appearances, as large irregularly-shaped grains with cuspate boundaries, or/and as fine-grained minerals with lobate boundaries. These two show intimate spatial relationship with fine-grained material forming semi- to continuous corridors to wide channels that links together and form an extensive network branching around large grains. We suggest, that the large minerals represent early formed solid granitic framework that was later invaded by a new melt batch that exploits microfractures in between and through the framework forming crystals giving rise to this interconnected network. The presence of later crystallized melt and its interaction with the solid rock was inferred from the following microstructures: (i) narrow, tortuous corridors of fine-grained minerals cutting across or lining the boundaries of larger grains, interpreted to be remnants of

  6. Geometry of Caldera Superfaults and Emplacement of Their Associated Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildyard, R.; Kokelaar, P.

    2006-12-01

    Caldera collapse generally involves large-scale fault movements, in some cases involving an annular structure (ring-fault) but commonly involving several intersecting fault strands. Fault displacements are typically hundreds of meters in hours or days. The geometry of caldera faults has often been depicted as inward dipping and bounding a coherent crustal block, but such `key-stone'-like geometry does not facilitate subsidence unless associated with overall extension. Recent modelling, experimentation and comparison with natural analogs show that bounding faults typically dip outwards. Reappraisal of the deeply dissected Glencoe Volcano in Scotland has shown that the archetypal bounding `ring-fault' and associated intrusions, which define an ellipse 14x8 km, comprise near vertical, outward-dipping structures that have accommodated ~700 m of subsidence. Along certain sections, pseudotachylyte occurs at the margins of voluminous (1-2000 m wide) fault intrusions of rhyolite, monzonite, diorite, tonalite and granite. The pseudotachylyte and rhyolite show various mingling relationships indicating a fluid and particulate-state interaction during emplacement. The inner contacts, against the subsided country rocks, are planar while the outer contacts are highly irregular, both on a large scale (100's m) and a small scale (10 cm -1 m). In one section, a fault strand cuts a hydrothermal system recorded by veins of quartz, epidote, pyrite and sericite. We infer that both friction melts and magmas were transformed explosively to froth or spray where they encountered rapid decompression along dilatant sections of the active superfaults. The friction melts were driven upwards, plastering separate fault surfaces, and were rapidly followed by fragmented rhyolite magma and then fluid magma that formed fault intrusions. The irregular outer contacts of the fault intrusions are interpreted as recording instantaneous explosive disruption of pressurized hydrothermal systems that were

  7. Controlling factors on earthquake swarms associated with magmatic intrusions; constraints from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Einarsson, P.; Brandsdottir, B.; Arnadottir, T.

    2005-12-01

    Intrusion of magma into the Earth's crust is frequently associated with seismic activity, often occurring as distinct earthquake swarms. Understanding the nature of these swarms is important for evaluating crisis situations in volcanic areas. However, there often seem to be little correlation between the amount of seismic energy release, the spatial extent of the volume of rock affected by the stress perturbations, and the volume of magma on the move, which complicates the immediate risk evaluation. A number of factors may influence the evolution of a magmatically induced seismic swarm and the resulting seismic energy release. A number of factors need to be evaluated in each individual case. These are, in random order: the crustal thickness, presence/absence of a crustal magma chamber, geothermal gradient, magmatic flow rate/stressing rate, intrusion volume, depth of intrusion, tectonic setting of the intruded area, regional stresses and tectonic history. Based on three case studies, where seismic swarm activities have been confirmed through deformation measurements to be related to magmatic movements, we attempt to evaluate the relative importance of the assumed controlling factors. All case examples are located within Iceland, but in different tectonic settings. 1. The Hengill triple junction, situated where two extensional plate boundaries join a transform zone. The area experienced a period of unusually persistent earthquake activity from 1994 to 1999, contemporaneously with ground uplift at a rate of 1-2 cm/yr. The uplift was modeled as a response to magma injection at about 7 km depth. 2. The Eyjafjallajokull volcano, situated in a volcanic flank zone where extensional fractures are only poorly developed. Two minor seismic swarms, in 1994 and 1999; were associated with a cumulative surface uplift of more than 35 cm. The two uplift events were modeled as sill intrusions at depths of 4.5 to 6.5 km. 3. The Krafla rift segment, forming part of an extensional

  8. Sheeted and bulbous pluton intrusion mechanisms of a small granitoid from southeastern Australia: implications for dyke-to-pluton transformation during emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. J.

    1994-06-01

    The small late syn-tectonic Carboniferous Davys Creek Granite (DCG) of southeastern Australia consists of microgranitic intrusive bodies of diverse geometry and structure. These bodies include: (1) subvertical concordant sheets; (2) bulbous peneconcordant plutons with apophyses and discordant lobes; and (3) subvertical dykes and stocks. The sequence of changing intrusive style is broadly 1-2-3. Transition from 1 to 2 was probably a response to rising magma pressures or declining tectonic stresses. The λ parameter of Emerman and Marrett (1990), which discriminates between stable sheet-like and potential stock/pluton/batholith emplacement modes, adequately predicts the transitions between sheet and pluton emplacements for the DCG. Ductile dyking along actively forming foliations appears to have been an important early intrusive mechanism. A transition from sheet to bulbous pluton intrusion style is suggested to have been in response to magma pressure increases.

  9. Health-related intrusive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Freeston, M H; Gagnon, F; Ladouceur, R; Thibodeau, N; Letarte, H; Rhéaume, J

    1994-04-01

    Two studies address the prevalence, concomitants, and appraisal of health-related intrusive thoughts. Eighty-three percent of adults (N = 658) in waiting rooms of two general hospitals reported at least one intrusive thought during the preceding month and 75.0% of patients and 55.5% of people accompanying them reported a health-related intrusive thought in the same period. The intrusions were associated with anxious and depressive symptoms. Health related intrusive thoughts were reported by 61% of a sample of university students (N = 608) and were the most frequent intrusive thought among 19.9% of the students. First, triggering stimuli reported by the subjects were significant predictors of thought frequency, worry, removal difficulty, and effort used in removing the thought. Second, appraisals of high probability were significant predictors of high frequency, worry, and especially difficulty in removing the thought. Finally, perceived responsibility and disapproval of the thought were also significant predictors of thought frequency, worry, removal difficulty, effort used in removing the thought, and guilt. These data support the position that cognitive appraisal of intrusive thoughts is closely linked to the subjective experience of the thought: more extreme appraisals were associated with more troublesome thoughts. The clinical implications of these studies are discussed in terms of current models of hypochondriasis and health anxiety. PMID:8027960

  10. Reducing depressive intrusions via a computerized cognitive bias modification of appraisals task: developing a cognitive vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tamara J; Moulds, Michelle L; Holmes, Emily A

    2009-02-01

    A feature of depression is the distressing experience of intrusive, negative memories. The maladaptive appraisals of such intrusions have been associated with symptom persistence. This study aimed to experimentally manipulate appraisals about depressive intrusions via a novel computerized cognitive bias modification (CBM) of appraisals paradigm, and to test the impact on depressive intrusion frequency for a standardized event (a depressive film). Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to either a session of positive or negative CBM. Participants then watched a depressing film (including scenes of bereavement and bullying) and subsequently monitored the occurrence of depressive intrusions related to the film in a diary for one week. At one-week follow-up, participants completed additional measures of intrusions--the Impact of Event Scale (IES) and an intrusion provocation task. As predicted, compared to the negative condition, participants who underwent positive CBM showed a more positive appraisal bias. Further, one week later, positive CBM participants reported fewer intrusions of the film and had lower IES scores. Our findings demonstrate that it is possible to manipulate maladaptive appraisals about depressive intrusions via a computerized CBM task. Further, this effect transfers to reducing intrusive symptomatology related to a standardized event (a depressive film) over one week, suggesting novel clinical implications. PMID:19091308

  11. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Bagnardi, M.; Acocella, V.

    2015-12-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we show with numerical models that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observations. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control: 1) the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations; 2) the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  12. On the conditions of magma mixing and its bearing on andesite production in the crust.

    PubMed

    Laumonier, Mickael; Scaillet, Bruno; Pichavant, Michel; Champallier, Rémi; Andujar, Joan; Arbaret, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mixing between magmas is thought to affect a variety of processes, from the growth of continental crust to the triggering of volcanic eruptions, but its thermophysical viability remains unclear. Here, by using high-pressure mixing experiments and thermal calculations, we show that hybridization during single-intrusive events requires injection of high proportions of the replenishing magma during short periods, producing magmas with 55-58 wt% SiO2 when the mafic end-member is basaltic. High strain rates and gas-rich conditions may produce more felsic hybrids. The incremental growth of crustal reservoirs limits the production of hybrids to the waning stage of pluton assembly and to small portions of it. Large-scale mixing appears to be more efficient at lower crustal conditions, but requires higher proportions of mafic melt, producing more mafic hybrids than in shallow reservoirs. Altogether, our results show that hybrid arc magmas correspond to periods of enhanced magma production at depth. PMID:25500902

  13. Accelerated uplift and magmatic intrusion of the Yellowstone caldera, 2004 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wu-Lung; Smith, Robert B; Wicks, Charles; Farrell, Jamie M; Puskas, Christine M

    2007-11-01

    The Yellowstone caldera began a rapid episode of ground uplift in mid-2004, revealed by Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements, at rates up to 7 centimeters per year, which is over three times faster than previously observed inflation rates. Source modeling of the deformation data suggests an expanding volcanic sill of approximately 1200 square kilometers at a 10-kilometer depth beneath the caldera, coincident with the top of a seismically imaged crustal magma chamber. The modeled rate of source volume increase is 0.1 cubic kilometer per year, similar to the amount of magma intrusion required to supply the observed high heat flow of the caldera. This evidence suggests magma recharge as the main mechanism for the accelerated uplift, although pressurization of magmatic fluids cannot be ruled out. PMID:17991858

  14. Accelerated uplift and magmatic intrusion of the Yellowstone caldera, 2004 to 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, W.-L.; Smith, R.B.; Wicks, C.; Farrell, J.M.; Puskas, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera began a rapid episode of ground uplift in mid-2004, revealed by Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements, at rates up to 7 centimeters per year, which is over three times faster than previously observed inflation rates. Source modeling of the deformation data suggests an expanding volcanic sill of ???1200 square kilometers at a 10-kilometer depth beneath the caldera, coincident with the top of a seismically imaged crustal magma chamber. The modeled rate of source volume increase is 0.1 cubic kilometer per year, similar to the amount of magma intrusion required to supply the observed high heat flow of the caldera. This evidence suggests magma recharge as the main mechanism for the accelerated uplift, although pressurization of magmatic fluids cannot be ruled out.

  15. Changes in the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, magma system 2003 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, S. I.; Linde, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    The structure of the magma system beneath the Soufriere Hills Volcano has been determined in many studies, e.g. Hautmann et al, 2010. A large magma chamber at about 11 km depth feeds a smaller one at about 5 km depth, which in turn couples to a dike topped by a ~1 km long conduit to the surface. Data from a network of four borehole dilatometers has shown significant changes in the hydraulic and gas coupling between the units. The strain ratios between the strain data at different sites allows a fairly confident assessment of where in the magma system the pressure changes occur. The major dome collapse on 13th July 2003 involved pressure change in the upper magma chamber only. The 5 following vulcanian explosions in three days, were confined to the conduit, as expected for fragmentation events. However, in the hour following the explosion on the 15th, there was an indication of a gas infusion into the dike from the magma chambers. The March 2004 event (Linde et al, 2010) started with a gas infusion into the dike from the upper magma chamber, that took less than two minutes, indicating that a gas path, not controlled by the highly viscous magma, had developed. All later vulcanian explosions in 2008, 2009, 2010, show large gas overpressure in the conduit, ~10x larger than for the July 2003 events. The deformation in December 2008, shows that both magma chambers and the dike are coupled. The high gas pressure detected before the 3 December explosion is consistent with the unusual lack of erupted pumice. It seems clear that all units are not permanently coupled together. Recent long-term inflation is dominated by the deeper magma chamber. Dome collapses, 2003 and 2006, affect the upper magma chamber. Since 2004, a fast gas path developed between the upper magma chamber and the dike. By 2008, this fast path extended to the deeper magma chamber as well. We conjecture that the enhanced magma flow rate, and therefore shear deformation rate, due to the five vulcanian

  16. Magma-maintained rift segmentation at continental rupture in the 2005 Afar dyking episode.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tim J; Ebinger, Cindy; Biggs, Juliet; Ayele, Atalay; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Keir, Derek; Stork, Anna

    2006-07-20

    Seafloor spreading centres show a regular along-axis segmentation thought to be produced by a segmented magma supply in the passively upwelling mantle. On the other hand, continental rifts are segmented by large offset normal faults, and many lack magmatism. It is unclear how, when and where the ubiquitous segmented melt zones are emplaced during the continental rupture process. Between 14 September and 4 October 2005, 163 earthquakes (magnitudes greater than 3.9) and a volcanic eruption occurred within the approximately 60-km-long Dabbahu magmatic segment of the Afar rift, a nascent seafloor spreading centre in stretched continental lithosphere. Here we present a three-dimensional deformation field for the Dabbahu rifting episode derived from satellite radar data, which shows that the entire segment ruptured, making it the largest to have occurred on land in the era of satellite geodesy. Simple elastic modelling shows that the magmatic segment opened by up to 8 m, yet seismic rupture can account for only 8 per cent of the observed deformation. Magma was injected along a dyke between depths of 2 and 9 km, corresponding to a total intrusion volume of approximately 2.5 km3. Much of the magma appears to have originated from shallow chambers beneath Dabbahu and Gabho volcanoes at the northern end of the segment, where an explosive fissural eruption occurred on 26 September 2005. Although comparable in magnitude to the ten year (1975-84) Krafla events in Iceland, seismic data suggest that most of the Dabbahu dyke intrusion occurred in less than a week. Thus, magma intrusion via dyking, rather than segmented normal faulting, maintains and probably initiated the along-axis segmentation along this sector of the Nubia-Arabia plate boundary. PMID:16855588

  17. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  18. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  19. Impermeable high-porosity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Vona, Alessandro; Kolzenburg, Stephan; Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Magma vesiculation (i.e., porosity increase) is the consequence of decompression-driven volatile release during ascent and/or heating. The ease at which these exsolved volatiles can escape is thought to strongly impact volcanic explosivity. Permeability is usually considered to increase as a function of porosity. High and low porosity are typically associated with high and low permeability, respectively. Here we present permeability experiments on foamed natural rhyolitic melts containing total porosities from 0.12 to 0.65; we compliment these data with measurements on synthetic foamed glasses (prepared by FOAMGLAS®) that contain a total porosity of 0.9. The rhyolitic melts (from Krafla, Iceland: Tg = 690 °C) were kept at atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours, followed by quenching. The four experiments yielded total porosities of 0.12, 0.44, 0.51, and 0.65, respectively. The permeability of these samples was then measured using a steady-state, benchtop permeameter under a confining pressure of 1 MPa. The permeability of the foamed samples containing a porosity of 0.12 and 0.44 were not measurable in our system, meaning their permeabilities are lower than ~10-18 m2. The permeability of the samples containing a porosity of 0.51 and 0.65 were 8.7 × 10-15 and 1.0 × 10-15 m2, respectively. Both types of FOAMGLAS® - containing a porosity of 0.9 - also have permeabilities lower than ~10-18 m2. Our study highlights that highly porous magmas are not necessarily permeable due to the absence of a connected network of pores. These data suggest that (1) the percolation threshold for magma requires further thought and, (2) that the liberation of exsolved volatiles will require the fracturing of bubble walls to connect the network of pores within the magma.

  20. Seismic evidence of magma transport in Eyjafjallajökull during 2009-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjaltadottir, S.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    The ice-capped central volcano Eyjafjallajökull in South-Iceland erupted in March and April 2010, after nearly 190 years of dormancy. Its last eruption occurred at the summit in 1821-23 and only two other eruptions are known during historic time in Iceland (last 1100 years). However, the volcano had shown signs of repeated magmatic activity since 1992, with the last intrusion episode occurring 10 years before the latest events. We have used relocated earthquakes recorded during 2009-2010 to track magma transport in the volcano during the recent intrusion and eruption episode. Only three major swarms were recorded in Eyjafjallajökull during the last 20 years. These occurred in 1994, 1996 and in 1999-2000. The 1996 swarm occurred at 20-25 km depth, near the Moho with no crustal uplift detected during the swarm, probably due to its great depth. However, the other two swarms occurred in the intermediate and upper crust and were accompanied by uplift centered at the southern flank caused by 4.5-6.5 km deep intrusions. The latest swarm activity began late in March 2009 when several deep earthquakes were recorded near the Moho. The swarm activity continued during June-August and was followed by a southward movement of a close GPS-station which indicated the formation of a new but small intrusion beneath the southern flank. After four quiet months the activity picked up again in late December. Similar to 1994, 1999 and 2009, the main activity was clustered approximately east of the summit at 9-11 km and 2-4 km depth. This pattern changed in late February when the seismicity partly migrated towards SSE, indicating the formation of a series of dykes at 4-9 km depth and again on 3 March with dramatic rise in intensity and the foci forming an E-W trending segment east of the main cluster. On 17 March the seismicity started to ascent towards the surface beneath the ice-cap but on 20 March the magma took a turn in the uppermost 2-3 km towards the first eruption site at the ice

  1. Mechanisms of differentiation in the Skaergaard magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Lesher, C. E.; Holness, M. B.; Jakobsen, J. K.; Salmonsen, L. P.; Humphreys, M. C. S.; Thy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Skaergaard intrusion is a superb natural laboratory for studying mechanisms of magma chamber differentiation. The magnificent exposures and new systematic sample sets of rocks that solidified inwards from the roof, walls and floor of the chamber provide means to test the relative roles of crystal settling, diffusion, convection, liquid immiscibility and compaction in different regions of the chamber and in opposite positions relative to gravity. Examination of the melt inclusions and interstitial pockets has demonstrated that a large portion of intrusion crystallized from an emulsified magma chamber composed of immiscible silica- and iron-rich melts. The similarity of ratios of elements with opposite partitioning between the immiscible melts (e.g. P and Rb) in wall, floor and roof rocks, however, indicate that large-scale separation did not occur. Yet, on a smaller scale of metres to hundred of metres and close to the interface between the roof and floor rocks (the Sandwich Horizon), irregular layers and pods of granophyre hosted by extremely iron-rich cumulates point to some separation of the two liquid phases. Similar proportions of the primocryst (cumulus) minerals in roof, wall and floor rocks indicate that crystal settling was not an important mechanism. Likewise, the lack of fractionation of elements with different behavior indicate that diffusion and fluid-driven metasomatism played relatively minor roles. Compositional convection and/or compaction within the solidifying crystal mush boundary layer are likely the most important mechanisms. A correlation of low trapped liquid fractions (calculated from strongly incompatible elements) in floor rocks with high fractionation density (the density difference between the crystal framework and the liquid) indicate that compaction is the dominating process in expelling evolved liquid from the crystal mush layer. This is supported by high and variable trapped liquid contents in the roof rocks, where gravity

  2. The chemical and isotopic differentiation of an epizonal magma body: Organ Needle pluton, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Farmer, G.L.; McCurry, M.; Mertzman, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Major and trace element, and Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of whole rocks and mineral separates from the Oligocene, alkaline Organ Needle pluton (ONP), southern New Mexico, constrain models for the differentiation of the magma body parental to this compositionally zoned and layered epizonal intrusive body. The data reveal that the pluton is rimmed by lower ??(Nd) (~-5) and higher 87Sr/86Sr (~0.7085) syenitic rocks than those in its interior (??(Nd) ~ 2, 87Sr/86Sr ~0.7060) and that the bulk compositions of the marginal rocks become more felsic with decreasing structural depth. At the deepest exposed levels of the pluton, the ??(Nd)~-5 lithology is a compositionally heterogeneous inequigranular syenite. Modal, compositional and isotopic data from separates of rare earth element (REE)-bearing major and accesory mineral phases (hornblende, titanite, apatite, zircon) demonstrate that this decoupling of trace and major elements in the inequigranular syenite results from accumulation of light REE (LREE)-bearing minerals that were evidently separated from silicic magmas as the latter rose along the sides of the magma chamber. Chemical and isotopic data for microgranular mafic enclaves, as well as for restite xenoliths of Precambrian granite wall rock, indicate that the isotopic distinction between the marginal and interior facies of the ONP probably reflects assimilation of the wall rock by ??(Nd) ~-2 mafic magmas near the base of the magma system. Fractional crystallization and crystal liquid separation of the crystally contaminated magma at the base and along the margins of the chamber generated the highly silicic magmas that ultimately pooled at the chamber top.

  3. Extremely High Magma Emplacement Rates Recorded in the Golden Horn Batholith, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, M. P.; Bowring, S. A.; Tepper, J. H.; Miller, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    High SiO2 rhyolites emplaced during 'super-eruptions' demonstrate that large volumes of eruptible magma can exist in the upper crust. However, the timescale over which the magma reservoirs that source these eruptions are built remains controversial. Thermal models suggest that magma emplacement rates need to be > 0.005-0.01 km3/yr in order to accumulate enough eruptible magma to source a 'super-eruption'. Yet, these rates are higher than the time-averaged rates (< 0.001 km3/yr) for nearly all well-studied granitoid plutonic complexes. This disparity contradicts geologic evidence suggesting that the high SiO2 rhyolites emplaced during 'super-eruptions' are extracted from crystal rich magma chambers that should be preserved in the geologic record as granodioritic and granitic plutons. We quantify time-averaged magma emplacement rates for the upper crustal Golden Horn batholith, WA based on new geologic mapping and U-Pb zircon CA-IDTIMS geochronology. The batholith is exposed over 310 km3 and can be separated in the field into five intrusive units. High topography allows the 3D geometry of each phase to be constrained and their volumes range from < 100 km3 to > 400 km3. U-Pb zircon geochronology reveals that four of the five phases were assembled incrementally and distinct zircon populations from samples within these phases suggest that individual magmatic pulses had fully crystallized before the next arrived. However, six nearly identical U-Pb zircon dates from a > 400 km3 rapakivi granite show that this phase was built in ca. 50 kyr and that large portions may have been emplaced nearly simultaneously. The implied emplacement rate for this phase (≥ 0.008 km3/yr) is in agreement with those predicted for assembly of the upper crustal magma chambers that source 'super-eruptions', and it may provide a rare and unprecedented opportunity to study the processes that occur in such chambers.

  4. Lead isotopic evidence for evolutionary changes in magma-crust interaction, Central Andes, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Barbara A.; Clark, Alan H.

    1984-07-01

    Lead isotopic measurements were made on Andean igneous rocks of Jurassic to Recent age in Moquegua and Tacna Departments, southernmost Peru, to clarify the petrogenesis of the rocks and, in particular, to investigate the effect of crustal thickness on rock composition. This location in the Cordillera Occidental is ideal for such a study because the ca. 2 Ga Precambrian basement rocks (Arequipa massif) have a distinct Pb isotopic signature which is an excellent tracer of crustal interaction, and because geomorphological research has shown that the continental crust was here thickened drastically in the later Tertiary. Seven samples of quartz diorites and granodiorites from the Ilo and Toquepala intrusive complexes, and seven samples of Toquepala Group subaerial volcanics were analyzed for Pb isotopic compositions. The plutonic rocks range in age from Jurassic to Eocene; the volcanic rocks are all Late Cretaceous to Eocene. With one exception, the Pb isotopic ratios are in the ranges 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.52-18.75, 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.58-15.65, and 208Pb/ 204Pb= 38.53-38.74. The data reflect very little or no interaction with old continental material of the Arequipa massif type. Lead from four Miocene Huaylillas Formation ash-flow tuffs, two Pliocene Capillune Formation andesites and five Quaternary Barroso Group andesites has lower 206Pb/ 204Pb than that in the pre-Miocene rocks, but relatively high 207Pb/ 204Pb and 208Pb/ 204Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.16-18.30, 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.55-15.63, 208Pb/ 204Pb= 38.45-38.90). Tilton and Barreiro [9] have shown that contamination by Arequipa massif granulites can explain the isotopic composition of the Barosso Group lavas, and the new data demonstrate that this effect is evident, to varying degrees, in all the analysed Neogene volcanic rocks. The initial incorporation of such basement material into the magma coincided with the Early Miocene uplift of this segment of the Cordillera Occidental [32], and thus with the creation of a thick

  5. Imaging the Socorro Magma Body Using Free Above-Ground Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, E.; Saldana, S.; Snelson, C. M.; Greschke, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is located within the Rio Grande Rift and is intersected by the Precambrian Socorro Fracture Zone near Socorro, NM. The SMB seems to be the source of a 5,000 km2 area of elevated seismic region known as the Socorro Seismic Anomaly. The first evidence of a subsurface reflector was from microearthquake studies. A COCORP seismic reflection profile provided further evidence for an essentially flat magmatic sill-like intrusion approximately 19 km below the surface, with less than a 1° slope and a lateral area of about 3400 km2 with an estimated thickness of about 100 m. A fundamental question regarding the SMB is related to the nature of its activity. The uplift associated with the SMB coupled with the presence of shallow earthquake swarms in the area is typically associated with the movement of magma, which may be indicative of active magmatic emplacement. As a pilot test to obtain P-wave velocity data, we used free explosive sources from the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) at New Mexico Tech in Socorro, NM. Our goals were to determine how much seismic energy is necessary to receive a decent signal back on the recorders and also to develop a preliminary refraction velocity model over the SMB. For this refraction experiment, 59 single-channel recorders (Texans - RT125a) were deployed over a distance of 125 km for a 1-week period centered at the EMRTC blast site. Over that time period, EMRTC set off six ~9,000 lb (4,082 kg) ANFO shots above ground. Although much of this energy went into the air, we were able to recover a small amount of this energy to build preliminary velocity models. The energy created by the blasts propagated about halfway through the array. These data have been used to produce a couple of 1-D models and a preliminary 2-D model of apparent velocity. We plan to use these results to develop a proposal to conduct a full controlled and passive-source experiment over the SMB in the near future.

  6. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  7. Characteristics and petrogenesis of Alaskan-type ultramafic-gabbro intrusions, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Loney, R.A. ); Himmelberg, G.R. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO )

    1993-04-01

    Alaskan-type ultramafic-gabbro intrusions occur along a belt that extends from Duke Island to Klukwan in southeastern Alaska and fall into two age groups, 400 to 440 Ma and 100 to 110 Ma. Most of the smaller bodies are magnetite-bearing hornblende clinopyroxenite; the larger ones consist of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxenite, with some gabbro, in addition to hornblende clinopyroxenite and hornblendite. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical characteristics of the Alaskan-type ultramafic bodies indicate that they originated by fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma and accumulation in a crustal magma chamber. The Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] content of clinopyroxene shows a marked enrichment with differentiation, suggesting crystallization from progressively more hydrous melts like those characteristics of arc magmas. REE abundance levels and patterns are markedly similar for given rock units in all the bodies studied suggesting that all the bodies were derived by differentiation of closely similar parent magmas under near identical conditions. The exact composition of the primary melt is uncertain but the authors' preferred interpretation is that the parental magma of most Alaskan-type bodies was a subalkaline hydrous basalt. The striking similarity between the REE abundance levels and patterns of the Alaskan-type clinopyroxenites and gabbros, and the clinopyroxenite xenoliths and plutonic gabbros associated with Aleutian Island Arc volcanism, further suggests that the primary magma was probably a hydrous olivine basalt similar to the primary magma proposed for the Aleutian arc lavas. The mineral chemistry and phase equilibria of the ultramafic bodies suggest that they crystallized in magma chambers at depths greater than about 9 km. Except for the Duke Island body, which has sedimentary structures and shows evidence of ubiquitous current activity, most of the other bodies appear to have accumulated under static conditions.

  8. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  9. The 2010-2011 Microearthquake Swarm in Krýsuvík, SW Iceland: Was it Triggered by Crustal Magma Injection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Michael, F.; Hager, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Iceland, the on-land continuation of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is the result of the interaction between the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the North-Atlantic mantle plume. The superposition and relative motion of the spreading plate boundary over the mantle plume are manifested by the volcanism and seismicity in Iceland. The Krýsuvík geothermal field is one of the most active geothermal fields in southwest Iceland. In 2010, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Reykjanes University, Uppsala University, and the Iceland Geosurvey (ISOR) deployed 38 temporary seismic stations on the Reykjanes Peninsula. Using data from 18 of the temporary seismic stations and from 5 stations of the South Iceland Lowland network around Krýsuvík, we captured an earthquake swarm that occurred between November, 2010 and February, 2011. We applied double difference tomography to relocate the events and determine the velocity structure in the region. Activity is clustered around the center of the Krýsuvík volcano system. Our seismic tomography result indicates a low velocity zone at a depth of about 6 km, right under the earthquake swarm. We consider that this low velocity zone contains some crustal magma that may be the thermal source for the geothermal field. At the same time, our relocated events delineate faults above and around this magma chamber. The system is within the stress field of a combination of left-lateral shear and extension; the majority of the strike-slip faults are right-lateral and most dip-slip faults are normal faults. Published geodetic measurements for the time period between 2009 and 2012 show a few centimeters uplift and extension in the area of the seismic swarm. We modeled the observed deformation using the Coulomb 3.3 software (U.S. Geological Survey). Our result indicates that a Mogi source of about 20×10^6 m^3 at a depth of about 6 km, consistent with the location and size of the tomography result, can explain the main deformation. The normal and the right-lateral

  10. Structural reconstruction and zonation of a tilted mid-crustal magma chamber: the felsic Chemehuevi Mountains plutonic suite

    SciTech Connect

    John, B.E.

    1988-07-01

    Structural relief resulting from middle Tertiary extensional deformation in the Chemehuevi Mountains of California exposes a unique cross section through an extensive (> 280 km/sup 2/) calc-alkalic, compositionally zoned, sill-like granitic intrusion of Late Cretaceous age. Minimum estimates for emplacement pressure, 4 to 6 kbar, imply that the Chemehuevi Mountains plutonic suite was initially intruded at mid-crustal depths and has undergone 10/sup 0/ to 15/sup 0/ of post emplacement tilting, tectonic denudation, and erosion. Reconstruction of the pre-Tertiary (pre-tilt) configuration suggests that this metaluminous to peraluminous granitic suite exhibits crude normal, vertical, and temporal zonation from granodiorite to granite. The zonation involves a decrease in age and an increase in silica away from the walls and roof, the youngest and most evolved members being concentrated toward the center and floor of the intrusion. The lower part of the intrusion had a flat floor, which was penetrated by at least three feeder dikes providing magma to the chamber. Structural reconstruction indicates that the roof is less than 1 km above the exposed top of the intrusion. The magma apparently ponded along the contact between undeformed Proterozoic basement above and subhorizontally foliated mylonitic gneisses below. This reconstruction provides opportunity to observe crosscutting relations between different types of mid-crustal structures (thick mylonitic shear zones, granitic intrusions, and temporally unrelated detachment faults), the geometry of which emphasizes the need for careful evaluation of seismic reflection profiles across complexly deformed and intruded continental crust.

  11. Magma chamber paradox: decompression upon replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papale, Paolo; Longo, Antonella; Montagna, Chiara Paola

    2013-04-01

    The invasion of active magma chambers by fresh magma of deeper provenance is invariably assumed to cause chamber pressurization. Pressure increase thus stands as an intuitive consequence of magma chamber replenishment. However, new numerical simulations demonstrate that pressure evolution is highly non-linear, and that decompression dominates when large density contrasts exist between injected and resident magmas. This apparent paradox originates from the compressible nature of volatile-rich magma and the dynamics of convection associated with injections of buoyant magma. While decompression can dominate in a shallow chamber, pressure increase develops in the connected deep regions of magma provenance. These results contradict classical views adopted to interpret observations at active as well as fossil magma chambers, and demonstrate that a simple reliance on intuition is insufficient: what may be perceived as a paradox - magma chamber decompression upon replenishment - is instead likely, and rooted in the complex physics that governs the multiphase, multi-component dynamics of magma transport in geometrically composite, spatially extended magmatic systems.

  12. Hydraulic Inflation and Buoyancy Pumping: A Model for Large, Fracture-Mediated Felsic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. D.; Ablay, G. J.; Grocott, J.; Petford, N.

    2005-05-01

    Large, intraplate, felsic intrusions with crustal anatectic sources, pipe-like conduits and tabular plutons are analysed, emphasising the magma-intrinsic factors that control their development. Conductively heated magma sources are broad and domical. Volume changes during melting generate buoyancy and hydraulic magmatic loads. The deformation state of the lithosphere determines its response. Rock strength depends on loading rate and limits differential stress. Tensile failure requires magma pore pressure, to reduce confining stress, while magma wedging in cracks modifies the stress field for vertical cracking. Non-magmatic loads include gravity and, critically, horizontal tensile stress from uplift, which favours vertical cracks. Tectonic forces are secondary. Intrusion begins with instability, due to the presence of magma and feedback between magmatic and ambient source loading. Hydrostatic magma pressure PM is augmented by buoyancy and melting dilativity overpressures (ΔPB and ΔPV). ΔPBmax increases with source height h while non-relaxed dilation creates ΔPV (proportional to h3), which arises, instantaneously, to the wall-rock strength. ΔPV confers high mechanical efficiency and increases faster than ΔPB to a max. that is orders of magnitude greater. Inelastic uplift results but, since full inelastic relaxation of ΔPV is impossible, elastic source compression results, providing hydraulic impetus for brittle source rupture and magma flow. For extensive melting, a molten cavity may develop. At lower melt fractions, melt veins form, connect and propagate as dykes. Magma pore overpressure and wedging fulfil the stress criteria for tensile rupture, whose geometry depends on the initial stress field (σH- or σV-dominant). In domed crust, radial ruptures focus to form a wide, central, pipe-like conduit. Requirements for a viable conduit are; (i) σV1; (ii) a positive gradient in PM, and; (iii) an aperture adequate to prevent magma freezing. If PM in dykes

  13. Numerical simulation of magma chamber dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Vassalli, Melissa; Giudice, Salvatore; Cassioli, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Magma chambers are characterized by periodic arrivals of deep magma batches that give origin to complex patterns of magma convection and mixing, and modify the distribution of physical quantities inside the chamber. We simulate the transient, 2D, multi-component homogeneous dynamics in geometrically complex dyke+chamber systems, by means of GALES, a finite element parallel C++ code solving mass, momentum and energy equations for multi-component homogeneous gas-liquid (± crystals) mixtures in compressible-to-incompressible flow conditions. Code validation analysis includes several cases from the classical engineering literature, corresponding to a variety of subsonic to supersonic gas-liquid flow regimes (see http://www.pi.ingv.it/~longo/gales/gales.html). The model allows specification of the composition of the different magmas in the domain, in terms of ten major oxides plus the two volatile species H2O and CO2. Gas-liquid thermodynamics are modeled by using the compositional dependent, non-ideal model in Papale et al. (Chem.. Geol., 2006). Magma properties are defined in terms of local pressure, temperature, and composition including volatiles. Several applications are performed within domains characterized by the presence of one or more magma chambers and one or more dykes, with different geometries and characteristic size from hundreds of m to several km. In most simulations an initial compositional interface is placed at the top of a feeding dyke, or at larger depth, with the deeper magma having a lower density as a consequence of larger volatile content. The numerical results show complex patterns of magma refilling in the chamber, with alternating phases of magma ingression and magma sinking from the chamber into the feeding dyke. Intense mixing takes place in feeding dykes, so that the new magma entering the chamber is always a mixture of the deep and the initially resident magma. Buoyant plume rise occurs through the formation of complex convective

  14. Magma Reservoir Processes Revealed by Geochemistry of the Ongoing East Rift Zone Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    limits of repeated MgO and temperature variation imply end-member magma conditions that are regulated by open-system recharge of the shallow magmatic plumbing system. The low-end of MgO variation (7 wt%) approaches the low-pressure multiphase cotectic, which is maintained by open-system replenishment of a persistent magma reservoir. The high-temperature end-member (10 wt% MgO) is probably regulated by olivine fractionation in a zone of turbulent mixing between primitive recharge magma (15 wt% MgO) and resident cotectic magma. The highest temperature magmas are associated with eruption pulses that occur in response to intrusive events at the summit and initiate short-term increases of HINCE/MINCE. Subsequent changes toward lower magmatic temperatures are associated with periods of overall summit deflation, relatively low-level effusion, and frequent eruptive pauses. The long-term trends can be explained by episodic mixing of chemically uniform recharge melt with diminishing proportions of pre-1983 summit magma (maintained at cotectic conditions). Decreasing HINCE/MINCE may signify that a greater proportion of recharge magma is being diverted directly to Pu`u `O`o with minimal summit interaction or that the mass ratio of those mixing end-members has changed due to a depleted summit chamber (or both). The coincidence of long-term summit deflation since the 1982 summit eruption suggests that shallow processes related to summit reservoir depletion may be responsible for decreasing HINCE/MINCE and Pb isotopes in post-1982 steady-state eruption products. Magma derived from a uniform mantle-source, after having flushed out older resident magma, may now completely occupy the shallow magmatic plumbing system.

  15. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  16. Insights into mare basalt thicknesses on the Moon from intrusive magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thiriet, Mélanie; Thorey, Clément

    2016-08-01

    Magmatic intrusions preferentially spread along interfaces marked by rigidity and density contrasts. Thus the contact between a lunar mare and its substratum provides a preferential location for subsequent magmatic intrusions. Shallow intrusions that bend the overlying layer develop characteristic shapes that depend on their radius and on the overlying layer flexural wavelength and hence on their emplacement depth. We characterize the topography of seven, previously identified, candidate intrusive domes located within different lunar maria, using data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. Their topographic profiles compare very well with theoretical shapes from a model of magma flow below an elastic layer, supporting their interpretation as intrusive features. This comparison allows us to constrain their intrusion depths and hence the minimum mare thickness at these sites. These new estimates are in the range 400-1900 m and are generally comparable to or thicker than previous estimates, when available. The largest thickness (⩾ 1700 m) is obtained next to the Hortensius and Kepler areas that are proposed to be the relicts of ancient volcanic shields.

  17. Degassing system from the magma reservoir of Miyakejima volcano revealed by GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Nakao, S.; Matsushima, T.

    2013-12-01

    Miyake-jima is a volcanic island located approximately 180 km south of Tokyo. The island is an active basaltic volcano that was dormant for a 17-year period between an eruption in 1983 and June 26, 2000, when it again became active. The volcanic activity that occurred in 2000 is divided into the following four stages: the magma intrusion stage, summit subsidence stage, summit eruptive stage, and degassing stage (Nakada et al., 2001). Earthquake swarm activity began on June 26, 2000, accompanied by large-scale crustal deformation. This led to a summit eruption on July 8, 2000. Based on the pattern of hypocenter migration and the nature of crustal deformation, it was estimated that magma migrated from beneath the summit of Miyake-jima to the northwest during the magma intrusion stage. The rapid collapse of the summit took place between July 8 and the beginning of August 2000 (summit subsidence stage). Large-scale eruptions took place on August 10, 18, and 29, 2000 (explosion stage). The eruptions largely ceased after August 29, followed by the release of large amounts of gas from the summit crater (degassing stage). In this study, we examined the location of the magma reservoir during the degassing stage based on crustal deformation observed by GPS. By comparing the amounts of degassing and volume change of the magma reservoir, as determined from crustal deformation, we determined the mechanism of degassing and the nature of the magma reservoir-vent system. According to observations by the Japan Meteorological Agency, a large amount of volcanic gas began to be released from Miyake-jima in September 2000 (Kazahaya et al., 2003). Approximately 42,000 tons/day of SO2 was released during the period between September 2000 and January 2001. Analysis of GPS data during the period [Figure 1] indicates a source of crustal deformation on the south side of the summit crater wall at a depth of 5.2 km. The rate of volume change was -3.8 x 106 m3/month [Figure 2]. As the volume is

  18. Fracturing of doleritic intrusions and associated contact zones: Implications for fluid flow in volcanic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Kim; Buckley, Simon J.; Chevallier, Luc; Fagereng, Åke; Galland, Olivier; Kurz, Tobias H.; Ogata, Kei; Planke, Sverre; Tveranger, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Igneous intrusions act as both carriers and barriers to subsurface fluid flow and are therefore expected to significantly influence the distribution and migration of groundwater and hydrocarbons in volcanic basins. Given the low matrix permeability of igneous rocks, the effective permeability in- and around intrusions is intimately linked to the characteristics of their associated fracture networks. Natural fracturing is caused by numerous processes including magma cooling, thermal contraction, magma emplacement and mechanical disturbance of the host rock. Fracturing may be locally enhanced along intrusion-host rock interfaces, at dyke-sill junctions, or at the base of curving sills, thereby potentially enhancing permeability associated with these features. In order to improve our understanding of fractures associated with intrusive bodies emplaced in sedimentary host rocks, we have investigated a series of outcrops from the Karoo Basin of the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, where the siliciclastic Burgersdorp Formation has been intruded by various intrusions (thin dykes, mid-sized sheet intrusions and thick sills) belonging to the Karoo dolerite. We present a quantified analysis of fracturing in- and around these igneous intrusions based on five outcrops at three individual study sites, utilizing a combination of field data, high-resolution lidar virtual outcrop models and image processing. Our results show a significant difference between the three sites in terms of fracture orientation. The observed differences can be attributed to contrasting intrusion geometries, outcrop geometry (for lidar data) and tectonic setting. Two main fracture sets were identified in the dolerite at two of the sites, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the contact respectively. Fracture spacing was consistent between the three sites, and exhibits a higher degree of variation in the dolerites compared to the host rock. At one of the study sites, fracture frequency in the

  19. Dynamic magma mixing revealed by the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Vlastelic, I.; Andreasen, R.; Bindeman, I.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moune, S.; Keiding, J. K.; Larsen, G.; Höskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, Th.

    2011-07-01

    Injection of basaltic magmas into silicic crustal holding chambers and subsequent mixing of the two components is a process that has been recognised since the late seventies to have resulted in explosive eruptions. Detailed reconstruction and assessment of the mixing process caused by such intrusion is now possible because of the exceptional time-sequence sample suite available from the tephra fallout of the 2010 summit eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano in South Iceland. From 14 to 19 April the tephra contains three glass types of basaltic, intermediate, and silicic compositions recording rapid magma mingling without homogenisation, involving evolved FeTi-basalt and dacite with composition identical to that produced by the 1821-1823 AD Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption. The time-dependent change in the magma composition suggests a binary mixing process with changing end-member compositions and proportions, or dynamic magma mixing. Beginning of May, a new injection of deep-derived basalt was recorded by deep seismicity, appearance of magnesium-rich olivine phenocrysts together with high sulphur output and presence of sulphide crystals. Thus the composition of the basaltic injection became more primitive and hotter with time prowoking changes in the silicic mixing end-member from pre-existing melt to the solid carapace of the magma chamber. Decreasing proportions of the mafic end-member with time in the erupted mixed-magma, demonstrate that injections of Mg-rich basalt was the motor of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption, and that its decreasing inflow terminated the eruption. Significant quantity of silicic magma is thus still present in the interior of the volcano. Our results show that detailed sampling during the entire eruption was essential for deciphering the complex magmatic processes at play, namely the dynamic magma mixing. Finally, the rapid compositional changes in the eruptive products suggest that magma mingling occurs on a timescale of

  20. Growth of plutons by incremental emplacement of sheets in crystal-rich host: Evidence from Miocene intrusions of the Colorado River region, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.F.; Furbish, D.J.; Walker, B.A.; Claiborne, L.L.; Koteas, G.C.; Bleick, H.A.; Miller, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the notion that plutons are constructed incrementally, commonly over long periods of time, yet field evidence for the multiple injections that seem to be required is commonly sparse or absent. Timescales of up to several million years, among other arguments, indicate that the dominant volume does not remain largely molten, yet if growing plutons are constructed from rapidly solidifying increments it is unlikely that intrusive contacts would escape notice. A model wherein magma increments are emplaced into melt-bearing but crystal-rich host, rather than either solid or crystal-poor material, provides a plausible explanation for this apparent conundrum. A partially solidified intrusion undoubtedly comprises zones with contrasting melt fraction and therefore strength. Depending on whether these zones behave elastically or ductilely in response to dike emplacement, intruding magma may spread to form sheets by either of two mechanisms. If the melt-bearing host is elastic on the relevant timescale, magma spreads rather than continuing to propagate upward, where it encounters a zone of higher rigidity (higher crystal fraction). Similarly, if the dike at first ascends through rigid, melt-poor material and then encounters a zone that is weak enough (poor enough in crystals) to respond ductilely, the ascending material will also spread because the dike tip ceases to propagate as in rigid material. We propose that ascending magma is thus in essence trapped, by either mechanism, within relatively crystal-poor zones. Contacts will commonly be obscure from the start because the contrast between intruding material (crystal-poorer magma) and host (crystal-richer material) is subtle, and they may be obscured even further by subsequent destabilization of the crystal-melt framework. Field evidence and zircon zoning stratigraphy in plutons of the Colorado River region of southern Nevada support the hypothesis that emplacement of magma replenishments into a

  1. Magma transport and storage at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii I: 1790-1952

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. L.; Klein, F.

    2011-12-01

    We trace the evolution of Kilauea from the time of the first oral records of an explosive eruption in 1790 to the long eruption in Halemaumau crater in 1952. The establishment of modern seismic and geodetic networks in the early 1960s showed that eruptions and intrusions were fed from two magma sources beneath the summit at depths of 2-6 and ~1 km respectively (sources 1 and 2), and that seaward spreading of the south flank took place on a decollement at 10-12 km depth at the base of the Kilauea edifice. A third diffuse, pressure-transmitting magma system (source 3) between the shallow East rift zone and the decollement was also identified. We test the null hypothesis that the volcano has behaved similarly throughout its lifetime, and conclude that the null hypothesis is not met for the period preceding the 1952 summit eruption because of changes in magma supply rate and differences in ground deformation patterns. The western missionaries arriving at Kilauea in 1823 were confronted with a caldera-wide lava lake. Filling rates determined by visual observation correspond to magma supply rates that averaged more than 0.3 km3/yr prior to 1840 and declined to 1894, when lava disappeared altogether at Halemaumau crater. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Thomas A. Jaggar in 1912 adjacent to the Volcano House Hotel on the rim of Kilauea. Instrumental observation at HVO began using a seismometer that doubled as a tiltmeter. A 1912-1924 magma supply rate of 0.024 km3/yr agreed with the rate of filling of Kilauea caldera from 1840-1894. 1924 was a critical year. An intrusion that moved down Kilauea's East rift zone beginning in February culminated beneath the lower East rift zone in April. In May, explosive eruptions accompanied a dramatic draining of Halemaumau. Triangulation results between 1912 and 1921 showed uplift extending far beyond Kilauea caldera and an equally large regional subsidence occurred between 1921 and 1927. HVO tilt narrows the

  2. Comparing magnetic and magmatic fabrics to constrain the magma flow record in La Gloria pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, Italo; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Gelman, Sarah E.; Bachmann, Olivier; Parada, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    This contribution illustrates a case study of a pluton (La Gloria pluton; LGP) where magnetic and magmatic fabrics are locally decoupled. We compare the magmatic fabric with the available magnetic fabric data to explore their abilities and elucidate the magma flow record of LGP. Results indicate that magnetic (controlled by multi-domain magnetite) and magmatic fabrics are generally consistent throughout LGP. Foliations define an axisymmetric pattern that gradually changes from vertical near lateral margins to less steep in the pluton interior, whereas lineations are subhorizontal following the elongation direction of the pluton. However, samples at the pluton center show marked differences between both fabrics: magnetic fabrics indicate subhorizontal magnetic lineations and foliations, and magmatic fabrics indicate subvertical lineations and foliations. Both magnetic and magmatic fabrics are interpreted to record strain caused by magma flow during thermal convection and lateral magma propagation at the transition between low and high crystallinity stages. We suggest that fabrics acquisition and consistency were determined by shear conditions (pure/simple shear rates ratio) and the orientation of the magma flow direction with respect to a rigid boundary (critical crystalline region) of the pluton. Magmatic fabric differs at the center of the pluton because pure shear is dominant and ascendant flows are orthogonal to the horizontal rigid boundary. LGP represents a whole-scale partly molten magma reservoir, where both thermal convection and lateral propagation of the magma are recorded simultaneously. This study highlights the importance of characterizing both fabrics to properly interpret magma flow recorded in plutons.

  3. Formation of crustal magma chambers in Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, A.

    1986-02-01

    Formation of crustal magma chambers in Iceland may be facilitated by the occurrence of stress barriers that lead to formation of thick sills. Such sills absorb the magma of all dikes that enter them and may evolve into magma chambers. Ideal sites for stress barriers, and hence for magma chambers, are rock formations where individual layers have different elastic properties. The rocks formed during the Pleistocene have notably different elastic properties, and when buried in the volcanic zones, they form more promising sites for magma chambers than the Tertiary rocks. This may explain why the number of magma chambers, indicated by the number of corresponding central volcanoes, during the late Pleistocene (i.e., during the past 0.7 m.y.) appears to be proportionally greater than the number of chambers (i.e., central volcanoes) active during Tertiary time.

  4. Shallow magma targets in the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1984-10-01

    Within the next few years a hole will be drilled into a shallow magma body in the western US for the purpose of evaluating the engineering feasibility of magma energy. This paper examines potential drilling sites for these engineering feasibility experiments. Target sites high on the list are ones that currently exhibit good geophysical and geological data for shallow magma and also have reasonable operational requirements. Top ranked sites for the first magma energy well are Long Valley, CA, and Coso/Indian Wells, CA. Kilauea, HI, also in the top group, is an attractive site for some limited field experiments. A number of additional sites offer promise as eventual magma energy sites, but sparsity of geophysical data presently prevents these sites from being considered for the first magma energy well.

  5. Dike intrusions during rifting episodes obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Luigi; Rivalta, Eleonora; Shuler, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Rifting episodes accommodate the relative motion of mature divergent plate boundaries with sequences of magma-filled dikes that compensate for the missing volume due to crustal splitting. Two major rifting episodes have been recorded since modern monitoring techniques are available: the 1975-1984 Krafla (Iceland) and the 2005-2010 Manda-Hararo (Ethiopia) dike sequences. The statistical properties of the frequency of dike intrusions during rifting have never been investigated in detail, but it has been suggested that they may have similarities with earthquake mainshock-aftershock sequences, for example they start with a large intrusion followed by several events of smaller magnitude. The scaling relationships of earthquakes have on the contrary been widely investigated: earthquakes have been found to follow a power law, the Gutenberg-Richter relation, from local to global scale, while the decay of aftershocks with time has been found to follow the Omori law. These statistical laws for earthquakes are the basis for hazard evaluation and the physical mechanisms behind them are the object of wide interest and debate. Here we investigate in detail the statistics of dikes from the Krafla and Manda-Hararo rifting episodes, including their frequency-magnitude distribution, the release of geodetic moment in time, the correlation between interevent times and intruded volumes. We find that the dimensions of dike intrusions obey a power law analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter relation, the long-term release of geodetic moment is governed by a relationship consistent with the Omori law, and the intrusions are roughly time-predictable. The need of magma availability affects however the timing of secondary dike intrusions: such timing is longer after large volume intrusions, contrarily to aftershock sequences where interevent times shorten after large events.

  6. The eruptibility of magmas at Tharsis and Syrtis Major on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic and geologic data indicate that the ratio of intrusive to extrusive magmatism (the I/E ratio) is higher in the Tharsis and Syrtis Major volcanic provinces on Mars relative to most volcanic centers on Earth. The fraction of magmas that erupt helps to determine the effects of magmatism on crustal structure and the flux of magmatic gases to the atmosphere and also influences estimates of melt production inferred from the history of surface volcanism. We consider several possible controls on the prevalence of intrusive magmatism at Tharsis and Syrtis Major, including melt production rates, lithospheric properties, regional stresses and strain rates, and magmatic volatile budgets. The Curie temperature is the minimum crustal temperature required for thermal demagnetization, implying that if the primary magnetic mineral is magnetite or hematite, the crust was warm during the intrusive magmatism reflected in Tharsis and Syrtis Major I/E ratios. When wall rocks are warm, thermally activated creep relaxes stresses from magma replenishment and regional tectonics, and eruptibility depends on buoyancy overpressure. We develop a new one-dimensional model for the development of buoyancy in a viscous regime that accounts for cooling, crystallization, volatile exsolution, bubble coalescence and rise, fluid egress, and compaction of country rock. Under these conditions, we find that initial water and CO2 contents typically <1.5 wt % can explain the observed range of intrusive/extrusive ratios. Our results support the hypothesis that warm crust and a relatively sparse volatile budget encouraged the development of large intrusive complexes beneath Tharsis and Syrtis Major.

  7. Modelling the Influence of Magma Weight on the Growth of Laccoliths and Large Mafic Sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunger, A. P.; Cruden, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    The use of elastic plate theory to model the emplacement of laccoliths and large mafic sills has been debated for nearly 40 years. These intrusions typically attain a horizontal width that is large relative to the emplacement depth. Provided that large scale plasticity is not observed in the overlying host rock, it should then be valid to approximate its deformation based on analysis of a thin elastic plate. Why, then, are the predictions that are usually cited from elastic plate theory characterized by bell-shaped geometry, in contrast to the flat-topped, steep sided geometry typical of laccoliths or the nearly uniform thickness typical of large mafic sills? In dismissing elastic plate theory on the grounds of disagreement between the observed and predicted geometry, authors often invoke large scale rock plasticity in order to explain the cross-sectional shape of sills and laccoliths. Sometimes this approach may be warranted. However, it would also appear that elastic plate theory should be revisited in light of the fact that previous elastic plate-based predictions have, in general, not taken into account an appropriate fracture propagation condition, fluid flow in the growing intrusion, and, importantly, the influence of the weight of the magma on intrusion growth. We present a model for the growth of circular intrusions that accounts for all of these factors. The model predicts the appropriate flat-topped, steep sided geometry of laccoliths and the thin, uniform-thickness geometry of large mafic sills. Furthermore, with a reasonable choice of rock and magma mechanical parameters, the model predicts thickness to length relationships that are consistent with field data. Hence, while it may sometimes be appropriate, there is in general no fundamental need to appeal to large scale plasticity in order to explain observed intrusion geometries and it may in fact be appropriate to understand the growth of laccoliths and large sills in light of a single underlying

  8. Cancer-Related Intrusive Thoughts Predict Behavioral Symptoms Following Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Alexandra; Bower, Julienne E.; Stanton, Annette L.; Ganz, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Behavioral symptoms are common in breast cancer survivors, including disturbances in energy, sleep, and mood, though few risk factors for these negative outcomes have been identified. Our study examined intrusive thoughts as a predictor of lingering symptoms in breast cancer survivors in the year following treatment. Method Data come from the Moving Beyond Cancer psychoeducational intervention trial, aimed at easing the transition from patient to survivor. Women (n = 558) completed psychosocial questionnaires within 4 weeks posttreatment and again 2, 6, and 12 months later. We examined intrusive thoughts about cancer at the baseline assessment as a predictor of fatigue, sleep problems, pain, breast cancer-specific symptoms, depressive symptoms, negative affect, and quality of life using growth curve modeling, controlling for study condition and other covariates. Results Intrusive thoughts were associated with higher levels of all symptoms at baseline and at the 12-month assessment. Intrusive thoughts also influenced the trajectory of pain, depressive symptoms, negative affect, and physical functioning over time; women with higher intrusions at baseline started worse and improved over time, whereas those with lower intrusions remained at a constant, lower level over time. Intrusions were not associated with the trajectory of fatigue, sleep, breast cancer-specific symptoms, or mental functioning; women with higher intrusions at baseline started worse and remained worse over time. Conclusion Intrusive thoughts are associated with enduring elevations in behavioral symptoms and impaired quality of life in the year after breast cancer treatment and may be a risk factor for poor outcomes. PMID:23379385

  9. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the narrow margin between eruption and intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Alexander; Kilburn, Christopher; Wall, Richard; Charlton, Danielle

    2016-04-01

    Volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity is one of the primary geophysical signals for monitoring volcanic unrest. It measures the brittle response of the crust to changes in stress and provides a natural proxy for gauging the stability of a pressurizing body of magma. Here we apply a new model of crustal extension to observations from the 2015 unrest of Cotopaxi, in Ecuador. The model agrees well with field data and is consistent with accelerating unrest during the pressurization and rupture of a vertically-extended magma source within the volcanic edifice. At andesitic-dacitic stratovolcanoes in subduction zones, unrest after long repose is often characterised by increases in VT event rate that change from an exponential to hyperbolic trend with time. This sequence was observed when renewed unrest was detected in April 2015 at Cotopaxi, following at least 73 years of repose. After about 80 days of elevated seismicity at an approximately steady rate, the numbers of VT events increased exponentially with time for c. 80 days, before increasing for c. 15 days along a faster, hyperbolic trend. Both trends were characterised by the same value of 2 for the ratio of maximum applied stress SF to tensile strength of the crust σT, consistent with the pressurization of an approximately vertical, cylindrical magma body. The hyperbolic trend indicated a potential rupture on 25 September. Rupture appears to have occurred on 21-22 September, when the VT rate rapidly decreased. However, no major eruption accompanied the change, suggesting that a near-surface intrusion occurred instead. Although the quantitative VT trends were consistent with the rupture of a magmatic body, they could not on their own distinguish between an eruptive or intrusive outcome. An outstanding goal remains to identify additional precursory characteristics for quantifying the probability that magma will reach the surface after escaping from a ruptured parent body. Data for this analysis were kindly made available

  10. Recent progress in magma energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, A.; Dunn, J.C.; Chu, T.Y.; Wemple, R.P.; Hickox, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ongoing research in the area of Magma Energy Extraction is directed at developing a fundamental understanding of the establishment and long term operation of an open, direct-contact heat exchanger in a crustal magma body. The energy extraction rate has a direct influence on the economic viability of the concept. An open heat exchanger, in which fluid is circulated through the interconnecting fissures and fractures in the solidified region around drilling tubing, offers the promise of very high rates of heat transfer. This paper discusses recent research in five areas: (1) fundamental mechanisms of solidifying and thermally fracturing magma; (2) convective heat transfer in the internally fractured solidified magma; (3) convective flow in the molten magma and heat transfer from the magma to the cooled heat exchanger protruding into it; (4) numerical simulation of the overall energy extraction process; and (5) the thermodynamics of energy conversion in a magma power plant at the surface. The studies show that an open heat exchanger can be formed by solidifying magma around a cooled borehole and that the resulting mass will be extensively fractured by thermally-induced stresses. Numerical models indicate that high quality thermal energy can be delivered at the wellhead at nominal rates from 25 to 30 MW electric. It is shown that optimum well circulation rates can be found that depend on the heat transfer characteristics of the magma heat exchanger and the thermodynamic power conversion efficiencies of the surface plant.

  11. Replenishment of magma chambers by light inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Whitehead, John A.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    1986-05-01

    Magma chambers, particularly those of basaltic composition, are often replenished by an influx of magma whose density is less than that of the resident magma. This paper describes the fundamental fluid mechanics involved in the replenishment by light inputs. If ρ denotes the uniform density of the resident magma and ρ — Δρ that of the input, the situation is described by the reduced gravity g' = gΔρ/ρ, the volume flux Q, and the viscosities of the resident and input magmas νe and νi, respectively. The (nondimensional) Reynolds numbers, Ree = (g'Q3)1/5/νe and Rei = (g'Q3)1/5/νi and chamber geometry then completely specify the system. For sufficiently low values of the two Reynolds numbers (each less than approximately 10), the input rises as a laminar conduit. For larger values of the Reynolds numbers, the conduit may break down and exhibit either a varicose or a meander instability and entrain some resident magma. At still larger Reynolds numbers, the flow will become quite unsteady and finally turbulent. The values of the Reynolds numbers at which these transitions occur have been documented by a series of experiments with water, glycerine, and corn syrup. If the input rises as a turbulent plume, significant entrainment of the resident magma can take place. The final spatial distribution of the mixed magma depends on the geometry of the chamber. If the chamber is much wider than it is high, the mixed magma forms a compositionally stratified region between the roof and a sharp front above uncontaminated magma. In the other geometrical extreme, the input magma is mixed with almost all of the resident magma. If the density of the resident magma is already stratified, the input plume may penetrate only part way into the chamber, even though its initial density is less than that of the lowest density resident magma. The plume will then intrude horizontally and form a hybrid layer at an intermediate depth. This provides a mechanism for preventing even

  12. Importance of iron-rich tholeiitic magmas at divergent plate margins: A reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, C. Kent; Melchior Larsen, Lotte; Nielsen, Troels F. D.

    1991-03-01

    When a tholeiitic liquid differentiates, it may give rise to either iron-poor, silica-rich (rhyolitic) differentiates or to iron-rich, silica-poor differentiates, as found in the Skaergaard intrusion. Iron-rich differentiated liquids are rare among erupted rocks, but are found in small quantities from several localities at divergent plate margins. Among the Tertiary basalts and intrusions in East Greenland, normal erupted basalts may be mixtures of primitive liquid and differentiated iron-rich liquid, which exists at depth but normally does not reach the surface because of its high density. The evolved liquids of the Skaergaard intrusion were of this kind. Data from mid-oceanic ridges confirm this view. We believe that iron-rich differentiated liquids, despite their scarcity on the surface, are much more voluminous at depth, as picrites, at the other side of the density minimum attained during liquid evolution, are thought to be. The trend toward iron enrichment develops when the tholeiitic magma differentiates in a closed system at a relatively low oxidation state, whereas the trend toward silica enrichment and iron depletion occurs when the magma has interacted with the oxidized and hydrated surroundings in the crust.

  13. Evaluating volumes for magma chambers and magma withdrawn for caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, Nobuo; Ruch, Joel; Acocella, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    We develop an analytical model to infer the total volume of a magma chamber associated with caldera collapse and the critical volume of magma that must be withdrawn to induce caldera collapse. The diameter of caldera border fault, depth to the magma chamber, and volumes of magma erupted before the onset of collapse and of entire eruption are compiled for 14 representative calderas. The volume of erupted magma at the onset of collapse aligns between the total erupted volume of the other representative caldera-forming eruptions and the volume of eruptions without collapse during the post-caldera stage, correlating with the structural diameter of the calderas. The total volume of magma chamber is evaluated using a piston-cylinder collapse model, in which the competition between the decompression inside magma chamber and friction along the caldera fault controls the collapse. Estimated volumes of the magma chambers associated with caldera collapse are 3-10 km3 for Vesuvius 79 A.D. to 3000-10 500 km3 for Long Valley, correlating with the cube of caldera diameters. The estimated volumes of magma chamber are always larger than the total volume of erupted magma for caldera formation, suggesting that the magma chambers are never completely emptied by the caldera-forming eruptions. The minimum volumes of erupted magma to trigger collapse are calculated from the correlation between the caldera diameters and the evaluated volume of magma chambers. The minimum eruptive volume for the collapse correlates with the square of the caldera radius r and the square of the depth to the magma chamber h, and inversely correlates with the bulk modulus of magma, which is mainly controlled by the bubble fraction in the magma. A bubble fraction between 5 and 10% at the onset of collapse may explain the distribution of the erupted volumes at the onset of collapse of the calderas in nature.

  14. Magma accumulation and segregation during regional-scale folding: The Holland's dome granite injection complex, Damara belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Tolene; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The regional-scale, upright fold of the Holland's dome in the Damara belt of central Namibia contains a kilometre-scale network of intrusive, highly fractionated uraniferous leucogranites. Three broadly orthogonal and intersecting sets of leucogranite sheets that intruded parallel and at right angles to the axial plane of the first-order fold can be distinguished. The granites are internally sheeted and illustrate the growth of the injection complex through the successive addition of thousands of smaller magma batches. Spatial and timing relationships point to a stepwise evolution of the injection complex. Early dilatancy-driven segregation and accumulation of granitic magmas in the core of the fold, above a basal detachment, was followed by compaction-driven segregation of a melt phase during fold tightening. The intersecting leucogranite sets provide a suitably organized permeability structure for melt segregation, while the successive injection of magma batches ensures compatibility between regional strain rates during folding and the rates of magma segregation. The three-dimensional network of melt-bearing structures further assisted regional shortening past the lock-up of the fold. The Holland's dome injection complex illustrates the geometric complexity of magma transfer pathways and the significance of regional-scale folding for the accumulation, segregation and fractionation of granitic magmas in suprasolidus crust.

  15. Mantle source of the 2.44-2.50-Ga mantle plume-related magmatism in the Fennoscandian Shield: evidence from Os, Nd, and Sr isotope compositions of the Monchepluton and Kemi intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hong; Hanski, Eero; Li, Chao; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Huhma, Hannu; Mokrushin, Artem V.; Latypov, Rais; Lahaye, Yann; O'Brien, Hugh; Qu, Wen-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Significant PGE and Cr mineralization occurs in a number of 2.44-2.50-Ga mafic layered intrusions located across the Karelian and Kola cratons. The intrusions have been interpreted to be related to mantle plume activity. Most of the intrusions have negative ɛNd values of about -1 to -2 and slightly radiogenic initial Sr isotope compositions of about 0.702 to 0.703. One potential explanation is crustal contamination of a magma derived from a mantle plume, but another possibility is that the magma was derived from metasomatized sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Samples from the upper chromitite layers of the Kemi intrusion and most samples from the previously studied Koitelainen and Akanvaara intrusions have supra-chondritic γOs values indicating some crustal contamination, which may have contributed to the formation of chromitites in these intrusions. Chromite separates from the main ore zone of the Kemi and Monchepluton intrusions show nearly chondritic γOs, similar to the coeval Vetreny belt komatiites. We suggest that the Os isotope composition of the primitive magma was not significantly changed by crustal contamination due to a high Os content of the magma and a low Os content of the contaminant. Modeling suggests that the Os and Nd isotope compositions of the Monchepluton and Kemi intrusions cannot be explained by assuming a magma source in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle with sub-chondritic γOs. A better match for the isotope data would be a plume mantle source with chondritic Re/Os and Os isotope composition, followed by crustal contamination.

  16. Petrogenesis of the Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide-bearing Tamarack Intrusive Complex, Midcontinent Rift System, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The Tamarack Intrusive Complex (TIC, 1105.6 ± 1.2 Ma) in NE Minnesota, was emplaced during the early stages of the development of the Midcontinent Rift System (MRS, "Early Stage": 1110-1106 Ma). Country rocks of the TIC are those of the Paleoproterozoic Thomson Formation, part of the Animikie Group including sulfide-bearing metasedimentary black shale. The magmatic system is composed of at least two principal mafic-ultramafic intrusive sequences: the sulfide-barren Bowl Intrusion in the south and the "dike" area intrusions in the north which host Ni-Cu-Platinum Group Elements (PGE) mineralization with up to 2.33% Ni, 1.24% Cu, 0.34 g/t Pt, 0.23 g/t Pd and 0.18 g/t Au. Two distinct intrusive units in the "dike" area are the CGO (coarse-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion, a sub-vertical dike-like body, and the overlying sub-horizontal FGO (fine-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion. Both intrusions comprise peridotite, feldspathic peridotite, feldspathic pyroxenite, melatroctolite and melagabbro. Massive sulfides are volumetrically minor and mainly occur as lenses emplaced into the country rocks associated with both intrusions. Semi-massive (net-textured) sulfides are distributed at the core of the CGO Intrusion, surrounded by a halo of the disseminated sulfides. Disseminated sulfides also occur in lenses along the base of the FGO Intrusion. Olivine compositions in the CGO Intrusion are between Fo89 and Fo82 and in the FGO Intrusion from Fo84 to Fo82. TIC intrusions have more primitive olivine compositions than that of olivine in the sheet-like intrusions in the Duluth Complex (below Fo70), as well as olivine from the smaller, conduit-related, Eagle and East Eagle Intrusions in Northern Michigan (Fo86 to Fo75). The FeO/MgO ratios of the CGO and FGO Intrusion parental magmas, inferred from olivine compositions, are similar to those of picritic basalts erupted during the early stages of the MRS formation. Trace element ratios differ slightly from other intrusions in the

  17. From intrusive to oscillating thoughts.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Anne Griswold

    2007-10-01

    This paper focused on the possibility that intrusive thoughts (ITs) are a form of an evolutionary, adaptive, and complex strategy to prepare for and resolve stressful life events through schema formation. Intrusive thoughts have been studied in relation to individual conditions, such as traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have also been documented in the average person experiencing everyday stress. In many descriptions of thought intrusion, it is accompanied by thought suppression. Several theories have been put forth to describe ITs, although none provides a satisfactory explanation as to whether ITs are a normal process, a normal process gone astray, or a sign of pathology. There is also no consistent view of the role that thought suppression plays in the process. I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression may be better understood by examining them together as a complex and adaptive mechanism capable of escalating in times of need. The ability of a biological mechanism to scale up in times of need is one hallmark of a complex and adaptive system. Other hallmarks of complexity, including self-similarity across scales, sensitivity to initial conditions, presence of feedback loops, and system oscillation, are also discussed in this article. Finally, I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression are better described together as an oscillatory cycle. PMID:17904485

  18. Recycled gabbro signature in Upper Cretaceous Magma within Strandja Massif: NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Basic magma intrusions within plate interiors upwelling mantle plumes have chemical signatures that are distinct from mid-ocean ridge magmas. When a basic magma interact with continental crust or with the felsic magma, the compositions of both magma changes, but there is no consensus as to how this interaction occurs. Here we analyse the mineral behavior and trace element signature of gabbroic rocks of the samples collected from the Strandja Massif. Srednogorie magmatic arc is a part of Apuseni- Banat-Timok-Srednogorie magmatic belt and formed by subduction and closure of the Tethys Ocean during Upper Cretaceous times. Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks cutting Strandja Massif in NW Turkey belong to eastern edge of Srednogorie Magmatic arc. Upper Cretacous magmatic rocks divided into four subgroup in Turkey part of Strandja massif: (I) granitic rocks, (II) monzonitic rock, (III) syenitic rocks and (IV) gabbroic rocks. Gabbroic rocks outcropped around study area in phaneritic - equigranular texture. According to mineralogic - petrographic studies gabbros have mainly holocrystalline texture and ophitic to subophitic texture composed of plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and rarely olivine and opaque minerals. Also because of special conditions there have been pegmatitic texture on mafic minerals with euhedral form up to 3 cm in size and orbicular texture which reach 15cm in size and rounded - elliptical form. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies reveals that plagioclase are ranging in composition from labradorite to bytownite, the pyroxene are ranging in composition from diopside to augite acting with uralitization processes and the olivine are generally in the composition of forsterite. Petrographic and mineralogical determination reveals some metasomatic magmatic epidote presence. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies on anhydrous minerals within gabbroic rocks shows affect of hydrous process because of magma mixing. The gabbroic rocks have tholeiitic and changed towards

  19. Formation of redox gradients during magma-magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, P.; Fiege, A.; Simon, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-mixing is a key process that controls mass transfer in magmatic systems. The variations in melt compositions near the magma-magma interface potentially change the Fe oxidation state [1] and, thus, affect the solubility and transport of metals. To test this hypothesis, diffusion-couple experiments were performed at 1000 °C, 150 MPa and QFM+4. Synthesized crystal-bearing cylinders of hydrous dacite and hydrous basaltic andesite were equilibrated for up to 80 h. The run products show that mafic components (Fe, Mg, etc.) were transported from the andesite into the dacite, while Si, Na and K diffused from the dacite into the andesite. A crystal dissolution sequence in the order of cpx, opx, plag, and spl/il was observed for the andesite. We combined μ-XANES spectroscopy at Fe K-edge [2] with two-oxide oxybarometry [3] to measure redox profiles within our experiments. Here, fO2 decreased towards the interface within the dacite and increased towards the interface within the andesite. This discontinuous fO2 evolution, with a sharp redox gradient of ~1.8 log fO2 units at the interface was maintained throughout the time-series despite the externally imposed fO2 of the vessel. We propose a combination of two mechanisms that create and sustain this redox gradient: 1) The dissolution of cpx and opx in the andesite mainly introduced Fe2+ into the melt, which diffused towards the dacite, lowering Fe3+/SFe near the interface. 2) Charge balance calculations in the melt during diffusive exchange suggest net positive charge excess in the andesite near the interface (i.e., oxidation) and net negative charge excess in the dacite near the interface (i.e., reduction). We suggest that this (metastable) redox layer can help to explain the contrasting Au/Cu ratios observed for arc-related porphyry-type ore deposits. [1] Moretti (2005), Ann. Geophys. 48, 583-608. [2] Cottrell et al. (2009), Chem. Geol. 268, 167-179. [3] Ghiorso and Evans (2008), Am. J. Sci. 308, 957-1039.

  20. Intrusion triggering of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Hooper, Andrew; Arnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Roberts, Matthew J; Oskarsson, Níels; Auriac, Amandine; Decriem, Judicael; Einarsson, Páll; Geirsson, Halldór; Hensch, Martin; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G; Sturkell, Erik; Sveinbjörnsson, Hjörleifur; Feigl, Kurt L

    2010-11-18

    Gradual inflation of magma chambers often precedes eruptions at highly active volcanoes. During such eruptions, rapid deflation occurs as magma flows out and pressure is reduced. Less is known about the deformation style at moderately active volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, where an explosive summit eruption of trachyandesite beginning on 14 April 2010 caused exceptional disruption to air traffic, closing airspace over much of Europe for days. This eruption was preceded by an effusive flank eruption of basalt from 20 March to 12 April 2010. The 2010 eruptions are the culmination of 18 years of intermittent volcanic unrest. Here we show that deformation associated with the eruptions was unusual because it did not relate to pressure changes within a single magma chamber. Deformation was rapid before the first eruption (>5 mm per day after 4 March), but negligible during it. Lack of distinct co-eruptive deflation indicates that the net volume of magma drained from shallow depth during this eruption was small; rather, magma flowed from considerable depth. Before the eruption, a ∼0.05 km(3) magmatic intrusion grew over a period of three months, in a temporally and spatially complex manner, as revealed by GPS (Global Positioning System) geodetic measurements and interferometric analysis of satellite radar images. The second eruption occurred within the ice-capped caldera of the volcano, with explosivity amplified by magma-ice interaction. Gradual contraction of a source, distinct from the pre-eruptive inflation sources, is evident from geodetic data. Eyjafjallajökull's behaviour can be attributed to its off-rift setting with a 'cold' subsurface structure and limited magma at shallow depth, as may be typical for moderately active volcanoes. Clear signs of volcanic unrest signals over years to weeks may indicate reawakening of such volcanoes, whereas immediate short-term eruption precursors may be subtle and difficult to detect. PMID:21085177

  1. The transition from diapirism to dike intrusion: Implications for planetary volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Allan M.

    1994-01-01

    Magma transport processes influence the rate of magma transport and how far the magma travels before it freezes, the degree to which the magma communicates chemically with the host rock, the morphology of volcanic landforms on planetary surfaces, the interplay between magmatism and regional tectonics, and even the direction the magma moves. The primary question motivating this research is: How does magma rheology influence the mechanisms by which it is transported through planetary lithospheres? It is widely recognized that on Earth basaltic intrusions typically take the form of narrow dikes, while granites are typically found in more equidimensional plutons. Several explanations for this observation were offered over the last 50 years. While basalts and rhyolites vary somewhat in temperature and density, the major difference is the 2 to 8 orders of magnitude contrast in viscosity. The significant ductile strains associated with many granitic plutons has led to the statement that the occurrence of granites in diapirs rather than dikes results from the fact that there is insufficient viscosity contrast between the magma and wall rock for the granite to intrude narrow cracks. A second explanation states that granites are so viscous that they cannot propagate far before freezing. Despite the length of time these explanations have been around, there has been relatively little effort to investigate them quantitatively. My goal has been to evaluate these explanations through a series of well-posed numerical models. These models can be tested by the decades of field data collected by structural geologists that have yet to be integrated into any coherent theory, and the results should have important implications for volcanism on the terrestrial planets.

  2. Insight into Vent Opening Probability in Volcanic Calderas in the Light of a Sill Intrusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, G.; D'Auria, L.; Martini, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a novel approach to provide insights on the probability of vent opening in calderas, using a dynamic model of sill intrusion. The evolution of the stress field is the main factor that controls the vent opening processes in volcanic calderas. On the basis of previous studies, we think that the intrusion of sills is one of the most common mechanism governing caldera unrest. Therefore, we have investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field due to the emplacement of a sill at shallow depth to provide insight on vent opening probability. We carried out several numerical experiments by using a physical model, to assess the role of the magma properties (viscosity), host rock characteristics (Young's modulus and thickness), and dynamics of the intrusion process (mass flow rate) in controlling the stress field. Our experiments highlight that high magma viscosity produces larger stress values, while low magma viscosity leads to lower stresses and favors the radial spreading of the sill. Also high-rock Young's modulus gives high stress intensity, whereas low values of Young's modulus produce a dramatic reduction of the stress associated with the intrusive process. The maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and propagates radially with it, over time. In our simulations, we find that maximum values of tensile stress occur in ring-shaped areas with radius ranging between 350 m and 2500 m from the injection point, depending on the model parameters. The probability of vent opening is higher in these areas.

  3. Why do Martian Magmas erupt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Eruption of silicate lava, whether on Earth or another planet, requires that at some depth the melt has lower density than the surrounding rocks. As the densities of silicate liquids change during crystallization, whether a particular silicate liquid will erupt or be trapped at a level of neutral buoyancy is a complex yet fundamental issue for planetary dynamics. In general, 3 factors drive surface eruptions: inherent buoyancy relative to mantle phases, compositional evolution, and volatile contents. These factors manifest on Earth as terrestrial basalts commonly have compositions close to a density minimum [1]. Recent work has produced estimates of Martian parental magma compositions [2-5] based on shergottite meteorites and from Gusev crater. Using the MELTS algorithm [6] and other density calibrations, we simulated evolution of these liquids, focusing on density changes. For much of the crystallization path, density is controlled by FeO. All of the liquids begin with ρ ~ 2.8 g/cc at 1 bar, and the evolution of liquid density is controlled by the liquidus phases. At low pressures, olivine is the liquidus phase for each melt, and as FeO is not incompatible in olivine, olivine crystallization decreases liquid density, increasing buoyancy with crystallization. However, FeO is incompatible in pyroxene, and thus liquids crystallizing pyroxene become denser and less buoyant with crystallization, producing liquids with densities up to and above 3.0 g/cc. As the olivine-pyroxene saturation relationship is affected by pressure and chemistry, the identity of the liquidus phase and density evolution will vary between magmas. Without spreading centers, Mars has no location where the mantle approaches the surface, and it is likely that any magma which is denser than the crust will stall below or within that crust. The crystallization path of a liquid is a function of pressure, with pyroxene crystallizing first at P > 10 kbar (~80 km depth), close to the base of the Martian

  4. Chemical heterogeneity of Mt. Etna magmas in the last 15 ka. Inferences on their mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Métrich, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Primitive basaltic magmas are crucial in the study of the geochemical heterogeneity documented in Etna magmas and their inferred mantle sources. We undertook a systematic sampling of the less evolved basalts (Mg# > 50) erupted over the last 15 ka, a time period which corresponds to the activity of the youngest volcanic edifice of Mt. Etna complex, i.e. Mongibello volcano. We focused on lava flows and pyroclastites emplaced during 'deep-dyke fed' (DDF) eruptions which were driven by the rapid ascent of deeply-rooted magma intrusions that bypassed the shallow plumbing system of the volcano. All the samples were analyzed by the same laboratory to avoid analytical bias, to build a comprehensive dataset on their major and trace element compositions and to propose a coherent framework for interpreting the geochemical fingerprints of present-day Etna basalts. Trace element modeling, together with literature data for Sr isotopes, gave insight into long-term magmatic processes related to different melting degrees of the heterogeneous mantle beneath Mt Etna. DDF magma batches provide good snapshots of their mantle source heterogeneities that point to the variable involvement of clinopyroxenitic lithology, Rb-87Sr-Cl-rich fluid component(s) possibly controlled by their source mineralogy, and slab-derived fluids selectively enriched in alkalis (Rb, K). The ongoing alkali (Rb, K) enrichment of the present-day magmas, well manifest since the 1970s, is decoupled from that of Sr and Cl. We propose that this process is linked to mantle source composition and is concomitant with changes in both volcanological and seismotectonic patterns of the volcano. There is no time evolution of DDF magma chemistry.

  5. Unraveling the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 plumbing system and magma chamber dynamics through high-resolution geochemical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laeger, Kathrin; Petrelli, Maurizio; Andronico, Daniele; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Cimarelli, Corrado; Misiti, Valeria; del Bello, Elisabetta; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The April-May 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (EFJ, Iceland) was triggered by an intrusion of fresh magma coming from deeper portions of the crust migrating into shallower depth of 3-6 km in the magmatic system. Here, we present new EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses on groundmass glasses of ash particles erupted between 18 and 22 May 2010, the last days of the eruption. The glasses define two well separated groups. The first group is basaltic in composition with SiO2 ranging from 49.98 to 51.76 wt.% and a total alkali content (Na2O + K2O) in the range between 4.63 and 5.17 wt.%. The second group ranges between trachyandesitic and rhyolitic compositions with SiO2 ranging between 57.13 to 70.38 wt.% and a total alkali content from 7.21 to 10.90 wt.%. Least square modelling after Störmer and Nicholls (1978) discriminates best the origin of the basaltic glass by both fractional crystallization of a more primitive basalt or mixing of a basalt and a felsic magma. Furthermore, this model proves that the trachyandesitic range is the result of mixing of trachyandesite and trachyte magma. Magma mixing modeling after Langmuir (1978) and element concentration histograms indicate a probable incomplete magma mixing as the main process forming the great compositional variability observed in the erupted products. Finally, we estimated mixing end-members of intermediate (~59 wt.% SiO2) and felsic composition (~66-68 wt.% SiO2) with a felsic melt-proportion of 0.35-0.47. In the 90s, recorded seismicity and ground deformation indicated intrusions at shallow depth under the EFJ edifice probably forming separated sills. Therefore, the origin of the trachyandesite is presumably to find in a discrete magma batch that generated years before eruption. The rhyolite composition can be considered as the residual melt that remained in the plumbing system of EFJ since the last eruption in 1821-23. We suggest that these different magma batches formed the plumbing system of EFJ and have

  6. Oxygen Isotope Trajectories of Crystallizing Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholz, C. E.; Jagoutz, O. E.; VanTongeren, J. A.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen isotopes are essential to quantify mantle-derived versus 'recycled' crustal contributions to arc magmas. High δ18O values in igneous rocks (i.e., δ18OSMOW > ~5.7) are generally used to identify supra-crustal inputs, but a melt can also become enriched in 18O due to magmatic differentiation [1,2]. To assess magmatic δ18O values of plutonic rocks, δ18Ozircon values, which are resilient to secondary alteration, are often used. Thus, to disentangle the effects of assimilation versus fractionation, both the absolute increase in melt δ18O due to differentiation and ∆18O(WR-zircon) must be determined. However, existing constraints on the effect of magmatic fractionation on melt δ18O are model-based [2] and calculated relationships between WR SiO2, δ18Ozircon, and δ18Omelt do not incorporate complex melt SiO2, H2O, and temperature (T) relationships [3]. To build upon these initial constraints, we combine the first high-precision δ18O data set on natural samples documenting changes in δ18O melt values with increasing extent of differentiation and modeling which incorporates experimentally constrained melt SiO2, H2O, and T relationships. We analyzed 55 mineral separates with infrared laser-fluorination [4] across large fractionation intervals of two well-studied cumulate sequences: (I) a relatively dry (~1 wt.% H2O initial) tholeiitic sequence (analyzed minerals include plag, opx, cpx, & Fe-rich ol) from the Bushveld Complex and (II) a hydrous high-K sequence (analyzed minerals include ol, cpx, bt, fsp, & qtz) from the Dariv paleoarc in Mongolia. Our results indicate that multiple per mil increases in melt δ18O can occur during magmatic fractionation that in detail depend strongly on melt composition and T. Calculated relationships between WR SiO2 and δ18Ozircon for experimental melt compositions show that wet, 'cool' and dry, 'hot' melts are characterized by larger and smaller ∆18O (melt-zircon) fractionations, respectively. Applying our results to

  7. Petrology of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, L.; Tegner, C.; Jakobsen, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    The Upper Border Series crystallized downwards from the roof of the Skaergaard magma chamber. It met with the Layered Series that crystallized upwards from the floor in the Sandwich Horizon that contains the last and most evolved rocks of the intrusion. Previous investigations of the Upper Border Series (Naslund, 1984) have shown that the compositional trends of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene largely mirror those of the Layered Series. At the same time it was argued that the crystallization sequence in Upper Border Series differed from the Layered Series in that apatite precipitated before magnetite that, in turn, appeared before Ca-rich pyroxene. From the existing data the magma from which the Upper Border Series crystallized was inferred to be enriched in SiO2, K2O, P2O5 and H2O relative to the magma in the lower parts of the intrusion. This has lead to the conception that the Upper Border Series crystallized from a chemically different magma. Here we present new petrography, mineralogy and bulk compositions for samples collected in three profiles through the Upper Border Series (Kilen, Hammerpas and Brødretoppen transects). Although euhedral apatite is present throughout most of the Upper Border Series, we interpret a marked increase in modal apatite late in the crystallization sequence as marking its first appearance on the liquidus at the crystallization front. The plagioclase An% at this level in the Upper Border Series is ˜40 and is identical with plagioclase An% at the level of apatite-in in the Layered Series. Similarly, we find that the plagioclase An% at the onset of FeTi-oxide and sulphide precipitation in the Upper Border Series (52 and 47, respectively) and Layered Series are alike. Finally, we interpret abundant augite in Upper Border Series rocks before magnetite-in as a cumulus phase. We therefore conclude that the crystallization sequences of the two series are identical. The new bulk rock data reveal that the Upper Border Series and the

  8. Evolution of magma plumbing system of Miyakejima volcano based on high-pressure experiments and melt inclusion analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Suzuki, T.; Hamada, M.

    2012-12-01

    chamber in Ofunato Stage should be at least ~1.5kbar. A series of crystallization trends were calculated using MELTS program (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995), and it is found that andesites erupted in Tsubota Stage can be formed by fractional crystallization of OFS basalt at 1.5kbar under NNO. Postulated water content in magma (~0.6 wt.%), however, is much lower than in Ofunato Stage (~3 wt.%). Accordingly, it is suggested that magma chamber has been significantly degassed (0.6 wt.% H2O in magma) during the dormant period (4~7kyBP). In the last 2.5ky (Oyama Stage and Shinmio Stage), Miyakejima has erupted evolved basalt to basaltic andesite. In Oyama Stage, olivine (Fo78-82) and plagioclase (An90-96) phenocrysts which were common in Ofunato Stage appeared occasionally in evolved basalt. Petrologic study shows that shallow level magma chamber has formed while the magma chamber in Ofunato Stage survived through time. In the Shinmio Stage, most ejecta are aphyric basaltic andesite suggesting that magma has erupted from the top portion of the shallow level magma chamber. Caldera formation in AD 2000 took place in association with an intrusion of a dyke to the northwest (~1km3 in volume) which evacuated the shallow level magma chamber. Future eruption of Miyakejima could be similar to those in Ofunato Stage because the shallow level magma chamber has collapsed.

  9. Flank collapse triggered by intrusion: the Canarian and Cape Verde Archipelagoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Derek; Day, Simon J.

    1999-12-01

    The potential to develop kilometer-scale instabilities on the flanks of intraplate volcanoes, typified by the Canary and Cape Verde Archipelagoes, is investigated. A primary triggering agent is forced injection of moderate-scale dikes, resulting in the concurrent development of mechanical and thermal fluid pressures along the basal décollement, and magmastatic pressures at the dike interface. These additive effects are shown capable of developing shallow-seated block instabilities for dike thicknesses of the order of 1 m, and horizontal lengths greater than about 1 km. For dikes that approach or penetrate the surface, and are greater in length than this threshold, the destabilizing influence of the magmastatic column is significant, and excess pore fluid pressures may not be necessary to initiate failure. The potentially destabilized block geometry changes from a flank-surface-parallel sliver for short dikes, to a deeper and less stable décollement as dike horizontal length builds and the effects of block lateral restraint diminish. For intrusions longer than about 1 km, the critical basal décollement dives below the water table and utilizes the complementary destabilizing influences of pore fluid pressures and magma "push" at the rear block-scarp. In addition to verifying the plausibility of suprahydrostatic pressures as capable of triggering failure on these volcanoes, timing of the onset of maximum instability may also be tracked. For events within the Cumbre Vieja (1949) and Fogo (1951, 1995) pre-effusive episodes, the observation of seismic activity within the first 1 week to 4 months is consistent with the predictions of thermal and mechanical pressurization.

  10. Experimental constraints on the deformation and breakup of injected magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Kirsten F.; Carazzo, Guillaume; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2012-04-01

    The injection, breakup and stirring of dikes entering convecting silicic magma chambers can govern how they grow and differentiate, as well as influence their potential for eruption at the surface. Enclaves observed in plutons may preserve a record of this process and, thus, identifying and understanding the physical processes underlying their formation is a crucial issue in volcanology. We use laboratory experiments and scaling theory to investigate the mechanical and rheological conditions leading to the deformation and breakup of analog crystal-rich dikes injected as discrete plumes that descend into an underlying imposed shear flow. To scale the experiments and map the results across a wide range of natural conditions we define the ratio S of the timescale for the growth of a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability of the sheared, injected material to the timescale for settling through the fluid layer and the ratio Y of the timescales for shearing and lateral disaggregation of the particle-fluid mixture (yielding). At low S (< 3) and high Y (> 40), descending plumes are stretched and tilted before undergoing R-T instability, forming drips with a wavelength that is comparable to the initial diameter of the injection. At low Y (< 40) and S values that increase from ∼ 3 as Y → 0, an injection yields in tension before a R-T instability can grow, forming discrete particle-fluid blobs that are much smaller than the initial injection diameter and separated by thin filaments of the original mixture. At high S (> 3) and high Y (> 40), injections remain intact as they settle through the layer and pond at the floor. Applied to magma chambers, our results do not support the production of a continuum of enclave sizes. Indeed, from scaling analyses we expect the two breakup regimes to form distinct size populations: Whereas enclaves formed in the R-T regime will be comparable to the injection size, those formed in the tension regime will be much smaller. We show

  11. Magma energy research project, FY80 annual progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colp, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    The technical feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies is explored. Five aspects of the project are studied: resource location and definition, source tapping, magma characterization, magma/material compatibility, and energy extraction.

  12. Magma Energy Research Project, FY80 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Colp, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    The technical feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies is explored. Five aspects of the project are studied: resource location and definition, source tapping, magma characterization, magma/material compatibility, and energy extraction.

  13. Diverse magma flow directions during construction of sheeted dike complexes at fast- to superfast-spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Varga, R. J.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dike intrusion is a fundamental process during upper oceanic crustal accretion at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges. Based on the distribution of magma along fast-spreading centers inferred from marine geophysical data, models predict systematic steep flow at magmatically robust segment centers and shallow magma flow toward distal segment ends. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics from 48 fully-oriented block samples of dikes from upper oceanic crust exposed at Hess Deep Rift and Pito Deep Rift reveal a wide range of magma flow directions that are not consistent with such simple magma supply models. The AMS is interpreted to arise from distribution anisotropy of titanomagnetite crystals based on weak shape-preferred orientation of opaque oxide and plagioclase crystals generally parallel to AMS maximum eigenvectors. Most dike samples show normal AMS fabrics with maximum eigenvector directions ranging from subvertical to subhorizontal. The distributions of inferred magma flow lineations from maximum eigenvectors show no preferred flow pattern, even after structural correction. We use a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test) to show that the distribution of bootstrapped flow lineation rakes from Pito Deep are not statistically distinct from Hess Deep, and neither are distinguishable from Oman and Troodos Ophiolite AMS data. Magma flow directions in sheeted dikes from these two seafloor escarpments also do not correlate with available geochemistry in any systematic way as previously predicted. These results indicate distinct compositional sources feed melt that is injected into dikes at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges with no preference for subhorizontal or subvertical magma flow. Collectively, results imply ephemeral melt lenses at different along-axis locations within the continuous axial magma chamber and either direct injection or intermingling of melt from other deeper ridge-centered or off-axis sources.

  14. Magma ocean: Mechanisms of formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal state of the Earth at the time relevant to formation of a magma ocean was dominated by the great impact that created the Moon. As shown in computer experiments, the iron in the impacting bodies quickly sank to the core of the proto-Earth, while a significant fraction of silicates was pushed far enough out beyond the geosynchronous limit to constitute the main material of the Moon. Most of any atmosphere would have been pushed aside, rather than being expelled in the impact. However, the energy remaining in the material not going to the core or expelled was still sufficient to raise its temperature some 1000's of degrees, enough to vaporize silicates and to generate a strong 'planetary wind': a hydrodynamic expansion carrying with it virtually all volatiles plus appreciable silicates. This expansion was violent and uneven in its most energetic stage, but probably the resulting magma ocean was global. The duration, until cooling, was sufficient for silicates to condense to melt and the duration was probably short. Comparison of the Earth and Venus indicates that the great impact was extraordinarily effective in removing volatiles from the proto-Earth; in particular, the enormous differences in primordial inert gases between the planets demand a catastrophic difference in origin circumstances. On the other hand, the comparison limits the amount of silicates lost by the Earth to a rather minor fraction; most of that expelled in the wind must have condensed soon enough for the silicate to fall back to Earth or be swept up by the proto-Moon. So the Earth was left with a magma ocean. The question is whether sufficient water was retained to constitute a steam atmosphere. Probably not, but unknowns affecting this question are the efficiencies of outgassing in great impacts and in subsequent convective churnings deep in the mantle. During the stage when mantle convection is turbulent, an appreciable fraction of volatiles were also retained at depth, perhaps in

  15. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  16. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors - such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses - relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11–15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011–2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  17. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Most silicic and some mafic magmas expand via second boiling if they crystallize at depths of about 10 km or less. The buildup of gas pressure due to second boiling can be relieved by expulsion of melt out of the region of crystallization, and this process of gas-driven filter pressing assists the crystallization differentiation of magmas. For gas-driven filter pressing to be effective, the region of crystallization must inflate slowly relative to buildup of pressure and expulsion of melt These conditions are satisfied in undercooled magmatic inclusions and in thin sheets of primitive magma underplating cooler magma reservoirs. Gas-driven filter pressing thereby adds fractionated melt to magma bodies. Gas-driven filter pressing is probably the dominant process by which highly evolved melts segregate from crystal mush to form aplitic dikes in granitic plutons; this process could also account for the production of voluminous, crystal-poor rhyolites.

  18. More Evidence for Multiple Meteorite Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-02-01

    Cosmochemists have identified six main compositional types of magma that formed inside asteroids during the first 100 million years of Solar System history. These magmas vary in their chemical and mineralogical make up, but all have in common low concentrations of sodium and other volatile elements. Our low-sodium-magma diet has now changed. Two groups of researchers have identified a new type of asteroidal magma that is rich in sodium and appears to have formed by partial melting of previously unmelted, volatile-rich chondritic rock. The teams, one led by James Day (University of Maryland) and the other by Chip Shearer (University of New Mexico), studied two meteorites found in Antarctica, named Graves Nunatak 06128 and 06129, using a battery of cosmochemical techniques. These studies show that an even wider variety of magmas was produced inside asteroids than we had thought, shedding light on the melting histories and formation of asteroids.

  19. Forecasting the failure of heterogeneous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallée, Y.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Eruption prediction is a long-sought-after goal of volcanology. Yet applying existing techniques retrospectively (hindcasting), we fail to predict events more often than we success. As much of the seismicity associated with intermediate to silicic volcanic eruptions comes from the brittle response of the ascending magma itself, we clearly require a good understanding of the parameters that control the ability to forecast magma failure itself. Here, we present suites of controlled experiments at magmatic temperatures using a range of synthetic magmas to investigate the control of microstructures on the efficacy of forecast models for material failure. We find that the failure of magmas with very little microstructural heterogeneity - such as melts - is very challenging to predict; whereas, the failure of very heterogeneous magmas is always well-predicted. To shed further light on this issue, we provide a scaling law based on the relationship between the microstructural heterogeneity in a magma and the error in the prediction of its failure time. We propose this method be used to elucidate the variable success rate of predicting volcanic predictions. We discuss this scaling in the context of the birth, life and death of structural heterogeneity during magma ascent with specific emphasis on obsidian-forming eruptions such as Chaitèn, 2008. During such eruptions, the repetitive creation and destruction of fractures filled with granular magma, which are thought to be the in situ remnants of seismogenic fracturing itself, are expressions of the life-cycle of heterogeneity in an otherwise coherent, melt-rich magma. We conclude that the next generation of failure forecast tools available to monitoring teams should incorporate some acknowledgment of the magma microstructure and not be solely based on the geophysical signals prior to eruption.

  20. The Effects of Preeruptive Magma Viscosity on Eruption Styles and Magma Eruption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Koyaguchi, T.; Kozono, T.; Takeuchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have collected data on magma eruption rate, which is one of the most fundamental parameters for a volcanic eruption. There are several compilations on eruption rates, for example, for Plinian eruptions (Carey and Sigurdsson, 1989), basaltic eruptions (Wadge, 1981), lava dome eruptions (Newhall and Melson, 1983), and all combined (Tomiya and Koyaguchi, 1998; Pyle, 2000). However, they did not quantitatively discuss the effects of magma viscosity, which must control eruption rates. Here, we discuss the effects of magma viscosity on eruption rates, by using 'preeruptive magma viscosities', which are important measures of magma eruptibility (Takeuchi, 2011). Preeruptive magma viscosity is the viscosity of magma (melt, dissolved water, and crystals) in the magma chamber at the preeruptive conditions, and can be approximately obtained only by the bulk rock SiO2 and phenocryst content, using an empirical formula (Takeuchi, 2010). We have found some interesting relationships, such as (1) eruption styles and rates are correlated to preeruptive magma viscosity but not correlated to bulk rock composition, and (2) the gap (ratio) in eruption rates between explosive and effusive phases in a series of eruptions is proportional to preeruptive magma viscosity. We also propose, by combining (1) and (2), that (3) the radius (or width) of volcanic conduit is positively correlated with preeruptive magma viscosity. Our data also show that the eruptive magmas are divided into two types. One is the low-viscosity type (basalt ~ phenocryst-poor andesite), characterized by lava flow and sub-Plinian eruptions. The other is the high-viscosity type (phenocryst-rich andesite ~ rhyolite), characterized by lava dome and Plinian eruptions. The boundary is at about 104 Pa s. These two types may be closely linked to the magma generation processes (fractional/batch crystallization vs. extraction from a mushy magma chamber).

  1. Gas emissions due to magma-sediment interactions during flood magmatism at the Siberian Traps: Gas dispersion and environmental consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Marecal, Virginie; Pirre, Michel; Gaillard, Fabrice; Arteta, Joaquim; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate the fluxes of extremely reduced gas emissions produced during the emplacement of the Siberian Traps large igneous province, due to magma intrusion in the coaliferous sediments of the Tunguska Basin. Using the results of a companion paper (Iacono-Marziano et al., accepted for publication), and a recent work about low temperature interaction between magma and organic matter (Svensen et al., 2009), we calculate CO-CH4-dominated gas emission rates of 7×1015-2×1016 g/yr for a single magmatic/volcanic event. These fluxes are 7-20 times higher than those calculated for purely magmatic gas emissions, in the absence of interaction with organic matter-rich sediments. We investigate, by means of atmospheric modelling employing present geography of Siberia, the short and mid-term dispersion of these gas emissions into the atmosphere. The lateral propagation of CO and CH4 leads to an important perturbation of the atmosphere chemistry, consisting in a strong reduction of the radical OH concentration. As a consequence, both CO and CH4 lifetimes in the lower atmosphere are enhanced by a factor of at least 3, at the continental scale, as a consequence of 30 days of magmatic activity. The short-term effect of the injection of carbon monoxide and methane into the atmosphere is therefore to increase the residence times of these two species and, in turn, their capacity of geographic expansion. The estimated CO and CH4 volume mixing ratios (i.e. the number of molecules of CO or CH4 per cm3, divided by the total number of molecules per cm3) in the low atmosphere are 2-5 ppmv at the continental scale and locally higher than 50 ppmv. The dimension of the area affected by these high volume mixing ratios decreases in the presence of a lava flow accompanying magma intrusion at depth. Complementary calculations for a 10-yr duration of the magmatic activity suggest (i) an increase in the mean CH4 volume mixing ratio of the whole atmosphere up to values 3-15 times higher than the

  2. Magma generation on Mars - Amounts, rates, and comparisons with earth, moon, and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Schneid, Byron D.

    1991-01-01

    Total extrusive and intrusive magma generated on Mars over the last approximately 3.8 billion years is estimated at 654 x 10 exp 6 cubic kilometers, or 0.17 cubic kilometers per year, substantially less than rates for earth (26 to 34 cu/km yr) and Venus (less than 20 cu/km yr) but much more than for the moon (0.025 cu/km yr). When scaled to earth's mass the Martian rate is much smaller than that for earth or Venus and slightly smaller than for the moon.

  3. Mesozoic invasion of crust by MORB-source asthenospheric magmas, U.S. Cordilleran interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventhal, Janet A.; Reid, Mary R.; Montana, Art; Holden, Peter

    1995-05-01

    Mafic and ultramafic xenoliths entrained in lavas of the Cima volcanic field have Nd and Sr isotopic ratios indicative of a source similar to that of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). Nd and Sr internal isochrons demonstrate a Late Cretaceous intrusion age. These results, combined with evidence for emplacement in the lower crust and upper mantle, indicate invasion of the lower crust by asthenospheric magmas in the Late Cretaceous. Constituting the first prima facie evidence for depleted-mantle magmatism in the Basin and Range province prior to late Cenozoic volcanism, these results lend key support to models suggesting crustal heating by ascent of asthenosphere in the Mesozoic Cordilleran interior.

  4. Data Mining for Intrusion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Anoop; Jajodia, Sushil

    Data Mining Techniques have been successfully applied in many different fields including marketing, manufacturing, fraud detection and network management. Over the past years there is a lot of interest in security technologies such as intrusion detection, cryptography, authentication and firewalls. This chapter discusses the application of Data Mining techniques to computer security. Conclusions are drawn and directions for future research are suggested.

  5. Evidence for dynamic withdrawal from a layered magma body: The Topopah Spring Tuff, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Vogel, T. A.; Younker, L. W.

    1989-05-10

    The Topopah Spring Tuff is a classic example of a compositionally zoned ash flow sheet resulting from eruption of a compositionally zoned magma body. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of whole rock tuff samples indicate that the base of the ash flow sheet and the predominant volume of erupted material consist of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite, with agradational transition into overlying crystal-rich quartz latite. However, major and trace element analyses of glassy pumice lumps and microprobe analyses of their silicate and oxide phenocrysts provide closer approximations of the chemical and thermal gradients within the magma body. The gradients inferred from these data indicate that the transition from high-silica rhyolitic to quartz latitic magma within the chamber was abrupt, rather than gradational, with a distinct liquid-liquid interface separating the contrasting magma layers. Compositionally and texturally distinct pumice lumps are present throughout the ash flow sheet. The degree of heterogeneity within and among pumice lumps increases with stratigraphic height, becoming most pronounced in the uppermost quartz latite, where the chemical variability among pumice lumps is as great as that of the entire ash flow sheet. These observations are consistent with fluid dynamic models in which the velocity field developed near the entrance region of the vent(s) results in simultaneous withdrawal of magma from all points of a continuously expanding lateral and vertical region within the chamber. The abrupt transition to chemically bimodal pumice types near the top of the ash flowsheet, dominated by those of quartz latitic composition, implies that the interface between the magma layers remained relatively stable until drawdown breached the interface and preferentially erupted hotter, more mafic magma along with lesser amounts of remaining high-silica rhyolitic magma.

  6. How do crystal-rich magmas outgas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Julie; Cashman, Katharine V.; Rust, Alison C.; Sandnes, Bjornar

    2014-05-01

    Crystals can occupy ~0 to 100% of the total magma volume, but their role in outgassing remains poorly understood. In particular, the upper half of this spectrum - when the particles touch - involves complex flow behaviours that inevitably affect the geometry and rate of gas migration. We use analogue experiments to examine the role of high particle concentrations on outgassing mechanisms. Mixtures of sugar syrup and glass beads are squeezed between two glass plates to allow observations in 2D. The experiments are performed horizontally, so buoyancy does not intervene, and the suspensions are allowed to expand laterally. Gas flow regimes are mapped out for two sets of experiments: foams generated by chemical reactions, and single air bubbles injected into the particle suspension. Chemically induced bubble nucleation and growth throughout the suspension gradually generated a foam and allowed observations of bubble growth and migration as the foam developed. High particle fractions, close to the random maximum packing, reduced foam expansion (i.e. promoted outgassing). In the early phases of the experiments, they caused a flushing of bubbles from the system which did not occur at low crystal contents. High particle fractions also led to melt segregation and phase re-arrangements, eventually focusing gas escape through connected channels. A more in-depth study of particle-bubble interactions was carried out for single bubbles expanding in a mush. These show a clear change in behaviour close to the limit for loose maximum packing of dry beads, determined experimentally. At concentrations below loose packing, gas expands in a fingering pattern, characterized by a steady advance of widening lobes. This transits to a 'pseudo-fracturing' regime at or near loose packing, whereby gas advances at a point, often in an episodic manner, and outgases with little to no bulk expansion. However, before they can degas, pseudo-fractures typically build up larger internal gas pressures

  7. A Long-Lived Porphyry Ore Deposit and Associated Upper Crustal Silicic Magma Body, Bajo de la Alumbrera, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. C.; Allen, C. M.; Reiners, P. W.; Dunlap, W. J.; Cooke, D. R.; Campbell, I. H.; White, N. C.

    2004-05-01

    Porphyry Cu deposits form within and adjacent to small porphyritic intrusions that are apophyses to larger silicic magma bodies that reside in the upper parts of the Earth's crusts. Centred on these intrusions are hydrothermal systems of exsolved magmatic fluid with a carapace of convectively circulating meteoric water. We have applied several different dating techniques to assess the longevity of the magmatic-hydrothermal system and to define the cooling history of porphyry intrusions at the Bajo de la Alumbrera porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Argentina. The closure temperatures of these techniques range from 800oC (zircon U-Pb) to ~70oC (apatite (U-Th)/He; Fig. 1). The resulting cooling history indicates that the magmatic-hydrothermal system cooled to ca. 200oC by ~1.5 m.y. after the last porphyry intrusion (i.e., 6.96±0.09 Ma; U-Pb zircon age). Based on (U-Th)/He apatite data (closure temperature ~60-70oC), exposure and cessation of the system occurred before 4 Ma. The longevity of the magmatic-hydrothermal system indicated by these results is inconsistent with accepted mechanisms for porphyry Cu deposit formation. Depending on wallrock permeability, depth and cooling method, a 2 km wide by 3 km high intrusion has been predicted to cool between 0.01 to 0.1 m.y. (marked as the grey interval; Cathles et al., 1997 Economic Geology). We have obtained numerous age determinations younger than the U-Pb zircon age of the last known intrusion at Bajo de la Alumbrera. These imply that simple cooling of the small, mineralized porphyries did not happen. For the magmatic-hydrothermal system to have been sustained for longer than 0.1 m.y., either 1) younger small intrusions have been episodically emplaced below the youngest known intrusions, thus prolonging heat flow, or 2) fluids derived from a deeper and larger parental intrusion have been episodically discharged through the ore deposit long after the porphyry intrusion had lost its available heat. In either case, the longevity of

  8. Snapshots from deep magma chambers: decoding field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.

    2014-05-01

    During the post-orogenic stage of a Neoproterozoic orogen (Araçuaí-West Congo), inversely zoned calc-alkaline to alkaline plutonic structures intruded previous geologic units. Structural measurements, mapping of flow patterns and additional geochemical and isotopic data point towards different compositional domains which have been generated during a time span between 20 to 30 Ma. The result from decades of mapping revealed the architecture of ca. 10 large plutons in more détail. This work will focus on the dynamics of magmatic interaction for six different plutons ranging from c.20 to 200 km2 in outcropping area. Conclusions are based on already published and new unpublished data aiming the state of the art. In the silica-richer structures concentric fragmented and folded layers of granite in a K-basaltic matrix contrast with predominant more homogeneous K-basaltic to gabbroic regions. These may be separated by stretched filament regions (magmatic shear zones) where mixing has been enhanced resulting in hybrid compositions. Locally sharp and pillow-like contacts between granitic and K-basaltic rocks depict a frozen-in situation of different intrusive episodes. In the silica-poorer plutonic bodies gradational contacts are more frequent and may be the result of convection enhanced diffusion. For all plutons, however, mostly sub-vertical internal contacts between most- and least-differentiated rocks suggest generation from predominat large magma bodies of variable composition which crystallized while crossing the middle to lower crust (< 25 km depth). They have been catch in the act on their way up. Accordingly mushroom- to funnel-like magma-chambers and/or conduits could register snapshots of the interaction dynamics between granitic and noritic/dioritic or syeno-monzonitic and gabbroic magmas. Different compositional domains within different plutons suggest distinct kinematics. Nevertheless all studied plutons provide outstanding evidence for mixing, not only

  9. The petrology of the layered gabbro intrusion, eastern gabbro, Coldwell alkaline complex, Northwestern Ontario, Canada: evidence for multiple phases of intrusion in a ring dyke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Cliff S. J.

    1997-07-01

    The Coldwell alkaline complex is a large (> 350 km 2) gabbro and syenite intrusion on the north shore of Lake Superior. It was emplaced at 1108 Ma during early magmatic activity associated with the formation of the Mid-Continent Rift of North America. The eastern gabbro forms a partial ring dyke on the outer margin of the complex and consists of at least three discrete intrusions. The largest of these is the layered gabbro that comprises a 300 m thick fine- to medium-grained basal unit overlain by up to 1100 m of variably massive to layered gabbroic cumulates which vary from olivine gabbro to anorthosite. Several xenoliths of Archaean metamorphic rocks that range in size from 10's to 100's of meters are present in the central part of the intrusion. Within discrete horizons in the layered gabbro are many centimeter- to meter-scale, gabbroic xenoliths. The main cumulus minerals, in order of crystallization, are plagioclase, olivine and clinopyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxides. Biotite and Fe-Ti-oxide are the dominant intercumulus phases. Orthopyroxene occurs not as a cumulus phase but as peritectic overgrowths on cumulus olivine. A detailed petrographic and mineral chemical study of samples from two stratigraphically controlled traverses through the layered gabbro indicates that the stratigraphy cannot be correlated along the 33 km strike of the ring dyke. Mineral compositions show both normal and reversed fractionation trends. These patterns are interpreted to record at least three separate intrusions of magma into restricted dilatant zones within the ring dyke possibly associated with ongoing caldera collapse. Calculations of parental melt composition using mineral — melt equilibria show that even the most primitive gabbros crystallized from an evolved magma with mg# of 0.42-0.49. The presence of orthopyroxene overgrowths on cumulus olivine suggests rising silica activity in the melt during crystallization and implies a subalkaline parentage for the layered gabbro.

  10. The growth history of the Lago Della Vacca (Southern Adamello Massive, Italy) intrusion from field observations, thermal and rheological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A.; Annen, C.; Blundy, J. D.; Caricchi, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Lago Della Vacca granitoid is an intrusive body emplaced at about 4-6 km in up to 1 My. The core of the body is characterised by the presence of dyke-like structures, enclave-swarms and randomly distributed enclaves, which appear undeformed. Enclaves become oblate with the short axis perpendicular to the foliation, which, in turn follows the margin of the plutonic body (John and Blundy, 1993). Geothermometry and experimental data have been used to constrain the temperature of injection of the mafic component (1273-1323 K), the temperature of the host granitic magma (1173-1223), and to characterise the evolution of crystallinity with temperature for both magmas (Blundy and Sparks, 1992). Based on these data thermal and rheological modelling have been combined to interpret the growth and deformation history of the Lago della Vacca intrusive body. The pluton was modeled as a series of incrementally emplaced nested cylinders with 1D-cylindrical conductive heat transfer. The evolution of temperature and melt fraction distribution in the pluton and country rock were determined and used as input parameters for the rheological modelling. The rheology of each magma depends on the viscosity of the melt and, more importantly, on crystallinity. Field observations suggest that the mafic magma was injected as dykes. Their partial or total disaggregation produced mafic enclaves. The presence of randomly distributed enclaves in the core of Lago Della Vacca body indicates that convection was active in this portion of the intrusion. The undeformed nature of the enclaves in this region also implies that the contrast in temperature between host magma and mafic material produced a sudden (hours) rheological inversion with the mafic magma becoming more viscous than the felsic end-member. In these conditions, the enclaves would be transported passively by the felsic-host without suffering any substantial deformation. Thermal modelling indicates that to maintain the core of the pluton

  11. Timescale of emplacement of the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion recorded in giant plagioclase at Sichuan Province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lilu; Zeng, Ling; Ren, Zhongyuan; Wang, Yu; Luo, Zhaohua

    2014-09-01

    Giant plagioclase crystals carried into the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion from a deeper magma chamber can help constrain the timescales of emplacement of the Panzhihua intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (LIP). In this study, we present the petrographic textures and chemical compositions of giant plagioclase and fine-grained gabbro samples along a ~ 50 m horizontal outcrop of the low zone of the Panzhihua deposit. The giant plagioclase gabbro (GPG) dykes mostly intrude into the fine-grained gabbros without significant contact. Both types of gabbros have the similar bulk-rock major and trace element compositions. However, the mineral composition shows that most of the plagioclase megacrysts contain less An than the plagioclase in fine-grained gabbro samples. In situ analyses of Sr isotopes from core-to-rim transects of plagioclase megacrysts are constant, indicating that there are no recycled crystals. The textural characteristics of samples combined with petrological modeling using MELTS suggest that the plagioclase megacrysts should crystallize and grow in a deeper magma chamber. Textual studies of the GPG indicate that these plagioclase megacrysts mostly plot as straight lines on a classic crystal size distribution (CSD) diagram. For a plagioclase growth range of 10- 11-10- 10 mm/s, the plagioclase should have a growth time of 530-8118 years. In a 100 km3 magma chamber releasing thermal energy at a rate of 1000 MW, the Panzhihua intrusion should reach 50% crystallization after ~ 2400 years. The growth time recorded by the megacrysts in the GPG and numerical modeling may indicate that the emplacement and crystallization of the Panzhihua intrusion may have taken place in thousands of years. In the Emeishan LIP, therefore the combination of large volumes of Fe-rich magma flux and efficient metal precipitation led to the formation of a giant Fe-Ti-V oxide deposit in a short period.

  12. Petrological evidence for non-linear increase of magmatic intrusion rates before eruption at open vent mafic volcanoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, D. C. S.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The most active volcanoes on earth erupt in a yearly to decadal time scales, typically erupt mafic magmas and are open-vent systems with prominent degassing plumes (e.g. Mayon, Arenal, Llaima, Etna). Here we investigate the plumbing systems, dynamics, and processes that drive eruptions at these systems. These are key questions for improving hazard evaluation, and better understanding the unrest associated with these types of volcanoes. The petrology and geochemistry from six historical eruptions (1947-2006) of Mayon volcano (Philippines) shows that all lavas are basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase + orthopyroxene (Opx) + clinopyroxene. Opx crystals show a variety of compositions and zoning patterns (reverse, normal or complex) with Mg# (= 100 *Mg/[Mg+Fe]) varying from 67 to 81. The simplest interpretation is that the low Mg# parts of the crystals resided on an upper crustal and crystal rich reservoir that was intruded by more primitive magmas from which the high Mg# parts of the crystals grew. Modelling Mg-Fe diffusion in Opx shows that times since magma injection and eruption range from a few days up to 3.5 years in all of the investigated eruptions. The longest diffusion times are shorter than the repose times between the eruptions, which implies that crystal recycling between eruptive events is negligible. This is a surprising result that shows that for each eruption a different part of the evolved crystal-rich plumbing system is activated. This can be due to random intrusion location or an irreversibility of the plumbing system that prevents multiple eruptions from the same crystal-rich part. Moreover, we find that the number of intrusions markedly increases before each eruption in a non-linear manner. Such an increased rate of intrusions with time might reflect non-linear rheological properties of the crystal-rich system, of the enclosing rocks, or the non-linear evolution of crystal-melt reaction-dissolution fronts during magma intrusions.

  13. Rapid dike intrusion into Sakurajima volcano on August 15, 2015, as detected by multi-parameter ground deformation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato; Tameguri, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    We present observations of ground deformation at Sakurajima in August 2015 and model the deformation using a combination of GNSS, tilt and strain data in order to interpret a rapid deformation event on August 15, 2015. The pattern of horizontal displacement during the period from August 14 to 16, 2015, shows a WNW-ESE extension, which suggests the opening of a dike. Using a genetic algorithm, we obtained the position, dip, strike length, width and opening of a dislocation source based on the combined data. A nearly vertical dike with a NNE-SSW strike was found at a depth of 1.0 km below sea level beneath the Showa crater. The length and width are 2.3 and 0.6 km, respectively, and a dike opening of 1.97 m yields a volume increase of 2.7 × 106 m3. 887 volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes beside the dike suggest that the rapid opening of the dike caused an accumulation of strain in the surrounding rocks, and the VT earthquakes were generated to release this strain. Half of the total amount of deformation was concentrated between 10:27 and 11:54 on August 15. It is estimated that the magma intrusion rate was 1 × 106 m3/h during this period. This is 200 times larger than the magma intrusion rate prior to one of the biggest eruptions at the summit crater of Minami-dake on July 24, 2012, and 2200 times larger than the average magma intrusion rate during the period from October 2011 to March 2012. The previous Mogi-type ground deformation is considered to be a process of magma accumulation in preexisting spherical reservoirs. Conversely, the August 2015 event was a dike intrusion and occurred in a different location to the preexisting reservoirs. The direction of the opening of the dike coincides with the T-axes and direction of faults creating a graben structure.

  14. Workshop on Magmatic Processes of Early Planetary Crusts: Magma Oceans and Stratiform Layered Intrusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. (Editor); Mccallum, I. S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The significance of the lunar highland pristine cumulate samples were reevaluated with the aid of the additional insights provided by geologically constrained terrestrial investigations. This exercise involved a review of the state of knowledge about terrestrial and lunar cumulate rocks as well as an enumeration and reevaluation of the processes hypothesized to have been responsible for their formation, both classically and at present.

  15. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  16. Prefrontal-posterior coupling while observing the suffering of other people, and the development of intrusive memories

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Eva M; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Schulter, Günter; Holmes, Emily A; Fink, Andreas; Papousek, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Witnessing the suffering of others, for instance, in hospital emergency rooms but also through televised images in news or reality programs, may be associated with the occurrence of later intrusive memories. The factors contributing to why some people develop intrusive memories and others do not are still poorly understood. N = 121 healthy women were exposed to film scenes showing the suffering of dying, severely injured, and mourning people while their EEG was recorded. Individuals showing greater decreases of functional coupling between prefrontal and posterior cortices (greater decreases of EEG beta coherences) reported more intrusive memories of the witnessed events. This was shown for intrusions in the short term (immediately after viewing the film) as well as in the medium term (intrusive memories over 1 week). The findings illuminate brain mechanisms involved in the encoding of information in ways that make intrusive memories more likely. PMID:24611634

  17. Geophysical Survey and Detailed Geologic Mapping of an Eroded Stratovolcano's Central Intrusive Complex, Summer Coon, Co.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Eroded volcanoes expose plumbing systems that provide important information on intrusive geometries, magma propagation directions, and the effects of host rock types and heterogeneities. Summer Coon Volcano, CO, is an Oligocene stratovolcano where erosion has removed much of the original edifice, revealing the intrusive stocks of the central intrusive complex (CIC). Surrounding the CIC are hundreds of radial dikes ranging from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition. Published geologic maps indicate most radial dikes do not connect to the intrusive stocks, supporting published theories that most did not emanate from the central intrusions. However, much of the area surrounding the CIC is covered by alluvium, suggesting that the lack of connection might be an artifact of exposure. We completed a ground magnetic survey and detailed geological mapping to determine if the dikes continue beneath the alluvium and into the intrusive stocks. Linear magnetic anomalies indicate four NW-SE trending rhyodacite dikes continue beneath the alluvium for up to 250 m, and mapping indicates that at least two of the rhyodacite dikes do extend into the CIC. Shorter linear anomalies are attributed to seven NW-SE trending basaltic dikes ~100-500-m-long which are sparsely exposed in the alluvium. Mapping shows that three rhyodacite dikes extend into the CIC and to within 200 m of their possible source, an 800-m-wide granodiorite stock. Additionally, three rhyolitic dikes extend to within several meters of a 200×500-m-wide tuff breccia zone of similar composition, likely their source. In summary, magnetic data and detailed mapping indicate that radial dikes do extend into the central intrusive complex in contrast to some model predictions.

  18. Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma.

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R

    2008-05-22

    It has long been assumed that seismogenic faulting is confined to cool, brittle rocks, with a temperature upper limit of approximately 600 degrees C (ref. 1). This thinking underpins our understanding of volcanic earthquakes, which are assumed to occur in cold rocks surrounding moving magma. However, the recent discovery of abundant brittle-ductile fault textures in silicic lavas has led to the counter-intuitive hypothesis that seismic events may be triggered by fracture and faulting within the erupting magma itself. This hypothesis is supported by recent observations of growing lava domes, where microearthquake swarms have coincided with the emplacement of gouge-covered lava spines, leading to models of seismogenic stick-slip along shallow shear zones in the magma. But can fracturing or faulting in high-temperature, eruptible magma really generate measurable seismic events? Here we deform high-temperature silica-rich magmas under simulated volcanic conditions in order to test the hypothesis that high-temperature magma fracture is seismogenic. The acoustic emissions recorded during experiments show that seismogenic rupture may occur in both crystal-rich and crystal-free silicic magmas at eruptive temperatures, extending the range of known conditions for seismogenic faulting. PMID:18497823

  19. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  20. Testing models of dike intrusion during rifting episodes: The role of heating in triggering earthquakes in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpinski, K.; Cote, D. M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2005, a major rifting episode occurred in the western Afar depression. Following the initial intrusion of an approximately 60 km-long, up to 8m-wide dike, seismic stations were deployed to the surrounding region. Since the 2005 deployment, discrete magma intrusions have been observed propagating along the rift axis as migrating swarms of moderate magnitude earthquakes that occur over times of vertical and horizontal deformation imaged in satellite radar interferometry. Between these discrete diking events, however, persistent, moderate magnitude (mb > 2 -4) earthquakes occur singly and in swarms along the length of the 2005 dike intrusion zone. More intense zones of seismicity correspond to areas of greater strain in the 2005 and subsequent dikes. Is the persistent along-axis seismicity indicative of ongoing, small volume dike intrusions at depth, tectonic faulting in response to the original dike intrusion, or is it caused by thermal stresses of dike solidification and cooling? Differentiating between mechanisms provides insights into rock failure and magma intrusion processes. A simple one-dimensional dike model is presented as an instantaneous, purely thermal (i.e. neglecting volumetric changes due to fluid emplacement) intrusion that cools by conduction to the surrounding host rock. The associated thermal stresses with a large volume intrusion (~0.05km3 or greater) are on the order of tens of MPa for several months. We compare seismogenic layer thickness variations with yield stress envelopes at the dike wall at a range of times after dike emplacement. The yield stress for the depth of the earthquakes is of the same order or less, meaning the thermal stresses are large enough to contribute to causing the mb 2-4 earthquakes observed in the region. This is evidence that earthquakes not only correspond to the rock breaking in front of the dike, but also mark the dike's path by the generation of thermally induced earthquakes in the wallrock. A second

  1. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical, and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC meteorite parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the types of magmas (magma compositions) present, the role of volatiles in magmatic processes, and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. We are also interested in how these processes and magma types varied over time.In earlier work on the A15 green and A17 orange lunar glasses, we discovered a variety of metal blebs. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs occur in the glass; others (in A17) were found in olivine phenocrysts that we find make up about 2 vol 96 of the orange glass magma. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption . They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas that drove the lunar fire-fountaining. During the tenure of this grant, we have continued to work on the remaining questions regarding the origin and evolution of the gas phase in lunar basaltic magmas, what they indicate about the lunar interior, and how the gas affects volcanic eruptions. Work on Martian magmas petrogenesis questions during the tenure of this grant has resulted in advances in our methods of evaluating magmatic oxidation state variations in Mars and some new insights into the compositional variations that existed in the SNC magmas over time . Additionally, Minitti has continued to work on the problem of possible shock effects on the abundance and distribution of water in Mars minerals.

  2. Pressurized magma reservoir within the east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i: Evidence for relaxed stress changes from the 1975 Kalapana earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Scott; Amelung, Falk

    2015-03-01

    We use 2000-2012 InSAR data from multiple satellites to investigate magma storage in Kīlauea's east rift zone (ERZ). The study period includes a surge in magma supply rate and intrusion-eruptions in 2007 and 2011. The Kupaianaha area inflated by ~5 cm prior to the 2007 intrusion and the Nāpau Crater area by ~10 cm following the 2011 intrusion. For the Nāpau Crater area, elastic modeling suggests an inflation source at 5 ± 2 km depth or more below sea level. The reservoir is located in the deeper section of the rift zone for which secular magma intrusion was inferred for the period following the 1975 Mw7.7 décollement earthquake. Reservoir pressurization suggests that in this section of the ERZ, extensional stress changes due to the earthquake have largely been compensated for and that this section is approaching its pre-1975 state. Reservoir pressurization also puts the molten core model into question for this section of Kīlauea's rift zone.

  3. Timescales of Magmatic Processes Preceding Eruption in a Large, Extraordinarily Restless, Silicic Magma System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent investigations of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field, central Chile, suggest the presence of a large, shallow, and active rhyolitic magma reservoir. Modest (up to ~1.2 km3) rhyolitic eruptions over the last 20 kyr encircle an area inflating at an average rate of 25 cm/yr since 2007. 40Ar/39Ar, 14C, and tephra stratigraphy indicate that the majority of rhyolitic volcanism was concentrated in two phases (phase 1 and 2) separated by 9 kyr of repose. Here we report new petrological and geochemical results in order to determine if LdM rhyolites were issued from the same reservoir, identify the nature and timescales of processes leading to their eruption, and begin to relate the spectacular signs of unrest to magmatic processes. All LdM rhyolites are crystal-poor and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase, biotite and rare quartz. Major and trace element contents indicate most plagioclase crystallized in equilibrium with the erupted rhyolitic magma. Incompatible trace element contents (e.g. Ce) delineate distinct crystal populations erupted during phases 1 and 2. Thus, the two magma reservoirs experienced limited physical interaction. A subset of crystal domains from both eruptive phases record melts inconsistent with the whole rock and glass, crystallization-dominated differentiation trend. Plagioclase erupted in the Early Espejos Tephra (phase 1), the largest recent explosive eruption, display the highest An and Mg contents and depletion of Ba and Sr. In contrast, early phase 2 plagioclase contain zones of Ba enrichment. This Mg and Ba enrichment records contrasting responses to the intrusion of mafic magma. The high Mg zones are consistent with an intermediate magma resulting from rhyolite and basalt mixing whereas the Ba enrichment results from melting of Ba-rich phases such as biotite and K-feldspar. Modeling of Mg, Sr, and Ba diffusion indicates that mixing between these Mg and Ba rich melts and the erupted magma body occurred within a year of eruption

  4. Rise, transport, and storage of magma during continental rupture: Constraints from the Afar rifting episode (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Cote, D. M.; Keir, D.; Rowland, J. V.; Hammond, J.

    2009-12-01

    The production, storage, and eruption of magma within continental and oceanic rift zones shapes the structure and morphology of the plate boundary, and the buoyancy force of the magma adds to the tectonic forces driving plate divergence. Dikes transport magma from crustal and sub-crustal magma reservoirs, accommodate extensional strain, and impart a length scale to rift deformation. From seismic and geodetic detection of rare ridge intrusion events, dikes of length 10-30 km are emplaced over time periods of hours to days. Both the temporal and spatial patterns of faulting and magmatism help to initiate and maintain the ~50 km along-axis segmentation of mid-ocean ridges and highly evolved continental rifts, and are fundamental to our understanding of lithospheric deformation within rift zones. Four years of seismicity data and field observations from the ongoing rifting episode in the subaerial southern Red Sea rift provide fundamental constraints on the time and length scales of magma transport in this incipient seafloor spreading center. Migrating swarms of tectonic, volcano-tectonic, and very low frequency earthquakes mark the along-axis propagation of 10-20 km-long dikes that initiate in the aseismic axial zone near the mid-segment (Belachew et al., 2009). Post-dike seismicity occurs along the length of the dike zones for months to years after large volume dike intrusions, illuminating differences in the dike height (Cote et al., 2009), as well as syn- and post-dike faulting. Episodic volcano-tectonic and low-frequency earthquakes near the centers of the 3 adjoining tectono-magmatic segments in the southern Red Sea rift suggest that their segment centers are underlain by pressurized magma chambers. For example, moderate magnitude, volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred at the centers of 4 tectono-magmatic segments during the 5-day earthquake swarm and eruption on the Erta’Ale magmatic segment in 2008. Ongoing studies examine the distribution of melt zones

  5. Timescale of Petrogenetic Processes Recorded in the Mount Perkins Magma System, Northern Colorado River Extension Corridor, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Miller, Calvin F.; Rhodes Gregory T.; Wooden, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Miocene Mt. Perkins Pluton is a small composite intrusive body emplaced in the shallow crust as four separate phases during the earliest stages of crustal extension. Phase 1 (oldest) consists of isotropic hornblende gabbro and a layered cumulate sequence. Phase 2 consists of quartz monzonite to quartz monzodiorite hosting mafic microgranitoid enclaves. Phase 3 is composed of quartz monzonite and is subdivided into mafic enclave-rich zones and enclave-free zones. Phase 4 consists of aphanitic dikes of mafic, intermediate and felsic compositions hosting mafic enclaves. Phases 2-4 enclaves record significant isotopic disequilibrium with surrounding granitoid host rocks, but collectively enclaves and host rocks form a cogenetic suite exhibiting systematic variations in Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes that correlate with major and trace elements. Phases 2-4 record multiple episodes of magma mingling among cogenetic hybrid magmas that formed via magma mixing and fractional crystallization at a deeper crustal. The mafic end-member was alkali basalt similar to nearby 6-4 Ma basalt with enriched OIB-like trace elements and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes. The felsic end-member was a subalkaline crustal-derived magma. Phase 1 isotropic gabbro exhibits elemental and isotopic compositional variations at relatively constant SiO2, suggesting generation of isotropic gabbro by an open-system process involving two mafic end-members. One end-member is similar in composition to the OIB-like mafic end-member for phases 2-4; the second is similar to nearby 11-8 Ma tholeiite basalt exhibiting low epsilon (sub Nd), and depleted incompatible trace elements. Phase 1 cumulates record in situ fractional crystallization of an OIB-like mafic magma with isotopic evidence of crustal contamination by partial melts generated in adjacent Proterozoic gneiss. The Mt Perkins pluton records a complex history in a lithospheric scale magma system involving two distinct mantle-derived mafic magmas and felsic magma sourced in the

  6. The Fish Canyon magma body, San Juan volcanic field, Colorado: Rejuvenation and eruption of an upper-crustal batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachmann, Olivier; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    More than 5000 km3 of nearly compositionally homogeneous crystalrich dacite (~68 wt % SiO2: ~45% Pl + Kfs + Qtz + Hbl + Bt + Spn + Mag + Ilm + Ap + Zrn + Po) erupted from the Fish Canyon magma body during three phases: (1) the pre-caldera Pagosa Peak Dacite (an unusual poorly fragmented pyroclastic deposit, ~ 200 km3); (2) the syn-collapse Fish Canyon Tuff (one of the largest known ignimbrites, ~ 5000 km3); (3) the post-collapse Nutras Creek Dacite (a volumetrically minor lava). The late evolution of the Fish Canyon magma is characterized by rejuvenation of a near-solidus upper-crustal intrusive body (mainly crystal mush) of batholithic dimensions. The necessary thermal input was supplied by a shallow intrusion of more mafic magma represented at the surface by sparse andesitic enclaves in late-erupted Fish Canyon Tuff and by the post-caldera Huerto Andesite. The solidified margins of this intrusion are represented by holocrystalline xenoliths with Fish Canyon mineralogy and mineral chemistry and widely dispersed partially remelted polymineralic aggregates, but dehydration melting was not an important mechanism in the rejuvenation of the Fish Canyon magma. Underlying mafic magma may have evolved H2O-F-S-Cl-rich fluids that fluxed melting in the overlying crystal mush. Manifestations of the late up-temperature magma evolution are: (1) resorbed quartz, as well as feldspars displaying a wide spectrum of textures indicative of both resorption and growth, including Rapakivi textures and reverse growth zoning (An27-28 to An32-33) at the margins of many plagioclase phenocrysts; (2) high Sr, Ba, and Eu contents in the high-SiO2 rhyolite matrix glass, which are inconsistent with extreme fractional crystallization of feldspar; (3) oscillatory and reverse growth zoning toward the margins of many euhedral hornblende phenocrysts (rimward increases from ~5??5-6 to 7??7-8??5 wt % Al2O3). Homogeneity in magma composition at the chamber-wide scale, contrasting with extreme textural

  7. Derivation of S and Pb in phanerozoic intrusion-related metal deposits from neoproterozoic sedimentary pyrite, Great Basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, P.G.; Poulson, S.R.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    The thick (???8 km), regionally extensive section of Neoproterozoic siliciclastic strata (terrigenous detrital succession, TDS) in the central and eastern Great Basin contains sedimentary pyrite characterized by mostly high d34S values (-11.6 to 40.8%, <70% exceed 10%; 51 analyses) derived from reduction of seawater sulfate, and by markedly radiogenic Pb isotopes ( 207Pb/204Pb <19.2; 15 analyses) acquired from clastic detritus eroded from Precambrian cratonal rocks to the east-southeast. In the overlying Paleozoic section, Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-Au deposits associated with Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary granitic intrusions (intrusion-related metal deposits) contain galena and other sulfide minerals with S and Pb isotope compositions similar to those of TDS sedimentary pyrite, consistent with derivation of deposit S and Pb from TDS pyrite. Minor element abundances in TDS pyrite (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Au) compared to sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite elsewhere are not noticeably elevated, implying that enrichment in source minerals is not a precondition for intrusion-related metal deposits. Three mechanisms for transferring components of TDS sedimentary pyrite to intrusion-related metal deposits are qualitatively evaluated. One mechanism involves (1) decomposition of TDS pyrite in thermal aureoles of intruding magmas, and (2) aqueous transport and precipitation in thermal or fluid mixing gradients of isotopically heavy S, radiogenic Pb, and possibly other sedimentary pyrite and detrital mineral components, as sulfide minerals in intrusion-related metal deposits. A second mechanism invokes mixing and S isotope exchange in thermal aureoles of Pb and S exsolved from magma and derived from decomposition of sedimentary pyrite. A third mechanism entails melting of TDS strata or assimilation of TDS strata by crustal or mantle magmas. TDS-derived or assimilated magmas ascend, decompress, and exsolve a mixture of TDS volatiles, including isotopically heavy S and radiogenic Pb

  8. Dynamics of magma ascent through the Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    A 9 m.y. old alkali basalt intrudes the Red Lake pluton, approx.90 m.y. old granodiorite of the Huntington Lake quadrangle in the Sierra Nevada, California. The basaltic neck, standing 5 meters above the floor of the Big Creek drainage (approx. 25 meters in diameter), appears to have been the feeder for the flows that cap Chinese Peak (approx. 1 km to the south). The surrounding Red Lake granodiorite was partially fused during the intrusive process. Ten meters of the fused rock is now exposed surrounding the basaltic neck. Thermal models indicate that magma must have flowed through the pipe for approx. 1000 years to produce the extensive melting of the country rock. The basalt was probably intruded at a temperature of 900/sup 0/C, ultramafic nodules indicate its mantle origin. Surrounding the inner basaltic core is a region of basalt interlayered with granitic melt and xenoliths, which formed due to interaction of the basalt and partially molten wall rock during magma ascent. The partially fused granodiorite wall rock contains 40-45% melt at the contact, decreasing to 20% melt 10 meters from the contact. The glass composition (approx.73%-approx.75% SiO/sub 2/, 5% K/sub 2/O) suggests invariant melting. Data on Rb, Sr, and Sr isotopic composition of the glass, residual crystals, and whole rocks are used to model chemical and isotopic equilibration of silicic liquids with their residual crystals. In comparison to the granodiorite, the glass is enriched in Rb (approx.250 ppm), depleted in Sr (approx.135 ppm), permitting the construction of an apparent isochron 11.0 +/- 2.7 m.y.

  9. Eruption of Deep Mushy Magma from the Searchlight Magma System, Southern Nevada (USA): a Crystal Size Distribution and Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazar, D.; Miller, J.; Miller, C.; Dodge, M.; Hodge, K.; Faulds, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Miocene Searchlight pluton and overlying volcanic rocks are exposed in the Eldorado Mountains of southern Nevada within the Colorado River Extensional Corridor. Steep tilting of the pluton and its cover provides an exceptional opportunity to study the magmatic plumbing system from bottom to top, including possible eruptions of magma from the Searchlight magma system. The pluton is approximately 10 km thick and divided into three compositionally distinct units that solidified in monotonic fashion: a 2 km thick upper fine-grained quartz monzonite (solidification front), a 6 km thick lower, more mafic quartz monzonite (cumulate), and a 2 km thick middle granite (extracted melt) [ref]. In addition, near E-W-striking rhyolite and trachydacite porphyry dikes intrude the upper quartz monzonite unit (but not the lower or middle units), and identical trachydacite porphyries (locally > 45 vol. % crystals) occur as irregular pods and masses in the roof area. The trachydacite porphyries superficially resemble trachydacite lavas in part of the overlying volcanic section. Ion probe zircon ages are identical within error for the upper unit, the lower unit, and the trachydacite dikes and pods (206Pb/238U age for samples of each ranging from 16.6±0.3 Ma to 16.9±0.2 Ma 2σ). Ages for the middle granite unit and rhyolite dikes are consistently younger (15.8-16.0 Ma). Crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis on plagioclase has been undertaken on samples from the upper Searchlight and overlying volcanic rocks in order to establish and corroborate linkages between the volcanic and intrusive units and to better understand the growth and solidification history of the Searchlight magma system. The CSD's for the intermediate porphyry dikes and pods that intrude upper Searchlight pluton are identical to trachydacite lava flows and domes erupted onto Proterozoic gneiss and earlier lava flows that comprise the roof of the pluton. The CSD's for these rocks are distinctly concave up and

  10. Formation of native iron in sediment-contaminated magma: I. A. case study of the Hanekammen Complex on Disko Island, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Ulff-Moller, F. )

    1990-01-01

    For the first time a compositional range of native iron bodies is described in a cogenetic series of sediment-contaminated volcanic rocks from the Tertiary West Greenland Basalt Province. The iron-bearing rocks occur in a high-level composite intrusion, the Hanekammen Complex. Reaction between a tholeiitic parent magma with >11% MgO and carbonaceous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich shale took place in a reservoir >3 km below the paleosurface and created magmatic layering with basaltic magma overlain by less dense andesitic magma. The contaminated rock series bears a strong imprint of assimilation but very little fractional crystallization, which implies that the two processes were not intimately coupled in the present in basalt and andesite form a general trend, defined by Co versus Ni concentrations, that reflects the degree of assimilation, the amount of immiscible sulfide liquid, and the degree of reduction (in order of decreasing importance). The zoning of single iron grains reflects the dynamics of their growth and, to some extent, subsequent homogenization and reaction with magma. Weakly zoned iron spherules in viscous andesite were formed and remained in situ, whereas iron grains in basalt settled through the layered magma and developed strong zoning. All iron types contain Co-rich domains (<1 mm in diameter); their conservation implies a residence time for the iron at magmatic temperatures on the order of a month or less before the emplacement in the subvolcanic intrusions.

  11. Magma Beneath Yellowstone National park.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G P; Christiansen, R L; Iyer, H M; Pitt, A D; Mabey, D R; Blank, H R; Zietz, I; Gettings, M E

    1975-05-23

    The Yellowstone plateau volcanic field is less than 2 million years old, lies in a region of intense tectonic and hydrothermal activity, and probably has the potential for further volcanic activity. The youngest of three volcanic cycles in the field climaxed 600,000 years ago with a voluminous ashflow eruption and the collapse of two contiguous cauldron blocks. Doming 150,000 years ago, followed by voluminous rhyolitic extrusions as recently as 70,000 years ago, and high convective heat flow at present indicate that the latest phase of volcanism may represent a new magmatic insurgence. These observations, coupled with (i) localized postglacial arcuate faulting beyond the northeast margin of the Yellowstone caldera, (ii) a major gravity low with steep bounding gradients and an amplitude regionally atypical for the elevation of the plateau, (iii) an aeromagnetic low reflecting extensive hydrothermal alteration and possibly indicating the presence of shallow material above its Curie temperature, (iv) only minor shallow seismicity within the caldera (in contrast to a high level of activity in some areas immediately outside), (v) attenuation and change of character of seismic waves crossing the caldera area, and (vi) a strong azimuthal pattern of teleseismic P-wave delays, strongly suggest that a body composed at least partly of magma underlies the region of the rhyolite plateau, including the Tertiary volcanics immediately to its northeast. The Yellowstone field represents the active end of a system of similar volcanic foci that has migrated progressively northeastward for 15 million years along the trace of the eastern Snake River Plain (8). Regional aeromagnetic patterns suggest that this course was guided by the structure of the Precambrian basement. If, as suggested by several investigators (24), the Yellowstone magma body marks a contemporary deep mantle plume, this plume, in its motion relative to the North American plate, would appear to be "navigating" along a

  12. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  13. Raman investigation of magma mingling experiments as a tool for tracking the chemical and structural evolution of melt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, D.; Morgavi, D.; Hess, K. U.; Pritchard, C. J.; Borovkov, N.; Perugini, D.; Larson, P. B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Magma mixing is a petrologic phenomenon, for which extensive evidence has been documented in rocks young and old, from intrusive and effusive igneous environments. Although magma mixing between mafic and silicic magmas is regarded as a major differentiation process, documentation of the mechanisms acting in melt interaction, both in its physical and chemical aspects, is still incomplete. We present the first Raman spectroscopic investigation of the products of magma-mixing experiments performed using natural basaltic and rhyolitic melts from the Yellowstone Norris-Mammoth Corridor. The mixing process is driven by a recently-developed apparatus that generates chaotic streamlines in the melts, mimicking the development of magma mixing in nature. The chemical variation of major elements is studied in detail by electron microprobe (EMPA) on mixed filaments of 1000 μm diameter. Raman and microprobe measurements have been performed every 10 μm this allow us to investigate the evolution of silicate structure, from the rhyolitic to the basaltic composition. Deconvoluted Raman spectra collected from the mixed experiment yield information about network-forming structural units (Qn species, where n indicates the number of bridging oxygen). By combining Raman spectra and chemical analyses we show, for the first time, how the percent of Qn species evolve with chemical composition in these natural silicate melts. Moreover, our results show how the ratio of network modifiers respect to network former cations, dramatically affects the Raman spectra of the rhyolitic end-member.

  14. Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Satyanarayan, Manavalan; Pati, Jayanta

    2015-04-01

    Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust Sarkar, S.1, Saha, L.1, Satyanarayan, M2. and Pati, J.K.3 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, Haridwar, India, 2. HR-ICPMS Lab, Geochemistry Group, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad-50007, India. 3. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Nehru Science Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, India. Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTGs) group of rocks, that mostly constitute the Archaean continental crusts, evolved through a time period of ~3.8 Ga-2.7 Ga with major episodes of juvenile magma generations at ~3.6 Ga and ~2.7 Ga. Geochemical signatures, especially HREE depletions of most TTGs conform to formation of this type of magma by partial melting of amphibolites or eclogites at 15-20 kbar pressure. While TTGs (mostly sodic in compositions) dominates the Eoarchaean (~3.8-3.6 Ga) to Mesoarchaean (~3.2-3.0 Ga) domains, granitic rocks (with significantly high potassium contents) became more dominant in the Neoarchaean period. The most commonly accepted model proposed for the formation of the potassic granite in the Neoarchaean time is by partial melting of TTGs along subduction zones. However Archaean granite intrusive into the gabbro-ultramafic complex from Scourie, NW Scotland has been interpreted to have formed by fractional crystallization of hornblende and plagioclase from co-existing trondhjemitic gneiss. In this study we have studied fractional crystallization paths from a Mesoarchaean trondhjemite from the central Bundelkhand craton, India using MELTS algorithm. Fractional crystallization modeling has been performed at pressure ranges of 20 kbar to 7 kbar. Calculations have shown crystallization of garnet-clinopyroxene bearing assemblages with progressive cooling of the magma at 20 kbar. At pressure ranges 19-16 kbar, solid phases

  15. Saucer-shaped Clastic Intrusions and Associated Injectites in the Westerm San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A.; Vigorito, M.; Vetel, W.; Cartwright, J.

    2007-12-01

    Clastic sills, including saucer-shaped intrusions, are the most volumetrically significant clastic intrusions in the Panoche Giant Injectite Complex (PGIC). Injection occurred in the Lower Paleocene during a period of inversion caused by the convergence of the Pacific and North American plates. Almost 400 km2 of exposure reveals the relationships between clastic intrusions, their parent beds and seafloor sand extrusions (extrudites). Sand was injected into partially-consolidated deepwater mudstones of late Cretaceous and early Paleocene age in a single event but with many pulses that produced cross-cutting intrusions. More than 40 km3 of sand is estimated to have injected within the area of outcrop. The total thickness of strata cut by injections (from deepest known Lower Cretaceous parent bed to extrudite) is in excess of 1.2 km. Saucer-shaped intrusions are composite features that comprise sills, low-angle dikes and dike swarms, arranged as low-angle conical or saucer-shaped injected units that exhibit a semi-elliptical to horse-shoe geometry in plan view and are V- or U-shaped in cross section. Saucer-shaped intrusions are 500 to 1.5km wide and in some cases cut through more than 250 m of stratigraphic section. The lowest parts of the saucer-shaped intrusions consists of multiply-stacked, low-angle dikes up to 80m thick that cut the stratigraphy at angles between 5-10º and locally exhibit stepped or transgressive geometry. The low-angle dykes are 8 to 20 m wide and laterally continuous over distances of a few to several hundreds of metres. Steeper segments (up to 30 deg) emanate laterally from the periphery of the lowest units and cut through the host-rock for a few up to several tens of metres, pinching-out laterally over distances of several tens to a few hundreds of metres. At their margins the saucer-shaped intrusions are bounded by steep (50-70 deg), narrow dikes (generally <1 m wide); such dikes are unlikely to be imaged on seismic data. The central areas

  16. Evaluation of Intrusion Detection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ulvila, Jacob W.; Gaffney, John E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive method for evaluating intrusion detection systems (IDSs). It integrates and extends ROC (receiver operating characteristic) and cost analysis methods to provide an expected cost metric. Results are given for determining the optimal operation of an IDS based on this expected cost metric. Results are given for the operation of a single IDS and for a combination of two IDSs. The method is illustrated for: 1) determining the best operating point for a single and double IDS based on the costs of mistakes and the hostility of the operating environment as represented in the prior probability of intrusion and 2) evaluating single and double IDSs on the basis of expected cost. A method is also described for representing a compound IDS as an equivalent single IDS. Results are presented from the point of view of a system administrator, but they apply equally to designers of IDSs.