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Sample records for laterally mobile functionalized

  1. Repeated mobility testing for later artificial visual function evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikay-Parel, M.; Ivastinovic, D.; Koch, M.; Hornig, R.; Dagnelie, G.; Richard, G.; Langmann, A.

    2007-03-01

    The study investigates the utility of a newly designed mobility test for repeated testing of visual function in patients with severe visual impairment and future application in evaluating functional progress in patients with artificial vision. Ten subjects divided into three groups based on visual acuity (VA) ranging from light perception to 20/200 and reduced visual field (VF) were included in the study. The mobility test consisted of using a set of four different but structurally similar and relatively short mazes having a constant number of obstacles of various sizes. The subjects, divided into three groups by acuity, passed through each course several times. In general, the patients with better VA had a larger extent of VF. Average speed and number of contacts were recorded as measures of performance. The average passing times of the groups through the courses were significantly different (p = 0.03), which was influenced by VA and VF. There was no significant difference in average number of contacts between the groups (p = 0.15). The mobility test proved to be appropriate for gaining statistically relevant results in repeated individual testing of patients with severe vision impairment. Results show promise for use this mobility test as a tool for assessing visual function of patients undergoing implantation of a visual prosthesis for artificial vision.

  2. It is not just muscle mass: a review of muscle quality, composition and metabolism during ageing as determinants of muscle function and mobility in later life.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Robin A; Cameron-Smith, David; Poppitt, Sally D

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide estimates predict 2 billion people will be aged over 65 years by 2050. A major current challenge is maintaining mobility and quality of life into old age. Impaired mobility is often a precursor of functional decline, disability and loss of independence. Sarcopenia which represents the age-related decline in muscle mass is a well-established factor associated with mobility limitations in older adults. However, there is now evidence that not only changes in muscle mass but other factors underpinning muscle quality including composition, metabolism, aerobic capacity, insulin resistance, fat infiltration, fibrosis and neural activation may also play a role in the decline in muscle function and impaired mobility associated with ageing. Importantly, changes in muscle quality may precede loss of muscle mass and therefore provide new opportunities for the assessment of muscle quality particularly in middle-aged adults who could benefit from interventions to improve muscle function. This review will discuss the accumulating evidence that in addition to muscle mass, factors underpinning muscle quality influence muscle function and mobility with age. Further development of tools to assess muscle quality in community settings is needed. Preventative diet, exercise or treatment interventions particularly in middle-aged adults at the low end of the spectrum of muscle function may help preserve mobility in later years and improve healthspan. PMID:25520782

  3. Quick lateral movements of the trunk in a seated position reflect mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) function in frail elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Kimura, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kensuke; Arai, Shin; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel and safe performance test for measuring mobility is described. The test, which we have named the Seated Side Tapping test (Side Tapping test), requires the subjects to move their bodies laterally to the left and right in turn as quickly as possible whilst remaining in a seated position. We examined the associations between the results of the new test and those of other mobility tests, ADL, and the use of walking aids. The participants were 75 frail elderly people who were receiving rehabilitation services. Gait speed and the timed up and go (TUG) test were employed as mobility tests, and the participants' use of walking aids was recorded. The ADL score was assessed using the Barthel Index. Significant correlations were found between the side tapping test and gait speed (r=-0.59, p<0.01), and TUG (r=0.63, p<0.01). This test also revealed significant relationships with the ADL scores and the use of walking aids. These results indicate that an ability to perform quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects their mobility during standing. Thus, we concluded that since the side tapping test is simple and safe, it is useful for detecting mobility impairments, ADL levels, and the need for walking aids, especially in frail elderly individuals. PMID:23270712

  4. MOTIVES FOR RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY IN LATER LIFE

    PubMed Central

    SERGEANT, JULIE F.; EKERDT, DAVID J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes. Well, she moved because my sister and I decided she was going to move. But she wanted to move. It wouldn’t have happened if we hadn’t decided that she was gonna move. It was a little complicated . . . - Linda Brierton’s daughter, Karen PMID:18453180

  5. Functional Lateralization of the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.

    1984-01-01

    Research concerning lateralization of human brain functions is examined in light of the recent publication of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. Following a review of research methodologies and functions ascribed to the hemispheres of the brain, differences are portrayed as complementary and coexisting modes of cognitive processing.…

  6. Modulation of Membrane Protein Lateral Mobility by Polyphosphates and Polyamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Melvin; Koppel, Dennis E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of ``fluorescence redistribution after fusion.'' Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  7. Lateral Mobility of E-cadherin Enhances Rac1 Response in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, J.; Kam, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    The fluidity of cellular membranes imparts lateral mobility of proteins across the cell surface. To understand the impact of lateral mobility on cell-cell communication, a protein consisting of the extracellular recognition domains of E-cadherin was associated with the surface of silica beads by either tethering to a bead-supported lipid bilayer or direct adsorption, resulting in laterally mobile and immobile presentations of this protein. These beads were then seeded onto the upper surface of MDCK cells. Functional engagement of these beads was compared by measurement of Rac1 recruitment around the bead. Lateral mobility enhanced recognition of E-cadherin, promoting cell response to the beads at lower per-area concentrations than their immobilized counterparts. A more complete understanding of how lateral mobility of membrane-associated proteins influences molecular recognition, and potentially other downstream responses, could provide new strategies for the design of materials and devices intended to capture the architecture of natural tissues. PMID:20368760

  8. Macroscopic lateral heterogeneity observed in a laterally mobile immiscible mixed polyelectrolyte-neutral polymer brush.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoung; Tsouris, Vasilios; Lim, Yunho; Mustafa, Rafid; Choi, Je; Choi, Yun Hwa; Park, Hae-Woong; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-06-01

    We studied mixed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. The question we attempted to answer was: when the chain grafting points are laterally mobile, how will this lateral mobility influence the structure and phase behavior of the mixed brush? Three different model mixed PEO/PDMAEMA brush systems were prepared: (1) a laterally mobile mixed brush by spreading onto the air-water interface a mixture of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PEO-PnBA) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PDMAEMA-PnBA) diblock copolymers (the specific diblock copolymers used will be denoted as PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118-PnBA100, where the subscripts refer to the number-average degrees of polymerization of the individual blocks), (2) a mobility-restricted (inseparable) version of the above mixed brush prepared using a PEO-PnBA-PDMAEMA triblock copolymer (denoted as PEO113-PnBA89-PDMAEMA120) having respective brush molecular weights matched with those of the diblock copolymers, and (3) a different laterally mobile mixed PEO and PDMAEMA brush prepared from a PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA200-PnBA103 diblock copolymer combination, which represents a further more height-mismatched mixed brush situation than described in (1). These three mixed brush systems were investigated by surface pressure-area isotherm and X-ray (XR) reflectivity measurements. These experimental data were analyzed within the theoretical framework of a continuum self-consistent field (SCF) polymer brush model. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest that the mobile mixed brush derived using the PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118-PnBA100 combination (i.e., mixed brush System #1) undergoes a lateral macroscopic phase separation at high chain grafting densities, whereas the more height-mismatched system (System #3) is only microscopically phase separated under comparable brush density conditions even though the lateral

  9. Macroscopic lateral heterogeneity observed in a laterally mobile immiscible mixed polyelectrolyte-neutral polymer brush

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoyoung; Tsouris, Vasilios; Lim, Yunho; Mustafa, Rafid; Choi, Je; Choi, Yun Hwa; Park, Hae-Woong; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-07-11

    We studied mixed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. The question we attempted to answer was: when the chain grafting points are laterally mobile, how will this lateral mobility influence the structure and phase behavior of the mixed brush? Three different model mixed PEO/PDMAEMA brush systems were prepared: (1) a laterally mobile mixed brush by spreading onto the air–water interface a mixture of poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PEO–PnBA) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)–poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PDMAEMA–PnBA) diblock copolymers (the specific diblock copolymers used will be denoted as PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118–PnBA100, where the subscripts refer to the number-average degrees of polymerization of the individual blocks), (2) a mobility-restricted (inseparable) version of the above mixed brush prepared using a PEO–PnBA–PDMAEMA triblock copolymer (denoted as PEO113–PnBA89–PDMAEMA120) having respective brush molecular weights matched with those of the diblock copolymers, and (3) a different laterally mobile mixed PEO and PDMAEMA brush prepared from a PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA200–PnBA103 diblock copolymer combination, which represents a further more height-mismatched mixed brush situation than described in (1). These three mixed brush systems were investigated by surface pressure–area isotherm and X-ray (XR) reflectivity measurements. These experimental data were analyzed within the theoretical framework of a continuum self-consistent field (SCF) polymer brush model. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest that the mobile mixed brush derived using the PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118–PnBA100 combination (i.e., mixed brush System #1) undergoes a lateral macroscopic phase separation

  10. Imaging P2X4 Receptor Lateral Mobility in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Toulme, Estelle; Khakh, Baljit S.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-gated ionotropic P2X4 receptors are up-regulated in activated microglia and are critical for the development of neuropathic pain, a microglia-associated disorder. However, the nature of how plasma membrane P2X4 receptors are regulated in microglia is not fully understood. We used single-molecule imaging to track quantum dot-labeled P2X4 receptors to explore P2X4 receptor mobility in the processes of resting and activated microglia. We find that plasma membrane P2X4 receptor lateral mobility in resting microglial processes is largely random, consisting of mobile and slowly mobile receptors. Moreover, lateral mobility is P2X subunit- and cell-specific, increased in an ATP activation and calcium-dependent manner, and enhanced in activated microglia by the p38 MAPK pathway that selectively regulates slowly mobile receptors. Thus, our data indicate that P2X4 receptors are dynamically regulated mobile ATP sensors, sampling more of the plasma membrane in response to ATP and during the activated state of microglia that is associated with nervous system dysfunction. PMID:22393055

  11. Lateral mobility of proteins in liquid membranes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Y.; Lopez-Esparza, R.; Reffay, M.; Sierecki, E.; Gov, N. S.; Genest, M.; Hodges, R. S.; Urbach, W.

    2006-02-01

    The biological function of transmembrane proteins is closely related to their insertion, which has most often been studied through their lateral mobility. For >30 years, it has been thought that hardly any information on the size of the diffusing object can be extracted from such experiments. Indeed, the hydrodynamic model developed by Saffman and Delbrück predicts a weak, logarithmic dependence of the diffusion coefficient D with the radius R of the protein. Despite widespread use, its validity has never been thoroughly investigated. To check this model, we measured the diffusion coefficients of various peptides and transmembrane proteins, incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) or in model bilayers of tunable thickness. We show in this work that, for several integral proteins spanning a large range of sizes, the diffusion coefficient is strongly linked to the protein dimensions. A heuristic model results in a Stokes-like expression for D, (D 1/R), which fits literature data as well as ours. Diffusion measurement is then a fast and fruitful method; it allows determining the oligomerization degree of proteins or studying lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions within bilayers. bilayers | transmembrane proteins | diffusion | peptides | sponge phase


  12. Early mobilization versus immobilization in the treatment of lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Eiff, M P; Smith, A T; Smith, G E

    1994-01-01

    We conducted a prospective trial at a military medical center to determine which treatment for first-time ankle sprains, early mobilization or immobilization, is more effective. Eighty-two patients with a lateral ankle sprain were randomly selected for one of two treatment groups. The Early Mobilization Group received an elastic wrap for 2 days followed by functional bracing for 8 days. Two days after injury, this group began weight-bearing and an ankle rehabilitation program. Patients in the Immobilization Group were placed in a nonweight-bearing plaster splint for 10 days followed by weight-bearing and the same rehabilitation program. Patients in the Early Mobilization Group had less pain at 3 weeks (57% versus 87%, P = 0.02); otherwise, there were no significant differences between groups in the frequency of residual symptoms. Only one patient in each group had residual symptoms 1 year after injury. Three patients (8%) in each group resprained their ankles. Ten days after injury, patients in the Early Mobilization Group were more likely to be back to full work (54% versus 13%, P < 0.001). We conclude that in first-time lateral ankle sprains, although both immobilization and early mobilization prevent late residual symptoms and ankle instability, early mobilization allows earlier return to work and may be more comfortable for patients. PMID:8129116

  13. Lateralization of auditory-cortex functions.

    PubMed

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2003-12-01

    In the present review, we summarize the most recent findings and current views about the structural and functional basis of human brain lateralization in the auditory modality. Main emphasis is given to hemodynamic and electromagnetic data of healthy adult participants with regard to music- vs. speech-sound encoding. Moreover, a selective set of behavioral dichotic-listening (DL) results and clinical findings (e.g., schizophrenia, dyslexia) are included. It is shown that human brain has a strong predisposition to process speech sounds in the left and music sounds in the right auditory cortex in the temporal lobe. Up to great extent, an auditory area located at the posterior end of the temporal lobe (called planum temporale [PT]) underlies this functional asymmetry. However, the predisposition is not bound to informational sound content but to rapid temporal information more common in speech than in music sounds. Finally, we obtain evidence for the vulnerability of the functional specialization of sound processing. These altered forms of lateralization may be caused by top-down and bottom-up effects inter- and intraindividually In other words, relatively small changes in acoustic sound features or in their familiarity may modify the degree in which the left vs. right auditory areas contribute to sound encoding. PMID:14629926

  14. Lateral Scapular Slide Test and Scapular Mobility in Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ozunlu, Nihan; Tekeli, Hatice; Baltaci, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Context: The stability of the scapula in relation to the entire moving upper extremity is the key in the throwing sequence. The importance of scapular positioning in volleyball players has been well documented in the literature, but no one has compared scapular positioning between volleyball players and sedentary people. Objective: To compare measurements of scapular mobility obtained using the lateral scapular slide test between volleyball players and sedentary participants without shoulder impairments and to compare changes in scapular mobility in players according to the number of years of sport participation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 121 people at a single university volunteered. Of these, 67 were sedentary (age = 24.3 ± 2.34 years, height = 1.69 ± 0.09 m, mass = 65.1 ± 11.91 kg); 54 were volleyball players from 4 professional teams and were separated into 2 groups according to their years of sport participation. The first group was named young players (n = 31; age = 17.7 ± 2.58 years, height = 1.83 ± 0.10 m, mass = 68.3 ± 12.21 kg, sport participation ≤ 9 years), and the second group was named old players (n = 23; age = 26.9 ± 3.39 years, height = 1.95 ± 4.38 m, mass = 90.7 ± 5.75 kg, sport participation ≥ 10 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Study participants completed a rating scale for pain and a questionnaire about demographic and shoulder problems. One assessor performed the lateral scapular slide test and additional flexibility measurements around the shoulder girdle. Flexibility (external rotation, internal rotation) and scapular position (1, 2, 3) were compared among groups (young players, old players, sedentary people) and between sides (dominant, nondominant). Results: In sedentary participants, we found differences for position 1 (t66 = 3.327, P = .002), position 2 (t66 = 2.491, P = .004), position 3 (t66 = 2.512, P = .006), and internal rotation

  15. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  16. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brumfeld, Vlad; Miller, Israel R.; Korenstein, Rafi

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 · 10-5 cm2V-1s-1. The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of ∼5 · 10-9 cm2s-1 was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  17. Promoting Function, Independence, and Mobility

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptom management, the use of mobility aids, automobile adaptations and the use of assistance animals. Increasing Accessibility often requires the adaptation of tools and devices at one’s home or ...

  18. Influence of receptor lateral mobility on adhesion strengthening between membranes containing LFA-3 and CD2.

    PubMed

    Chan, P Y; Lawrence, M B; Dustin, M L; Ferguson, L M; Golan, D E; Springer, T A

    1991-10-01

    We have used an in vitro model system of glass-supported planar membranes to study the effects of lateral mobility of membrane-bound receptors on cell adhesion. Egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers were reconstituted with two anchorage isoforms of the adhesion molecule lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3). The diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored LFA-3 approached that of phospholipids in the bilayers, whereas the transmembrane (TM)-anchored isoform of LFA-3 was immobile. Both static and laminar flow assays were used to quantify the strength of adherence to the lipid bilayers of the T lymphoma cell line Jurkat that expresses the counter-receptor CD2. Cell adhesion was dependent on LFA-3 density and was more efficient on membranes containing the GPI isoform than the TM isoform. Kinetic measurements demonstrated an influence of contact time on the strength of adhesion to the GPI isoform at lower site densities (25-50 sites/microns2), showing that the mobility of LFA-3 is important in adhesion strengthening. At higher site densities (1,500 sites/microns2) and longer contact times (20 min), Jurkat cell binding to the TM and GPI isoforms of LFA-3 showed equivalent adhesion strengths, although adhesion strength of the GPI isoform developed twofold more rapidly than the TM isoform. Reduction of CD2 mobility on Jurkat cells at 5 degrees C greatly decreased the rate of adhesion strengthening with the TM isoform of LFA-3, resulting in a 30-fold difference between the two LFA-3 isoforms. Our results demonstrate that the ability of a membrane receptor and its membrane-bound counter-receptor to diffuse laterally enhances cell adhesion both by allowing accumulation of ligands in the cell contact area and by increasing the rate of receptor-ligand bond formation. PMID:1717480

  19. Brain Function Lateralization and Language Acquisition: the Evidence from Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanches, Mary

    1979-01-01

    Presents evidence of differences in brain function lateralization between Japanese-speakers and speakers of Indo-European languages, and suggests that current conceptualizations of brain function specialization are not adequate. (AM)

  20. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  1. Functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q X; He, X J; Wong, H C; Kindt, K S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair-cell development, function, and regeneration are fundamental processes that are challenging to study in mammalian systems. Zebrafish are an excellent alternative model to study hair cells because they have an external auxiliary organ called the lateral line. The hair cells of the lateral line are easily accessible, which makes them suitable for live, function-based fluorescence imaging. In this chapter, we describe methods to perform functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells. We compare genetically encoded calcium indicators that have been used previously to measure calcium in lateral-line hair cells. We also outline equipment required for calcium imaging and compare different imaging systems. Lastly, we discuss how to set up optimal imaging parameters and how to process and visualize calcium signals. Overall, using these methods, in vivo calcium imaging is a powerful tool to examine sensory hair-cell function in an intact organism. PMID:27263415

  2. The Effects of Enriched Neonatal Experiences Upon Later Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Cucinotta, Pattiann

    1971-01-01

    The data reported in this small study confirm previous research indicating that early stimulation, though initially affecting human behavior, has little permanent effect upon later functioning. (Author/WY)

  3. Lateral Dispersal and Foraging Behavior of Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the Absence and Presence of Mobile and Non-Mobile Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Harit K.; Grewal, Parwinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes have been classified into cruisers (active searchers) and ambushers (sit and wait foragers). However, little is known about their dispersal and foraging behavior at population level in soil. We studied lateral dispersal of the ambush foraging Steinernema carpocapsae (ALL strain) and cruise foraging Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (GPS11 strain) from infected host cadavers in microcosms (0.05 m2) containing Wooster silt-loam soil (Oxyaquic fragiudalf) and vegetation in the presence or absence of non-mobile and mobile hosts. Results showed that the presence of a non-mobile host (Galleria mellonella larva in a wire mesh cage) enhanced H. bacteriophora dispersal for up to 24 hr compared with no-host treatment, but had no impact on S. carpocapsae dispersal. In contrast, presence of a mobile host (G. mellonella larvae) increased dispersal of S. carpocapsae compared with no host treatment, but had no effect on H. bacteriophora dispersal. Also H. bacteriophora was better at infecting non-mobile than mobile hosts released into the microcosms and S. carpocapsae was better at infecting mobile than non-mobile hosts, thus affirming the established cruiser-ambusher theory. However, results also revealed that a large proportion of infective juveniles (IJs) of both species stayed near (≤ 3.8 cm) the source cadaver (88-96% S. carpocapsae; 67–79% H. bacteriophora), and the proportion of IJs reaching the farthest distance (11.4 cm) was significantly higher for S. carpocapsae (1.4%) than H. bacteriophora (0.4%) in the presence of mobile hosts. S. carpocapsae also had higher average population displacement than H. bacteriophora in the presence of both the non-mobile (5.07 vs. 3.6 cm/day) and mobile (8.06 vs. 5.3 cm/day) hosts. We conclude that the two species differ in their dispersal and foraging behavior at the population level and this behavior is affected by both the presence and absence of hosts and by their mobility. PMID:26079715

  4. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  5. High hole mobility GeSn on insulator formed by self-organized seeding lateral growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Wen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xu; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen; Wang, Qiming

    2014-11-01

    Tensile strained single-crystal GeSn on insulator (GSOI) was obtained using self-organized seeding lateral growth. Segregation of Sn atoms and Sn distribution occurred during the lateral growth of the GeSn stripe. At both edges of the GSOI, Sn concentration distribution was found in good agreement with calculation based on the Scheil equation. P-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors were fabricated using the GSOI materials. Good transistor performance with the low field peak hole mobility of 383 cm2 V-1 s-1 was obtained, which indicated the high quality of this GSOI structure.

  6. Early ankle mobilization, Part II: A one-year follow-up of acute, lateral ankle sprains (a randomized clinical trial).

    PubMed

    Dettori, J R; Basmania, C J

    1994-01-01

    A 1-year follow-up of military members who received either early ankle mobilization or cast immobilization following a moderate or severe lateral ankle sprain was conducted to determine the long-term effects between these two forms of conservative treatment. Functional job- and sports-related disabilities together with subjective complaints were assessed. A significantly large proportion (44%) of all subjects were symptomatic at follow-up. Those receiving early ankle mobilization had slightly more residual subjective complaints compared with those receiving cast immobilization. There was, however, little effect on functional job- or sports-related disability, the early mobilization group having slightly fewer functional problems. There was no difference in subjective complaints or functional limitations by the degree of injury for moderate or severe lateral ankle sprains. PMID:8164861

  7. Vertical and lateral mobilities in n-(Ga, Mn)N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihyun; Ren, F.; Thaler, G. T.; Frazier, R.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.; Zavada, J. M.; Wilson, R. G.

    2003-03-01

    Lateral electron mobilities in 0.2-μm-thick n-(Ga, Mn)N films were obtained from Hall measurements, producing values of 116˜102 cm2/V s in the temperature range from 298 to 373 K. These values are comparable to, but slightly lower than, electron mobilities in n-GaN of the same electron concentration. By sharp contrast, analysis of the reverse saturation current in mesa Schottky diodes fabricated in the n-(Ga, Mn)N show vertical electron mobilities of 840˜336 cm2/V s in the temperature range from 298 to 373 K. This is consistent with a reduction in electron scattering by charged dislocations for vertical transport geometries [M. Misra, A. V. Sampath, and T. D. Moustakas, Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1045 (2000)].

  8. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J. -Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned overmore » a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.« less

  9. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. M.; Laroche, D.; Huang, S.-H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J.-Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  10. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J. -Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  11. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T. M.; Laroche, D.; Huang, S.-H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J.-Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm−2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm−2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential. PMID:26865160

  12. A review of lateralization of spatial functioning in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Oleksiak, Anna; Postma, Albert; van der Ham, Ineke J M; Klink, P Christiaan; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2011-06-24

    The majority of research on functional cerebral lateralization in primates revolves around vocal abilities, addressing the evolutionary origin of the human language faculty and its predominance in the left hemisphere of the brain. Right hemisphere specialization in spatial cognition is commonly reported in humans. This functional asymmetry is especially evident in the context of the unilateral neglect, a deficit in attention to and awareness of one side of space, that more frequently occurs after right-side rather than left-side brain damage. Since most of the research efforts are concentrated on vocalization in primates, much less is known about the presence or absence of spatial functions lateralization. Obtaining this knowledge can provide insight into the evolutionary aspect of the functionally lateralized brain of Homo sapiens and deliver refinement and validation of the nonhuman primate unilateral neglect model. This paper reviews the literature on functional brain asymmetries in processing spatial information, limiting the search to nonhuman primates, and concludes there is no clear evidence that monkeys process spatial information with different efficiency in the two hemispheres. We suggest that lateralization of spatial cognition in humans represents a relatively new feature on the evolutionary time scale, possibly developed as a by-product of the left hemisphere intrusion of language competence. Further, we argue that the monkey model of hemispatial neglect requires reconsideration. PMID:21059373

  13. Functional analysis on the treatment of torn discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Wong, To; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcome on the treatment of torn discoid lateral meniscus. Thirty-two torn discoid lateral meniscuses in 29 patients were retrospectively reviewed. There were 13 males and 16 females with a mean age of 31.3±17.0. The age distribution were 24% in pediatric age (< 11 years old), 38%in young adult under 25 years and 38% in 25 years and older. Subjective symptoms included pain in 63%, popping and snapping in 56%, locking in 41%, givingway in 17%; and objective signs included decreased knee motion in 16%. Partial lateral menisectomy and saucerization were performed in 18 knees (56%), meniscus repairs were done in eight knee (25% ) and subtotal lateral menisectomy in six knees (19%). At an average follow up of 52.5±25.9 months (24-96 months). The results showed 84% good to excellent, 16% fair, and none poor. No significant difference was noted on the outcomes of different treatment methods. The age of symptom onset and the time of operation correlated with the IKDC and Tenger score. (p<0.001). Our data showed symptomatic torn discoid lateral meniscus may manifest at any age from childhood to adult. The first manifestation of symptom before age 11 year old was observed in only 24%. Therefore, discoid lateral meniscus should not be considered a childhood disease. PMID:20692839

  14. Lateral patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to restore functional capacity in patients previously undergoing lateral retinacular release

    PubMed Central

    Beckert, Mitch; Crebs, Dylan; Nieto, Michael; Gao, Yubo; Albright, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study patient outcomes after surgical correction for iatrogenic patellar instability. METHODS This retrospective study looked at 17 patients (19 knees) suffering from disabling medial patellar instability following lateral release surgery. All patients underwent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL) reconstruction by a single surgeon. Assessments in all 19 cases included functional outcome scores, range of motion, and assessment for the presence of apprehension sign of the patella to determine if LPFL reconstruction surgery was successful at restoring patellofemoral stability. RESULTS No patients reported any residual postoperative symptoms of patellar instability. Also no patients demonstrated medial patellar apprehension or examiner induced subluxation with the medial instability test described earlier following LPFL reconstruction. Furthermore, all patients recovered normal range of motion compared to the contralateral limb. For patients with pre and postoperative outcome scores, the mean overall knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score increased significantly, from 34.39 preoperatively (range: 7.7-70.12) to 69.54 postoperatively (range: 26.82-91.46) at final follow-up (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION This novel technique for LPFL reconstruction is effective at restoring lateral restraint of the patellofemoral joint and improving joint functionality. PMID:27574606

  15. Orientation and lateral mobility of cytochrome c on the surface of ultrathin lipid multilayer films.

    PubMed Central

    Pachence, J M; Amador, S; Maniara, G; Vanderkooi, J; Dutton, P L; Blasie, J K

    1990-01-01

    . Furthermore, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to characterize the lateral mobility of the electrostatically bound cytochrome c over the monolayer plane. The optical linear dichroism and these initial FRAP studies have indicated that cytochrome c electrostatically bound to a lipid surface maintains a well-defined orientation relative to the membrane surface while exhibiting measurable, but highly restricted, lateral motion in the plane of the surface. PMID:2169915

  16. Surface plasmon resonance as detection tool for lipids lateral mobility in biomimetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Giancarlo; D’Agostino, Riccardo; Becucci, Lucia; Guidelli, Rolando; Tiribilli, Bruno; Del Rosso, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A procedure based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed to monitor the lateral mobility of lipid molecules in solid-supported bilayer lipid membranes (ssBLMs), an essential prerequisite for the formation of important microdomains called lipid rafts (LRs). The procedure relies on the marked tendency of the ganglioside GM1 to be recruited by LRs and to act as a specific receptor of the beta-subunit of the cholera toxin (ChTB). In the presence of both GM1 and ChTB, spontaneous formation of lipid rafts domains in mobile ssBLMs is accompanied by an appreciable increase in the amount of adsorbed ChTB, as monitored by SPR. PMID:23243563

  17. Functional MRI of Language Lateralization During Development in Children

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Scott K.; Vannest, Jennifer; Mecoli, Marc; Jacola, Lisa M.; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Karunanayaka, Prasanna R.; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Yuan, Weihong; Plante, Elena; Byars, Anna W.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of language function in the brain have been documented from infancy through adulthood. Even macroscopic measures of language lateralization reflect a dynamic process of language development. In this review, we summarize a series of functional MRI studies of language skills in children ages of 5 to 18 years, both typically-developing children and children with brain injuries or neurological disorders that occur at different developmental stages, with different degrees of severity. These studies used a battery of fMRI-compatible language tasks designed to tap sentential and lexical language skills that develop early and later in childhood. In typically-developing children, lateralization changes with age are associated with language skills that have a protracted period of development, reflecting the developmental process of skill acquisition rather than general maturation of the brain. Normative data, across the developmental period, acts as a reference for disentangling developmental patterns in brain activation from changes due to developmental or acquired abnormalities. This review emphasizes the importance of considering age and child development in neuroimaging studies of language. PMID:17828669

  18. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  19. Determination of lateral-stability derivatives and transfer-function coefficients from frequency-response data for lateral motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Robinson, Samuel W , Jr; Gates, Ordway, B , jr

    1955-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the lateral-stability derivatives, transfer-function coefficients, and the modes for lateral motion from frequency-response data for a rigid aircraft. The method is based on the application of the vector technique to the equations of lateral motion, so that the three equations of lateral motion can be separated into six equations. The method of least squares is then applied to the data for each of these equations to yield the coefficients of the equations of lateral motion from which the lateral-stability derivatives and lateral transfer-function coefficients are computed. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the use of the method.

  20. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane: A study by electrophotoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Brumfeld, V; Miller, I R; Korenstein, R

    1989-09-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 . 10(-5) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1). The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of approximately 5 . 10(-9) cm(2)s(-1) was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  1. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Nature's fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5's active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  2. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  3. FUNCTIONALIZED LATERAL SURFACE COATED LASERS FOR CHEM-BIO DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Behymer, E M

    2007-07-05

    We present a class of compact, monolithic, photonic sensors consisting of multiple section edge emitting lasers with functionalized lateral surface coatings for low level detection of chemical or biological agents. Specifically, we discuss 8 {micro}m x 250 {micro}m Pd-coated H{sub 2} sensors and configurations to reduce the minimum detection limit from 138ppm for passive sensors to 1ppm for active sensors. Compared with conventional optical H{sub 2} sensors that use fiber gratings, surface plasmon resonances, or surface reflectance, our sensors offer the advantages of smaller size, wider dynamic range, monolithic integration of laser source and detector, and 2-D scalability to arrays of sensors that are functionalized to detect different agents.

  4. Leisure Engagement: Medical Conditions, Mobility Difficulties, and Activity Limitations—A Later Life Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ingeborg; Nyqvist, Fredrica; Gustafson, Yngve; Nygård, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to investigate the impact of medical conditions, mobility difficulties, and activity limitations on older people's engagement in leisure activities. Methods. The analyses are based on a cross regional survey carried out in 2010 in the Bothnia region (Northern Sweden and Western Finland). A posted questionnaire, which included questions on different aspects of leisure engagement, medical history, and health, was sent out to older persons in the region. The final sample consisted of 5435 persons aged 65, 70, 75, and 80 years. The data was analyzed by using ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression. Results. The most important predictor of leisure engagement abstention among older people is the prevalence of activity limitations, whereas mobility difficulties and medical conditions play less important roles. The strong negative association between activity limitations and leisure engagement remains significant even after we control for individual, sociodemographic characteristics, and country. Discussion. This study provides a window into leisure engagement in later life and factors influencing the magnitude of engagement in leisure activities. PMID:26346706

  5. Lateral Mobility of Presynaptic L-Type Calcium Channels at Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Chen, Minghui; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2011-01-01

    At most synapses, presynaptic Ca2+ channels are positioned near vesicle release sites, and increasing this distance reduces synaptic strength. We examined the lateral membrane mobility of presynaptic L-type Ca2+ channels at photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Movements of individual Ca2+ channels were tracked by coupling quantum dots to an antibody against the extracellular α2δ4 Ca2+ channel subunit. α2δ4 antibodies labeled photoreceptor terminals and co-localized with antibodies to synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 α1 subunits. The results show that Ca2+ channels are dynamic and move within a confined region beneath the synaptic ribbon. The size of this confinement area is regulated by actin and membrane cholesterol. Fusion of nearby synaptic vesicles caused jumps in Ca2+ channel position, propelling them towards the outer edge of the confinement domain. Channels rebounded rapidly towards the center. Thus, although CaV channels are mobile, molecular scaffolds confine them beneath the ribbon to maintain neurotransmission even at high release rates. PMID:21430141

  6. Intramuscular Adipose Tissue, Sarcopenia, and Mobility Function in Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L.; Addison, Odessa; Dibble, Leland E.; Foreman, K. Bo; Morrell, Glen; LaStayo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and sarcopenia may adversely impact mobility function and physical activity. This study determined the association of locomotor muscle structure and function with mobility function in older adults. Method. 109 older adults with a variety of comorbid disease conditions were examined for thigh muscle composition via MRI, knee extensor strength via isometric dynamometry, and mobility function. The contribution of strength, quadriceps lean tissue, and IMAT to explaining the variability in mobility function was examined using multivariate linear regression models. Results. The predictors as a group contributed 27–45% of the variance in all outcome measures; however, IMAT contributed between 8–15% of the variance in all four mobility variables, while lean explained only 5% variance in only one mobility measure. Conclusions. Thigh IMAT, a newly identified muscle impairment appears to be a potent muscle variable related to the ability of older adults to move about in their community. PMID:22500231

  7. Laterality of hand function in naturalistically housed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alison W; Weghorst, Jennifer A

    2005-05-01

    Studies of laterality of hand function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have the potential to tell us about the origins of handedness in Homo sapiens. However, the data are confusing, with discrepancies present between studies done in the field and the laboratory: the former show wild chimpanzees to be unlateralised at the population level, while the latter show captive chimpanzees as lateralised at the population level. This study of 26 semi-free ranging chimpanzees of Chester Zoo, UK, aimed to investigate a situation between the wild and captivity and provided ethological data for 43 categories of spontaneous manual use and 14 categories of tool use. Other variables recorded were subordinate hand activity, whether the subject was arboreal or terrestrial, and the identity of the subject. Using switching focal subject sampling, 23,978 bouts of hand use and 1,090 bouts of tool use were recorded. No population-level handedness was present for manual non-tool use activities in the naturalistically housed chimpanzees of Chester Zoo in a similar way to studies of wild chimpanzees. However, about half of the individuals were lateralised to one side or the other for the foraging behaviours of pick up, eat, and pluck. Using a modified version of McGrew and Marchant's (1997) Laterality Framework, these results are comparable to some wild and captive populations for similar foraging tasks. Bimanuality was rare and thus prevented comparison with captive experimental studies that have reported population right handedness. Behaviour involving contact with water elicited stronger lateralisation. Chester chimpanzees were more likely to exhibit hand preferences for manual tasks with increasing age but there were no effects of sex or rearing history on hand specialisations in adult individuals. Lateralisation was biased in tool use, which evoked significant left hand preferences in half the individuals, with no effect of age. Results are discussed comparatively with reference to

  8. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  9. Childbirth and Female Sexual Function Later in Life

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Julia E.; Brown, Jeanette S.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Thom, David H.; Subak, Leslee L.; Huang, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine relationships between parity, mode of delivery, and other parturition-related factors with women's sexual function later in life. Methods Self-administered questionnaires examined sexual desire, activity, satisfaction, and problems in a multiethnic cohort of women aged 40 years and older with at least one past childbirth event. Trained abstractors obtained information on parity, mode of delivery, and other parturition-related factors from archived records. Multivariable regression models examined associations with sexual function, controlling for age, race or ethnicity, partner status, diabetes, and general health. Results Among 1,094 participants, mean (±SD) age was 56.3 (±8.7) years, 568 (43%) were racial or ethnic minorities (214 Black, 171 Asian, and 183 Latina), and 963 (88%) were multiparous. Fifty-six percent (n=601) reported low sexual desire ; 53% (n=577) reported less than monthly sexual activity, and 43% (n=399) reported low overall sexual satisfaction. Greater parity was not associated with increased risk of reporting low sexual desire (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.08, CI=0.96-1.21 per each birth), less than monthly sexual activity (AOR=1.05, CI=0.93-1.20 per each birth), or low sexual satisfaction (AOR=0.96, CI=0.85-1.09 per each birth). Compared to vaginal delivery alone, women with a history of cesarean delivery were not significantly more likely to report low desire (AOR=0.71, CI=0.34-1.47), less than monthly sexual activity (AOR=1.03, CI=0.46-2.32), or low sexual satisfaction (AOR=0.57, CI=0.26-1.22). Women with a history of operative-assisted delivery were more likely to report low desire (AOR=1.38, CI=1.04-1.83). Conclusions Among women with at least one childbirth event, parity and mode of delivery are not major determinants of sexual desire, activity, or satisfaction later in life. PMID:24104776

  10. Electrophysiological assessment of corticorespiratory pathway function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Tetsuo; Kugio, Yumiko; Fujimaki, Yumi; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Hayashi, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory muscle paralysis is inevitable in the clinical course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Our objective was to electrophysiologically assess the function of the phrenic nerve and diaphragm motor cortex in ALS. Phrenic nerve M waves, diaphragm motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation, and their clinical correlations were analyzed in 29 ALS patients. The M wave amplitude was significantly lower in patients than in healthy control subjects (p<0.001). The MEP amplitudes both in the expiratory and inspiratory phases were significantly decreased in patients (p<0.01). In particular, 15 patients showed no MEPs in the expiratory phase, six of whom also showed no MEPs in the inspiratory phase. Five of them had no respiratory complaints. There was a weak, non-significant correlation between the inspiratory MEP amplitude and forced vital capacity (p=0.052). We conclude that the loss of MEP might reflect the subclinical involvement of the voluntary respiratory drive from the diaphragm motor cortex, potentially leading to further respiratory deterioration. PMID:19707909

  11. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  12. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients.

  13. Lateral mobility of integrin alpha IIb beta 3 (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) in the plasma membrane of a human megakaryocyte.

    PubMed

    Schootemeijer, A; van Willigen, G; van der Vuurst, H; Tertoolen, L G; De Laat, S W; Akkerman, J W

    1997-01-01

    The migration of integrins to sites of cell-cell and cell-matrix contact is thought to be important for adhesion strengthening. We studied the lateral diffusion of integrin alpha IIb beta 3 (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) in the plasma membrane of a cultured human megakaryocyte by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of FITC-labelled monovalent Fab fragments directed against the beta 3 subunit. The diffusion of beta 3 on the unstimulated megakaryocyte showed a lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of 0.37 x 10(-9) cm2/s and a mobile fraction of about 50%. Stimulation with ADP (20 microM) or alpha-thrombin (10 U/ml) at 22 degrees C induced transient decreases in both parameters reducing D to 0.21 x 10(-9) cm2/s and the mobile fraction to about 25%. The fall in D was observed within 1 min after stimulation but the fall in mobile fraction showed a lag phase of 5 min. The lag phase was absent in the presence of Calpain I inhibitor, where-as cytochalasin D completely abolished the decreased in mobile fraction. The data are compatible with the concept that cell activation induces anchorage of 50% of the mobile alpha IIb beta 3 (25% of the whole population of receptor) to the cytoplasmic actin filaments, although, as discussed, other rationals are not ruled out. PMID:9031465

  14. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-01

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:25798456

  15. Fundamental analysis and algorithms for development of a mobile fast-scan lateral migration radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhong

    Lateral migration radiography (LMR) is a unique x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique to image surface and subsurface, or internal structure of an object. An x-ray pencil beam scans the interrogated area and the backscattered photons are registered by detectors which have varying degrees of collimation. In early LMR applications, either the LMR systems or the imaged objects are moved on a rectangular grid, and at each node, the systems register backscattered photon energy deposition as pixel intensity in acquired images. The mechanical movement of the system or objects from pixel to pixel causes prolonged image scan time with a high percentage of system dead time. To avoid this drawback, a particular x-ray beam formation technique is proposed and analyzed. A corresponding mobile, fast-scan LMR system is designed, fabricated and tested. The results show a two orders-of-magnitude reduction in image scan time compared with those of previous systems. The x-ray beam formation technique, based on a rotating collimator in the LMR system, implements surface line scan by sampling an x-ray fan beam. This rotating collimator yields unique imaging effects compared to those for an x-ray beam with fixed collimation and perpendicular incidence: (1) the speed of the x-ray beam spot on the scanned surface is not uniform; (2) constant movement of the x-ray beam spot changes the resolution in the image raster direction; (3) x-ray beam spot size changes with location on the scanned surface; (4) the object image shows a squeezed effect in the raster scan direction; (5) under a uniform background, the Compton scatter angular distribution causes the x-ray backscatter field to be stronger, when the x-ray beam has greater incidence angle; and (6) the x-ray illumination spot trace on the scanned surface is skewed. The physics generating these effects is analyzed with Monte Carlo computer simulations and/or measurements. Image acquisition and image processing algorithms are

  16. The comparison of anterior knee pain in severe and non severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following a mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pongcharoen, Boonchana; Reutiwarangkoon, Chaivet

    2016-01-01

    In the past, medial osteoarthritis (OA) knee with symptomatic patellofemoral (PF) arthritis has not been recommended for a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). However, recent studies have reported that UKA has shown good results in patients with medial OA of the knee, including those with PF arthritis. The purpose of this study is to compare the results between patients with medial OA knees; those with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella and patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following mobile bearing UKA. We have prospectively evaluated 104 patients (114 knees) who had undergone an Oxford mobile bearing UKA. The mean follow-up was 19.05 months (range 12.30-29.70 months). The patients were divided into two groups: group I consisted of eighty patients (88 knees) who did not have severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 0-2) and group II had twenty-four patients (26 knees) who had severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 3, 4). We recorded the incidence of anterior knee pain, knee scores, pain scores, and functional scores in comparison of the two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) and incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain had not shown any significant differences. The VAS for post-operative anterior knee pain was 0.11 (SD 0.56, range 0-3 point) versus 0.12 (SD 0.59, range 0-3 point) for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.98). The incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain was 4.5 versus 3.8 % for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.88). The pain scores and functional scores had not exhibited any differences. However, the knee scores of patients with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella was worse than those seen in patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella with a statistical significance. It was scored as 96.78 (SD 4.56, range 85-100) versus 94.43 (SD 4.50, range 81-100) for group I

  17. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  18. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  19. Manatee vibrissae: evidence for a "lateral line" function.

    PubMed

    Reep, Roger L; Gaspard, Joseph C; Sarko, Diana; Rice, Frank L; Mann, David A; Bauer, Gordon B

    2011-04-01

    Aquatic mammals use vibrissae to detect hydrodynamic stimuli over a range from 5 to 150 Hz, similar to the range detected by lateral line systems in fishes and amphibians. Manatees possess ∼5,300 vibrissae distributed over the body, innervated by ∼209,000 axons. This extensive innervation devoted to vibrissae follicles is reflected in enlarged, elaborate somatosensory regions of the gracile, cuneate, and Bischoff's brain-stem nuclei, ventrobasal thalamus, and presumptive somatosensory cortex. Our preliminary psychophysical testing indicates that in Florida and Antillean manatees the Weber fraction for detection thresholds for grating textures ranges from 0.025 to 0.14. At the lower end of this range, sensitivity is comparable to human index finger thresholds. For hydrodynamic stimuli of 5-150 Hz, detection threshold levels for manatees using facial or postfacial vibrissae were substantially lower than those reported for harbor seals and similar to reports of sensitivity for the lateral line systems of some fish. Our findings suggest that the facial and postfacial vibrissae are used to detect hydrodynamic stimuli, whereas only the facial vibrissae are used for direct contact investigation. PMID:21534997

  20. A Lateralization of Function Approach to Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilea, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). "Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach." "Brain and Cognition," 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex…

  1. Formation and function of Vibrio parahaemolyticus lateral flagella.

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, S; Okamoto, K

    1977-01-01

    Formation of the lateral flagella (L-flagella) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was studied immunologically, using specific antiserum against L-flagella. On solid medium, L-flagella were formed at both high (37 degrees C) and low (25 degrees C) temperatures, although at high temperatures they became dissociated from the cells and decomposed in the medium. L-flagella were not formed in liquid or soft-agar medium. Formation of L-flagella was decreased by lowering the pH of the medium and repressed by transferring the cells from solid medium to liquid medium. Mutants possessing L-flagella but not a polar monotrichous flagellum (M-flagellum) swarmed on solid medium, whereas mutants were grown on solid medium and then transfered to liquid medium, the cells oscillated until they lost L-flagella. It is postulated that L-flagella are locomotive organelles on solid medium and in some cases also in liquid medium, whereas M-flagella are locomotive organelles only in liquid medium. PMID:845115

  2. Socioeconomic factors from midlife predict mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later; Findings from the AGES-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Taking into account our rapidly ageing population, older people are of particular interest in studying health inequalities. Most studies of older persons only include measures of current socioeconomic status (SES) and do not take into account data from earlier stages of life. In addition, only classic SES measures are used, while alternative measures, such as car ownership and house ownership, might equally well predict health. The present study aims to examine the effect of midlife socioeconomic factors on mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later. Methods Data were from 4,809 men and women aged 33–65 years who participated in the Reykjavik Study (1967–1992) and who were re-examined in old age in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) -Reykjavik Study (2002–2006). Results Education and occupation predicted mobility limitation and depressed mood. Independently, home and car ownership and the availability of housing features predicted mobility limitation. Shortages of food in childhood and lack of a car in midlife predicted depressed mood. Conclusion Socioeconomic factors from midlife and from childhood affect mobility limitation and depressed mood in old age. Prevention of health problems in old age should begin as early as midlife. PMID:23379351

  3. Hypothermic lung preservation functions, six or more years later.

    PubMed Central

    Garzon, A A; Goldstein, S; Okadigwe, C I; Paley, N B; Minkowitz, S

    1977-01-01

    The functions of each lung were measured 41 and 79 months following hypothermic twenty-four four lung preservation and autotransplantation in six and four dogs respectively. Functional results were compared with long-term autotransplanted canine lungs. Compliance, total lung capacity, functional reserve capacity and ventilation of preserved lungs were similar to autotransplanted lungs, and only slightly decreased as compared with normal animals. There was no statistically significant difference between the pulmonary diffusion capacity and oxygen uptake of the preserved and autotransplanted lungs group and autotransplants alone. However, in both groups, diffusion capacity and oxygen uptake were decreased as compared with intact animals. Pulmonary hypertension was found on occlusion of the contralateral lung's artery: it was due to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. No gross narrowing of the pulmonary artery or venous anastomosis was found that could explain the increased resistance. Diffuse emphysema of various degrees was observed in all animals. This study seems to indicate that hypothermic preservation of the lung does not affect significantly the long-term functional ability of the organ, and probably will have practical value in future clinical lung transplantation. Images Fig. 1. PMID:341822

  4. Moving the Nest: The Impact of Coresidential Children on Mobility in Later Midlife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, this article examines the relationship between the presence and age of children in the home and parental mobility in midlife. Although a substantial literature evaluates the factors affecting the timing of children leaving (and returning) home, less attention has been paid to…

  5. Lateral and Rotational Mobilities of Lipids in Specific Cellular Membranes of Eucalyptus gunnii Cultivars Exhibiting Different Freezing Tolerance 1

    PubMed Central

    Leborgne, Nathalie; Dupou-Cézanne, Laurence; Teulières, Chantal; Canut, Hervé; Tocanne, Jean-François; Boudet, Alain M.

    1992-01-01

    Two cell lines of Eucalyptus gunnii have been shown to keep their differential frost tolerance at the cellular level after long-term culture. They have been used to investigate the fluidity of specific cell membranes in relation with frost tolerance. Protoplasts and isolated vacuoles were obtained from both cell lines. In addition, purified plasma membrane and tonoplast (the vacuolar membrane) were separated from a crude microsomal fraction through free-flow electrophoresis. The lateral and rotational mobilities of lipids in these different membranes were studied by two biophysical techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence polarization. After labeling the vacuoles isolated from the frost-sensitive cells with 1-oleoyl-2-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benz-oxadiazol-4-yl)aminocaproyl phosphatidylcholine, a single mobile component was observed with a diffusion coefficient of 2.4 × 10−9 cm2 s−1 and a mobile fraction close to 100% at a temperature of 23°C. When using isolated vacuoles from the frost tolerant line, a higher lateral diffusion of tonoplast lipids was found with a diffusion coefficient of 3.2 × 10−9 cm2 s−1, still with a mobile fraction close to 100%. No convincing data were obtained when performing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments on protoplasts. Fluorescence polarization experiments confirmed the differential behavior of the two cell lines for tonoplast and also for plasma membrane. In addition, they showed that intrinsically tonoplast exhibited a higher fluidity than plasma membrane. Our results provide the first information on the fluidity of tonoplast and on the compared properties of two important plant membranes—tonoplast and plasma membrane—through the use of two complementary biophysical approaches. In addition, they suggest there is a correlation between membrane fluidity and cold tolerance. The potential interest of plant vacuole as a natural model system in membrane studies is emphasized

  6. Network structure of functional hippocampal lateralization in birds.

    PubMed

    Jonckers, Elisabeth; Güntürkün, Onur; De Groof, Geert; Van der Linden, Annemie; Bingman, Verner P

    2015-11-01

    Functional hemispheric asymmetry is a common feature of vertebrate brain organization, yet little is known about how hemispheric dominance is implemented at the neural level. One notable example of hemispheric dominance in birds is the leading role of the left hippocampal formation in controlling navigational processes that support homing in pigeons. Relying on resting state fMRI analyses (where Functional connectivity (FC) can be determined by placing a reference 'seed' for connectivity in one hemisphere), we show that following seeding in either an anterior or posterior region of the hippocampal formation of homing pigeons and starlings, the emergent FC maps are consistently larger following seeding of the left hippocampus. Left seedings are also more likely to result in FC maps that extend to the contralateral hippocampus and outside the boundaries of the hippocampus. The data support the hypothesis that broader FC is one neural-organizational property that confers, with respect to navigation, functional dominance to the left hippocampus of birds. PMID:25821141

  7. Impaired proteasome function in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Strong, Michael J; Durham, Heather D

    2012-06-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome system, important for maintaining protein quality control, is compromised in experimental models of familial ALS. The objective of this study was to determine if proteasome function is impaired in sporadic ALS. Proteasomal activities and subunit composition were evaluated in homogenates of spinal cord samples obtained at autopsy from sporadic ALS and non-neurological control cases, compared to cerebellum as a clinically spared tissue. The level of 20S α structural proteasome subunits was assessed in motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. Catalysis of peptide substrates of the three major proteasomal activities was substantially reduced in ALS thoracic spinal cord, but not in cerebellum, accompanied by alterations in the constitutive proteasome machinery. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased to 60% and 65% of control in ventral and dorsal spinal cord, respectively, concomitant with reduction in the β5 subunit with this catalytic activity. Caspase- and trypsin-like activities were reduced to a similar extent (46% - 68% of control). Proteasome levels, although generally maintained, appeared reduced specifically in motor neurons by immunolabelling. In conclusion, there are commonalities of findings in sporadic ALS patients and presymptomatic SOD1-G93A transgenic mice and these implicate inadequate proteasome function in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic ALS. PMID:22632443

  8. Ovarian function, reproduction, and later operations following adnexal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ranney, B; Chastain, D

    1978-05-01

    Among 3102 patients who had major gynecologic operations, only 223 (7.18%) needed adnexal operations during which reproductive potential was preserved. Operations involved ovaries (156), tubes (55), and embryologic cysts (32). After recovery 53.69% of these patients had viable babies (64.46% of patients under age 30). Patients were examined up to 28 years after operations, an average 11.32 years. When last examined. most patients still retained physiologic evidence of ovarian hormonal function; 20 patients had passed through spontaneous menopause, at an average age of 49.4 years. Fifty-two patients needed subsequent pelvic operations, but only 7 for possibly related conditions (4 repeat tubal pregnancies and 3 cyst-adenomas). All but one twisted adnexal mass, with gangrene, originated as a paramesonephric duct cyst. Seventeen adnexal operations were associated with pregnancy: 15 mothers had healthy babies, and 2 aborted. Details concerning numbers and characteristics of specific lesions are included in the paper. PMID:652198

  9. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  10. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  11. EEG and functional ultrasound imaging in mobile rats

    PubMed Central

    Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Pernot, Mathieu; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We developed an integrated experimental framework which extends the brain exploration capabilities of functional ultrasound imaging to awake/mobile animals. In addition to hemodynamic data, this method further allows parallel access to EEG recordings of neuronal activity. This approach is illustrated with two proofs of concept: first, a behavioral study, concerning theta rhythm activation in a maze running task and, second, a disease-related study concerning spontaneous epileptic seizures. PMID:26237228

  12. Herbivorous fishes, ecosystem function and mobile links on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding large-scale movement of ecologically important taxa is key to both species and ecosystem management. Those species responsible for maintaining functional connectivity between habitats are often called mobile links and are regarded as essential elements of resilience. By providing connectivity, they support resilience across spatial scales. Most marine organisms, including fishes, have long-term, biogeographic-scale connectivity through larval movement. Although most reef species are highly site attached after larval settlement, some taxa may also be able to provide rapid, reef-scale connectivity as adults. On coral reefs, the identity of such taxa and the extent of their mobility are not yet known. We use acoustic telemetry to monitor the movements of Kyphosus vaigiensis, one of the few reef fishes that feeds on adult brown macroalgae. Unlike other benthic herbivorous fish species, it also exhibits large-scale (>2 km) movements. Individual K. vaigiensis cover, on average, a 2.5 km length of reef (11 km maximum) each day. These large-scale movements suggest that this species may act as a mobile link, providing functional connectivity, should the need arise, and helping to support functional processes across habitats and spatial scales. An analysis of published studies of home ranges in reef fishes found a consistent relationship between home range size and body length. K. vaigiensis is the sole herbivore to depart significantly from the expected home range-body size relationship, with home range sizes more comparable to exceptionally mobile large pelagic predators rather than other reef herbivores. While the large-scale movements of K. vaigiensis reveal its potential capacity to enhance resilience over large areas, it also emphasizes the potential limitations of small marine reserves to protect some herbivore populations.

  13. Functional dissociation between lateral and medial entorhinal cortex in memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1983-07-01

    The effects of lesions of the medial or the lateral entorhinal cortex in mice were examined on acquisition, retention and extinction of an operant-conditioning task in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals, lesions in the medial entorhinal had no behavioral effects whereas lesions in the lateral entorhinal enhanced retention and increased resistance to extinction but did not change acquisition of this task. These results suggest a functional dissociation between the two parts of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:6882517

  14. Extraction of the lateral incisors to treat maxillary protrusion: quantitative evaluation of the stomatognathic functions.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sumiyoshi, Kumi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    To treat morphological abnormalities, impaction, and severe malposition of the teeth, the lateral incisors are sometimes extracted, followed by orthodontic space closure. This procedure often requires special consideration, not only with regard to esthetics but also for functional issues. However, thus far, few reports that have performed a functional evaluation in such cases. The purpose of this article is to report the successful treatment of an adult patient with a Class II division 1 malocclusion who was treated with extraction of the upper lateral incisors. The female patient, aged 23 years and 6 months, had a chief complaint of maxillary incisal protrusion and crooked teeth. In this patient, the upper lateral incisors were extracted to fulfill the patient's strong request, followed by orthodontic treatment using edgewise appliances. A high-pull J-hook headgear on the lower dental arch was used to prevent further labial inclination of the lower incisors. The total active treatment period was 37 months. The resulting occlusion and a satisfactory facial profile were maintained during a 4-year retention period. Additionally, this treatment did not affect the stomatognathic functions as assessed by the following criteria: range of the incisal path or condylar motion during maximal open-close movement, protrusive excursion, lateral excursion, and the chewing test. In conclusion, extraction of the upper lateral incisors can be an effective treatment choice when the upper lateral incisors are dwarfed, are nonvital, or demonstrate severe malposition. PMID:22908948

  15. Mobile phone emission modulates interhemispheric functional coupling of EEG alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Claudio; Ferreri, Florinda; Curcio, Giuseppe; Fini, Rita; Del Percio, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2007-03-01

    We tested the working hypothesis that electromagnetic fields from mobile phones (EMFs) affect interhemispheric synchronization of cerebral rhythms, an important physiological feature of information transfer into the brain. Ten subjects underwent two electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, separated by 1 week, following a crossover double-blind paradigm in which they were exposed to a mobile phone signal (global system for mobile communications; GSM). The mobile phone was held on the left side of the subject head by a modified helmet, and orientated in the normal position for use over the ear. The microphone was orientated towards the corner of the mouth, and the antenna was near the head in the parietotemporal area. In addition, we positioned another similar phone (but without battery) on the right side of the helmet, to balance the weight and to prevent the subject localizing the side of GSM stimulation (and consequently lateralizing attention). In one session the exposure was real (GSM) while in the other it was Sham; both sessions lasted 45 min. Functional interhemispheric connectivity was modelled using the analysis of EEG spectral coherence between frontal, central and parietal electrode pairs. Individual EEG rhythms of interest were delta (about 2-4 Hz), theta (about 4-6 Hz), alpha 1 (about 6-8 Hz), alpha 2 (about 8-10 Hz) and alpha 3 (about 10-12 Hz). Results showed that, compared to Sham stimulation, GSM stimulation modulated the interhemispheric frontal and temporal coherence at alpha 2 and alpha 3 bands. The present results suggest that prolonged mobile phone emission affects not only the cortical activity but also the spread of neural synchronization conveyed by interhemispherical functional coupling of EEG rhythms. PMID:17432975

  16. Excimer fluorescence compared to depolarization in the flow cytometric characterization of lateral membrane mobility in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Gregor; Schaefer, Buerk; Wimmer, Martin S.; Schmitz, Gerd

    1998-04-01

    An altered cellular membrane fluidity secondary to changes of cholesterol metabolism is a potentially important mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Especially in blood platelets an increased sensitivity for stimulation dependent aggregation which is a risk factor for thrombosis has been experimentally linked to disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The goal of this study was the development of a flow cytometric assay for the direct analysis of cellular membrane microviscosity in correlation to activation associated phenotypic changes of platelets in vitro. The analysis of fluorescence polarization following the staining of hydrophobic lipid regions of cell membranes with the fluorescent dye 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) is a well established method for the analysis of membrane fluidity. The extent of fluorescence anisotropy dependent on the rotational mobility of this fluorochrome is indirectly proportional to the microviscosity of the stained membrane subcompartment. In this study, an alternative and more simple method based on the diffusion dependent excimer formation of pyrenedecanoic acid (PDA) (J. Immunol. Methods 96:225-31, 1987) was characterized in comparison to the DPH method as a reference. Human platelets showed a rapid uptake of both DPH and PDA resulting in the staining primarily of the plasma membrane after up to 30 min of incubation. Staining analyzed at 351 nm excitation resulted in a saturation of the depolarization coefficient of DPH at 20 (mu) M but an increase of the excimer to monomer ratio of PDA with increasing dye concentration. A 'membrane fluidity coefficient' which saturated at 5 (mu) M PDA was calculated as the excimer fluorescence divided through the square of monomer fluorescence thereby correcting for the influence of dye concentration on excimer formation. The temperature dependent changes of membrane viscosity were further used as a model for the comparison of both methods. Cells analyzed at temperatures

  17. 47 CFR 22.575 - Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of mobile channel for remote control of...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service One-Way Or Two-Way Mobile Operation § 22.575 Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions. Carriers...

  18. 47 CFR 22.575 - Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of mobile channel for remote control of...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service One-Way Or Two-Way Mobile Operation § 22.575 Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions. Carriers...

  19. Form and Function of the Nasal Tip: Reorienting and Reshaping the Lateral Crus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Grant S

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the external nasal valve affects both the form and function of the nose. Successful treatment of these problems is dependent on proper analysis and diagnosis of the aberrant anatomy. Cephalic malpositioning of the lateral crura has been described for nearly 30 years. Repositioning of the lateral crura in a more caudal orientation with lateral crural strut grafts will correct aesthetic abnormalities and reinforce the external nasal valve. Sagittal malpositioning has been more recently described and also has deleterious effects on both the shape of the nasal tip and breathing. Reorienting the short axis of the lateral crus is another powerful tool for the rhinoplasty surgeon to correct the weak and narrow external nasal valve. PMID:26862964

  20. Visual hierarchical processing and lateralization of cognitive functions through domestic chicks' eyes.

    PubMed

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Pecchia, Tommaso; Patt, Francesco; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical stimuli have proven effective for investigating principles of visual organization in humans. A large body of evidence suggests that the analysis of the global forms precedes the analysis of the local forms in our species. Studies on lateralization also indicate that analytic and holistic encoding strategies are separated between the two hemispheres of the brain. This raises the question of whether precedence effects may reflect the activation of lateralized functions within the brain. Non-human animals have perceptual organization and functional lateralization that are comparable to that of humans. Here we trained the domestic chick in a concurrent discrimination task involving hierarchical stimuli. Then, we evaluated the animals for analytic and holistic encoding strategies in a series of transformational tests by relying on a monocular occlusion technique. A local precedence emerged in both the left and the right hemisphere, adding further evidence in favour of analytic processing in non-human animals. PMID:24404163

  1. Visual Hierarchical Processing and Lateralization of Cognitive Functions through Domestic Chicks' Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Pecchia, Tommaso; Patt, Francesco; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical stimuli have proven effective for investigating principles of visual organization in humans. A large body of evidence suggests that the analysis of the global forms precedes the analysis of the local forms in our species. Studies on lateralization also indicate that analytic and holistic encoding strategies are separated between the two hemispheres of the brain. This raises the question of whether precedence effects may reflect the activation of lateralized functions within the brain. Non-human animals have perceptual organization and functional lateralization that are comparable to that of humans. Here we trained the domestic chick in a concurrent discrimination task involving hierarchical stimuli. Then, we evaluated the animals for analytic and holistic encoding strategies in a series of transformational tests by relying on a monocular occlusion technique. A local precedence emerged in both the left and the right hemisphere, adding further evidence in favour of analytic processing in non-human animals. PMID:24404163

  2. The Effect of the Modified Lateral Suprascapular Block on Shoulder Function in Patients With Chronic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Christian; Rumpold-Seitlinger, Gudrun; Farzi, Sylvia; Auer, Johann; Bornemann-Cimenti, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) is commonly used in pain therapy for patients with chronic shoulder pain. The effect of SSNB on shoulder function has, however, not been investigated so far. If in shoulder function, i.e. the range of motion is increased after application of the nerve block, it can be expected that subsequent physiotherapy, besides being less painful, is also more effective in terms of restoring shoulder mobility. Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of SSNB on shoulder function, in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Patients and Methods: Patients were evaluated using the Constant-Murley Score (CMS) and number rating scale values for pain. The SSN was blocked using the Feigl approach, with 5 ml ropivacaine 0.5%. Shoulder function and pain were assessed 60 minutes and 24 hours after the block. Results: Totally, 20 patients completed the study. The CMS and pain scores significantly improved after the block. Conclusions: The use of the modified lateral SSNB of Feigl significantly reduces pain and increases shoulder function, in chronic shoulder pain. PMID:26705528

  3. Perception and Lateralization of Spoken Emotion by Youths with High-Functioning Forms of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kimberly F.; Montgomery, Allen A.; Abramson, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The perception and the cerebral lateralization of spoken emotions were investigated in children and adolescents with high-functioning forms of autism (HFFA), and age-matched typically developing controls (TDC). A dichotic listening task using nonsense passages was used to investigate the recognition of four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and…

  4. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Atypical Lateralization in Motor and Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been…

  5. Effects of structural characterizations on fragility functions of bridges subject to seismic shaking and lateral spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Huo, Yili; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Kashighandi, Pirooz

    2008-12-01

    This paper evaluates the seismic vulnerability of different classes of typical bridges in California when subjected to seismic shaking or liquefaction-induced lateral spreading. The detailed structural configurations in terms of superstructure type, connection, continuity at support and foundation type, etc. render different damage resistant capability. Six classes of bridges are established based on their anticipated failure mechanisms under earthquake shaking. The numerical models that are capable of simulating the complex soil-structure interaction effects, nonlinear behavior of columns and connections are developed for each bridge class. The dynamic responses are obtained using nonlinear time history analyses for a suite of 250 earthquake motions with increasing intensity. An equivalent static analysis procedure is also implemented to evaluate the vulnerability of the bridges when subjected to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading. Fragility functions for each bridge class are derived and compared for both seismic shaking (based on nonlinear dynamic analyses) and lateral spreading (based on equivalent static analyses) for different performance states. The study finds that the fragility functions due to either ground shaking or lateral spreading show significant correlation with the structural characterizations, but differences emerge for ground shaking and lateral spreading conditions. Structural properties that will mostly affect the bridges’ damage resistant capacity are also identified.

  6. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S; Hammer, Robert E; Comerford, Sarah A; Amatruda, James F; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53(-) germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5' sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  7. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E.; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Hammer, Robert E.; Comerford, Sarah A.; Amatruda, James F.; Abrams, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53− germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5′ sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  8. Development and field testing of a mobile backscatter x-ray lateral migration radiography land mine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Su, Zhong; Houssay, Laurent; Ekdahl, Dan; Brygoo, Stephanie

    2002-08-01

    Lateral migration radiography (LMR), a new form of Compton backscatter x-ray imaging, is applied to the detection and identification of buried land mines. A mobile LMR land mine detection system was developed and field tested. Weight for this initial system was about 175 kg; weight for a prototype should be about 100 kg. X-ray generator power level was 750 watts; the power level requirement for a prototype should be about 300 watts. An innovative rotating collimator for the x-ray source beam was developed to provide rapid side-to-side scanning of the beam without having to move the x-ray generator in this direction. Acquisition of images of a 40 cm by 40 cm area takes from 30 to 60 seconds, depending on the desired resolution. The imaging capabilities of LMR make it well suited for use as a land mine detection confirmation sensor. This system was employed on the vehicular test lanes at Fort A.P. Hill in October, 2001. High quality images were obtained for a variety of buried land mines. The system was also used to scan 30 locations on one of the test lanes where GPR consistently yielded false alarms. In only two cases did the LMR image sets yield a signature that could be considered to possibly indicate a mine.

  9. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning.

    PubMed

    Heitzeg, Mary M; Cope, Lora M; Martz, Meghan E; Hardee, Jillian E; Zucker, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning-negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)-were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4, mean age 19.6, and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2. Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  10. Reduced laterality as a trait marker of schizophrenia--evidence from structural and functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Viola; Knöchel, Christian; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Schönmeyer, Ralf; Lindner, Michael; van de Ven, Vincent; Haenschel, Corinna; Uhlhaas, Peter; Maurer, Konrad; Linden, David E J

    2010-02-10

    Laterality is a characteristic principle of the organization of the brain systems for language, and reduced hemispheric asymmetry has been considered a risk factor for schizophrenia. Here we sought support for the risk factor hypothesis by investigating whether reduced asymmetry of temporal lobe structure and function is also present in unaffected relatives. Sixteen schizophrenia patients, 16 age-matched first-degree relatives, and 15 healthy controls underwent high-resolution three-dimensional anatomical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging during auditory stimulation. Both the overall auditory cortex and planum temporale volumes and the lateralization to the left hemisphere were markedly reduced in patients. The decrease of lateralization correlated with increased severity of symptoms. In addition, both the overall functional activation in response to auditory stimulation and its asymmetry were reduced in the patients. Relatives had intermediate values between patients and controls on both structural and functional measures. This study provides added support for the idea that reduced hemispheric asymmetry is a biological risk factor for schizophrenia. PMID:20147555

  11. Left hemispheric dominance of vestibular processing indicates lateralization of cortical functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Lange, Elena; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Reuss, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Lateralization of cortical functions such as speech dominance, handedness and processing of vestibular information are present not only in humans but also in ontogenetic older species, e.g. rats. In human functional imaging studies, the processing of vestibular information was found to be correlated with the hemispherical dominance as determined by the handedness. It is located mainly within the right hemisphere in right handers and within the left hemisphere in left handers. Since dominance of vestibular processing is unknown in animals, our aim was to study the lateralization of cortical processing in a functional imaging study applying small-animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and galvanic vestibular stimulation in an in vivo rat model. The cortical and subcortical network processing vestibular information could be demonstrated and correlated with data from other animal studies. By calculating a lateralization index as well as flipped region of interest analyses, we found that the vestibular processing in rats follows a strong left hemispheric dominance independent from the "handedness" of the animals. These findings support the idea of an early hemispheric specialization of vestibular cortical functions in ontogenetic older species. PMID:23979449

  12. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  13. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  14. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  15. Habitual Physical Activity Levels are Associated with Performance in Measures of Physical Function and Mobility in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Morie, Marina; Reid, Kieran F.; Miciek, Renee; Lajevardi, Newsha; Choong, Karen; Krasnoff, Joanne B.; Storer, Thomas W.; Fielding, Roger A.; Bhasin, Shalender; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether objectively measured physical activity levels are associated with physical function and mobility in older men. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Academic research center. Participants Eighty-two community-dwelling men ≥ 65 years of age with self-reported mobility limitations were divided into a low activity and a high activity group based on the median average daily physical activity counts of the whole sample. Measurements Physical activity by triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift and lower task; aerobic capacity by maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max); and leg press and chest press maximal strength and peak power. Results Older men with higher compared to lower physical activity levels demonstrated a > 1.4 point higher mean SPPB score and a 0.35 m/s faster walking speed. They also climbed a standard flight of stairs 1.85 sec faster and completed 60% more shelves in a lift and lower task (all p < 0.01). Muscle strength and power measures, however, were not significantly different between the low and high activity group. Correlation analyses and multiple linear regression models showed that physical activity is positively associated with all physical function and mobility measures, leg press strength, and VO2max. Conclusion Older men with higher physical activity levels demonstrate better physical function and mobility than less active peers. Moreover, in older men physical activity levels are predictive of performance in measures of physical function and mobility. Future work is needed to determine whether modifications in physical activity levels can improve or preserve physical performance in later-life. PMID:20738436

  16. Cognitive Functioning Predicts Driver Safety On Road-Tests 1 and 2 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Aksan, Nazan; Anderson, Steven W.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Amy M.; Uc, Ergun Y.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our ability to predict aging related declines in driving performance from off-road assessments have clinical practice and social policy implications. OBJECTIVES 1) To describe longitudinal changes in mean-level and evaluate rank-order stability in potential predictors of driving safety (visual sensory, motor, visual attention, and cognitive functioning) and safety errors during an 18-mile on-road-drive-test among older adults. 2) To evaluate the relative predictive power of earlier visual sensory, motor, visual attention, and cognitive functioning on future safety errors controlling for earlier driving capacity. DESIGN A three-year longitudinal observational study; SETTING A large teaching hospital in the Mid-West; PARTICIPANTS 111 neurologically normal older adults (60 to 89 years at baseline); MEASUREMENTS Safety errors based on video review of a standard 18-mile on-road driving test served as the outcome measure. Comprehensive battery of tests on the predictor side included visual sensory functioning, motor functioning, cognitive functioning, and a measure of Useful Field of View. RESULTS Longitudinal changes in mean-levels of safety errors and cognitive functioning were small from year-to-year. Relative rank-order stability between consecutive assessments was moderate in overall safety errors, it was moderate to strong in visual attention and cognitive functioning. While prospective bivariate correlations ranged from fair to moderate between safety errors and predictors, only functioning in the cognitive domain predicted future driver performance one and two-years later in multivariate analyses. CONCLUSION Normative aging related declines in driver performance as assessed by on-road tests emerge slowly. The findings clearly demonstrated that even in the presence conservative controls, such as previous driving ability, age, visual sensory and motor functioning, cognitive functioning predicted future driving performance on-road one and two-years later

  17. Variations in subject pool as a function of earlier or later participation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L

    2000-04-01

    Data were obtained from 113 participants in a university subject pool during a 16-wk. semester. Without knowing the purpose of the study, participants self-selected to participate earlier (Weeks 3 and 4: n = 63) or later (Weeks 15 or 16) n = 50). Variations in scores on the NEO Personality Inventory--Revised, the Crowne-Marlowe Social Desirability Scale, the General Expectancy of Success Scale, the Shipley Institute of Living Scale, self-reported SATs and GPAs, and a measure of academic self-efficacy as a function of earlier or later participation were examined. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that early participants differed significantly from later participants but not in predicted ways. Earlier participants scored higher on NEO PI-R Neuroticism; specifically men (n = 15) and women (n = 48) scored higher on Hostility, and women scored higher on Depression and Self-consciousness. An additional significant difference occurred for self-reported SAT Verbal scores for men, which were significantly higher for later participants. These temporal variations may represent confounds in research using university subject pools. PMID:10840925

  18. Integral functions of electron lateral distribution and their fluctuations in electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kirillov, A. A.; Linde, I. A.; Lyutov, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulated lateral distribution functions for electrons of EPC developing in lead, at superhigh energies (.1-1 PeV) for depths t or = 60 c.u. delta t=1t. c.u. are presented. The higher moment characteristics, i.e., variation, asymmetry, excess, are presented along with analytical solutions for the same characteristics at fixed observation level calculated to theory approximations A and B by using numerical inversion of the Laplace transformation. The conclusion is made of a complex, usually non-Gaussian shape of the function of the particle number distribution within a circle of given radius at fixed depth.

  19. [Predominant occlusal function during lateral mandibular movements in the black African patient].

    PubMed

    Djeredou, K B; Kamagate, F S; Thiam, A; Pesson, D M; Bamba, I

    2002-12-01

    The research of the predominant occlusal function during mandibular movements of laterality at the topic African melanoderme, drove authors of this survey to: select 52 healthy topics (11 women and 41 men), aged of 22 to 33 years old observe and note at every topic the presence and the nature of contacts or their possible absence of the working side during the movement of deduction. Observations done as well directly in mouth, that on models put in semi-adaptable articulators, permitted to note that the function of posterior group is more the recovered so much at women that at men, at the young adults and at adults. PMID:12680132

  20. Tools and talk: an evolutionary perspective on the functional deficits associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Turner, Martin R; Lemon, Roger

    2014-04-01

    We propose that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia may be viewed as a failure of interlinked functional complexes having their origins in key evolutionary adaptations. We discuss how hand-arm function, locomotion, brainstem function (involving vocalization/speech, swallowing and breathing), and cognitive impairment share complex, interdependent evolutionary adaptations that can be traced back several million years. Fine movements of the hand facilitated tool-making and use enhanced by development of bipedalism. Development of the larynx and integration of respiratory control were central to vocalization, which when combined with gesture are intermediary to human language. These adaptations were accompanied by progressive encephalization, with development of Theory of Mind to facilitate socialization. The varied clinical phenotypes of ALS can thus be understood in the context of inter-related functional complexes that subserve "Tools and Talk"; they have a long evolutionary history and are related to specific developmental neural and gene networks. PMID:24273101

  1. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  2. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke. Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed. Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients’ ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery. Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1–3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4–6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores. Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  3. Effects of Functional Mobility Skills Training for Adults with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a functional mobility program on the functional standing and walking skills of five adults with developmental disabilities. The Mobility Opportunities Via Education (MOVE) Curriculum was implemented using a multiple-baseline across subjects design. Repeated measures were taken during baseline, intervention…

  4. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  5. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: Application of a biomarker development strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R.; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses. PMID:25610790

  6. Functional neuroimaging findings in patients with lateral and mesio-lateral temporal lobe epilepsy; FDG-PET and ictal SPECT studies.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Seo, Dae Won; Hong, Seung-Chyul; Hong, Seung Bong

    2015-05-01

    The differentiation of combined mesial and lateral temporal onset of seizures (mesio-lateral TLE, MLTLE) from lateral TLE (LTLE) is critical to achieve good surgical outcomes. However, the functional neuroimaging features in LTLE patients based on the ictal onset zone utilizing intracranial EEG (iEEG) in a large series have not been investigated. We enrolled patients diagnosed with MLTLE (n = 35) and LTLE (n = 53) based on the site of ictal onset zone from iEEG monitoring. MLTLE is defined when ictal discharges originate from the mesial and lateral temporal cortices independently, whereas seizures of LTLE arise exclusively from the lateral temporal cortex. Compared to patients with LTLE, patients with MLTLE were more likely to have 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) hypometabolism and hyperperfusion on ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) restricted to the temporal areas. MLTLE patients had more frequent aura or secondarily generalized seizures than LTLE patients. No significant differences were found in scalp EEG, MRI, and Wada asymmetry between groups. The overall seizure-free rate was good (73.8%, mean follow-up = 9.7 years), which was not different (Engel class I, 74.3% in MLTLE vs. 73.6% in LTLE). Postsurgical memory function was spared in LTLE patients, while visual memory was impaired in MLTLE patients when their mesial temporal structures were sufficiently resected. It suggests that functional neuroimaging (interictal PET and ictal and interictal SPECT) may play a crucial role to differentiate between MLTLE and LTLE. PMID:25794857

  7. Mislocated FUS is sufficient for gain-of-toxic-function amyotrophic lateral sclerosis phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Shiihashi, Gen; Ito, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuya; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Ebine, Taeko; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in RNA-binding proteins, including fused in sarcoma (FUS) and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, encoded by TARDBP), are associated with sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A major question is whether neuronal loss is caused by toxic gain-of-function cytoplasmic aggregates or loss of nuclear RNA-binding protein function. We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing exogenous FUS without a nuclear localization signal (ΔNLS-FUS), which developed progressive spastic motor deficits and neuronal loss in the motor cortex. The ΔNLS-FUS protein was restricted to the cytoplasm and formed ubiquitin/p62-positive aggregates. Endogenous FUS expression, nuclear localization, and splicing activity were not altered, indicating that mislocated FUS is sufficient for proteinopathy. Crossing ΔNLS-FUS with wild-type human TDP-43 transgenic mice exacerbated pathological and behavioural phenotypes, suggesting that both proteins are involved in a common cascade. RNA-sequence analysis revealed specific transcriptome alterations, including genes regulating dynein-associated molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress. ΔNLS-FUS mice are promising tools for understanding amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis and testing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27368346

  8. Aspects of Radiation Budget, Subsurface Lateral Moisture Exchange, and Vegetation Function in Areas of Complex Topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2004-12-01

    There is evidence that topography strongly affects the state, function, and distribution of vegetation by controlling incoming solar radiation and lateral redistribution of soil moisture. However, numerical experiments studying the effects that a topography can have on vegetation have oversimplified the treatment of topography and/or the representation of vegetation. We investigate the control of topography on vegetation state and stress via detailed modeling of radiation and soil moisture budgets across the varied terrain of a watershed. A detailed vegetation-hydrology model parameterizes the processes of canopy radiative transfer and rainfall interception and couples the processes of infiltration and evapotranspiration to photosynthesis via moisture uptake through a root systems with varied profiles. The model is applied on a continuous basis to synthetic watersheds of topography dominated by either convex or concave hillslopes. The numerical analysis is carried out for several plant functional types and soils. Inferences from the spatially-distributed dynamics are used to examine topographic niches favorable to vegetation.

  9. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function Around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A.; Hashim, U.; Marwah, M.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code in the energy range (10^{13} - 10^{16}) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for the two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation measured by the Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability to identify the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades by determining its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  10. Optimizing mobility in later life: the role of the urban built environment for older adults aging in place.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose

    2013-12-01

    Hazards in the urban built environment can create barriers to mobility among older adults aging in place. We investigated the relationship between urban built environment characteristics and 15-month trajectories of mobility disability in a sample of 1,188 older adults living in Detroit, MI, a city that has undergone rapid economic and structural decline. Data come from the Michigan Minimum Data Set for Home Care (2001-2008), an enumerative database of older adults in Michigan who qualify for federal or state-funded home and community-based long-term care through a Medicaid waiver program. Standardized assessments are made at intake and every 90 days by case managers. Built environments were assessed with a virtual audit using the "Street View" feature of Google Earth. A summary accessibility score was created for each block based on a count of the number of accessible features (e.g., continuous barrier-free sidewalks and proximity of public transportation). Using growth mixture models, two latent trajectories of outdoor mobility were identified: one capturing occasional outdoor mobility (representing 83 % of the sample) and one capturing almost no mobility outside the home. Controlling for sociodemographic and health risk factors, individuals living in more accessible environments had a 18 % higher odds of being in the more mobile group (OR = 1.18, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.41). These findings emphasize the importance of the built environment for mobility among urban-dwelling older adults. PMID:23592019

  11. Band 3 and glycophorin are progressively aggregated in density-fractionated sickle and normal red blood cells. Evidence from rotational and lateral mobility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, J D; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    Band 3 aggregation in the plane of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is postulated to be important in the pathophysiology of hemolysis of dense sickle and normal RBCs. We used the fluorescence photobleaching recovery and polarized fluorescence depletion techniques to measure the lateral and rotational mobility of band 3, glycophorins, and phospholipid analogues in membranes of density-separated intact RBCs from seven patients with sickle cell disease and eight normal controls. The fractions of laterally mobile band 3 and glycophorin decreased progressively as sickle RBC density increased. Normal RBCs also showed a progressive decrease in band 3 fractional mobility with increasing buoyant density. Rapidly rotating, slowly rotating, and rotationally immobile forms of band 3 were observed in both sickle and normal RBC membranes. The fraction of rapidly rotating band 3 progressively decreased and the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 progressively increased with increasing sickle RBC density. Changes in the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 were not reversible upon hypotonic swelling of dense sickle RBCs, and normal RBCs osmotically shrunken in sucrose buffers failed to manifest band 3 immobilization at median cell hemoglobin concentration values characteristic of dense sickle RBCs. We conclude that dense sickle and normal RBCs acquire irreversible membrane abnormalities that cause transmembrane protein immobilization and band 3 aggregation. Band 3 aggregates could serve as cell surface sites of autologous antibody binding and thereby lead to removal of dense sickle and normal (senescent) RBCs from the circulation. PMID:8423219

  12. Investigating the contribution of VAPB/ALS8 loss of function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; El Oussini, Hajer; Bercier, Valérie; Gros-Louis, François; Valdmanis, Paul N; McDearmid, Jonathan; Mejier, Inge A; Dion, Patrick A; Dupre, Nicolas; Hollinger, David; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Camu, William; Meininger, Vincent; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; René, Frédérique; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-06-15

    The mutations P56S and T46I in the gene encoding vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B/C (VAPB) cause ALS8, a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Overexpression of mutant forms of VAPB leads to cytosolic aggregates, suggesting a gain of function of the mutant protein. However, recent work suggested that the loss of VAPB function could be the major mechanism leading to ALS8. Here, we used multiple genetic and experimental approaches to study whether VAPB loss of function might be sufficient to trigger motor neuron degeneration. In order to identify additional ALS-associated VAPB mutations, we screened the entire VAPB gene in a cohort of ALS patients and detected two mutations (A145V and S160Δ). To directly address the contribution of VAPB loss of function in ALS, we generated zebrafish and mouse models with either a decreased or a complete loss of Vapb expression. Vapb knockdown in zebrafish led to swimming deficits. Mice knocked-out for Vapb showed mild motor deficits after 18 months of age yet had innervated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Importantly, overexpression of VAPB mutations were unable to rescue the motor deficit caused by Vapb knockdown in zebrafish and failed to cause a toxic gain-of-function defect on their own. Thus, Vapb loss of function weakens the motor system of vertebrate animal models but is on its own unable to lead to a complete ALS phenotype. Our findings are consistent with the notion that VAPB mutations constitute a risk factor for motor neuron disease through a loss of VAPB function. PMID:23446633

  13. Youth in group home care: youth characteristics and predictors of later functioning.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wai-Ying; Mettrick, Jennifer E; Stephan, Sharon H; Von Waldner, Christina A

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the findings of an exploratory research study of foster care youth residing in group homes in a mid-Atlantic state in the USA. The aims of the present study were to (1) describe youth characteristics, (2) explore whether baseline functioning differed by gender or ethnicity, (3) explore predictors of cross-time differences in psychosocial functioning, and (4) explore predictors of later functioning, specifically age, gender, and length of stay. Psychosocial functioning at two time points (i.e., T1 = admission into group home; T2 = current or discharge) in 180 charts from 29 randomly selected group homes were reviewed. Youth were on average 14.86 years of age, predominantly male (71%; n = 128), and predominantly African American (79%). Findings suggest that group home placement may benefit some youth but not others, particularly girls and younger children with lower initial level of need. Findings underscore the potential complexity of intervention impact in the context of unique youth, family, and environment factors. PMID:22529035

  14. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflie, R. J.; Fernandez, L. Bustos; Perec, C. J.; Gonzalez, E.; Marzi, A.

    1974-01-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested. PMID:4852110

  15. Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Tanja; Korpijaakko-Huuhka, Anna-Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Hollo, Kirsi; Ylinen, Aarne; Palmio, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the cranial nerve symptoms, speech disorders and communicative effectiveness of Finnish patients with diagnosed or possible amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at their first assessment by a speech-language pathologist. The group studied consisted of 30 participants who had clinical signs of bulbar deterioration at the beginning of the study. They underwent a thorough clinical speech and communication examination. The cranial nerve symptoms and ability to communicate were compared in 14 participants with probable or definitive ALS and in 16 participants with suspected or possible ALS. The initial type of ALS was also assessed. More deterioration in soft palate function was found in participants with possible ALS than with diagnosed ALS. Likewise, a slower speech rate combined with more severe dysarthria was observed in possible ALS. In both groups, there was some deterioration in communicative effectiveness. In the possible ALS group the diagnostic delay was longer and speech therapy intervention actualized later. The participants with ALS showed multidimensional decline in communication at their first visit to the speech-language pathologist, but impairments and activity limitations were more severe in suspected or possible ALS. The majority of persons with bulbar-onset ALS in this study were in the latter diagnostic group. This suggests that they are more susceptible to delayed diagnosis and delayed speech therapy assessment. It is important to start speech therapy intervention during the diagnostic processes particularly if the person already shows bulbar symptoms. PMID:27110704

  16. Seven Years Later: Effects of a Neighborhood Mobility Program on Poor Black and Latino Adults' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauth, Rebecca C.; Leventhal, Tama; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    This study explored program effects on adults' well-being seven years following the implementation of a court-ordered neighborhood mobility program. Low-income black and Latino adults residing in poor, segregated neighborhoods in Yonkers, New York were randomly selected to relocate to publicly funded town-houses in middle-class neighborhoods…

  17. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

  18. Time away from work predicts later cognitive function: Differences by activity during leave

    PubMed Central

    Leist, Anja K.; Glymour, M Maria; Mackenbach, Johan P; van Lenthe, Frank J; Avendano, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine how different activities performed during employment gaps are associated with later cognitive function and change. Method Five cognitive measures were used to indicate cognitive impairment of 18,259 respondents to the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (age 50-73) in 2004/5 or 2006/7. Using complete employment histories, employment gaps of six months or more between ages 25 and 65 were identified. Results Controlling for early-life socioeconomic status, school performance, and education, higher risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as unemployment (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.18, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI] 1.04, 1.35) and sickness (OR = 1.78, 95 % CI 1.52, 2.09). In contrast, lower risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as training (OR = 0.73, 95 % CI 0.52, 1.01) or maternity (OR = 0.65, 95 % CI 0.57, 0.79). In longitudinal mixed effects models, training and maternity spells were associated with lower two-year aging-related cognitive decline. Discussion Periods away from work described as unemployment or sickness are associated with lower cognitive function, whereas maternity and training spells are associated with better late-life cognitive function. Both causation and selection mechanisms may explain these findings. PMID:23889855

  19. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  20. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  1. Oral health conditions and cognitive functioning in middle and later adulthood

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of oral health conditions on cognitive functioning on basis of data samples from several European countries. Methods Secondary analyses were conducted of data from wave 2 of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) which includes 14 European countries and is intended to be representative of each country’s middle and later adulthood population. Information on word recall, verbal fluency, and numeracy as well as information on chewing ability and denture wearing status was available for a total of 28,693 persons aged 50+. Multivariate regression analysis was used to detect influences of oral health parameters on cognitive functioning (p < 0.05). Results Persons with good chewing ability or without dentures had significantly better word recall, verbal fluency, and numeracy skills than persons with chewing impairment or with dentures. The observed patterns of parameter estimates imply differential oral health impacts on numeracy compared to word recall and verbal fluency. Conclusions The present study provides novel large-scale epidemiological evidence supportive of an association between oral health and cognitive functioning. Future research should intend to verify the precise causal links between oral health conditions, various cognitive dimensions, and their neural correlates. PMID:24923362

  2. Language Laterality in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Controls: A Functional, Volumetric, and Diffusion Tensor MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Tracey A.; Silver, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically investigated in ASD. The goal of this study was to examine differences in gray matter volume of perisylvian language regions, connections between language regions, and language abilities in individuals with typical left lateralized language compared to those with atypical (bilateral or right) asymmetry of language functions. 14 adolescent boys with ASD and 20 typically developing adolescent boys participated, including equal numbers of left- and right-handed individuals in each group. Participants with typical left lateralized language activation had smaller frontal language region volume and higher fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus compared to the group with atypical language laterality, across both ASD and control participants. The group with typical language asymmetry included the most right-handed controls and fewest left-handers with ASD. Atypical language laterality was more prevalent in the ASD than control group. These findings support an association between laterality of language function and language region anatomy. They also suggest anatomical differences may be more associated with variation in language laterality than specifically with ASD. Language laterality therefore may provide a novel way of subdividing samples, resulting in more homogenous groups for research into genetic and neurocognitive foundations of developmental disorders. PMID:20031197

  3. Effect of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan’s mobilization with movement group (n=12) and “weight-bearing with placebo” mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke.

  4. Frontal lobe function and behavioral changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wei, QianQian; Chen, XuePing; Zheng, ZhenZhen; Huang, Rui; Guo, XiaoYan; Cao, Bei; Zhao, Bi; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing interest, the frequency and characteristics of frontal lobe functional and behavioral deficits in Chinese people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as their impact on the survival of ALS patients, remain unknown. The Chinese version of the frontal assessment battery (FAB) and frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) were used to evaluate 126 sporadic ALS patients and 50 healthy controls. The prevalence of frontal lobe dysfunction was 32.5%. The most notable impairment domain of the FAB was lexical fluency (30.7%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that an onset age older than 45 years (OR 5.976, P = 0.002) and a lower educational level (OR 0.858, P = 0.002) were potential determinants of an abnormal FAB. Based on the FBI score, 46.0% of patients showed varied degrees of frontal behavioral changes. The most common impaired neurobehavioral domains were irritability (25.4%), logopenia (20.6%) and apathy (19.0%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised scale score (OR 0.127, P = 0.001) was a potential determinant of an abnormal FBI. Frontal functional impairment and the severity of frontal behavioral changes were not associated with the survival status or the progression of ALS by the cox proportional hazard model and multivariate regression analyses, respectively. Frontal lobe dysfunction and frontal behavioral changes are common in Chinese ALS patients. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be related to the onset age and educational level. The severity of frontal behavioral changes may be associated with the ALSFRS-R. However, the frontal functional impairment and the frontal behavioral changes do not worsen the progression or survival of ALS. PMID:25249295

  5. The effect of oppositional parietal transcranial direct current stimulation on lateralized brain functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Lucia M; Leech, Rob; Scott, Gregory; Malhotra, Paresh; Seemungal, Barry; Sharp, David J

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive functions such as numerical processing and spatial attention show varying degrees of lateralization. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can be used to investigate how modulating cortical excitability affects performance of these tasks. This study investigated the effect of bi-parietal tDCS on numerical processing, spatial and sustained attention. It was hypothesized that tDCS would have distinct effects on these tasks because of varying lateralization (numerical processing left, spatial attention right) and that these effects are partly mediated by modulation of sustained attention. A single-blinded, crossover, sham-controlled study was performed. Eighteen healthy right-handed participants performed cognitive tasks during three sessions of oppositional parietal tDCS stimulation: sham; right anodal with left cathodal (RA/LC); and right cathodal with left anodal (RC/LA). Participants performed a number comparison task, a modified Posner task, a choice reaction task (CRT) and the rapid visual processing task (RVP). RA/LC tDCS impaired number comparison performance compared with sham, with slower responses to numerically close numbers pairs. RA/LC and RC/LA tDCS had distinct effects on CRT performance, specifically affecting vigilance level during the final block of the task. No effect of stimulation on the Posner task or RVP was found. It was demonstrated that oppositional parietal tDCS affected both numerical performance and vigilance level in a polarity-dependent manner. The effect of tDCS on numerical processing may partly be due to attentional effects. The behavioural effects of tDCS were specifically observed under high task demands, demonstrating the consequences of an interaction between stimulation type and cognitive load. PMID:26414683

  6. Lateral flow biosensor for multiplex detection of nitrofuran metabolites based on functionalized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuewen; Liang, Xiaoling; Dong, Jianghong; Fang, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Lingwen

    2016-09-01

    The use of potential mutagenic nitrofuran antibiotic in food animal production has been banned world-wide. Common methods for nitrofuran detection involve complex extraction procedures. In the present study, magnetic beads functionalized with antibody against nitrofuran derivative were used as both the extraction and color developing media in lateral flow biosensor. Derivatization reagent carboxybenzaldehyde is firstly modified with ractopamine. After reaction with nitrofuran metabolites, the resultant molecule has two functional groups: the metabolite moiety and the ractopamine moiety. Metabolite moiety is captured by the antibody that is coated on magnetic beads. This duplex is then loaded onto biosensor and ractopamine moiety is further captured by the antibody immobilized on the test zone of nitrocellulose membrane. Without tedious organic reagent-based extraction procedure, this biosensor was capable of visually detecting four metabolites simultaneously with a detection limit of 0.1 μg/L. No cross-reactivity was observed in the presence of 50 μg/L interferential components. Graphical abstract Derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, or AMOZ) and LFA detection of the derivative products. PMID:27438720

  7. Correlation between permanent tooth eruption pattern and the predominance of the motor function laterality

    PubMed Central

    Veloso-Durán, Ana; Vazquez-Salceda, Carmen M.; López-Jiménez, Julian; Veloso-Durán, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To asses whether dental eruption order can play a role in the early diagnosis of crossed laterality. Study Design: Dental eruption pattern along with eye, ear, hand and foot lateralism were examined on 131 children between 6 to 8 years old from public schools from a multietnic population area of Barcelona city. Statistic methods (Statgraphics Plus 5.1 program) were used to evaluate data recollected. Results: Only foot and dentition lateralities behave as independent variables regarding hand laterality. So dental eruption laterality (along with the foot one) would be one of the parameters more related to hand laterality given that dentition variable relationship is greater that the foot one. This suggests that tooth eruption could be more clinically relevant. Crossed laterality hand-foot is significantly more predominant in men (13%) than in women (1,6%). Meanwhile, the relationship between hand and dentition didn’t show any influence of sex. Conclusions: Dental eruption order, can be used as a good parameter in the determination of the patient’s laterality. Key words:Dentition, dental eruption, motor laterality, crossed laterality. PMID:24608220

  8. Neurocognitive and Functional Correlates of Mobile Phone Use in Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A; Harmell, Alexandrea L; Vahia, Ipsit V; Mausbach, Brent T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to examine the association of mobile phone use and ownership with psychopathology, cognitive functioning and functional outcome in 196 outpatients aged 40 and older who were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Methods Participants reported their past and current mobile phone use on a standardized self-report scale and they were administered tests of global cognition, functional capacity and informant-rated functional outcome. Results The great majority of subjects had used a mobile phone (78%) but few currently owned one (27%). After adjusting for age (mean age 51), any past mobile phone use was associated with less severe negative symptoms, and higher global cognitive performance, functional capacity, and functional outcome. A total of 60% of participants reported being comfortable with mobile phones, but comfort was not associated with any cognitive or functional outcomes. Conclusions Most older patients with schizophrenia have used mobile phones and lifetime mobile phone use is a positive indicator of cognitive and functional status. PMID:25768842

  9. Early Language Milestones Predict Later Language, but not Autism Symptoms in Higher Functioning Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenworthy, Lauren; Wallace, Gregory L.; Powell, Kelly; Anselmo, Cheryl; Martin, Alex; Black, David O.

    2012-01-01

    Language ability is a known predictor of outcome in children with autism but plays a more controversial role for higher functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We studied the relationship between early language milestones and later structural language, adaptive functioning and autism symptoms in a sample of 76 children (mean age…

  10. Structural and functional evaluation of cortical motor areas in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cosottini, Mirco; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Piazza, Selina; Diciotti, Stefano; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mascalchi, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    The structural and functional data gathered with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques about the brain cortical motor damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are controversial. In fact some structural MRI studies showed foci of gray matter (GM) atrophy in the precentral gyrus, even in the early stage, while others did not. Most functional MRI (fMRI) studies in ALS reported hyperactivation of extra-primary motor cortices, while contradictory results were obtained on the activation of the primary motor cortex. We aimed to investigate the cortical motor circuitries in ALS patients by a combined structural and functional approach. Twenty patients with definite ALS and 16 healthy subjects underwent a structural examination with acquisition of a 3D T1-weighted sequence and fMRI examination during a maximal force handgrip task executed with the right-hand, the left-hand and with both hands simultaneously. The T1-weighted images were analyzed with Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) that showed several clusters of reduced cortical GM in ALS patients compared to controls including the pre and postcentral gyri, the superior, middle and inferior frontal gyri, the supplementary motor area, the superior and inferior parietal cortices and the temporal lobe, bilaterally but more extensive on the right side. In ALS patients a significant hypoactivation of the primary sensory motor cortex and frontal dorsal premotor areas as compared to controls was observed. The hypoactivated areas matched with foci of cortical atrophy demonstrated by VBM. The fMRI analysis also showed an enhanced activation in the ventral premotor frontal areas and in the parietal cortex pertaining to the fronto-parietal motor circuit which paralleled with disease progression rate and matched with cortical regions of atrophy. The hyperactivation of the fronto-parietal circuit was asymmetric and prevalent in the left hemisphere. VBM and fMRI identified structural and functional markers of an extended

  11. Functional Contribution of the Transcription Factor ATF4 to the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matus, Soledad; Lopez, Estefanía; Valenzuela, Vicente; Nassif, Melissa; Hetz, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress represents an early pathological event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ATF4 is a key ER stress transcription factor that plays a role in both adaptation to stress and the activation of apoptosis. Here we investigated the contribution of ATF4 to ALS. ATF4 deficiency reduced the rate of birth of SOD1G86R transgenic mice. The fraction of ATF4−/−-SOD1G85R transgenic mice that were born are more resistant to develop ALS, leading to delayed disease onset and prolonged life span. ATF4 deficiency completely attenuated the induction of pro-apoptotic genes, including BIM and CHOP, and also led to quantitative changes in the ER protein homeostasis network. Unexpectedly, ATF4 deficiency enhanced mutant SOD1 aggregation at the end stage of the disease. Studies in the motoneuron cell line NSC34 demonstrated that knocking down ATF4 enhances mutant SOD1 aggregation possibly due to alteration in the redox status of the cell. Our results support a functional role of ATF4 in ALS, offering a novel target for disease intervention. PMID:23874395

  12. Temporal weighting functions for interaural time and level differences. III. Temporal weighting for lateral position judgments

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, G. Christopher; Ostreicher, Jennifer D.; Brown, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal variation in listeners' sensitivity to interaural time and level differences (ITD and ILD) was assessed using the temporal weighting function (TWF) paradigm [Stecker and Hafter (2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 1046–1057] in the context of sound-source lateralization. Brief Gabor click trains were presented over headphones with overall ITD and/or ILD ranging ±500 μs ITD and/or ±5 dB ILD across trials; values for individual clicks within each train varied by an additional ±100 μs or ±2 dB to allow TWF calculation by multiple regression. In separate conditions, TWFs were measured for (i) ITD alone, (ii) ILD alone, (iii) ITD and ILD covarying (“in agreement”), and (iv) ITD and ILD varying independently across clicks. Consistent with past studies that measured TWF for binaural discrimination, TWFs demonstrated high weight on the first click for stimuli with short interclick interval (ICI = 2 ms), but flatter weighting for longer ICI (5–10 ms). Some conditions additionally demonstrated greater weight for clicks near the offset than near the middle of the train [Stecker and Hafter (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 3914–3924]. The latter result was observed only when stimuli carried ILD, and appeared more reliably for 5 ms than for 2 or 10 ms ICI. PMID:23927122

  13. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M H; Jones, 'Ōiwi Parker; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

    2015-09-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug-kettle) than unrelated (car-teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function. PMID:25496810

  14. Refined lateral energy correction functions for the KASCADE-Grande experiment based on Geant4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Fuchs, B.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2015-02-01

    In previous studies of KASCADE-Grande data, a Monte Carlo simulation code based on the GEANT3 program has been developed to describe the energy deposited by EAS particles in the detector stations. In an attempt to decrease the simulation time and ensure compatibility with the geometry description in standard KASCADE-Grande analysis software, several structural elements have been neglected in the implementation of the Grande station geometry. To improve the agreement between experimental and simulated data, a more accurate simulation of the response of the KASCADE-Grande detector is necessary. A new simulation code has been developed based on the GEANT4 program, including a realistic geometry of the detector station with structural elements that have not been considered in previous studies. The new code is used to study the influence of a realistic detector geometry on the energy deposited in the Grande detector stations by particles from EAS events simulated by CORSIKA. Lateral Energy Correction Functions are determined and compared with previous results based on GEANT3.

  15. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M.H.; Parker Jones, 'Ōiwi; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Green, David W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2015-01-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug–kettle) than unrelated (car–teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function. PMID:25496810

  16. The integration of lateral gastrocnemius muscle function and kinematics in running turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Nelson, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals commonly move over a range of speeds, and encounter considerable variation in habitat structure, such as inclines. Hindlimb kinematics and muscle function in diverse groups of vertebrates are affected by these changes in behavior and habitat structure, providing a fruitful source of variation for studying the integration of kinematics and muscle function. While it has been observed in a variety of vertebrates that muscle length change can be minimal during locomotion, it is unclear how, and to what degree, in vivo muscle length change patterns are integrated with kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that the length of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius (LG), a biarticular muscle that has moments at the ankle and knee, is not solely affected by changes in joint kinematics. We recorded in vivo muscle length changes (using sonomicrometry) and hindlimb movements (using high-speed video) of wild turkeys running on various inclines, and at different speeds. We quantified the relationship between joint angle (knee and ankle separately) and muscle length in freshly euthanized specimens, and then applied an empirically derived correction for changes in pennation angle and tendon strain during locomotion to improve the accuracy of our predicted lengths. We estimated muscle length at four points during each stride and then compared these values with those measured directly. Other than during swing, the predicted changes in muscle length calculated from the changes in joint kinematics did not correspond with our measured values of LG length. Therefore, the lengths at which the LG operates inturkeys are not determined entirely by kinematics. In addition to strain in series elastic components, we hypothesize that heterogeneous strain within muscles, interactions between muscles and muscle pennation angle all contribute to the non-linear relationship between muscle length changes and kinematics. PMID:18657958

  17. Material specific lateralization of medial temporal lobe function: An fMRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Marshall A; Hornberger, Michael; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The theory of material specific lateralization of memory function posits that left and right MTL regions are asymmetrically involved in mnemonic processing of verbal and nonverbal material respectively. Lesion and functional imaging (fMRI) studies provide robust evidence for a left MTL asymmetry in the verbal memory domain. Evidence for a right MTL/nonverbal asymmetry is not as robust. A handful of fMRI studies have investigated this issue but have generally utilised nonverbal stimuli which are amenable to semantic elaboration. This fMRI study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of recognition memory processing in 20 healthy young adults (mean age = 26 years) for verbal stimuli and nonverbal stimuli that were specifically designed to minimize verbalisation. Analyses revealed that the neural correlates of recognition memory processing for verbal and nonverbal stimuli were differentiable and asymmetrically recruited the left and right MTL respectively. The right perirhinal cortex and hippocampus were preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of items devoid of semantic information. In contrast, the left anterior hippocampus was preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of stimuli which contained semantic meaning. These results suggest that the left MTL is preferentially involved in mnemonic processing of verbal/semantic information. In contrast, the right MTL is preferentially involved in visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing. We propose that during development, the left MTL becomes specialised for verbal mnemonic processing due to its proximity with left lateralised cortical language processing areas while visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing gets 'crowded out' to become predominantly, but not completely, the domain of the right MTL. PMID:26700110

  18. The first discovered water channel protein, later called aquaporin 1: molecular characteristics, functions and medical implications.

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    After a decade of work on the water permeability of red blood cells (RBC) Benga group in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, discovered in 1985 the first water channel protein in the RBC membrane. The discovery was reported in publications in 1986 and reviewed in subsequent years. The same protein was purified by chance by Agre group in Baltimore, USA, in 1988, who called in 1991 the protein CHIP28 (CHannel forming Integral membrane Protein of 28 kDa), suggesting that it may play a role in linkage of the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer. In 1992 the Agre group identified CHIP28's water transport property. One year later CHIP28 was named aquaporin 1, abbreviated as AQP1. In this review the molecular structure-function relationships of AQP1 are presented. In the natural or model membranes AQP1 is in the form of a homotetramer, however, each monomer has an independent water channel (pore). The three-dimensional structure of AQP1 is described, with a detailed description of the channel (pore), the molecular mechanisms of permeation through the channel of water molecules and exclusion of protons. The permeability of the pore to gases (CO(2), NH(3), NO, O(2)) and ions is also mentioned. I have also reviewed the functional roles and medical implications of AQP1 expressed in various organs and cells (microvascular endothelial cells, kidney, central nervous system, eye, lacrimal and salivary glands, respiratory apparatus, gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary compartments, female and male reproductive system, inner ear, skin). The role of AQP1 in cell migration and angiogenesis in relation with cancer, the genetics of AQP1 and mutations in human subjects are also mentioned. The role of AQP1 in red blood cells is discussed based on our comparative studies of water permeability in over 30 species. PMID:22705445

  19. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents’ perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02–3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97–5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94–2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01–5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night. PMID:26222312

  20. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night.

    PubMed

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents' perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02-3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97-5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94-2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night. PMID:26222312

  1. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C.; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. Methods 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Results Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (p<0.0005). Among patients, clustering coefficient in alpha and gamma bands was increased in all regions of the scalp and connectivity were significantly increased (p=0.02). Nodal network showed increased assortativity in alpha band in the patients group. The Clustering Coefficient in Partial Directed Connectivity (PDC) showed significantly higher values for patients in alpha, beta, gamma, theta and delta frequencies (p=0.05). Discussion There is increased connectivity in the fronto-central regions of the scalp and areas corresponding to Salience and Default Mode network in ALS, suggesting a pathologic disruption of neuronal networking in early disease states. Spectral EEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS. PMID:26091258

  2. Intravenous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Survival and Motor Function in Experimental Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Uccelli, Antonio; Milanese, Marco; Principato, Maria Cristina; Morando, Sara; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Vergani, Laura; Giunti, Debora; Voci, Adriana; Carminati, Enrico; Giribaldi, Francesco; Caponnetto, Claudia; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2012-01-01

    Despite some advances in the understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis, significant achievements in treating this disease are still lacking. Mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) have been shown to be effective in several models of neurological disease. To determine the effects of the intravenous injection of MSCs in an ALS mouse model during the symptomatic stage of disease, MSCs (1 × 106) were intravenously injected in mice expressing human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) carrying the G93A mutation (SOD1/G93A) presenting with experimental ALS. Survival, motor abilities, histology, oxidative stress markers and [3H]d-aspartate release in the spinal cord were investigated. MSC injection in SOD1/G93A mice improved survival and motor functions compared with saline-injected controls. Injected MSCs scantly home to the central nervous system and poorly engraft. We observed a reduced accumulation of ubiquitin agglomerates and of activated astrocytes and microglia in the spinal cord of MSC-treated SOD1/G93A mice, with no changes in the number of choline acetyltransferase– and glutamate transporter type 1–positive cells. MSC administration turned around the upregulation of metallothionein mRNA expression and of the activity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione S-transferase, both associated with disease progression. Last, we observed that MSCs reverted both spontaneous and stimulus-evoked neuronal release of [3H]d-aspartate, a marker of endogenous glutamate, which is upregulated in SOD1/G93A mice. These findings suggest that intravenous administration of MSCs significantly improves the clinical outcome and pathological scores of mutant SOD1/G93A mice, thus providing the rationale for their exploitation for the treatment of ALS. PMID:22481270

  3. Dissociable functions of reward inference in the lateral prefrontal cortex and the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shingo; Pan, Xiaochuan; Oguchi, Mineki; Taylor, Jessica E.; Sakagami, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    In a complex and uncertain world, how do we select appropriate behavior? One possibility is that we choose actions that are highly reinforced by their probabilistic consequences (model-free processing). However, we may instead plan actions prior to their actual execution by predicting their consequences (model-based processing). It has been suggested that the brain contains multiple yet distinct systems involved in reward prediction. Several studies have tried to allocate model-free and model-based systems to the striatum and the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), respectively. Although there is much support for this hypothesis, recent research has revealed discrepancies. To understand the nature of the reward prediction systems in the LPFC and the striatum, a series of single-unit recording experiments were conducted. LPFC neurons were found to infer the reward associated with the stimuli even when the monkeys had not yet learned the stimulus-reward (SR) associations directly. Striatal neurons seemed to predict the reward for each stimulus only after directly experiencing the SR contingency. However, the one exception was “Exclusive Or” situations in which striatal neurons could predict the reward without direct experience. Previous single-unit studies in monkeys have reported that neurons in the LPFC encode category information, and represent reward information specific to a group of stimuli. Here, as an extension of these, we review recent evidence that a group of LPFC neurons can predict reward specific to a category of visual stimuli defined by relevant behavioral responses. We suggest that the functional difference in reward prediction between the LPFC and the striatum is that while LPFC neurons can utilize abstract code, striatal neurons can code individual associations between stimuli and reward but cannot utilize abstract code. PMID:26236266

  4. Dissociable functions of reward inference in the lateral prefrontal cortex and the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shingo; Pan, Xiaochuan; Oguchi, Mineki; Taylor, Jessica E; Sakagami, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    In a complex and uncertain world, how do we select appropriate behavior? One possibility is that we choose actions that are highly reinforced by their probabilistic consequences (model-free processing). However, we may instead plan actions prior to their actual execution by predicting their consequences (model-based processing). It has been suggested that the brain contains multiple yet distinct systems involved in reward prediction. Several studies have tried to allocate model-free and model-based systems to the striatum and the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), respectively. Although there is much support for this hypothesis, recent research has revealed discrepancies. To understand the nature of the reward prediction systems in the LPFC and the striatum, a series of single-unit recording experiments were conducted. LPFC neurons were found to infer the reward associated with the stimuli even when the monkeys had not yet learned the stimulus-reward (SR) associations directly. Striatal neurons seemed to predict the reward for each stimulus only after directly experiencing the SR contingency. However, the one exception was "Exclusive Or" situations in which striatal neurons could predict the reward without direct experience. Previous single-unit studies in monkeys have reported that neurons in the LPFC encode category information, and represent reward information specific to a group of stimuli. Here, as an extension of these, we review recent evidence that a group of LPFC neurons can predict reward specific to a category of visual stimuli defined by relevant behavioral responses. We suggest that the functional difference in reward prediction between the LPFC and the striatum is that while LPFC neurons can utilize abstract code, striatal neurons can code individual associations between stimuli and reward but cannot utilize abstract code. PMID:26236266

  5. Structural neural correlates of impaired mobility and subsequent decline in executive functions: A 12-month prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun Liang; Best, John R.; Chiu, Bryan K.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Voss, Michelle W.; Handy, Todd C.; Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Impaired mobility, such as falls, may be an early biomarker of subsequent cognitive decline and is associated with subclinical alterations in both brain structure and function. In this 12-month prospective study, we examined whether there are volumetric differences in gray matter and subcortical regions, as well as cerebral white matter, between older fallers and non-fallers. In addition, we assessed whether these baseline volumetric differences are associated with changes in cognitive function over 12 months. A total of 66 community-dwelling older adults were recruited and categorized by their falls status. Magnetic resonance imaging occurred at baseline and participants’ physical and cognitive performances were assessed at baseline and 12-months. At baseline, fallers showed significantly lower volumes in gray matter, subcortical regions, and cerebral white matter compared with non-fallers. Notably, fallers had significantly lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume. Moreover, lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume at baseline was associated with greater decline in set-shifting performance over 12 months. Our data suggest that falls may indicate subclinical alterations in regional brain volume that are associated with subsequent decline in executive functions. PMID:27079333

  6. Structural neural correlates of impaired mobility and subsequent decline in executive functions: a 12-month prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun Liang; Best, John R; Chiu, Bryan K; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Voss, Michelle W; Handy, Todd C; Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Impaired mobility, such as falls, may be an early biomarker of subsequent cognitive decline and is associated with subclinical alterations in both brain structure and function. In this 12-month prospective study, we examined whether there are volumetric differences in gray matter and subcortical regions, as well as cerebral white matter, between older fallers and non-fallers. In addition, we assessed whether these baseline volumetric differences are associated with changes in cognitive function over 12months. A total of 66 community-dwelling older adults were recruited and categorized by their falls status. Magnetic resonance imaging occurred at baseline and participants' physical and cognitive performances were assessed at baseline and 12-months. At baseline, fallers showed significantly lower volumes in gray matter, subcortical regions, and cerebral white matter compared with non-fallers. Notably, fallers had significantly lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume. Moreover, lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume at baseline was associated with greater decline in set-shifting performance over 12months. Our data suggest that falls may indicate subclinical alterations in regional brain volume that are associated with subsequent decline in executive functions. PMID:27079333

  7. Assessment on self-care, mobility and social function of children with spina bifida in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sirzai, Hulya; Dogu, Beril; Demir, Selamet; Yilmaz, Figen; Kuran, Banu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the functional performance in children with spina bifida, using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) to look into capacity of twenty-eight children with spina bifida with lesions at different levels in different dimensions of self-care, mobility and social function. Mean age of the patients was 3.5 ± 2.3 (1–10) years. In the muscle test carried out, 13 patients (44.8%) had no movements including pelvic elevation in lower extremity muscles and they were at level 5. Sixteen patients (54%) were non-ambulatory according to the Hoofer ambulation classification. Raw and scale scores in the self-care, mobility and social function domains both in the functional skill scale and in the caregiver scale were found to be lower compared to the data of the normal population. A statistically significant correlation was observed in the self-care values of the Functional Skills Scales and the Caregiver Assistance Scale measurements, which was positive for age and negative for Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.05). A positive relation was found between the Functional Skills Scales-mobility area and age while a negative relation was observed between Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). A negative relation was also found between Caregiver Assistance Scale-mobility and Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). In our study, the functional performance of the children was found to be low. Low-level lesions, encouraging muscular strength and independence in mobility are all very important factors for functional independence. PMID:25206788

  8. Treatment of complete rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle: a randomized clinical trial comparing cast immobilization with functional treatment.

    PubMed

    Ardèvol, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Belda, Víctor; Argilaga, Sílvia

    2002-11-01

    This study compared the therapeutic efficacy between cast immobilization and functional treatment of grade III ruptures of the lateral ankle ligaments. Subjects ( n=121) had closed physeal cartilage, age under 35 years, grade III rupture without previous or associated injuries, and practiced regular sports. Patients were randomized into an immobilization group (21 days plaster cast) or a functional one (15 days strapping plus early controlled mobilization). Symptoms (pain, swelling, stiffness, subjective instability), joint laxity, return to preinjury activity (time and level) and rate of reinjury were assessed 3, 6, and 12 months after sprain. Objective joint laxity was related to constitutional laxity, creating a new variable [talar tilt at injury - talar tilt at control]/contralateral talar tilt. The functional group showed significantly earlier and better return to physical activity, fewer symptoms at 3 and 6 months but no intergroup difference at 12 months. Functional treatment also showed better decrease in joint laxity. No intergroup differences were found in the reinjury rate. We conclude that functional treatment is safe, associated with a more rapid recovery, and particularly suitable in athletic populations. PMID:12444517

  9. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  10. Stimulus-Dominance Effects and Lateral Asymmetries for Language in Normal Subjects and in Patients with a Single Functional Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stefano, Marirosa; Marano, Elena; Viti, Marzia

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of language laterality by the dichotic fused-words test may be impaired by interference effects revealed by the dominant report of one member of the stimuli-pair. Stimulus-dominance and ear asymmetry were evaluated in normal population (48 subjects of both sex and handedness) and in 2 patients with a single functional hemisphere.…

  11. Functional and Esthetic Treatment of Lateral Incisor Agenesis with a Mini-Implant in a Young Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Moacir Guilherme; Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Marques, Leandro Silva

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the treatment of lateral incisor agenesis in a young patient. Treatment was performed with a mini-implant and a temporary crown. Radiographic and clinical follow up for one year demonstrated a very satisfactory restoration with regard to function and esthetics as well as the stability of the mini-implant. PMID:26349292

  12. Effects of the Nerve Mobilization Technique on Lower Limb Function in Patients with Poststroke Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Kyu; Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of a sciatic nerve mobilization technique on improvement of lower limb function in patient with poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Twenty- two stroke patients participated in this study. [Methods] They were randomly selected based on selection criteria and divided into two groups. In the subject group (n=10), sciatic nerve mobilization with conventional physical therapy was applied to patients. In the control group (n=10), only conventional physical therapy was applied to stroke patients. [Results] There were significant differences between the two groups in pressure, sway, total pressure, angle of the knee joint, and functional reaching test results in the intervention at two weeks and at four weeks. [Conclusion] The present study showed that sciatic nerve mobilization with conventional physical therapy was more effective for lower limb function than conventional physical therapy alone in patient with poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:25140078

  13. The role of attachment in the relationship between child maltreatment and later emotional and behavioral functioning.

    PubMed

    Lowell, Amanda; Renk, Kimberly; Adgate, Amanda Havill

    2014-09-01

    The experience of childhood maltreatment is an important predictor of unfavorable emotional and behavioral outcomes. Because little research examined explanatory variables in the relationship between childhood maltreatment experiences and later outcomes, this study examined the role that attachment serves in this relationship. Four hundred twenty-four participants completed questionnaires assessing the variables of interest for this study. Results indicated that both childhood maltreatment experiences (particularly emotional abuse) and attachment (particularly to mothers and peers) are significant predictors of later emotional and behavioral outcomes. Further, attachment contributed unique and significant variance to the relationship between childhood maltreatment experiences and later outcomes. Such findings suggested that secure attachment may serve as a protective factor against maladaptive emotional and behavioral outcomes as children reach emerging adulthood, even in the context of childhood maltreatment experiences. The importance of studying the relationships among these variables is discussed. PMID:24631414

  14. Self Perceived Emotional Functioning of Spanish Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Jesús S.; Salas, Teresa; Fajardo, María L.; Iváñez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Santos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: ALS is a neurodegenerative disease of the entire motor system that most frequently ends with respiratory arrest in few years. Its diagnosis and the rapid progression of the motor dysfunctions produce a continued emotional impact. Studies on this impact are helpful to plan adequate psychotherapeutic strategies. Objective: To assess and analyze: First: How the patients with ALS perceive their emotional health. Second: The emotional impact of their physical disabilities. Third: The physical disabilities with highest emotional impact. Fourth: The feelings with highest emotional impact. Methods: Up to 110 Spanish patients with ALS were assessed less than 1 year from diagnosis, then twice more at 6 month intervals, using the ALS Quality of Life Assessment Questionnaire (ALSAQ-40) validated for use in Spanish. Descriptive analysis and correlation between variables were obtained. Results: Worries about the future, of lack of freedom, and of being a burden were prevalent feelings. On average depression was felt only “sometimes.” Only 25% of the variations in the emotional state were explained by changes in the physical state at first evaluation, and 16% at the last one. Emotional functioning correlated significantly with the physical disabilities at first and second evaluation, less so at third. Communication disabilities always had the highest impact. Depression at first evaluation and hopelessness at the next two evaluations had the highest emotional impact. Hopelessness did not correlate with any physical disability at the third evaluation. On the whole, emotional dysfunction was self perceived as intermediate (between none and worst), and remained stable at 1 year follow up, in both bulbar and spinal onset patients. Conclusions: Physical dysfunctions per se have a limited role in patients´ emotional distress. Communication disabilities, as well as feelings of depression at early stages of illness, and of hopelessness later on, had the most impact

  15. Heterochrony, modularity, and the functional evolution of the mechanosensory lateral line canal system of fishes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The canals of the mechanosensory lateral line system are components of the dermatocranium, and demonstrate phenotypic variation in bony fishes. Widened lateral line canals evolved convergently in a limited number of families of teleost fishes and it had been hypothesized that they evolved from narrow canals via heterochrony and explore modularity in the lateral line system. Two species of cichlids with different canal phenotypes were used to test a hypothesis of heterochrony. Histological material prepared from ontogenetic series of Aulonocara stuartgranti (widened canals) and Tramitichromis sp. (narrow canals) was analyzed using ANCOVA to determine rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size (length, width) and to compare the timing of onset of critical stages in canal morphogenesis (enclosure, ossification). Results A faster rate of increase in canal diameter and neuromast width (but not length), and a delay in onset of canal morphogenesis were found in Aulonocara relative to Tramitichromis. However, rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canals, among canal portions and among canals segments reveal similar trends within both species. Conclusion The evolution of widened lateral line canals is the result of dissociated heterochrony - acceleration in the rate of increase of both canal diameter and neuromast size, and delay in the onset of canal morphogenesis, in Aulonocara (widened canals) relative to Tramitichromis (narrow canals). Common rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canal portions in different dermatocranial bones and among canal segments reflect the absence of local heterochronies, and suggest modular integration among canals in each species. Thus, canal and neuromast morphology are more strongly influenced by their identities as features of the lateral line system than by the attributes of the dermatocranial bones in which the canals are found. Rate heterochrony manifested during the

  16. Graph Theory Analysis of Functional Brain Networks and Mobility Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Jonathan H.; Morgan, Ashley R.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The brain’s structural integrity is associated with mobility function in older adults. Changes in function may be evident earlier than changes in structure and may be more directly related to mobility. Therefore, we assessed whether functional brain networks varied with mobility function in older adults. Methods. Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging were collected on 24 young (mean age = 26.4±5.1) and 48 older (mean age = 72.04±5.1) participants. Older participants were divided into three groups by SPPB score: Low SPPB (score = 7–9), Mid SPPB (score = 10), High SPPB (score = 11–12).Graph theory–based methods were used to characterize and compare brain network organization. Results. Connectivity in the somatomotor cortex distinguished between groups based on SPPB score. The community structure of the somatomotor cortex was significantly less consistent in the Low SPPB group (mean = 0.097±0.05) compared with Young (mean = 0.163±0.09, p = .03) SPPB group. Striking differences were evident in second-order connections between somatomotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus and insula that reached statistical significance. The Low SPPB group (mean = 140.87±109.30) had a significantly higher number of connections than Young (mean = 45.05±33.79, p = .0003) or High (mean = 49.61±35.31, p = .002) SPPB group. Conclusions. Older adults with poorer mobility function exhibited reduced consistency of somatomotor community structure and a greater number of secondary connections with vestibular and multisensory regions of the brain. Further study is needed to fully interpret these effects, but analysis of functional brain networks adds new insights to the contribution of the brain to mobility. PMID:24717331

  17. Electron and thermal neutron lateral distribution functions in EAS at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegolev, O. B.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Cai, Z. Y.; Cao, Z.; Cui, S. W.; Gromushkin, D. M.; Guo, X. W.; He, H. H.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Stenkin, Yu V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Zhao, J.

    2016-05-01

    EAS array of novel type have been constructed on the base of ARGO-YBJ experiment (Tibet, China). It consists of the four specially designed scintillator en-detectors capable to measure two main EAS components: hadrons through thermal neutrons (n) and electrons (e). The results of simulation for these arrays using CORSIKA and GEANT4 codes are presented. Simulated thermal neutron and electron lateral distributions are compared with experimental data. Obtained distributions are compared with those obtained by other arrays.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF CONTAMINANT METAL MOBILITY AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE, TIME, AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to determine the geochemical processes that control the mobility of Sr in the presence of clays (kaolinite, montmorillonite) and iron hydroxides (goethite) as a function of temperature, pH, and time. The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental data neede...

  19. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  20. Does quadriceps neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  1. Does neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  2. Temperature dependent carrier mobility in graphene: Effect of Pd nanoparticle functionalization and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bochen; Uddin, Md Ahsan; Singh, Amol; Webb, Richard; Koley, Goutam

    2016-02-01

    The two dimensional nature of graphene, with charge carriers confined within one atomic layer thickness, causes its electrical, optical, and sensing properties to be strongly influenced by the surrounding media and functionalization layers. In this study, the effect of catalytically active Pd nanoparticle (NP) functionalization and subsequent hydrogenation on the hall mobility and carrier density of chemical vapor deposition synthesized graphene has been investigated as a function of temperature. Prior to functionalization, the mobility decreased monotonically as the temperature was reduced from 298 to 10 K, indicating coulomb scattering as the dominant scattering mechanism as expected for bilayer graphene. Similar decreasing trend with temperature was also observed after 2 nm Pd deposition, however, hydrogenation of the Pd NP led to significant enhancement in mobility from ˜2250 to 3840 cm2/V s at room temperature, which further monotonically increased to 5280 cm2/V s at 10 K. We attribute this contrasting trend in temperature dependent mobility to a switch in the dominant scattering mechanism from coulomb to surface optical (SO) phonon scattering due to higher dielectric constant and polar nature of PdHx formed upon hydrogenation of the Pd NPs.

  3. Functional lateralization in cingulate cortex predicts motor recovery after basal ganglia stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chen, Zengai; Su, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yajing; Xu, Qun; Xu, Jianrong; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-02-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) is involved in higher order motor control such as movement planning and execution of complex motor synergies. Neuroimaging study on stroke patients specifically with BG lesions would help to clarify the consequence of BG damage on motor control. In this paper, we performed a longitudinal study in the stroke patients with lesions in BG regions across three motor recovery stages, i.e., less than 2week (Session 1), 1-3m (Session 2) and more than 3m (Session 3). The patients showed an activation shift from bilateral hemispheres during early sessions (<3m) to the ipsilesional cortex in late session (>3m), suggesting a compensation effect from the contralesional hemisphere during motor recovery. We found that the lateralization of cerebellum(CB) for affected hand task correlated with patients' concurrent Fugl-Meyer index (FMI) in Session 2. Moreover, the cingulate cortex lateralization index in Session 2 was shown to significantly correlate with subsequent FMI change between Session 3 and Session 2, which serves as a prognostic marker for motor recovery. Our findings consolidated the close interactions between BG and CB during the motor recovery after stroke. The dominance of activation in contralateral cingulate cortex was associated with a better motor recovery, suggesting the important role of ipsilesional attention modulation in the early stage after BG stroke. PMID:26742641

  4. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  5. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  6. Widespread Structural and Functional Connectivity Changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Insights from Advanced Neuroimaging Research

    PubMed Central

    Trojsi, Francesca; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease principally affecting motor neurons. Besides motor symptoms, a subset of patients develop cognitive disturbances or even frontotemporal dementia (FTD), indicating that ALS may also involve extramotor brain regions. Both neuropathological and neuroimaging findings have provided further insight on the widespread effect of the neurodegeneration on brain connectivity and the underlying neurobiology of motor neurons degeneration. However, associated effects on motor and extramotor brain networks are largely unknown. Particularly, neuropathological findings suggest that ALS not only affects the frontotemporal network but rather is part of a wide clinicopathological spectrum of brain disorders known as TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the neuropsychological and neuropathological sequelae of TDP-43 proteinopathies, with special focus on the neuroimaging findings associated with cognitive change in ALS. PMID:22720174

  7. Effects of blueberry supplementation on measures of functional mobility in older adults.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Matthew A; Hilton, James; Gould, Richard; Kelly, Valerie E

    2015-06-01

    Limited functional mobility in older adults has been associated with declines in tests of motor, psychomotor, and executive function. Animal studies have demonstrated reversals in indices of motor and psychomotor function via supplementation with polyphenolic-rich foods such as blueberries. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 6 weeks of daily consumption of 2 cups of frozen blueberries affects functional mobility in older adults. Pre- and post-intervention assessments of grip strength, simple reaction time, adaptive gait, and executive function were completed for older adults (age >60 years) partially randomly assigned to a blueberry (BB) supplementation or a carrot juice drink control (CAR) group. Paired t tests were used to assess within-group effects for outcome variables in each supplementation group, and a mixed-model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to determine group (CAR vs. BB) differences. Mixed-model analysis indicated that the BB group demonstrated significant improvements relative to the CAR group in performance (i.e., number of step errors) of a challenging dual-task adaptive gait test that were independent of differences in gait speed. Within only the BB group, significant improvements were also seen in 3 other measures (i.e., usual gait speed; number of step errors during single-task adaptive gait; and gait speed during dual-task adaptive gait). These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that blueberry supplementation may provide an effective countermeasure to age-related declines in functional mobility and serve as justification for an expansion to larger trials to more fully assess this nonpharmacologic approach to maintaining optimal mobility and independence. PMID:25909473

  8. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway. PMID:26276834

  9. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway. PMID:26276834

  10. Association between perinatal methylation of the neuronal differentiation regulator HES1 and later childhood neurocognitive function and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Lillycrop, Karen A; Costello, Paula M; Teh, Ai Ling; Murray, Robert J; Clarke-Harris, Rebecca; Barton, Sheila J; Garratt, Emma S; Ngo, Sherry; Sheppard, Allan M; Wong, Johnny; Dogra, Shaillay; Burdge, Graham C; Cooper, Cyrus; Inskip, Hazel M; Gale, Catharine R; Gluckman, Peter D; Harvey, Nicholas C; Chong, Yap-Seng; Yap, Fabian; Meaney, Michael J; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Holbrook, Joanna D; Godfrey, Keith M

    2015-01-01

    Background Early life environments induce long-term changes in neurocognitive development and behaviour. In animal models, early environmental cues affect neuropsychological phenotypes via epigenetic processes but, as yet, there is little direct evidence for such mechanisms in humans. Method We examined the relation between DNA methylation at birth and child neuropsychological outcomes in two culturally diverse populations using a genome-wide methylation analysis and validation by pyrosequencing. Results Within the UK Southampton Women’s Survey (SWS) we first identified 41 differentially methylated regions of interest (DMROI) at birth associated with child’s full-scale IQ at age 4 years. Associations between HES1 DMROI methylation and later cognitive function were confirmed by pyrosequencing in 175 SWS children. Consistent with these findings, higher HES1 methylation was associated with higher executive memory function in a second independent group of 200 SWS 7-year-olds. Finally, we examined a pathway for this relationship within a Singaporean cohort (n = 108). Here, HES1 DMROI methylation predicted differences in early infant behaviour, known to be associated with academic success. In vitro, methylation of HES1 inhibited ETS transcription factor binding, suggesting a functional role of this site. Conclusions Thus, our findings suggest that perinatal epigenetic processes mark later neurocognitive function and behaviour, providing support for a role of epigenetic processes in mediating the long-term consequences of early life environment on cognitive development. PMID:25906782

  11. Effects of a low-volume, vigorous intensity step exercise program on functional mobility in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; McGrath, Denise; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Mair, Jacqueline L; Greene, Barry R; Caulfield, Brian; De Vito, Giuseppe; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2013-08-01

    Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility. PMID:23568151

  12. Propositional Density and Cognitive Function in Later Life: Findings From the Precursors Study

    PubMed Central

    Agree, Emily M.; Meoni, Lucy A.; Klag, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We used longitudinal data from the Johns Hopkins Precursors Study to test the hypothesis that written propositional density measured early in life is lower for people who develop dementia categorized as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This association was reported in 1996 for the Nun Study, and the Precursors Study offered an unprecedented chance to reexamine it among respondents with different gender, education, and occupation profiles. Methods. Eighteen individuals classified as AD patients (average age at diagnosis: 74) were assigned 2 sex-and-age matched controls, and propositional density in medical school admission essays (average age at writing: 22) was assessed via Computerized Propositional Idea Density Rater 3 linguistic analysis software. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the matched case-control study were calculated using conditional (fixed-effects) logistic regression. Results. Mean propositional density is lower for cases than for controls (4.70 vs. 4.99 propositions per 10 words, 1-sided p = .01). Higher propositional density substantially lowers the odds of AD (OR = 0.16, 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.90, 1-sided p = .02). Discussion. Propositional density scores in writing samples from early adulthood appear to predict AD in later life for men as well as women. Studies of cognition across the life course might beneficially incorporate propositional density as a potential marker of cognitive reserve. PMID:20837676

  13. Sleep disorders and diaphragmatic function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Similowski, T; Salachas, F; Garma, L; Mehiri, S; Attali, V; Behin-Bellhesen, V; Meininger, V; Derenne, J P

    2000-03-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons leads to respiratory failure, often with predominant diaphragm dysfunction, and death. Because the diaphragm is the only active inspiratory muscle during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, there is a high theoretical risk of respiratory disorders during REM sleep in patients with ALS. To assess this hypothesis, we studied sleep characteristics (polysomnography) in 21 patients with ALS, stratified according to the presence or absence of diaphragmatic dysfunction. Diaphragmatic dysfunction was defined as an absent or delayed diaphragm response to cervical or cortical magnetic stimulation, abdominal paradox, or respiratory pulse (Group 1, 13 patients). These patients did not differ in age, clinical course, or form (bulbar or spinal) from the eight others, who did not have diaphragmatic dysfunction (Group 2). REM sleep was reduced in Group 1 (7 +/- 7% of total sleep time; mean +/- SD) and normal in Group 2 (18 +/- 6%, p = 0.004). Apneas or hypopneas were rare in both groups. In Group 1, REM sleep was absent or minimal (less than 3 min) in five patients. An unusual and remarkable preservation of phasic inspiratory sternomastoid activation during REM was associated with longer REM sleep duration in six of the other patients with diaphragmatic dysfunction. Median survival time was dramatically shorter (217 d) in Group 1 than in Group 2 (619 d, p = 0.015). PMID:10712332

  14. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L; Jørgensen, L H; Bech, R D; Frandsen, U; Schrøder, H D

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing skeletal muscle biopsies from ALS patients collected before and after a 12-week period of normal daily activities and compare these with healthy age-matched control tissue. We do this by evaluating mRNA and protein (immunohistochemical) markers of regeneration, neurodegeneration, myogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and inflammation. Our results show morphological changes indicative of active denervation and reinnervation and an increase in small atrophic fibres. We demonstrate differences between ALS and controls in pathways controlling skeletal muscle homeostasis, cytoskeletal and regenerative markers, neurodegenerative factors, myogenic factors, cell cycle determinants, and inflammatory markers. Our results on Pax7 and MyoD protein expression suggest that proliferation and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells are affected in ALS patients, and the myogenic processes cannot overcome the denervation-induced wasting. PMID:27195289

  15. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, L.; Jørgensen, L. H.; Bech, R. D.; Frandsen, U.; Schrøder, H. D.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing skeletal muscle biopsies from ALS patients collected before and after a 12-week period of normal daily activities and compare these with healthy age-matched control tissue. We do this by evaluating mRNA and protein (immunohistochemical) markers of regeneration, neurodegeneration, myogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and inflammation. Our results show morphological changes indicative of active denervation and reinnervation and an increase in small atrophic fibres. We demonstrate differences between ALS and controls in pathways controlling skeletal muscle homeostasis, cytoskeletal and regenerative markers, neurodegenerative factors, myogenic factors, cell cycle determinants, and inflammatory markers. Our results on Pax7 and MyoD protein expression suggest that proliferation and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells are affected in ALS patients, and the myogenic processes cannot overcome the denervation-induced wasting. PMID:27195289

  16. Fifty Years Later: The Sequence, Structure and Function of Lacewing Cross-beta Silk

    SciTech Connect

    Weisman, Sarah; Okada, Shoko; Mudie, Stephen T.; Huson, Mickey G.; Trueman, Holly E.; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Haritos, Victoria S.; Sutherland, Tara D.

    2009-12-01

    Classic studies of protein structure in the 1950s and 1960s demonstrated that green lacewing egg stalk silk possesses a rare native cross-beta sheet conformation. We have identified and sequenced the silk genes expressed by adult females of a green lacewing species. The two encoded silk proteins are 109 and 67 kDa in size and rich in serine, glycine and alanine. Over 70% of each protein sequence consists of highly repetitive regions with 16-residue periodicity. The repetitive sequences can be fitted to an elegant cross-beta sheet structural model with protein chains folded into regular 8-residue long beta strands. This model is supported by wide-angle X-ray scattering data and tensile testing from both our work and the original papers. We suggest that the silk proteins assemble into stacked beta sheet crystallites bound together by a network of cystine cross-links. This hierarchical structure gives the lacewing silk high lateral stiffness nearly threefold that of silkworm silk, enabling the egg stalks to effectively suspend eggs and protect them from predators.

  17. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6C(hi) monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell-selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  18. Functional and pathological relevance of HERC family proteins: a decade later.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-05-01

    The HERC gene family encodes proteins with two characteristic domains in their sequence: the HECT domain and the RCC1-like domain (RLD). In humans, the HERC family comprises six members that can be divided into two groups based on their molecular mass and domain structure. Whereas large HERCs (HERC1 and HERC2) contain one HECT and more than one RLD, small HERCs (HERC3-6) possess single HECT and RLD domains. Accumulating evidence shows the HERC family proteins to be key components of a wide range of cellular functions, including neurodevelopment, DNA damage repair, cell growth and immune response. Considering the significant recent advances made regarding HERC functionality, an updated review summarizing the progress is greatly needed at 10 years since the last HERC review. We provide an integrated view of HERC function and go into detail about its implications for several human diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26801221

  19. Investigating the Cherenkov light lateral distribution function for primary proton and iron nuclei in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A. A.; Hashim, U.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The lateral distribution function (LDF) of Cherenkov radiation in extensive air showers (EAS) was simulated by CORSIKA program for the conditions of Yakutsk Cherenkov array at the high energy range (1013-1016) eV for two primary particles (p and Fe) for different zenith angles. By depending on Breit-Wigner function for analyzing of Cherenkov light LDF, a parameterization of Cherenkov light LDF was reconstructed by depending on CORSIKA simulation as a function of primary energy. The comparison between the estimated Cherenkov light LDF with the LDF that measured on the Yakutsk EAS array gives the ability of particle identification that initiated the shower and determination of particle's energy around the knee region. The extrapolation of approximated Cherenkov light LDF for energies 20 and 30 PeV was obtained for primary particles (p and Fe).

  20. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method: We…

  1. Immune responses at brain barriers and implications for brain development and neurological function in later life

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Helen B.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Sá-Pereira, Inês; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    For a long time the brain has been considered an immune-privileged site due to a muted inflammatory response and the presence of protective brain barriers. It is now recognized that neuroinflammation may play an important role in almost all neurological disorders and that the brain barriers may be contributing through either normal immune signaling or disruption of their basic physiological mechanisms. The distinction between normal function and dysfunction at the barriers is difficult to dissect, partly due to a lack of understanding of normal barrier function and partly because of physiological changes that occur as part of normal development and ageing. Brain barriers consist of a number of interacting structural and physiological elements including tight junctions between adjacent barrier cells and an array of influx and efflux transporters. Despite these protective mechanisms, the capacity for immune-surveillance of the brain is maintained, and there is evidence of inflammatory signaling at the brain barriers that may be an important part of the body's response to damage or infection. This signaling system appears to change both with normal ageing, and during disease. Changes may affect diapedesis of immune cells and active molecular transfer, or cause rearrangement of the tight junctions and an increase in passive permeability across barrier interfaces. Here we review the many elements that contribute to brain barrier functions and how they respond to inflammation, particularly during development and aging. The implications of inflammation–induced barrier dysfunction for brain development and subsequent neurological function are also discussed. PMID:23986663

  2. Primary Cortical Folding in the Human Newborn: An Early Marker of Later Functional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, J.; Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Leuchter, R. Ha-Vinh; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Huppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be…

  3. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity. PMID:10219131

  4. Electromyographic assessment of forearm muscle function in tennis players with and without Lateral Epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Frostick, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    There is no consensus about the main aetiology of Lateral Epicondylitis (LE) or Tennis Elbow. While electromyographic assessment of alterations in neuromuscular control and activation patterns of forearm muscles has received increasing interest as potential intrinsic factors in non-tennis players, there has been insufficient attention in tennis players. The purpose of present review was to search the literature for the electromyographic studies of forearm muscles in tennis players in order to (1) identify related implications for LE, (2) highlight key technical and methodological shortcomings, and (3) suggest potential pathways for future research. An electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholars (1980 to October 2014) was conducted. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles were screened to identify "peer-reviewed" studies specifically looking into "electromyographic assessment of forearm muscles" in "tennis players". After screening 104 articles, 13 original articles were considered in the main review involving a total of 216 participants (78% male, 22% female). There were indications of increased wrist extensor activity in all tennis strokes and less experienced single-handed players, however with insufficient evidence to support their relationship with the development of LE. Studies varied widely in study population, sample size, gender, level of tennis skills, electrode type, forearm muscles studied, EMG recording protocol, EMG normalisation method, and reported parameters. As a result, it was not possible to present combined results of existing studies and draw concrete conclusions in terms of clinical implications of findings. There is a need for establishment of specific guidelines and recommendations for EMG assessment of forearm musculature particularly in terms of electrode and muscle selection. Further studies of both healthy controls and tennis players suffering from LE with adequate sample sizes and well-defined demographics

  5. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. PMID:25791198

  6. Issues in localization of brain function: The case of lateralized frontal cortex in cognition, emotion, and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gregory A.; Crocker, Laura D.; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Infantolino, Zachary P.; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The appeal of simple, sweeping portraits of large-scale brain mechanisms relevant to psychological phenomena competes with a rich, complex research base. As a prominent example, two views of frontal brain organization have emphasized dichotomous lateralization as a function of either emotional valence (positive/negative) or approach/avoidance motivation. Compelling findings support each. The literature has struggled to choose between them for three decades, without success. Both views are proving untenable as comprehensive models. Evidence of other frontal lateralizations, involving distinctions among dimensions of depression and anxiety, make a dichotomous view even more problematic. Recent evidence indicates that positive valence and approach motivation are associated with different areas in the left-hemisphere. Findings that appear contradictory at the level of frontal lobes as the units of analysis can be accommodated because hemodynamic and electromagnetic neuroimaging studies suggest considerable functional differentiation, in specialization and activation, of subregions of frontal cortex, including their connectivity to each other and to other regions. Such findings contribute to a more nuanced understanding of functional localization that accommodates aspects of multiple theoretical perspectives. PMID:23386814

  7. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke.Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed.Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients' ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery.Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1-3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4-6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores.Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  8. Lateralized Resting-State Functional Brain Network Organization Changes in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bumhee; Roy, Bhaswati; Woo, Mary A.; Palomares, Jose A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients show brain injury in autonomic, affective, and cognitive sites, which can change resting-state functional connectivity (FC), potentially altering overall functional brain network organization. However, the status of such connectivity or functional organization is unknown in HF. Determination of that status was the aim here, and we examined region-to-region FC and brain network topological properties across the whole-brain in 27 HF patients compared to 53 controls with resting-state functional MRI procedures. Decreased FC in HF appeared between the caudate and cerebellar regions, olfactory and cerebellar sites, vermis and medial frontal regions, and precentral gyri and cerebellar areas. However, increased FC emerged between the middle frontal gyrus and sensorimotor areas, superior parietal gyrus and orbito/medial frontal regions, inferior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus/cerebellar lobe/pallidum, fusiform gyrus and superior orbitofrontal gyrus and cerebellar sites, and within vermis and cerebellar areas; these connections were largely in the right hemisphere (p<0.005; 10,000 permutations). The topology of functional integration and specialized characteristics in HF are significantly changed in regions showing altered FC, an outcome which would interfere with brain network organization (p<0.05; 10,000 permutations). Brain dysfunction in HF extends to resting conditions, and autonomic, cognitive, and affective deficits may stem from altered FC and brain network organization that may contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the condition. Our findings likely result from the prominent axonal and nuclear structural changes reported earlier in HF; protecting neural tissue may improve FC integrity, and thus, increase quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27203600

  9. DIABETES IMPAIRS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL MOBILIZATION THROUGH ALTERATION OF NICHE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Francesca; Lymperi, Stefania; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Saez, Borja; Spencer, Joel A; Yeap, Beow Y; Masselli, Elena; Graiani, Gallia; Prezioso, Lucia; Rizzini, Elisa Lodi; Mangoni, Marcellina; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Sykes, Stephen M; Lin, Charles P.; Frenette, Paul S.; Quaini, Federico; Scadden, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) transplantation success depends upon adequate cell collection after G-CSF-administration that a substantial fraction of patients fails to achieve. Retrospective analysis of patient records demonstrated that diabetes correlated with lower CD34+ cell mobilization. Using mouse models, we found impaired HSPC egress from the bone marrow in either streptozotocin-induced or db/db diabetic animals. HSPC aberrantly localized within the marrow microenvironment of diabetic animals in association with abnormalities in sympathetic neuron number and function. Markedly increased sympathetic neuron density was accompanied by abnormal response to β-adrenergic stimulation and a failure to generate the G-CSF-induced CXCL12 gradient in nestin-expressing mesenchymal cells associated with HSPC mobilization. Alternative mobilization by direct pharmacologic inhibition of CXCL12-CXCR4 interaction rescued the defect. These data reveal diabetes-induced changes in bone marrow physiology and microanatomy and point to a pathophysiologically based approach to overcome HSPC mobilization defects in diabetic patients. PMID:21998408

  10. Association between mid-life marital status and cognitive function in later life: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Krister; Rovio, Suvi; Helkala, Eeva-Liisa; Vilska, Anna-Riitta; Winblad, Bengt; Soininen, Hilkka; Nissinen, Aulikki; Mohammed, Abdul H

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether mid-life marital status is related to cognitive function in later life. Design Prospective population based study with an average follow-up of 21 years. Setting Kuopio and Joensuu regions in eastern Finland. Participants Participants were derived from random, population based samples previously investigated in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987; 1449 individuals (73%), aged 65-79, underwent re-examination in 1998. Main outcome measures Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment. Results People cohabiting with a partner in mid-life (mean age 50.4) were less likely than all other categories (single, separated, or widowed) to show cognitive impairment later in life at ages 65-79. Those widowed or divorced in mid-life and still so at follow-up had three times the risk compared with married or cohabiting people. Those widowed both at mid-life and later life had an odds ratio of 7.67 (1.6 to 40.0) for Alzheimer’s disease compared with married or cohabiting people. The highest increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease was in carriers of the apolipoprotein E e4 allele who lost their partner before mid-life and were still widowed or divorced at follow-up. The progressive entering of several adjustment variables from mid-life did not alter these associations. Conclusions Living in a relationship with a partner might imply cognitive and social challenges that have a protective effect against cognitive impairment later in life, consistent with the brain reserve hypothesis. The specific increased risk for widowed and divorced people compared with single people indicates that other factors are needed to explain parts of the results. A sociogenetic disease model might explain the dramatic increase in risk of Alzheimer’s disease for widowed apolipoprotein E e4 carriers. PMID:19574312

  11. Identification and characterization of RP1 Tra1 cistrons involved in pilus function and plasmid mobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Fong, S T; Stanisich, V A

    1993-01-01

    Transfer-defective mutants of the Tra1 region of RP1 were isolated. Complementation studies involving stable heterozygotes combined with the mapping of Tn5 insertion mutations revealed two pilus cistrons, pilA and pilB, at positions 46.9 to 48.2 kb and 46.0 to 46.4 kb, respectively. All pilB mutants were Dps- (i.e., resistant to donor-specific phages PR4 and PRR1), whereas pilA mutants were Dps- (promoter-proximal mutations), Dps+/- (sensitive only to PR4 [more centrally located mutations]), or Dps+ (sensitive to both phages [promoter-distal mutations]). The correlation between the site mutated and the Dps phenotype, together with the finding that certain Dps+ pilA mutants continued to mobilize nonconjugative plasmids, suggested that pilA is bifunctional, contributing both to pilus function (at the promoter-proximal end) and to RP1 mobilization. It was also shown that the 43.5- to 49.5-kb region that includes pilA and pilB encodes all of the Tra1 pilus functions required for propagation of donor-specific phages and hence, probably, for pili that are active in conjugation. Finally, three cistrons that specifically affect RP1 mobilization were identified. Two of these, mobA and mobB, occur immediately anticlockwise to oriT and probably correspond to the traJ and traI genes characterized by other workers. The third cistron, mobC, occurs clockwise to oriT and may be a new mobilization gene, since its function can be substituted by IncP beta plasmids, a feature different from that of the traK mobilization gene which occurs in the same region but is RP1 specific. None of the mob cistrons was required for mobilization of nonconjugative plasmids, except for mobB, which was required by pVS99. PMID:8093446

  12. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an Extensive Air Shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 10{sup 17} and 10{sup 19} eV and zenith angles up to 65{sup o}. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  13. Total and specific polyphenol intakes in midlife are associated with cognitive function measured 13 years later.

    PubMed

    Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Fezeu, Léopold; Andreeva, Valentina A; Touvier, Mathilde; Scalbert, Augustin; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols, and in particular flavonoids, are omnipresent plant-food components displaying biochemical properties possibly beneficial to brain health. We sought to evaluate the long-term association between total and class-specific polyphenol intake and cognitive performance. Polyphenol intake was estimated using the Phenol-Explorer database applied to at least six 24-h dietary records collected in 1994-1996 as part of the SU.VI.MAX (Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants) study. The cognitive performance of 2574 middle-aged adults participating in the cohort was assessed in 2007-2009 using the following four neuropsychological tests: phonemic and semantic fluency, the RI-48 Cued Recall test, the Trail Making test, and Forward and Backward Digit Span. Inter-correlations among the test scores were estimated with principal component analysis. Associations between polyphenol intake and cognition were assessed by multivariate linear regression and ANCOVA. In multivariate models, high total polyphenol intake was associated with better language and verbal memory (P = 0.01) but not with executive functioning (P = 0.09). More specifically, intake of catechins (P = 0.001), theaflavins (P = 0.002), flavonols (P = 0.01), and hydroxybenzoic acids (P = 0.0004) was positively associated with language and verbal memory, especially with episodic memory assessed by the RI-48 test. In contrast, negative associations between scores on executive functioning and intake of dihydrochalcones (P = 0.01), catechins (P = 0.01), proanthocyanidins (P = 0.01), and flavonols (P = 0.01) were detected. High intake of specific polyphenols, including flavonoids and phenolic acids, may help to preserve verbal memory, which is a salient vulnerable domain in pathological brain aging. Further investigations are needed to clarify the observed negative associations regarding executive functioning. PMID:22090468

  14. Vibrotactile perceived intensity for mobile devices as a function of direction, amplitude, and frequency.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inwook; Seo, Jongman; Kim, Myongchan; Choi, Seungmoon

    2013-01-01

    Vibrotactile rendering is an emerging interaction method for information transmission in mobile devices, replacing or supplementing visual and auditory displays. To design effective vibrotactile actuators or display algorithms, an understanding of the perceived intensity (strength) of their vibrations is essential. This paper aims to build a robust model for the perceived intensities of mobile device vibrations, which can be immediately used by engineers and application designers. To this end, we carried out two psychophysical experiments using absolute magnitude estimation procedures. In Experiment I, we investigated the effects of vibration direction and device weight on the perceived intensity of mobile device vibrations. The vibration directions tested (height, width, and depth), and the device weights (90-130 g) were determined considering those of contemporary mobile devices. Only the vibration direction was found to be a statistically significant factor, showing the highest perceived intensities along the height direction of a mobile device. In Experiment II, we measured the perceived intensities of vibrations with various amplitudes and frequencies along the three vibration directions. Then, for each direction, a psychophysical magnitude function and equal sensation contours were constructed based on Stevens' power law, which clearly visualize the consequences of vibration parameter changes on the resulting perceptual strength. In addition, we found a monotonic relationship between the physical power of vibration absorbed by the hand and the resulting perceived intensity. This suggests that the former, which is greatly easier to acquire in practice, is a reliable predictor of the latter. We expect that the results of this study can provide immediate knowledge about the perceptual strength of vibrations that engineers and applications developers will find useful. PMID:24808331

  15. Laterality effects of human pudendal nerve stimulation on corticoanal pathways: evidence for functional asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, S; Enck, P; Aziz, Q; Uengoergil, S; Hobson, A; Thompson, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although motor and sensory pathways to the human external anal sphincter are bilateral, a unilateral pudendal neuropathy may still disrupt anal continence. Anal continence can, however, be preserved despite unilateral pudendal damage, and so to explain those differing observations, we postulated that pudendal innervation might be asymmetric.
AIMS—To explore the individual effects of right and left pudendal nerve stimulation on the corticofugal pathways to the human external anal sphincter and thus assess evidence for functional asymmetric pelvic innervation.
METHODS—In eight healthy subjects, anal sphincter electromyographic responses, evoked to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, were recorded 5-500 msec after digital transrectal electrical conditioning stimuli applied to each pudendal nerve.
RESULTS—Right or left pudendal nerve stimulation evoked anal responses of similar latencies but asymmetric amplitudes in six subjects: dominant responses (>50% contralateral side) from the right pudendal in four subjects and from the left in two. Cortical stimulation also evoked anal responses with amplitude 448 (121) µV and latency 20.9 (1.1) msec. When cortical stimulation was preceded by pudendal nerve stimulation, the cortical responses were facilitated at interstimulus intervals of 5-20 msec. Dominant pudendal nerve stimulation induced greater facilitation of the cortically evoked responses than the non-dominant nerve.
CONCLUSIONS—Cortical pathways to the external anal sphincter are facilitated by pudendal nerve conditioning, in an asymmetric manner. This functional asymmetry may explain the presence and absence of anal incontinence after unilateral pudendal nerve injury.


Keywords: cerebral cortex; continence; electromyography; external anal sphincter; incontinence; magnetic stimulation PMID:10369705

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene Impairs Later-Life Cortical Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Monique M.; Maguire, Mark; Ramesh, Aramandla; Aimin, Qiao; Liu, Sheng; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Aschner, Michael; Ebner, Ford F.; Hood, Darryl B.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants, such as Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] has been shown to impair brain development. The overarching hypothesis of our work is that glutamate receptor subunit expression is crucial for cortical evoked responses and that prenatal B(a)P exposure modulates the temporal developmental expression of glutamatergic receptor subunits in the somatosensory cortex. To characterize prenatal B(a)P exposure on the development of cortical function, pregnant Long Evans rats were exposed to low-level B(a)P (300μg/kg BW) by oral gavage on gestational days 14 to 17. At this exposure dose, there was no significant effect of B(a)P on 1) the number of pups born per litter, 2) the pre-weaning growth curves and 3) initial and final brain to body weight ratios. Control and B(a)P-exposed offspring were profiled for B(a)P metabolites in plasma and whole brain during the pre-weaning period. No detectable levels of metabolites were found in the control offspring. However, a time-dependent decrease in total metabolite concentration was observed in B(a)P-exposed offspring. On PND100-120, cerebrocortical mRNA expression was determined for the glutamatergic NMDA receptor subunit (NR2B) in control and B(a)P-exposed offspring. Neural activity was also recorded from neurons in primary somatic sensory (barrel) cortex. Semiquantitative PCR from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed a significant 50% reduction in NR2B mRNA expression in B(a)P-exposed offspring relative to controls. Recordings from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor -dependent neuronal activity in barrel cortex evoked by whisker stimulation was also significantly reduced (70%) as compared to controls. Analysis showed that the greatest deficit in cortical neuronal responses occurred in the shorter latency epochs from 5-20ms post-stimulus. The results suggest that in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene results in diminished mRNA expression of the NMDA NR2B receptor

  17. Lateralization of the frontal lobe functions elicited by a cognitive bias task is a fundamental process. Lesion study.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Kakurou; Aihara, Masao; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Nakazawa, Shinpei

    2005-09-01

    function elicited by mCBT is fundamental and independent of language lateralization, rather than secondary to it. Furthermore, these findings also indicate that the timetable for the development of lateralized frontal lobe functions depends upon biologic factors. PMID:16122629

  18. Benzodiazepine (BZD) use in community-dwelling older adults: Longitudinal associations with mobility, functioning, and pain.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Megan E; Sawyer, Patricia; Kennedy, Richard; Bradley, Laurence A; Allman, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prospective association between baseline BZD use and mobility, functioning, and pain among urban and rural African-American and non-Hispanic white community-dwelling older adults. From 1999 to 2001, a cohort of 1000 community-dwelling adults, aged ≥ 65 years, representing a random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, stratified by ethnicity, sex, and urban/rural residence were recruited. BZD use was assessed at an in-home visit. Every six months thereafter, study outcomes were assessed via telephone for 8.5-years. Mobility was assessed with the Life-Space Assessment (LSA). Functioning was quantified with level of difficulty in five basic activities of daily living (ADL: bathing, dressing, transferring, toileting, eating), and six instrumental activities of daily living (IADL: shopping, managing money, preparing meals, light and heavy housework, telephone use). Pain was measured by frequency per week and the magnitude of interference with daily tasks. All analytic models were adjusted for relevant covariates and mental health symptoms. After multivariable adjustment, baseline BZD use was significantly associated with greater difficulty with basic ADL (Estimate=0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04-0.74), and more frequent pain (Estimate=0.41, 95%CI: 0.09-0.74) in the total sample and declines in mobility among rural residents (Estimate=-0.67, t(5,902)=-1.98, p=0.048), over 8.5 years. BZD use was prospectively associated with greater risk for basic ADL difficulties and frequent pain among African-American and non-Hispanic white community-dwelling older adults, and life-space mobility declines among rural-dwellers, independently of relevant covariates. These findings highlight the potential long-term negative impact of BZD use among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24880195

  19. The Axon Initial Segment, 50Years Later: A Nexus for Neuronal Organization and Function.

    PubMed

    Leterrier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The axon initial segment is a highly specialized neuronal compartment, identified almost 50years ago by the pioneers of electron microscopy. Located in the first 50μm of the axon, it contains unique cytoskeletal features and concentrates a repertoire of specific scaffold and membrane proteins that assembles just after axon determination. The axon initial segment (AIS) supports two crucial physiological functions of the mature neuron: first, it generates and shapes the action potential. Second, it separates the cell body from the axon, preserving the molecular identity of each compartment. In addition to a diffusion barrier restricting membrane proteins and lipids exchange, an intracellular filter has been proposed that could selectively exclude somatodendritic vesicles and recruit axonal cargoes. Finally, the AIS scaffold is capable of morphological plasticity during development or in response to network activity. These changes directly impact the neuron excitability, allowing an adaptive and homeostatic response. These plastic electrogenic properties, as well as the regulation of protein transport to and from the axon, may have important implications in several neuropathological contexts where the AIS structure is altered. Fifty years after its first characterization, the AIS thus emerges as a nexus for both neuronal organization and physiology. PMID:26781833

  20. Sex differences and handedness in hemispheric lateralization of tactile-spatial functions.

    PubMed

    Genetta-Wadley, A; Swirsky-Sacchetti, T

    1990-04-01

    Sex differences in spatial processing and handedness were studied with a tactile-spatial task in 27 male and 29 female right-handed undergraduate students in psychology. Subjects were asked to identify amorphous shapes to investigate possible male right-hemisphere specialization for spatial functions and bilateral representation among the women. The Annett handedness questionnaire estimated extent of right-handedness. Subjects were classified by major, and women by phase of menstrual cycle. Analysis shows significantly more right-handedness in women and ambidexterity in men. Over-all, men do not perform significantly better than women, although men outperform women with their left hands when handedness is covaried. Within sex, no difference is seen between left and right hand scores for men, but women perform significantly better with right than left hands. Further analyses suggest men appear right-hemisphere dominant for this task whereas women show left-hemisphere dominance. Analyses of hormonal data support recent research, in that for women on the pill there is a trend to perform worse than all other groups. Engineering students perform significantly better than all other majors. PMID:2342860

  1. Return of functional mobility after an open tibial fracture: a sensor-based longitudinal cohort study using the Hamlyn Mobility Score.

    PubMed

    Kwasnicki, R M; Hettiaratchy, S; Okogbaa, J; Lo, B; Yang, G-Z; Darzi, A

    2015-08-01

    In this study we quantified and characterised the return of functional mobility following open tibial fracture using the Hamlyn Mobility Score. A total of 20 patients who had undergone reconstruction following this fracture were reviewed at three-month intervals for one year. An ear-worn movement sensor was used to assess their mobility and gait. The Hamlyn Mobility Score and its constituent kinematic features were calculated longitudinally, allowing analysis of mobility during recovery and between patients with varying grades of fracture. The mean score improved throughout the study period. Patients with more severe fractures recovered at a slower rate; those with a grade I Gustilo-Anderson fracture completing most of their recovery within three months, those with a grade II fracture within six months and those with a grade III fracture within nine months. Analysis of gait showed that the quality of walking continued to improve up to 12 months post-operatively, whereas the capacity to walk, as measured by the six-minute walking test, plateaued after six months. Late complications occurred in two patients, in whom the trajectory of recovery deviated by > 0.5 standard deviations below that of the remaining patients. This is the first objective, longitudinal assessment of functional recovery in patients with an open tibial fracture, providing some clarification of the differences in prognosis and recovery associated with different grades of fracture. PMID:26224831

  2. Anxiety in high-functioning autism: A pilot study of experience sampling using a mobile platform.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Gracey, Carolyn; Wood, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and stress are everyday issues for many people with high-functioning autism, and while cognitive-behavioural therapy is the treatment of choice for the management of anxiety, there are challenges in using it with people with high-functioning autism. This study used modified experience sampling techniques to examine everyday anxiety and stress in adults with high-functioning autism and to explore the feasibility of delivering real-time stress management techniques using a mobile platform. High levels of anxiety were found to be characterised by worry, confusing thoughts and being alone but was not associated with internal focus, imagery or rumination. Participants reported improved mood and less worry and anxious thinking in the active phase of the study. These results support previous studies indicating that people with high-functioning autism differ in their experience of anxiety and provided preliminary data on the feasibility of real-time stress management. The limitations of this approach are discussed together with considerations for future work in the area of developing clinical interventions on mobile platforms. PMID:26514793

  3. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region. PMID:26325624

  4. Interference of lateralized distractors on arithmetic problem solving: a functional role for attention shifts in mental calculation.

    PubMed

    Masson, Nicolas; Pesenti, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Solving arithmetic problems has been shown to induce shifts of spatial attention in simple probe-detection tasks, subtractions orienting attention to the left side and additions to the right side of space. Whether these attentional shifts constitute epiphenomena or are critically linked to the calculation process is still unknown. In the present study, we investigate participants' performance on addition and subtraction solving while they have to detect central or lateralized targets. The results show that lateralized distractors presented in the hemifield congruent to the operation to be solved interfere with arithmetical solving: participants are slower to solve subtractions or additions when distractors are located on the left or on the right, respectively. These results converge with previous data to show that attentional shifts underlie not only number processing but also mental arithmetic. They extend them as they reveal the reverse effect of the one previously reported by showing that inducing attention shifts interferes with the solving of arithmetic problems. They also demonstrate that spatial attentional shifts are part of the calculation procedure of solving mentally arithmetic problems. Their functional role is to access, from the first operand, the representation of the result in a direction congruent to the operation. PMID:25991551

  5. Shared Brain Lateralization Patterns in Language and Acheulean Stone Tool Production: A Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Study

    PubMed Central

    Uomini, Natalie Thaïs; Meyer, Georg Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Background The popular theory that complex tool-making and language co-evolved in the human lineage rests on the hypothesis that both skills share underlying brain processes and systems. However, language and stone tool-making have so far only been studied separately using a range of neuroimaging techniques and diverse paradigms. Methodology/Principal Findings We present the first-ever study of brain activation that directly compares active Acheulean tool-making and language. Using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (fTCD), we measured brain blood flow lateralization patterns (hemodynamics) in subjects who performed two tasks designed to isolate the planning component of Acheulean stone tool-making and cued word generation as a language task. We show highly correlated hemodynamics in the initial 10 seconds of task execution. Conclusions/Significance Stone tool-making and cued word generation cause common cerebral blood flow lateralization signatures in our participants. This is consistent with a shared neural substrate for prehistoric stone tool-making and language, and is compatible with language evolution theories that posit a co-evolution of language and manual praxis. In turn, our results support the hypothesis that aspects of language might have emerged as early as 1.75 million years ago, with the start of Acheulean technology. PMID:24023634

  6. Understanding the lateral dose response functions of high-resolution photon detectors by reverse Monte Carlo and deconvolution analysis.

    PubMed

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2015-08-21

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the mechanism underlying the perturbation of the field of the secondary electrons, which occurs in the presence of a detector in water as the surrounding medium. By means of 'reverse' Monte Carlo simulation, the points of origin of the secondary electrons contributing to the detector's signal are identified and associated with the detector's mass density, electron density and atomic composition. The spatial pattern of the origin of these secondary electrons, in addition to the formation of the detector signal by components from all parts of its sensitive volume, determines the shape of the lateral dose response function, i.e. of the convolution kernel K(x,y) linking the lateral profile of the absorbed dose in the undisturbed surrounding medium with the associated profile of the detector's signal. The shape of the convolution kernel is shown to vary essentially with the electron density of the detector's material, and to be attributable to the relative contribution by the signal-generating secondary electrons originating within the detector's volume to the total detector signal. Finally, the representation of the over- or underresponse of a photon detector by this density-dependent convolution kernel will be applied to provide a new analytical expression for the associated volume effect correction factor. PMID:26267311

  7. Embedded transmissibility function analysis for damage detection in a mobile sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Wang, Yang; Guo, Jiajie; Lee, Kok-Meng

    2010-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection have attracted great interest in recent decades, in meeting the challenges of assessing the safety condition of large-scale civil structures. By wiring remote sensors directly to a centralized data acquisition system, traditional structural health monitoring systems are usually costly and the installation is time-consuming. Recent advances in wireless sensing technology have made it feasible for structural health monitoring; furthermore, the computational core in a wireless sensing unit offers onboard data interrogation. In addition to wireless sensing, the authors have recently developed a mobile sensing system for providing high spatial resolution and flexible sensor deployment in structural health monitoring. In this study, transmissibility function analysis is embedded in the mobile sensing node to perform onboard and in-network structural damage detection. The system implementation is validated using a laboratory 2D steel portal frame. Simulated damage is applied to the frame structure, and the damage is successfully identified by two mobile sensing nodes that autonomously navigate through the structure.

  8. Mobile telephone use effects on peripheral audiovestibular function: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Ceranic, Borka; Cox, Robin; Watt, Hilary; Chadwick, Philip; Luxon, Linda M

    2008-02-01

    Low level radio-frequency (RF) signals may produce disorientation, headache and nausea. This double blind study tested nine case-subjects, who complained of various symptoms after prolonged mobile telephone use and 21 control subjects. Each subject underwent a series of trials, in which a dummy mobile telephone exposure system was held to each ear for 30 min in (a) pulsed, (b) continuous RF emission or, (c) no emission test modes. In the active pulsed and continuous modes the same mean power as the output of a typical handset was delivered at a carrier frequency of 882 MHz and at a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) value of 1.3 W kg(-1) (+/- 30%). In Experiment I (auditory), transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), which assess the outer hair cells in the inner ear, were conducted. In Experiment II (vestibular) the vestibulo-ocular reflex was recorded by video-oculography (VOG), at baseline and immediately post exposure. There were no significant TEOAE changes from baseline to post-exposure recording for any of the exposures and no significant differences in the TEOAEs' change from baseline to post exposure between cases and controls. The VOG did not identify any effect of the exposure on the vestibular end organ in either cases or controls. In conclusion, 30 min exposure to mobile phone RF did not show any immediate effects on vestibulocochlear function as measured by TEOAE and the VOR. PMID:17929266

  9. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  10. Association of cigarette smoking with Chinese ankylosing spondylitis patients in Taiwan: a poor disease outcome in systemic inflammation, functional ability, and physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Lu, Chin-Li; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the association between smoking and the disease activity, functional ability, physical mobility, and systemic inflammation in Chinese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Seventy five male Chinese AS patients in Taiwan were enrolled in the cross-sectional study. These patients fulfilled the 1984 modified New York criteria. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing the demographic data, disease activity, functional ability (BASFI), and patient's global assessment. Meanwhile, physical examinations were performed to determine the patient's physical mobility. Acute-phase reactants, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein levels were also measured in the AS patients. Smoking habits with smoking duration and smoking intensity (pack-years of smoking) were recorded. Among these physical mobility parameters, modified Schober's index (p < 0.001), cervical rotation (p = 0.034), later lumbar flexion (p = 0.002), chest expansion (p = 0.016), and occiput-to-wall distances (p = 0.003) were significantly impaired in smoking AS patients (n = 35) as compared to non-smoking (n = 40). Systemic inflammation parameter, ESR was significantly higher in smoking AS patients than non-smoking (p = 0.03). The odds ratio of advanced modified Schober's index, lateral lumbar flexion, fingertip-to-floor distance, chest expansion, and occiput-to-wall were significantly elevated in smoking AS patients as compared to non-smoking. Moreover, the smoking intensity correlated significantly with BASFI (r = 0.481, p = 0.005), cervical rotation (r = -0.401, p = 0.031), fingertip-to-floor distance (r = 0.485, p = 0.004), and occiput-to-wall distance (r = 0.473, p = 0.005) in the 35 smoking AS patients. The cigarette smokers in the Chinese AS patients have increased systemic inflammation and poor physical mobility. In addition, the higher smoking intensity in the AS smokers is associated with poor disease outcome, including functional ability and physical mobility

  11. Effects on auditory function of chronic exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan Singh; Goel, Deepak; Mishra, Sarita; Jha, Vivek Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has given rise to apprehension regarding the possible hazardous health effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on auditory function. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of long-term (>4 yr) exposure to EMFs emitted by mobile phones on auditory function. Our study population was made up of 40 healthy medical students-31 men and 9 women, aged 20 to 30 years (mean 22.7). Of this group, 31 subjects typically held their phone to the right ear and 9 to the left ear; the non-phone-using ear served as each subject's control ear. The phone-using subjects were also split into two groups of 20 based on the duration of their daily phone use (≤60 min vs. >60 min). All subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, impedance audiometry, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA), and comparisons were made between the phone-using ear and the control ear and between the shorter and longer duration of daily use. We found no statistically significant differences in high-frequency pure-tone average between the phone-using ears and the control ears (p = 0.69) or between the shorter- and longer-duration phone-using ears (p = 0.85). Moreover, statistical analysis of BERA findings revealed no significant differences between the phone-using ears and the control ears in terms of wave I-III, III-V, and I-V interpeak latencies (p = 0.59, 0.74 and 0.44, respectively). None of the subjects reported any subjective symptoms, such as headache, tinnitus, or sensations of burning or warmth behind, around, or on the phone-using ear. We conclude that the long-term exposure to EMFs from mobile phones does not affect auditory function. PMID:27551848

  12. Negative Symptoms and Functioning During the First Year after a Recent Onset of Schizophrenia and Eight Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Joseph; Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Gitlin, Michael J.; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Ered, Arielle; Villa, Kathleen F.; Hellemann, Gerhard S.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the longitudinal course of negative symptoms, especially in relationship to functioning, in the early phase of schizophrenia is crucial to developing intervention approaches. The course of negative symptoms and daily functioning was examined over a one-year period following a recent onset of schizophrenia and at an 8-year follow-up point. Methods The study included 149 recent-onset schizophrenia patients who had a mean age of 23.7 (SD=4.4) years and mean education of 12.9 (SD=2.2) years. Negative symptom (BPRS and SANS) and functional outcome (SCORS) assessments were conducted frequently by trained raters. Results After antipsychotic medication stabilization, negative symptoms during the first outpatient year were moderately stable (BPRS ICC=0.64 and SANS ICC=0.66). Despite this overall moderate stability, 24% of patients experienced at least one period of negative symptoms exacerbation. Furthermore, entry level of negative symptoms was significantly associated with poor social functioning (r =−.34, p < .01) and work/school functioning (r =−.25, p < .05) at 12 months, and with negative symptoms at the 8-year follow-up (r =.29, p <.05). Discussion Early negative symptoms are fairly stable during the first outpatient year, are predictors of daily functioning at 12 months, and predict negative symptoms 8 years later. Despite the high levels of stability, negative symptoms did fluctuate in a subsample of patients. These findings suggest that negative symptoms may be an important early course target for intervention aimed at promoting recovery. PMID:25499044

  13. SU-E-T-232: Micro Diamonds - Determination of Their Lateral Response Function Via Gap-Beam Dose Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Poppinga, D; Looe, H; Chofor, N; Schoenfeld, A; Fischer, J; Meyners, J; Delfs, B; Stelljes, T; Poppe, B; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Marinelli, M; Harder, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is the measurement of the lateral response function of microDiamonds by comparison with radiochromic film dose measurement. In this study a TM60019 microDiamond (PTW Freiburg, Germany) and a prototype synthetic diamond detector with smaller sensitive volume were investigated. Methods: Two lead blocks were positioned below the gantry head of an Elekta Synergy accelerator using a gantry mount. Between the blocks two sheets of paper were fixed. The water phantom was positioned below the gantry mount, so that the block to water distance was 20 cm. The gap beam profile was measured at 5 cm water depth by radiochromic EBT3 film and diamond detectors. The film was fixed on a RW3 plate, moved by the step motor system of the phantom and digitized by an Epson 10000XL scanner using the red color channel. Results: The lateral response of the prototype diamond detector is comparable to that of film measurements, i.e. has negligible width. This corresponds to the small detector volume of the prototype detector. In contrast to this the FWHM values of the gap-beam dose profiles measured with the TM60019 detector are somewhat larger, which corresponds to the larger sensitive detector volume. Conclusion: This study has illustrated the high spatial resolution of the diamond detectors. In comparison with filmmeasured narrow-beam dose profiles, the TM60019 has a spatial resolution function of about 2 mm FWHM, whereas the FWHM for the prototype is practically negligible. However due to the low signal caused by the small sensitive volume, measurements with the prototype in clinical routine are a challenge. On the other hand the TM60019 is a good compromise between detector volume and signal output and thus a well suited detector for most clinically relevant small field situations.

  14. Functional Restoration of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patient-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Through Inhibition of DNA Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youn Seo; Kim, Seung Hyun; Cho, Goang-Won

    2016-05-01

    Alteration of DNA methylation is highly associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Remedying these aberrant methylation patterns may serve to improve these diseases. Previously, we reported that human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from ALS patients (ALS-MSCs) have functionally decreased stem cell potency, and excessively express DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). In this study, we examined the correlation between excessive DNMT expression and functional decline in ALS-MSCs. The DNMT inhibitor RG108 was used for this. RG108-treated ALS-MSCs exhibit increased expression of the anti-senescence genes TERT, VEGF, and ANG, and decreased expression of the senescence-related genes ATM and p21. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase and the expression of senescence proteins p53 and p16 were reduced in RG108-treated ALS-MSCs. The abilities of cell migration and protection against oxidative damage were improved in the treated ALS-MSCs. In neuronal differentiation experiments, the treated MSCs more effectively differentiated into neuron-like cells. These results suggest that ALS-MSC function can be restored by inhibiting excessively expressed DNMTs, an approach that may ultimately provide better efficacy in stem cell therapy. PMID:26210997

  15. Dissociation of Structural and Functional Integrities of the Motor System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong Seok; Ferguson, Michele; Tan, Rachel; Mioshi, Eneida; Simon, Neil; Burrell, James; Vucic, Steve; Hodges, John R.; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study investigated the structural and functional changes in the motor system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; n=25) and behavioral-variant fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD; n=17) relative to healthy controls (n=37). Methods Structural changes were examined using a region-of-interest approach, applying voxel-based morphometry for gray-matter changes and diffusion tensor imaging for white-matter changes. Functional changes in the motor system were elucidated using threshold-tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measurements of upper motor-neuron excitability. Results The structural analyses showed that in ALS there were more white-matter changes in the corticospinal and motor-cortex regions and more gray-matter changes in the cerebellum in comparison to controls. bvFTD showed substantial gray- and white-matter changes across virtually all motor-system regions compared to controls, although the brainstem was affected less than the other regions. Direct comparisons across patient groups showed that the gray- and white-matter motor-system changes inclusive of the motor cortex were greater in bvFTD than in ALS. By contrast, the functional integrity of the motor system was more adversely affected in ALS than in bvFTD, with both patient groups showing increased excitability of upper motor neurons compared to controls. Conclusions Cross-correlation of structural and functional data further revealed a neural dissociation of different motor-system regions and tracts covarying with the TMS excitability across both patient groups. The structural and functional motor-system integrities appear to be dissociated between ALS and bvFTD, which represents useful information for the diagnosis of motor-system changes in these two disorders. PMID:26932257

  16. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation.

    PubMed

    Zia, Roseanna N; Swan, James W; Su, Yu

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  17. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Roseanna N. Su, Yu; Swan, James W.

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261–290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16–29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375–400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1–29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle

  18. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna N.; Swan, James W.; Su, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  19. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  20. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rachel E; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A; Boudreau, Robert M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Vinik, Aaron I; Newman, Anne B; Strotmeyer, Elsa S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  1. Native mass spectrometry and ion mobility characterize the orange carotenoid protein functional domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Lu, Yue; Wolf, Nathan R; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) plays a unique role in protecting many cyanobacteria from light-induced damage. The active form of OCP is directly involved in energy dissipation by binding to the phycobilisome (PBS), the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria. There are two structural modules in OCP, an N-terminal domain (NTD), and a C-terminal domain (CTD), which play different functional roles during the OCP-PBS quenching cycle. Because of the quasi-stable nature of active OCP, structural analysis of active OCP has been lacking compared to its inactive form. In this report, partial proteolysis was used to generate two structural domains, NTD and CTD, from active OCP. We used multiple native mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches to interrogate the structural features of the NTD and the CTD. Collisional activation and ion mobility analysis indicated that the NTD releases its bound carotenoid without forming any intermediates and the CTD is resistant to unfolding upon collisional energy ramping. The unfolding intermediates observed in inactive intact OCP suggest that it is the N-terminal extension and the NTD-CTD loop that lead to the observed unfolding intermediates. These combined approaches extend the knowledge of OCP photo-activation and structural features of OCP functional domains. Combining native MS, ion mobility, and collisional activation promises to be a sensitive new approach for studies of photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes. PMID:26921809

  2. Functional specializations in lateral prefrontal cortex associated with the integration and segregation of information in working memory.

    PubMed

    De Pisapia, Nicola; Slomski, Jessica A; Braver, Todd S

    2007-05-01

    Control processes are thought to play an important role in working memory (WM), by enabling the coordination, transformation, and integration of stored information. Yet little is known about the neural mechanisms that subserve such control processes. This study examined whether integration operations within WM involve the activation of distinct neural mechanisms within lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor brain activity while participants performed a mental arithmetic task. In the integration (IN) condition, a WM preload item had to be mentally inserted into the last step of the math problem. This contrasted with the segregation (SG) condition, which also required maintenance of the WM preload while performing mental arithmetic but had no integration requirement. Two additional control conditions involved either ignoring the preload (math only condition) or ignoring the math problem (recall only condition). Left anterior PFC (Brodmann's Area [BA] 46/10) was selectively engaged by integration demands, with activation increasing prior to, as well as during the integration period. A homologous right anterior PFC region showed selectively increased activity in the SG condition during the period in which the math problem and preload digit were reported. Left middorsolateral PFC regions (BA 9/46) showed increased, but equivalent, activity in both the SG and IN conditions relative to both control conditions. These results provide support for the selective role of lateral PFC in cognitive control over WM and suggest more specific hypotheses regarding dissociable PFC mechanisms involved during the integration and segregation of stored WM items. PMID:16769743

  3. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour. PMID:27596282

  4. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour. PMID:27596282

  5. Language lateralization of hearing native signers: A functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) study of speech and sign production

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Daws, Richard; Payne, Heather; Blott, Jonathan; Marshall, Chloë; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest greater involvement of the left parietal lobe in sign language compared to speech production. This stronger activation might be linked to the specific demands of sign encoding and proprioceptive monitoring. In Experiment 1 we investigate hemispheric lateralization during sign and speech generation in hearing native users of English and British Sign Language (BSL). Participants exhibited stronger lateralization during BSL than English production. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether this increased lateralization index could be due exclusively to the higher motoric demands of sign production. Sign naïve participants performed a phonological fluency task in English and a non-sign repetition task. Participants were left lateralized in the phonological fluency task but there was no consistent pattern of lateralization for the non-sign repetition in these hearing non-signers. The current data demonstrate stronger left hemisphere lateralization for producing signs than speech, which was not primarily driven by motoric articulatory demands. PMID:26605960

  6. Language lateralization of hearing native signers: A functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) study of speech and sign production.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Daws, Richard; Payne, Heather; Blott, Jonathan; Marshall, Chloë; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest greater involvement of the left parietal lobe in sign language compared to speech production. This stronger activation might be linked to the specific demands of sign encoding and proprioceptive monitoring. In Experiment 1 we investigate hemispheric lateralization during sign and speech generation in hearing native users of English and British Sign Language (BSL). Participants exhibited stronger lateralization during BSL than English production. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether this increased lateralization index could be due exclusively to the higher motoric demands of sign production. Sign naïve participants performed a phonological fluency task in English and a non-sign repetition task. Participants were left lateralized in the phonological fluency task but there was no consistent pattern of lateralization for the non-sign repetition in these hearing non-signers. The current data demonstrate stronger left hemisphere lateralization for producing signs than speech, which was not primarily driven by motoric articulatory demands. PMID:26605960

  7. Health and Quality of Life Perception in Older Adults: The Joint Role of Cognitive Efficiency and Functional Mobility.

    PubMed

    Forte, Roberta; Boreham, Colin A G; De Vito, Giuseppe; Pesce, Caterina

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive and mobility functions are involved in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The present cross-sectional study aimed at investigating what facets of efficient cognition and functional mobility interactively contribute to mental and physical HRQoL. Fifty-six healthy older individuals (aged 65-75 years) were evaluated for mental and physical HRQoL, core cognitive executive functions (inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility), and functional mobility (walking) under single and dual task conditions. Multiple regression analyses were run to verify which core executive functions predicted mental and physical HRQoL and whether the ability to perform complex (dual) walking tasks moderated such association. Inhibitory efficiency and the ability to perform physical-mental dual tasks interactively predicted mental HRQoL, whereas cognitive flexibility and the ability to perform physical dual tasks interactively predicted physical HRQoL. Different core executive functions seem relevant for mental and physical HRQoL. Executive function efficiency seems to translate into HRQoL perception when coupled with tangible experience of the ability to walk under dual task conditions that mirror everyday life demands. Implications of these results for supporting the perception of mental and physical quality of life at advanced age are discussed, suggesting the usefulness of multicomponent interventions and environments conducive to walking that jointly aid successful cognitive aging and functional mobility. PMID:26378556

  8. Health and Quality of Life Perception in Older Adults: The Joint Role of Cognitive Efficiency and Functional Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Roberta; Boreham, Colin A.G.; De Vito, Giuseppe; Pesce, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and mobility functions are involved in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The present cross-sectional study aimed at investigating what facets of efficient cognition and functional mobility interactively contribute to mental and physical HRQoL. Fifty-six healthy older individuals (aged 65–75 years) were evaluated for mental and physical HRQoL, core cognitive executive functions (inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility), and functional mobility (walking) under single and dual task conditions. Multiple regression analyses were run to verify which core executive functions predicted mental and physical HRQoL and whether the ability to perform complex (dual) walking tasks moderated such association. Inhibitory efficiency and the ability to perform physical-mental dual tasks interactively predicted mental HRQoL, whereas cognitive flexibility and the ability to perform physical dual tasks interactively predicted physical HRQoL. Different core executive functions seem relevant for mental and physical HRQoL. Executive function efficiency seems to translate into HRQoL perception when coupled with tangible experience of the ability to walk under dual task conditions that mirror everyday life demands. Implications of these results for supporting the perception of mental and physical quality of life at advanced age are discussed, suggesting the usefulness of multicomponent interventions and environments conducive to walking that jointly aid successful cognitive aging and functional mobility. PMID:26378556

  9. Development of an Objective Space Suit Mobility Performance Metric Using Metabolic Cost and Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating EVA suit performance and mobility have historically concentrated on isolated joint range of motion and torque. However, these techniques do little to evaluate how well a suited crewmember can actually perform during an EVA. An alternative method of characterizing suited mobility through measurement of metabolic cost to the wearer has been evaluated at Johnson Space Center over the past several years. The most recent study involved six test subjects completing multiple trials of various functional tasks in each of three different space suits; the results indicated it was often possible to discern between different suit designs on the basis of metabolic cost alone. However, other variables may have an effect on real-world suited performance; namely, completion time of the task, the gravity field in which the task is completed, etc. While previous results have analyzed completion time, metabolic cost, and metabolic cost normalized to system mass individually, it is desirable to develop a single metric comprising these (and potentially other) performance metrics. This paper outlines the background upon which this single-score metric is determined to be feasible, and initial efforts to develop such a metric. Forward work includes variable coefficient determination and verification of the metric through repeated testing.

  10. Classification of ion mobility spectra by functional groups using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, S.; Nazarov, E.; Wang, Y. F.; Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neural networks were trained using whole ion mobility spectra from a standardized database of 3137 spectra for 204 chemicals at various concentrations. Performance of the network was measured by the success of classification into ten chemical classes. Eleven stages for evaluation of spectra and of spectral pre-processing were employed and minimums established for response thresholds and spectral purity. After optimization of the database, network, and pre-processing routines, the fraction of successful classifications by functional group was 0.91 throughout a range of concentrations. Network classification relied on a combination of features, including drift times, number of peaks, relative intensities, and other factors apparently including peak shape. The network was opportunistic, exploiting different features within different chemical classes. Application of neural networks in a two-tier design where chemicals were first identified by class and then individually eliminated all but one false positive out of 161 test spectra. These findings establish that ion mobility spectra, even with low resolution instrumentation, contain sufficient detail to permit the development of automated identification systems.

  11. High mobility group protein 2 functionally interacts with the POU domains of octamer transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, S; König, H; Wirth, T

    1995-01-01

    The octamer transcription factors Oct1 and Oct2 are involved in the transcriptional regulation of both lymphoid-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes. Their activity depends critically on their interaction with distinct cellular cofactors. Therefore, we have isolated cDNAs encoding proteins that physically interact with Oct2. Here we describe the analysis of one such clone, representing the murine homologue of high mobility group (HMG) protein 2. We have mapped the interaction domains for both proteins and have shown that HMG2 and Oct2 interact via their HMG domains and POU homeodomains, respectively. This interaction is not restricted to Oct2, as other members of the octamer transcription factor family like Oct1 and Oct6 also interact with HMG2. The interaction with HMG2 results in a marked increase in the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of the Oct proteins. Interestingly, the HMG2 protein is not present in the protein-DNA complex detected by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The Oct and HMG2 proteins also interact in vivo. A chimeric protein, in which the strong transactivation domain of VP16 was fused directly to the HMG domains of HMG2, stimulated the activity of an octamer-dependent reporter construct upon cotransfection. Furthermore, the expression of antisense RNA for HMG2 specifically reduces octamer-dependent transcription. These results suggest that one of the functions of HMG2 is to support the octamer transcription factors in their role as transcriptional activators. Images PMID:7720710

  12. Deficits in a lateralized associative learning task in dopamine-depleted rats with functional recovery by dopamine-rich transplants.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Eilís; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2004-10-01

    Experimental therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) are commonly validated in unilateral animal models using simple tests of motor asymmetry such as rotation, stepping and cylinder tests. However, the human disorder is considerably more complex than this, and alternative tests that permit a more complete evaluation of the efficacy and mechanism of action of novel treatments are needed. In this study, an operant task that assesses the selection, initiation and execution of lateralized movements was used to investigate the effects of embryonic dopamine cell transplants in the unilateral medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion model of PD. Lesioned Lister Hooded rats had a pronounced contralateral selection and initiation deficit, as well as an impairment in execution of movements bilaterally. They also attempted fewer trials and made more procedural errors than unlesioned rats. Transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons to the striatum led to a marked improvement in specific parameters and a more modest improvement in others. The graft improved the contralateral selection deficit and the execution of movements bilaterally, but had no effect on the initiation of contralateral movements. Transplanted rats also attempted more trials and made fewer errors. In contrast, the more commonly used stepping and cylinder tests revealed no functional effect of the graft. This data suggests that this operant task may be a powerful tool for validating and elucidating the mechanism of action of experimental brain repair therapies prior to entering the clinic. PMID:15380018

  13. Lateralization of cervical spinal cord activity during an isometric upper extremity motor task with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kenneth A; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Kahnt, Thorsten; Parrish, Todd B

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to use an isometric upper extremity motor task to detect activity induced blood oxygen level dependent signal changes in the cervical spinal cord with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven healthy volunteers performed six 5minute runs of an alternating left- and right-sided isometric wrist flexion task, during which images of the cervical spinal cord were acquired with a reduced field-of-view T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar-imaging sequence. Spatial normalization to a standard spinal cord template was performed, and group average activation maps were generated in a mixed-effects analysis. The task activity significantly exceeded that of the control analyses. The activity was lateralized to the hemicord ipsilateral to the task and reliable across the runs at the group and subject level. Finally, a multi-voxel pattern analysis was able to successfully decode the left and right tasks at the C6 and C7 vertebral levels. PMID:26488256

  14. Management of Grade III Mobile Anterior Tooth in Function Using Endostabilizer – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Swapnil N

    2014-01-01

    Impact of implant dentistry is such that today very few dentists think about saving grade III mobile anterior teeth. A patient with grade III mobility of central incisor due to apical root resorption was treated by using 80 no.stainless steel ‘H’ file as endostabiliser and one year follow up was done. Endostabiliser reduced the mobility of grade III mobile teeth drastically, immediately after its placement. Tooth was absolutely asymptomatic throughout one year follow up. PMID:25654043

  15. Stability of early identified aggressive victim status in elementary school and associations with later mental health problems and functional impairments.

    PubMed

    Burk, Linnea R; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Park, Jong-Hyo; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Klein, Marjorie H; Essex, Marilyn J

    2011-02-01

    Aggressive victims-children who are both perpetrators and victims of peer aggression-experience greater concurrent mental health problems and impairments than children who are only aggressive or only victimized. The stability of early identified aggressive victim status has not been evaluated due to the fact that most studies of aggressor/victim subgroups have focused on preadolescents and/or adolescents. Further, whether children who exhibit early and persistent patterns of aggression and victimization continue to experience greater mental health problems and functional impairments through the transition to adolescence is not known. This study followed 344 children (180 girls) previously identified as socially adjusted, victims, aggressors, or aggressive victims at Grade 1 (Burk et al. 2008) to investigate their involvement in peer bullying through Grade 5. The children, their mothers, and teachers reported on children's involvement in peer aggression and victimization at Grades 1, 3, and 5; and reported on internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, inattention and impulsivity, as well as academic functioning, physical health, and service use at Grades 5, 7, and 9. Most children categorized as aggressive victims in Grade 1 continued to be significantly involved in peer bullying across elementary school. Children with recurrent aggressive victim status exhibited higher levels of some mental health problems and greater school impairments across the adolescent transition when compared to other longitudinal peer status groups. This study suggests screening for aggressive victim status at Grade 1 is potentially beneficial. Further early interventions may need to be carefully tailored to prevent and/or attenuate later psychological, academic, and physical health problems. PMID:20811772

  16. Assessment of pulmonary function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: when can polygraphy help evaluate the need for non-invasive ventilation?

    PubMed Central

    Prell, Tino; Ringer, Thomas M; Wullenkord, Kara; Garrison, Philipp; Gunkel, Anne; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Witte, Otto W; Grosskreutz, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) is an established, effective, long-term treatment for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the correct indicators for the establishment of NPPV have not been defined. Methods In this retrospective study, records (spirometry, nocturnal polygraphy, nocturnal blood gases) of 131 patients with ALS were reviewed in order to evaluate the role of polygraphy for prediction of respiratory failure in ALS. Results The patient group reporting with versus without dyspnoea had significantly lower values on the revised ALS-Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R), vital capacity (VC), forced VC (FVC), arterial oxygen saturation and arterial oxygen tension readings, including a higher apnoea–hypopnoea index. 23 patients, who did not report about dyspnoea, had an FVC of <75%. Nocturnal hypoventilation was observed in 67% of the patients with ALS independent of their ALSFRS-R. The patient group with nocturnal hypoventilation was characterised by a significantly lower VC, FVC and maximal static inspiratory pressure compared with the group without nocturnal hypoventilation. However, also in the absence of nocturnal hypoventilation, 8 patients had a VC <50% as predicted. Discussion Our study shows that in patients not reporting dyspnoea and having an FVC of >75%, nocturnal hypoventilation was observed in nearly every second patient. Therefore, for the question of whether NPPV should be initiated, polygraphy does not provide useful additional information if the FVC is already <75% as predicted. However, in patients with more or less normal lung function parameters or where lung spirometry cannot perform adequately (eg, bulbar ALS), it can provide sufficient evidence for the need of NPPV. PMID:27010615

  17. A structural equation model relating physical function, pain, impaired mobility (IM), and falls in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dai, Boyi; Ware, William B; Giuliani, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    The current study used a structural equation model to investigate the interrelationships among physical function, pain, IM, and falls in 511 American older adults. The model included 11 measurement variables (tandem stance, single leg stance, 360° turn, chair stand, arm curl, sit and reach, back scratch, normative score of 6-min walk or 2-min step, timed up and go, pain, and fall) and four latent variables (balance, strength, flexibility, and IM). The final model with the combined sample demonstrated good fit with the participant data (χ(2)(31)=30.0, N=499, p=0.52; Goodness of Fit Index (GFI)=0.99). Balance had a significant and the largest effect on IM (standardized regression weights=-1.05, p<0.001). Strength, endurance, flexibility, and pain had small effects on IM (standardized regression weights<0.2). The findings suggest that balance and mobility testing should be a priority in fall screening and prevention programs. PMID:22766209

  18. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  19. Outcome and patients' satisfaction after functional treatment of acute lateral ankle injuries at emergency departments versus family doctor offices

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Patrik R; Benneker, Lorin M; Eggli, Stefan; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2008-01-01

    Background In some Western countries, more and more patients seek initial treatment even for minor injuries at emergency units of hospitals. The initial evaluation and treatment as well as aftercare of these patients require large amounts of personnel and logistical resources, which are limited and costly, especially if compared to treatment by a general practitioner. In this study, we investigated whether outsourcing from our level 1 trauma center to a general practitioner has an influence on patient satisfaction and compliance. Methods This prospective, randomized study, included n = 100 patients who suffered from a lateral ankle ligament injury grade I-II (16, 17). After radiological exclusion of osseous lesions, the patients received early functional treatment and were shown physical therapy exercises to be done at home, without immobilization or the use of stabilizing ortheses. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 patients each: Group A (ER): Follow-up and final examination in the hospital's emergency unit. Group B (GP): Follow-up by general practitioner, final examination at hospital's emergency unit. The patients were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with the treatment and outcome of the treatment. Results Female and male patients were equally represented in both groups. The age of the patients ranged from 16 – 64 years, with a mean age of 34 years (ER) and 35 years (GP). 98% (n = 98) of all patients were satisfied with their treatment, and 93% (n = 93) were satisfied with the outcome. For these parameters no significant difference between the two groups could be noted (p = 0.7406 and 0.7631 respectively). 39% of all patients acquired stabilizing ortheses like ankle braces (Aircast, Malleoloc etc.) on their own initiative. There was a not significant tendency for more self-acquired ortheses in the group treated by general practicioners (p = 0,2669). Conclusion Patients who first present at the ER with a lateral ankle ligament

  20. Zoledronate Inhibits Ischemia-Induced Neovascularization by Impairing the Mobilization and Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chang, Wei-Chou; Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are a class of pharmacologic compounds that are commonly used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis and malignant osteolytic processes. Studies have shown that bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in postnatal neovascularization. Whether the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate zoledronate inhibits ischemia-induced neovascularization by modulating EPC functions remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced in wild-type mice after 2 weeks of treatment with vehicle or zoledronate (low-dose: 30 μg/kg; high-dose: 100 μg/kg). Doppler perfusion imaging demonstrated that the ischemic limb/normal side blood perfusion ratio was significantly lower in wild-type mice treated with low-dose zoledronate and in mice treated with high-dose zoledronate than in controls 4 weeks after ischemic surgery (control vs. low-dose vs. high-dose: 87±7% vs. *61±18% vs. **49±17%, *p<0.01, **p<0.005 compared to control). Capillary densities were also significantly lower in mice treated with low-dose zoledronate and in mice treated with high-dose zoledronate than in control mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed impaired mobilization of EPC-like cells (Sca-1+/Flk-1+) after surgical induction of ischemia in mice treated with zoledronate but normal levels of mobilization in mice treated with vehicle. In addition, ischemic tissue from mice that received zoledronate treatment exhibited significantly lower levels of the active form of MMP-9, lower levels of VEGF, and lower levels of phosphorylated eNOS and phosphorylated Akt than ischemic tissue from mice that received vehicle. Results of the in vitro studies showed that incubation with zoledronate inhibited the viability, migration, and tube-forming capacities of EPC. Conclusions/Significance Zoledronate inhibited ischemia-induced neovascularization by impairing EPC mobilization and angiogenic functions. These findings suggest

  1. The expression of CG9940 affects the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wen, Deng-Tai; Zheng, Lan; Ni, Liu; Wang, Hui; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Min

    2016-10-01

    The CG9940 gene, which encodes the NAD(+) synthase protein in Drosophila, is conserved in human, zebra fish, and mosquito. NAD(+) synthase is a homodimer, which catalyzes the final step in de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, an amide transfer from either ammonia or glutamine to nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). Both the CG9940 and exercise are closely relative to NAD(+) level, and NAD(+) plays important roles not only in energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions but also in aging. In our study, the expression of CG9940 was changed by UAS/GAL4 system in Drosophila. Flies were trained by a training device. Cardiac function was analyzed by M-mode traces, climbing index was measured through negative geotaxis assay, and lifespan was measured via lifespan assays. The important new findings from our present study included the following: (1) the expression of the CG9940 could affect cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan in Drosophila. Over-expression of the CG9940 gene had positive effects on Drosophila, such as enhanced aging cardiac output, reduced heart failure, delayed age-related mobility decline, and prolonged lifespan, but lower-expression of the CG9940 had negative effects on them. (2) Different expressions of the CG9940 resulted in different influences on the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila. Both normal-expression and over-expression of the CG9940 resulted in positive influences on the adaptation of cardiac functions, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila such as exercise slowed age-related decline of cardiac function, mobility and extent of lifespan in these flies, while lower-expression of the CG9940 led to negative impacts on the adaptation of mobility and lifespan to exercise in Drosophila. PMID:27448710

  2. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Cameron; West, Joshua H; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2015-01-01

    Background Several thousand mobile phone apps are available to download to mobile phones for health and fitness. Mobile phones may provide a unique means of administering health interventions to populations. Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to systematically search and describe the literature on mobile apps used in health behavior interventions, describe the behavioral features and focus of health apps, and to evaluate the potential of apps to disseminate health behavior interventions. Methods We conducted a review of the literature in September 2014 using key search terms in several relevant scientific journal databases. Only English articles pertaining to health interventions using mobile phone apps were included in the final sample. Results The 24 studies identified for this review were primarily feasibility and pilot studies of mobile apps with small sample sizes. All studies were informed by behavioral theories or strategies, with self-monitoring as the most common construct. Acceptability of mobile phone apps was high among mobile phone users. Conclusions The lack of large sample studies using mobile phone apps may signal a need for additional studies on the potential use of mobile apps to assist individuals in changing their health behaviors. Of these studies, there is early evidence that apps are well received by users. Based on available research, mobile apps may be considered a feasible and acceptable means of administering health interventions, but a greater number of studies and more rigorous research and evaluations are needed to determine efficacy and establish evidence for best practices. PMID:25803705

  3. Functional Mobility Performance and Balance Confidence in Older Adults after Sensorimotor Adaptation Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Weaver, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates a main contributor of injury in older adults is from falling. The decline in sensory systems limits information needed to successfully maneuver through the environment. The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged exposure to the realignment of perceptual-motor systems increases adaptability of balance, and if balance confidence improves after training. A total of 16 older adults between ages 65-85 were randomized to a control group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a static visual scene) and an experimental group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a rotating visual scene). Prior to visual exposure, participants completed six trials of walking through a soft foamed obstacle course. Participants came in twice a week for 4 weeks to complete training of walking on a treadmill and viewing the visual scene for 20 minutes each session. Participants completed the obstacle course after training and four weeks later. Average time, penalty, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale scores were computed for both groups across testing times. The older adults who trained, significantly improved their time through the obstacle course F (2, 28) = 9.41, p < 0.05, as well as reduced their penalty scores F (2, 28) = 21.03, p < 0.05, compared to those who did not train. There was no difference in balance confidence scores between groups across testing times F (2, 28) = 0.503, p > 0.05. Although the training group improved mobility through the obstacle course, there were no differences between the groups in balance confidence.

  4. Community environment, cognitive impairment and dementia in later life: results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Prina, A. Matthew; Jones, Andrew P.; Barnes, Linda E.; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Background: few studies have investigated the impact of the community environment, as distinct from area deprivation, on cognition in later life. This study explores cross-sectional associations between cognitive impairment and dementia and environmental features at the community level in older people. Method: the postcodes of the 2,424 participants in the year-10 interview of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study in England were mapped into small area level geographical units (Lower-layer Super Output Areas) and linked to environmental data in government statistics. Multilevel logistic regression was conducted to investigate associations between cognitive impairment (defined as MMSE ≤ 25), dementia (organicity level ≥3 in GMS-AGECAT) and community level measurements including area deprivation, natural environment, land use mix and crime. Sensitivity analyses tested the impact of people moving residence within the last two years. Results: higher levels of area deprivation and crime were not significantly associated with cognitive impairment and dementia after accounting for individual level factors. Living in areas with high land use mix was significantly associated with a nearly 60% reduced odds of dementia (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 0.8) after adjusting for individual level factors and area deprivation, but there was no linear trend for cognitive impairment. Increased odds of dementia (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2, 4.2) and cognitive impairment (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.0) were found in the highest quartile of natural environment availability. Findings were robust to exclusion of the recently relocated. Conclusion: features of land use have complex associations with cognitive impairment and dementia. Further investigations should focus on environmental influences on cognition to inform health and social policies. PMID:26464419

  5. Lateral asymmetry as a function of motor practice type of complex upper- and lower-limb movement in young children.

    PubMed

    Marinsek, Miha

    2016-05-01

    The influence of different motor practice types on lateral asymmetry of performance was investigated in 40 preschool children. Lateral preference was measured prior the experiment. For the purpose of present study dribbling a ball with a hand and foot was used to assess lateral asymmetry of performance before and after three different motor practice types. Motor practice with the non-dominant, dominant, and both (contralateral) limbs took place in the indoor facility 4 times/week for 6 weeks. Each session lasted 30-40 min. Our results showed that unilateral practice of dribbling is more beneficial for diminishing lateral asymmetry of performance in comparison to bilateral practice. Moreover, participants who practiced with their dominant limb diminished lateral asymmetry of performance the most and made the largest overall improvement. We did not find important differences between acquisitions of dribbling with upper- and lower-extremity. In this sense, the results support the notion of lateral asymmetry of performance to be task-specific. PMID:26754104

  6. Design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer with a thick gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Puddu, Silvia; Waker, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer (EMS) including a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) is presented. The THGEM was designed to easily be incorporated in an existing EMS to investigate the ability to detect tritium in air using a micropattern gas detector. The THGEM and a collection plate (anode) were installed and the appropriate circuitry was designed and connected to supply the required voltages to the THGEM-EMS. An alpha source (241Am) was used to generate electron-ion pairs within the gas-filled sensitive volume of the EMS. The electrons were used to investigate the THGEM-EMS response as a function of applied voltage to the THGEM and anode. The relative gas-gain and system resolution of the THGEM-EMS were measured at various applied voltage settings. It was observed a potential difference across the THGEM of +420 V and potential difference across the induction region of +150 V for this EMS setup resulted in the minimum voltage requirements to operate with a stable gain and system resolution. Furthermore, as expected, the gain is strongly affected not only by the potential difference across the THGEM, but also by the applied voltage to the anode and resulting potential difference between the THGEM and anode.

  7. Functional mobility in a divided attention task in older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sheila de Melo; Radanovic, Márcia; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Motor disorders may occur in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly under divided attention conditions. We examined functional mobility in 104 older adults (42 with MCI, 26 with mild AD, and 36 cognitively healthy) using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) under 4 experimental conditions: TUG single task, TUG plus a cognitive task, TUG plus a manual task, and TUG plus a cognitive and a manual task. Statistically significant differences in mean time of execution were found in all four experimental conditions when comparing MCI and controls (p < .001), and when comparing MCI and AD patients (p < .05). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses showed that all four testing conditions could differentiate the three groups (area under the curve > .8, p < .001 for MCI vs. controls; area under the curve > .7, p < .001 for MCI vs. AD). The authors conclude that functional motor deficits occurring in MCI can be assessed by the TUG test, in single or dual task modality. PMID:25610990

  8. Driving Performance during Word Generation--Testing the Function of Human Brain Lateralization Using fTCD in an Ecologically Relevant Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lust, J. M.; Geuze, R. H.; Groothuis, A. G. G.; van der Zwan, J. E.; Brouwer, W. H.; van Wolffelaar, P. C.; Bouma, A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that cerebral lateralization of function enhances cognitive performance. Evidence was found in birds and fish. However, recent research in humans did not support this hypothesis. We aimed to replicate and extend these findings for single- and dual-task performance in an ecologically relevant task. We combined a word…

  9. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  10. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest pr...