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Sample records for lateral neck dissection

  1. Neck dissection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000659.htm Neck dissection - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neck dissection is surgery to remove the lymph nodes in ...

  2. J incision in neck dissections.

    PubMed

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  3. Efficacy of octreotide against chylothorax following lateral neck dissection for thyroid cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashibara, Noriaki; Ogawa, Toshihisa; Tsuji, Eiichi; Ishizuna, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postsurgical chylothorax is a rare complication of cervical dissection for thyroid cancer. We report that octreotide, a synthetic analog of somatostatin, is effective in treating chylothorax after thyroid carcinoma surgery. Presentation of case The patient was a 48-year-old woman who presented to our institution complaining of a left anterior cervical mass. We diagnosed this as thyroid papillary carcinoma and performed a subtotal excision of the thyroid gland with left cervical lymph node dissection. The patient developed dyspnea, and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral chylothorax on Day 4 post-surgery. Octreotide was administered since bilateral chylothorax was noted. A marked decrease in chyle effusion was noted just 3 days after starting octreotide, and after a total of 9 days of treatment, there were no further signs of chylous effusion. Discussion Octreotide is effective against postsurgical chylothorax; however, if there are no signs of improvement, we believe surgical treatment should be considered. Conclusion Octreotide should be administered first to treat postsurgical chylothorax before surgical treatment is considered. PMID:26963261

  4. Preventable Sternocleidomastoid Muscular Atrophy after Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nao; Sawai, Natsuko Yoshimura; Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ogura, Hide; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modified radical neck dissection (mRND) [preserving the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the spinal accessory nerve] and supraomohyoid neck dissection have become common surgical procedures for treating head and neck cancer. Postoperative severe asymmetry of the neck and severe atrophy of the SCM, however, have been demonstrated. Methods: Using computed tomographic images, cross-sectional areas of the SCMs were measured in 99 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent unilateral mRND or supraomohyoid neck dissection. An asymmetry index was used. Results: Innervation to the SCM was preserved in 91 patients. The spinal accessory nerve and the innervation were sacrificed in 3 patients; the innervation was repaired in 5 patients. Sacrifice of innervation to the SCM resulted in extremely severe asymmetry. Repair of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 40%. Preservation of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 75% at the middle portion of the neck and in 56% at the lower portion after mRND. Conclusion: Preserving innervation to the SCM and gentle handling of the nerve during neck dissection could prevent severe asymmetry after neck dissection. PMID:26495217

  5. Prevention of complications in neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kerawala, Cyrus J; Heliotos, Manolis

    2009-01-01

    Background The neck dissection has remained a pivotal aspect of head and neck cancer management for over a century. During this time its role has expanded from a purely therapeutic option into an elective setting, in part promoted by efforts to reduce its morbidity. Objectives This review will consider the potential complications of neck dissection and on the basis of the available evidence describe both their management and prevention. Conclusion Although the neck dissection continues to provide clinicians with a method of addressing cervical disease, its reliability and safety can only be assured if surgeons remain cognisant of the potential complications and aim to minimise such morbidity by appropriate management in the peri-operative period. PMID:19822010

  6. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

  7. The impact of surgical technique on neck dissection nodal yield: making a difference.

    PubMed

    Lörincz, Balazs B; Langwieder, Felix; Möckelmann, Nikolaus; Sehner, Susanne; Knecht, Rainald

    2016-05-01

    The nodal yield of neck dissections is an independent prognostic factor in several types of head and neck cancer. The authors aimed to determine whether the applied dissection technique has a significant impact on nodal yield. This is a single-institution, prospective study with internal control group (level of evidence: 2A). Data of 150 patients undergoing 223 neck dissections between February 2011 and March 2013 have been collected in a comprehensive cancer centre. Eighty-two patients underwent neck dissection with unwrapping the cervical fascia from lateral to medial, while 68 patients were operated without specifically unwrapping the fascia, in a caudal to cranial fashion. The standardised, horizontal neck dissection technique along the fascial planes resulted in a significantly higher nodal count in Levels I, II, III and IV, as well as in terms of overall nodal yield (mean: n = 22.53) than that of the vertical dissection applied in the control group (mean: n = 15.00). This is the first publication showing a direct correlation between neck dissection nodal yield and surgical technique. Therefore, it is paramount to optimise the applied surgical concept to maximise the oncological benefit. PMID:25784183

  8. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  9. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  10. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  11. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  12. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  13. Application of a cervical low incision in the functional neck dissection of thyroid papillary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    XU, JIAJIE; CHEN, CHAO; ZHENG, CHUANMING; WANG, KEJING; SHANG, JINBIAO; FANG, XIANHUA; GE, MINGHUA; TAN, ZHUO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to discuss the advantage of the application of a cervical low incision for functional neck dissection in patients with thyroid papillary carcinoma. The study was a retrospective analysis of 87 thyroid papillary carcinoma patients; cervical low incision in the functional neck dissection was applied for 47 cases and the classic ‘L’ incision was applied for 40 cases. The different integrity, surgical time, blood loss and the aesthetic property of the incision were compared between the cervical low incision and the classic ‘L’ incision for lateral neck dissection of thyroid cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was that the average total amount and the region II lymph nodes of the unilateral neck dissection were 33 and 10 for the cervical low incision group, and 32 and 11 for the classic ‘L’ incision group, respectively (P>0.05). The average unilateral neck dissection times were 87 and 58 min for the cervical low incision group and the classic ‘L’ incision group, respectively (P<0.05). The blood loss of the cervical low incision group was 67 ml, while the loss for the classic ‘L’ incision group was 61 ml (P>0.05). The postoperative incision of the cervical low incision group was smaller and more concealing. Additionally, the cosmetic deformities were milder for an inconspicuous cervical scar, and the sensation was improved for the patients in comparison with the classic ‘L’ incision group. These results suggest that the application of cervical low incision for functional neck dissection in thyroid papillary carcinoma patients aids in reducing postoperative complications, without increasing recurrence rates. Therefore, the classic ‘L’ incision can be replaced by the cervical low incision. PMID:27073645

  14. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min |. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. |; Chang, Kristi; Smith, Russell B. |; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken |; Buatti, John M. |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

  15. An Unusual Observation During Neck Dissection.

    PubMed

    Anehosur, Venkatesh; Rajendiran, Saravanan; Jayade, Gautam R; Kumar, Niranjan

    2016-07-01

    External jugular vein (EJV) is a major superficial vein in the neck which drains deeper parts of face and posterior scalp region. Although it follows a predicted pattern in formation, course and termination in general unusually it also exhibits variations which are clinically important. Gross variations in the incidence of these variations in EJV are noted. We report an anomalous course of EJV which drains into internal jugular vein in our case report. Knowledge about EJV and its origin, course and termination is important for surgeons, interventional radiologist, anaesthesiologist, clinicians in general to avoid inadvertent complication. PMID:27408458

  16. Pre-operative segmentation of neck CT datasets for the planning of neck dissections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, Jeanette; Dornheim, Jana; Preim, Bernhard; Hertel, Ilka; Strauss, Gero

    2006-03-01

    For the pre-operative segmentation of CT neck datasets, we developed the software assistant NeckVision. The relevant anatomical structures for neck dissection planning can be segmented and the resulting patient-specific 3D-models are visualized afterwards in another software system for intervention planning. As a first step, we examined the appropriateness of elementary segmentation techniques based on gray values and contour information to extract the structures in the neck region from CT data. Region growing, interactive watershed transformation and live-wire are employed for segmentation of different target structures. It is also examined, which of the segmentation tasks can be automated. Based on this analysis, the software assistant NeckVision was developed to optimally support the workflow of image analysis for clinicians. The usability of NeckVision was tested within a first evaluation with four otorhinolaryngologists from the university hospital of Leipzig, four computer scientists from the university of Magdeburg and two laymen in both fields.

  17. Planned neck dissection for patients with complete response to chemoradiotherapy: a concept approaching obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Alfio; Corry, June; Silver, Carl E; Shaha, Ashok R; Thomas Robbins, K; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-02-01

    The question of efficacy of "planned" neck dissection following complete response to chemoradiation of head and neck cancer is discussed. There is general agreement that preemptive neck dissection in patients who present initially with low volume (N1) neck disease is not necessary. However, routine performance of planned neck dissection for patients who present initially with high volume (> or =N2) disease remains controversial. The authors reviewed a large number of studies reported in the recent literature and discuss how they affect this debate.Twenty-four of the reviewed studies indicate a benefit in regional control obtained by "planned" neck dissection among patients who had bulky neck disease pretreatment. All these studies are retrospective, they do not assess treatment response prior to surgery, although they do show very good regional control rates. Twenty-six studies demonstrate no benefit from "planned" neck dissection after complete clinical response. The reasons for these different conclusions include the development of more effective chemoradiation regimens which have improved the initial locoregional control rates of patients undergoing primary chemoradiation treatment, and improvements in diagnostic technology which have increased ability to detect low volume persistent tumor in the post treatment period. When neck dissection is necessary for persistent or recurrent disease, recent studies have shown that selective or superselective neck dissection may produce results therapeutically equivalent to those obtained with more extensive procedures, with less morbidity.There is now a large body of evidence, based on long-term clinical outcomes, that patients who have achieved a complete clinical (including radiologic) response to chemoradiation have a low rate of isolated neck failure, and the continued use of planned neck dissection for these patients cannot be justified. PMID:19572281

  18. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2015-01-01

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered. PMID:26756035

  19. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  20. Up-front neck dissection followed by concurrent chemoradiation in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paximadis, Peter A.; Christensen, Michael E.; Dyson, Greg; Kamdar, Dev P.; Sukari, Ammar; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Yoo, George H.; Kim, Harold E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate management of the neck in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze our institutional experience with up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Methods Fifty-five patients with radiographic evidence of large or necrotic lymph nodes underwent up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiation. Results The 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated at 71.3% and 64.7%, respectively. There were 2 failures in the dissected neck, for a control rate of 96.7%. There were 7 locoregional failures and 12 distant failures, for locoregional and distant control rates of 87.3% and 78.2%, respectively. Conclusion Up-front neck dissection followed by chemoradiotherapy resulted in excellent locoregional control, OS, and PFS. Utilization of this strategy should be considered in carefully selected patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer. PMID:22307819

  1. Questionable Necessity for Removing Submandibular Gland in Neck Dissection in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Gaurav; Nagpure, Prakash S; Chavan, Sushil S

    2016-09-01

    To assess whether submandibular gland is involved by metastasis in cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas. It was a retrospective study, where we reviewed the records of the patients who underwent neck dissections for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the oral cavity. It included 112 patients who had undergone 115 neck dissections (three patients had undergone bilateral neck dissection), either therapeutic or prophylactic. No pathologic evidence of metastasis to submandibular gland was seen in any of the case. Preservation of submandibular glands can be a good technique for reducing future complications in a patient undergoing Neck Dissection wherever feasible. Therefore, if there is no need to expose large oral cavity tumors through the submandibular triangle, or when there is no direct extension of the primary and/or regional lymph nodes into the submandibular gland, it may be safe to preserve the submandibular gland. PMID:27508132

  2. A Population-Based Study of 30-day Incidence of Ischemic Stroke Following Surgical Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S. Danielle; Liu, Kuan; Garg, Amit X.; Tam, Samantha; Palma, David; Thind, Amardeep; Winquist, Eric; Yoo, John; Nichols, Anthony; Fung, Kevin; Hall, Stephen; Shariff, Salimah Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following neck dissection compared to matched patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. A surgical dissection of the neck is a common procedure performed for many types of cancer. Whether such dissections increase the risk of ischemic stroke is uncertain. A retrospective cohort study using data from linked administrative and registry databases (1995–2012) in the province of Ontario, Canada was performed. Patients were matched 1-to-1 on age, sex, date of surgery, and comorbidities to patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke assessed in hospitalized patients using validated database codes. A total of 14,837 patients underwent surgical neck dissection. The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following the dissection was 0.7%. This incidence decreased in recent years (1.1% in 1995 to 2000; 0.8% in 2001 to 2006; 0.3% in 2007 to 2012; P for trend <0.0001). The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke in patients undergoing neck dissection is similar to matched patients undergoing thoracic surgery (0.5%, P = 0.26) and colectomy (0.5%, P = 0.1). Factors independently associated with a higher risk of stroke in 30 days following neck dissection surgery were of age ≥75 years (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–2.53), and a history of diabetes (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02–2.49), hypertension (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.64–4.25), or prior stroke (OR 4.06, 95% CI 2.29–7.18). Less than 1% of patients undergoing surgical neck dissection will experience an ischemic stroke in the following 30 days. This incidence of stroke is similar to thoracic surgery and colectomy. PMID:26287406

  3. The pros and cons of prophylactic central neck dissection in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Anthony R.; Gundara, Justin S.; Norlén, Olov; Lee, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) for management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is controversial. Compared to many malignancies, PTC has a high overall survival but local recurrence due to lymph node metastases continue to present management challenges. Unlike lateral cervical nodal metastasis metastasis, central neck nodal metastasis are unable to be reliably detected clinically or radiologically at pre-operative assessment. Residual disease (recurrent or persistent) typically requires re-operative surgery in the central compartment, which carries a heightened risk of significant morbidity. These nodal groups can be accessed during the index thyroidectomy for PTC. Thus, pCND offers potential to reduce the rates of recurrence and the need for re-operative surgery in the central neck. This benefit needs to be balanced with the potential morbidity risk from pCND itself at the index resection. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pCND with regard to long-term outcomes and potential morbidity. The rationale of pCND will be discussed, along with the indications for ipsilateral and contralateral pCND, the role of re-operative surgery for recurrence and the use of selective versus routine pCND. Strategies to select higher risk patients for pCND with the use of molecular markers will be addressed, along with a discussion of quality of life (QoL) research in PTC. PMID:25083483

  4. Level IIB Neck Dissection in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Science or Myth?

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Yasmine; Akrish, Sharon; Abd-Elraziq, Morad; El-Naaj, Imad Abu

    2016-06-01

    Selective neck dissection enables us to reduce the morbidity of neck dissection while maintaining the same oncological results, mainly in clinically negative neck N0. The most common morbidity associated with selective neck dissection is spinal accessory nerve dysfunction and related shoulder disability, which are encountered during dissection of level IIB.The aim of authors' study is to evaluate the incidence of sublevel IIB lymphatic metastasis in clinically N0 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients.The study group comprised 48 men (68%) and 22 women (32%). The median number of the lymph nodes removed from level IIB was 6.5. All the investigated necks were clinically classified as N0, of which 14 (20%) turned out to have an occult nodal metastasis, including only 1 patient (1.42%) of level IIB occult metastasis, which originated from the primary tumor located in the tongue and also metastasized to level IIA. The most associated morbidity was shoulder pain and dysfunction, which presented in 60% of the patients.Also, an electronic search was conducted to find relevant studies investigating the prevalence of level IIB metastasis in OSCC. Ten studies were included for full text review, including the current study. The overall incidence of level IIB metastasis is 4% (17 patients); of these 17 patients, only 4 patients had isolated level IIB nodal metastases (2%).To conclude, neck dissecting, including dissecting level IIB, remains the keystone of treating OSCC. Its prognostic and therapeutic value exceeds its associated morbidity; therefore, dissecting level IIB is recommended in treating OSCC in clinically N0 patients. PMID:27171965

  5. Alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation into neck-related muscles after neck dissection for patients with oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Oda, Masafumi; Matsuo, Kou; Nishino, Takanobu; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Uehara, Masataka; Yoshiga, Daigo; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Nishimura, Shun; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) accumulations are commonly seen in the neck-related muscles of the surgical and non-surgical sides after surgery with neck dissection (ND) for oral cancers, which leads to radiologists having difficulty in diagnosing the lesions. To examine the alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation in neck-related muscles of patients after ND for oral cancer. Material and Methods 18F-FDG accumulations on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in neck-related muscles were retrospectively analyzed after surgical dissection of cervical lymph nodes in oral cancers. Results According to the extent of ND of cervical lymph nodes, the rate of patients with 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas increased in the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and posterior neck muscles of the surgical and/or non-surgical sides. In addition, SUVmax of 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were increased according to the extent of the ND. Conclusions In evaluating 18F-FDG accumulations after ND for oral cancers, we should pay attention to the 18F-FDG distributions in neck-related muscles including the non-surgical side as false-positive findings. Key words:18F-FDG, PET-CT, oral cancers, muscles. PMID:27031062

  6. H incision--method of choice for radical neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Kambic, V; Sĭrca, A

    1977-05-01

    To prevent skin necrosis, fistula formation and rupture of the carotid arteries after RND, vascularization of the skin of the neck has been considered. The neck vessels (in cadavers) were injected with coloured media and specimens of the skin were cleared (Spalteholz method). The arteries supplying the skin of the neck followed in general an obviously longitudinal course: one group of cutaneous arteries descending from the branches of the external carotid; another group ascending from the branches of the subclavian artery. The upper and lower groups of arteries joined approximately in the middle of the neck. The density of cutaneous arteries in the neck was much poorer than in the facial skin. On the basis of these anatomic data, an incision for RND has been proposed in the form of an H or three-quarter H, in which the transverse line of the incision follows the least vascularized skin region of the neck, without interrupting the great skin vessels. Incisions in the form of a Z or a double Y, OR McFee's incision, do not fulfil this requirement. The authors also report the results of wound healing after RND in 184 patients who were operated in the period fron 1968 to 1975 at the E. N. T. clinic of Ljubljana, where the H incision or one of its modifications was used. PMID:864314

  7. Neck dissection for oral squamous cell carcinoma: our experience and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article describes our experience with neck dissection in 10 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods Between January 2007 and October 2009, 10 patients underwent primary surgery for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. For patients with N0 disease on clinical exam, selective neck dissection (SND [I-III]) was performed. In patients with palpable cervical metastases (N+), modified radical neck dissections were performed, except in one patient in whom SND (I-III) was performed. The histopathologic reports were reviewed to assess the surgical margins, the presence of extra-capsular spread, perineural invasion, and lymphatic invasion. Results On histopathologic examination, positive soft tissue margins were found in three patients, and regional lymph node metastases were present in five of the ten patients. Perineural invasion was noted in five patients, and extra nodal spread was found in four patients. Regional recurrence was seen in two patients and loco-regional recurrence plus distant metastasis to the tibia was observed in one patient. During the study period, three patients died. Seven patients remain free of disease to date. Conclusion Histopathological evaluation provides important and reliable information for disease staging, treatment planning, and prognosis. The philosophy of neck dissection is evolving rapidly with regard to the selectivity with which at-risk lymph node groups are removed. The sample size in the present study is small, thus, caution should be employed when interpreting these results. PMID:26734556

  8. Outcomes for patients with papillary thyroid cancer who do not undergo prophylactic central neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, I. J.; Wang, L. Y.; Ganly, I.; Patel, S. G.; Morris, L. G.; Migliacci, J. C.; Tuttle, R. M.; Shah, J. P.; Shaha, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in the management of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is controversial. This report describes outcomes of an observational approach in patients without clinical evidence of nodal disease in PTC. Methods All patients who had surgery between 1986 and 2010 without CND for PTC were identified. All patients had careful clinical assessment of the central neck during preoperative and perioperative evaluation, with any suspicious nodal tissue excised for analysis. The cohort included patients in whom lymph nodes had been removed, but no patient had undergone a formal neck dissection. Recurrence-free survival (RFS), central neck RFS and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Of 1798 patients, 397 (22·1 per cent) were men, 1088 (60·5 per cent) were aged 45 years or more, and 539 (30·0 per cent) had pT3 or pT4 disease. Some 742 patients (41·3 per cent) received adjuvant treatment with radioactive iodine. At a median follow-up of 46 months the 5-year DSS rate was 100 per cent. Five-year RFS and central neck RFS rates were 96·6 and 99·1 per cent respectively. Conclusion Observation of the central neck is safe and should be recommended for all patients with PTC considered before and during surgery to be free of central neck metastasis. PMID:26511531

  9. Cortex-sparing infarction in triple cervical artery dissection following chiropractic neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Melikyan, Gayane; Kamran, Saadat; Akhtar, Naveed; Deleu, Dirk; Miyares, Francisco Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multivessel cervical dissection with cortical sparing is exceptional in clinical practice. Case presentation: A 55-year-old man presented with acute-onset neck pain with associated sudden onset right-sided hemiparesis and dysphasia after chiropractic manipulation for chronic neck pain. Results and Discussion: Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral internal carotid artery dissection and left extracranial vertebral artery dissection with bilateral anterior cerebral artery territory infarctions and large cortical-sparing left middle cerebral artery infarction. This suggests the presence of functionally patent and interconnecting leptomeningeal anastomoses between cerebral arteries, which may provide sufficient blood flow to salvage penumbral regions when a supplying artery is occluded. Conclusion: Chiropractic cervical manipulation can result in catastrophic vascular lesions preventable if these practices are limited to highly specialized personnel under very specific situations. PMID:26835412

  10. Oncological and surgical outcome of total laryngectomy in combination with neck dissection in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Bohne, Franziska; Kissing, Lena; Daniel, Hanna; Kurt, Bilgen; Wilhelm, Thomas; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Hoch, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    There are controversial data on oncological and surgical outcome after major head and neck cancer surgery in the elderly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of elderly cancer patients after total laryngectomy in combination with neck dissection. A total of 58 patients separated into two age groups (28 < 65 vs. 30 ≥ 65 years) with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer who underwent total laryngectomy and neck dissection were enrolled. Comorbidities of both age groups using the Charlson comorbidity index, hospitalization days as well as surgical complications evaluated by the Clavien-Dindo classification were examined. Overall and disease-free survivals of all patients were analyzed. The average follow-up was 2.9 years. Surgical complication rate was significantly increased in elderly (p = 0.04). However, complications could be treated without surgical intervention in most cases without significant extension of hospitalization. Locoregional and distant control did not significantly differ in both age groups. Disease-free and overall survival showed no significant differences for the two age groups by the Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.66 and 0.08, respectively). Total laryngectomy in combination with neck dissection can be considered in elderly patients with satisfactory oncological and surgical outcome. PMID:26972426

  11. Submandibular gland mucocele presenting as a lateral neck swelling.

    PubMed

    Felstead, Am; Patel, Pm; Revington, Pj

    2012-01-01

    Mucus extravasation cysts or mucoceles are an extremely rare occurrence in the major salivary glands. We report upon an unusual case of a submandibular gland mucocele presenting as a neck lump. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of swellings in the lateral neck. Diagnosis and management are complicated by their similarity to the plunging or cervical ranula and differentiation may be potentially difficult. Detailed imaging often reveals the plunging ranula as being characterised by a so -called 'tail' sign. In our case this sign was absent and subsequent excision confirmed origin from the submandibular gland. We discuss potential treatment modalities and propose a rationale for definitive management. PMID:24960677

  12. Technical hints and potential pitfalls in modified radical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leyre; Sancho, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Modified radical neck dissection (MRND) is often performed in conjunction with total thyroidectomy for the management of thyroid cancer. Prevention of postoperative sequelae after MRND is closely dependent on the avoidance of technical mistakes that may lead to significant complications and long-term morbidity. A thorough technical discussion with emphasis on potential pitfalls is made of the most relevant steps of MRND using the extrafascial approach: fascial dissection, approach to the accessory nerve, posterior limits, upper internal jugular vein (IJV), transverse cervical vessels, thoracic duct and compartment V dissection. Some anatomical hints are emphasized to help the novice surgeon to develop a refined surgical technique, the key to an uneventful postoperative course. PMID:25083480

  13. The pros and cons of routine central compartment neck dissection for clinically nodal negative (cN0) papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ai Chen; Wong, Kai Pun

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic disease to regional lymph nodes (LNs) is common in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). LN dissection is increasingly performed as part of the surgical management of PTC. The role of prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) in PTC is unclear. There is limited evidence to support a routine pCND in clinical setting for nodal negative (cN0) PTC. The aim of this review was to examine the pros and cons of prophylactic neck dissection in cN0 PTC. In summary, the advantages of pCND are: removal of the central LNs that potentially harbor micro-metastases, more accurate staging of disease in order to plan more individualized management, reducing the need for re-operation to remove the metastatic LNs which have developed later and possible improvement in overall survival. The disadvantages are: an extensive surgery but lack of evidence of survival benefit, higher incidence of complications with little impact on local recurrence rate, possibility of over treating in cN0 patients and it does not sound like a cost effective approach in the management of small thyroid cancer. Considering low frequency of permanent morbidity, some authors believe that prophylactic neck dissection is safe in experienced hands even though its prognostic benefit has yet to be demonstrated. PMID:25083482

  14. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in aspirative drains after neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Mastronicola, R; Berteau, C; Tu, Q; Cortese, S; Guillet, J; Phulpin, B; Gangloff, P; Bezdetnaya, L; Merlin, J-L; Faure, G; Dolivet, G

    2016-02-01

    The dissemination of individual tumor cells is a common phenomenon in solid cancers. Detection of tumor cells in bone marrow disseminated tumor cells (DTC) and in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells (CTC) in nonmetastatic situation is of high prognostic significance. Compared to breast, colon and prostate cancers, the studies on CTC and DTC in head and neck cancers are sparse. The objective of our study was to detect DTC in drains after neck dissection. Fourteen patients undergoing surgery for stages III and IV head and neck cancers were enrolled in this study--twelve presenting with squamous cell carcinoma and two with adenocarcinoma. Redon drain analysis was performed by the Cellsearch method using immunomagnetic and fluorescence approaches. A positivity threshold value was set at 2DTC/7.5 ml of the sample. Tumor cells were detected in drains of 69 % of patients a few days after surgery. The range of quantification was 3-2,094 DTC/5 ml and we showed morphological differences between the two types of carcinoma cells. DTC were detected after neck dissection both in squamous cell carcinoma and in adenocarcinoma. Potential clinical significance of tumor cells needs to be further investigated as their presence could affect pre-surgical and post-operative treatments. PMID:25634063

  15. Transaxillary single-incision robotic neck dissection for metastatic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In head and neck area, neck dissection (ND) is one of the most complex and precision-needed procedure. The long cervical scar and post-operative neck discomfort have been also inevitable brands after this procedure. Heretofore, few dare to try endoscopic surgical technique to the ND mainly due to its complexity and jeopardy of complication. Although, there have been several reports about the endoscopic approaches for functional ND or ND, they had so many technical and instrumental limitations. The dexterities of the surgical robotics have advanced the techniques of endoscopic surgery, and have facilitated the most precise and delicate endoscopic surgical procedure in head and neck area. The technical feasibility and early surgical outcomes of robotic ND using the transaxillary approach for the management of metastatic thyroid cancer have already been reported as satisfactory. Robotic ND can allow complete compartment-oriented lymph node (LN) dissection without any fatal complications, or compromising oncologic principles. We previously described a novel method of robotic thyroidectomy with ND using a gasless transaxillary approach for metastatic thyroid cancer, and here, we firstly introduce a less invasive robotic procedure which has been modified from the original one, which we refer to as the transaxillary single-incision robotic ND. PMID:26425451

  16. Effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Rahamthulla, S. A. K. Uroof; Priya, P. Vani; Hussain, S. M. D. Javeed; Nasyam, Fazil Arshad; Akifuddin, Syed; Srinivas, Velpula Sasidhar

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of gingivobuccal mucosa of oral cavity with clinically N0 neck, conducted over a period of 2 years from July 2007 to Oct 2009 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Narayana Dental College and Hospital. The study was conducted in patients irrespective of age, sex, size, thickness, and type of differentiation of the lesion. All patients have clinically non-palpable lymphnodes (N0 neck), while patients with palpable lymphnodes, patients with previous surgery, and patients with previous radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Results: Level I was the commonest site of neck metastasis in our study. Among the five patients, two (40%) patients (case 2 and 3) had occult cervical metastasis (level IB nodes are histopathologically positive nodes) and the remaining three patients (60%) had no occult cervical metastasis. The recurrence rate was 20% for patients who received postoperative radiotherapy. There was no morbidity and postoperative dysfunction and the mortality rate was only 20% in our study. Conclusion: Supraomohyoid neck dissection is the therapeutic procedure in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus of mandible. Supraomohyoid neck dissection, when indicated, contributes to the concept of less-invasive surgery and offers functional and aesthetic advantages without compromising the clearance with minimal morbidity. PMID:25992339

  17. Fracture of the clavicle following radical neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy: a case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Bushey, M.J.; Chung, C.; Baum, S.

    1982-11-01

    The treatment of head and neck cancer with radiotherapy and radical neck dissection has many recognized complications. Radiotherapy in therapeutic doses can produce devascularization and weakening of bone. Radical neck dissection results in altered mechanics of the shoulder girdle and a disruption of normally balanced forces acting on the clavicle. An unusual case of clavicle fracture which is considered to have resulted from an interaction of the effects of these therapies is discussed. An approach for recognizing and distinguishing this entity by its time course, and radiographic and nuclide bone scan appearance is presented.

  18. (Chemo)radiotherapy after laser microsurgery and selective neck dissection for pN2 head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Ihler, Friedrich; Zeller, Nina; Welz, Christian; Jung, Klaus; Canis, Martin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed the efficacy of transoral laser microsurgery and postoperative (chemo) radiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Between 1987 and 2007, 318 patients with pN2 neck disease were included. Seventy-three patients received laser resection and neck dissection alone, 154 postoperative radiotherapy, and 91 postoperative (C)RT. Mean follow-up was 58.2 ± 51.2 months, and locoregional control was significantly better after postoperative (C)RT (surgery alone: 42 %, radiotherapy: 57 %, CRT: 59 %; p < 0.01). Postoperative (C)RT did not have a significant impact on disease-specific survival (DSS) (surgery alone: 55 %, radiotherapy alone: 60 %, CRT: 64 %; p = 0.36). Fifty-seven patients (17.92 %) developed distant metastases, and 39 patients (12.26 %) presented with secondary malignancies, with no significant differences found between the treatment groups. Postoperative (C)RT significantly improved locoregional control, but had no significant effect on DSS because of high rates of secondary malignancies and distant metastases. Reduced radicality in combination with an effective screening might improve prognosis and quality of life of these patients. PMID:25864181

  19. A pain in the neck: carotid artery dissection presenting as vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Collamer, Angelique N; Battafarano, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissection is increasingly recognized as a common cause of ischemic stroke in the young and middle-aged. Noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography have widely replaced conventional angiography as the initial diagnostic study of extracranial dissections, allowing greater numbers of patients to be screened and thus leading to increased frequency of the diagnosis. We present a case of spontaneous carotid artery dissection in a previously healthy 48-year-old woman who presented with neck pain and elevated inflammatory markers. Marked gadolinium enhancement of the right extracranial internal carotid artery on magnetic resonance imaging led to an initial diagnosis of vasculitis. This case shows that the vessel injury associated with spontaneous carotid artery dissection is associated with an inflammatory response that can mimic vasculitis on highly sensitive imaging techniques, a phenomenon not well described previously. In this report, we review the nonvasculitic conditions that can mimic vasculitis and present clinicians complex diagnostic challenges. Recognition of these pseudovasculitic syndromes is important to avoid overdiagnosis resulting in unnecessary and potentially harmful immunosuppressive and cytotoxic treatments. PMID:23820364

  20. Unexpected Delayed Colon Perforation after the Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection with Snaring of a Laterally Spreading Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Bo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Wan Soo; Kwak, Min Seob; Lee, Ji Wan; Shin, Dong Yeol; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Colonic perforation may occur as a complication of diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy. The risk factors for perforation after colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) include an inexperienced endoscopist, a large tumor size, and submucosal fibrosis. The mechanisms of perforation include unintended endoscopic resection/dissection and severe thermal injury. Here, we report a case of colon perforation that occurred after ESD with snaring of a laterally spreading tumor. The perforation was completely unexpected because there were no colorectal ESD-associated risk factors for perforation, deep dissection, or severe coagulation injury in our patient. PMID:26668808

  1. Evaluation of perception performance in neck dissection planning using eye tracking and attention landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgert, Oliver; Örn, Veronika; Velichkovsky, Boris M.; Gessat, Michael; Joos, Markus; Strauß, Gero; Tietjen, Christian; Preim, Bernhard; Hertel, Ilka

    2007-03-01

    Neck dissection is a surgical intervention at which cervical lymph node metastases are removed. Accurate surgical planning is of high importance because wrong judgment of the situation causes severe harm for the patient. Diagnostic perception of radiological images by a surgeon is an acquired skill that can be enhanced by training and experience. To improve accuracy in detecting pathological lymph nodes by newcomers and less experienced professionals, it is essential to understand how surgical experts solve relevant visual and recognition tasks. By using eye tracking and especially the newly-developed attention landscapes visualizations, it could be determined whether visualization options, for example 3D models instead of CT data, help in increasing accuracy and speed of neck dissection planning. Thirteen ORL surgeons with different levels of expertise participated in this study. They inspected different visualizations of 3D models and original CT datasets of patients. Among others, we used scanpath analysis and attention landscapes to interpret the inspection strategies. It was possible to distinguish different patterns of visual exploratory activity. The experienced surgeons exhibited a higher concentration of attention on the limited number of areas of interest and demonstrated less saccadic eye movements indicating a better orientation.

  2. Sublingual-plunging ranula as a complication of supraomohyoid neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Eva-Maria; Vasilios, Banikas; Maria, Lazaridou; Styliani, Papaemmanouil; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2011-01-01

    Ranulas are rare cystic lesions resulting from damage or rupture of one or more of the ducts of the sublingual gland, that lead to mucus extravasation or dilatation of the gland's duct. Extravasation cysts are more common than retention cysts. We present a case of a 45-year-old male with a squamous cell carcinoma of the ventral surface of the tongue that was treated with excision of the oral lesion and bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection without supplementary radiotherapy. A left myocutaneous platysma flap was raised for defect closure. Ten months postoperatively he presented complaining of swelling of the right submandibular region. The diagnosis, based on his medical anamnesis and the CT imaging, was a sublingual-plunging ranula. It is postulated that the ranula resulted from damage to the ducts of the sublingual gland during selective neck dissection. One year postoperatively there are no signs of recurrence either of the ranula or of the cancer. We suggest that sublingual gland excision and intraoral cyst marsupialization is a logical treatment for sublingual-plunging ranulas. PMID:22096692

  3. Effect of clinical symptoms on the indication for selective neck dissection for N0 carcinomas of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mariko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishio, Naoki; Shimono, Mariko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-07-01

    Lymph node metastasis is a major prognostic factor in parotid carcinoma, however, the pre-operative diagnosis of occult nodal metastasis is difficult in clinical N0 (cN0) parotid cancer patients. In addition, the indication of neck dissection in T1-3 cN0 patients is controversial. The current study investigated 17 patients with clinical T1-3 cN0 parotid cancer, and analyzed the correlation between patient symptoms/findings and pathological N status/tumor histological grade. In the statistical analysis, pain was found to significantly correlate with neck metastasis. Furthermore, cN0-staged patients without pain exhibited no neck metastasis. However, no significant correlation was identified between patient symptoms or findings and histological grade. These results indicate the possibility that selective neck dissection can be omitted for T1-3 cN0-staged patients without pain. PMID:24959272

  4. Impact of prophylactic central neck dissection on oncologic outcomes of papillary thyroid carcinoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mamelle, Elisabeth; Borget, Isabelle; Leboulleux, Sophie; Mirghani, Haïtham; Suárez, Carlos; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Hamoir, Marc; Robbins, K. Thomas; Khafif, Avi; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Silver, Carl E.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio; Hartl, Dana M.

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic neck dissection (PND) for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is controversial. Our aim was to assess current levels of evidence (LE) according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (http://www.cebm.net/?O=1025) regarding the oncologic benefits of PND. Data were analyzed via MEDLINE key-words: PTC, differentiated thyroid carcinoma, PND, central lymph node metastases, central compartment, recurrence-free survival. There was conflicting evidence regarding the rate of reoperation for recurrence, with some studies showing a lower rate after PND with increased recurrence-free survival and a higher rate of undetectable pre- and post-ablation thyroglobulin levels (LE 4), whereas other studies did not show a difference (LE 4). Only one study (LE 4) showed improved disease-specific survival with PND. PND may improve recurrence-free survival, although this is supported by only a low LE. Current recommendations can only be based on low-level evidence. PMID:25022716

  5. Total thyroidectomy without prophylactic central neck dissection in clinically node-negative papillary thyroid cancer: is it an adequate treatment?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical lymph node metastases in papillary thyroid cancer are common. Although central neck dissection is indicated in clinically nodal-positive disease, it remains controversial in patients with no clinical evidence of nodal metastasis. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the outcomes of clinically lymph node-negative patients with papillary thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy without a central neck dissection, in order to determine the rates of recurrence and reoperation in these patients compared with a group of patients submitted to total thyroidectomy with central neck dissection. Methods Two-hundred and eighty-five patients undergoing total thyroidectomy with preoperative diagnosis of papillary thyroid cancer, in the absence of suspicious nodes, were divided in two groups: those who underwent a thyroidectomy only (group A; n = 220) and those who also received a central neck dissection (group B; n = 65). Results Six cases (2.1%) of nodal recurrence were observed: 4 in group A and 2 in group B. Tumor histology was associated with risk of recurrence: Hürthle cell-variant and tall cell-variant carcinomas were associated with a high risk of recurrence. Multifocality and extrathyroidal invasion also presented a higher risk, while smaller tumors were at lower risk. Conclusions The role of prophylactic central lymph node dissection in the management of papillary thyroid cancer remains controversial. Total thyroidectomy appears to be an adequate treatment for clinically node-negative papillary thyroid cancer. Prophylactic central neck dissection could be considered for the more appropriate selection of patients for radioiodine treatment and should be reserved for high-risk patients only. No clinical or pathological factors are able to predict with any certainty the presence of nodal metastasis. In our experience, tumor size, some histological types, multifocality, and locoregional infiltration are related to an

  6. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  7. The Role of Prophylactic Central Neck Dissection in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Issues and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kai-Pun; Lang, Brian Hung-Hin

    2011-01-01

    Prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is one of the most controversial surgical subjects in recent times. To date, there is little evidence to support the practice of pCND in patients with DTC undergoing total thyroidectomy. Although the recently revised American Thyroid Association (ATA) guideline has clarified many inconsistencies regarding pCND and has recommended pCND in “high-risk” patients, many issues and controversies surrounding the subject of pCND in DTC remain. The recent literature has revealed an insignificant trend toward lower recurrence rate in patients with DTC who undergo total thyroidectomy and pCND than those who undergo total thyroidectomy alone. However, this was subjected to biases, and there are concerns whether pCND should be performed by all surgeons who manage DTC because of increased surgical morbodity. Performing a unilateral pCND may be better than a bilateral pCND given its lower surgical morbidity. Further studies in this controversial subject are much needed. PMID:21977029

  8. Neurovascular bundle dissection for Nesbit procedure in congenital penile curvature patients: medial or lateral?

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Akman, Tolga; Salabas, Emre; Dincer, Murat; Ortac, Mazhar; Kadioglu, Ates

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of the modified Nesbit procedure using different techniques for dissecting the neurovascular bundle (NVB) to correct ventral congenital penile curvatures (CPCs). The bundle was mobilized using the medial and lateral dissection technique in 21 (Group 1) and 13 (Group 2) patients, respectively. In the medial technique, Buck's fascia is opened at the dorsal side of the penis, the deep dorsal vein is removed at the most prominent site of the curvature and a diamond-shaped tunica albuginea (TA) is excised from the midline of the penis. In the lateral technique, the bundle is mobilized using a longitudinal lateral incision of the Buck's fascia above the urethra at the 5 and 7 o'clock positions via a bilateral approach. The localization and degree of curvature was evaluated using the combined intracavernous injection stimulation test or from the patients' photographs. The mean patient age and degree of curvature were similar between groups. The mean operation time was longer for Group 2 (P = 0.01). In Group 1, nine patients (42.8%) required one diamond excision, 10 (47.6%) required two diamond excisions and two (9.5%) required more than two excisions; in Group 2, six patients (46.2%) required two diamond excisions and seven patients (53.8%) required more than two diamond excisions (P = 0.019). The differences in penile shortening, penile straightening and numbness of the glans penis were not statistically significant. Medial dissection of the bundle for the modified Nesbit procedure reduces the number of diamond-shaped removals of TA and thus shortens operation time in comparison with its lateral counterpart. PMID:24625879

  9. [The role definition of lateral arm free flap in reconstruction after head and neck cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cai, Y C; Wang, W; He, Y X; Lan, X J; Li, Q L; Zhou, Y Q; Liu, J F; Zhu, G Q; Liu, K; Wang, S X; Wang, K; Fan, J C; Sun, R H

    2016-02-01

    Application of free flap is one of the important repair means in head and neck surgery. A variety of free flaps, such as anterolateral thigh flap, have showed unique advantages in repair for tissue defects after resection of head and neck tumor, and have became increasing popularity. Lateral arm flee flap is an important repair means in plastic surgery, which has developed more than 30 years, but the application of this flap for reconstruction in head and neck surgery is relatively backward, with few reports. This review focuses on the creativity and innovation, the relationship between anatomy and clinical application, and the application status and prospects for lateral arm flee flap in individual head and neck reconstruction surgery. PMID:26898882

  10. Extrathyroid carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE): a new case report and review of the therapeutic role of neck dissection and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyu Young; Kwon, Mi Jung; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jin Hwan; Lee, Dong Jin

    2014-01-01

    We present here a case of extrathyroid CASTLE (the third case reported in the English literature) treated with excision and neck dissection without radiotherapy. Also, we reviewed the literature and analyzed the therapeutic results of each treatment modality for CASTLE. A 27-year-old male had initially presented with a painless, right neck mass for 2 months. Computed tomography of the neck showed a 3.8 × 3.2 × 3.8 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass at right level IIa, and no definite thyroid lesion was found. An excisional biopsy was done and the pathologic diagnosis was CASTLE. Then we performed a right modified radical neck dissection and right thyroid lobectomy. After three years, no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted. Total excision followed by neck dissection could be a sufficient surgical treatment option for CASTLE. Postoperative radiotherapy might be an alternative treatment option for neck dissection in patients with positive nodal status. PMID:25086818

  11. Dissecting firearm injury to the head and neck with non-linear bullet trajectory: a case report.

    PubMed

    Can, Muhammet; Yildirim, Nadir; Ataç, Gökçe Kaan

    2010-04-15

    Firearm injuries to the head and neck have a potential for fatal complications caused by damage to neurovascular structures in the region. We herewith present a case of a missile injury to the face, caused by a bullet from a rifle with high muzzle energy that slackened while penetrating a vehicle before hitting the victim. The bullet advanced through the retrofacial spaces following a non-linear course and was retained within the opposite parapharyngeal region without injuring any vital structure. The resultant damage was a 'low-velocity injury'. However, it is noteworthy that the missile had still retained enough energy to penetrate the tissue and travel in a 'dissecting' fashion. It is likely that the blunting of the missile during vehicle penetration and the compactness of the anatomical structures bordering the head and neck spaces, such as fascia and tendons, forced the projectile to follow a non-linear inter-structural path. This case yet again demonstrates that the magnitude of firearm-related tissue damage may also depend upon the shape of the projectile and confirms that the head and neck spaces have anatomical integrity rather than just being arbitrarily designated topographical areas. It has also been confirmed that non-surgical approach with regular follow-ups is a viable option for uncomplicated head and neck injuries. PMID:20106613

  12. Dissection Dissected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, William

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of dissection in science courses, examining essential lessons students can learn (such as developing an abiding respect for all forms of life, including the animal being dissected). Also presents a list of tips related to classroom dissection and comments on formaldehyde and formalin substitutes. (JN)

  13. THERAPY OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Central neck dissection: a step forward in the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sitges-Serra, Antonio; Lorente, Leyre; Mateu, Germán; Sancho, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    Since its introduction in the '70s and '80s, CND for papillary cancer is here to stay. Compartment VI should always be explored during surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) for obvious lymph node metastases. These can be easily spotted by an experienced surgeon or, eventually, by frozen section. No doubt, obvious nodal disease in the Delphian, paratracheal and subithsmic areas should be dissected in a comprehensive manner (therapeutic central neck dissection), avoiding the selective removal of suspicious nodes. Available evidence for routine prophylactic CND is not completely satisfactory. Our group's opinion, however, is that it reduces or even eliminates the need for repeat surgery in the central neck, better defines the extent (and stage) of the disease and provides a further argument against routine radioiodine ablation. Thus, PTC is becoming more and more a surgical disease that can be cured by optimized surgery alone in the majority of cases. Prophylactic CND, however, involves a higher risk for the parathyroid function and should be skilfully performed, preferably only on the same side as the primary tumour and preserving the cervical portion of the thymus. PMID:26088823

  14. Visible Perforating Lateral Osteotomy: Internal Perforating Technique with Wide Periosteal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Rho, Bong Il; Lee, In Ho; Park, Eun Soo

    2016-01-01

    There are two general categories of lateral osteotomy techniques-the external perforating method and the internal continuous method. Regardless of which technique is used, procedural effectiveness is hampered by limited visualization in the surgical field. Considering this point, we devised a new technique that involves using a wide subperiosteal dissection and internal perforation under direct visualization. Using an intranasal approach, whereby the visibility of the intended fracture line was maintained, enabled a greater degree of control, and in turn, results that were more precise, and thus predictable and reproducible. Traditionally, it has been taken as dogma that the periosteum must be preserved, considering the potential for dead space and bony instability; however, under sufficient visualization of the surgical field with an internal perforating method, complete osteotomy with fully preserved intranasal mucosa could be conducted exactly as intended. This intact mucosal lining compensates for the elevated periosteum. Compressive dressing and drainage through a Silastic angio-needle catheter enabled the elimination of dead space. Therefore, precise, reproducible, and predictable osteotomy minimizing the potential for associated complications such as ecchymosis, that is, bruising owing to hemorrhage, could be performed. In this article, we introduce a novel technique for lateral osteotomy with improved visualization. PMID:26848452

  15. Visible Perforating Lateral Osteotomy: Internal Perforating Technique with Wide Periosteal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Bong Il; Lee, In Ho

    2016-01-01

    There are two general categories of lateral osteotomy techniques—the external perforating method and the internal continuous method. Regardless of which technique is used, procedural effectiveness is hampered by limited visualization in the surgical field. Considering this point, we devised a new technique that involves using a wide subperiosteal dissection and internal perforation under direct visualization. Using an intranasal approach, whereby the visibility of the intended fracture line was maintained, enabled a greater degree of control, and in turn, results that were more precise, and thus predictable and reproducible. Traditionally, it has been taken as dogma that the periosteum must be preserved, considering the potential for dead space and bony instability; however, under sufficient visualization of the surgical field with an internal perforating method, complete osteotomy with fully preserved intranasal mucosa could be conducted exactly as intended. This intact mucosal lining compensates for the elevated periosteum. Compressive dressing and drainage through a Silastic angio-needle catheter enabled the elimination of dead space. Therefore, precise, reproducible, and predictable osteotomy minimizing the potential for associated complications such as ecchymosis, that is, bruising owing to hemorrhage, could be performed. In this article, we introduce a novel technique for lateral osteotomy with improved visualization. PMID:26848452

  16. Absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in a patient that underwent neck dissection for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Umeda, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Akiko; Shigeta, Takashi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Komori, Takahide

    2014-01-01

    The congenital absence of a skeletal muscle is a rare cause of congenital muscular torticollis, and the condition is associated with various unusual anatomical structures. We describe a rare case of congenital absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in a patient who underwent neck dissection. In this case, both the external jugular vein and the spinal accessory nerve were absent. However, we found that branches of the C3 nerve extended from the cervical plexus to the trapezius muscle and seemed to be acting as trapezius muscle motor nerves in place of the accessory nerve. After the operation, the patient was able to lift and abduct his right arm, and his shoulder did not droop. PMID:24854995

  17. Dissecting Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AV Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This journal features articles covering various aspects of dissection. "Biology--The Study of Life" (George Russell) offers students experiments that do not require using invasive procedures. "Animal Cruelty--Behind the Scenes" (Zoe Weil) describes sources of laboratory animals. "Doing without Dissection" (Juliana Texley) discusses objections over…

  18. Influence of head-down and lateral decubitus neck flexion on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Wood, R H; Welsch, M A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the response of heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive index of autonomic control, to head-down neck flexion (HDNF), which engages both otoliths and neck muscle afferents, and to lateral decubitus neck flexion (LNF), in which neck afferents are activated, whereas otolith afferent input is not. HRV and forearm blood flow were evaluated in participants lying prone, during HDNF, lying in the lateral decubitus position, and during LNF. Compared with the prone position, HDNF resulted in lower high-frequency (46.9 +/- 7.1 vs. 62.3 +/- 6.2) and higher low-frequency (53.1 +/- 7.1 vs. 37.7 +/- 6.2) power, expressed as normalized units, along with higher low-frequency-to-high-frequency ratio (1.65 +/- 0.3 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.2), whereas LNF resulted in no alterations in HRV indexes. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in forearm blood flow or vascular resistance among any of the positions. Our data suggest that otolith organs influence autonomic modulation of the heart, supporting previous studies reporting that HDNF elicits increased sympathetic outflow. These data further suggest that HDNF results in a parasympathetic withdrawal from the heart in addition to sympathetic activation. PMID:11133902

  19. Post-radiotherapy neck dissection improves control at non-regional disease sites after definitive chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Ranck, Mark C.; Abundo, Rainier; Jefferson, Gina; Kolokythas, Antonia; Wenig, Barry L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance After chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, over ninety percent of patients who achieved a complete response by imaging were regionally controlled without post-radiotherapy neck dissections (PRND). Since several groups have reported that lymph node involvement also predicted failure at both primary and distant sites, it remains unclear the extent to which PRND impacts non-regional sites of disease. Objective Here, we evaluated how PRND impacted local and distant control in patients who achieved a clinical complete response. Design We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for stage III/IV disease with definitive chemoradiation between 1990 to 2012. Setting University of Illinois at Chicago. Participants 287 patients were treated with definitive CRT, of whom seventy-four underwent PRND. Median follow up was 25.4 months. Interventions Chemoradiation followed by lymph node dissection or observation. Main Outcomes and Measures Endpoints evaluated included local control (LC), regional control (RC), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) using first-failure analysis. Results Patients with advanced nodal disease (≥N2b; n=176) had improved PFS (74.6% vs. 39.1%; P<.001) while patients with lesser nodal disease had similar PFS. For patients with advanced nodal disease, PRND improved 2-year LC (85.5 vs. 53.5%; p<.001), locoregional control with PRND (78.9% vs. 45.7%; P<.001), FFDM (79.5% vs. 67.5%%; P=.03) and OS (84.5% vs. 61.7%; P=.004) but not RC (96.9% vs. 90.1%; P=.21) The benefit in LC (87.4% vs. 66.2%; P=.02) and PFS (80.7% vs. 53.4%; P=.01) persisted for those with negative post-treatment imaging who underwent PRND. On univariate analysis, PRND, alcohol use, nodal stage and chemoradiation significantly impacted 2 year LC and/or PFS. On multivariate analysis, PRND remained strongly prognostic for 2 year LC (HR 0.22; P=.0007) and PFS (HR 0.42; P=.002). Conclusions and Relevance PRND improved

  20. Genetic dissections of partial resistances to leaf and neck blast in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Rao, Zhi-Ming; Wu, Jian-Li; Zhuang, Jie-Yun; Chai, Rong-Yao; Fan, Ye-Yang; Leung, Hei; Zheng, Kang-Le

    2005-06-01

    In a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of indica rice, two subpopulations composed of susceptible lines were selected for mapping of partial resistance to leaf blast with two isolates of the pathogen. A third subpopulation composed of susceptible lines with similar heading time was used for mapping of partial resistance to neck blast with a third isolate. The traits measured for partial resistance included diseased leaf area (DLA), lesion size (LS) and lesion number (LN) for leaf blast and lesion length (LL) and conidium amount (CA) for neck blast. A linkage map consisting of 168 DNA markers was constructed by using the whole RIL population. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conditioning these traits were determined at one-locus and two-locus levels. Eleven main-effect QTLs and 28 digenic interactions were detected by QTLMapper 1.01 b. Only three QTLs showing main effects were also involved in digenic interactions for the same trait. General contributions of epistatic QTLs of each trait ranged from 16.0% to 51.7%, while those of main-effect QTLs of each trait ranged from 4.7% to 38.8%. The general contributions of main-effect QTLs of most traits were smaller than those of epistatic QTLs, confirming the importance of epistasis as the genetic basis for complex traits. The general contributions of the main and epistatic effects of all QTLs detected for the two traits LL and CA of the partial resistance to neck blast reached 70.6% and 82.6% respectively, which obviously represented a major part of the genetic basis controlling partial resistance to neck blast. The results indicated the necessity for partial resistance mapping to use susceptible subpopulations where the interference of major resistance genes is avoided. PMID:16018181

  1. No benefit for regional control and survival by planned neck dissection in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer irrespective of p16 expression.

    PubMed

    Maquieira, R; Haerle, S K; Huber, G F; Soltermann, A; Haile, S R; Stoeckli, S J; Broglie, Martina A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess regional control and survival in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer patients with advanced neck disease (≥cN2a) receiving planned neck dissection (PND) irrespective of the nodal response compared to salvage neck dissection (SND) in case of regional persistence or reccurence in relation to tumoral p16 overexpression. 96 consecutive patients treated at the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland were included. Tissue microarray-based scoring of p16 expression was obtained. 5 years overall (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in the PND and SND cohort were 70 vs. 57 % (p = 0.20) and 80 vs. 65 % (p = 0.14), respectively. Regional control in PND and SND achieved 95 vs. 87 % (p = 0.29), respectively. There was no statistically significant impact of neck treatment (PND vs. SND) on regional control or survival among patients with p16-negative tumors (5 years OS 59 vs. 50 %, p = 0.66; 5 years DSS 59 vs. 57 %, p = 0.89) nor among patients with p16-positive tumors (5 years OS 84 vs. 67 %, p = 0.21; 5 years DSS 95 vs. 81 %, p = 0.24). The type of neck dissection after primary intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) had no impact on regional control and survival even in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease. Therefore we are convinced that based on the accuracy of newer diagnostic modalities the surveillance of a radiologically negative neck after primary chemoradiation (CRT) is oncologically safe irrespective of p16 expression of the tumor. PMID:26059208

  2. Lymph node status of lateral neck compartment in patients with N1b papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Min; Wang, Soo-Geun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, In-Ju; Son, Seok-Man; Lee, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Loco-regional recurrence-free survival was significantly decreased in the papillary thyroid cancer patients with > 6 metastatic lymph nodes and a lymph node ratio > 0.22. Also, the risk of lung metastasis was significantly increased in cases with bilateral neck node metastases. Objective This study focused on the metastatic lymph node status of the lateral neck compartment to understand its prognostic significance for loco-regional recurrence and distant metastasis. Methods Between January 2004 and December 2009, 1040 patients were diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer and underwent treatment. Results In a multivariate analysis, sex, the number of metastatic lymph nodes, and the lymph node ratio was significantly associated with loco-regional recurrence. The sensitivity/specificity of > 6 metastatic lymph nodes for predicting recurrence was 64.0%/69.7%. The 5-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival of patients with 0-6 metastatic lymph nodes and > 6 metastatic lymph nodes were 93.4% and 79.2%, respectively. The 5-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival of patients with a lymph node ratio ≤ 0.22 and a lymph node ratio > 0.22 were 97.1% and 78.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, only bilateral neck node metastases were significantly associated with lung metastasis. PMID:26635131

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in preschool-aged Japanese children - efficiency of screening using lateral neck radiography.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Komada, Ichiro; Nishikawa, Michiko; Okawa, Masako; Koizumi, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Shoko; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in preschool-aged children diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) version 3 criteria was relatively higher than that diagnosed by ICSD-2. Although the assessment of the upper airway by lateral neck radiography was effective for detecting OSA in this age group, this assessment is not recommended for all children as a screening method because of parental concern related to radiation exposure. Objective This study investigated the prevalence of OSA and the screening capacity of lateral neck radiography in community-based preschool-aged children. Methods Parents of 211 children aged 3-6 years were requested to complete the sleep-related questionnaire. Subjects who agreed to further investigations were invited to undergo home type 3 portable monitoring and clinical examination, including radiography. We estimated the prevalence of OSA and evaluated the detection power of radiography for predicting OSA. Results One hundred and eighty-eight (89.1%) subjects completed the questionnaire and 67 (31.8%) agreed to further examinations. The weighted prevalence was 7.3% and 12.8% by ICSD-2 and 3, respectively. Area under the receiver operator curve for the adenoidal/nasopharyngeal and tonsil/pharyngeal ratios measured using radiography was slightly larger than that for tonsil size graded by visual inspection. PMID:26901288

  4. A Lateralized Odor Learning Model in Neonatal Rats for Dissecting Neural Circuitry Underpinning Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Gillian L.; Yuan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Rat pups during a critical postnatal period (≤ 10 days) readily form a preference for an odor that is associated with stimuli mimicking maternal care. Such a preference memory can last from hours, to days, even life-long, depending on training parameters. Early odor preference learning provides us with a model in which the critical changes for a natural form of learning occur in the olfactory circuitry. An additional feature that makes it a powerful tool for the analysis of memory processes is that early odor preference learning can be lateralized via single naris occlusion within the critical period. This is due to the lack of mature anterior commissural connections of the olfactory hemispheres at this early age. This work outlines behavioral protocols for lateralized odor learning using nose plugs. Acute, reversible naris occlusion minimizes tissue and neuronal damages associated with long-term occlusion and more aggressive methods such as cauterization. The lateralized odor learning model permits within-animal comparison, therefore greatly reducing variance compared to between-animal designs. This method has been used successfully to probe the circuit changes in the olfactory system produced by training. Future directions include exploring molecular underpinnings of odor memory using this lateralized learning model; and correlating physiological change with memory strength and durations. PMID:25177826

  5. Molecular dissection of the migrating posterior lateral line primordium during early development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Development of the posterior lateral line (PLL) system in zebrafish involves cell migration, proliferation and differentiation of mechanosensory cells. The PLL forms when cranial placodal cells delaminate and become a coherent, migratory primordium that traverses the length of the fish to form this sensory system. As it migrates, the primordium deposits groups of cells called neuromasts, the specialized organs that contain the mechanosensory hair cells. Therefore the primordium provides both a model for studying collective directional cell migration and the differentiation of sensory cells from multipotent progenitor cells. Results Through the combined use of transgenic fish, Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting and microarray analysis we identified a repertoire of key genes expressed in the migrating primordium and in differentiated neuromasts. We validated the specific expression in the primordium of a subset of the identified sequences by quantitative RT-PCR, and by in situ hybridization. We also show that interfering with the function of two genes, f11r and cd9b, defects in primordium migration are induced. Finally, pathway construction revealed functional relationships among the genes enriched in the migrating cell population. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that this is a robust approach to globally analyze tissue-specific expression and we predict that many of the genes identified in this study will show critical functions in developmental events involving collective cell migration and possibly in pathological situations such as tumor metastasis. PMID:21144052

  6. Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan; Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Rajkumar, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection, in context of rapid application, approximation of the skin edges, economy and aesthetics of the resultant scar. Aim: (1) To compare surgical stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary wound closure, with respect to presence/absence of wound infection and dehiscence (2) To compare the resultant scar following the two different methods of the closure at 3rd month postoperatively with the help of visual analog scale and analyze the result statistically Design: This study was designed to compare skin closure using staples and silk sutures in patients undergoing neck dissection, using both methods in one-half of the same wound; thus each wound affording its own control. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on patients requiring collar line incision (high submandibular incision) with or without a cephalad extension of midline lower lip split incision for surgical access, who presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery. (1) Sample size: 10 (2) Study design: Prospective Comparative study (3) Study duration: One and half years (4) Surgical stainless steel staples: Proximate Plus MD 35 W, Ethicon Endo Surgery (5) Sutures: 3–0 Ethiprime NW 5003, Non-Absorbable Surgical Suture, Mersilk-90 cm, Ethicon, (16 mm 3/8 circle cutting needle). Conclusion: It was concluded that there is no significant difference between the scars observed in the regions of incision which underwent primary closure by two different methods, that is surgical stainless steel staples and 3–0 Mersilk Sutures. PMID:25821376

  7. Chimeric lateral supramalleolar artery perforator fibula free flap in the reconstruction of composite head and neck defects.

    PubMed

    Massarelli, Olindo; Gobbi, Roberta; Biglio, Andrea; Soma, Damiano; Tullio, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The authors evaluate the use of an osteomyocutaneous fibula free flap, combined in a chimeric fashion, with a lateral supramalleolar flap, in 10 patients with composite head and neck defects. All reconstructions were performed successfully. With the exception of one patient who died after disease recurrence, all patients were decannulated and resumed an oral diet. Speech intelligibility was good in seven of 10 patients. Dental implants were used in two of 10 patients, with a total of 10 fixtures placed successfully. The donor site healed without complications in all except one case, where necrosis of the skin graft occurred with fungal infection. The chimeric lateral supramalleolar artery perforator fibula free flap may be a valid option for maximizing the quality of life in patients with composite oromandibular defects. PMID:24374672

  8. Effect of Octreotide Injection on Postoperative Drainage After Neck Dissection: A Preliminary Report of a Prospective, Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dongbin; Jeon, Jae Han; Kim, Heejin; Sohn, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Somatostatin inhibits lymph production and reduces lymph flow into the lymphatic duct. We hypothesized that octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analog, would reduce drainage after neck dissection (ND) by reducing the overall lymphatic flow in the neck as well as thoracic duct flow. Methods From 2012 to 2014, total 123 patients who had undergone left-sided comprehensive ND, were divided into an octreotide group (49 patients) and a control group (74 patients). Seventeen patients from the octreotide group and 17 from the control group were individually matched by age (±10 years), sex, body mass index (±1 kg/m2), type of cancer, surgeon, and the extent of surgery. These 34 patients were finally included in the study. Results The total fluid drainage volume (540.9 mL vs. 707.9 mL) and drainage volume during the period of octreotide use (the first 5 postoperative days) (461.1 mL vs. 676.4 mL) were significantly lower in the octreotide group. The duration of drain placement (6.3 days vs. 9.4 days) was also shorter in the octreotide group. In the octreotide group, the mean triglyceride concentration in the drainage fluid was significantly lower than that in the control group (43.1 mg/dL vs. 88.8 mg/dL). There was no complication associated with the use of octreotide. Conclusion Our study has shown that postoperative octreotide injections reduce postoperative drainage and the duration of drain placement. Further studies with larger patient populations are warranted to confirm these results and to evaluate the clinical benefits for patients. PMID:27090270

  9. Head and neck cancer specialist offers us wonderful support.

    PubMed

    Green, Kylee

    2016-08-31

    My husband Jerry was diagnosed with mouth cancer in January 2014 aged 45. A month later he went in for an operation and had a radical neck dissection. The floor of his mouth was replaced with skin from his forearm and part of his tongue was removed. PMID:27577315

  10. In (or outside of) your neck of the woods: laterality in spatial body representation

    PubMed Central

    Hach, Sylvia; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Beside language, space is to date the most widely recognized lateralized systems. For example, it has been shown that even mental representations of space and the spatial representation of abstract concepts display lateralized characteristics. For the most part, this body of literature describes space as distal or something outside of the observer or actor. What has been strangely absent in the literature on the whole and specifically in the spatial literature until recently is the most proximal space imaginable – the body. In this review, we will summarize three strands of literature showing laterality in body representations. First, evidence of hemispheric asymmetries in body space in health and, second in body space in disease will be examined. Third, studies pointing to differential contributions of the right and left hemisphere to illusory body (space) will be summarized. Together these studies show hemispheric asymmetries to be evident in body representations at the level of simple somatosensory and proprioceptive representations. We propose a novel working hypothesis, whereby neural systems dedicated to processing action-oriented information about one’s own body space may ontogenetically serve as a template for the perception of the external world. PMID:24600421

  11. Impact of Iymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND, we analysed data of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001–2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan– Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC. PMID:23132792

  12. Evaluating a novel cervical orthosis, the Sheffield Support Snood, in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease with neck weakness.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Susan; Reed, Heath; Clarke, Zoë; Judge, Simon; Heron, Nicola; Mccarthy, Avril; Langley, Joe; Stanton, Andrew; Wells, Oliver; Squire, Gill; Quinn, Ann; Strong, Mark; Shaw, Pamela J; Mcdermott, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Current practice and guidelines recommend the use of neck orthoses for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to compensate for neck weakness and to provide surrogate neck control. However, available options are frequently described by patients as restrictive and unsuitable and there was a need for a new device that addressed the needs of people with ALS. This project utilized a co-design process to develop a new neck orthosis that was more flexible yet supportive. Following development of a prototype device, a mixed methods cohort study was undertaken with patients and carers, in order to evaluate the new orthosis. Twenty-six patients were recruited to the study, with 20 of these completing all phases of data collection. Participants described the impact of neck weakness on their life and limitations of existing supports. Evaluation of the new orthosis identified key beneficial features: notably, increased support while providing a greater range of movement, flexibility of use, and improved appearance and comfort. In conclusion, the results of this evaluation highlight the value of this alternative option for people with ALS, and potentially other patient groups who require a neck orthosis. PMID:26915274

  13. Dissection of the extracranial vertebral artery: report of four cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Hinse, P; Thie, A; Lachenmayer, L

    1991-01-01

    Four cases of cervical vertebral artery (VA) dissection are reported. In three patients VA dissection was associated with neck trauma. All patients were young or middle-aged (range 27 to 49 years). In two there was a history of migraine. Pain preceded neurological symptoms from hours to six weeks. Three patients had neurological deficits including elements of the lateral medullary syndrome, and one experienced recurrent transient ischaemic attacks in the vertebrobasilar territory. Angiographic findings included irregular stenosis, occlusion and pseudoaneurysm; in two patients VA abnormalities were bilateral. All patients were treated with anticoagulants and improved. In a review of 28 cases with traumatic dissection and 29 cases with spontaneous dissection of the VA reported in the literature, distinct clinical and angiographic features emerge. Aetiology remains obscure in most cases of spontaneous dissection and management is still controversial. Images PMID:1744639

  14. Clinical Usefulness of [(18)F]Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Uptake in 178 Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients With Nodal Metastasis Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy: Consideration of Its Prognostic Value and Ability to Provide Guidance for Optimal Selection of Patients for Planned Neck Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuchi, Haruo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomita, Natsuo; Nakahara, Rie; Takada, Akinori; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of pretreatment [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with nodal metastasis treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2002 and December 2006, 178 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and nodal metastasis underwent fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography before chemoradiotherapy. Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake by both the primary lesion and the neck node was measured using the standard uptake value (SUV). The overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, nodal progression-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were calculated, and several prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: The patients with a nodal SUV {>=}6.00 had a significantly lower 3-year disease-free survival rate than those with a lower SUV (44% vs. 69%, p = .004). On multivariate analysis, a high SUV of nodal disease also proved to be a significantly unfavorable factor for disease-free survival (p = .04, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-3.23), nodal progression-free survival (p = .05; 95% CI, 1.00-4.15), and distant metastasis-free survival (p = .016; 95% CI, 1.25-8.92). Among the patients with a greater nodal SUV ({>=}6.00), those treated with planned neck dissection had better nodal progression-free survival than those in the observation group (p = .04, hazard ratio, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.00-5.85). Conclusion: Among head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, the pretreatment SUV of nodal disease was one of the strongest prognostic factors and also provided important information for the selection of patients suitable for planned neck dissection.

  15. Dissecting the Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hisham M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection remains one of the most devastating diseases. Current practice guidelines provide diagnostic and therapeutic interventions based primarily on the aortic diameter. The level of evidence supporting these recommendations is Level C or “Expert Opinion” Since aortic dissection is a catastrophic structural failure, its investigation along the guidelines of accident investigation may offer a useful alternative, utilizing process mapping and root-cause analysis methodology. Since the objective of practice guidelines is to address the risk of serious events, on the utilization of a probabilistic predictive modeling methodology, using bioinformatics tools, may offer a more comprehensive risk assessment. PMID:27069940

  16. Diagnosis of lateral pelvic lymph node metastasis of T1 lower rectal cancer using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: A case report with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection of lower rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    OGAWA, SHIMPEI; ITABASHI, MICHIO; HIROSAWA, TOMOICHIRO; HASHIMOTO, TAKUZO; BAMBA, YOSHIKO; OKAMOTO, TAKAHIRO

    2016-01-01

    The present study presented a 35-year-old female patient in whom fecal occult blood was detected in a medical check-up. Colonoscopy revealed a superficial elevated-type tumor with central depression in the lower rectum. The tumor was diagnosed as T1 deep invasive cancer. No swollen lymph nodes or distant metastasis were found on computed tomography or [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography with computed tomography. However, a swollen right lateral pelvic lymph node (LPLN; short axis 4 mm) was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This lymph node exhibited high intensity on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), suggesting metastasis. Low anterior resection, regional lymph node dissection and right LPLN dissection (LPLD) were performed. Histological analysis revealed metastasis in the right LPLN, as suggested by the high DWI intensity. The indication for LPLD in the current Japanese guidelines is based on the tumor location and depth of invasion (≥T3), however, not on the status of LPLN metastasis in pre-operative evaluation. The present case was cT1, which is not included in this indication. DWI is sensitive for the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis of colorectal cancer, although inflammation-induced swelling of lymph nodes in advanced rectal cancer may cause a false-positive result, which is uncommon in T1 cases. Therefore, an LPLN with a high intensity DWI signal in T1 cases is likely to be metastasis-positive. Pre-operative DWI-MRI may be useful for identifying LPLN metastasis when planning the treatment strategy in these cases. The present study suggested reinvestigation of the indication for LPLD with inclusion of LPLN status on pre-operative imaging. PMID:27123286

  17. Cancer in the neck: Evaluation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma; Basic principles of radiobiology in head and neck oncology; Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck; and Morbidity of modified neck dissection.

  18. [A Case of Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Patient with Various Main Trunk Dissections in the Head and Neck over a Short Period].

    PubMed

    Ando, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Osamu; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Nashimoto, Takeo; Kikuchi, Bumpei

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)from an intracranial vertebral artery(VA)dissection in a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia(FMD)who presented with headache. A 54-year-old woman complained of spontaneous occipital headache. The dilatation of the left VA was detected on magnetic resonance angiography(MRA). She was diagnosed with left VA dissection(headache onset type). After sudden onset of headache on the second day of hospitalization, her consciousness level, as defined by the Japan Coma Scale, was 300. Computed tomography(CT)revealed SAH. Cerebral angiography showed the dilatation of the left intracranial VA and contrast material pooling, which was suspected to be a sign of dissection. We performed VA intravascular ligation by coil embolization. The postoperative course was good but postoperative MRA revealed arterial wall irregularities in both the extra cranial internal carotid artery and the right VA. Cerebral angiography showed the presence of the string-of-beads sign at these arteries. She was diagnosed with FMD. SAH might develop during the follow-up period in patients with VA dissection, even those in whom the initial symptom is headache. In addition, cases of FMD might also be complicated by various lesions of the main trunk of the cerebral artery. PMID:27384119

  19. [Dissection of the neck: a wax anatomical sample of the Spitzner Collection (no 23) in the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum of Anatomy: an observation and photographical tri-dimensional reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P; Martinello, K

    2010-11-01

    An anatomical model of the dissection of the human neck, supraclavicular and submandibular regions, was studied in order to determine its anatomical accuracy. The sample was made of brightly coloured wax and was of female appearance. Formally, it belonged to the collection (n(o) 23) of a medical doctor: Spitzner (1813-1894). It was donated late in the 20th century to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière museums, 45, rue des Saints-Pères, Paris 6(e), université Paris-Descartes (catalog n(o): 1222, SRA-1995). It measured 36cm in width and 27cm in height. With the camera, it was pictured on its main views and every 5-degree on 270° along its vertical axis in order to obtain a tri-dimensional, photographic reconstruction. The arterial and venous vessels were enhanced and the thyroid and submandibular glands as well. The musculo-osseous frames limited five main regions of dissection. Neither nerves nor lymphatics were represented. The author of this wax sample remains unknown (no signature). The aspect does not look like the samples of the Tramond or Auzoux's factories. The Spitzner collection was primarily an itinerant exhibition; however, it is of a highly anatomical quality. It is well known by the anatomical art world, especially abroad: its aesthetical features and facial characters make it very recognizable. PMID:20399131

  20. Selection of ideal perforators and the use of a free-style free flap during dissection of an anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Chan, Karen Kar-Wun; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-09-01

    The technique of raising an anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap has been revolutionised by free-style retrograde intramuscular dissection of perforators to overcome anatomical variations, but choosing the appropriate perforator is still the key to success. We have shown this in a 41-year-old man with cancer of the buccal mucosa treated by wide excision and reconstruction with an ALT free flap that failed because of formation of microthrombi within the perforator. We identified only one tiny perforator that followed an 8cm, tortuous course within the vastus lateralis muscle. A long, narrow lumen in the perforator increases resistance proportionally to the length and four times the radius. Difficult dissection of the root makes the vessels prone to spasm. If no sizeable perforator is found, adjacent tissues on the medial or proximal thigh could be raised as alternative free-style flaps. PMID:27086511

  1. Free combined composite flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system for repair of massive defects of the head and neck regions: an introduction to the chimeric flap principle.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Yamamoto, H; Hosoda, M; Moriguchi, T; Orita, Y; Nagayama, H

    1993-09-01

    Chimeric composite flaps combined using microanastomoses consist of two or more flaps or tissues, each with an isolated pedicle and a single vascular source. Free combined chimeric flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system were used to treat massive composite defects of the head and neck in 10 cases. A combined anterolateral thigh flap and vascularized iliac bone graft based on the lateral circumflex femoral system and the deep circumflex iliac system was the most commonly used combination. An anteromedial thigh flap and a paraumbilical perforator-based flap were also combined with this principal combination. The advantages of this chimeric flap over other osteocutaneous flaps are: (1) The flap is relatively thin and the pedicle vessels are up to 10 cm longer and are wider than those of other flaps for easier harvesting of the flap. (2) It is unnecessary to reposition the patient. (3) The vascular pedicle to the skin can be separated from that of the bone. (4) The donor site is not close to the recipient site. (5) The donor scar is in an unexposed area. (6) The skin territory of this flap is extremely wide. (7) A combined anterolateral and anteromedial thigh flap and vascularized iliac bone graft can be easily obtained as an extended combined osteocutaneous flap. (8) Other neighboring skin flaps, such as a groin flap, a paraumbilical perforator-based flap, or a medial thigh flap, can be combined with this chimeric flap because several major muscle branches to be anastomosed derive from the lateral circumflex femoral system. Chimeric composite flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system are considered suitable for the repair of massive composite defects of the head and neck. PMID:8341739

  2. A patient with a painless neck tumour revealed as a carotid paraganglioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peric, Barbara; Marinsek, Ziva Pohar; Skrbinc, Breda; Music, Maja; Zagar, Ivana; Hocevar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Carotid paragangliomas are usually slowly enlarging and painless lateral neck masses. These mostly benign lesions are recognized due to their typical location, vessel displacement and specific blood supply, features that are usually seen on different imaging modalities. Surgery for carotid paraganglioma can be associated with immediate cerebrovascular complications or delayed neurological impairment.We are reporting the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a painless mass on the right side of his neck 11 months after being treated for testicular cancer. After a fine-needle aspiration biopsy, he was diagnosed with a testicular cancer lymph node metastasis. Neck US and fluorine [F-18]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET-CT showed no signs of hypervascularity or vessel displacement. The patient underwent a level II to V functional neck dissection. During the procedure, suspicion of a carotid paraganglioma was raised and the tumour was carefully dissected from the walls of the carotid arteries with minimal blood loss and no cranial nerve dysfunction.The histology report revealed carotid paraganglioma with no metastasis in the rest of the lymph nodes. The patient's history of testicular germ cell tumour led to a functional neck dissection during which a previously unrecognized carotid paraganglioma was removed.Surgery for carotid PG can be associated with complications that have major impact on quality of life. A thorough assessment of the patient and neck mass must therefore be performed preoperatively in order to perform the surgical procedure under optimal conditions. PMID:25141773

  3. [Thrombosis of the external jugular vein. Case report of a rare cause for pain in the lateral neck].

    PubMed

    Bartella, Alexander; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; Schuknecht, Bernhard; Gander, Thomas; Grätz, Klaus W; Kruse, Astrid I

    2014-01-01

    Dental practitioners are sometimes confronted with patients complaining about pain in the neck area. Especially if an induration in the region of the big vessels is present, one must keep in mind the differential diagnosis of a spontaneous thrombosis of the external jugular vein. This diagnosis needs consequent treatment but also consequent search for an underlying pathology. This case report presents such a situation in an exemplary way. Despite risk factors, the reason for thrombosis stays in the dark. However, all possible causes were cleared and are shown to the reader. Especially malignancies are responsible for thrombosis of the jugular vein in many cases. PMID:24585364

  4. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  5. PET-CT–guided surveillance of head and neck cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  6. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  7. The evolution of surgery in the management of neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Chiesa, F; Lyubaev, V; Aidarbekova, A; Brzhezovskiy, V

    2006-01-01

    Summary In spite of advancement in science, molecular medicine and target therapies, surgical treatment of metastases using different techniques, from selective neck dissection to extended radical neck dissections, form a major part in the management of neck metastases. This is due to the fact that, so far, there is no treatment more effective for resectable neck metastases, than surgery. Since most head and neck cancer patients die due to loco-regional progression of disease, and a very large majority of them do not live long enough to develop distant metastases, the status of neck lymph nodes remains the single most important prognostic factor, in these cases. In the 100 years since George Washington Crile described Radical Neck Dissection, we now have a much better understanding of the biological and clinical behaviour of neck metastases. This has ultimately led to the conservative approaches of selective neck dissections depending on the primary site of the tumour, type of tumour and the characteristic features of the metastases themselves. A search of the literature on neck lymph nodes and neck dissections, on the internet and in old publications, not available in the electronic media, has been carried out. Using this as the basis, we arranged, in sequence, the dates of various landmarks in the treatment of head and neck cancer related to neck dissections to emphasize the overall process of evolution of neck dissection thereby showing how the field of head and neck surgery has travelled a long way from radical neck dissection to its modifications and further to selective neck dissections and sentinel node biopsies. The present understanding of the patterns of neck metastases enables us not only to adequately treat the neck metastases, but also to diagnose metastases from unknown primaries. Therefore, depending on the site of the primary tumour, it is now easy to predict the most probable route of metastatic spread and vice versa. This has enabled us to adopt

  8. [Skin collagen abnormalities in a Japanese patient with extracranial internal carotid artery dissection followed by extracranial vertebral artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Sengoku, Renpei; Sato, Hironori; Honda, Hidehiko; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Ono, Seiitsu

    2006-02-01

    A 41-year-old man with hypertension and hyperlipidemia who complained of left hemiparesis after a temporal headache was admitted to our hospital. A cervical MRI with gadolinium enhancement revealed an intramural hematoma is compatible with right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection. Two weeks later, he complained of sudden onset of pain in the right side of his neck. The right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection followed by the right extracranial vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed. Spontaneous cervical artery dissection (SCAD) is one of the causes of stroke in young adults. The pathogenesis of SCAD remains unknown. Minor trauma like an excessive sneeze, migraine, and connective tissue disorders such as fibromuscular dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are well-known as risk factors for SCAD. Pathologically skin collagen abnormalities have been seen in German patients with SCAD without clinical evidence for any specific connective tissue disorder. We examined the ultrastructural morphology of the Japanese patient's dermal connective tissue components by electron microscopy. The patient's collagen fibers contained fibrils with highly variable diameters, and there were other ultrastructural abnormalities, including flower-like fibrils and large-diameter composite fibrils. This is the first report of a case of ultrastructural abnormalities of dermal connective tissue in a Japanese patient with SCAD. PMID:16619839

  9. Surgical Excision of Madelung Disease Using Bilateral Cervical Lymphnode Dissection Technique—Its Effect and the Influence of Previous Injection Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Andou, Erika; Komoto, Masakazu; Hasegawa, Toshio; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Madelung disease, also known as benign symmetrical lipomatosis, is a rare condition characterized by symmetrical diffuse adipose tissue in the neck, shoulders, and arms. The present report described the case of a 51-year-old man diagnosed with Madelung disease who presented with masses primarily in the neck. He had previously shown partial improvement after injection lipolysis and shoulder surgery. However, 4 years later, following corticosteroid administration for the treatment of acute deafness, cervical lipomatosis progressed to the extent that he was unable to fasten his shirt. The initial treatment plan involved bilateral surgical excision of the lipomatous masses of the neck and liposuction for those in the submental area. However, the lipomas were adherent to the surrounding tissue and were partially fibrosed, presumably due to the previous injection lipolysis; thus, liposuction was not possible, and all the masses around the neck were carefully excised using cervical lymph node dissection technique. Thirty-two months later, the patient showed good cosmetic results, with no recurrence of cervical lipomatosis. Radical resection of the lipomas using a cervical dissection technique is useful in the treatment of Madelung disease; however, clinicians must consider the potential for adhesions and plan a meticulous dissection in those who have undergone injection lipolysis before the surgery. PMID:25973353

  10. Surgical excision of madelung disease using bilateral cervical lymphnode dissection technique-its effect and the influence of previous injection lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Andou, Erika; Komoto, Masakazu; Hasegawa, Toshio; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-04-01

    Madelung disease, also known as benign symmetrical lipomatosis, is a rare condition characterized by symmetrical diffuse adipose tissue in the neck, shoulders, and arms. The present report described the case of a 51-year-old man diagnosed with Madelung disease who presented with masses primarily in the neck. He had previously shown partial improvement after injection lipolysis and shoulder surgery. However, 4 years later, following corticosteroid administration for the treatment of acute deafness, cervical lipomatosis progressed to the extent that he was unable to fasten his shirt. The initial treatment plan involved bilateral surgical excision of the lipomatous masses of the neck and liposuction for those in the submental area. However, the lipomas were adherent to the surrounding tissue and were partially fibrosed, presumably due to the previous injection lipolysis; thus, liposuction was not possible, and all the masses around the neck were carefully excised using cervical lymph node dissection technique. Thirty-two months later, the patient showed good cosmetic results, with no recurrence of cervical lipomatosis. Radical resection of the lipomas using a cervical dissection technique is useful in the treatment of Madelung disease; however, clinicians must consider the potential for adhesions and plan a meticulous dissection in those who have undergone injection lipolysis before the surgery. PMID:25973353

  11. Polyomino Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Tiina; Liu, Andy

    2012-01-01

    One of Gardner's passions was to introduce puzzles into the classroom. From this point of view, polyomino dissections are an excellent topic. They require little background, provide training in geometric visualization, and mostly they are fun. In this article, we put together a large collection of such puzzles, introduce a new approach in solving…

  12. Quantification of lymph nodes in the central compartment of the neck: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Ofo, Enyinnaya; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cope, Daron; Barr, James; Kapoor, Karan; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Oakley, Richard; Lock, Claire; Odell, Edward; Simo, Ricard

    2016-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) accounts for over 90 % of thyroid malignancies, and is frequently associated with central neck compartment nodal metastasis that requires a therapeutic central compartment neck dissection (CCND) for clinically evident nodes. Current knowledge on the expected lymph node yield from a CCND is limited, compared with data on the lateral neck. The aim of our study was to accurately quantify nodal yield from the cadaveric central neck compartment. Twenty-eight cadaveric necks were dissected and the central neck compartment was subdivided into four regions: pre-laryngeal (delphian), pre-tracheal, right and left para-tracheal regions. Each cadaver had a thyroid gland, which was also removed, and the CCND tissue in each compartment was processed and examined by a consultant histopathologist. Only lymphoid tissue with a defined microscopic fibrous capsule and subcapsular sinus was included in the node count. The median total lymph node count per cadaver was four (range 1-16), with a median of one node detectable in each para-tracheal region (range 0-7) and the pre-tracheal region (range 0-8). The median pre-laryngeal node count was 0 (range 0- 2). The average lymph node size across all compartments was 2.9 mm. This is the first European study to assess cadaveric central neck lymph nodes and establish baseline counts for nodal yield. If a prophylactic or therapeutic CCND is required during thyroid surgery, those involved in DTC management must recognise that there is a wide range, and low median yield of central neck compartment lymph nodes. PMID:26589898

  13. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  14. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, H. Hakan; Medina, Jesus E.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Silver, Carl E.; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Suçrez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  15. A comparison of the effects of animal dissection and a computer simulation dissection program on students' knowledge of frog anatomy and attitudes toward dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel-Clark, Isabella

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of computer-simulated dissection versus the effectiveness of true dissection related to student achievement and attitude. Student achievement was measured by post-dissection and delayed post-dissection tests which measured students' knowledge on frog anatomy. Students' attitudes were measured by pre-dissection and post-dissection attitude surveys. The sample used consisted of 115 high school biology students from four classes taught by two teachers. The site had a student enrollment of 1243 with a minority population of 58%. Each teacher had one class that conducted a true dissection of a frog and another class that completed the Digital Frog 2 computer simulation program. Each group conducted their dissection for two days and then took a test on a real specimen. Two weeks later, each group was tested again on the same structures that were on the first test. Data were analyzed using t-tests for independent means and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results indicated that students who participated in the true dissection scored significantly higher on both the post and delayed post-dissection achievement tests. The academic achievements were consistent across gender, grade level, and previous science grade. Student attitude was also analyzed by calculating frequencies of the survey questions. Results indicated differences in attitudes between students in the true dissection group versus students in the computer-simulated dissection group.

  16. Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio of Central Neck Compartment Has Predictive Values for Locoregional Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Yong; Cho, Jae-Keun; Moon, Jeong Hwan; Son, Young-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the significance of metastatic lymph node ratio (the ratio between the metastatic lymph node and the harvested lymph nodes; MLNR) in the central neck for the prediction of locoregional recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Methods After reviewing medical records of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma patients who received total thyroidectomy with central neck node dissection, 573 consecutive adult patients were enrolled in this study, with a follow-up period of more than 36 months. Regarding the risk of recurrence, multivariate analyses were performed with the following variables; sex, age, multiplicity of the primary tumor, presence of pathological extrathyroidal extension, the level of postoperative stimulated serum thyroglobulin, the number of harvested lymph nodes, the number of lymph node metastasis and MLNR. Results The MLNR showed a predictive significance for the locoregional recurrence (P<0.05). Most recurrences were occurred in the lateral neck (n=12, 80%) with a median interval of 20 months. The lowest cutoff value of the MLNR for a meaningful separation of disease recurrence was 0.44 (hazard ratio, 8.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.49 to 52.58; P=0.001). Conclusion When the MLNR is higher than 0.44, there is an increased risk of locoregional recurrence mostly in the lateral neck. Therefore, MLNR of the central neck in a permanent or frozen biopsy may be helpful in decision making in the extent of thyroidectomy and/or the need for contralateral central neck lymph nodes dissection. PMID:26976031

  17. [An Adult Case of Difficult Intubation Caused by Late Complications of Radiotherapy for Pediatric Neck Malignancy, as well as a Later Laryngeal Elevation Surgery].

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Mari; Okada, Toshiki

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 32-year-old female who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery under general anesthesia. She had been diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma of her neck at 5 years of age, and received tumor resection and chemoradiotherapy. Afterwards, she was suffering from dysphagia as a late complication of radiotherapy. She received laryngeal elevation surgery at 24 years of age, in order to improve swallowing disturbance. With rapid induction of anesthesia, she was easily ventilated with mask and bag. However, it was difficult to visualize her vocal cord with various intubating apparatus, because of her mandible hypoplasia, small oral cavity, and laryngeal elevation. After all, we were able to intubate her trachea using Pentax Airway-scope® (AWS) with a Pediatric-type INTLOCK Blade™ (ITL-P). Radiotherapy for head and neck malignancy at childhood causes various late complications, leading to difficult intubation. Meanwhile, laryngeal elevation surgery for dysphagia anatomically makes intubation more difficult An adult who has such past history should be expected as an extremely difficult intubation case, and we must be prepared with various intubating apparatus including AWS with ITL-P. PMID:26790331

  18. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  19. Influence of excisional or incisional biopsy of metastatic neck nodes on the management of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.

    1985-08-01

    Between November 1964 and December 1981, 80 patients who had undergone an open biopsy of a cervical lymph node containing squamous cell carcinoma were treated with curative intent in the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy. Irradiation was the initial step in the definitive treatment of all patients, followed by neck dissection and/or primary resection, as indicated. The patients were divided into two groups. (a) NX (no gross residual neck disease) (25 patients). No neck dissections were added following irradiation in this group of patients. The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in the NX group was 79%, and the rate of neck disease control was 96%. (b) Gross residual neck disease (55 patients). The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in this group of patients was 31%, and the rate of neck disease control was 64%. The more consistent addition of a neck dissection in recent years has resulted in improved neck control rates in this group. There are some differences in the rates of neck control, control above the clavicles, survival, distant metastasis, and complications between this series and other reported series in which open neck-node biopsy preceded definitive treatment. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed.

  20. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature

    PubMed Central

    Lavallee, Amy V.; Ching, Randal P.; Nuckley, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6–23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects’ ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30 s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force= −0.0879(age)2+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions. PMID:23127787

  1. Combined ipsilateral neck and axillary lymphadenectomy for metastatic skin cancers: a case series and surgical tips.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, J; Martin, H; Shaaban, H

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of distant disease simultaneous skin cancer metastasis to neck and axillary lymph nodes necessitates both an axillary and neck en block lymphadenectomy. A combined ipsilateral neck and axillary lymph node dissection should involve an in-continuity dissection through the cervicoaxillary canal for optimal lymphatic and oncological clearance. Review of the literature reveals little published instruction on the procedure since the radical surgery performed by Bowden over 50 years ago. We present 4 cases where ipsilateral axillary and neck lymph node dissections were performed for metastatic melanoma and a case of apical axillary node dissection via a neck incision approach. Our surgical tips include performing apical axillary node dissection via the neck incision and consideration of clavicular osteotomy or clavicular excision. A transclavicular approach was taken in one patient who had an excellent functional outcome after a plate and screw fixation. One elderly patient required a middle third claviculectomy which reduced shoulder elevation but was not associated with functional impairment. We conclude the surgery is safe and associated with the usual morbidity ascribed with either an axillary or neck dissection undertaken in isolation. However, patients have a significant risk of disease relapse as would be expected due to the duel metastatic sites, multiple lymph node and neck involvement which are known to be independent poor prognostic factors on melanoma survival and relapse. PMID:23664381

  2. [Fiddler's neck].

    PubMed

    Knierim, C; Goertz, W; Reifenberger, J; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2013-10-01

    The fiddler's neck is an uncommon variant of acne mechanica in violinists and violists. It is a single firm red-brown dermal nodule usually on the left side of neck. This special form of acne mechanica represents a therapeutic challenge since the triggering mechanical factors persist, unless they can be corrected by changes in positioning or modifications of the chin pad. A 72-year-old woman who had played the violin since childhood presented with a red-brown nodule on her neck for 18 months. Cushioning provided no relief. Excision of the affected area with primary closure represented one therapeutic option. Further supportive measures include improved posture to reduce the pressure between skin and instrument and interposing a neck cloth. PMID:23989244

  3. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... falls can cause severe neck injuries, such as vertebral fractures, whiplash, blood vessel injury, and even paralysis. Other ... fibromyalgia Cervical arthritis or spondylosis Ruptured disk ... spine from osteoporosis Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal ...

  4. "Hands-Off" Dissection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Computer programs and models are used to express respect for life by not sacrificing any animal but these alternatives might be deeply flawed. Alternatives to dissection are perverse alternatives that tend to preserve the features of inappropriate dissections like destructiveness, reductionism and objectification.

  5. Surgical Dissection of the Anterolateral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Matthew; Busch, Kyle; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations into the structure and function of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) have resulted in renewed interest in the role of the lateral extra-articular structures in rotational control of the knee. With increased focus on the ALL, debate about the anatomic characteristics, the functional role in knee stability, and even the existence of this lateral structure has ensued. This article describes our dissection method for the ALL. Through careful dissection and precise elevation of the iliotibial band, the ALL can be clearly identified as a distinct structure with an attachment near the lateral epicondyle on the femur and an insertion in a fan-like fashion onto the tibia, between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. This investigation provides the surgeon with anatomic landmarks to use during surgical reconstruction of the ALL. PMID:27274451

  6. GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit Animation revealing a swath of NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory GMI precipitation rates over Typhoon Hagupit. A...

  7. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  8. Painless Aortic Dissection Presenting as Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Necmettin; Nazli, Yunus; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Akkaya, Ismail Olgun; Cakir, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be life-threatening. As a presenting manifestation of aortic dissection, neurologic complications such as paraplegia are rare. Herein, we report the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset paraplegia and ischemia of the legs, with no chest or back pain. His medical history included coronary artery bypass grafting. Physical examination revealed pulseless lower extremities, and computed tomography showed aortic dissection from the ascending aorta to the common iliac arteries bilaterally. A lumbar catheter was inserted for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and axillary arterial cannulation was established. With the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, the aortic dissection was corrected, and the previous coronary artery grafts were reattached. The surgery restored spinal and lower-extremity perfusion, and the patient walked unaided from the hospital upon his discharge 5 days later. Although acute aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia is rare, it should be considered in patients who have pulseless femoral arteries bilaterally and sudden-onset paraplegia, despite no pain in the chest or back. Prompt diagnosis and intervention can prevent morbidity and death. PMID:22740752

  9. Management of type A dissection with malperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Patel, Himanshu J.; Williams, David M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2016-01-01

    Malperfusion is a common lethal complication of acute aortic dissection following rupture, for which the optimal management strategy has yet to be clearly established. The objective of this study was to reassess the management of acute type A aortic dissection (Type A-AAD) with malperfusion. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of all patients with Type A-AAD with malperfusion at the University of Michigan and compared the results from patients that directly underwent open surgical repair versus those who had percutaneous reperfusion prior to open surgical repair. Based on the results, we developed a patient care protocol for the treatment of all patients with acute type A dissection. We later re-analyzed the long-term outcomes for patients using the protocol. The present study demonstrated that, although the outcomes for patients with acute type A aortic dissection with malperfusion syndrome treated with initial percutaneous reperfusion and delayed open surgical intervention are not as good as the results for patients with uncomplicated Type A-AAD that undergo immediate surgical repair, their outcomes continue the long-term outcomes of the former group are superior. To outdo patients with acute type A aortic dissection with malperfusion syndrome treated with immediate open surgical intervention. In conclusion, at the University of Michigan we continue to use our patient care protocol to treat patients with Type A-AAD. PMID:27563540

  10. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  11. Cerebrum-cervical arterial dissection in adults during sports and recreation.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Adoni, Tarso; Amaral, Lazaro Luiz Faria do; Braga, Flavio Tulio; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Campos, Christiane Siqueira; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Fortes Diniz; Giacon, Luciano Marcus Tirotti; Gomes, Sidney; Goncalves, Marcus Vinicius Magno; Magalhaes, Pedro Silva Correa; Matta, Andre Palma da Cunha; Oliveira, Francisco Tomaz Meneses de; Oliveira, Joao Felipe de; Pierucettti, Marco Antonio; Pereira, Samira Luísa Dos Apostolos; Pontes, Maciel Eduardo; Siquineli, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Dissection of cervical arteries constitutes a medical emergency. Although relatively rarely, activities classified as sports and recreation may be a cause of arterial dissection independently of neck or head trauma. The purpose of the present paper was to present a series of cases of cerebrum-cervical arterial dissection in individuals during or soon after the practice of these sports activities. Methods Retrospective data on patients with arterial dissection related to sports and recreation. Results Forty-one cases were identified. The most frequently affected vessel was the vertebral artery. A large variety of activities had a temporal relationship to arterial dissection, and jogging was the most frequent of these. This is the largest case series in the literature. Conclusion Arterial dissection may be a complication from practicing sports. PMID:26445125

  12. [Rare giant salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma on the neck].

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongling; Li, Qinghuai

    2013-12-01

    The patient has found his neck mass for more than 30 years, and the neck mass has slowly growed into giant tumor. Five days ago, the neck giant mass suddenly burst, hemorrhage and overflow liquid. The giant mass with irregular in shape, surface uneven, skin highly tension and superficial venous engorgement, was seen in left lateral neck. CT scan demonstrates a mixture of solid, cystic and lobulated mass shadow within subcutaneous fat spaces of left lateral neck. Postoperative pathological examination proved that it is salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:24620671

  13. Evaluation and localization of lymphatic drainage and sentinel lymph nodes in patients with head and neck melanomas by hybrid SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mar, Martha V; Miller, Scott A; Kim, E Edmund; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2007-03-01

    In patients with head and neck tumors, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy can be used to map lymphatic drainage patterns and identify sentinel lymph nodes. However, it is very difficult to determine the exact locations of head and neck sentinel nodes on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy without the use of anatomic landmarks. Lymph nodes in the head and neck are grouped into 7 regions, or levels, on the basis of anatomic landmarks. In patients undergoing standard lymphoscintigraphy, obtaining lateral marker images that show important anatomic landmarks can help with the localization of sentinel nodes. However, technical problems often render marker images of little or no use. Hybrid SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging facilitates the localization of sentinel nodes by reliably showing the relationships between sentinel nodes and important anatomic structures. After reading this article, the reader should understand the lymph node level classification system for head and neck melanomas, be able to describe the technique used for the imaging of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region, and be able to demonstrate how SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging can enable precise sentinel node localization and thus help to ensure minimal dissection. PMID:17337652

  14. Parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Crockett, Thomas W.; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Binary dissection is widely used to partition non-uniform domains over parallel computers. This algorithm does not consider the perimeter, surface area, or aspect ratio of the regions being generated and can yield decompositions that have poor communication to computation ratio. Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm in which each cut is chosen to minimize load + lambda x(shape). In a 2 (or 3) dimensional problem, load is the amount of computation to be performed in a subregion and shape could refer to the perimeter (respectively surface) of that subregion. Shape is a measure of communication overhead and the parameter permits us to trade off load imbalance against communication overhead. When A is zero, the algorithm reduces to plain binary dissection. This algorithm can be used to partition graphs embedded in 2 or 3-d. Load is the number of nodes in a subregion, shape the number of edges that leave that subregion, and lambda the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. An algorithm is presented that finds the depth d parametric dissection of an embedded graph with n vertices and e edges in O(max(n log n, de)) time, which is an improvement over the O(dn log n) time of plain binary dissection. Parallel versions of this algorithm are also presented; the best of these requires O((n/p) log(sup 3)p) time on a p processor hypercube, assuming graphs of bounded degree. How PBD is applied to 3-d unstructured meshes and yields partitions that are better than those obtained by plain dissection is described. Its application to the color image quantization problem is also discussed, in which samples in a high-resolution color space are mapped onto a lower resolution space in a way that minimizes the color error.

  15. Is dissection humane?

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tabinda

    2011-01-01

    Dissection is being jeopardized in the modern medical education. It has unrelentingly faced the lashes of time and has been the scapegoat for numerous convenient curricula reforms and subjective biases. The cadaver is unparallel in establishing core knowledge among the medical community and it needs to be appreciated in a new light in the “cyber anatomy” realm of today. This article elucidates the medical and ethical validity of continuing human body dissection in medicine which outweighs all the prejudices associated with it. PMID:23908746

  16. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  17. Cervical artery dissection: early recognition and stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-07-01

    Cervical artery dissections involve the carotid or vertebral arteries. Although the overall incidence is low, they remain a common cause of stroke in children, young adults, and trauma patients. Symptoms such as headache, neck pain, and dizziness are commonly seen in the emergency department, but may not be apparent in the obtunded trauma patient. A missed diagnosis of cervical artery dissection can result in devastating neurological sequelae, so emergency clinicians must act quickly to recognize this event and begin treatment as soon as possible while neurological consultation is obtained. This issue reviews the evidence in applying advanced screening criteria and choosing imaging and antithrombotic treatment strategies for patients with cervical artery dissections to reduce the occurrence of ischemic stroke. PMID:27315017

  18. Review of the role of sentinel node biopsy in cutaneous head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jennifer M; Whitfield, Robert J; Gill, P Grantley

    2016-05-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is recommended for selected melanoma patients in many parts of the world. This review examines the evidence surrounding the accuracy and prognostic value of SNB and completion neck dissection in head and neck melanoma. Sentinel nodes were identified in an average of 94.7% of head and neck cases compared with 95.3-100% in all melanoma cases. More false-negative sentinel nodes were found in head and neck cases. A positive sentinel node was associated with both lower disease-free survival (53.4 versus 83.2%) and overall survival (40 versus 84%). We conclude that SNB should be offered to all patients with intermediate and high-risk melanomas in the head and neck area. To date, evidence does not exist to demonstrate the safety of avoiding completion lymph node dissection in sentinel node-positive patients with head and neck melanoma. PMID:26362016

  19. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  20. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing ...

  1. Alternatives To Dissection. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Bill, Ed.; Winiarskyj, Lesia, Ed.

    This packet attempts to provide educationally sound alternatives to dissection in the classroom, thereby making it possible for teachers to eliminate dissection from the curriculum. This packet can also be used by educators who include dissection in their curricula but consider it important to respect the expression of students' ethical, moral, or…

  2. Repair of type A dissection-benefits of dissection rota

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Harrington, Deborah; Fok, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute type A aortic dissection repair is a surgical emergency associated with high mortality. In 2007, Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital was the first institution in the United Kingdom to implement a thoracic aortic on-call dissection rota. We set out to investigate whether the dissection rota improved hospital quality outcomes and long-term survival. Methods Data from a prospectively collected database was analysed following case note validation. Two hundred patients underwent acute type A aortic dissection repair between October 1998 and November 2015. To assess the effect of the post-dissection rota on operative and postoperative outcomes, propensity matching of pre- and post-dissection rota patients was used. Results Eighty patients were identified from the pre-dissection rota era and 120 from the post-dissection rota era. Sixty patients from each era were then propensity matched. Comparative analyses showed that patients who underwent acute type A dissection repair in the post-dissection rota period were less likely to suffer in-hospital mortality in both the matched and unmatched groups (30% vs. 13.3%; P=0.004 and 28.3% vs. 11.7%; P=0.055, respectively). A similar improvement was shown in acute renal failure (26.3% vs. 14.2%; P=0.033 and 31.7% vs. 15.0%; P=0.044, respectively). However, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic cross clamp times were still significantly longer in the matched post–dissection rota cohort. There was a significant improvement in 5-year survival for the pre- and post-dissection rota in both the matched and unmatched patients (P=0.004 and P=0.034). Conclusions Reorganization of surgical expertise, activity and implementation of a dissection rota within our hospital have resulted in lower in-hospital mortality and better survival outcomes in this group of patients. PMID:27386408

  3. Cervical artery dissection: emerging risk factors.

    PubMed

    Micheli, S; Paciaroni, M; Corea, F; Agnelli, G; Zampolini, M; Caso, V

    2010-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CAD) represents an increasingly recognized cause of stroke and the most common cause of ischemic stroke in young adults. Many factors have been identified in association with CAD such as primary disease of arterial wall (fibrodysplasia) and other non-specific diseases related to CAD like Ehlers Danlos-syndrome IV, Marfan's syndrome, vessel tortuosity. Moreover, an underlying arteriopathy which could be in part genetically determined, has been suspected. The rule of emerging risk factors for CAD such as recent respiratory tract infection, migraine and hyperhomocysteinemia are still a matter of research. Other known risks factors for CAD are major head/neck trauma like chiropractic maneuver, coughing or hyperextension injury associated to car. We examined emerging risks factors for CAD detected in the last years, as CAD pathogenesis is still not completely understood and needs further investigations. PMID:21270941

  4. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  5. Acute Myocardial Infarction Due to Spontaneous Dissection of the Right Coronary Artery in a Young Male

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris P. Moyssakis, Ioannis; Perakis, Alexandros; Athanasiou, Andreas; Anagnostopoulou, Sophia; Benos, Ioannis; Votteas, Vassilios E.

    2004-09-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 33-year-old male who presented with an acute inferior myocardial infarction. Coronary arteriography performed 3 hours after the episode revealed a dissection involving the middle segment of right coronary artery. Because of a spiral form of dissection and the TIMI 3 flow grade, our patient was treated medically and repeat coronary angiography 6 months later was decided.

  6. Correlation among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index (NDI) in young women with slight neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Rim; Kang, Mi-Hee; Bahng, Sun-Young; An, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the correlations among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index in women in their 20s with slight neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 60 female students at U university in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The lateral scapular slide test, which measures the distance between the thorax and scapula, was used to analyze the scapular asymmetry. The lateral scapular slide test was performed in three positions. The visual analogue scale and neck disability index were used to measure neck pain. [Results] In the lateral scapular slide test in position 3 (shoulder abduction at 90 degrees), the scapular left-right asymmetry and VAS showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r=0.344. The VAS and NDI showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r = 0.632. [Conclusion] Scapular asymmetry indicates imbalance of surrounding muscles of the scapula and is related to neck pain based on the results of measuring the distance from the thorax to the scapula. PMID:27313361

  7. Aortic dissection--an update.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Eagle, Kim A

    2005-06-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality requiring emergent diagnosis and therapy. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging technology have facilitated the early diagnosis of this condition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with chest, back, or abdominal pain. Emergent surgery is the treatment for patients with type A dissection while optimal medical therapy is appropriate in patients with uncomplicated type B dissection. Adequate beta-blockade is the cornerstone of medical therapy. Patients who survive acute aortic dissection need long-term medical therapy with beta-blockers and statins and appropriate serial imaging follow-up. Future advances in this field include biomarkers in the early diagnosis of acute aortic dissection and presymptomatic diagnosis with genetic screening. Overall patients with aortic dissection are at high risk for an adverse outcome and need to be managed aggressively in hospital and long term with frequent follow-up. PMID:15973249

  8. Prediction of occult neck disease in laryngeal cancer by means of a logistic regression statistical model.

    PubMed

    Ghouri, A F; Zamora, R L; Sessions, D G; Spitznagel, E L; Harvey, J E

    1994-10-01

    The ability to accurately predict the presence of subclinical metastatic neck disease in clinically N0 patients with primary epidermoid cancer of the larynx would be of great value in determining whether to perform an elective neck dissection. We describe a statistical approach to estimating the probability of occult neck disease given pretreatment clinical parameters. A retrospective study was performed involving 736 clinically N0 patients with primary laryngeal cancer who were treated surgically with primary resection and ipsilateral neck dissection. Nodal involvement was determined histologically after surgical lymphadenectomy. A logistic regression model was used to derive an equation that calculated the probability of occult neck metastasis based on pretreatment T stage, tumor location, and histologic grade. The model has a sensitivity of 74%, a specificity of 87%, and can be entered into a programmable calculator. PMID:7934602

  9. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  10. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  11. Clinical impact of radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases from head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, A; Rassow, S; Bohne, F; Wilhelm, T; Hoch, S

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of lymph node metastases involving the carotid artery is controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the outcomes of head and neck cancer patients with radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases. A total of 27 patients with head and neck cancer and radiologically diagnosed advanced metastases involving the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery were enrolled. All patients underwent a primary or salvage neck dissection and surgical carotid peeling. The oncological outcome and survival of all patients were analyzed. Loco-regional control was observed in 13 of the 27 patients (48.1%). During follow-up, five patients (18.5%) developed second primaries and 11 (40.7%) developed distant metastases. The survival time was poor independent of regional control. The median overall survival was 1.55 years and disease-free survival was 0.71 year. Radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases in head and neck cancer appears to correlate with a poor long-term prognosis, with a high rate of distant metastases despite loco-regional control. PMID:26723499

  12. Cross-matched blood for major head and neck surgery: an analysis of requirements.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, A M; Telfer, M R; Stassen, L F

    1998-04-01

    We retrospectively analysed our blood ordering practice; the number of units of cross-matched blood requested was compared with the number transfused, in 70 patients undergoing a total of 82 ablative operations for malignant disease. Patients undergoing neck dissection alone, or excision of tumour with free revascularized flap reconstruction without neck dissection, are unlikely to require blood transfusion. Operations that include excision of tumour with primary closure and neck dissection, excision of tumour with pedicled flap reconstruction and excision of tumour with any form of flap reconstruction and neck dissection in continuity, will probably require transfusion. If atypical antibodies are present in the patient's serum on screening, cross-matched blood should always be available preoperatively. Provided that atypical antibodies are not present and that blood is available within 40 minutes from the blood bank, our results show that it is safe to adopt a policy of blood grouping and saving serum, for patients undergoing neck dissection alone, but cross-matching two or more units of blood for patients who are to have more extensive operations. PMID:9643594

  13. Bilateral popliteal arterial dissection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Liang; Ko, Shih-Yu; Tan, Ken-Hing

    2012-01-01

    A clinical feature of bilateral popliteal arterial dissection without involving the descending aorta, bilateral iliac, as well as femoral arteries has never been reported in the past literature. We report a 56-year-old man with hypertension and coronary artery disease who presented to our emergency department with complaints of bilateral knee pain after long-distance walking. Physical examination was notable for elevated blood pressure, but there was no palpable pulsation over dorsalis pedis arteries on his feet. Laboratory evaluation revealed a d-dimer level of 35.2 mg/L (FEU) on the day of the test and 1.2 mg/L one and a half months ago (normal level, <0.55). These findings were suggestive of a recent-onset peripheral arterial occlusive disorder. Computed tomography of the aorta showed bilateral popliteal arterial dissection with arterial intimal flap. Abdominal aorta, bilateral iliac, and femoral arteries remained intact with only arteriosclerotic change. Minimally invasive endovascular stent grafting was then performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery. PMID:21106320

  14. Huge dissected ascending aorta associated with pseudo aneurysm and aortic coarctation feridoun.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-07-01

    We report a unique case of chronic dissection of the ascending aorta complicated with huge and thrombotic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with coarctation of descending aorta. Preoperative investigations such as transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) confirmed the diagnosis of dissection. Intraoperative findings included a12 cm eccentric bulge of the right lateral side of dilated the ascending aorta filled with the clot and a circular shaped intimal tear communicating with an extended hematoma and dissection of the media layer. The rarity of the report is an association of the chronic dissection with huge pseudoaneurysm and coarctation. The patient underwent staged repair of an aneurysm and coarctation and had an uneventful postoperative recovery period. PMID:26520633

  15. Vertebral Dissecting Aneurysm Treated with Wingspan Stent Deployment and Detachable Coils

    PubMed Central

    Lv, M.; Lv, X.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We describe the first documented endovascular treatment of vertebral dissecting aneurysm using a Wingspan stent and detachable coils. A 54-year-old man presented with a nonruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm. Because of the dissecting nature of the vertebral aneurysms, a 3x15-mm Wingspan stent was placed in the left vertebral artery. One month later, several detachable coils were introduced into the aneurysm. Six-month follow-up angiogram confirmed the obliteration. Vertebral dissecting aneurysm can be treated with Wingspan stent placement and detachable coils. PMID:20465940

  16. Management of the node-positive neck in the patient with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, Gary B.; Hessel, Amy; Beadle, Beth M.; Ahmed, Salmaan; El-naggar, Adel; Fuller, Clifton D.; Byers, Lauren A.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Kies, Merill S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess the rates of recurrence in the neck for node-positive patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated with definitive radiation (with or without chemotherapy). Methods This is a single institutional retrospective study. Methodology included database search, and statistical testing including frequency analysis, Kaplan-Meier tests, and comparative tests including chi-square, logistic regression and log-rank. Results The cohort consisted of 401 node-positive patients irradiated between 2006 – June 2012. Three hundred eighty eight patients had CT restaging, and 251 had PET and/or US as a component of their post radiation staging. Eighty patients (20%) underwent neck dissection, and 21 (26%) had a positive specimen. The rate of neck dissection increased with increasing nodal stage, and was lower in patients who had PET scans or ultrasound in addition to CT restaging. The median follow-up was 30 months. The 2-year actuarial neck recurrence rate was 7% and 5% in all patients and those with local control, respectively. Nodal recurrence rates were greater in current smokers (p=.008). There was no difference in nodal recurrences rates in patients who did or did not have a neck dissection (p = .4) Conclusions A treatment strategy of (chemo)radiation with neck dissection performed based on response resulted in high rates of regional disease control in patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:24898672

  17. Bilateral carotid and bilateral vertebral artery dissection following facial massage.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Andrea L; Zink, Walter; Zimmerman, Robert; Riina, Howard; Benitez, Ronald

    A 50-year-old woman underwent facial massage. After 13 days, she experienced left retro-orbital pain, ptosis, and miosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed stenotic dissection of bilateral cervical internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The intracranial vasculature was intact. She was treated conservatively with long-term oral anticoagulation and remains asymptomatic 18 months later. PMID:18388028

  18. Fatal dissecting aneurysm of the aorta in a diver.

    PubMed

    James, R; Hayman, J A

    1986-07-01

    A 20-yr-old trained sports diver developed severe chest pain shortly after decompressing from a 40 m repetitive freshwater sinkhole dive, and died 6 h later. An autopsy examination showed a dissecting aneurysm of the aorta with rupture into the left pleural cavity. The relationship between the fatal event and the diving is discussed. PMID:3785985

  19. Tinea capitis mimicking dissecting cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Torok, Rachel D; Bellet, Jane S

    2013-01-01

    Tinea capitis is a common disease of childhood that typically follows one of several clinical patterns. Our patient and several previously reported cases demonstrate the existence of a dissecting cellulitis-like presentation of tinea capitis. This variant should be recognized to prevent misdiagnosis of dissecting cellulitis and allow proper treatment to prevent scarring alopecia. PMID:24134312

  20. "Dissection" of a Hair Dryer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenstein, Stan; Simpson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    The electrical design of the common hair dryer is based almost entirely on relatively simple principles learned in introductory physics classes. Just as biology students dissect a frog to see the principles of anatomy in action, physics students can "dissect" a hair dryer to see how principles of electricity are used in a real system. They can…

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  2. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  3. Dissection of Kinesin's Processivity

    PubMed Central

    Adio, Sarah; Jaud, Johann; Ebbing, Bettina; Rief, Matthias; Woehlke, Günther

    2009-01-01

    The protein family of kinesins contains processive motor proteins that move stepwise along microtubules. This mechanism requires the precise coupling of the catalytic steps in the two heads, and their precise mechanical coordination. Here we show that these functionalities can be uncoupled in chimera of processive and non-processive kinesins. A chimera with the motor domain of Kinesin-1 and the dimerization domain of a non-processive Kinesin-3 motor behaves qualitatively as conventional kinesin and moves processively in TIRF and bead motility assays, suggesting that spatial proximity of two Kinein-1 motor domains is sufficient for processive behavior. In the reverse chimera, the non-processive motor domains are unable to step along microtubules, despite the presence of the Kinesin-1 neck coiled coil. Still, ATP-binding to one head of these chimera induces ADP-release from the partner head, a characteristic feature of alternating site catalysis. These results show that processive movement of kinesin dimers requires elements in the motor head that respond to ADP-release and induce stepping, in addition to a proper spacing of the motor heads via the neck coiled coil. PMID:19242550

  4. Automatic Dissection Of Plantlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, B. G.; Harris, I. P.; Marchant, J. A.; Tillett, R. D.

    1989-03-01

    Micropropagation is a technique used in horticulture for generating a monoclonal colony of plants. A tiny plantlet is cut into several parts, each of which is then replanted. At the moment, the cutting is performed manually. Automating this task would have significant economic benefits. A robot designed to dissect plants would need to be equipped with intelligent visual sensing. This article is concerned with the image acquisition and processing techniques which such a machine might use. A program, which can calculate where to cut a plant with an "open" structure, is presented. This is expressed in the ProVision language, which is described in another article presented at this conference. (Article 1002-65)

  5. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  6. Carcinoma of the neck showing thymic-like elements (CASTLE): report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Maria Gaia; Romano, Fabrizio; De Fina, Sergio; Sartori, Paola; Leone, Eugenio Biagio; Rubino, Barbara; Uggeri, Franco

    2006-04-01

    Carcinoma showing thymic-like elements (CASTLE) is a rare tumor affecting thyroid and neck soft tissues, which has to be distinguished from squamous cell and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, because it has a better prognosis. We report a new case of CASTLE which occurred in a patient submitted to total thyroidectomy with central neck dissection. The tumor stained positively for CD5, which seems to be the most useful marker in the differential diagnosis. By the analysis of the 18 cases reported in literature, total thyroidectomy with selective modified neck dissection should be the treatment of choice and radiotherapy should be considered for patients with positive nodal status. PMID:16703183

  7. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  8. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  9. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  10. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  11. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  12. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  13. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Indications and Extent of Central Neck Dissection—Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Boi, Francesco; Baghino, Germana; Nicolosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the rate of metastases in the central neck compartment and examine the morbidity and rate of recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with or without a central neck dissection. Two hundred and fifteen patients undergoing total thyroidectomy with preoperative diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer, in the absence of suspicious nodes, were divided in two groups: those who underwent a thyroidectomy only (group A; n = 169) and those who also received a central neck dissection (group B; n = 46). Five cases (2.32%) of nodal recurrence were observed: 3 in group A and 2 in group B. Tumor histology was associated with a risk of recurrence: Hürthle cell-variant and tall cell-variant carcinomas were associated with a high risk of recurrence. Multifocality and extrathyroidal invasion also presented a higher risk, while smaller tumors were at lower risk. The results of this study suggest that prophylactic central neck dissection should be reserved for high-risk patients only. A wider use of immunocytochemical and genetic markers to improve preoperative diagnosis and the development of methods for the intraoperative identification of metastatic lymph nodes will be useful in the future for the improved selection of patients for central neck dissections. PMID:24282633

  14. Experience with parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm that can be used for partitioning graphs embedded in 2- or 3-dimensional space. It partitions explicitly on the basis of nodes + (lambda)x(edges cut), where lambda is the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. The new algorithm is faster than the original binary dissection algorithm and attempts to obtain better partitions than the older algorithm, which only takes nodes into account. The performance of parametric dissection with plain binary dissection on 3 large unstructured 3-d meshes obtained from computational fluid dynamics and on 2 random graphs were compared. It was showm that the new algorithm can usually yield partitions that are substantially superior, but that its performance is heavily dependent on the input data.

  15. NSAID-induced pyloric stenosis leading to oesophageal intramucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Tey, Kai Rou; Kemmerly, Thomas; Banerjee, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 75-year-old woman with significant non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use who presented with haematemesis. Upper endoscopy revealed a large (9 cm) intramucosal dissection of the oesophagus without extension into the gastro-oesophageal junction and a severely narrowed pylorus. We postulate that she developed pyloric stenosis due to peptic ulcer disease from chronic NSAID use. This then led to gastro-oesophageal reflux. Undigested pills in the refluxate had contacted oesophageal mucosa, leading to pill-induced oesophageal injury. This, along with vomiting, is postulated to have led to the oesophageal intramucosal dissection. She improved with conservative medical management with a clear liquid diet and proton pump inhibitors, and a follow-up upper endoscopy 1 week later showed recovery of the previously seen intramucosal dissection. PMID:27199442

  16. Cervical arterial dissection: current concepts .

    PubMed

    Menon, Ranjith K; Norris, John W

    2008-10-01

    The increasing use and safety of noninvasive imaging in recent years has revealed the surprising frequency of dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries (cervical arterial dissection [CAD]) as a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. This review is an overview of current concepts and practice of patients with CAD, but our ideas are constantly evolving with new discoveries from neurovascular imaging and medical and surgical management in this area. PMID:18990128

  17. The discovery of the body: human dissection and its cultural contexts in ancient Greece.

    PubMed Central

    von Staden, H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first half of the third century B.C, two Greeks, Herophilus of Chalcedon and his younger contemporary Erasistratus of Ceos, became the first and last ancient scientists to perform systematic dissections of human cadavers. In all probability, they also conducted vivisections of condemned criminals. Their anatomical and physiological discoveries were extraordinary. The uniqueness of these events presents an intriguing historical puzzle. Animals had been dissected by Aristotle in the preceding century (and partly dissected by other Greeks in earlier centuries), and, later, Galen (second century A.D.) and others again systematically dissected numerous animals. But no ancient scientists ever seem to have resumed systematic human dissection. This paper explores, first, the cultural factors--including traditional Greek attitudes to the corpse and to the skin, also as manifested in Greek sacred laws--that may have prevented systematic human dissection during almost all of Greek antiquity, from the Pre-Socratic philosopher-scientists of the sixth and fifth centuries B.C. to distinguished Greek physicians of the later Roman Empire. Second, the exceptional constellation of cultural, political, and social circumstances in early Alexandria that might have emboldened Herophilus to overcome the pressures of cultural traditions and to initiate systematic human dissection, is analyzed. Finally, the paper explores possible reasons for the mysteriously abrupt disappearance of systematic human dissection from Greek science after the death of Erasistratus and Herophilus. PMID:1285450

  18. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

  19. Evaluation and management of symptomatic isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissection.

    PubMed

    Galastri, Francisco Leonardo; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Motta-Leal-Filho, Joaquim Mauricio; De Fina, Bruna; Affonso, Breno Boueri; de Amorim, Jorge Eduardo; Wolosker, Nelson; Nasser, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe 10 cases of symptomatic isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissection (ISCTD) in order to evaluate the initial clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment modalities and outcomes. A retrospective search was performed from 2009 to 2014 and 10 patients with ISCTD were included in the study. Patients with associated aortic and/or other visceral artery dissection were excluded. The following information was collected from each case: sex, age, associated risk factors, symptoms, diagnostic method, anatomic dissection pattern, treatment modality and outcome. Most patients were male (90%), with an average age of 44.8 years, and the most common symptom was abdominal pain (100%). Hypertension and vasculitis (polyarteritis nodosa) were the most frequent risk factors (40% and 30%, respectively). Diagnosis was made in all patients with computed tomography. Dissection was limited to the celiac trunk in three patients and extended to celiac branches in the other seven. Initial conservative treatment was attempted in every case and was successful in nine patients. In one case, initial conservative treatment was unsuccessful and arterial stenting with coil embolization of the false lumen was performed. After successful initial treatment, late progression of the dissection to aneurysmal dilatation was observed in two patients and it was decided to perform endovascular treatment. Mean follow-up was 19 months, ranging from 2 to 59 months. In conclusion, initial conservative treatment seems adequate for most patients with ISCTD. Long-term follow-up is mandatory, owing to the risk of later progression to aneurysm. PMID:25910918

  20. Chronic neck pain and masticatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Jean-François; Debuse, Thierry; Duquesnoy, Bernard

    2005-12-01

    Chronic nonspecific neck pain is a common problem in rheumatology and may resist conventional treatment. Pathophysiological links exist between the cervical spine and masticatory system. Occlusal disorders may cause neck pain and may respond to dental treatment. The estimated prevalence of occlusal disorders is about 45%, with half the cases being due to functional factors. Minor repeated masticatory dysfunction (MD) with craniocervical asymmetry is the most common clinical picture. The pain is usually located in the suboccipital region and refractory to conventional treatment. The time pattern may be suggestive, with nocturnal arousals or triggering by temporomandibular movements. MD should be strongly suspected in patients with at least two of the following: history of treated or untreated MD, unilateral temporomandibular joint pain and clicking, lateral deviation during mouth opening, and limitation of mouth opening (less than three fingerbreadths). Rheumatologists should consider MD among causes of neck pain, most notably in patients with abnormal craniocervical posture, signs linking the neck pain to mastication, and clinical manifestations of MD. Evidence suggesting that MD may cause neck pain has been published. However, studies are needed to determine whether treatment of MD can relieve neck pain. PMID:16226475

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Vazquez, Esther G.; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  2. A comparison of retention of anatomical knowledge in an introductory college biology course: Traditional dissection vs. virtual dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeger, Kelli Rae

    Dissection has always played a crucial role in biology and anatomy courses at all levels of education. However, in recent years, ethical concerns, as well as improved technology, have brought to the forefront the issue of whether virtual dissection is as effective or whether it is more effective than traditional dissection. Most prior research indicated the two methods produced equal results. However, none of those studies examined retention of information past the initial test of knowledge. Two groups of college students currently enrolled in an introductory level college biology course were given one hour to complete a frog dissection. One group performed a traditional frog dissection, making cuts in an actual preserved frog specimen with scalpels and scissors. The other group performed a virtual frog dissection, using "The Digital Frog 2" software. Immediately after the dissections were completed, each group was given an examination consisting of questions on actual specimens, pictures generated from the computer software, and illustrations that neither group had seen. Two weeks later, unannounced, the groups took the same exam in order to test retention. The traditional dissection group scored significantly higher on two of the three sections, as well as the total score on the initial exam. However, with the exception of specimen questions (on which the traditional group retained significantly more information), there was no significant difference in the retention from exam 1 to exam 2 between the two groups. These results, along with the majority of prior studies, show that the two methods produce, for the most part, the same end results. Therefore, the decision of which method to employ should be based on the goals and preferences of the instructor(s) and the department. If that department's goals include: Being at the forefront of new technology, increasing time management, increasing student: teacher ratio for economic reasons, and/or ethical issues, then

  3. Forgotten triangles of neck

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons

  4. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  5. [Congenital neck mass. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Epprecht-González, M P; Alba-Mesquida, J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. Although some of them are diagnosed in utero, most of them remain silent until complications appear in the adult age. The anatomical location, consistency and age are determinants in guiding the possible diagnosis. A midline infrahyoid mass may be a thyroglossal cyst, however a lateral neck mass is more possible to result in a brachial cyst. Complementary imaging studies are essential such as pathological tests like needle aspiration fine needle aspiration (FNA). PMID:26558520

  6. Neck skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Duplechain, J Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The author of this article uses the pulsed ablative CO2 laser for resurfacing of the neck and face, based on the gold standard status of the CO2 laser and a novel post-treatment plan that greatly reduces adverse effects traditionally associated with fully ablative resurfacing. The croton oil peel is an inexpensive and effective modality for rejuvenating neck skin. The use of either technique as an adjunct to neck lift surgery, with or without facelift surgery, permits surgeons to fulfill the expectations of patients who want the skin of their face and neck to be homogeneous and more attractive. PMID:24745383

  7. Functional dissection of the lck proximal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J M; Forbush, K A; Perlmutter, R M

    1992-01-01

    The lck gene encodes a protein tyrosine kinase that participates in lymphocyte-specific signal transduction pathways. Previous studies have established that lck transcription is regulated by two distinct promoter elements termed proximal (or 3') and distal (or 5'). The proximal promoter is active almost exclusively in thymocytes and becomes inactive later during T-cell maturation. To dissect the mechanisms responsible for lck gene regulation, we generated transgenic animals bearing 5' truncations in the proximal promoter element. Sequences between -584 and +37 with respect to the proximal promoter transcription start site act to direct tissue-specific and temporally correct transcription of either a tagged version of the lck gene itself or a heterologous reporter sequence (lacZ). This region contains binding sites for at least five distinct nuclear proteins, of which one is found only in cells that support proximal lck promoter activity and a second appears only in nonexpressing cells. Interestingly, the transcribed region of the lck gene contains positive control elements that can substantially boost expression from minimal (-130 bp) proximal promoter constructs. These results provide a basis for the biochemical dissection of transcriptional regulators that act at defined points during T-cell development. Images PMID:1588967

  8. Course and Prognostic Factors for Neck Pain in Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Côté, Pierre; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Holm, Lena W.; Carragee, Eugene J.; Hurwitz, Eric L.; Peloso, Paul M.; Cassidy, J. David; Guzman, Jaime; Nordin, Margareta; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best-evidence synthesis. Objective To perform a best evidence synthesis on the course and prognostic factors for neck pain and its associated disorders in workers. Summary of Background Data Knowledge of the course of neck pain in workers guides expectations for recovery. Identifying prognostic factors assists in planning effective workplace policies, formulating interventions and promoting lifestyle changes to decrease the frequency and burden of neck pain in the workplace. Methods The Bone and Joint Decade 2000−2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force) conducted a critical review of the literature published between 1980 and 2006 to assemble the best evidence on neck pain and its associated disorders. Studies meeting criteria for scientific validity were included in a best evidence synthesis. Results We found 226 articles related to course and prognostic factors in neck pain and its associated disorders. After a critical review, 70 (31%) were accepted on scientific merit; 14 of these studies related to course and prognostic factors in working populations. Between 60% and 80% of workers with neck pain reported neck pain1 year later. Few workplace or physical job demands were identified as being linked to recovery from neck pain. However, workers with little influence on their own work situation had a slightly poorer prognosis, and white-collar workers had a better prognosis than blue-collar workers. General exercise was associated with better prognosis; prior neck pain and prior sick leave were associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusion The Neck Pain Task Force presents a report of current best evidence on course and prognosis for neck pain. Few modifiable prognostic factors were identified; however, having some influence over one's own job and being physically active seem to hold promise as prognostic factors.

  9. Horner's Syndrome due to a Spontaneous Internal Carotid Artery Dissection after Deep Sea Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Reyes, Jose Luis; Envid Lázaro, Blanca Mar; Fernández Letamendi, Teresa; Yeste Martín, Ryth; Jódar Morente, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) is a rare entity that either results from traumatic injury or can be spontaneously preceded or not by a minor trauma such as sporting activities. It represents a major cause of stroke in young patients. The diagnosis should be suspected with the combination of Horner's syndrome, headache or neck pain, and retinal or cerebral ischaemia. The confirmation is frequently made with a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Although anticoagulation with heparin followed by vitamin-K-antagonists is the most common treatment, there is no difference in efficacy of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs at preventing stroke and death in patients with symptomatic carotid dissection. We describe a patient with ICAD following deep sea scuba diving, who presented with Horner's syndrome and neck pain and was successfully treated with anticoagulants. PMID:27525139

  10. Horner's Syndrome due to a Spontaneous Internal Carotid Artery Dissection after Deep Sea Scuba Diving.

    PubMed

    Alonso Formento, Jose Enrique; Fernández Reyes, Jose Luis; Envid Lázaro, Blanca Mar; Fernández Letamendi, Teresa; Yeste Martín, Ryth; Jódar Morente, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) is a rare entity that either results from traumatic injury or can be spontaneously preceded or not by a minor trauma such as sporting activities. It represents a major cause of stroke in young patients. The diagnosis should be suspected with the combination of Horner's syndrome, headache or neck pain, and retinal or cerebral ischaemia. The confirmation is frequently made with a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Although anticoagulation with heparin followed by vitamin-K-antagonists is the most common treatment, there is no difference in efficacy of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs at preventing stroke and death in patients with symptomatic carotid dissection. We describe a patient with ICAD following deep sea scuba diving, who presented with Horner's syndrome and neck pain and was successfully treated with anticoagulants. PMID:27525139

  11. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:25795261

  12. Dissection of ascending aorta. Rare complication of aortocoronary venous bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, P; Perrenoud, J J; Périat, M

    1981-01-01

    Dissection of the ascending aorta is a rare complication of aortocoronary bypass surgery. A 63-year-old man who had received a double graft was found to have dissection of the ascending aorta, which was shown angiographically four months after operation. Since the patient was asymptomatic, operation was postponed. He has been followed up regularly and two years later his condition is still satisfactory. Images PMID:6976179

  13. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Hallett, John W.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  14. The impact of gross anatomy on the future head and neck surgeon.

    PubMed

    Archibald, David J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2009-01-01

    Gross anatomy is not only a rite of passage for medical students as they enter the world of practicing medicine but may also be an unrecognized fork in the road in their pursuit of choosing a medical specialty. Otolaryngology: head and neck surgery tends to be poorly represented in medical school curriculum, often only offered as an elective rotation. However, head and neck anatomy remains a constant in most medical schools, granting some exposure to otolaryngology whether students realize it or not. A common thread among most head and neck surgeons in their decision to pursue this surgical specialty is a love for head and neck anatomy, spawned in that first year gross anatomy course. This first and potentially only exposure to otolaryngology should be optimized, as it can have a profound effect in the selection of otolaryngology as a specialty. This introduction can be facilitated by (1) inviting otolaryngology residents to assist during the dissection of the head and neck, (2) soliciting otolaryngology attending physicians to provide clinical correlation lectures, and (3) anatomy professors should identify students who excel in the head and neck portion of the curriculum and direct them towards otolaryngology mentors. There may be a great missed opportunity if a career in otolaryngology is not discussed with students during the dissection of the head and neck. PMID:19347950

  15. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1–3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  16. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  17. Animal Rights Activism Threatens Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Constance

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the movement against the use of dissections in science laboratories. Examples of protests across the United States are included. Compared is the plight of using animals in a biology classroom and the demise of the teaching of evolution in some areas. (KR)

  18. Dissection & Science Fairs. [Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    This collection of pamphlets and articles reprinted from other National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) publications was compiled to address the issues of classroom laboratory dissection and the use of animals in science fair projects. Three of the pamphlets contained in this packet are student handbooks designed to help students of elementary,…

  19. Spontaneous internal carotid dissection in a 38-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abed, Kareem; Misra, Amit; Vankawala, Viren

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a patient found to have amaurosis fugax as a result of non-traumatic internal carotid dissection. Monocular blindness can be due to multiple causes including keratitis, acute glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage, uveitis, retinal vascular occlusion, retinal detachment, optic neuropathy, trauma, or vascular malformations. In the setting of headache, neck pain, and an otherwise normal ophthalmic examination, this case report highlights the importance of recognizing transient ischemic attack and carotid artery dissection in the differential diagnosis. To further clarify the diagnosis, carotid ultrasound may aid diagnosis as was seen in this case, where decreased internal carotid artery velocities were found and subsequent CT angiography of the neck confirmed a diagnosis of carotid dissection. If a dissection is present, progression of symptoms may indicate impending cerebral infarction and warrant immediate attention. Antiplatelet therapy is the first-line treatment with anticoagulation, thrombolysis, and surgery reserved for cases of recurrent, progressive symptomatic episodes. Surgical options include endovascular repair such as angioplasty, stent placement, embolization, surgical revascularization, and bypass. PMID:26486115

  20. Hebephilia: A Postmortem Dissection.

    PubMed

    Singy, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    In 2008, the concept of hebephilia, which denotes an erotic preference for "pubescent children," was suggested by Blanchard and his team for inclusion in the DSM-5 (Blanchard et al., 2009). Four years later, the APA's Board of Trustees opted for the status quo and rejected that proposal. This essay sheds light on the reason for this rejection. I consider three important questions related to hebephilia: Does hebephilia exist? Is it a disease? And what would have been the social consequences of including it in the DSM? I argue that if Blanchard failed to convince others that hebephilia should be included in the DSM-5, it is not because he focused too much on the first question and was unable to offer a convincing answer to the second one, but because he made the mistake of dismissing the third one as extraneous. The DSM is not intended to be a pure research manual, and a category like hebephilia cannot be evaluated without taking into account its potential forensic impact. In part or in whole, the decision to include a new diagnostic category in the DSM is, and always should be, a political decision. PMID:25894647

  1. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  2. [Aortic intramural hematoma. An atypical pattern equivalent to aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    López-Mínguez, J R; Merchán, A; Arrobas, J; Fernández, G; González-Egüaras, M; García-Andoaín, J M; Alonso, M; Gamero, C; Poblador, M A; Alonso, F

    1995-09-01

    A case is presented of a hypertensive woman who had suffered a stabbing back pain for some three hours, with mild irradiation to precordium and accompanied by vegetative signs. A sinusal rhythm and negative T waves of little depth were seen on the ECG. A transthoracic bidimensional echocardiogram (TTE) showed a normal left ventricle with a somewhat dilated aortic root and the existence of a double echo running parallel to the anterior wall of the aorta but non-ondulating and without a visible intimal flap. Because of suspected aortic dissection an urgent contrasted CAT and a transesophageal echocardiogram were performed. These were informed as an aneurysm of the aortic root with mural thrombus from the ascending to descending aorta, but with no existing intimal flap suggesting dissection. A cardiac catheterization showed a mildly some dilated aortic root without dissection signs and normal left ventricle and coronary arteries. The patient was presented for surgical evaluation but, since no dissection was present, was not considered urgent surgery; she was admitted to the coronary unit and died 48 hours later in a situation of acute pericardial tamponade, documented by TTE, surely due to rupture of the aortic root to pericardial sack. This way of presenting threatened aorta rupture that has been only recently recognized is discussed, as well as some misconceptions which must be avoided. PMID:7569267

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Isolated Dissection of Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    PubMed

    Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Galzerano, G; Setacci, C

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery is extremely rare. In December 2012, a 45-year-old man, without significant comorbidities, presented at the emergency room of another hospital with abdominal pain. The patient was treated with medical therapy and discharged on resolution of the pain. Three months later he returned to the emergency room with a new onset of pain. CT-angiography (CTA) showed an isolated SMA dissection associated with aneurysmal dilatation. The patient was referred to our attention. We attempted endovascular exclusion of the dissecting aneurysm in May 2013. We deployed a self-expandable nitinol stent (BostonSC Adapt 4-9×32 mm) in order to simultaneously repair the dissection, preserve the branches and exclude the aneurysm. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. At 10-month follow-up CTA showed excellent positioning of the stent, patency of the visceral branches and shrinkage of the aneurysm. PMID:26324038

  4. Concurrence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Suzuki, Takeya; Wakako, Akira; Sadato, Akiyo; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of concurrent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and acute aortic dissection (AAD). A 38-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of severe headache, and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of SAH. Thoracic to neck computed tomography angiography (CTA), performed in addition to brain CTA, suggested a tear in the aortic arch, and subsequent CT aortography established the diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. The AAD in our patient, who reported no episodes of chest or back pain, was detected incidentally by thoracic to neck CTA. The imaging study has rarely been indicated for SAH except that it provides additional anatomical information in patients for whom extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery or endovascular treatment is considered. Nevertheless, our experience may highlight additional diagnostic value of thoracic to neck CTA in SAH patients. PMID:27083068

  5. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  6. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  7. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  8. Neck-Tongue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nancy; Dougherty, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is a headache disorder often initiated by rapid axial rotation of the neck resulting in unilateral neck and/or occipital pain and transient ipsilateral tongue sensory disturbance. In this review, we examine reported cases of NTS since its initial description in 1980 to highlight the significance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of headache in patients presenting with neck pain and altered tongue sensation. The anatomical basis of NTS centers on the C1-C2 facet joint, C2 ventral ramus, and inferior oblique muscle in the atlanto-axial space. NTS may be categorized as complicated (secondary to another disease process) or uncomplicated (hereditary, related to trauma, or idiopathic). Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion after a thorough history and physical without a pathognomonic radiologic finding. It is typically treated conservatively with medications, local injections, immobilization with cervical collars, or physical therapy; rarely is surgical intervention pursued. PMID:26984539

  9. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  10. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  11. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    PubMed

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    Spinal injury following inertial loading of the head and neck (whiplash) is a common sequel of low speed traffic crashes. A variety of non-musculoskeletal injuries have been described in association with injury to the spine following whiplash trauma, including traumatic brain injury, vestibular derangement, and cranial nerve injury, among others. Vascular injuries in the head and neck have, however, only rarely been described. We present the case of a middle-aged male who sustained an ultimately fatal injury that resulted from injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intracerebral vascular structures following a hard braking maneuver, with no direct head- or neck contact with the vehicular interior. Based on this unusual mechanism of injury we reviewed hospital data from the United States nationwide inpatient database (NIS) to assess the frequency of similar injuries reportedly resulting from traffic crashes. The post-mortem examination revealed a left internal carotid artery dissection associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the close temporal association, the absent prior history, and the plausibility of the injury mechanism, the injury was attributed to the braking maneuver. An analysis of NIS data demonstrated that the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is significantly higher when there is a traumatic etiology, and higher yet when the trauma is a traffic crash (odds ratio 3.3 and 4.3, respectively). The presented case, together with the hospital inpatient data analysis, indicate that although SAH in combination with ICA dissection is relatively rare, it is substantially more probable following a traffic crash. In a clinical or forensic setting the inference that magnitude of a trauma was low should not serve as a basis for either excluding a cervical artery dissection from a differential diagnosis, or for excluding the trauma as a cause of a diagnosed dissection. This case report illustrates a rare fatal outcome of inertial load to

  12. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    PubMed

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength. PMID:24893597

  13. Thoracic Aortic Dissection: Are Matrix Metalloproteinases Involved?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Shen, Ying H.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection, one of the major diseases affecting the aorta, carries a very high mortality rate. Improving our understanding of the pathobiology of this disease may help us develop medical treatments to prevent dissection and subsequent aneurysm formation and rupture. Dissection is associated with degeneration of the aortic media. Recent studies have shown increased expression and activation of a family of proteolytic enzymes—called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)—in dissected aortic tissue, suggesting that MMPs may play a major role in this disease. Inhibition of MMPs may be beneficial in reducing MMP-mediated aortic damage associated with dissection. This article reviews the recent literature and summarizes our current understanding of the role of MMPs in the pathobiology of thoracic aortic dissection. The potential importance of MMP inhibition as a future treatment of aortic dissection is also discussed. PMID:19476747

  14. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses. PMID:21546166

  15. Dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Jyoti P; Marmon, Shoshana; Fischer, Max; Kamino, Hideko; Patel, Rishi; Shapiro, Jerry

    2012-12-01

    Dissecting cellulitis of the scalp is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disease of the scalp that results in scarring alopecia. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with recalcitrant disease who is now responding to treatment with isotretinoin. The pathogenesis, clinical presentation, disease associations, and histopathological findings are reviewed. Treatment can be challenging. The literature on medical and surgical therapeutic options is reviewed. PMID:23286798

  16. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  17. The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J. David; Carroll, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II–IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12–4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain. PMID:20213298

  18. Acute carotid artery dissection treated with stenting and hematoma aspiration guided by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liming; Zha, Changsong; Liu, Hao; Xu, Jianjun; Xiang, Yuexia; Zou, Zhongmin

    2013-10-01

    We report the successful treatment of dissection with stenosis of the carotid artery by stenting and aspiration of hematoma. A male patient, presenting with acute blurred vision and weakness and numbness of the right side of his body, was diagnosed with common carotid artery (CCA) dissection and severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and CCA by digital subtraction arteriography and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU). Two stents were separately implanted into the left internal carotid artery and CCA to restore blood flow and seal the opening of the dissection. The hematoma inside the CCA dissection was transcutaneously aspirated under CDU guidance after thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. Three days after the operation, the dissection was still sealed. The patient was discharged 1 week later without any signs or symptoms. Follow-up examination at 70 days confirmed complete healing of the CCA dissection. Transcutaneous intradissection hematoma aspiration with CDU guidance may be applicable in treating arterial dissection, especially when conservative treatments cannot be expected to improve severe flow disturbances. PMID:22941665

  19. Iatrogenic dissection of the descending aorta: Conservative or endovascular treatment?

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Kratimenos, Theodoros; Karameri, Vasiliki; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is without any doubt a standard technique and the treatment of choice of severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in very high-operative risk patients. However, a number of complications may occur and has been described. Improper valve position, valve migration, paravalvular regurgitation, conduction disturbances, stroke and aortic dissection have been succeeded despite the perfection of the technique. For anyone of the complications above described, a solution may be invented. We present an interesting case of an 81-year-old woman with severe AVS treated through TAVI due to very high operative risk. This female, 12 days later presented with thoracic pain and shortness of breath and through the computed tomography of the chest performed was diagnosed a dissection of the descending aorta. She successfully underwent on thoracic endovascular aortic repair. In this report, we refer the bibliographic data and we discuss the treatment options in these cases. PMID:27397470

  20. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  1. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: II. a review of therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Strojan, Primož; Ferlito, Alfio; Langendijk, Johannes A; Corry, June; Woolgar, Julia A; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E; Paleri, Vinidh; Fagan, Johannes J; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Haigentz, Missak; Suárez, Carlos; Robbins, K Thomas; Rodrigo, Juan P; Olsen, Kerry D; Hinni, Michael L; Werner, Jochen A; Mondin, Vanni; Kowalski, Luiz P; Devaney, Kenneth O; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Wolf, Gregory T; Shaha, Ashok R; Genden, Eric M; Barnes, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Although uncommon, cancer of an unknown primary (CUP) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes poses a range of dilemmas relating to optimal treatment. The ideal resolution would be a properly designed prospective randomized trial, but it is unlikely that this will ever be conducted in this group of patients. Accordingly, knowledge gained from retrospective studies and experience from treating patients with known head and neck primary tumors form the basis of therapeutic strategies in CUP. This review provides a critical appraisal of various treatment approaches described in the literature. Emerging treatment options for CUP with metastases to cervical lymph nodes are discussed in view of recent innovations in the field of head and neck oncology and suitable therapeutic strategies for particular clinical scenarios are presented. For pN1 or cN1 disease without extracapsular extension (ECE), selective neck dissection or radiotherapy offer high rates of regional control. For more advanced neck disease, intensive combined treatment is required, either a combination of neck dissection and radiotherapy, or initial (chemo)radiotherapy followed by neck dissection if a complete response is not recorded on imaging. Each of these approaches seems to be equally effective. Use of extensive bilateral neck/mucosal irradiation must be weighed against toxicity, availability of close follow-up with elective neck imaging and guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) when appropriate, the human papillomavirus (HPV) status of the tumor, and particularly against the distribution pattern (oropharynx in the majority of cases) and the emergence rate of hidden primary lesions (<10% after comprehensive workup). The addition of systemic agents is expected to yield similar improvement in outcome as has been observed for known head and neck primary tumors. PMID:22034062

  2. Intensity modulated perioperative HDR brachytherapy for recurrent and/or advanced head and neck metastases.

    PubMed

    Teudt, Ingo U; Kovàcs, György; Ritter, Matthias; Melchert, Corinna; Soror, Tamer; Wollenberg, Barbara; Meyer, Jens E

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent neck metastases following surgery and full dose adjuvant radiotherapy of squamous cell head and neck cancer remain a clinical challenge. After revision neck dissection and chemotherapy re-irradiation dosage is often limited and survival prognosis deteriorates. Here, adjuvant high-dose rate intensity modulated perioperative brachytherapy (HDR IMBT) offers a second full radiation dose with a limited volume of normal tissue radiation in the neck. In this retrospective study patients were identified who underwent revision surgery and perioperative HDR IMBT for recurrent neck metastases. Survival rates were estimated and the scarce literature on interstitial brachytherapy of the neck was reviewed. From 2006 to 2014, nine patients were treated for recurrent or palliative neck metastases using salvage surgery and HDR IMBT. Eight patients received previous surgery and external beam radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Two and five year overall survival was calculated to be 78 and 67 %, respectively. HDR IMBT is a salvage treatment option for selected cases in the neck following surgical revision or last-line treatment strategies. In the literature and this small cohort radiation toxicity and the risk of "carotid blow-out" seemed to be low. PMID:26498949

  3. [Isolated spontaneous dissection of visceral arteries].

    PubMed

    Corral, M A; Encinas, J; Fernández-Pérez, G C

    2014-01-01

    We present the cases of two men with isolated spontaneous dissection of visceral arteries diagnosed by multidetector CT. In the first patient, dissection of the celiac trunk was associated with periarterial changes. In the second patient, dissection of the superior mesenteric artery was associated with stenosis at the root of the celiac trunk. Both patients presented with acute pain, which was more intense and longer lasting in the first patient. Aortic dissection was suspected clinically in both patients. Both dissections were short and had patent saccular false lumens and reduced caliber of the true lumens. This morphological type is one of the most uncommon within this rare entity. However, in recent years, the number of cases published is rising. This suggests that this entity may have been underdiagnosed before the widespread use of multidetector CT. We discuss the two morphological classifications of dissection of the visceral arteries and the need to adapt therapeutic management to the particular circumstances of each case. PMID:21724211

  4. The equine neck and its function during movement and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zsoldos, Rebeka R; Licka, Theresia F

    2015-10-01

    During both locomotion and body movements at stance, the head and neck of the horse are a major craniocaudal and lateral balancing mechanism employing input from the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The function of the equine neck has recently become the focus of several research groups; this is probably also feeding on an increase of interest in the equine neck in equestrian sports, with a controversial discussion of specific neck positions such as maximum head and neck flexion. The aim of this review is to offer an overview of new findings on the structures and functions of the equine neck, illustrating their interplay. The movement of the neck is based on intervertebral motion, but it is also an integral part of locomotion; this is illustrated by the different neck conformations in the breeds of horses used for various types of work. The considerable effect of the neck movement and posture onto the whole trunk and even the limbs is transmitted via bony, ligamentous and muscular structures. Also, the fact that the neck position can easily be influenced by the rider and/or by the employment of training aids makes it an important avenue for training of new movements of the neck as well as the whole horse. Additionally, the neck position also affects the cervical spinal cord as well as the roots of the spinal nerves; besides the commonly encountered long-term neurological effects of cervical vertebral disorders, short-term changes of neural and muscular function have also been identified in the maximum flexion of the cranial neck and head position. During locomotion, the neck stores elastic energy within the passive tissues such as ligaments, joint capsules and fasciae. For adequate stabilisation, additional muscle activity is necessary; this is learned and requires constant muscle training as it is essential to prevent excessive wear and tear on the vertebral joints and also repetitive or single trauma to the spinal nerves and the spinal cord. The

  5. Less may be more: nodal treatment in neck positive head neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Studer, Gabriela; Huber, Gerhard F; Holz, Edna; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing debates about the need and extent of planned neck dissection (PND), and required nodal radiation doses volumes lead to this evaluation. Aim was to assess nodal control after definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT ± systemic therapy) followed by PND in our head neck cancer cohort with advanced nodal disease. Between 01/2005 and 12/2013, 99 squamous cell cancer HNC patients with pre-therapeutic nodal metastasis ≥3 cm were treated with definitive IMRT followed by PND. In addition, outcome in 103 patients with nodal relapse after IMRT and observation only (no-PND cohort) were analyzed. Prior to PND, PET-CT, fine needle aspirations, ultrasound and palpation were assessed regarding its predictive value. Patterns of nodal relapse were assessed in patients with isolated neck failure after definitive IMRT alone. 70/99 (70 %) PND specimens showed histopathological complete response (hCR), which translated into statistically significantly superior survival compared with partial response (hPR) with 4-year overall survival, disease specific survival and nodal control rates of 90/83/96 vs 67/60/78 % (p = 0.002/0.001/0.003). 1/99 patient developed isolated subsequent nodal disease. 64/2147 removed nodes contained viable tumor (3 %). Predictive information of the performed diagnostic investigations was not reliable. 17/70 hCR patients showed true negative findings in available three to four investigations (0/29 hPR). 27/103 no-PND patients developed isolated neck disease (26 %) with successful salvage in 21/24 [88 %, or 21/27 (78 %)]. Nearly all failures occurred in the prior nodal gross tumor volume area. A more restrictive approach regarding PND and/or nodal IMRT dose-volumes may be justified. PMID:25920604

  6. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  7. Update on primary head and neck mucosal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    López, Fernando; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Cardesa, Antonio; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Devaney, Kenneth O.; Mendenhall, William M.; Haigentz, Missak; Strojan, Primož; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Bradford, Carol R.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Hunt, Jennifer L.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas (PMMs) of the head and neck are uncommon malignancies that arise mainly in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, followed by the oral cavity. The mainstay of treatment is radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy in selected patients with high-risk features. Multimodality therapy has not been well studied and is not standardized. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems to improve locoregional control but does not improve overall survival (OS). Elective neck dissection is advocated in patients with oral PMM. Systemic therapy should be considered only for patients with metastatic or unresectable locoregional disease. Despite improvements in the field of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapy, patients with PMM still face a very unfavorable prognosis (5-year disease-free survival [DFS] <20%) with high rates of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis. The present review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on the molecular biology, pathological diagnosis, and management of this disease. PMID:25242350

  8. Evaluation of Educator & Student Use of & Attitudes toward Dissection & Dissection Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osenkowski, Pamela; Green, Che; Tjaden, Anne; Cunniff, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Animal dissection has been routinely practiced in American biology classrooms for decades. With technological advancements, more states adopting student choice measures, and increased awareness about ethical concerns surrounding dissection, many useful dissection alternatives have been developed. To understand the current use of animal dissection…

  9. Treatment of Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Eric L.; Cheng, Ivan; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul; Holm, Lena W.; Côthé, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on surgical interventions for neck pain alone or with radicular pain in the absence of serious pathologic disease. Summary of Background Data There have been no comprehensive systematic literature or evidence-based reviews published on this topic. Methods We systematically searched Medline for literature published from 1980 to 2006 on percutaneous and open surgical interventions for neck pain. Publications on the topic were also solicited from experts in the field. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our Best Evidence Synthesis. Results Of the 31,878 articles screened, 1203 studies were relevant to the Neck Pain Task Force mandate and of these, 31 regarding treatment by surgery or injections were accepted as scientifically admissible. Radiofrequency neurotomy, cervical facet injections, cervical fusion and cervical arthroplasty for neck pain without radiculopathy are not supported by current evidence. We found there is support for short-term symptomatic improvement of radicular symptoms with epidural corticosteroids. It is not clear from the evidence that long-term out comes are improved with the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy compared to non operative measures. However, relatively rapid and substantial symptomatic relief after surgical treatment seems to be reliably achieved. It is not evident that one open surgical technique is clearly superior to others for radiculopathy. Cervical foramenal or epidural injections are associated with relatively frequent minor adverse events (5%–20%); however, serious adverse events are very uncommon (<1%). After open surgical procedures on the cervical spine, potentially serious acute complications are seen in approximately 4% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment and limited

  10. Complex reconstructions in head and neck cancer surgery: decision making

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Defects in head and neck after tumor resection often provide significant functional and cosmetic deformity. The challenge for reconstruction is not only the aesthetic result, but the functional repair. Cancer may involve composite elements and the in sano resection may lead to an extensive tissue defect. No prospective randomized controlled studies for comparison of different free flaps are available. There are many options to cover defects and restore function in the head and neck area, however we conclude from experience that nearly all defects in head and neck can be closed by 5 different free flaps: radial forearm flap, free fibula flap, anterior lateral thigh flap, lateral arm flap and parascapular flap. PMID:21385421

  11. Management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary site to the head and neck (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shi Min; Wu, Xi-Fu; Li, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Ge-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) is an intriguing clinical phenomenon found in ~3-9% of all head and neck cancers. It has not yet been determined whether CUP forms a distinct biological entity with specific genetic and phenotypic characteristics, or whether it is the clinical presentation of metastasis in patients with an undetected primary tumor and no visible clinical signs. The treatment of patients with cervical lymph node metastases from CUP remains controversial, due to the lack of randomized clinical trials comparing different treatment options. Consequently, treatment is currently based on non-randomized data and institutional policy. In the present review, the range and limitations of diagnostic procedures are summarized and an optimal diagnostic work-up is recommended. The initial preferred diagnostic procedures include fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and imaging. Although neck dissection followed by postoperative radiotherapy is the the most generally accepted approach, other curative options may be used in certain patients, such as neck dissection alone, nodal excision followed by postoperative radiotherapy, or radiotherapy alone. There remains controversy regarding target radiation volumes, ranging from ipsilateral neck irradiation to prophylactic irradiation of all the potential mucosal sites and both sides of the neck. When no primary lesion is identified with imaging and endoscopy in patients without history of smoking and alcohol abuse, molecular profiling of an FNAB sample for human papillomavirus and/or Epstein-Barr virus is required. PMID:25279174

  12. Utility of an intraoperative ultrasound in lateral approach mini-parathyroidectomy with discordant pre-operative imaging.

    PubMed

    Al-Lami, Ali; Riffat, Faruque; Alamgir, Furqan; Dwivedi, Raghav; Berman, Laurence; Fish, Brian; Jani, Piyush

    2013-05-01

    Objectives of this study were to assess the utility of intra-operative ultrasound to resolve discordant pre-operative imaging prior to a lateral approach mini-parathyroidectomy, by studying prospective case series in a head and neck endocrine unit. Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to a single adenoma with discordant pre-operative ultrasound and sestamibi were enrolled. They underwent a further intra-operative ultrasound by a head and neck radiologist with a view to proceed with a mini-parathyroidectomy. The main outcome measure was utility of intra-operative ultrasound compared to operative findings and pre-operative imaging. Secondary measures were complications of mini-parathyroidectomy, operative and ambulatory discharge time. Twenty-two patients underwent surgery with intra-operative ultrasound in the surgical position. The intra-operative ultrasound findings correlated with the operative findings in all cases (100 %). There were 16 inferior adenomas and 6 superior adenomas. Six inferior adenomas were in a retrosternal position, eight were obscured by benign thyroid lesions and a further two reported pre-operatively as superior. Three out of six superior adenomas were reported as inferior pre-operatively as the inferior thyroid artery was inadequately visualised, two were retro-carotid and one was retro-oesophageal. All patients were discharged within 23 h of surgery. There were no unsuccessful focused explorations. Histological analysis confirmed the adenomas. No morbidity (vocal cord palsy, haematoma, hungry bones) was noted. The results indicated that intra-operative ultrasound by a dedicated radiologist is a valuable tool in resolving discordance of pre-operative imaging. Appropriate patient positioning with neck extension and muscle relaxation allows placement of the probe in the obscure retro-carotid and retro-oesophageal locations and unmasks apparent "mediastinal" parathyroids facilitating focused dissection. PMID:23183852

  13. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  14. Objecting To Dissection: A College Student's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    In a number of states, students from kindergarten through high school have won the right to refuse to dissect or kill animals and the right to substitute an alternative project. This booklet was designed to help college science students take an ethical stand by refusing to participate in dissection exercises. The booklet begins with an overview of…

  15. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  16. Quick Dissection of the Segmental Bronchi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional anatomy of the bronchopulmonary segments is essential for respiratory medicine. This report describes a quick guide for dissecting the segmental bronchi in formaldehyde-fixed human material. All segmental bronchi are easy to dissect, and thus, this exercise will help medical students to better understand the…

  17. Beyond Dissection: Innovative Tools for Biology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sandra, Ed.

    This catalog lists resources available for classroom use in teaching about anatomy and physiology which are alternatives to dissection. The entries are provided under three main categories: (1) Whole Animal Dissection/Vivisection; (2) Animal Organ or System Anatomy and Physiology; and (3) Other, including animal behavior, biotechnology,…

  18. Modeling plaque fissuring and dissection during balloon angioplasty intervention.

    PubMed

    Gasser, T Christian; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2007-05-01

    Balloon angioplasty intervention is traumatic to arterial tissue. Fracture mechanisms such as plaque fissuring and/or dissection occur and constitute major contributions to the lumen enlargement. However, these types of mechanically-based traumatization of arterial tissue are also contributing factors to both acute procedural complications and chronic restenosis of the treatment site. We propose physical and finite element models, which are generally useable to trace fissuring and/or dissection in atherosclerotic plaques during balloon angioplasty interventions. The arterial wall is described as an anisotropic, heterogeneous, highly deformable, nearly incompressible body, whereas tissue failure is captured by a strong discontinuity kinematics and a novel cohesive zone model. The numerical implementation is based on the partition of unity finite element method and the interface element method. The later is used to link together meshes of the different tissue components. The balloon angioplasty-based failure mechanisms are numerically studied in 3D by means of an atherosclerotic-prone human external iliac artery, with a type V lesion. Image-based 3D geometry is generated and tissue-specific material properties are considered. Numerical results show that in a primary phase the plaque fissures at both shoulders of the fibrous cap and stops at the lamina elastica interna. In a secondary phase, local dissections between the intima and the media develop at the fibrous cap location with the smallest thickness. The predicted results indicate that plaque fissuring and dissection cause localized mechanical trauma, but prevent the main portion of the stenosis from high stress, and hence from continuous tissue damage. PMID:17385047

  19. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Goh, Anne C H; Lundstrom, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome. PMID:26504447

  20. Biomechanical effects of dissecting flexor carpi ulnaris.

    PubMed

    Kreulen, M; Smeulders, M J C; Hage, J J; Huijing, P A

    2003-08-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the length and function of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle were affected by separating it from its soft tissue connections. We measured the length of flexor carpi ulnaris before and after its dissection in ten patients with cerebral palsy. After tenotomy, tetanic contraction shortened the muscle by a mean of 8 mm. Subsequent dissection to separate it from all soft tissue connections, resulted in a further mean shortening of 17 mm (p < 0.001). This indicated that the dissected connective tissue had been strong enough to maintain the length of the contracting muscle. Passive extension of the wrist still lengthened the muscle after tenotomy, whereas this excursion significantly decreased after subsequent dissection. We conclude that the connective tissue envelope, which may be dissected during tendon transfer of flexor carpi ulnaris may act as a myofascial pathway for the transmission of force. This may have clinical implications for the outcome after tendon transfer. PMID:12931805

  1. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome. PMID:26504447

  2. A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Yin, Bo; Fu, Fang-Wang; Shao, Sheng-Min; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. Here, we reported a rare case of locked-in syndrome (LIS) due to bilaterial VAD after CSM treated by arterial embolectomy.A 36-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with numbness and weakness of limbs after treating with CSM for neck for half an hour. Gradually, although the patient remained conscious, he could not speak but could communicate with the surrounding by blinking or moving his eyes, and turned to complete quadriplegia, complete facial and bulbar palsy, dyspnea at 4 hours after admission. He was diagnosed with LIS. Then, the patient was received cervical and brain computed tomography angiography that showed bilateral VAD. Aortocranial digital subtraction angiography showed vertebrobasilar thrombosis, blocking left vertebral artery, and stenosis of right vertebral artery. The patient was treated by using emergency arterial embolectomy and followed by antiplatelet therapy and supportive therapy in the intensive care unit and a general ward. Twenty-seven days later, the patient's physical function gradually improved and discharged but still left neurological deficit with muscle strength grade 3/5 and hyperreflexia of limbs.Our findings suggested that CSM might have potential severe side-effect like LIS due to bilaterial VAD, and arterial embolectomy is an important treatment choice. The practitioner must be aware of this complication and should give the patients informed consent to CSM, although not all stroke cases temporally related to SCM have pre-existing craniocervical artery dissection. PMID:26844510

  3. A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Yin, Bo; Fu, Fang-Wang; Shao, Sheng-Min; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. Here, we reported a rare case of locked-in syndrome (LIS) due to bilaterial VAD after CSM treated by arterial embolectomy. A 36-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with numbness and weakness of limbs after treating with CSM for neck for half an hour. Gradually, although the patient remained conscious, he could not speak but could communicate with the surrounding by blinking or moving his eyes, and turned to complete quadriplegia, complete facial and bulbar palsy, dyspnea at 4 hours after admission. He was diagnosed with LIS. Then, the patient was received cervical and brain computed tomography angiography that showed bilateral VAD. Aortocranial digital subtraction angiography showed vertebrobasilar thrombosis, blocking left vertebral artery, and stenosis of right vertebral artery. The patient was treated by using emergency arterial embolectomy and followed by antiplatelet therapy and supportive therapy in the intensive care unit and a general ward. Twenty-seven days later, the patient's physical function gradually improved and discharged but still left neurological deficit with muscle strength grade 3/5 and hyperreflexia of limbs. Our findings suggested that CSM might have potential severe side-effect like LIS due to bilaterial VAD, and arterial embolectomy is an important treatment choice. The practitioner must be aware of this complication and should give the patients informed consent to CSM, although not all stroke cases temporally related to SCM have pre-existing craniocervical artery dissection. PMID:26844510

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  5. [Head and neck cancer--history].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    According to epidemiological data head and neck cancers constitute for 12% of all malignancies in the world. It is estimated that a total of 400 000 cases of the mouth and throat and of 160 000 cases of laryngeal cancer, 300 000 people die each year. History of head and neck cancers developed and underwent many changes at the turn of the century. Treatment, pathogenesis and possessed state of knowledge on the subject has changed. Starting from the ancient times there were texts on how to treat and examine patients. The Edwin Smith and Ebers Papyrus are two of the oldest medical documents describing the treatment of cancer patients. Hippocrates was the first person who used the word "cancer" and probably he was the first who divided the tumors into benign and malignant. In a document known as the Doctrine of Hippocrates he described skin cancer and cancer treatments. Over the next centuries, medical science did not develop because of religious concerns about autopsy and surgical procedures. The 17th century is a period in which there were a lot of new information about how to treat such oral cancer. Cancer of the tongue was removed by cauterization, which in the 18th century was replaced by the use of surgical instruments. In the same age glossectomy has been accepted as the treatment of choice performed in the treatment of cancer. The 19th century brought a major breakthrough in the treatment of surgical, diagnostic, anesthetic techniques and understanding of the pathological mechanisms. Histological evaluation of tumors has become mandatory and standard practice in the assessment of cancer. Laryngectomy and neck lymph nodes removal has become commonplace. Modified Radical Neck Dissection (MRND), became popularized as another cancer treatment technique. Describing ways to treat cancer, radiotherapy can not be ignored - there are several new techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionation currently used. Chemotherapy and the

  6. Stenotic and obstructive lesions in acute dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1975-05-01

    The present study of 33 operatively treated patients, 88 per cent of whom survived the procedure, is concerned with an important problem associated with acute thoracic aortic dissection, the stenotic and obstructive lesions of the aorta and its branches. Their variety and nature are described, as are the additional operative procedures deemed necessary at the time of the operation, immediately thereafter, or later on. Much has been learned about these difficulties from clinical and autopsy observations and especially from careful arteriographic surveys. They seem to be generally well withstood following resectional and grafting procedures upon the affected segment of the thoracic aorta. Occasionally, additional operative manipulations may be necessary at the same time, for example, interpolation of grafts between the ascending aortic graft and a coronary when the origin of the latter is sheared off by the dissection, and distal arterial manipulations when the patient still has ischemic lower extremities immediately after the primary procedure. Later operations must sometimes be performed because of persistence of complaints such as intermittent claudication. It is extremely rare that immediate reoperation is advisable because of indications of intra-abdominal ischemia. Much more can be learned from careful pre- and postoperative arteriographic study. PMID:1130882

  7. Stenotic and obstructive lesions in acute dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1975-01-01

    The present study of 33 operatively treated patients, 88 per cent of whom survived the procedure, is concerned with an important problem associated with acute thoracic aortic dissection, the stenotic and obstructive lesions of the aorta and its branches. Their variety and nature are described, as are the additional operative procedures deemed necessary at the time of the operation, immediately thereafter, or later on. Much has been learned about these difficulties from clinical and autopsy observations and especially from careful arteriographic surveys. They seem to be generally well withstood following resectional and grafting procedures upon the affected segment of the thoracic aorta. Occasionally, additional operative manipulations may be necessary at the same time, for example, interpolation of grafts between the ascending aortic graft and a coronary when the origin of the latter is sheared off by the dissection, and distal arterial manipulations when the patient still has ischemic lower extremities immediately after the primary procedure. Later operations must sometimes be performed because of persistence of complaints such as intermittent claudication. It is extremely rare that immediate reoperation is advisable because of indications of intra-abdominal ischemia. Much more can be learned from careful pre- and postoperative arteriographic study. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1130882

  8. [Bilateral carotid artery dissection in a kite surfer by strangulation with the kite lines].

    PubMed

    Driessen, A; Probst, C; Sakka, S G; Eikermann, C; Mutschler, M

    2015-06-01

    While a kite surfer was preparing the kite it was caught by a gust of wind, which blew it 10 m into the air and the cords became entangled around the neck of the kite surfer causing strangulation. After admittance to hospital, the diagnostics revealed multiple injuries including a bilateral dissection of the internal carotid arteries, cerebral edema and multiple fractures. As kitesurfing is gaining popularity severe injuries are becoming more frequent. Safety precautions, such as preparing the kite with two persons, wearing safety equipment and using bars with a safety leash can prevent severe injuries. PMID:25135706

  9. Descending endografts for type A dissections: con.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Sandhu, Harleen K; Estrera, Anthony L

    2016-05-01

    An important goal of surgical repair of type A aortic dissection is to resect the intimal tear. Studies on the fate of residual dissection after acute type A aortic dissection repair in the past decade have driven surgeons to seek procedures to avoid distal reoperation. Aggressive surgical approach with total arch replacement in acute type A dissection has demonstrated lower incidence of distal reoperation and slower aortic growth rate compared to less aggressive ascending/hemiarch repair. Recently, successful results of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in type B aortic dissection have encouraged surgeons to further attack acute type A aortic dissection with hybrid approach: antegrade endografting in the descending thoracic true lumen as an adjunct to hemiarch or total arch repair. However, is the hybrid approach with simultaneous descending endografting justified in all the acute type A aortic dissection cases? The outcomes of the hybrid approach reported by the several groups have demonstrated 80-100% of false lumen thrombus formation in the proximal descending aorta (stented segment); however, the complete obliteration of the false lumen is only 17-50%. The incidence of distal reoperation/reintervention after hybrid approach is as high as 14% and an adjunctive procedure is often performed. Moreover, there are concerns about additional risks associated with the hybrid procedures, such as spinal cord injury (SCI), stent graft induced new entry and stroke. The data on this new approach are still very limited. Hence, further study is warranted to prove its safety and durability. PMID:27386411

  10. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jennifer D.; Racz, Bence; Sheng, Morgan; Choquet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and solute molecules to the spine head. However, it is unclear whether the spine neck geometry alone restricts access to dendritic spines or if a physical barrier to the diffusion of molecules exists. Here, we investigated whether a complex of septin cytoskeletal GTPases localized at the base of the spine neck regulates diffusion across the spine neck. We found that, during development, a marker of the septin complex, Septin7 (Sept7), becomes localized to the spine neck where it forms a stable structure underneath the plasma membrane. We show that diffusion of receptors and bulk membrane, but not cytoplasmic proteins, is slower in spines bearing Sept7 at their neck. Finally, when Sept7 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, membrane molecules explored larger membrane areas. Our findings indicate that Sept7 regulates membrane protein access to spines. PMID:25494357

  11. Surgical Correction of a Webbed-Neck Deformity in Turner'S Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Tomasz; Lorenc-Podgórska, Katarzyna; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2015-03-01

    Turner's syndrome occurs in approximately 1 out of every 2,000 to 2,500 live-born girls. This genetically determined pathology is characterised by multiple congenital anomalies. A typical form of this syndrome is associated with a lack of one of the sex chromosomes (karyotype 45, X). From the point of view of plastic surgery, one of the most important elements of the therapy is correction of the webbed neck deformity. The aim of the study was to present the possibilities of surgical treatment of a webbed neck of patients with Turner's syndrome and the evaluation of treatment results. In the years 2000-2012, six children with Turner's syndrome were treated because of the webbed neck deformity. The age of patients ranged from 9 to 17 years. In the case of all patients, the aim was to distribute the neck skin folds by using Z-plasty in conjunction with a shift to the back of glabrous skin flaps mobilised from the anterolateral surface of the neck. In the case of four operated patients, the folds were completely removed and a correct symmetrical outline of the neck was obtained. One patient was found to have unilateral moderate webbed neck recurrence after about 2 years of treatment. In one case, the correction was insufficient. The performed surgical procedures enabled correction of low hairline only in the lateral parts of the neck. The lower line of the scalp in the central part of the neck has remained unchanged. The lateral approach with a shift of glabrous skin flap to the back, which we performed, allows for effective reduction of the webbed neck, excision of bands of the connective tissue and correction of the low hairline on the side of the neck. Z-plasty enables an adequate extension of scars and improves the contour of the neck. PMID:26146109

  12. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  13. Acute aortic dissection in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaohua; Yang, Shouguo; Wang, Fangshun; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic dissection occurring during pregnancy represents a lethal risk to both the mother and fetus. Management of parturient with acute aortic dissection is complex. We report our experience of two pregnancies with type A acute aortic dissection. One patient is a 31-year-old pregnant woman (33rd gestational week) with a bicuspid aortic valve and the other is a 32-year-old pregnant woman (30th gestational week) with the Marfan syndrome. In both cases, a combined emergency operation consisting of Cesarean section, total hysterectomy prior to corrective surgery for aortic dissection was successfully performed within a relatively short period of time after the onset. Both patients' postoperative recovery was uneventful, and we achieved a favorable maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:25085319

  14. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  15. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation. PMID:16312247

  16. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  17. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  18. Is Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection the Option for Early Gastric Cancer Patients with Contraindication to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Said; Coriat, Romain; Audard, Virginie; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frederic; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2010-01-01

    Surgical therapy is the traditional approach for early gastric cancer. Patients with comorbidities cannot benefit from this treatment because of high surgical morbidities and mortalities. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a new technique for complete en bloc resection of early gastric cancer. We report the case of a patient with severe cardiomyopathy who developed early gastric cancer without metastases present on CT scan. The patient underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection because of the high risk associated to surgery due to severe comorbidity. The patient had complete submucosal dissection with complete en bloc resection. The lateral and deep margins were free of cancerous cells based on histopathology study. The patient was controlled every 6 months for 30 months by endoscopy. Systematic biopsies were done. No recurrences were diagnosed. This report supports the application of endoscopic treatment for patients with early gastric cancer and at high risk for surgery due to comorbidities. PMID:21060691

  19. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair. PMID:15640303

  20. Managing Dissections of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    WONG, DANIEL R.; LEMAIRE, SCOTT A.; COSELLI, JOSEPH S.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and it requires timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Long-term antihypertensive therapy remains critical for the treatment of this disease. Surgical intervention, although still a formidable undertaking, has evolved to better address both acute and chronic dissection, and the results have improved. Basic and clinical research, as well as technological advances, have increased our understanding of this challenging disease state. PMID:18481490

  1. Use of the Pipeline Embolization Device to Treat Recently Ruptured Dissecting Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Robert S.K.; Mak, Calvin H.K.; Wong, Alain K.S.; Chan, Kwong Yau; Leung, Kar Ming

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Pipeline embolization device (PED) is one of the flow-diverting stents approved for the treatment of unruptured large or wide-necked cerebral aneurysms in 2011 1. Its use has now been extended to the treatment of recently ruptured dissecting cerebral aneurysm, carotid pseudoaneurysm from radiation injury, and blister aneurysms 2,3. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing the PED as a primary treatment for ruptured dissecting intracranial aneurysms. A single center retrospective review was conducted for all patients primarily treated with PED for acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured dissecting cerebral aneurysms between December 2010 and February 2013. Patients were followed up with CT angiogram (CTA) or digital subtraction angiogram (DSA). Eight patients with a total of eight dissecting aneurysms were identified. The mean duration from SAH to treatment was 2.5 days. Six of the aneurysms arose from vertebral arteries and two from the basilar artery. Immediate check-DSA confirmed satisfactory contrast stasis in all eight cases, and complete aneurysmal obliteration was achieved at six months. There were two (25%) procedure-related complications, but no major procedure-related complications, such as thromboembolic events or rebleeding from aneurysm were encountered. The PED is a feasible treatment option for ruptured dissecting cerebral aneurysms in acute phase. According to our experience, using PED as flow-diverters in acute SAH does not significantly increase the complication risks or mortality rate if the antiplatelet regime is carefully monitored. Future studies shall evaluate the optimal antiplatelet regimen for using the PED in the acute phase. PMID:25207906

  2. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation. PMID:27138033

  3. The lateral calcaneal flap for sensate heel reconstruction revisited.

    PubMed

    Korentager, R

    1994-06-01

    Defects of the heel can be difficult to treat because they require a thin, sensate, soft-tissue cover. The lateral calcaneal flap can provide this type of reconstruction in selected patients. A 27-year-old man had a painful defect in a grafted heel that prevented him from working. A satisfactory painless heel was provided by resurfacing the area with a lateral calcaneal flap. The donor defect was minimized by interfascicular dissection of the sural nerve. PMID:8199942

  4. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  6. Overexpression of neuromedin U is correlated with regional metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Li, Fen; Hua, Qing-Quan; Chen, Shiming; Xiao, Bokui; Dai, Mengyuan; Li, Man; Zheng, Anyuan; Yu, Di; Hu, Zhang Wei; Tao, Zezhang

    2016-08-01

    Regional metastasis is an important prognostic factor for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Neuromedin U (Nmu) is a secreted neuropeptide, named due to its potent uterine contraction‑inducing activity. The aim of the present study was to analyze the significance of Nmu in the regional metastasis of HNSCC. The characteristics of 240 patients recruited from the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) were summarized retrospectively. The positive rate of neck dissection was analyzed according to the material. The expression levels of Nmu in human tumor samples were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, the expression of Nmu was investigated using a tissue microassay to analyze the association between Nmu protein expression and Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) status. The positive rate of neck dissection was 51.4% in the study sample. The expression levels of Nmu in primary tumors with regional metastasis were higher, compared with those without metastasis. There was increased protein expression of Nmu in the advanced tumor tissues. The data obtained in the present study demonstrated that the expression of Nmu was correlated with regional metastasis and TNM status. Overexpression of Nmu may be involved in the process of regional metastasis of HNSCC, and may serve as a novel and valuable biomarker for predicting regional metastasis in patients with HNSCC. PMID:27279246

  7. Overexpression of neuromedin U is correlated with regional metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Li, Fen; Hua, Qing-Quan; Chen, Shiming; Xiao, Bokui; Dai, Mengyuan; Li, Man; Zheng, Anyuan; Yu, Di; Hu, Zhang Wei; Tao, Zezhang

    2016-01-01

    Regional metastasis is an important prognostic factor for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Neuromedin U (Nmu) is a secreted neuropeptide, named due to its potent uterine contraction-inducing activity. The aim of the present study was to analyze the significance of Nmu in the regional metastasis of HNSCC. The characteristics of 240 patients recruited from the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) were summarized retrospectively. The positive rate of neck dissection was analyzed according to the material. The expression levels of Nmu in human tumor samples were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, the expression of Nmu was investigated using a tissue microassay to analyze the association between Nmu protein expression and Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) status. The positive rate of neck dissection was 51.4% in the study sample. The expression levels of Nmu in primary tumors with regional metastasis were higher, compared with those without metastasis. There was increased protein expression of Nmu in the advanced tumor tissues. The data obtained in the present study demonstrated that the expression of Nmu was correlated with regional metastasis and TNM status. Overexpression of Nmu may be involved in the process of regional metastasis of HNSCC, and may serve as a novel and valuable biomarker for predicting regional metastasis in patients with HNSCC. PMID:27279246

  8. The Effect of Animal Dissections on Student Acquisition of Knowledge of and Attitudes toward the Animals Dissected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Terry L.

    A conflict exists over the use of animals in the classroom. One aspect of this use involved the dissection of animals. Animal protection advocates report that dissections constitute abuse of the animals dissected. The advocates state that what is learned by dissection could be more effectively learned by other means. Some science educators state…

  9. Molecular Dissection of Phage Endolysin

    PubMed Central

    Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Joshi, Himanshu; Jain, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has always been recognized as one of the most successful pathogens. Bacteriophages that attack and kill mycobacteria offer an alternate mechanism for the curtailment of this bacterium. Upon infection, mycobacteriophages produce lysins that catalyze cell wall peptidoglycan hydrolysis and mycolic acid layer breakdown of the host resulting in bacterial cell rupture and virus release. The ability to lyse bacterial cells make lysins extremely significant. We report here a detailed molecular dissection of the function and regulation of mycobacteriophage D29 Lysin A. Several truncated versions of Lysin A were constructed, and their activities were analyzed by zymography and by expressing them in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Our experiments establish that Lysin A harbors two catalytically active domains, both of which show E. coli cell lysis upon their expression exclusively in the periplasmic space. However, the expression of only one of these domains and the full-length Lysin A caused M. smegmatis cell lysis. Interestingly, full-length protein remained inactive in E. coli periplasm. Our data suggest that the inactivity is ensued by a C-terminal domain that interacts with the N-terminal domain. This interaction was affirmed by surface plasmon resonance. Our experiments also demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of Lysin A selectively binds to M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis peptidoglycans. Our methodology of studying E. coli cell lysis by Lysin A and its truncations after expressing these proteins in the bacterial periplasm with the help of signal peptide paves the way for a large scale identification and analysis of such proteins obtained from other bacteriophages. PMID:24627486

  10. Dissection and dissection-associated required experiences improve student performance in gross anatomy: Differences among quartiles.

    PubMed

    Pizzimenti, Marc A; Pantazis, Nicholas; Sandra, Alexander; Hoffmann, Darren S; Lenoch, Susan; Ferguson, Kristi J

    2016-05-01

    To promote student learning, educational strategies should provide multiple levels of engagement with the subject matter. This study investigated examination data from five first year medical gross anatomy class cohorts (692 students) to determine if enhanced student performance was correlated with learning through dissection in a course that used a rotating dissection schedule coupled with peer teaching and other associated experiences. When students performed two of five weekly dissections for a given unit, their average scores on both laboratory and written examinations tended to increase as compared to when they had completed only one week of dissection (P < 0.01). However, these performance gains differed across the class strata and were related to the amount of dissection completed. Students in the upper quartile (UQS) of the class benefited when they had dissected once (92.8%) or twice (92.4%), and these scores were significantly higher than those attained when learning from peers (90.3%, P < 0.01). Students in the lower quartile (LQS) benefited most from the dissection experiences, where practical examination performance was better (77.8% and 80.5%) than when these students learned material from their peers (73.7%, P < 0.01). Although UQS benefited from dissection, LQS benefited to a greater extent in both the practical and written examinations with dissection. Although limited, these data suggest that dissection, coupled with associated educational activities, is an effective pedagogical strategy for learning. Further investigation is required to evaluate the concomitant benefits of peer teaching that are associated with the dissection experience. Anat Sci Educ 9: 238-246. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26536279