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Sample records for lattice improved actions

  1. Improved actions, redundant operators and scaling in lattice SU(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Apoorva; Gupta, Rajan

    1987-01-01

    Schwinger-Dyson equations are used to systematically calculate redundant operators in lattice QCD and their role in perturbatively improved actions is analyzed. The criteria for improved actions in Monte Carlo simulations are discussed and their usefulness also. In particular the renormalized trajectory is estimated for the b = sqrt(3) renormalization group transformation in a four-parameter space and its scaling behavior is studied for future use in spectrum calculations. J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellow.

  2. Calculation of K →π π decay amplitudes with improved Wilson fermion action in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, N.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshié, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present our result for the K →π π decay amplitudes for both the Δ I =1 /2 and 3 /2 processes with the improved Wilson fermion action. Expanding on the earlier works by Bernard et al. and by Donini et al., we show that mixings with four-fermion operators with wrong chirality are absent even for the Wilson fermion action for the parity odd process in both channels due to CPS symmetry. Therefore, after subtraction of an effect from the lower dimensional operator, a calculation of the decay amplitudes is possible without complications from operators with wrong chirality, as for the case with chirally symmetric lattice actions. As a first step to verify the possibility of calculations with the Wilson fermion action, we consider the decay amplitudes at an unphysical quark mass mK˜2 mπ . Our calculations are carried out with Nf=2 +1 gauge configurations generated with the Iwasaki gauge action and nonperturbatively O (a )-improved Wilson fermion action at a =0.091 fm , mπ=280 MeV , and mK=580 MeV on a 323×64 (L a =2.9 fm ) lattice. For the quark loops in the penguin and disconnected contributions in the I =0 channel, the combined hopping parameter expansion and truncated solver method work very well for variance reduction. We obtain, for the first time with a Wilson-type fermion action, that Re A0=60 (36 )×1 0-8 GeV and Im A0=-67 (56 )×1 0-12 GeV for a matching scale q*=1 /a . The dependence on the matching scale q* for these values is weak.

  3. THERMODYNAMICS OF TWO-FLAVOR LATTICE QCD WITH AN IMPROVED WILSON QUARK ACTION AT NON-ZERO TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    MAEZAWA,Y.; AOKI, S.; EJIRI, S.; HATSUDA, T.; ISHII, N.; KANAYA, K.; UKITA, N.

    2006-11-14

    The authors report the current status of the systematic studies of the QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks. They evaluate the critical temperature of two flavor QCD in the chiral limit at zero chemical potential and show the preliminary result. Also they discuss fluctuations at none-zero temperature and density by calculating the quark number and isospin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to chemical potential.

  4. Radiative improvement of the lattice nonrelativistic QCD action using the background field method with applications to quarkonium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammant, T. C.; Hart, A. G.; von Hippel, G. M.; Horgan, R. R.; Monahan, C. J.

    2013-07-01

    We apply the background field (BF) method to nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) on the lattice in order to determine the one-loop radiative corrections to the coefficients of the NRQCD action in a manifestly gauge-covariant manner by matching the NRQCD prediction for particular on-shell processes with those of relativistic continuum QCD. We explain how the BF method is implemented in automated perturbation theory and discuss the technique for matching the relativistic and nonrelativistic theories. We compute the one-loop radiative corrections to the σ·B and Darwin terms for the NRQCD action currently used in simulations, as well as the one-loop coefficients of the spin-dependent O(α2) four-fermion contact terms. The effect of the corrections on the hyperfine splitting of bottomonium is estimated using earlier simulation results [A. Gray et al., Phys. Rev. D 72, 094507 (2005)]; the corrected lattice prediction is found to be in agreement with experiment. Agreement of the hyperfine splitting of bottomonium and the B-meson system is confirmed by recent simulation studies [R. J. Dowdall et al., Phys. Rev. D 85, 054509 (2012); Phys. Rev. D 86, 094510 (2012)]. which include our NRQCD radiative corrections for the first time.

  5. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  6. Nonperturbative renormalization of the axial current in Nf=3 lattice QCD with Wilson fermions and a tree-level improved gauge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulava, John; Della Morte, Michele; Heitger, Jochen; Wittemeier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We nonperturbatively determine the renormalization factor of the axial vector current in lattice QCD with Nf=3 flavors of Wilson-clover fermions and the tree-level Symanzik-improved gauge action. The (by now standard) renormalization condition is derived from the massive axial Ward identity, and it is imposed among Schrödinger functional states with large overlap on the lowest lying hadronic state in the pseudoscalar channel, in order to reduce kinematically enhanced cutoff effects. We explore a range of couplings relevant for simulations at lattice spacings of ≈0.09 fm and below. An interpolation formula for ZA(g02) , smoothly connecting the nonperturbative values to the 1-loop expression, is provided together with our final results.

  7. Perfect Actions and Operators for Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    1996-05-01

    Wilson's renormalization group implies that lattice actions located on a renormalized trajectory emanating from a fixed point represent perfect discretizations of continuum physics. With a perfect action the spectrum of a lattice theory is identical with the one of the continuum theory even at finite lattice spacing. Similarly, perfect operators yield cut-off independent matrix elements. Hence, continuum QCD can in principle be reconstructed from a lattice with finite spacing. In practice it is difficult to construct perfect actions and perfect operators explicitly. Here perturbation theory is used to derive perfect actions for quarks and gluons by performing a block renormalization group transformation directly from the continuum. The renormalized trajectory for free massive quarks is identified and a parameter in the renormalization group transformation is tuned such that for 1-d configurations the perfect action reduces to the nearest neighbor Wilson fermion action. Then the 4-d perfect action turns out to be extremely local as well, which is vital for numerical simulations. The fixed point action for free gluons is also obtained by blocking from the continuum. For 2-d configurations it reduces to the standard plaquette action, and for 4-d configurations it is still very local. With interactions between quarks and gluons switched on the perfect quark-gluon and 3-gluon vertex functions are computed analytically. In particular, a perfect clover term can be extracted from the quark-gluon vertex. The perturbatively perfect action is directly applicable to heavy quark physics. The construction of a perfect QCD action for light quarks should include nonperturbative effects, which is possible using numerical methods. Classically perfect quark and gluon fields are constructed as well. They allow to interpolate the continuum fields from the lattice data. In this way one can obtain information about space-time regions between lattice points. The classically perfect fields

  8. Perturbative renormalization factors and O(a2) corrections for lattice four-fermion operators with improved fermion/gluon actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Martha; Dimopoulos, Petros; Frezzotti, Roberto; Lubicz, Vittorio; Panagopoulos, Haralambos; Skouroupathis, Apostolos; Fotos Stylianou

    2011-04-01

    In this work we calculate the corrections to the amputated Green’s functions of four-fermion operators, in 1-loop lattice perturbation theory. One of the novel aspects of our calculations is that they are carried out to second order in the lattice spacing, O(a2). We employ the Wilson/clover action for massless fermions (also applicable for the twisted mass action in the chiral limit) and a family of Symanzik improved actions for gluons. Our calculations have been carried out in a general covariant gauge. Results have been obtained for several popular choices of values for the Symanzik coefficients (Plaquette, Tree-level Symanzik, Iwasaki, TILW and DBW2 action). While our Green’s function calculations regard any pointlike four-fermion operators which do not mix with lower dimension ones, we pay particular attention to ΔF=2 operators, both parity conserving and parity violating (F stands for flavor: S, C, B). By appropriately projecting those bare Green’s functions we compute the perturbative renormalization constants for a complete basis of four-fermion operators and we study their mixing pattern. For some of the actions considered here, even O(a0) results did not exist in the literature to date. The correction terms which we calculate (along with our previous O(a2) calculation of ZΨ [M. Constantinou, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 10 (2009) 064.10.1088/1126-6708/2009/10/064][M. Constantinou, P. Dimopoulos, R. Frezzotti, G. Herdoiza, K. Jansen, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, G. C. Rossi, S. Simula, F. Stylianou, and A. Vladikas, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 08 (2010) 068.10.1007/JHEP08(2010)068][C. Alexandrou, M. Constantinou, T. Korzec, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou (unpublished).]) are essential ingredients for minimizing the lattice artifacts which are present in nonperturbative evaluations of renormalization constants with the RI'-MOM method. Our perturbative results, for the matrix elements of

  9. Perturbative renormalization factors and O(a{sup 2}) corrections for lattice four-fermion operators with improved fermion/gluon actions

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, Martha; Panagopoulos, Haralambos; Skouroupathis, Apostolos; Stylianou, Fotos; Dimopoulos, Petros; Frezzotti, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    In this work we calculate the corrections to the amputated Green's functions of four-fermion operators, in 1-loop lattice perturbation theory. One of the novel aspects of our calculations is that they are carried out to second order in the lattice spacing, O(a{sup 2}). We employ the Wilson/clover action for massless fermions (also applicable for the twisted mass action in the chiral limit) and a family of Symanzik improved actions for gluons. Our calculations have been carried out in a general covariant gauge. Results have been obtained for several popular choices of values for the Symanzik coefficients (Plaquette, Tree-level Symanzik, Iwasaki, TILW and DBW2 action). While our Green's function calculations regard any pointlike four-fermion operators which do not mix with lower dimension ones, we pay particular attention to {Delta}F=2 operators, both parity conserving and parity violating (F stands for flavor: S, C, B). By appropriately projecting those bare Green's functions we compute the perturbative renormalization constants for a complete basis of four-fermion operators and we study their mixing pattern. For some of the actions considered here, even O(a{sup 0}) results did not exist in the literature to date. The correction terms which we calculate (along with our previous O(a{sup 2}) calculation of Z{sub {Psi}}[M. Constantinou, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2009) 064.][M. Constantinou, P. Dimopoulos, R. Frezzotti, G. Herdoiza, K. Jansen, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, G. C. Rossi, S. Simula, F. Stylianou, and A. Vladikas, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2010) 068.][C. Alexandrou, M. Constantinou, T. Korzec, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou (unpublished).]) are essential ingredients for minimizing the lattice artifacts which are present in nonperturbative evaluations of renormalization constants with the RI{sup '}-MOM method. Our perturbative results, for the matrix elements of {Delta}F=2 operators and for the corresponding

  10. New lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Oktay, Mehmet B.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2008-03-01

    We extend the Fermilab method for heavy quarks to include interactions of dimension six and seven in the action. There are, in general, many new interactions, but we carry out the calculations needed to match the lattice action to continuum QCD at the tree level, finding six non-zero couplings. Using the heavy-quark theory of cutoff effects, we estimate how large the remaining discretization errors are. We find that our tree-level matching, augmented with one-loop matching of the dimension-five interactions, can bring these errors below 1%, at currently available lattice spacings.

  11. Lattice gauge action suppressing near-zero modes of HW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Shoji; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Kaneko, Takashi; Matsufuru, Hideo; Onogi, Tetsuya; Yamada, Norikazu

    2006-11-01

    We propose a lattice action including unphysical Wilson fermions with a negative mass m0 of the order of the inverse lattice spacing. With this action, the exact zero mode of the Hermitian Wilson-Dirac operator HW(m0) cannot appear and near-zero modes are strongly suppressed. By measuring the spectral density ρ(λW), we find a gap near λW=0 on the configurations generated with the standard and improved gauge actions. This gap provides a necessary condition for the proof of the exponential locality of the overlap-Dirac operator by Hernandez, Jansen, and Lüscher. Since the number of near-zero modes is small, the numerical cost to calculate the matrix sign function of HW(m0) is significantly reduced, and the simulation including dynamical overlap fermions becomes feasible. We also introduce a pair of twisted mass pseudofermions to cancel the unwanted higher mode effects of the Wilson fermions. The gauge coupling renormalization due to the additional fields is then minimized. The topological charge measured through the index of the overlap-Dirac operator is conserved during continuous evolutions of gauge field variables.

  12. Chiral perturbation theory for the Wilson lattice action

    SciTech Connect

    Rupak, Gautam; Shoresh, Noam

    2002-01-25

    The authors extend chiral perturbation theory to include linear dependence on the lattice spacing a for the Wilson action. The perturbation theory is written as a double expansion in the small quark mass m{sub q} and lattice spacing a. They present formulae for the mass and decay constant of a flavor-non-singlet meson in this scheme to order a and m{sub q}{sup 2}. The extension to the partially quenched theory is also described.

  13. Topological susceptibility with the improved Asqtad action

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bernard et al.

    2004-01-06

    As a test of the chiral properties of the improved Asqtad (staggered fermion) action, we have been measuring the topological susceptibility as a function of quark masses for 2 + 1 dynamical flavors. We report preliminary results, which show reasonable agreement with leading order chiral perturbation theory for lattice spacing less than 0.1 fm. The total topological charge, however, shows strong persistence over Monte Carlo time.

  14. Scaling tests of the improved Kogut-Susskind quark action

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Orginos, Kostas; Sugar, Bob; Toussaint, Doug

    2000-06-01

    Improved lattice actions for Kogut-Susskind quarks have been shown to improve rotational symmetry and flavor symmetry. In this work we find improved scaling behavior of the {rho} and nucleon masses expressed in units of a length scale obtained from the static quark potential, and better behavior of the Dirac operator in instanton backgrounds. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Definitions of the gauge-theory coupling in lattice and continuum quantum chromodynamics: Implications of change in the lattice action

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.B.; Rebbi, C.; Salomonson, P.; Skagerstam, B.

    1982-10-15

    We investigate various effects of a change in action for lattice QCD. The lattice scale parameter ..lambda../sub L/ depends on the action used and ..lambda../sub L//..lambda../sub MOM/ is computed by the background-field method in the continuum limit for Manton's and the generalized Villain's (the heat-kernel) action. When comparing with results from Monte Carlo simulations we find evidence for sizable three-loop corrections to the lattice ..beta.. function. Creutz's renormalization-group analysis is extended to Manton's and the heat-kernel action. The method produces good results with the actions we study. The static quark-antiquark potential we obtain, which is close in form to a phenomenological charmonium potential, exhibits an independence of the lattice action used. Finally, we present a discussion of the effects of changing the form of the action, relating these to a line of critical points that the theory may possess.

  16. Fermion actions extracted from lattice super Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Tatsuhiro

    2013-12-01

    We revisit 2D = (2, 2) super Yang-Mills lattice formulation (Sugino model) to investigate its fermion action with two (Majorana) fermion flavors and exact chiral-U(1) R symmetry. We show that the reconcilement of chiral symmetry and absence of further species-doubling originates in the 4D clifford algebra structure of the action, where 2D two flavors are spuriously treated as a single 4D four-spinor with four 4D gamma matrices introduced into kinetic and Wilson terms. This fermion construction based on the higher-dimensional clifford algebra is extended to four dimensions in two manners: (1) pseudo-8D sixteen-spinor treatment of 4D four flavors with eight 8D gamma matrices, (2) pseudo-6D eight-spinor treatment of 4D two flavors with five out of six 6D gamma matrices. We obtain 4D four-species and two-species lattice fermions with unbroken subgroup of chiral symmetry and other essential properties. We discuss their relations to staggered and Wilson twisted-mass fermions. We also discuss their potential feedback to 4D super Yang-Mills lattice formulations.

  17. Excited nucleon spectrum using non-perturbative improved clover action

    SciTech Connect

    D. G. Richards; M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; D. Pleiter; P. E. L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; C. M. Maynard

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the extraction of negative-parity baryon masses from lattice QCD calculations. The mass of the lowest-lying negative-parity J = 1/2- state is computed in quenched lattice QCD using an O(a)-improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found with the nucleon mass. The calculation is performed on two lattice volumes, and three lattice spacings enabling a study of both finite-volume and finite-lattice-spacing uncertainties. A measurement of the first excited radial excitation of the nucleon finds a mass comparable, or even somewhat larger than that of the negative-parity ground state, in accord with other lattice determinations but in disagreement with experiment. Results are also presented for the lightest negative-parity I=3/2 state.

  18. Improved semileptonic form factor calculations in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Richard; Bali, Gunnar; Collins, Sara

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the computational efficiency of two stochastic based alternatives to the sequential propagator method used in lattice QCD calculations of heavy-light semileptonic form factors. In the first method, we replace the sequential propagator, which couples the calculation of two of the three propagators required for the calculation, with a stochastic propagator so that the calculations of all three propagators are independent. This method is more flexible than the sequential propagator method but introduces stochastic noise. We study the noise to determine when this method becomes competitive with the sequential propagator method, and find that for any practical calculation it is competitive with or superior to the sequential propagator method. We also examine a second stochastic method, the so-called 'one-end trick', concluding it is relatively inefficient in this context. The investigation is carried out on two gauge field ensembles, using the nonperturbatively improved Wilson-Sheikholeslami-Wohlert action with N{sub f}=2 mass-degenerate sea quarks. The two ensembles have similar lattice spacings but different sea-quark masses. We use the first stochastic method to extract O(a)-improved, matched lattice results for the semileptonic form factors on the ensemble with lighter sea quarks, extracting f{sub +}(0).

  19. SU(2) low-energy constants from mixed-action lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, S. R.; Detmold, W.; Junnarkar, P. M.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-11-01

    An analysis of the pion mass and pion decay constant is performed using mixed-action lattice QCD calculations with domain-wall valence quarks on ensembles of rooted, staggered nf=2+1 configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration. Calculations were performed at two lattice spacings of b≈0.125fm and b≈0.09fm, at two strange quark masses, multiple light quark masses, and a number of lattice volumes. The ratios of light quark to strange quark masses are in the range 0.1≤ml/ms≤0.6, while pion masses are in the range 235≲mπ≲680MeV. A two-flavor chiral perturbation theory analysis of the lattice QCD calculations constrains the Gasser-Leutwyler coefficients l¯3 and l¯4 to be l¯3=4.04(40)((73)/(55)) and l¯4=4.30(51)((84)/(60)). All systematic effects in the calculations are explored, including those from the finite lattice space-time volume, the finite lattice spacing, and the finite fifth dimension in the domain-wall quark action. A consistency is demonstrated between a chiral perturbation theory analysis at fixed lattice spacing combined with a leading order continuum extrapolation, and the mixed-action chiral perturbation theory analysis which explicitly includes the leading order discretization effects. Chiral corrections to the pion decay constant are found to give fπ/f=1.062(26)((42)/(40)) where f is the decay constant in the chiral limit, and when combined with the experimental determination of fπ results in a value of f=122.8(3.0)((4.6)/(4.8))MeV. The most recent scale setting by the MILC Collaboration yields a postdiction of fπ=128.2(3.6)((4.4)/(6.0))((1.2)/(3.3))MeV at the physical pion mass. A detailed error analysis indicates that precise calculations at lighter pion masses is the single most important systematic to address to improve upon the present work.

  20. Improving Learning and Teaching through Action Learning and Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skeriit, Ortrun

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical framework for action learning and action research is presented, as a basis for better understanding college instruction and learning. Action research is viewed as a philosophy, theory of learning, research methodology, and teaching technique. It is argued that action research both increases knowledge and improves teaching.…

  1. The Neutral kaon mixing parameter B(K) from unquenched mixed-action lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin, Jack Laiho, Ruth S. Van de Water

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutral kaon mixing parameter B{sub K} in unquenched lattice QCD using asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks. We use the '2+1' flavor gauge configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration, and simulate with multiple valence and sea quark masses at two lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.12 fm and a {approx} 0.09 fm. We match the lattice determination of B{sub K} to the continuum value using the nonperturbative method of Rome-Southampton, and extrapolate B{sub K} to the continuum and physical quark masses using mixed action chiral perturbation theory. The 'mixed-action' method enables us to control all sources of systematic uncertainty and therefore to precisely determine B{sub K}; we find a value of B{sub K}{sup {ovr MS},NDR} (2 GeV) = 0.527(6)(21), where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  2. Neutral Kaon Mixing Parameter BK from Unquenched Mixed-action Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Water, R.; Aubin, C; Laiho, J

    2010-01-21

    We calculate the neutral kaon mixing parameter B{sub K} in unquenched lattice QCD using asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks. We use the '2+1' flavor gauge configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration, and simulate with multiple valence and sea-quark masses at two lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.12 fm and a {approx} 0.09 fm. We match the lattice determination of B{sub K} to the continuum value using the nonperturbative method of Rome-Southampton, and extrapolate B{sub K} to the continuum and physical quark masses using mixed-action chiral perturbation theory. The 'mixed-action' method enables us to control all sources of systematic uncertainty and therefore to precisely determine B{sub K}; we find a value of B{sub K}{sup MS{sup -},NDR} (2 GeV) = 0.527(6)(21), where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  3. Precise Determination of the I = 2 Scattering Length from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2008-01-01

    The I=2 pipi scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations (with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks) at four light-quark masses. Two- and three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order is used to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. At the physical charged pion mass, we find m_pi a_pipi(I=2) = -0.04330 +- 0.00042, where the error bar combines the statistical and systematic uncertainties in quadrature.

  4. Improvement of Wilson fermions and twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2005-11-01

    In order for Wilson fermions to be a competitive option to use in lattice QCD (LQCD) simulations, the large inherent discretization errors starting at O(a) (a being the lattice spacing) have to be removed. This can be accomplished through the Symanizk improvement program, where improvement terms have to be added to both the action and the operators of interest with coefficients appropriately chosen so that the rate of convergence to the continuum limit is quadratic in a. For this to be applicable to numerical simulations, improvement coefficients have to be determined non-perturbatively. A program for doing so has been pioneered by the Alpha collaboration. In this work, an extension of that program is made to improve all bilinear operators in QCD with two, three, and four flavours of non-degenerate quarks. With even numbers of quark flavours, an alternative approach is afforded by twisted mass LQCD (tmLQCD), where O(a) improvement in physical quantities can be achieved automatically at maximal twist. In this work, the features and utilities of tmLQCD are studied in detail in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (chiPT). By matching onto an effective chiral theory, the phase structure of tmLQCD and the properties of the mesons (pions) in the theory has been investigated. Pionic quantities easy to calculate in numerical simulations and useful for probing the symmetry breaking effects of tmLQCD have been calculated, and conditions under which automatic O(a) improvement holds at maximal twist has been carefully studied. The resulting twisted mass chiPT has also been extended to study the baryons in this work, which has not been done before. This allows one to probe tmLQCD with more quantities, and in particular, quantities that do not involve quark-disconnected diagrams and so are much easier to calculate in numerical simulations. A major part of this dissertation has already appeared in published form. Chapters 3 through 5 are based on Refs. [1--5].

  5. Discretization effects and the scalar meson correlator in mixed-action lattice simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2008-06-01

    We study discretization effects in a mixed-action lattice theory with domain-wall valence quarks and Asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. At the level of the chiral effective Lagrangian, discretization effects in the mixed-action theory give rise to two new parameters as compared to the lowest order Lagrangian for rooted-staggered fermions - the residual quark mass m{sub res} and the mixed valence-sea meson mass splitting {delta}{sub mix}. We find that m{sub res}, which parametrizes explicit chiral symmetry breaking in the mixed-action theory, is approximately one-quarter the size of our lightest valence quark mass on our coarser lattice spacing and of comparable size to that of simulations by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. We also find that the size of {delta}{sub mix} is comparable to the size of the smallest of the staggered meson taste splittings measured by the MILC Collaboration. Because lattice artifacts are different in the valence and sea sectors of the mixed-action theory, they give rise to unitarity-violating effects that disappear in the continuum limit, some of which should be described by mixed-action chiral perturbation theory (MA{chi}PT). Such effects are expected to be mild for many quantities of interest but are expected to be significant in the case of the isovector scalar (a{sub 0}) correlator. Specifically, once the parameters m{sub res}, {delta}{sub mix}, and two others that can be determined from the light pseudoscalar meson spectrum are known, the two-particle intermediate state 'bubble' contribution to the scalar correlator is completely predicted within MA{chi}PT. We find that the behavior of the scalar meson correlator is quantitatively consistent with the MA{chi}PT prediction; this supports the claim that MA{chi}PT describes the dominant unitarity-violating effects in the mixed-action theory and can therefore be used to remove lattice artifacts and recover physical quantities.

  6. Lattice Calculation of Baryon Masses using Clover Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Richards; M. Gockeler; P.E.L. Rakow; D. Pleiter; G. Schierholz; R. Horsley; C.M. Maynard

    2002-03-01

    We present a calculation of the lowest-lying baryon masses in the quenched approximation to QCD. The calculations are performed using a non-perturbatively improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon and its parity partner. An analysis of the mass of the first radial excitation of the nucleon finds a value considerably larger than that of the parity partner of the nucleon, and thus little evidence for the Roper resonance as a simple three-quark state.

  7. Simplicial pseudorandom lattice study of a three-dimensional Abelian gauge model, the regular lattice as an extremum of the action

    SciTech Connect

    Pertermann, D.; Ranft, J.

    1986-09-15

    We introduce a simplicial pseudorandom version of lattice gauge theory. In this formulation it is possible to interpolate continuously between a regular simplicial lattice and a pseudorandom lattice. Using this method we study a simple three-dimensional Abelian lattice gauge theory. Calculating average plaquette expectation values, we find an extremum of the action for our regular simplicial lattice. Such a behavior was found in analytical studies in one and two dimensions.

  8. Numerical Tests of the Improved Fermilab Action

    SciTech Connect

    Detar, C.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Oktay, M.B.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the Fermilab heavy-quark action was extended to include dimension-six and -seven operators in order to reduce the discretization errors. In this talk, we present results of the first numerical simulations with this action (the OK action), where we study the masses of the quarkonium and heavy-light systems. We calculate combinations of masses designed to test improvement and compare results obtained with the OK action to their counterparts obtained with the clover action. Our preliminary results show a clear improvement.

  9. Decay Constants of B and D Mesons from Non-pertubatively Improved Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Bowler; L. Del Debbio; J.M. Flynn; G.N, Lacagnina; V.I. Lesk; C.M. Maynard; D.G. Richards

    2000-07-01

    The decay constants of B and D mesons are computed in quenched lattice QCD at two different values of the coupling. The action and operators are ? (a) improved with non-perturbative coefficients where available. The results and systematic errors are discussed in detail. Results for vector decay constants, flavour symmetry breaking ratios of decay constants, the pseudoscalar-vector mass splitting and D meson masses are also presented.

  10. Thermal expansion of noble metals using improved lattice dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2013-06-01

    Isothermal bulk modulus and volume thermal expansion for noble metals have been studied on the basis of improved lattice dynamical model proposed by Pandya et al [Physica B 307, 138-149 (2001)]. The present study shows that for all three noble metals the approach gives satisfactory results, when they are compared with experimental findings. The present study thus confirms the use of improved model to study anharmonic property, and can be extended to study temperature dependent properties in high temperature range.

  11. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Konstantinos Orginos, Aaron Torok, Silas R Beane, Thomas C Luu, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-04-01

    The $\\pi^+\\Sigma^+$, $\\pi^+\\Xi^0$ , $K^+p$, $K^+n$, and $K^0 \\Xi^0$ scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find $a_{\\pi^+\\Sigma^+} = ?0.197 ± 0.017$ fm, and $a_{\\pi^+\\Xi^0} = ?0.098 0.017$ fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  12. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving. PMID:27485132

  13. Negative-Parity Baryon Masses Using O(a)-improved Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; D. Pleiter; P.E.L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; C.M. Maynard; D.G. Richards

    2001-06-01

    We present a calculation of the mass of the lowest-lying negative-parity J=1/2{sup {minus}} state in quenched QCD. Results are obtained using a non-perturbatively {Omicron}(a)-improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon, and its parity partner. The calculation is performed on two lattice volumes, and at three lattice spacings, enabling a study of both finite-volume and finite lattice-spacing uncertainties. A comparison is made with results obtained using the unimproved Wilson fermion action.

  14. Improved and perfect actions in discrete gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bahr, Benjamin; Dittrich, Bianca

    2009-12-15

    We consider the notion of improved and perfect actions within Regge calculus. These actions are constructed in such a way that they - although being defined on a triangulation - reproduce the continuum dynamics exactly, and therefore capture the gauge symmetries of general relativity. We construct the perfect action in three dimensions with a cosmological constant, and in four dimensions for one simplex. We conclude with a discussion about Regge calculus with curved simplices, which arises naturally in this context.

  15. Flavor symmetry breaking in lattice QCD with a mixed action

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2011-03-01

    We study the phase structure of mixed-action QCD with two Wilson sea quarks and any number of chiral valence quarks (and ghosts), starting from the chiral Lagrangian. A priori the effective theory allows for a rich phase structure, including a phase with a condensate made of sea and valence quarks. In such a phase, mass eigenstates would become admixtures of sea and valence fields, and pure-sea correlation functions would depend on the parameters of the valence sector, in contradiction with the actual setup of mixed-action simulations. Using that the spectrum of the chiral Dirac operator has a gap for nonzero quark mass we prove that spontaneous symmetry breaking of the flavor symmetries can only occur within the sea sector. This rules out a mixed condensate and implies restrictions on the low-energy constants of the effective theory.

  16. SU(2) Low-Energy Constants from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane, William Detmold, Parikshit Junnarkar, T.C. Luu, Konstantinos Orginos, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Aaron Torok, Andre Walker-Loud

    2012-11-01

    An analysis of the pion mass and pion decay constant is performed using mixed-action Lattice QCD calculations with domain-wall valence quarks on ensembles of rooted, staggered n_f = 2+1 MILC configurations. Calculations were performed at two lattice spacings of b~0.125 fm and b~0.09 fm, at two strange quark masses, multiple light quark masses, and a number of lattice volumes. The ratios of light quark to strange quark masses are in the range 0.1 <= m_l / m_s <= 0.6, while pion masses are in the range 235 < m_\\pi < 680 MeV. A two-flavor chiral perturbation theory analysis of the Lattice QCD calculations constrains the Gasser-Leutwyler coefficients bar{l}_3 and bar{l}_4 to be bar{l}_3 = 4.04(40)(+73-55) and bar{l}_4 = 4.30(51)(+84-60). All systematic effects in the calculations are explored, including those from the finite lattice space-time volume, the finite lattice spacing, and the finite fifth dimension in the domain-wall quark action. A consistency is demonstrated between a chiral perturbation theory analysis at fixed lattice spacing combined with a leading order continuum extrapolation, and the mixed-action chiral perturbation theory analysis which explicitly includes the leading order discretization effects. Chiral corrections to the pion decay constant are found to give f_\\pi / f = 1.062(26)(+42-40) where f is the decay constant in the chiral limit. The most recent scale setting by the MILC Collaboration yields a postdiction of f_\\pi = 128.2(3.6)(+4.4-6.0)(+1.2-3.3) MeV at the physical pion mass.

  17. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) <=10-16 , dominated by atom number fluctuation noise. We also provide updates on our cryogenic sapphire cavity with a reduced thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  18. Action Research: Improving Graduate-Level Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Nari

    2012-01-01

    I am a doctoral student enrolled in an educational research program. While completing an action research course, I conducted research to improve my academic writing and to develop skills for formulating arguments about educational issues. From this research I developed an appreciation for and an understanding of good writing habits and elements of…

  19. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-30

    The {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}p, K{sup +}n, {bar K}{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}, and {bar K}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0} scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}} = -0.197 {+-} 0.017 fm, and a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}} = -0.098 {+-} 0.017 fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  20. Improving Teaching with Collaborative Action Research: An ASCD Action Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Once you've established a professional learning community (PLC), you need to get this ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) action tool to ensure that your PLC stays focused on addressing teaching methods and student learning problems. This ASCD action tool explains how your PLC can use collaborative action research to…

  1. Charm spectroscopy on dynamical 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion lattices with a relativistic heavy quark action

    SciTech Connect

    Min Li; Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-10-01

    We present a preliminary calculation of the charmonium spectrum using the dynamical 2+1 flavor $24^3\\times 64$ domain wall fermion lattice configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. We use the relativistic heavy quark action with 3 parameters non-perturbatively determined by matching to experimental quantities. Chiral extrapolation is done on four light sea quark masses from 0.005 to 0.03, with $m_s=0.04$ and $m_{res}=0.003$. We can either predict meson masses assuming the lattice spacing is known from other methods, or calculate the lattice spacing using those quantities.

  2. Chiral transition and deconfinement transition in QCD with the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky P.; Bazavov, A.

    2011-10-11

    We report preliminary results on the chiral and deconfinement aspects of the QCD transition at finite temperature using the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action on lattices with temporal extent of N{sub {tau}} = 6 and 8. The chiral aspects of the transition are studied in terms of quark condensates and the disconnected chiral susceptibility. We study the deconfinement transition in terms of the strange quark number susceptibility and the renormalized Polyakov loop. We made continuum estimates for some quantities and find reasonably good agreement between our results and the recent continuum extrapolated results obtained with the stout staggered quark action.

  3. Miura-type transformations for lattice equations and Lie group actions associated with Darboux–Lax representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkeley, George; Igonin, Sergei

    2016-07-01

    Miura-type transformations (MTs) are an essential tool in the theory of integrable nonlinear partial differential and difference equations. We present a geometric method to construct MTs for differential-difference (lattice) equations from Darboux–Lax representations (DLRs) of such equations. The method is applicable to parameter-dependent DLRs satisfying certain conditions. We construct MTs and modified lattice equations from invariants of some Lie group actions on manifolds associated with such DLRs. Using this construction, from a given suitable DLR one can obtain many MTs of different orders. The main idea behind this method is closely related to the results of Drinfeld and Sokolov on MTs for the partial differential KdV equation. Considered examples include the Volterra, Narita–Itoh–Bogoyavlensky, Toda, and Adler–Postnikov lattices. Some of the constructed MTs and modified lattice equations seem to be new.

  4. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  5. The phase structure of lattice QCD with two flavors of Wilson quarks and renormalization group improved gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farchioni, F.; Jansen, K.; Montvay, I.; Scholz, E.; Scorzato, L.; Shindler, A.; Ukita, N.; Urbach, C.; Wetzorke, I.

    2005-07-01

    The effect of changing the lattice action for the gluon field on the recently observed [F. Farchioni, R. Frezzotti, K. Jansen, I. Montvay, G.C. Rossi, E. Scholz, A. Shindler, N. Ukita, C. Urbach, I. Wetzorke, Eur. Phys. J. C 39, 421 (2005); hep-lat/0406039] first order phase transition near zero quark mass is investigated by replacing the Wilson plaquette action by the DBW2 action. The lattice action for quarks is unchanged: it is in both cases the original Wilson action. It turns out that Wilson fermions with the DBW2 gauge action have a phase structure where the minimal pion mass and the jump of the average plaquette are decreased, when compared to Wilson fermions with Wilson plaquette action at similar values of the lattice spacing. Taking the DBW2 gauge action is advantageous also from the point of view of the computational costs of numerical simulations.

  6. Lattice QCD for parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadling, Henley Sean

    Lattice QCD is an important tool in the investigation of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This is particularly true at lower energies where traditional perturbative techniques fail, and where other non-perturbative theoretical efforts are not entirely satisfactory. Important features of QCD such as confinement and the masses of the low lying hadronic states have been demonstrated and calculated in lattice QCD simulations. In calculations such as these, non-lattice techniques in QCD have failed. However, despite the incredible advances in computer technology, a full solution of lattice QCD may still be in the too-distant future. Much effort is being expended in the search for ways to reduce the computational burden so that an adequate solution of lattice QCD is possible in the near future. There has been considerable progress in recent years, especially in the research of improved lattice actions. In this thesis, a new approach to lattice QCD algorithms is introduced, which results in very significant efficiency improvements. The new approach is explained in detail, evaluated and verified by comparing physics results with current lattice QCD simulations. The new sub-lattice layout methodology has been specifically designed for current and future hardware. Together with concurrent research into improved lattice actions and more efficient numerical algorithms, the very significant efficiency improvements demonstrated in this thesis can play an important role in allowing lattice QCD researchers access to much more realistic simulations. The techniques presented in this thesis also allow ambitious QCD simulations to be performed on cheap clusters of commodity computers.

  7. The Gell-Mann - Okubo Mass Relation among Baryons from Fully-Dynamical, Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos; Silas Beane; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We explore the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation among the octet baryons using fully-dynamical, mixed-action (domain-wall on rooted-staggered) lattice QCD calculations at a lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.125 fm and pion masses of m{sub pi} {approx} 290 MeV, 350 MeV, 490 MeV and 590 MeV. Deviations from the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation are found to be small at each quark mass.

  8. 24 Command Fire Improvement Action Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, G.B.

    2000-12-01

    Fluor Hanford (FH) is responsible for providing support to the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) in the implementation of the Hanford Emergency Preparedness (EP) program. During fiscal year 2000, a number of program improvements were identified from various sources including a major range fire (24 Command Fire). Evaluations of the emergency preparedness program have confirmed that it currently meets all requirements and that performance of personnel involved is good, however the desire to effect continuous improvement resulted in the development of this improvement program plan. This program plan defines the activities that will be performed in order to achieve the desired performance improvements.

  9. Actions for productivity improvement in crew training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Improvement of the productivity of astronaut crew instructors in the Space Shuttle program and beyond is proposed. It is suggested that instructor certification plans should be established to shorten the time required for trainers to develop their skills and improve their ability to convey those skills. Members of the training cadre should be thoroughly cross trained in their task. This provides better understanding of the overall task and greater flexibility in instructor utilization. Improved facility access will give instructors the benefit of practical application experience. Former crews should be integrated into the training of upcoming crews to bridge some of the gap between simulated conditions and the real world. The information contained in lengthy and complex training manuals can be presented more clearly and efficiently as computer lessons. The illustration, animation and interactive capabilities of the computer combine an effective means of explanation.

  10. Improving Student Engagement: Ten Proposals for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980s an extensive research literature has investigated how to improve student success in higher education focusing on student outcomes such as retention, completion and employability. A parallel research programme has focused on how students engage with their studies and what they, institutions and educators can do to enhance their…

  11. Action Research: Improving Schools and Empowering Educators. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertler, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Written for pre- and in-service educators, this "Third Edition" of Craig A. Mertler's "Action Research: Improving Schools and Empowering Educators" introduces the process of conducting one's own classroom- or school-based action research in conjunction with everyday instructional practices and activities. The text provides educators with the…

  12. Improving Teacher Education through Action Research. Routledge Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Ming-Fai, Ed.; Grossman, David L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a dearth of studies on teacher educators using action research to improve their own practice. This book is the first systematic study of a group of teachers examining and enhancing their own practice through the inquiry process of action research. This book presents a broad overview of a variety of methodologies that can be used to…

  13. An improved imaginary transition {gamma}{sub t} lattice for the Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    1992-08-01

    An improved imaginary-{gamma}{sub t} lattice for the 150 GeV Fermilab Main Injector is presented. It has the properties of small dispersion function, good tunability, small tune dependences on momentum with the presence of chromaticity sextupoles, and a large dynamical aperture. In addition, many of the quadrupoles can be recycled from the present Main Ring.

  14. A lattice determination of moments of unpolarized nucleon structure functions using improved Wilson fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Schierholz, G.

    2005-06-01

    Within the framework of quenched lattice QCD and using O(a) improved Wilson fermions and nonperturbative renormalization, a high statistics computation of low moments of the unpolarized nucleon structure functions is given. Particular attention is paid to the chiral and continuum extrapolations.

  15. Continuous Improvement in Action: Educators' Evidence Use for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Rubin, Mollie

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the article is the process educators use to interpret data to turn it into usable knowledge (Honig & Coburn, 2008) while engaging in a continuous improvement process. The authors examine the types of evidence educators draw upon, its perceived relevance, and the social context in which the evidence is examined. Evidence includes…

  16. Bottom-Hadron Mass Splittings from Static-Quark Action on 2+1-Flavor Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin, Saul D. Cohen, Nilmani Mathur, Kostas Orginos

    2009-09-01

    We calculate bottom-baryon mass splittings using full QCD with 2+1 flavors of dynamical Kogut-Susskind sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks along with a static heavy quark on a lattice of spatial volume of $(\\sim 2.5\\mbox{ fm})^3$ with lattice spacing of about 0.124~fm over a range of pion masses as low as 291~MeV. We calculate the mass splittings of bottom hadrons with respect to $B_d$ and $\\Lambda_b$. Our results are in agreement with experimental observations and other lattice calculations, within our statistical and systematic errors. In particular, we find the mass of the $\\Omega_b$ to be consistent with the recent CDF measurement. We also predict the mass for the as yet unobserved $\\Xi^\\prime_b$ to be 5955(27)~MeV.

  17. High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (III): three-loop quark currents for Iwasaki gauge action and Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, M.; Di Renzo, F.; Hasegawa, M.

    2014-07-01

    This is the third of a series of papers on three-loop computation of renormalization constants for Lattice QCD. Our main points of interest are results for the regularization defined by the Iwasaki gauge action and Wilson fermions. Our results for quark bilinears renormalized according to the RI'-MOM scheme can be compared to non-perturbative results. The latter are available for twisted mass QCD: being defined in the chiral limit, the renormalization constants must be the same. We also address more general problems. In particular, we discuss a few methodological issues connected to summing the perturbative series such as the effectiveness of boosted perturbation theory and the disentanglement of irrelevant and finite-volume contributions. Discussing these issues we consider not only the new results of this paper, but also those for the regularization defined by the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and Wilson fermions, which we presented in a recent paper of ours. We finally comment on the extent to which the techniques we put at work in the NSPT context can provide a fresher look into the lattice version of the RI'-MOM scheme.

  18. Improved resource use decisions and actions through remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill-Rowley, R.; Boylan, M.; Enslin, W.; Vlasin, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Operational uses of remote sensing for improving management decisions and actions concerning resource uses are considered in terms of first generation, or direct-action; and second generation or indirect, delayed-action applications. From among applications completed during 1974-75, seven case studies are offered in illustration of the many contrasts which can be drawn between first and second generation application studies. These include: (1) multi-agency river basin planning; (2) corridor assessment and route location for highway location together with improvement of county-level planning decisions; (3) improving timber management practices; (4) enforcement of new state statutes; (5) county-wide open space preservation; (6) land value reappraisal relative to property tax equalization; and (7) optimizing agri-business processing plant locations.

  19. Dual-action gas thrust bearing for improving load capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films to improve the load carrying capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of a dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and can improve their efficiency.

  20. The Work Compatibility Improvement Framework: theory and application of improvement action and intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Genaidy, Ash M; Rinder, Magda M; Sequeira, Reynold; A-Rehim, Amal D

    2009-05-01

    Challenges facing management of manufacturing firms can be transformed into asset gains by giving careful consideration to the worker-work environment interface. The benefits of a 'healthy' interface may lead to sizable reductions in rising health care costs and retention of highly qualified workers. This paper presents a novel approach for the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The work tasks of this research consisted of: (a) fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention; (b) design concepts and process of improvement action/intervention generation; (c) assessment model of estimated gains in company's assets; (d) application demonstration in the manufacturing sector. The process of improvement action/intervention generation is described, preceded by a description of the fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention and system architecture. This is followed by a documentation of estimated asset gains as a result of the improvement plan. The results showed that expert workers were, on average, 78% in agreement with the algorithm-identified improvement actions. Their knowledge was used to update the recommended actions as well as to detail the multiple strategies required to address the improvement actions. As a result, an integrated improvement plan was developed resulting in estimated asset gains of $1.6 million, which was validated by the general manager. The research reported herein documented the theory and application of the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The economic assessment of the suggested improvement is also reported and this has proved to be an important driver to secure the firm collaboration of manufacturing enterprise management. An integrated improvement solution plan backed by a detailed economic assessment of suggested improvements is essential to demonstrate the full potential of workplace micro- and macro-ergonomic interventions. PMID

  1. Action for Healthy Kids Suggests that Improvements Are Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Action for Healthy Kids (AFHK), a national non-profit group that addresses childhood obesity, released a special report warning that schools still need improvements to the quality of the foods they serve and the amount of physical activity opportunities they offer American children. The report also outlines a significant obstacle--most school…

  2. Action Research to Improve Collaboration among Student Support Services Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salm, Twyla

    2014-01-01

    This study explores action research as a professional development strategy to improve interprofessional collaboration in a school division team focused on supporting students with a variety of learning and behavioural needs. Occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, a psychologist, and a social worker worked together to learn more…

  3. Improving Instruction in the Mathematics Methods Classroom through Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostofo, Jameel; Zambo, Ron

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuing emphasis in the United States on improving students' mathematical abilities, and one approach is to better prepare teachers. To investigate the potential usefulness of Lesson Study to better prepare teachers, one author set out to conduct action research on his classroom practice. Specifically, he sought to determine whether…

  4. Training of Manual Actions Improves Language Understanding of Semantically Related Action Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Matteo; Gatti, Roberto; Tettamanti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual knowledge accessed by language may involve the reactivation of the associated primary sensory-motor processes. Whether these embodied representations are indeed constitutive to conceptual knowledge is hotly debated, particularly since direct evidence that sensory-motor expertise can improve conceptual processing is scarce. In this study, we sought for this crucial piece of evidence, by training naive healthy subjects to perform complex manual actions and by measuring, before and after training, their performance in a semantic language task. Nineteen participants engaged in 3 weeks of motor training. Each participant was trained in three complex manual actions (e.g., origami). Before and after the training period, each subject underwent a series of manual dexterity tests and a semantic language task. The latter consisted of a sentence-picture semantic congruency judgment task, with 6 target congruent sentence-picture pairs (semantically related to the trained manual actions), 6 non-target congruent pairs (semantically unrelated), and 12 filler incongruent pairs. Manual action training induced a significant improvement in all manual dexterity tests, demonstrating the successful acquisition of sensory-motor expertise. In the semantic language task, the reaction times (RTs) to both target and non-target congruent sentence-picture pairs decreased after action training, indicating a more efficient conceptual-semantic processing. Noteworthy, the RTs for target pairs decreased more than those for non-target pairs, as indicated by the 2 × 2 interaction. These results were confirmed when controlling for the potential bias of increased frequency of use of target lexical items during manual training. The results of the present study suggest that sensory-motor expertise gained by training of specific manual actions can lead to an improvement of cognitive-linguistic skills related to the specific conceptual-semantic domain associated to the trained actions

  5. The Upstream Hospital Leader: Taking Action to Improve Population Health.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ross; Meili, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Canadian hospital leaders face numerous barriers when they seek to work upstream in an effort to improve population health. A noted challenge is lack of role clarity. We introduce the concept of an "upstream hospital leader" in an attempt to address this challenge, and suggest behaviours for how this role can advance population health at the individual, organizational and health system levels. These suggestions aim to contribute to the ongoing conversation and growing interest in the role of hospitals in population health improvement. We invite feedback on these suggestions and encourage leaders to explore opportunities where greater upstream action by their hospital and health system can improve population health. PMID:27009704

  6. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  7. Monogamy of entanglement and improved mean-field ansatz for spin lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloh, Andreas; Schützhold, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    We consider rather general spin-1 /2 lattices with large coordination numbers Z . Based on the monogamy of entanglement and other properties of the concurrence C , we derive rigorous bounds for the entanglement between neighboring spins, such as C ≤1 /√{Z } , which show that C decreases for large Z . In addition, we demonstrate that the concurrence C measures the deviation from mean-field behavior and can only vanish if the mean-field ansatz yields an exact ground state of the Hamiltonian. Motivated by these findings, we propose an improved mean-field ansatz by adding entanglement.

  8. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  9. Analysis of improved Lattice Boltzmann phase field method for soluble surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sman, R. G. M.; Meinders, M. B. J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel Lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids with soluble surfactants adsorbing at the interface with improved numerical and extended physical properties. The numerical improvements are based on the use of an analytical representation of a regularized delta-function in the surface free energy functional for the surfactant. Furthermore, the physics of the system have been extended to differential solubility of the surfactant combined with the use of Frumkin sorption behaviour. This enables the scheme to approach more realistic systems like foams and emulsions. This novel scheme is much superior in numerical stability than our previous scheme, based on a squared gradient approximation. Furthermore, we have observed the phenomenon of interface broadening under certain conditions. This phenomenon limits the surface pressure to about 30% of the capillary pressure of a bare droplet. It remains to be investigated whether this interface broadening reflects some physical effect, as has been observed for proteins.

  10. IMPROVEMENT AND RENORMALIZATION CONSTANTS IN O(a) IMPROVED LATTICE QCD

    SciTech Connect

    T. BHATTACHARYA; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We present results at {beta} = 6.0 and 6.2 for the O(a) improvement and renormalization constants for bilinear operators using axial and vector Ward identities. We discuss the extraction of the mass dependence of the renormalization constants and the coefficients of the equation of motion operators.

  11. An improved lattice Boltzmann scheme for multiphase fluid with multi-range interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maquignon, Nicolas; Duchateau, Julien; Roussel, Gilles; Rousselle, François; Renaud, Christophe

    2014-10-06

    Modeling of fluids with liquid to gas phase transition has become important for understanding many environmental or industrial processes. Such simulations need new techniques, because traditional solvers are often limited. The Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) allows simulate complex fluids, because its mesoscopic nature gives possibility to incorporate additional physics in comparison to usual methods. In this work, an improved lattice Boltzmann model for phase transition flow will be introduced. First, the state of art for Shan and Chen (SC) type of LBM will be reminded. Then, link to real thermodynamics will be established with Maxwell equal areas construction. Convergence to isothermal liquid vapor equilibrium will be shown and discussed. Inclusion of an equation of state for real fluid and better incorporation of force term is presented. Multi-range interactions have been used for SC model, but it hasn't been yet applied to real fluid with non-ideal equation of state. In this work, we evaluate this model when it is applied to real liquid-vapor equilibrium. We show that important differences are found for evaluation of gas density. In order to recover thermodynamic consistency, we use a new scheme for calculation of force term, which is a combination of multi range model and numerical weighting used by Gong and Cheng. We show the superiority of our new model by studying convergence to equilibrium values over a large temperature range. We prove that spurious velocities remaining at equilibrium are decreased.

  12. A relativistic O (a{sup 2}) improved action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    M. B. Oktay et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors extend the Fermilab formalism for heavy quarks to develop an {Omicron}(a{sup 2}) improved relativistic action. They discuss their construction of the action, including the identification of redundant operators and the calculation of the improvement coefficients.

  13. Comprehensive Evaluation and Implementation of Improvement Actions in Butcher Shops.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Gerardo A; Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Adriani, Cristian; Linares, Luciano; Etcheverría, Analía; Sanz, Marcelo; Sucari, Adriana; Peral García, Pilar; Signorini, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne pathogens can cause acute and chronic diseases and produce a wide range of symptoms. Since the consumption of ground beef is a risk factor for infections with some bacterial pathogens, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of butcher shops, implemented improvement actions for both butcher shops and consumers, and verified the impact of those actions implemented. A comprehensive evaluation was made and risk was quantified on a 1-100 scale as high-risk (1-40), moderate-risk (41-70) or low-risk (71-100). A total of 172 raw ground beef and 672 environmental samples were collected from 86 butcher shops during the evaluation (2010-2011) and verification (2013) stages of the study. Ground beef samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic organisms, Escherichia coli and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus enumeration. Salmonella spp., E. coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and Listeria monocytogenes were detected and isolated from all samples. Risk quantification resulted in 43 (50.0%) high-risk, 34 (39.5%) moderate-risk, and nine (10.5%) low-risk butcher shops. Training sessions for 498 handlers and 4,506 consumers were held. Re-evaluation by risk quantification and microbiological analyses resulted in 19 (22.1%) high-risk, 42 (48.8%) moderate-risk and 25 (29.1%) low-risk butcher shops. The count of indicator microorganisms decreased with respect to the 2010-2011 period. After the implementation of improvement actions, the presence of L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and stx genes in ground beef decreased. Salmonella spp. was isolated from 10 (11.6%) ground beef samples, without detecting statistically significant differences between both study periods (evaluation and verification). The percentage of pathogens in environmental samples was reduced in the verification period (Salmonella spp., 1.5%; L. monocytogenes, 10.7%; E. coli O157:H7, 0.6%; non-O157 STEC, 6.8%). Risk quantification was useful to identify those relevant facts

  14. Human Action Recognition Using Improved Salient Dense Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingwu; Cheng, Haisu; Zhou, Yan; Huo, Guanying

    2016-01-01

    Human action recognition in videos is a topic of active research in computer vision. Dense trajectory (DT) features were shown to be efficient for representing videos in state-of-the-art approaches. In this paper, we present a more effective approach of video representation using improved salient dense trajectories: first, detecting the motion salient region and extracting the dense trajectories by tracking interest points in each spatial scale separately and then refining the dense trajectories via the analysis of the motion saliency. Then, we compute several descriptors (i.e., trajectory displacement, HOG, HOF, and MBH) in the spatiotemporal volume aligned with the trajectories. Finally, in order to represent the videos better, we optimize the framework of bag-of-words according to the motion salient intensity distribution and the idea of sparse coefficient reconstruction. Our architecture is trained and evaluated on the four standard video actions datasets of KTH, UCF sports, HMDB51, and UCF50, and the experimental results show that our approach performs competitively comparing with the state-of-the-art results. PMID:27293425

  15. An improved scheme based on log-likelihood-ratio for lattice reduction-aided MIMO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunchao; Liu, Chen; Lu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lattice reduction (LR)-aided detectors have been shown great potentials in wireless communications for their low complexity and low bit-error-rate (BER) performance. The LR algorithms use the unimodular transformation to improve the orthogonality of the channel matrix. However, the LR algorithms only utilize the channel state information (CSI) and do not take account for the received signal, which is also important information in enhancing the performance of the detectors. In this paper, we make a readjustment of the received signal in the LR domain and propose a new scheme which is based on the log-likelihood-ratio (LLR) criterion to improve the LR-aided detectors. The motivation of using the LLR criterion is that it utilizes both the received signal and the CSI, so that it can provide exact pairwise error probabilities (PEPs) of the symbols. Then, in the proposed scheme, we design the LLR-based transformation algorithm (TA) which uses the unimodular transformation to minimize the PEPs of the symbols by the LLR criterion. Note that the PEPs of the symbols affect the error propagation in the vertical Bell Laboratories Layered Space-Time (VBLAST) detector, and decreasing the PEPs can reduce the error propagation in the VBLAST detectors; thus, our LLR-based TA-aided VBLAST detectors will exhibit better BER performance than the previous LR-aided VBLAST detectors. Both the BER performance and the computational complexity are demonstrated through the simulation results.

  16. Action Research to Improve the Learning Space for Diagnostic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Ellen; Owens, Leigh

    2015-12-01

    The module described and evaluated here was created in response to perceived learning difficulties in diagnostic test design and interpretation for students in third-year Clinical Microbiology. Previously, the activities in lectures and laboratory classes in the module fell into the lower cognitive operations of "knowledge" and "understanding." The new approach was to exchange part of the traditional activities with elements of interactive learning, where students had the opportunity to engage in deep learning using a variety of learning styles. The effectiveness of the new curriculum was assessed by means of on-course student assessment throughout the module, a final exam, an anonymous questionnaire on student evaluation of the different activities and a focus group of volunteers. Although the new curriculum enabled a major part of the student cohort to achieve higher pass grades (p < 0.001), it did not meet the requirements of the weaker students, and the proportion of the students failing the module remained at 34%. The action research applied here provided a number of valuable suggestions from students on how to improve future curricula from their perspective. Most importantly, an interactive online program that facilitated flexibility in the learning space for the different reagents and their interaction in diagnostic tests was proposed. The methods applied to improve and assess a curriculum refresh by involving students as partners in the process, as well as the outcomes, are discussed. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. PMID:26753024

  17. Action Research to Improve the Learning Space for Diagnostic Techniques†

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, Ellen; Owens, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    The module described and evaluated here was created in response to perceived learning difficulties in diagnostic test design and interpretation for students in third-year Clinical Microbiology. Previously, the activities in lectures and laboratory classes in the module fell into the lower cognitive operations of “knowledge” and “understanding.” The new approach was to exchange part of the traditional activities with elements of interactive learning, where students had the opportunity to engage in deep learning using a variety of learning styles. The effectiveness of the new curriculum was assessed by means of on-course student assessment throughout the module, a final exam, an anonymous questionnaire on student evaluation of the different activities and a focus group of volunteers. Although the new curriculum enabled a major part of the student cohort to achieve higher pass grades (p < 0.001), it did not meet the requirements of the weaker students, and the proportion of the students failing the module remained at 34%. The action research applied here provided a number of valuable suggestions from students on how to improve future curricula from their perspective. Most importantly, an interactive online program that facilitated flexibility in the learning space for the different reagents and their interaction in diagnostic tests was proposed. The methods applied to improve and assess a curriculum refresh by involving students as partners in the process, as well as the outcomes, are discussed. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:26753024

  18. Novel Fat-Link Fermion Actions

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Zanotti; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. B. Zhang; W. Melnitchouk; F. X. Lee

    2001-07-01

    The hadron mass spectrum is calculated in lattice QCD using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators in the fermion action are constructed using smeared links. The simulations are performed on a 16{sup 3} x 32 lattice with a lattice spacing of a=0.125 fm. We compare actions with n=4 and 12 smearing sweeps with a smearing fraction of 0.7. The n=4 Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) action provides scaling which is superior to mean-field improvement, and offers advantages over nonperturbative 0(a) improvement.

  19. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Kostas; Richards, David

    2015-02-05

    The solution of QCD on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this study, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  20. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David G.

    2015-03-01

    The solution of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this paper, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  1. Improving the Response of a Wheel Speed Sensor by Using a RLS Lattice Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2006-01-01

    Among the complete family of sensors for automotive safety, consumer and industrial application, speed sensors stand out as one of the most important. Actually, speed sensors have the diversity to be used in a broad range of applications. In today's automotive industry, such sensors are used in the antilock braking system, the traction control system and the electronic stability program. Also, typical applications are cam and crank shaft position/speed and wheel and turbo shaft speed measurement. In addition, they are used to control a variety of functions, including fuel injection, ignition timing in engines, and so on. However, some types of speed sensors cannot respond to very low speeds for different reasons. What is more, the main reason why such sensors are not good at detecting very low speeds is that they are more susceptible to noise when the speed of the target is low. In short, they suffer from noise and generally only work at medium to high speeds. This is one of the drawbacks of the inductive (magnetic reluctance) speed sensors and is the case under study. Furthermore, there are other speed sensors like the differential Hall Effect sensors that are relatively immune to interference and noise, but they cannot detect static fields. This limits their operations to speeds which give a switching frequency greater than a minimum operating frequency. In short, this research is focused on improving the performance of a variable reluctance speed sensor placed in a car under performance tests by using a recursive least-squares (RLS) lattice algorithm. Such an algorithm is situated in an adaptive noise canceller and carries out an optimal estimation of the relevant signal coming from the sensor, which is buried in a broad-band noise background where we have little knowledge of the noise characteristics. The experimental results are satisfactory and show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output.

  2. Running Newton constant, improved gravitational actions, and galaxy rotation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Weyer, H.

    2004-12-01

    A renormalization group (RG) improvement of the Einstein-Hilbert action is performed which promotes Newton’s constant and the cosmological constant to scalar functions on spacetime. They arise from solutions of an exact RG equation by means of a “cutoff identification” which associates RG scales to the points of spacetime. The resulting modified Einstein equations for spherically symmetric, static spacetimes are derived and analyzed in detail. The modifications of the Newtonian limit due to the RG evolution are obtained for the general case. As an application, the viability of a scenario is investigated where strong quantum effects in the infrared cause Newton’s constant to grow at large (astrophysical) distances. For two specific RG trajectories exact vacuum spacetimes modifying the Schwarzschild metric are obtained by means of a solution-generating Weyl transformation. Their possible relevance to the problem of the observed approximately flat galaxy rotation curves is discussed. It is found that a power law running of Newton’s constant with a small exponent of the order 10-6 would account for their non-Keplerian behavior without having to postulate the presence of any dark matter in the galactic halo.

  3. Critical Literacy for School Improvement: An Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Karyn; White, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the integrative process of initiating an action research project on literacy for students "at risk" in a Canadian urban elementary school. As the article demonstrates, this requires development of a school-wide framework, which informs the action research project and desired outcomes, and a shared ownership of…

  4. Improving Educational Aspirations and Outcomes through Community Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how a community action research approach supported the implementation of an educational support programme for children, parents and local educators. The aim was the creation of a learning community that acknowledged, valued and used the expertise and experience of all involved. The action reflection cycle informed the…

  5. Lattice QCD and High Baryon Density State

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Keitaro; Nakamura, Atsushi; Motoki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Takuya

    2011-10-21

    We report our recent studies on the finite density QCD obtained from lattice QCD simulation with clover-improved Wilson fermions of two flavor and RG-improved gauge action. We approach the subject from two paths, i.e., the imaginary and chemical potentials.

  6. B-meson decay constants from improved lattice nonrelativistic QCD with physical u, d, s, and c quarks.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, R J; Davies, C T H; Horgan, R R; Monahan, C J; Shigemitsu, J

    2013-05-31

    We present the first lattice QCD calculation of the decay constants f(B) and f(B(s)) with physical light quark masses. We use configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration including the effect of u, d, s, and c highly improved staggered quarks in the sea at three lattice spacings and with three u/d quark mass values going down to the physical value. We use improved nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) for the valence b quarks. Our results are f(B)=0.186(4) GeV, f(B(s))=0.224(4) GeV, f(B(s))/f(B)=1.205(7), and M(B(s))-M(B)=85(2) MeV, superseding earlier results with NRQCD b quarks. We discuss the implications of our results for the standard model rates for B((s))→μ(+)μ(-) and B→τν. PMID:23767714

  7. Action Research: An Educational Leader's Guide to School Improvement. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Jeffrey

    This book, in its second edition, is intended as a practical guide to conducting action research in schools--it outlines the process of designing and reporting an action research project. Contending that action research can be used as a powerful tool that can contribute to school renewal and instructional improvement, the book defines and presents…

  8. Flexible and Inexpensive: Improving Learning Transfer and Program Evaluation through Participant Action Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Chris A.; Goldman, Ellen F.; Hook, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Action plans have been shown to improve transfer of learning and have proven an effective tool in training evaluation. This study describes how action planning was simply and successfully adapted to a preexisting curriculum with few additional resources. The decision to use participant action planning, the administration of it, and the…

  9. Using Action Research to Engage Youth in Improving OST Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Youth are often portrayed as apathetic, uninvolved, and reluctant to participate in their communities (Baizerman, Hildreth, & Roholt, 2013). Ironically, however, communities offer few opportunities for youth to address issues that are compelling to their interests and that engage their commitment and action (Bradford & Cullen, 2012;…

  10. Improving Adolescent Learning: An Action Agenda. A TASC Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    At a recent national forum at the Ford Foundation in New York, 140 education and youth development professionals discussed how to better support adolescent learning. Drawing on the discussion and the latest research in neuroscience, psychology and cognitive learning science, TASC presents an action agenda that can be tailored to circumstances in…

  11. Action Research: An Educational Leader's Guide to School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Jeffrey

    Useful as a classroom text and self-teaching tool, this book outlines the process of designing and reporting action research projects in schools. The underlying assumption of the book is that research is not a domain that belongs only to academics, but is a powerful approach that can be used by practitioners to contribute to school renewal and…

  12. The Data-to-Action Framework: A Rapid Program Improvement Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakocs, Ronda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2015-01-01

    Although health education programs may benefit from quality improvement methods, scant resources exist to help practitioners apply these methods for program improvement. The purpose of this article is to describe the Data-to-Action framework, a process that guides practitioners through rapid-feedback cycles in order to generate actionable data to…

  13. Improved age estimates for key Late Quaternary European tephra horizons in the RESET lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Albert, Paul G.; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Hardiman, Mark; Housley, Rupert A.; Lane, Christine S.; Lee, Sharen; Matthews, Ian P.; Smith, Victoria C.; Lowe, John J.

    2015-06-01

    The research project 'Response of Humans to Abrupt Environmental Transitions' (RESET) used tephra layers to tie together and synchronise the chronologies of stratigraphic records at archaeological and environmental sites. With the increasing importance of tephra as chronological markers in sedimentary sequences, both in this project and more generally, comes a requirement to have good estimates for the absolute age of these volcanic horizons. This paper summarises the chronology of the key tephra in the RESET tephra lattice in the time range 10-60 ka BP, from the existing literature, from papers produced as part of the RESET project, and reanalysis conducted for this paper. The paper outlines the chronological approach taken to the dating of tephra within the RESET project, and the basis for further work, as part of the INTIMATE (INTegrating Ice core MArine and TErrestrial records) initiative. For each of the tephra layers in the lattice, the existing literature is discussed and, where relevant date estimates updated using the latest radiocarbon calibration curves (IntCal13 and Marine13) and methods. Maps show the approximate extent of tephra finds, giving a visual indication of the coverage of the lattice in different time-periods.

  14. Improvement of HMM-based action classification by using state transition probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Yuka; Aruga, Haruki; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    We propose a method to classify multiple similar actions which are contained in human behaviors by considering a weak-constrained order of "actions". The proposed method regards the human behavior as a combination of "action" patterns which have order constrained weakly. In this method, actions are classified by using not only image features but also consistency of transitions between an action and next action. By considering such an action transition, our method can recognize human behavior even if image features of different action are similar to each other. Based on this idea, we have improved the previous HMM-based algorithm effectively. Through some experiments using test image sequences of human behavior appeared in a bathroom, we have confirmed that the average classification success rate is 97 %, which is about 53 % higher than the previous method.

  15. Lattice-Matched InGaAs–InAlAs Core–Shell Nanowires with Improved Luminescence and Photoresponse Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Core–shell nanowires (NW) have become very prominent systems for band engineered NW heterostructures that effectively suppress detrimental surface states and improve performance of related devices. This concept is particularly attractive for material systems with high intrinsic surface state densities, such as the low-bandgap In-containing group-III arsenides, however selection of inappropriate, lattice-mismatched shell materials have frequently caused undesired strain accumulation, defect formation, and modifications of the electronic band structure. Here, we demonstrate the realization of closely lattice-matched radial InGaAs–InAlAs core–shell NWs tunable over large compositional ranges [x(Ga)∼y(Al) = 0.2–0.65] via completely catalyst-free selective-area molecular beam epitaxy. On the basis of high-resolution X-ray reciprocal space maps the strain in the NW core is found to be insignificant (ε < 0.1%), which is further reflected by the absence of strain-induced spectral shifts in luminescence spectra and nearly unmodified band structure. Remarkably, the lattice-matched InAlAs shell strongly enhances the optical efficiency by up to 2 orders of magnitude, where the efficiency enhancement scales directly with increasing band offset as both Ga- and Al-contents increase. Ultimately, we fabricated vertical InGaAs−InAlAs NW/Si photovoltaic cells and show that the enhanced internal quantum efficiency is directly translated to an energy conversion efficiency that is ∼3–4 times larger as compared to an unpassivated cell. These results highlight the promising performance of lattice-matched III–V core–shell NW heterostructures with significant impact on future development of related nanophotonic and electronic devices. PMID:25922974

  16. An Action Plan for Improving Mediocre or Stagnant Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Kimberley B.

    2013-01-01

    Although all of the schools in the target school system adhere to a school improvement process, achievement scores remain mediocre or stagnant within the overseas school in Italy that serves children of United States armed service members. To address this problem, this study explored the target school's improvement process to discover how…

  17. Improving Middle-Grade Schools: A Framework for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Gayle

    This monograph describes the Middle Grades Assessment Program (MGAP), presents 11 case studies of schools implementing the program, and offers experience-based suggestions for school improvement. The MGAP provides an approach to school improvement that involves training staff to assess their school on nine criteria, an approach designed for…

  18. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... out its responsibilities with respect to school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring, the... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  19. Action Video Gaming and Cognitive Control: Playing First Person Shooter Games Is Associated with Improved Action Cascading but Not Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in developing efficient methods to enhance cognitive functioning and/or to ameliorate cognitive deficits. One particular line of research focuses on the possibly cognitive enhancing effects that action video game (AVG) playing may have on game players. Interestingly, AVGs, especially first person shooter games, require gamers to develop different action control strategies to rapidly react to fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to flexibly adapt their behaviour to the ever-changing context. This study investigated whether and to what extent experience with such videogames is associated with enhanced performance on cognitive control tasks that require similar abilities. Experienced action videogame-players (AVGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed a stop-change paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of action cascading and response inhibition. Replicating previous findings, AVGPs showed higher efficiency in response execution, but not improved response inhibition (i.e. inhibitory control), as compared to NVGPs. More importantly, compared to NVGPs, AVGPs showed enhanced action cascading processes when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, as well as when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. Our findings suggest that playing AVGs is associated with enhanced action cascading and multi-component behaviour without affecting inhibitory control. PMID:26655929

  20. Action Video Gaming and Cognitive Control: Playing First Person Shooter Games Is Associated with Improved Action Cascading but Not Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in developing efficient methods to enhance cognitive functioning and/or to ameliorate cognitive deficits. One particular line of research focuses on the possibly cognitive enhancing effects that action video game (AVG) playing may have on game players. Interestingly, AVGs, especially first person shooter games, require gamers to develop different action control strategies to rapidly react to fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to flexibly adapt their behaviour to the ever-changing context. This study investigated whether and to what extent experience with such videogames is associated with enhanced performance on cognitive control tasks that require similar abilities. Experienced action videogame-players (AVGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed a stop-change paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of action cascading and response inhibition. Replicating previous findings, AVGPs showed higher efficiency in response execution, but not improved response inhibition (i.e. inhibitory control), as compared to NVGPs. More importantly, compared to NVGPs, AVGPs showed enhanced action cascading processes when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, as well as when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. Our findings suggest that playing AVGs is associated with enhanced action cascading and multi-component behaviour without affecting inhibitory control. PMID:26655929

  1. Improved Absolute Frequency Measurement of the 171Yb Optical Lattice Clock towards a Candidate for the Redefinition of the Second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Kohno, Takuya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Onae, Atsushi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Amemiya, Masaki; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate an improved absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition at 578 nm in 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The clock laser linewidth is reduced to ≈2 Hz by phase-locking the laser to an ultrastable neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm through an optical frequency comb with an intracavity electrooptic modulator to achieve a high servo bandwidth. The absolute frequency is determined as 518 295 836 590 863.1(2.0) Hz relative to the SI second, and will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures.

  2. Progress in kaon physics on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Weonjong

    2006-12-01

    We review recent progress in calculating kaon spectrum, pseudoscalar meson decay constants, B K , ɛ ɛ, K ππ matrix elements, kaon semileptonic form factors, and moments of kaon distribution amplitudes on the lattice. We also address the issue of how best to improve the staggered fermion formulation for the action and operators.

  3. Hadron Masses From Novel Fat-Link Fermion Actions

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Zanotti; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. B. Zhang; W. Melnitchouk; F. X. Lee

    2001-11-01

    The hadron mass spectrum is calculated in lattice QCD using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators in the fermion action are constructed using smeared links. The simulations are performed on a 16{sup 3} x 32 lattice with a lattice spacing of a=0.125 fm. We compare actions with n=4 and 12 smearing sweeps with a smearing fraction of 0.7. The n=4 Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) action provides scaling which is superior to mean-field improvement, and offers advantages over nonperturbative 0(a) improvement, including a reduced exceptional configuration problem.

  4. Improved stochastic estimation of quark propagation with Laplacian Heaviside smearing in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, C.; Lenkner, D.; Wong, C. H.; Bulava, J.; Foley, J.; Juge, K. J.; Peardon, M.

    2011-06-01

    A new method of stochastically estimating the low-lying effects of quark propagation is proposed which allows accurate determinations of temporal correlations of single-hadron and multihadron operators in lattice QCD. The method is well suited for calculations in large volumes. Contributions involving quark propagation connecting hadron sink operators at the same final time can be handled in a straightforward manner, even for a large number of final time slices. The method exploits Laplacian Heaviside (LapH) smearing. Z{sub N} noise is introduced in a novel way, and variance reduction is achieved using judiciously-chosen noise-dilution projectors. The method is tested using isoscalar mesons in the scalar, pseudoscalar, and vector channels, and using the two-pion system of total isospin I=0, 1, 2 on large anisotropic 24{sup 3}x128 lattices with spatial spacing a{sub s}{approx}0.12 fm and temporal spacing a{sub t}{approx}0.034 fm for pion masses m{sub {pi}}{approx_equal}390 and 240 MeV.

  5. FEASIBILITY OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF SOILS TO IMPROVE REMEDIAL ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing, a method of increasing fluid flow within the subsurface, should improve the effectiveness of several remedial techniques, including pump and treat, vapor extraction, bio-remediation, and soil-flushing. he technique is widely used to increase the yields of oi...

  6. FEASIBILITY OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF SOILS TO IMPROVE REMEDIAL ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing, a technique commonly used to increase the yields of oil wells, could improve the effectiveness of several methods of in situ remediation. This project consisted of laboratory and field tests in which hydraulic fractures were created in soil. Laboratory te...

  7. Data Wise in Action: Stories of Schools Using Data to Improve Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudett, Kathryn Parker, Ed.; Steele, Jennifer L., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    What does it look like when a school uses data wisely? "Data Wise in Action", a new companion and sequel to the bestselling "Data Wise", tells the stories of eight very different schools following the Data Wise process of using assessment results to improve teaching and learning. "Data Wise in Action" highlights the leadership challenges schools…

  8. Examining What We Do to Improve Our Schools: Eight Steps from Analysis to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey; Combs, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This book shows school leaders how they can infuse their daily practice with an examination of the actions they take to improve their schools. It identifies eight steps that inform the school improvement process and boost student achievement. These steps provide a framework for examining school improvement as part of a genuine process with meaning…

  9. Systematic Collective Action To Improve Media Services in a High School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Francis R.

    This practicum was designed to improve a high school education media center through systematic collective action. The goal was to improve delivery of education media services by: (1) improving material conditions; (2) developing collaboration between education media specialists and academic teachers; and (3) involvement of the entire learning…

  10. Improving the Response of a Rollover Sensor Placed in a Car under Performance Tests by Using a RLS Lattice Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a sensor to measure the rollover angle of a car under performance tests is presented. Basically, the sensor consists of a dual-axis accelerometer, analog-electronic instrumentation stages, a data acquisition system and an adaptive filter based on a recursive least-squares (RLS) lattice algorithm. In short, the adaptive filter is used to improve the performance of the rollover sensor by carrying out an optimal prediction of the relevant signal coming from the sensor, which is buried in a broad-band noise background where we have little knowledge of the noise characteristics. The experimental results are satisfactory and show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output.

  11. Novel drug delivery strategies for improving econazole antifungal action.

    PubMed

    Firooz, Alireza; Nafisi, Shohreh; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-11-10

    Econazole is a commonly used azole antifungal in clinical treatment of superficial fungal infections. It is generally used as conventional cream and gel preparations under the brand names of Spectazole (United States), Ecostatin (Canada), Pevaryl (Western Europe). Treatment efficiency of antifungal drugs depends on their penetration through target layers of skin at effective concentrations. Econazole's poor water solubility limits its bioavailability and antifungal effects. Therefore, formulation strategies have been examined for delivering econazole through targeted skin sites. The present overview focuses on novel nano-based formulation approaches used to improve econazole penetration through skin for treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26383840

  12. ``Science Talks'' in Kindergarten Classrooms: Improving Classroom Practice Through Collaborative Action Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meilan; Passalacqua, Susan; Lundeberg, Mary; Koehler, Matthew J.; Eberhardt, Jan; Parker, Joyce; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Zhang, Tianyi; Paik, Sunhee

    2010-03-01

    In this study we described an action research project enacted by a veteran Kindergarten teacher (Sarah) in the context of a professional development program. Over the course of a year, Sarah collaborated with other teachers in a small group to investigate how to use “Science Talks” to promote student learning in Kindergarten classrooms. A Problem-Based Learning approach was adopted to guide the collaborative action research. Based on a rich set of data sources, we concluded that Sarah’s action research improved student learning and led to her own professional growth. We also identified important conditions in support of action research.

  13. Dismantle or Improve ObamaCare? Nurses Must Take Action.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Deborah B

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2014 mid-term elections, what will the next 2 years of Republican leadership do to change the structures still being put into place to meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)? Nurses need to be visible by creating partnerships with their new state and federal representatives and by demonstrating collaboration through identified shared values. Nurses must hold all congressional leaders accountable for continuing to improve access to quality and affordable health care, while containing costs and strengthening incentives to provide a client-centered approach to care delivery. As health care reform legislation is a highly charged political battleground, nurses must support legislative changes in the ACA that will strengthen our health care system, not weaken it. PMID:26267964

  14. Sustainable Development Goals for Monitoring Action to Improve Global Health.

    PubMed

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Women and children compose the largest segment of the more than 1 billion people worldwide who are unable to access needed health care services. To address this and other global health issues, the United Nations brought together world leaders to address growing health inequities, first by establishing the Millennium Development Goals in 2000 and more recently establishing Sustainable Development Goals, which are an intergovernmental set of 17 goals consisting of 169 targets with 304 indicators to measure compliance; they were designed to be applicable to all countries. Goal number 3, "Good Health and Well-Being: Ensure Heathy Lives and Promote Well-Being for All at All Ages," includes targets to improve the health of women and newborns. PMID:27520607

  15. Improved lattice Boltzmann modeling of binary flow based on the conservative Allen-Cahn equation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Song, Baowei; Sukop, Michael C; Hu, Haibao

    2016-08-01

    The primary and key task of binary fluid flow modeling is to track the interface with good accuracy, which is usually challenging due to the sharp-interface limit and numerical dispersion. This article concentrates on further development of the conservative Allen-Cahn equation (ACE) [Geier et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 063309 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.91.063309] under the framework of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), with incorporation of the incompressible hydrodynamic equations [Liang et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 053320 (2014)10.1103/PhysRevE.89.053320]. Utilizing a modified equilibrium distribution function and an additional source term, this model is capable of correctly recovering the conservative ACE through the Chapman-Enskog analysis. We also simulate four phase-tracking benchmark cases, including one three-dimensional case; all show good accuracy as well as low numerical dispersion. By coupling the incompressible hydrodynamic equations, we also simulate layered Poiseuille flow and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, illustrating satisfying performance in dealing with complex flow problems, e.g., high viscosity ratio, high density ratio, and high Reynolds number situations. The present work provides a reliable and efficient solution for binary flow modeling. PMID:27627416

  16. Final Report for Award DE-SC0005403. Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Hertz, Joshua L.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-06

    The enclosed document provides a final report to document the research performed at the University of Delaware under Grant DE-SC0005403: Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping. The ultimate goal of this project was to learn how to systematically strain the inter-atomic distance in thin ceramic films and how to use this newfound control to improve the ease by which oxygen ions can conduct through the films. Increasing the ionic conductivity of ceramics holds the promise of drastic improvements in the performance of solid oxide fuel cells, chemical sensors, gas permeation membranes, and related devices. Before this work, the experimental evidence advocating for strain-based techniques was often controversial and poorly characterized. Enabling much of this work was a new method to quickly create a very wide range of ceramic nanostructures that was established during the first phase of the project. Following this initial phase, we created a variety of promising nanostructured epitaxial films and multilayers with systematic variations in lattice mismatch and dopant content. Over the course of the work, a positive effect of tensile atomic strain on the oxygen conductivity was conclusively found using a few different forms of samples and experimental techniques. The samples were built by sputtering, an industrially scalable technique, and thus the technological implementation of these results may be economically feasible. Still, two other results consistently achieved over multiple efforts in this work give pause. The first of these results was that very specific, pristine surfaces upon which to build the nanostructures were strictly required in order to achieve measurable results. The second of these results was that compressively strained films with concomitant reductions in oxygen conductivity are much easier to obtain relative to tensile-strained films with increased conductivity.

  17. Education to Action: Improving Public Perception of Bats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmaster, Eric; Vonk, Jennifer; Mies, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Public perception of bats has historically been largely negative with bats often portrayed as carriers of disease. Bats are commonly associated with vampire lore and thus elicit largely fearful reactions despite the fact that they are a vital and valuable part of the ecosystem. Bats provide a variety of essential services from pest control to plant pollination. Despite the benefits of bats to the environment and the economy, bats are suffering at the hands of humans. They are victims of turbines, human encroachment, pesticides, and, most recently, white nose syndrome. Because of their critical importance to the environment, humans should do what they can to help protect bats. We propose that humans will be more likely to do so if their perceptions and attitudes toward bats can be significantly improved. In a preliminary study we found some support for the idea that people can be educated about bats through bat oriented events and exhibits, and that this greater knowledge can inspire humans to act to save bats. PMID:26784239

  18. Education to Action: Improving Public Perception of Bats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmaster, Eric; Vonk, Jennifer; Mies, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Public perception of bats has historically been largely negative with bats often portrayed as carriers of disease. Bats are commonly associated with vampire lore and thus elicit largely fearful reactions despite the fact that they are a vital and valuable part of the ecosystem. Bats provide a variety of essential services from pest control to plant pollination. Despite the benefits of bats to the environment and the economy, bats are suffering at the hands of humans. They are victims of turbines, human encroachment, pesticides, and, most recently, white nose syndrome. Because of their critical importance to the environment, humans should do what they can to help protect bats. We propose that humans will be more likely to do so if their perceptions and attitudes toward bats can be significantly improved. In a preliminary study we found some support for the idea that people can be educated about bats through bat oriented events and exhibits, and that this greater knowledge can inspire humans to act to save bats. PMID:26784239

  19. An investigation of meson spectroscopy on isotropic clover lattices at the SU(3) flavor-symmetric point

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-23

    We present an investigation of the excited meson spectrum at the N_f= 3 point obtained on isotropic clover lattices with a plaquette Wilson gauge action, and a NP-improved clover fermion action, at a lattice spacing of a \\simeq 0.08 fm, and compare with corresponding calculations on an anisotropic lattice at fine temporal lattice spacing but a spatial lattice spacing of a_s \\simeq 0.125 fm. The methodology adopted follows that employed in the calculation of the spectrum on anisotropic lattices, and we test the efficacy of that approach for isotropic lattices. In particular, we explore the extent to which rotational symmetry for predominantly single-hadron states is realized. By comparison of the energy levels with that obtained using the anisotropic lattice, we obtain an indication of discretization uncertainties in the single-hadron spectrum.

  20. From Questions to Actions: Using Questionnaire Data for Continuous School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, Victoria L.; Geise, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    How do the best administrators find out how to improve their schools? They actively engage the people who work and study there. In "From Questions to Actions: Using Questionnaire Data for Continuous School Improvement," data experts Victoria L. Bernhardt and Bradley J. Geise explain how to collect and analyze data with an eye toward positive…

  1. Lesion Characteristics Related to Treatment Improvement in Object and Action Naming for Patients with Chronic Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, R. Bruce; Raymer, Anastasia; Chang, Yu-Ling; FitzGerald, David B.; Crosson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between degree of lesion in various locations and improvement during treatment in stroke patients with chronic aphasia. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the degree of lesion in specific brain regions was related to magnitude of improvement over the course of object and action naming…

  2. 34 CFR 200.37 - Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. 200.37 Section 200.37 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING...

  3. 34 CFR 200.37 - Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. 200.37 Section 200.37 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING...

  4. 34 CFR 200.37 - Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. 200.37 Section 200.37 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING...

  5. 34 CFR 200.37 - Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. 200.37 Section 200.37 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING...

  6. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring. 200.49 Section 200.49 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF...

  7. Improving Middle School Parental Engagement in Transition to Common Core State Standards: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harla, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in schools is an important potential contributor to improving American education and making the U.S. more globally competitive. This qualitative and quantitative mixed-methodology action research study probed the viability of engaging parents around issues of educational improvement by inviting them to participate in training…

  8. Walking but Not Barking Improves Verb Recovery: Implications for Action Observation Treatment in Aphasia Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Marangolo, Paola; Cipollari, Susanna; Fiori, Valentina; Razzano, Carmela; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that action observation treatment without concomitant verbal cue has a positive impact on the recovery of verb retrieval deficits in aphasic patients. In agreement with an embodied cognition viewpoint, a hypothesis has been advanced that gestures and language form a single communication system and words whose retrieval is facilitated by gestures are semantically represented through sensory-motor features. However, it is still an open question as to what extent this treatment approach works. Results from the recovery of motor deficits have suggested that action observation promotes motor recovery only for actions that are part of the motor repertoire of the observer. The aim of the present experiment was to further investigate the role of action observation treatment in verb recovery. In particular, we contrasted the effects induced by observing human actions (e.g. dancing, kicking, pointing, eating) versus non human actions (e.g. barking, printing). Seven chronic aphasic patients with a selective deficit in verb retrieval underwent an intensive rehabilitation training that included five daily sessions over two consecutive weeks. Each subject was asked to carefully observe 115 video-clips of actions, one at a time and, after observing them, they had to produce the corresponding verb. Two groups of actions were randomly presented: humans versus nonhuman actions. In all patients, significant improvement in verb retrieval was found only by observing video-clips of human actions. Moreover, follow-up testing revealed long-term verb recovery that was still present two months after the two treatments had ended. In support of the multimodal concept representation's proposal, we suggest that just the observation of actions pertaining to the human motor repertoire is an effective rehabilitation approach for verb recovery. PMID:22719906

  9. Community-based health improvement: lessons from the Learning for Action Institute, Simmons College.

    PubMed

    Knapp, M L; Lowe, J M

    2001-01-01

    The Learning for Action Institute at the Graduate School for Health Studies, Simmons College, uses continuous quality improvement concepts and methods to help community-based groups to make positive change. Eight core concepts are the basis for creating sustainable improvements, developing new models for community capacity, and building and disseminating knowledge of what has been learned. These concepts are: clarify the aim, form the right team, target improvement efforts, use data, listen to the customer, use tools and methods, conduct improvement and learning cycles, and make improvements. Two community-based projects are used to illustrate the concepts. PMID:11499348

  10. An Improved Momentum-Exchanged Immersed Boundary-Based Lattice Boltzmann Method for Incompressible Viscous Thermal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mufeng; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    An improved momentum-exchanged immersed boundary-based lattice Boltzmann method (MEIB-LBM) for incompressible viscous thermal flows is presented here. MEIB-LBM was first proposed by Niu et al, which has been shown later that the non-slip boundary condition is not satisfied. Wang. et al. and Hu. et al overcome this drawback by iterative method. But it needs to give an appropriate relaxation parameter. In this work, we come back to the intrinsic feature of LBM, which uses the density distribution function as a dependent variable to evolve the flow field, and uses the density distribution function correction at the neighboring Euler mesh points to satisfy the non-slip boundary condition on the immersed boundary. The same idea can also be applied to the thermal flows with fluid-structure interference. The merits of present improvements for the original MEIB-LBM are that the intrinsic feature of LBM is kept and the flow penetration across the immersed boundaries is avoided. To validate the present method, examples, including forced convection over a stationary heated circular cylinder for heat flux condition, and natural convection with a suspended circle particle in viscous fluid, are simulated. The streamlines, isothermal contours, the drag coefficients and Nusselt numbers are calculated and compared to the benchmark results to demonstrate the effective of the present method.

  11. Thomas-Fermi Quark Model and Techniques to Improve Lattice QCD Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan

    Two topics are discussed separately in this thesis. In the first part a semiclassical quark model, called the Thomas-Fermi quark model, is reviewed. After a modified approach to spin in the model is introduced, I present the calculation of the spectra of octet and decuplet baryons. The six-quark doubly strange H-dibaryon state is also investigated. In the second part, two numerical techniques which improve latice QCD calculations are covered. The first one, which we call Polynomial-Preconditioned GMRES-DR(PP-GMRESDR), is used to speed up the calculation of large systems of linear equations in LQCD. The second one, called the Polynomial-Subtraction method, is used to help reduce the noise variance of the calculations for disconnected loops in LQCD.

  12. The K+ K+ scattering length from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-09-11

    The K+K+ scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks. Three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, which includes the leading effects of the finite lattice spacing, is used to extrapolate the results of the lattice calculation to the physical value of mK + /fK + . We find mK^+ aK^+ K^+ = â~0.352 ± 0.016, where the statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.

  13. Improving Indigenous Completion Rates in Mainstream TAFE: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balatti, Jo; Gargano, Lyn; Goldman, Martha; Wood, Gary; Woodlock, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Indigenous engagement with vocational education and training (VET) has improved significantly, but successful Indigenous completion rates are lower nationally when compared to the overall population. This report, based on an action research project, examines intra-institutional factors at four Queensland TAFE (technical and further education)…

  14. Improving the Process of Career Decision Making: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbank, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study adopts an action research approach with the aim of improving the process of career decision making among undergraduates in a business school at a "new" university in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: The study utilised unfreezing techniques, multiple case studies in conjunction with the principle of analogical encoding, and…

  15. Action Research for Instructional Improvement: The Bad, the Ugly, and the Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patthey, Ghislaine Genevieve; Thomas-Spiegel, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In the wake of accreditation cycles stressing student outcomes, we believed the reflective and practitioner-centered philosophy of action research a perfect fit for effecting institutional improvements for a four-year grant-funded effort in our urban-suburban community colleges in California. We learned that things were both worse and better than…

  16. Using Professional Development to Improve Elementary Teachers' Mathematics Teaching: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that it is common for elementary teachers to possess limited mathematics content knowledge, high levels of math anxiety, and low levels of mathematics teacher efficacy. Assuming action research as the chosen methodology, this research study was developed with the ultimate goal of improving how elementary teachers in my district…

  17. Seeking to Improve African American Girls' Attitudes toward Science: A Participatory Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Gayle A.; Cook, Kristin L.; Quigley, Cassie F.; Prince, Pearl; Lucas, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    In this participatory action research study, we answered the question, How can we improve attitudes toward science education of the African American girls at an elementary school? Girls in grades 3-6 completed the Modified Attitudes toward Science Inventory. A purposeful sample of 30 girls participated in several focus-group interviews throughout…

  18. One School's Approach to Overcoming Resistance and Improving Appraisal: Organizational Learning in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the action research (AR) approach adopted by one New Zealand (NZ) primary school to review and improve its appraisal system. Historically the staff had demonstrated considerable negativity towards appraisal. The classic reconnaissance, implementation and evaluation phases of AR were adopted by the case study school as a…

  19. Moving from I to Us: The Power of Action Research To Improve Students' Writing Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Christine; Cross, Lorraine

    Project WATCH! (Writing Across the Curriculum Hawks!) was the 1999-2000 schoolwide action research project at the A.D. Henderson University School grades K-8. The study question, "How can teachers build schoolwide capacity to support improved student writing across the curriculum?", examined whole-school collaboration where all teachers understand…

  20. Improving "At-Action" Decision-Making in Team Sports through a Holistic Coaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard L.; Harvey, Stephen; Mouchet, Alain

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on Game Sense pedagogy and complex learning theory (CLT) to make suggestions for improving decision-making ability in team sports by adopting a holistic approach to coaching with a focus on decision-making "at-action". It emphasizes the complexity of decision-making and the need to focus on the game as a whole entity,…

  1. Using Action Research Interventions to Improve the Effectiveness of an Executive Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth investigation of an executive team, to determine which internal and external factors impacted the team and to determine in what ways action research interventions improved the team's effectiveness. Methodology: The subjects in this study were seven members of a school district…

  2. An Action Research Study Designed to Implement Student Negotiation to Improve Speaking Classroom Practice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the second stage of an action research study designed to improve the effectiveness of speaking classes through negotiating the lesson contents with students. The data were collected through interviews, questionnaires and observations as a way of eliciting students' views. The research, conducted in an English language…

  3. An Action Research on Improvement of Reading Comprehension of CET4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Jian-ping

    2013-01-01

    This action research is aiming at improvement of reading comprehension of College English teaching and learning, which is a major time-consuming course with low efficiency in colleges and universities in China. The research subjects were 134 first-year college students of science, engineering and liberal arts, who were from either developed…

  4. An Evaluation of Professional Development to Improve Teachers' Perspectives and Behaviors: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckford-Young, Paulette Vivienne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to conduct a professional development activity to provide content-area teachers with academic vocabulary strategies to be implemented during instruction on a daily basis. Professional development is essential for teachers to gain new knowledge and skills in order to hone their craft to improve student…

  5. The use of shock-detecting sensor to improve the stability of Lattice Boltzmann Model for high Mach number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadyani, Mohsen; Esfahanian, Vahid; Taeibi-Rahni, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Attempts to simulate compressible flows with moderate Mach number to relatively high ones using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) have been made by numerous researchers in the recent decade. The stability of the LBM is a challenging problem in the simulation of compressible flows with different types of embedded discontinuities. The present study proposes an approach for simulation of inviscid flows by a compressible LB model in order to enhance the robustness using a combination of Essentially NonOscillatory (ENO) scheme and Shock-Detecting Sensor (SDS) procedure. A sensor is introduced with adjustable parameters which is active near the discontinuities and affects less on smooth regions. The validity of the improved model to capture shocks and to resolve contact discontinuity and rarefaction waves in the well-known benchmarks such as, Riemann problem, and shock reflection is investigated. In addition, the problem of supersonic flow in a channel with ramp is simulated using a skewed rectangular grid generated by an algebraic grid generation method. The numerical results are compared with analytical ones and those obtained by solving the original model. The numerical results show that the presented scheme is capable of generating more robust solutions in the simulation of compressible flows and is almost free of oscillations for high Mach numbers. Good agreements are obtained for all problems.

  6. Action video games do not improve the speed of information processing in simple perceptual tasks.

    PubMed

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Boekel, Wouter; Forstmann, Birte U; Ratcliff, Roger; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2014-10-01

    Previous research suggests that playing action video games improves performance on sensory, perceptual, and attentional tasks. For instance, Green, Pouget, and Bavelier (2010) used the diffusion model to decompose data from a motion detection task and estimate the contribution of several underlying psychological processes. Their analysis indicated that playing action video games leads to faster information processing, reduced response caution, and no difference in motor responding. Because perceptual learning is generally thought to be highly context-specific, this transfer from gaming is surprising and warrants corroborative evidence from a large-scale training study. We conducted 2 experiments in which participants practiced either an action video game or a cognitive game in 5 separate, supervised sessions. Prior to each session and following the last session, participants performed a perceptual discrimination task. In the second experiment, we included a third condition in which no video games were played at all. Behavioral data and diffusion model parameters showed similar practice effects for the action gamers, the cognitive gamers, and the nongamers and suggest that, in contrast to earlier reports, playing action video games does not improve the speed of information processing in simple perceptual tasks. PMID:24933517

  7. Quest for More Information from Lattice QCD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Forcrand, P.; García Pérez, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hioki, S.; Matsufuru, H.; Miyamura, O.; Umeda, T.; Nakamura, A.; Stamatescu, I.-O.; Tago, Y.; Takaishi, T.

    Lattice QCD is one of the most powerful tools to study the non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction. Although much information has been obtained so far to understand QCD, the computational cost becomes higher and higher as we calculate on finer lattices; simulations near the continuum are still far beyond. We report the progress on (1) renormalization group (RG) improved actions and (2) anisotropic lattice, which QCD-TARO group has developed and studied in order to get more information from the simulations on the present computers. RG improved actions were proposed and studied by Wilson and Iwasaki to remove discretization effects for long distance observables. We have studied 1× 1 + 1× 2 type actions, which includes Wilson, Symanzik and Iwasaki ones, by the strong and weak coupling expansions and Monte Carlo RG method. We have calculated RG flow and obtained a new effective β-function. Anisotropic lattice, where the temporal lattice spacing is smaller than that along the spatial one, makes us possible to perform finer resolution measurements in the temporal direction. This is especially useful at the finite temperature, where the temporal lattice size is limited. We have calculated meson pole and screening masses. We have found they behave in a different manner as a function of T.

  8. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  9. Reducing finite lattice spacing errors for staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yubing

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis we study on-shell-improved lattice QCD with staggered fermions using Symanzik's improvement program. We present a complete and detailed discussion of the finite lattice spacing corrections to staggered fermion matrix elements. Expanding upon arguments of Sharpe, we explicitly implement the Symanzik improvement program demonstrating the absence of order a terms in the on-shell-improved action. We propose a general program to improve fermion operators to remove all O(a) corrections from their matrix elements, and demonstrate this program for the examples of matrix elements of fermion bilinears and BK. We find the former does have O(a) corrections while the latter does not. Also, we give an explicit form of lattice currents which are accurate to order a2 at the tree-level. Furthermore, we find that there are as many as 15 independent lattice operators of dimension-6 (including both gauge and fermion operators) which must be added to the unimproved action to form an O(a2)-improved action. Among them, the total number of dimension-6 gauge operators and fermion bilinears is 5. The other ten terms are four- fermion operators. At the tree level and tadpole-improved tree level, all ten four-fermion operators are absent.

  10. Food and Nutritional Improvement Action of Communities in Japan: Lessons for the World.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Midori; Kusama, Kaoru; Shikanai, Saiko

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the national health policy "Healthy Japan 21 (second term)" was introduced in 2013 to support prevention of lifestyle-related disease. Policy has also been recently revised on the promotion of nutrition education (shokuiku). Community-based food and nutrition actions were developed based on those policies and aimed to reinforce the linkages across the food chain, looking along its length "from field to food", including production, processing, preparation, eating and disposal. Local government is responsible for identifying the important food and nutritional problems, to devise and group effective actions on the basis of local health issues. The National Institute of Public Health (NIPH) is responsible for carrying out public health staff training on policy-based health issues. Training carried out by the NIPH, the Japan Dietetic Association and the Japan Public Health Association was designed to create an enabling environment for nutrition action. The community-based actions, including nutrition education and information, are carried out by several bodies, including local government, schools, facilities, volunteer groups, residents' associations, and commercial companies, to establish sustainable food systems promoting healthy diets. The community-empowering actions and effective cooperation are reported as good practice models in an annual white paper by the Cabinet Office. Japanese dieticians are expected to share their experiences of local nutrition improvement activities in Japan with international colleagues. Experience from elsewhere, including from Japanese dieticians working in developing countries, should also be applied on their return. PMID:26598887

  11. Glueball Spectrum and Matrix Elements on Anisotropic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Alexandru; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; C. Morningstar; M. Peardon; S. Tamhankar; B.L. Young; J.B. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The glueball-to-vacuum matrix elements of local gluonic operators in scalar, tensor, and pseudoscalar channels are investigated numerically on several anisotropic lattices with the spatial lattice spacing ranging from 0.1fm - 0.2fm. These matrix elements are needed to predict the glueball branching ratios in J/{psi} radiative decays which will help identify the glueball states in experiments. Two types of improved local gluonic operators are constructed for a self-consistent check and the finite volume effects are studied. We find that lattice spacing dependence of our results is very weak and the continuum limits are reliably extrapolated, as a result of improvement of the lattice gauge action and local operators. We also give updated glueball masses with various quantum numbers.

  12. An action to an object does not improve its episodic encoding but removes distraction.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Xavier; Ensslin, Astrid; Marí-Beffa, Paloma

    2016-04-01

    There is some debate as to whether responding to objects in our environment improves episodic memory or does not impact it. Some authors claim that actively encoding objects improves their representation in episodic memory. Conversely, episodic memory has also been shown to improve in passive conditions, suggesting that the action itself could interfere with the encoding process. This study looks at the impact of attention and action on episodic memory using a novel what-where-when (WWW) task that includes information about object identity (what) and spatial (where) and temporal (when) properties. With this approach, we studied the episodic memory of 2 types of objects: a target, where attention or an action is defined, and a distractor, an object to be ignored, following 2 selective states: active versus passive selection. When targets were actively selected, we found no evidence of episodic memory enhancement compared to passive selection; instead, memory from irrelevant sources was suppressed. The pattern was replicated across a 2-D static display and a more realistic 3-D virtual environment. This selective attention effect on episodic memory was not observed on nonepisodic measures, demonstrating a link between attention and the encoding of episodic experiences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26523488

  13. 25 CFR 256.28 - What can I do if I disagree with actions taken under the Housing Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Indian Affairs, in accordance with 25 CFR part 2. You may appeal action or inaction by tribal officials... Housing Improvement Program? 256.28 Section 256.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOUSING HOUSING IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM § 256.28 What can I do if I disagree with actions taken...

  14. 25 CFR 256.28 - What can I do if I disagree with actions taken under the Housing Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Indian Affairs, in accordance with 25 CFR part 2. You may appeal action or inaction by tribal officials... Housing Improvement Program? 256.28 Section 256.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOUSING HOUSING IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM § 256.28 What can I do if I disagree with actions taken...

  15. 25 CFR 30.122 - Must the Bureau assist a school it identified for school improvement, corrective action, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Must the Bureau assist a school it identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring? 30.122 Section 30.122 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS....122 Must the Bureau assist a school it identified for school improvement, corrective action,...

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level.

  18. Improved Frequency Measurement of a One-Dimensional Optical Lattice Clock with a Spin-Polarized Fermionic 87Sr Isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamoto, Masao; Hong, Feng-Lei; Higashi, Ryoichi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Imae, Michito; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate a one-dimensional optical lattice clock with a spin-polarized fermionic isotope designed to realize a collision-shift-free atomic clock with neutral atom ensembles. To reduce systematic uncertainties, we developed both Zeeman shift and vector light-shift cancellation techniques. By introducing both an H-maser and a global positioning system (GPS) carrier phase link, the absolute frequency of the 1S0(F=9/2)-{}3P0(F=9/2) clock transition of the 87Sr optical lattice clock is determined as 429,228,004,229,875(4) Hz, where the uncertainty is mainly limited by that of the frequency link. The result indicates that the Sr lattice clock will play an important role in the scope of the redefinition of the “second” by optical frequency standards.

  19. Involving deprived communities in improving the quality of primary care services: does participatory action research work?

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Peter G; Mercer, Stewart W; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2007-01-01

    Background Participation by communities in improving the quality of health services has become a feature of government policy in the United Kingdom. The aim of the study was to involve a deprived community in the UK in shaping quality improvements of local primary care services. The specific objectives were firstly to create participation by local people in evaluating the primary care services available in the area and secondly to bring about change as a result of this process. Methods The methods of participatory action research was used. The study was set in an area of high socio-economic deprivation served by a 'Local Health Care Co-operative' in a peripheral housing estate in Glasgow, Scotland. 72 local residents took part in 11 focus groups: eight of these were with community groups and three with other residents. 372 local residents completed questionnaires either by brief face-to-face interviews (114) or by self or carer completion (258). Results The study group produced recommendations on physical access to the health centre, time constraints in accessing services and problems encountered in individual relationships with health staff. They also highlighted the social gap between health service providers and the daily life of community residents. Action was taken to bring these recommendations to the attention of the Primary Care Organisation. Conclusion Participatory action research was used to involve a deprived community in the UK in a 'bottom-up' approach aimed at improving quality of local primary care services. Although successful in creating a partnership between academic researchers and lay researchers and participation by local people in evaluating the primary care services available in the area, the impact of the study in terms of immediate action taken over specific issues has been modest. The possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:17572913

  20. Heavy quarks on anisotropic lattices: The charmonium spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping

    2000-10-01

    We present results for the mass spectrum of cc¯ mesons simulated on anisotropic lattices where the temporal spacing is only half of the spatial spacing. The lattice QCD action is the Wilson gauge action plus the clover-improved Wilson fermion action. The two clover coefficients on an anisotropic lattice are estimated using mean links in Landau gauge. The bare velocity of light νt has been tuned to keep the anisotropic, heavy-quark Wilson action relativistic. Local meson operators and three box sources are used in obtaining clear statistics for the lowest lying and first excited charmonium states of 1 S0, 3S1, 1P1, 3P 0 and 3P1. The continuum limit is discussed by extrapolating from quenched simulations at four lattice spacings in the range 0.1-0.3 fm. Results are compared with the observed values in nature and other lattice approaches. Finite volume effects and dispersion relations are checked.

  1. Action video games and improved attentional control: Disentangling selection- and response-based processes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-10-01

    Research has demonstrated that experience with action video games is associated with improvements in a host of cognitive tasks. Evidence from paradigms that assess aspects of attention has suggested that action video game players (AVGPs) possess greater control over the allocation of attentional resources than do non-video-game players (NVGPs). Using a compound search task that teased apart selection- and response-based processes (Duncan, 1985), we required participants to perform an oculomotor capture task in which they made saccades to a uniquely colored target (selection-based process) and then produced a manual directional response based on information within the target (response-based process). We replicated the finding that AVGPs are less susceptible to attentional distraction and, critically, revealed that AVGPs outperform NVGPs on both selection-based and response-based processes. These results not only are consistent with the improved-attentional-control account of AVGP benefits, but they suggest that the benefit of action video game playing extends across the full breadth of attention-mediated stimulus-response processes that impact human performance. PMID:25772554

  2. Together we can make a difference: the case for transnational action for improved health in prisons.

    PubMed

    Easley, Cheryl E

    2011-10-01

    In spite of international differences in the treatment of incarcerated persons, as a group, they are vulnerable to poor health status and lack of access to quality health care. The health care of prisoners is affected by knowledge and commitment to ideas of human rights and social justice, as well as economic conditions. Prisoners are at increased risk of both acute and chronic diseases, and may constitute a threat to the health of other prisoners, their attendants or outside communities upon release. Mental illness and related problems of substance abuse are prevalent in prison populations, with many US prisons serving as modern asylums. Public health workers and organizations can stimulate and implement action to improve health in prisons. The World Federation of Public Health Associations can play a leadership role in co-ordinating and facilitating collaborative international action and research to enhance the health of prisoners and their communities worldwide. PMID:21968088

  3. Action plans for COPD: strategies to manage exacerbations and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jalota, Leena; Jain, Vipul V

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third-largest killer in the world, and certainly takes a toll on the health care system. Recurrent COPD exacerbations accelerate lung-function decline, worsen mortality, and consume over US$50 billion in health care spending annually. This has led to a tide of payment reforms eliciting interest in strategies reducing preventable COPD exacerbations. In this review, we analyze and discuss the evidence for COPD action plan-based self-management strategies. Although action plans may provide stabilization of acute symptomatology, there are several limitations. These include patient-centered attributes, such as comprehension and adherence, and nonadherence of health care providers to established guidelines. While no single intervention can be expected independently to translate into improved outcomes, structured together within a comprehensive integrated disease-management program, they may provide a robust paradigm. PMID:27330286

  4. Action plans for COPD: strategies to manage exacerbations and improve outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jalota, Leena; Jain, Vipul V

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third-largest killer in the world, and certainly takes a toll on the health care system. Recurrent COPD exacerbations accelerate lung-function decline, worsen mortality, and consume over US$50 billion in health care spending annually. This has led to a tide of payment reforms eliciting interest in strategies reducing preventable COPD exacerbations. In this review, we analyze and discuss the evidence for COPD action plan-based self-management strategies. Although action plans may provide stabilization of acute symptomatology, there are several limitations. These include patient-centered attributes, such as comprehension and adherence, and nonadherence of health care providers to established guidelines. While no single intervention can be expected independently to translate into improved outcomes, structured together within a comprehensive integrated disease-management program, they may provide a robust paradigm. PMID:27330286

  5. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  6. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  7. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments. PMID:21752182

  8. Simulation of ECG Repolarization Phase with Improved Model of Cell Action Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trobec, Roman; Depolli, Matjaž; Avbelj, Viktor

    An improved model of action potentials (AP) is proposed to increase the accuracy of simulated electrocardiograms (ECGs). ECG simulator is based on a spatial model of a left ventricle, composed of cubic cells. Three distinct APs, modeled with functions proposed by Wohlfard, have been assigned to the cells, forming epicardial, mid, and endocardial layers. Identification of exact parameter values for AP models has been done through optimization of the simulated ECGs. Results have shown that only through an introduction of a minor extension to the AP model, simulator is able to produce more realistic ECGs. The same extension also proves essential for achieving a better fit between the measured and modeled APs.

  9. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti

    2005-03-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark, with minimal quark content $uudd\\bar{s}$, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large $20^{3} \\times 40$ lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  10. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lasscock, B.G.; Hedditch, J.; Kamleh, W.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-07-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudds, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various spin-(1/2) pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3}x40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of binding at quark masses near the physical regime, observed for established baryon resonances, is not observed for spin-(1/2) pentaquark states. Thus we find no evidence supporting the existence of a spin-(1/2) pentaquark resonance in quenched QCD.

  11. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; James Zanotti

    2005-02-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudd{bar s}, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3} x 40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  12. MCNP Super Lattice Method for VHTR ORIGEN2.2 Nuclear Library Improvement Based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; J. R. Parry

    2010-10-01

    The advanced Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) achieves simplification of safety through reliance on innovative features and passive systems. One of the VHTRs innovative features is the reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under extreme accident conditions. The effect of the random fuel kernel distribution in the fuel prismatic block creates a double-heterogeneous lattice, which needs to be addressed through the use of the newly developed prismatic super Kernel-by-Kernel Fuel (KbKF) lattice model method. Based on the new ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross section evaluated data, the developed KbKF super lattice model was then used with MCNP to calculate the material isotopes neutron reaction rates, such as, (n,?); (n,n’); (n,2n’); (n,f); (n,p); (n,?). Then, the MCNP-calculated results are rearranged to generate a set of new libraries “VHTRXS.lib,” for the ORIGEN2.2 isotopes depletion and build-up analysis code. The libraries contain one group cross section data for the structural light elements, actinides, and fission products that can be applied in the VHTR related fuel burnup and material transmutation analysis codes. The efficiency and ease of use of the MCNP method to generate and update the ORIGEN2.2 one-group spectrum weighed cross section library for VHTR was demonstrated.

  13. From Fantasy to Action: Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Improves Academic Performance in Children.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kirby, Teri; Gollwitzer, Anton; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2013-11-01

    The current intervention tested whether a metacognitive self-regulatory strategy of goal pursuit can help economically disadvantaged children convert positive thoughts and images about their future into effective action. Mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) entails mental contrasting a desired future with relevant obstacles of reality and forming implementation intentions (if-then plans) specifying when and where to overcome those obstacles. Seventy-seven fifth graders from an urban middle school were randomly assigned to learn either MCII or a Positive Thinking control strategy. Compared to children in the control condition, children taught how to apply MCII to their academic wishes and concerns significantly improved their report card grades (η(2) = .07), attendance (η(2) = .05), and conduct (η(2) = .07). These findings suggest that MCII holds considerable promise for helping disadvantaged middle school children improve their academic performance. PMID:25068007

  14. Combined actions for the improvement of properties of cement-ash binder systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grankovskii, I.G.; Uglyrenko, T.V.

    1983-01-20

    The use of fly ash from thermal electric power generating stations in concrete technology as a hydraulic additive to improve the quality of concretes and cement slurries has been shown to be effective in many studies. However, under natural hardening conditions, cement-ash compositions acquire strength very slowly, and their favorable qualities are manifested at an age of approximately three months. On the basis of new data on the structurizing and strengthening effects of small amounts of mineral additives in the mixing water, along with studies of the optimal mechanical activation by mixing the cement slurries in accordance with the kinetics of structurization, in this paper the results from studies of combined actions on binder systems with the aim of improving the engineering characteristics of slurries used in cementing, increasing the slurry mobility, accelerating the hardening, and increasing the strength of hardened compositions in which up to 30% of the cement is replaced by fly ash, are presented.

  15. From Fantasy to Action: Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Improves Academic Performance in Children

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kirby, Teri; Gollwitzer, Anton; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The current intervention tested whether a metacognitive self-regulatory strategy of goal pursuit can help economically disadvantaged children convert positive thoughts and images about their future into effective action. Mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) entails mental contrasting a desired future with relevant obstacles of reality and forming implementation intentions (if-then plans) specifying when and where to overcome those obstacles. Seventy-seven fifth graders from an urban middle school were randomly assigned to learn either MCII or a Positive Thinking control strategy. Compared to children in the control condition, children taught how to apply MCII to their academic wishes and concerns significantly improved their report card grades (η2 = .07), attendance (η2 = .05), and conduct (η2 = .07). These findings suggest that MCII holds considerable promise for helping disadvantaged middle school children improve their academic performance. PMID:25068007

  16. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  17. Action Research as another Literacy Skill To Improve Academic Performance: A Case Study of Empowered Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariizumi, Yoshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background: Even though action research has been employed in an increasing number of fields of practice including teaching, nursing, and business, application in learning has been scarcely reported. This case study is one of the first attempts to apply action research principles to help learners improve their learning performance. Purpose: This…

  18. 78 FR 54947 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed US 1 Improvements-Rockingham, Richmond County, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... County, NC ] from Sandhill Road (SR 1971) to Marston Road (SR 1001). Those actions grant licenses... proposed action will improve 19 miles of US 1 from Sandhill Road (SR 1971) south of Rockingham to Marston... on new location, and widens about five miles of existing US 1. From Sandhill Road (SR 1971) to...

  19. Managing Quality by Action Research--Improving Quality Service Delivery in Higher Education as a Marketing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbitt, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Describes two action research projects undertaken at an Australian university to improve quality of services to foreign students and improve the institution's image through word of mouth, or informal marketing. Each project, although small, facilitated changes or improvements to a targeted service. The role of management in empowering employees…

  20. Development of a mental health action checklist for improving workplace environment as means of job stress prevention.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Kawakami, Norito; Kogi, Kazutaka; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shimazu, Miyuki; Nagami, Makiko; Shimazu, Akihito

    2007-07-01

    An action checklist for improving the workplace environment by means of enhancing mental health of workers (Mental Health Action Check List: MHACL) was developed. The use of the checklist for primary prevention was examined. MHACL was developed through three steps: (1) Review of related references and collection of improvement examples for designing a draft MHACL; (2) pilot application of the draft at industrial workplaces and trials at workshops of occupational health staff; and (3) proposing a new MHACL for general use in industry. Workplace improvement actions related to mental health were listed in eight technical areas. From 84 workplaces in Japan, 201 such actions were collected. Typical improvement action phrases were extracted based on these examples, and a draft MHACL containing 40 generally applicable actions were prepared. This draft was applied to selected workplaces for its use as a tool for group discussion. Then, the utility of the checklist was discussed by 105 occupational health staff working in public service offices. The workshop suggested modifications of the draft MHACL including improved check items and usage procedures and the need to use easy-to-understand actions. The final version of the MHACL comprised 30 items in six technical areas: A) sharing work planning, B) work time and organization, C) ergonomic work methods, D) workplace environment, E) mutual support in the workplace, and F) preparedness and care. A new action checklist was proposed for use as a means of changing existing workplace environments and proposing practical actions for improving it. The checklist was confirmed to be useful for organizing workplace-level discussion for identifying immediate improvements at the workplace. The checklist is expected to be widely applied for promoting primary prevention measures in terms of better mental health. PMID:17721060

  1. Improved Strain-Free GaN Growth with a Nearly Lattice-Matched AlInN Interlayer by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae Su; Jeong, Hyun; Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Yong Seok; Park, Ah Hyun; Kim, Hun; Jea Lee, Kang; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, a strain-free GaN layer has been successfully grown by employing a 40-nm-thick nearly lattice-matched (NLM) Al1-xInxN as an interlayer. The Al1-xInxN interlayers having an InN molar fraction of x˜0.11 and 0.13 led to crack-networking at the GaN surface due to excessive tensile strain by lattice-mismatching. In the case of the GaN layer with a NLM Al1-xInxN interlayer (x˜0.18), however, strain-free GaN structure with improved structural and optical properties was demonstrated from the results of atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence. By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the origin on strain-free state and improved properties of the GaN layer with the NLM AlInN interlayer was investigated. Based on TEM observations, we suggest that the faulted zone-like growth mechanism on roughed AlInN surface and partial compensation of tensile thermal stress are major factors on the improved strain-free GaN film.

  2. 75 FR 79751 - Improving Government Regulations; Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... manner similar to the domestic source restriction of the Buy American Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 05/07/10 75 FR 25167 NPRM Comment Period End 07/06/10 Final Action 12/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility.... Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 01/15/10 75 FR 2457 NPRM Comment Period End 03/16/10 Final Action...

  3. Protein folding optimization based on 3D off-lattice model via an improved artificial bee colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai; Lin, Mu; Liu, Qiao; Li, Ya; Zhou, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    Protein folding is a fundamental topic in molecular biology. Conventional experimental techniques for protein structure identification or protein folding recognition require strict laboratory requirements and heavy operating burdens, which have largely limited their applications. Alternatively, computer-aided techniques have been developed to optimize protein structures or to predict the protein folding process. In this paper, we utilize a 3D off-lattice model to describe the original protein folding scheme as a simplified energy-optimal numerical problem, where all types of amino acid residues are binarized into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. We apply a balance-evolution artificial bee colony (BE-ABC) algorithm as the minimization solver, which is featured by the adaptive adjustment of search intensity to cater for the varying needs during the entire optimization process. In this work, we establish a benchmark case set with 13 real protein sequences from the Protein Data Bank database and evaluate the convergence performance of BE-ABC algorithm through strict comparisons with several state-of-the-art ABC variants in short-term numerical experiments. Besides that, our obtained best-so-far protein structures are compared to the ones in comprehensive previous literature. This study also provides preliminary insights into how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied to reveal the dynamics of protein folding. Graphical Abstract Protein folding optimization using 3D off-lattice model and advanced optimization techniques. PMID:26381910

  4. Central action of FGF19 reduces hypothalamic AGRP/NPY neuron activity and improves glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Geneviève; Jo, Young-Hwan; Li, Xiaosong; Schwartz, Gary J; Zhang, Ying; Dun, Nae J; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Blouet, Clémence; Chang, Jaw K; Chua, Streamson

    2014-02-01

    Tight control of glucose excursions has been a long-standing goal of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with hyperglycemia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 is a hormone-like enterokine released postprandially that emerged as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Remarkably, FGF19 treatment has hypoglycemic actions that remain potent in models of genetic and acquired insulin resistance. Here, we provided evidence that the central nervous system responds to FGF19 administered in the periphery. Then, in two mouse models of insulin resistance, leptin-deficiency and high-fat diet feeding, third intra-cerebro-ventricular infusions of FGF19 improved glycemic status, reduced insulin resistance and potentiated insulin signaling in the periphery. In addition, our study highlights a new mechanism of central FGF19 action, involving the suppression of AGRP/NPY neuronal activity. Overall, our work unveils novel regulatory pathways induced by FGF19 that will be useful in the design of novel strategies to control diabetes in obesity. PMID:24567901

  5. Evidence for action on improving the maternal and newborn health workforce: The basis for quality care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jim; Sochas, Laura; Cometto, Giorgio; Matthews, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious new goals to end preventable maternal and newborn deaths will not only require increased coverage but also improved quality of care. Unfortunately, current levels of quality in the delivery of maternal and newborn care are low in high-burden countries, for reasons that are intimately linked with inadequate planning and management of the maternal and newborn health workforce. The Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health is a key opportunity to strengthen global and country-level accountability frameworks for the health workforce and its capacity to deliver quality care. In order to succeed, maternal and newborn health specialists must embrace this strategy and its linkages with the new Global Strategy for Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health; action is needed across high- and low-income countries; and any accountability framework must be underpinned by ambitious, measurable indicators and strengthened data collection on human resources for health. PMID:26725857

  6. Measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, M.; Drummond, I. T.; Horgan, R. R.; Shanahan, H.; Peardon, M.

    2001-04-01

    Using tadpole-improved actions we investigate the consistency between different methods of measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons for bare aspect ratios {chi}{sub 0}=4,6,10 and inverse lattice spacing in the range a{sub s}{sup -1}=660--840 MeV. The tadpole corrections to the action, which are established self-consistently, are defined for two cases, mean link tadpoles in the Landau gauge and gauge invariant mean plaquette tadpoles. Parameters in the latter case exhibited no dependence on the spatial lattice size L, while in the former, parameters showed only a weak dependence on L easily extrapolated to L={infinity}. The renormalized anisotropy {chi}{sub R} was measured using both the torelon dispersion relation and the sideways potential method. There is general agreement between these approaches, but there are discrepancies which are evidence for the presence of lattice artifact contributions. For the torelon these are estimated to be O({alpha}{sub S}a{sub s}{sup 2}/R{sup 2}), where R is the flux-tube radius. We also present some new data that suggest that rotational invariance is established more accurately for the mean-link action than the plaquette action.

  7. Lattice Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Given a segment that joins two lattice points in R[superscript 3], when is it possible to form a lattice cube that uses this segment as one of its twelve edges? A necessary and sufficient condition is that the length of the segment be an integer. This paper presents an algorithm for finding such a cube when the prime factors of the length are…

  8. New York State Board of Regents Action Plan to Improve Elementary and Secondary Education Results in New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This report presents a comprehensive plan to improve teaching and learning in New York State's public and private schools. After surveying school improvement efforts since 1977, characteristics of New York education, and the state Board of Regents' recent goals review, the report states the regents' goals underlying this action plan. These…

  9. 25 CFR 30.121 - What funds are available to assist schools identified for school improvement, corrective action...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... carry out those schools' responsibilities under 20 U.S.C. 6316(b). With the approval of the school board... school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring? 30.121 Section 30.121 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Progress § 30.121 What funds are available to assist schools identified for school improvement,...

  10. 25 CFR 30.121 - What funds are available to assist schools identified for school improvement, corrective action...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... carry out those schools' responsibilities under 20 U.S.C. 6316(b). With the approval of the school board... school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring? 30.121 Section 30.121 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Progress § 30.121 What funds are available to assist schools identified for school improvement,...

  11. Overlap fermions on a 20{sup 4} lattice

    SciTech Connect

    K.-F. Liu; Shao-Jing Dong; Frank X. Lee; Jianbo Zhang

    1994-03-01

    We report results on hadron masses, fitting of the quenched chiral log, and quark masses from Neuberger's overlap fermion on a quenched 20{sup 4} lattice with lattice spacing a = 0.15 fm. We used the improved gauge action which is shown to lower the density of small eigenvalues for H{sup 2} as compared to the Wilson gauge action. This makes the calculation feasible on 64 nodes of CRAY-T3E. Also presented is the pion mass on a small volume (6{sup 3} x 12 with a Wilson gauge action at beta = 5.7). We find that for configurations that the topological charge Q {ne} 0, the pion mass tends to a constant and for configurations with trivial topology, it approaches zero possibly linearly with the quark mass.

  12. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  13. Improving screening and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Weiler, John M; Hallstrand, Teal S; Parsons, Jonathan P; Randolph, Christopher; Silvers, William S; Storms, William W; Bronstone, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of an expert panel of nationally recognized allergists and pulmonologists who met to discuss how to improve detection and diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), a transient airway narrowing that occurs during and most often after exercise in people with and without underlying asthma. EIB is both commonly underdiagnosed and overdiagnosed. EIB underdiagnosis may result in habitual avoidance of sports and physical activity, chronic deconditioning, weight gain, poor asthma control, low self-esteem, and reduced quality of life. Routine use of a reliable and valid self-administered EIB screening questionnaire by professionals best positioned to screen large numbers of people could substantially improve the detection of EIB. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature that evaluated the accuracy of EIB screening questionnaires that might be adopted for widespread EIB screening in the general population. Results of this review indicated that no existing EIB screening questionnaire had adequate sensitivity and specificity for this purpose. The authors present a call to action to develop a new EIB screening questionnaire, and discuss the rigorous qualitative and quantitative research necessary to develop and validate such an instrument, including key methodological pitfalls that must be avoided. PMID:24811017

  14. Action Analytics: Measuring and Improving Performance that Matters in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Donald; Baer, Linda; Leonard, Joan; Pugliese, Louis; Lefrere, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The action analytics of the future will better assess students' competencies. Using individualized planning, advising, and best practices from cradle to career, these action analytics solutions will align interventions to facilitate retention and transitions and will fully maximize learners' success. Six primary actions are needed to evolve from…

  15. 76 FR 40038 - Improving Government Regulations; Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... minimal. Timetable: ] Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/11 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes... be minimal. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/11 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required.... Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/11 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency...

  16. Action Research: A Tool for Improving Teacher Quality and Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Katherine A.; Greene, H. Carol; Anderson, Patricia J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Action research is a meaningful form of research because it is conducted by the teacher in his or her own classroom. Action research requires a teacher to design a study in an area of interest and conduct it in their own classroom. Action research is a requirement for some masters of education programs in the United States. Purpose: To…

  17. Topiramate treatment improves hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling and action and reduces obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Caricilli, Andrea M; Penteado, Erica; de Abreu, Lélia L; Quaresma, Paula G F; Santos, Andressa C; Guadagnini, Dioze; Razolli, Daniella; Mittestainer, Francine C; Carvalheira, Jose B; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario J A; Prada, Patricia O

    2012-09-01

    Topiramate (TPM) treatment has been shown to reduce adiposity in humans and rodents. The reduction in adiposity is related to decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, the molecular mechanisms through which TPM induces weight loss are contradictory and remain to be clarified. Whether TPM treatment alters hypothalamic insulin, or leptin signaling and action, is not well established. Thus, we investigate herein whether short-term TPM treatment alters energy balance by affecting insulin and leptin signaling, action, or neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed with a high-fat diet. As expected, short-term treatment with TPM diminished adiposity in obese mice mainly due to reduced food intake. TPM increased anorexigenic signaling by enhancing the leptin-induced leptin receptor/Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and the insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate/Akt/forkhead box O1 pathway in parallel to reduced phosphatase protein expression in the hypothalamus of obese mice. These effects were independent of body weight. TPM also raised anorexigenic neuropeptides such as POMC, TRH, and CRH mRNA levels in obese mice. In addition, TPM increased the activation of the hypothalamic MAPK/ERK pathway induced by leptin, accompanied by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator α and uncoupling protein 1 protein levels in brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, TPM increased AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation in peripheral tissues, which may help improve energy metabolism in these tissues. Together, these results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which TPM treatment reduces adiposity. PMID:22822160

  18. Nano-structured and functionalized surfaces for cytocompatibility improvement and bactericidal action.

    PubMed

    Slepicka, Petr; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Siegel, Jakub; Kolska, Zdenka; Bacakova, Lucie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    The field of material surface modification with the aim of biomaterial construction involves several approaches of treatments that allow the preparation of materials, which positively influence adhesion of cells and their proliferation and thus aid and improve tissue formation. Modified materials have a surface composition and morphology intended to interact with biological systems and cellular functions. Not only surface chemistry has an effect on material biological response, surface structures of different morphology can be constructed to guide a desirable biological outcome. Nano-patterned material surfaces have been tested with the aim of how surface geometry and physical properties on a micro- and nano-scale can affect cellular response and influence cell adhesion and proliferation. Biological functionality of solid state substrates was significantly improved by the irradiation of material with plasma discharge or laser treatment. Commonly used "artificial" polymers (e.g. polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN)) and biopolymers (e.g. Poly-l-Lactic acid (PLLA), polymethylpentene (PMP)) were treated with aim of biocompatibility improvement. The treatment of polymer/biopolymer substrates leads to formation of ripple or wrinkle-like structures, supported also with heat treatment or other subsequent surface processing. Several types of chemically different substances (e.g. metal or carbon nano-particles, proteins) were grafted onto material surfaces or built into material structures by different processes. Surface physico-chemical properties (e.g. chemistry, charge, morphology, wettability, electrical conductivity, optical and mechanical properties) of treated surfaces were determined. The enhancement of adhesion and proliferation of cells on modified substrates was investigated in vitro. Bactericidal action of noble metal nano-particles (e.g. Au, Ag) on polymers was

  19. Improvements of sensorimotor processes during action cascading associated with changes in sensory processing architecture-insights from sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Krutika; Hahne, Anja; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In most everyday situations sensorimotor processes are quite complex because situations often require to carry out several actions in a specific temporal order; i.e. one has to cascade different actions. While it is known that changes to stimuli affect action cascading mechanisms, it is unknown whether action cascading changes when sensory stimuli are not manipulated, but the neural architecture to process these stimuli is altered. In the current study we test this hypothesis using prelingually deaf subjects as a model to answer this question. We use a system neurophysiological approach using event-related potentials (ERPs) and source localization techniques. We show that prelingually deaf subjects show improvements in action cascading. However, this improvement is most likely not due to changes at the perceptual (P1-ERP) and attentional processing level (N1-ERP), but due to changes at the response selection level (P3-ERP). It seems that the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) is important for these effects to occur, because the TPJ comprises overlapping networks important for the processing of sensory information and the selection of responses. Sensory deprivation thus affects cognitive processes downstream of sensory processing and only these seem to be important for behavioral improvements in situations requiring complex sensorimotor processes and action cascading. PMID:27321666

  20. Improvements of sensorimotor processes during action cascading associated with changes in sensory processing architecture–insights from sensory deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Krutika; Hahne, Anja; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In most everyday situations sensorimotor processes are quite complex because situations often require to carry out several actions in a specific temporal order; i.e. one has to cascade different actions. While it is known that changes to stimuli affect action cascading mechanisms, it is unknown whether action cascading changes when sensory stimuli are not manipulated, but the neural architecture to process these stimuli is altered. In the current study we test this hypothesis using prelingually deaf subjects as a model to answer this question. We use a system neurophysiological approach using event-related potentials (ERPs) and source localization techniques. We show that prelingually deaf subjects show improvements in action cascading. However, this improvement is most likely not due to changes at the perceptual (P1-ERP) and attentional processing level (N1-ERP), but due to changes at the response selection level (P3-ERP). It seems that the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) is important for these effects to occur, because the TPJ comprises overlapping networks important for the processing of sensory information and the selection of responses. Sensory deprivation thus affects cognitive processes downstream of sensory processing and only these seem to be important for behavioral improvements in situations requiring complex sensorimotor processes and action cascading. PMID:27321666

  1. Glueball spectrum from an anisotropic lattice study

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, C.J.; Peardon, M.

    1999-08-01

    The spectrum of glueballs below 4 GeV in the SU(3) pure-gauge theory is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations of gluons on several anisotropic lattices with spatial grid separations ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 fm. Systematic errors from discretization and finite volume are studied, and the continuum spin quantum numbers are identified. Care is taken to distinguish single glueball states from two-glueball and torelon-pair states. Our determination of the spectrum significantly improves upon previous Wilson action calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  3. Estimate of the charmed 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum from quenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Luo Xiangqian

    2006-03-01

    We compute from quenched lattice QCD the ground state masses of the charmed hybrid mesons ccg, with exotic quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup -+}, 0{sup +-} and 0{sup --}. The 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum has never been provided by lattice simulations due to the difficulties to extract high gluonic excitations from noise. We employ improved gauge and fermion actions on the anisotropic lattice, which reduce greatly the lattice artifacts, and lead to very good signals. The data are extrapolated to the continuum limit, with finite size effects under well control. For 1{sup -+} and 0{sup +-} hybrid mesons, the ground state masses are 4.405(38) GeV and 4.714(52) GeV. We predict for the first time from lattice QCD, the ground state mass of 0{sup --} to be 5.883(146) GeV.

  4. Analysis of the lattice Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook no-slip boundary condition: Ways to improve accuracy and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschaeve, Joris C. G.

    2009-09-01

    An analytical and numerical analysis of the no-slip boundary condition at walls at rest for the lattice Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook method is performed. The main result of this analysis is an alternative formulation for the no-slip boundary condition at walls at rest. Numerical experiments assess the accuracy and stability of this formulation for Poiseuille and Womersley flows, flow over a backward facing step, and unsteady flow around a square cylinder. This no-slip boundary condition is compared analytically and numerically to the boundary conditions of Inamuro [Phys. Fluids 7, 2928 (1995)] and Zou and He [Phys. Fluids 9, 1591 (1997)] and it is found that all three make use of the same mechanism for the off-diagonal element of the stress tensor. Mass conservation, however, is only assured by the present one. In addition, our analysis points out which mechanism lies behind the instabilities also observed by Lätt [Phys. Rev. E 77, 056703 (2008)] for this kind of boundary conditions. We present a way to remove these instabilities, allowing one to reach relaxation frequencies considerably closer to 2.

  5. From treatment to preventive actions: improving function in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Sartor, Cristina D

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy is an insidious and long-term complication of this disease. Synergistic treatments and preventive actions are crucial because there are no clear boundaries for determining when health professionals should intervene or what intervention would best avoid the consequences of neuropathy. Until now, most therapies to any diabetic individual were applied only after the patient's limb was ulcerated or amputated. The loss of muscle and joint functions is recognized as the main cause of plantar overloading. However, if foot and ankle exercises are performed following the early diagnosis of diabetes, they can enable the patient to maintain sufficient residual function to interact with the environment. This article summarizes the current knowledge about the musculoskeletal deficits and biomechanical alterations caused by neuropathy. It also describes the potential benefits of foot and ankle exercises for any diabetic patient that is not undergoing the plantar ulcer healing process. We concentrate on the prevention of the long-term deficits of neuropathy. We also discuss the main strategies and protocols of therapeutic exercises for joints and muscles with deficits, which are applicable to all diabetic patients with mild to moderate neuropathy. We describe further efforts in exploiting the applicability of assistive technologies to improve the adherence to an exercise program. Following the contemporary trends towards self-monitoring and self-care, we developed a software to monitor and promote personalized exercises with the aim of improving autonomous performance in daily living tasks. Initiatives to prevent the complications of functional diabetes are highly recommended before it is too late for the patient and there is no longer an opportunity to reverse the tragic consequences of neuropathy progression. PMID:26452065

  6. Embodied Action Improves Cognition in Children: Evidence from a Study Based on Piagetian Conservation Tasks.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Mariana; Carro, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence highlights the relevance of embodied cognition in learning processes. In this study we evaluate whether embodied action (enaction) improves cognitive understanding in children. Using the Piagetian conservation tasks in 6-7 year olds, we analyzed quantity conservation conceptualization in children who were active participants in the transformation process and compared these results to those of children who were mere observers of an adult's demonstration (as traditionally conducted). The investigation was performed with 105 first-graders. Conservation tasks were demonstrated to half the children, while the other half actively carried out the transformation of matter. Our findings showed that active manipulation of the material helped children recognize quantity invariance in a higher proportion than when the demonstration was only observed. That is, their enactive experience enabled them to comprehend conservation phenomena more easily than if they were merely passive observers. The outcome of this research thus emphasizes how active participation benefits cognitive processes in learning contexts, promoting autonomy, and agency during childhood. PMID:27047420

  7. Improved top-down control reduces oculomotor capture: the case of action video game players.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Kingstone, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Action video game players (AVGPs) have been demonstrated to outperform non-video-game players(NVGPs) on a range of cognitive tasks. Evidence to date suggests that AVGPs’ enhanced performance in attention based tasks can be accounted for by improved top-down control over the allocation of visuospatial attention. Thus,we propose that AVGPs provide a population that can be used to investigate the role of top-down factors in key models of attention. Previous work using AVGPs has indicated that they experience less interfering effects from a salient but task-irrelevant distractor in an attentional capture paradigm (Chisholm, Hickey, Theeuwes, & Kingstone,2010). Two fundamentally different bottom-up and top-down models of attention can account for this result. In the present study, we compared AVGP and NVGP performance in an oculomotor capture paradigm to address when and how top-down control modulates capture. In tracking eye movements, we acquired an explicit measurement of attention allocation and replicated the covert attention effect that AVGPs are quicker than NVGPs to attend to a target in the presence of a task-irrelevant distractor. Critically, our study reveals that this top-down gain is the result of fewer shifts of attention to the salient distractor, rather than faster disengagement after bottom-up capture has occurred. This supports the theory that top-down control can modulate the involuntary capture of attention [added]. PMID:22160821

  8. Biopsy-induced inflammatory conditions improve endometrial receptivity: the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gnainsky, Y; Granot, I; Aldo, P; Barash, A; Or, Y; Mor, G; Dekel, N

    2015-01-01

    A decade ago, we first reported that endometrial biopsy significantly improves the success of pregnancy in IVF patients with recurrent implantation failure, an observation that was later confirmed by others. Recently, we have demonstrated that this treatment elevated the levels of endometrial pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased the abundance of macrophages (Mac) and dendritic cells (DCs). We therefore hypothesised that the biopsy-related successful pregnancy is secondary to an inflammatory response, and aimed at deciphering its mechanism of action. Supporting our hypothesis, we found that the pro-inflammatory TNFα stimulated primary endometrial stromal cells to express cytokines that attracted monocytes and induced their differentiation into DCs. These monocyte-derived DCs stimulated endometrial epithelial cells to express the adhesive molecule SPP1 (osteopontin (OPN)) and its receptors ITGB3 and CD44, whereas MUC16, which interferes with adhesion, was downregulated. Other implantation-associated genes, such as CHST2, CCL4 (MIP1B) and GROA, were upregulated by monocyte-derived Mac. These findings suggest that uterine receptivity is mediated by the expression of molecules associated with inflammation. Such an inflammatory milieu is not generated in some IVF patients with recurrent implantation failure in the absence of local injury provoked by the biopsy treatment. PMID:25349438

  9. Embodied Action Improves Cognition in Children: Evidence from a Study Based on Piagetian Conservation Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Mariana; Carro, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence highlights the relevance of embodied cognition in learning processes. In this study we evaluate whether embodied action (enaction) improves cognitive understanding in children. Using the Piagetian conservation tasks in 6–7 year olds, we analyzed quantity conservation conceptualization in children who were active participants in the transformation process and compared these results to those of children who were mere observers of an adult's demonstration (as traditionally conducted). The investigation was performed with 105 first-graders. Conservation tasks were demonstrated to half the children, while the other half actively carried out the transformation of matter. Our findings showed that active manipulation of the material helped children recognize quantity invariance in a higher proportion than when the demonstration was only observed. That is, their enactive experience enabled them to comprehend conservation phenomena more easily than if they were merely passive observers. The outcome of this research thus emphasizes how active participation benefits cognitive processes in learning contexts, promoting autonomy, and agency during childhood. PMID:27047420

  10. The Public Health Service action plan to improve access to immunization services. The Interagency Committee to Improve Access to Immunization Services.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The Public Health Service's Interagency Committee to Improve Access to Immunization Services (ICI) has responsibility for improving the immunization protection of the nation's children and other vulnerable populations. ICI's Action Plan to Improve Access to Immunization Services sets 14 goals with 120 action steps for improving immunization services nationwide by (a) increasing coordination among Federal health, income, housing, education, and nutrition programs; (b) reducing policy and management barriers that limit access to delivery systems, and (c) strengthening the delivery infrastructure. To accomplish the goals of the plan, there is a $72.0 million increase in funding appropriated in fiscal year 1992 specifically for this purpose. The President's Budget for fiscal year 1993 includes a $24.5 million increase for continued program implementation. The additional resources will be used to address delivery and access problems, which have been determined to be the primary factors limiting immunization for many children. PMID:1594732

  11. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  12. Exploring strange nucleon form factors on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Ronald; Brower, Richard C.; Clark, Michael A.; Fleming, George T.; Osborn, James C.; Rebbi, Claudio; Schaich, David

    2012-03-01

    We discuss techniques for evaluating sea quark contributions to hadronic form factors on the lattice and apply these to an exploratory calculation of the strange electromagnetic, axial, and scalar form factors of the nucleon. We employ the Wilson gauge and fermion actions on an anisotropic 243×64 lattice, probing a range of momentum transfer with Q2<1GeV2. The strange electric and magnetic form factors, GEs(Q2) and GMs(Q2), are found to be small and consistent with zero within the statistics of our calculation. The lattice data favor a small negative value for the strange axial form factor GAs(Q2) and exhibit a strong signal for the bare strange scalar matrix element ⟨N|s¯s|N⟩0. We discuss the unique systematic uncertainties affecting the latter quantity relative to the continuum, as well as prospects for improving future determinations with Wilson-like fermions.

  13. Improving Pedagogy through Action Learning and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This ASA Teaching Workshop explored the potential of Action Learning to use teachers' tacit knowledge to collaboratively confront pedagogical issues. The Action Learning model grows out of industrial management and is based on the notion that peers are a valuable resource for learning about how to solve the problems encountered in the workplace.…

  14. Participatory Action Research for Educational Leadership: Using Data-Driven Decision Making to Improve Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, E. Alana; Milenkiewicz, Margaret T.; Bucknam, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The participatory action research (PAR) process discussed in the text represents the next evolutionary stage for action research and practitioner research in education. The authors integrate process with methodology to provide an overview of the PAR process similar to professional learning communities in schools. Results of the original PAR study…

  15. Towards a Collaborative Action Research in Spain to Improve Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Díaz, Elia; Calvo, Adelina; Rodríguez-Hoyos, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative action research process in pre-school and primary education in Spain during a four-year period (2006-2010). The aim was the need to promote a level of reflection among the participants as to their teaching practice. The methodology used was a technologically mediated action research process. The results are…

  16. Improving Physics Teaching through Action Research: The Impact of a Nationwide Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Marcus; Rietdijk, Willeke; Garrett, Caro; Griffiths, Janice

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an independent evaluation of the Action Research for Physics (ARP) programme, a nationwide professional development programme which trains teachers to use action research to increase student interest in physics and encourage them to take post-compulsory physics. The impact of the programme was explored from the perspective of…

  17. Action Research: A Tool for Promoting Faculty Development and Continuous Improvement in Leadership Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Cynthia L.; Klein, C. Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of action research to examine the content and outcomes of university-based leadership preparation programs. Using examples drawn from an ongoing action research project with candidates in a master's level principal preparation program, we demonstrate how the collection and analysis of candidate's written…

  18. Looking in the mirror: Teachers' use of autobiography and action research to improve practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Nancy T.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents an argument for valuing subjective, reflective knowledge based on Habermas' category of cognitive interest of emancipatory knowing. Using the teachers' autobiographies and action research as data sources, the process of personal empowerment is explored. A model of change derived from analysis of teachers' writings is proposed that includes disturbance, alternatives, confidence and action.

  19. Monte Carlo methods in lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for SU(2) gauge theory in 4 dimensions is calculated. This computation was done on a prototype parallel processor and the implementation of gauge theories on this system is described in detail. Using an action of the purely Wilson form (tract of plaquette in the fundamental representation), results with high statistics are obtained. These results are not consistent with scaling according to the continuum renormalization group. Using actions containing higher representations of the group, a search is made for one which is closer to the continuum limit. The choice is based upon the phase structure of these extended theories and also upon the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation to the renormalizaiton group on the lattice. The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for this improved action is obtained and the mass divided by the square root of the string tension is a constant as the lattice spacing is varied. The other topic studied is the inclusion of dynamical fermions into Monte Carlo calculations via the pseudo fermion technique. Monte Carlo results obtained with this method are compared with those from an exact algorithm based on Gauss-Seidel inversion. First applied were the methods to the Schwinger model and SU(3) theory.

  20. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  1. Reading between the Lines of Online Course Evaluations: Identifiable Actions That Improve Student Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness and Course Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Students continue to demand and enroll in online courses, but are not always satisfied with their experiences. The purpose of this study was to determine if students' responses to evaluations for online courses could be used to identify faculty actions that could lead to improved evaluation scores in teaching effectiveness and overall course…

  2. 25 CFR 30.122 - Must the Bureau assist a school it identified for school improvement, corrective action, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Must the Bureau assist a school it identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring? 30.122 Section 30.122 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS Failure To Make Adequate Yearly Progress §...

  3. Leading School-Wide Improvement in Low-Performing Schools Facing Conditions of Accountability: Key Actions and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosner, Shelby; Jones, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance a framework that identifies three key domains of work and a set of more nuanced considerations and actions within each domain for school leaders seeking to improve school-wide student learning in low-performing schools facing conditions of accountability. Design/methodology/approach: Review of…

  4. Affirmative Action Plan for Improvement of Equal Opportunities for Members of Minority Groups, Women, and Physically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    This document presents the affirmative action plan developed by Black Hawk College to assure the development and maintenance of educational programs, services, and employment practices that are sensitive to the needs of minorities, women, and the physically handicapped. Part I deals with employment, outlining a specific plan for improving equal…

  5. How Schools Are Using Action Research on Practical Work, New Technologies and Research and Development to Improve Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Three methods from different schools illustrate how the cyclic process of action research can be used to develop teaching skills. The importance of learning from successful and unsuccessful lessons or parts of lessons is emphasised as the basis for development and improvement. This process can be carried out on an individual basis but development…

  6. Baryon Resonances from a Novel Fat-Link Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; F. X. Lee; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

    2001-07-01

    We present first results for masses of positive and negative parity excited baryons in lattice QCD using an O(a{sup 2}) improved gluon action and a Fat Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed with fat links. The results are in agreement with earlier calculations of N* resonances using improved actions and exhibit a clear mass splitting between the nucleon and its chiral partner, even for the Wilson fermion action. The results also indicate a splitting between the lowest J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} states for the standard nucleon interpolating fields.

  7. Action video game playing is associated with improved visual sensitivity, but not alterations in visual sensory memory.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, L Gregory; Cain, Matthew S; Darling, Elise F; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    Action video game playing has been experimentally linked to a number of perceptual and cognitive improvements. These benefits are captured through a wide range of psychometric tasks and have led to the proposition that action video game experience may promote the ability to extract statistical evidence from sensory stimuli. Such an advantage could arise from a number of possible mechanisms: improvements in visual sensitivity, enhancements in the capacity or duration for which information is retained in visual memory, or higher-level strategic use of information for decision making. The present study measured the capacity and time course of visual sensory memory using a partial report performance task as a means to distinguish between these three possible mechanisms. Sensitivity measures and parameter estimates that describe sensory memory capacity and the rate of memory decay were compared between individuals who reported high evels and low levels of action video game experience. Our results revealed a uniform increase in partial report accuracy at all stimulus-to-cue delays for action video game players but no difference in the rate or time course of the memory decay. The present findings suggest that action video game playing may be related to enhancements in the initial sensitivity to visual stimuli, but not to a greater retention of information in iconic memory buffers. PMID:23709062

  8. Improving dynamical lattice QCD simulations through integrator tuning using Poisson brackets and a force-gradient integrator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Michael A.; Joo, Balint; Kennedy, Anthony D.; Silva, Paolo J.

    2011-10-01

    We show how the integrators used for the molecular dynamics step of the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm can be further improved. These integrators not only approximately conserve some Hamiltonian H but conserve exactly a nearby shadow Hamiltonian H~. This property allows for a new tuning method of the molecular dynamics integrator and also allows for a new class of integrators (force-gradient integrators) which is expected to reduce significantly the computational cost of future large-scale gauge field ensemble generation.

  9. Improving dynamical lattice QCD simulations through integrator tuning using Poisson brackets and a force-gradient integrator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M. A.; Joo, Balint; Kennedy, A. D.; Silva, P. J.

    2011-10-01

    We show how the integrators used for the molecular dynamics step of the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm can be further improved. These integrators not only approximately conserve some Hamiltonian H but conserve exactly a nearby shadow Hamiltonian H-tilde. This property allows for a new tuning method of the molecular dynamics integrator and also allows for a new class of integrators (force-gradient integrators) which is expected to reduce significantly the computational cost of future large-scale gauge field ensemble generation.

  10. Quantum nonlinear Schrodinger equation on a lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bogolyubov, N.M.; Korepin, V.E.

    1986-09-01

    A local Hamiltonian is constructed for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation on a lattice in both the classical and the quantum variants. This Hamiltonian is an explicit elementary function of the local Bose fields. The lattice model possesses the same structure of the action-angle variables as the continuous model.

  11. Progress in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1983-01-01

    These lectures first provide an overview of the current status of lattice gauge theory calculations. They then review some technical points on group integration, gauge fixing, and order parameters. Various Monte Carlo algorithms are discussed. Finally, alternatives to the Wilson action are considered in the context of universality for the continuum limit. 41 references.

  12. Enhanced Mitochondrial Superoxide Scavenging Does Not Improve Muscle Insulin Action in the High Fat-Fed Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lark, Daniel S.; Kang, Li; Lustig, Mary E.; Bonner, Jeffrey S.; James, Freyja D.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Improving mitochondrial oxidant scavenging may be a viable strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and diabetes. Mice overexpressing the mitochondrial matrix isoform of superoxide dismutase (sod2tg mice) and/or transgenically expressing catalase within the mitochondrial matrix (mcattg mice) have increased scavenging of O2˙ˉ and H2O2, respectively. Furthermore, muscle insulin action is partially preserved in high fat (HF)-fed mcattg mice. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that increased O2˙ˉ scavenging alone or in combination with increased H2O2 scavenging (mtAO mice) enhances in vivo muscle insulin action in the HF-fed mouse. Insulin action was examined in conscious, unrestrained and unstressed wild type (WT), sod2tg, mcattg and mtAO mice using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (insulin clamps) combined with radioactive glucose tracers following sixteen weeks of normal chow or HF (60% calories from fat) feeding. Glucose infusion rates, whole body glucose disappearance, and muscle glucose uptake during the insulin clamp were similar in chow- and HF-fed WT and sod2tg mice. Consistent with our previous work, HF-fed mcattg mice had improved muscle insulin action, however, an additive effect was not seen in mtAO mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in muscle from clamped mice was consistent with glucose flux measurements. These results demonstrate that increased O2˙ˉ scavenging does not improve muscle insulin action in the HF-fed mouse alone or when coupled to increased H2O2 scavenging. PMID:25992608

  13. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  14. Electric Polarizability of Neutral Hadrons from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Christensen; Walter Wilcox; Frank X. Lee; Leming Zhou

    2004-08-01

    By simulating a uniform electric field on a lattice and measuring the change in the rest mass, we calculate the electric polarizability of neutral mesons and baryons using the methods of quenched lattice QCD. Specifically, we measure the electric polarizability coefficient from the quadratic response to the electric field for 10 particles: the vector mesons {rho}{sup 0} and K{sup *0}; the octet baryons n, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub o}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}; and the decouplet baryons {Delta}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}. Independent calculations using two fermion actions were done for consistency and comparison purposes. One calculation uses Wilson fermions with a lattice spacing of a = 0.10 fm. The other uses tadpole improved Luesher-Weiss gauge fields and clover quark action with a lattice spacing a = 0.17 fm. Our results for neutron electric polarizability are compared to experiment.

  15. The Michigan Healthy School Action Tools process generates improvements in school nutrition policies and practices, and student dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Katherine; Oleksyk, Shannon; Golzynski, Diane; Drzal, Nick; Lucarelli, Jennifer; Reznar, Melissa; Wen, Yalu; Krabill Yoder, Karen

    2015-05-01

    The Michigan Healthy School Action Tools (HSAT) is an online self-assessment and action planning process for schools seeking to improve their health policies and practices. The School Nutrition Advances Kids study, a 2-year quasi-experimental intervention with low-income middle schools, evaluated whether completing the HSAT with a facilitator assistance and small grant funding resulted in (1) improvements in school nutrition practices and policies and (2) improvements in student dietary intake. A total of 65 low-income Michigan middle schools participated in the study. The Block Youth Food Frequency Questionnaire was completed by 1,176 seventh-grade students at baseline and in eighth grade (during intervention). Schools reported nutrition-related policies and practices/education using the School Environment and Policy Survey. Schools completing the HSAT were compared to schools that did not complete the HSAT with regard to number of policy and practice changes and student dietary intake. Schools that completed the HSAT made significantly more nutrition practice/education changes than schools that did not complete the HSAT, and students in those schools made dietary improvements in fruit, fiber, and cholesterol intake. The Michigan HSAT process is an effective strategy to initiate improvements in nutrition policies and practices within schools, and to improve student dietary intake. PMID:25733730

  16. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  17. Improving the Operability of the Cosmic-ray Neutron Soil Moisture Method: An Estimation of Lattice Water using Global Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkenbiner, C. E.; Avery, W. A.; Kuzila, M.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Franz, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, global trends in consumptive water-use indicate an increasing and unsustainable reliance on groundwater resources. Each year approximately 60% of water used for agriculture is wasted through inadequate water conservation, losses in distribution, and inappropriate times and rates of irrigation. Therefore, in order to coordinate a strategy to accomplish the agricultural demands of our global community we must maintain a stable global food and water trade while increasing crop yield and efficiency. This research aims to improve the operability of the recently developed and promising cosmic-ray neutron method for estimating field scale soil moisture. The sensor works by passively counting above ground low-energy neutrons which correlate to the total water in the sensor measurement volume (a sphere with radius of ~300 m and vertical soil depth of ~30 cm). Because the sensor responds to different forms of water (sources of hydrogen), estimates of background water in the mineral soil need to be accounted for in order to minimize measurement error. Here we compared field-scale estimates of soil mineral water with readily available global datasets. Using the newly compiled 1km resolution Global Soil Dataset (GSDE), we were able to investigate the correlation between soil mineral water and clay content for various soil taxonomic orders. Preliminary results suggest statistically significant linear relationships for Aridisol, Mollisol and Ultisol soil orders. Incorporation of this dataset will allow for real-time soil moisture mapping of hundreds of center-pivots using the mobile cosmic-ray probe without the need for time-consuming in-situ soil sampling. Integrating this technique into soil moisture management has the potential to increase the efficiency of irrigation water used in agriculture.

  18. Improving Student Engagement: An Evaluation of the Latinos in Action Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Jose E.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanic students make up 12% of the enrollment in Utah elementary and secondary schools but only 3.4% of the enrollment at Utah's colleges and universities, according to Aleman and Rorrer (2006). The intervention Latinos in Action (LIA) seeks to increase high school completion and college graduation rates among emergent bilingual Latinos by…

  19. Youth Participatory Action Research and School Improvement: The Missing Voices of Black Youth in Montreal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Anne-Marie; Celemencki, Jacqueline; Calixte, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the implementation and results of a youth participatory action research (YPAR) project carried out with black high school students in 2009 and 2010 in Montreal, QC. The aim of the project was to involve black youth in studying the factors that either enhance or impede their success in school and thereby have them identify…

  20. Reflecting on Evidence: Leaders Use Action Research to Improve Their Teacher Performance Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on an action research (AR) project with six public high school leaders (reviewers) who volunteered to engage in an 18 month project to overcome their own defensiveness in addressing concerns with teachers (reviewees) whose performance they were evaluating. In the paper I outline how I acted as a coach in a long-term development…

  1. Using Action Research to Improve Student Engagement in a Peer-Assisted Learning Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Benson, Robyn; Brack, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of students learning together in peer-assisted learning (PAL) programmes have been widely reported. Implementing and evaluating PAL programmes provide specific challenges for academic staff. This paper explains how action research was used to design, trial and refine a same-year PAL programme to enhance student engagement. The PAL…

  2. Moving Forward: Southern States Take Action To Improve Access to Quality, Affordable Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Inst. on Children and Families, Columbia, SC.

    The Southern Regional Initiative on Child Care (established by the Southern Institute on Children and Families) is guided by the Southern Regional Task Force on Child Care including representatives from 16 southern states and the District of Columbia. The initial charge from the Task Force was to develop a southern regional action plan to improve…

  3. Code-specific learning rules improve action selection by populations of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Population coding is widely regarded as a key mechanism for achieving reliable behavioral decisions. We previously introduced reinforcement learning for population-based decision making by spiking neurons. Here we generalize population reinforcement learning to spike-based plasticity rules that take account of the postsynaptic neural code. We consider spike/no-spike, spike count and spike latency codes. The multi-valued and continuous-valued features in the postsynaptic code allow for a generalization of binary decision making to multi-valued decision making and continuous-valued action selection. We show that code-specific learning rules speed up learning both for the discrete classification and the continuous regression tasks. The suggested learning rules also speed up with increasing population size as opposed to standard reinforcement learning rules. Continuous action selection is further shown to explain realistic learning speeds in the Morris water maze. Finally, we introduce the concept of action perturbation as opposed to the classical weight- or node-perturbation as an exploration mechanism underlying reinforcement learning. Exploration in the action space greatly increases the speed of learning as compared to exploration in the neuron or weight space. PMID:24875790

  4. 77 FR 17565 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... West Project) in Draper, Salt Lake County in the State of Utah. These actions grant licenses, permits... in the State of Utah: The Bangerter 600 West Project in Draper, Salt Lake County, Utah, project... Railroad (UPRR) line at about 900 West in the city of Draper in Salt Lake County. The Selected...

  5. Action Research to Improve Youth and Adult Literacy: Empowering Learners in a Multilingual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alidou, Hassana, Ed.; Glanz, Christine, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in education today is to adapt and respond to a linguistically and culturally diverse world, and to combat social disintegration and discrimination. Participatory and collaborative action research represents an empowering and emancipatory approach to this challenge because the "target groups" become…

  6. 78 FR 44237 - Improving Government Regulations; Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... regarding restrictions on the disclosure of fundamental research. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Final... period that follows publication in the Federal Register. This agenda updates the report published on... format that offers users the ability to obtain information from the agenda database. Because...

  7. Using Action Research to Teach Students to Manage Team Learning and Improve Teamwork Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Ladd, Brenda; Chan, Christopher C. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating strategies that students can use to develop skills in managing team learning. Two groups of second-year management students participated in a semester-long action research project over two semesters. The students were educated on team development, team processes and conflict management and how to…

  8. Phase structure of two-color QCD at real and imaginary chemical potentials: Lattice simulations and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiyama, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Saito, Takuya; Ishii, Masahiro; Takahashi, Junichi; Kashiwa, Kouji; Kouno, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the phase structure of two-color QCD at both real and imaginary chemical potentials (μ ), performing lattice simulations and analyzing the data with the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. Lattice QCD simulations are done on an 83×4 lattice with the clover-improved two-flavor Wilson fermion action and the renormalization-group-improved Iwasaki gauge action. We test the analytic continuation of physical quantities from imaginary μ to real μ by comparing lattice QCD results calculated at real μ with the results of an analytic function, the coefficients of which are determined from lattice QCD results at imaginary μ . We also test the validity of the PNJL model by comparing model results with lattice QCD ones. The PNJL model is good in the deconfinement region, but less accurate in the transition and confinement regions. This problem is cured by introducing the baryon degree of freedom to the model. It is also found that the vector-type four-quark interaction is necessary to explain lattice data on the quark number density.

  9. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  10. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  11. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  12. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann computational physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments of the lattice gas automata method and its extension to the lattice Boltzmann method have provided new computational schemes for solving a variety of partial differential equations and modeling different physics systems. The lattice gas method, regarded as the simplest microscopic and kinetic approach which generates meaningful macroscopic dynamics, is fully parallel and can be easily programmed on parallel machines. In this talk, the author will review basic principles of the lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann method, its mathematical foundation and its numerical implementation. A detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann method with the lattice gas technique and other traditional numerical schemes, including the finite-difference scheme and the pseudo-spectral method, for solving the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic fluid flows, will be discussed. Recent achievements of the lattice gas and the the lattice Boltzmann method and their applications in surface phenomena, spinodal decomposition and pattern formation in chemical reaction-diffusion systems will be presented.

  13. Top 10 Ways to Improve Science Achievement: Actions for School Principals, Assistant Principals, Department Chairs and School Improvement Consultants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    High Schools That Work (HSTW) Assessment data show the need to improve science education in both the middle grades and high school. Science education increases students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills. This publication is designed to help principals, other school leaders and teachers identify rigorous instruction and successfully…

  14. PC Clusters for Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, D. J.

    2005-03-01

    In the last several years, tightly coupled PC clusters have become widely applied, cost effective resources for lattice gauge computations. This paper discusses the practice of building such clusters, in particular balanced design requirements. I review and quantify the improvements over time of key performance parameters and overall price to performance ratio. Applying these trends and technology forecasts given by computer equipment manufacturers, I predict the range of price to performance for lattice codes expected in the next several years.

  15. Area of Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  16. Improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin action induced by increasing energy expenditure or decreasing energy intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Edward P.; Racette, Susan B.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Fontana, Luigi; Steger-May, Karen; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Klein, Samuel; Holloszy, John O.

    2006-01-01

    Background Weight loss, through caloric restriction (CR) or increases in exercise energy expenditure (EX), improves glucose tolerance and insulin action. However, EX may further improve glucoregulation through weight-loss independent mechanisms. Objective To assess the hypothesis that weight loss through EX improves glucoregulation and circulating factors involved in insulin action, to a greater extent than does similar weight loss through CR. Design Sedentary 50- to 60-year-old men and women (body mass index=23.5–29.9 kg/m2) were randomized to 12-month EX (n=18) or CR (n=18) weight loss interventions or to a healthy lifestyle (HL) control group (n=10). Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the glucose and insulin areas under the curve (AUCs) were assessed by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Adiponectin and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were assessed in fasting serum. Fat mass was determined by DXA. Results Yearlong energy deficits were not different between EX and CR as evidenced by body weight and fat mass changes. ISI increased, and the glucose and insulin AUCs decreased in the EX and CR groups and remained unchanged in the HL group but did not differ between EX and CR. Marginally significant increases in adiponectin, and decreases in the TNFα-to-adiponectin ratio, occurred in the EX and CR groups but not in the HL group. Conclusions EX- and CR-induced weight losses are both effective for improving glucose tolerance and insulin action in non-obese, healthy, middle-aged men and women; however, it does not appear that exercise training-induced weight loss results in greater improvements than those that result from CR. PMID:17093155

  17. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  18. Getting Ideas into Action: Building Networked Improvement Communities in Education. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.; Gomez, Louis M.; Grunow, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    In this Carnegie essay by Anthony Bryk, Louis Gomez and Alicia Grunow, the authors argue that the social organization of the research enterprise is badly broken and a very different alternative is needed. They instead support a science of improvement research and introduce the idea of a networked improvement community that creates the purposeful…

  19. An action research study; cultural differences impact how manufacturing organizations receive continuous improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattman, Braden R.

    National culture and organizational culture impact how continuous improvement methods are received, implemented and deployed by suppliers. Previous research emphasized the dominance of national culture over organizational culture. The countries studied included Poland, Mexico, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Estonia, India, Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. The research found that Canada was most receptive to continuous improvement, with China being the least receptive. The study found that organizational culture was more influential than national culture. Isomorphism and benchmarking is driving continuous-improvement language and methods to be more universally known within business. Business and management practices are taking precedence in driving change within organizations.

  20. Automated generation of lattice QCD Feynman rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A.; von Hippel, G. M.; Horgan, R. R.; Müller, E. H.

    2009-12-01

    The derivation of the Feynman rules for lattice perturbation theory from actions and operators is complicated, especially for highly improved actions such as HISQ. This task is, however, both important and particularly suitable for automation. We describe a suite of software to generate and evaluate Feynman rules for a wide range of lattice field theories with gluons and (relativistic and/or heavy) quarks. Our programs are capable of dealing with actions as complicated as (m)NRQCD and HISQ. Automated differentiation methods are used to calculate also the derivatives of Feynman diagrams. Program summaryProgram title: HiPPY, HPsrc Catalogue identifier: AEDX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv2 (see Additional comments below) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 513 426 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 893 707 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, Fortran95 Computer: HiPPy: Single-processor workstations. HPsrc: Single-processor workstations and MPI-enabled multi-processor systems Operating system: HiPPy: Any for which Python v2.5.x is available. HPsrc: Any for which a standards-compliant Fortran95 compiler is available Has the code been vectorised or parallelised?: Yes RAM: Problem specific, typically less than 1 GB for either code Classification: 4.4, 11.5 Nature of problem: Derivation and use of perturbative Feynman rules for complicated lattice QCD actions. Solution method: An automated expansion method implemented in Python (HiPPy) and code to use expansions to generate Feynman rules in Fortran95 (HPsrc). Restrictions: No general restrictions. Specific restrictions are discussed in the text. Additional comments: The HiPPy and HPsrc codes are released under the second version of the GNU General Public Licence (GPL v2). Therefore anyone is

  1. Improving our legacy: Incorporation of adaptive management into state wildlife action plans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The loss of biodiversity is a mounting concern, but despite numerous attempts there are few large scale conservation efforts that have proven successful in reversing current declines. Given the challenge of biodiversity conservation, there is a need to develop strategic conservation plans that address species declines even with the inherent uncertainty in managing multiple species in complex environments. In 2002, the State Wildlife Grant program was initiated to fulfill this need, and while not explicitly outlined by Congress follows the fundamental premise of adaptive management, 'Learning by doing'. When action is necessary, but basic biological information and an understanding of appropriate management strategies are lacking, adaptive management enables managers to be proactive in spite of uncertainty. However, regardless of the strengths of adaptive management, the development of an effective adaptive management framework is challenging. In a review of 53 State Wildlife Action Plans, I found a keen awareness by planners that adaptive management was an effective method for addressing biodiversity conservation, but the development and incorporation of explicit adaptive management approaches within each plan remained elusive. Only ???25% of the plans included a framework for how adaptive management would be implemented at the project level within their state. There was, however, considerable support across plans for further development and implementation of adaptive management. By furthering the incorporation of adaptive management principles in conservation plans and explicitly outlining the decision making process, states will be poised to meet the pending challenges to biodiversity conservation. ?? 2010 .

  2. Featuring dental education research: applying the principles of action research to improve teaching of dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Khan, S B

    2009-11-01

    This article focuses on educational research conducted at the newly merged UWC faculty of dentistry. The research emphasises the change in teaching methods employed to address the concerns experienced in teaching the new large classes as observed in the prosthetic techniques module. These educational interventions were conducted over 5 years and the study design included the principles of action research. Students were assisted in learning the theory of the practical procedures and the subsequent completion of these procedures with the accurate application of the theoretical concepts. Changes in the teaching methods enhanced students learning and successful translation of the theory into practical work. The active learning exercises incorporated into the teaching further motivated and assisted students with deep learning. The debates indicated that students know and accept the value of the module as part of their training. PMID:20306872

  3. Anatomy of the lattice magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornyakov, V. G.; Chernodub, M. N.; Gubarev, F. V.; Polikarpov, M. I.; Suzuki, T.; Veselov, A. I.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2002-06-01

    We study the Abelian and non-Abelian action density near the monopole in the maximal Abelian gauge of /SU(2) lattice gauge theory. We find that the non-Abelian action density near the monopoles belonging to the percolating cluster decreases when we approach the monopole center. Our estimate of the monopole radius is Rmon~0.04 fm.

  4. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  5. Analysis and improvement of Brinkman lattice Boltzmann schemes: Bulk, boundary, interface. Similarity and distinctness with finite elements in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Silva, Goncalo; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    This work focuses on the numerical solution of the Stokes-Brinkman equation for a voxel-type porous-media grid, resolved by one to eight spacings per permeability contrast of 1 to 10 orders in magnitude. It is first analytically demonstrated that the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the linear-finite-element method (FEM) both suffer from the viscosity correction induced by the linear variation of the resistance with the velocity. This numerical artefact may lead to an apparent negative viscosity in low-permeable blocks, inducing spurious velocity oscillations. The two-relaxation-times (TRT) LBM may control this effect thanks to free-tunable two-rates combination Λ . Moreover, the Brinkman-force-based BF-TRT schemes may maintain the nondimensional Darcy group and produce viscosity-independent permeability provided that the spatial distribution of Λ is fixed independently of the kinematic viscosity. Such a property is lost not only in the BF-BGK scheme but also by "partial bounce-back" TRT gray models, as shown in this work. Further, we propose a consistent and improved IBF-TRT model which vanishes viscosity correction via simple specific adjusting of the viscous-mode relaxation rate to local permeability value. This prevents the model from velocity fluctuations and, in parallel, improves for effective permeability measurements, from porous channel to multidimensions. The framework of our exact analysis employs a symbolic approach developed for both LBM and FEM in single and stratified, unconfined, and bounded channels. It shows that even with similar bulk discretization, BF, IBF, and FEM may manifest quite different velocity profiles on the coarse grids due to their intrinsic contrasts in the setting of interface continuity and no-slip conditions. While FEM enforces them on the grid vertexes, the LBM prescribes them implicitly. We derive effective LBM continuity conditions and show that the heterogeneous viscosity correction impacts them, a property also shared

  6. Analysis and improvement of Brinkman lattice Boltzmann schemes: bulk, boundary, interface. Similarity and distinctness with finite elements in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina; Silva, Goncalo; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    This work focuses on the numerical solution of the Stokes-Brinkman equation for a voxel-type porous-media grid, resolved by one to eight spacings per permeability contrast of 1 to 10 orders in magnitude. It is first analytically demonstrated that the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the linear-finite-element method (FEM) both suffer from the viscosity correction induced by the linear variation of the resistance with the velocity. This numerical artefact may lead to an apparent negative viscosity in low-permeable blocks, inducing spurious velocity oscillations. The two-relaxation-times (TRT) LBM may control this effect thanks to free-tunable two-rates combination Λ. Moreover, the Brinkman-force-based BF-TRT schemes may maintain the nondimensional Darcy group and produce viscosity-independent permeability provided that the spatial distribution of Λ is fixed independently of the kinematic viscosity. Such a property is lost not only in the BF-BGK scheme but also by "partial bounce-back" TRT gray models, as shown in this work. Further, we propose a consistent and improved IBF-TRT model which vanishes viscosity correction via simple specific adjusting of the viscous-mode relaxation rate to local permeability value. This prevents the model from velocity fluctuations and, in parallel, improves for effective permeability measurements, from porous channel to multidimensions. The framework of our exact analysis employs a symbolic approach developed for both LBM and FEM in single and stratified, unconfined, and bounded channels. It shows that even with similar bulk discretization, BF, IBF, and FEM may manifest quite different velocity profiles on the coarse grids due to their intrinsic contrasts in the setting of interface continuity and no-slip conditions. While FEM enforces them on the grid vertexes, the LBM prescribes them implicitly. We derive effective LBM continuity conditions and show that the heterogeneous viscosity correction impacts them, a property also shared

  7. Comment on "An improved gray Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating fluid flow in multi-scale porous media": Intrinsic links between LBE Brinkman schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2016-02-01

    In this Comment on the recent work (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11] by Zhu and Ma (ZM) we first show that all three local gray Lattice Boltzmann (GLB) schemes in the form (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11]: GS (Chen and Zhu, 2008; Gao and Sharma, 1994) [1,4], WBS (Walsh et al., 2009) [12] and ZM, fail to get constant Darcy's velocity in series of porous blocks. This inconsistency is because of their incorrect definition of the macroscopic velocity in the presence of the heterogeneous momentum exchange, while the original WBS model (Walsh et al., 2009) [12] does this properly. We improve the GS and ZM schemes for this and other related deficiencies. Second, we show that the "discontinuous velocity" they recover on the stratified interfaces with their WBS scheme is inherent, in different degrees, to all LBE Brinkman schemes, including ZM scheme. None of them guarantees the stress and the velocity continuity by their implicit interface conditions, even in the frame of the two-relaxation-times (TRT) collision operator where these two properties are assured in stratified Stokes flow, Ginzburg (2007) [5]. Third, the GLB schemes are presented in work (Zhu and Ma, 2013) [11] as the alternative ones to direct, Brinkman-force based (BF) schemes (Freed, 1998; Nie and Martys, 2007) [3,8]. Yet, we show that the BF-TRT scheme (Ginzburg, 2008) [6] gets the solutions of any of the improved GLB schemes for specific, viscosity-dependent choice of its one or two local relaxation rates. This provides the principal difference between the GLB and BF: while the BF may respect the linearity of the Stokes-Brinkman equation rigorously, the GLB-TRT cannot, unless it reduces to the BF via the inverse transform of the relaxation rates. Furthermore, we show that, in limited parameter space, "gray" schemes may run one another. From the practical point of view, permeability values obtained with the GLB are viscosity-dependent, unlike with the BF. Finally, the GLB shares with the BF a so-called anisotropy (Ginzburg

  8. Improving College Choice: Helping Students and Parents Make Better Informed Decisions. Data for Action 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    As the demand for college graduates increases, it is critical (from both supply and demand perspectives) that students choose the postsecondary option that best meets their needs. Improved college readiness is an important first step to better informed choices about college. Parents and students need access to easy-to-understand data to make the…

  9. Improving Instructional Practices at the Secondary Level through Actions of a Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudermilk, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    Schools' functioning as learning organizations provide educators the opportunity to focus on working together in innovative ways. However, it is unknown to what extent learning organizations exist in small high schools or whether small high schools' functioning as learning organizations improve academic achievement. The purpose of this study was…

  10. Teacher Satisfaction and Community Action: Improving Education in Rural and Remote Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Don; And Others

    This paper addresses issues related to school location, staff turnover, and educational improvement through community involvement. A study involving second-year teachers in Australia indicates that teacher satisfaction was related to satisfying relationships with fellow staff and with students who were cooperative and enthusiastic about learning.…

  11. Improving Student Learning: Action Principles for Families, Schools, Districts and States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    Improving Schools to Promote Learning is a concise and common-sense examination of all the moving parts that drive student learning. The book ties together the research, policies, and practices relative to the state, district, school, classroom, and family, and explains their effects on student learning. The author covers an array of topics,…

  12. The Pratt Center for Community Improvement: A University Urban Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, George M.; Shiffman, Ronald

    The Pratt Center for Community Improvement was founded in Brooklyn in 1963 by Pratt Institute. Its aim was to help equalize the knowledge level of city and community representatives concerning issues in urban renewal, and to gain the confidence of local residents and enhance their participation in decision making. Participant education and…

  13. Action Research to Improve Methods of Delivery and Feedback in an Access Grid Room Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The…

  14. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  15. Nuclear Force from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, N.; Aoki, S.; Hatsuda, T.

    2007-07-13

    The nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential is studied by lattice QCD simulations in the quenched approximation, using the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on a 32{sup 4} [{approx_equal}(4.4 fm){sup 4}] lattice. A NN potential V{sub NN}(r) is defined from the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter amplitude with a local interpolating operator for the nucleon. By studying the NN interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} channels, we show that the central part of V{sub NN}(r) has a strong repulsive core of a few hundred MeV at short distances (r < or approx. 0.5 fm) surrounded by an attractive well at medium and long distances. These features are consistent with the known phenomenological features of the nuclear force.

  16. Nuclear force from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Aoki, S; Hatsuda, T

    2007-07-13

    The nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential is studied by lattice QCD simulations in the quenched approximation, using the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on a 32(4) [approximately (4.4 fm)(4)] lattice. A NN potential V(NN)(r) is defined from the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter amplitude with a local interpolating operator for the nucleon. By studying the NN interaction in the (1)S(0) and (3)S(1) channels, we show that the central part of V(NN)(r) has a strong repulsive core of a few hundred MeV at short distances (r approximately < 0.5 fm) surrounded by an attractive well at medium and long distances. These features are consistent with the known phenomenological features of the nuclear force. PMID:17678213

  17. Microemulgel: an overwhelming approach to improve therapeutic action of drug moiety.

    PubMed

    Ashara, Kalpesh C; Paun, Jalpa S; Soniwala, M M; Chavda, J R; Mendapara, Vishal P; Mori, Nitin M

    2016-07-01

    As compared to gel and other topical preparations microemulgel has been prepared by screening of oils, emulsifier, and co-emulsifier on bases of solubility of an API in it. An API has high solubility and oil may also have more or less pharmacological property, so it may assist the therapeutic action of API. Due to presence of oil portion, it leads to more penetration of API in the skin. Oil Micelle Size was less than 500 nm which provides more area for absorption of API in the skin so more penetration and more effective than macro-emulsion. Microemulgel has an advantage of emulgel that has dual benefits of micro-emulsion and gel and several other desirable properties like good consistency, thyrotrophic, greaseless, easily spreadable as well as removable, emollient, non-staining, water soluble, longer shelf-life, bio-friendly, transparent, pleasant appearance, ability of patients for self-medication, termination of medications will be easy, etc. PMID:27330376

  18. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation over left dorsal premotor cortex improves the dynamic control of visuospatially cued actions

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Nick S.; Bestmann, Sven; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Weiss, Michael M.; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Frackowiak, Richard S.J.; Rothwell, John C.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2013-01-01

    Left rostral dorsal premotor cortex (rPMd) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) have been implicated in the dynamic control of actions. In 12 right-handed healthy individuals we applied 30 minutes of low-frequency (1Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left rPMd to investigate the involvement of left rPMd and SMG in the rapid adjustment of actions guided by visuospatial cues. After rTMS, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while making spatially congruent button presses with right or left index finger in response to a left- or right-sided target. Subjects were asked to covertly prepare motor responses as indicated by a directional cue presented one second before the target. On 20% of trials the cue was invalid requiring subjects to re-adjust their motor plan according to the target location. Compared to sham rTMS, real rTMS increased the number of correct responses in invalidly cued trials. After real rTMS, task-related activity of the stimulated left rPMd showed increased task-related coupling with activity in ipsilateral SMG and adjacent anterior intraparietal area (AIP). Individuals who showed a stronger increase in left-hemispheric premotor-parietal connectivity also made fewer errors on invalidly cued trials after rTMS. The results suggest that rTMS over left rPMd improved the ability to dynamically adjust visuospatial response mapping by strengthening left-hemispheric connectivity between rPMd and the SMG-AIP region. These results support the notion that left rPMd and SMG-AIP contribute towards dynamic control of actions, and demonstrate that low-frequency rTMS can enhance functional coupling between task-relevant brain regions and improve some aspects of motor performance. PMID:20610756

  19. Improving the antidepressant action and the bioavailability of sertraline by co-crystallization with coumarin 3-carboxylate. Structural determination.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Laino, Carlos H; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Martini, Nancy; Rodríguez, Ailén N; Martínez Medina, Juan J; López Tévez, Libertad L; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-04-01

    To improve the antidepressant action of sertraline a new salt with coumarin-3-carboxylate anion (SerH-CCA) has been synthesized by two different methods and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and structural determinations by X-ray diffraction methods. The new salt is stabilized by strong intermolecular H-bonds involving the protonated amine group of SerH and the deprotonated carboxylate group of CCA. These findings can be correlated with the interpretation of the infrared spectrum. The salt, sertraline (SerHCl) and the sodium salt of coumarin-3-carboxylate (NaCCA) were orally administered male Wistar rats (10 mg/kg, based on sertraline). Rats were evaluated in separate groups by means of the forced swimming (FST). SerH-CCA produced antidepressant effects in a magnitude that exceeded SerHCl individual effects. None of these treatments affected activity levels by the open field OFT tests. We have also determined that the ion pair also improve the binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) of the drug but retain its antimicrobial activity. It is reasonable to conclude that the replacement of chloride anion by a large organic anion in sertraline strengthens the pharmacological action of the native drug, binding to BSA with higher activity and retaining the antimicrobial activity of the antidepressant compound. PMID:26952715

  20. Change in action: using positive deviance to improve student clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Zareen; Jaffery, Tara; Shahid, Afshan; Moin, Shaheen; Gilani, Ahsen; Burdick, William

    2012-03-01

    At our medical college many students have lower ratings in their clinical performance once they start their clinical years (third year). This is contrary to their results in other written exams. Some students demonstrate better clinical performance. We used the six-step Positive Deviance (PD) Conceptual Framework to identify and disseminate the strategies employed by the successful students to improve group clinical performance. Fifty 3rd year students (of a 5-year MBBS program) rotating through internal medicine were assessed mid-rotation with mini-CEX and 360° evaluations. Twenty students (40%) who performed well were invited for in depth interviews in order to identify positive deviant behavior in their clinical skills learning practices. The seven students (14%) who reported novel behaviors were asked to develop strategies for dissemination of their learning behavior in their peers. They decided to work in small groups with their peers, using the identified PD behaviors to encourage learning of history taking and examining skills in their peers. Group performance was assessed at the end of rotation, using mini-CEX and 360° evaluation in comparison to a subsequent group of students in the same year that did not work in PD peer learning groups. For the 360° evaluation the EP(2) (generalizability coefficient) was 0.92 and for the mini-CEX the EP(2) was 0.95, taking into account the variances between participants, groups, time and the interactions effects; thus indicating good reliability of both the assessment methods. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) was seen for improvement in medical interviewing skills and clinical judgment on the mini-CEX exam and 360 evaluation (p < 0.0001) in the PD group. Positive Deviance approach can help highlight behaviors among medical students, which contribute to success but may go unnoticed. Learning strategies based on the PD framework can improve student's group performance. PMID:21553153

  1. Creutz fermions on an orthogonal lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Borici, Artan

    2008-10-01

    In a recent paper, Creutz has given a new action describing two species of Dirac fermions with exact chiral symmetry on the lattice. This action depends on parameters which may be fixed at certain values in order to get the right continuum limit. In this letter, we elaborate more on this idea and present an action which is free of any other parameter except the fermion mass.

  2. Earth Science Informatics Community Requirements for Improving Sustainable Science Software Practices: User Perspectives and Implications for Organizational Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Robinson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Science software is integral to the scientific process and must be developed and managed in a sustainable manner to ensure future access to scientific data and related resources. Organizations that are part of the scientific enterprise, as well as members of the scientific community who work within these entities, can contribute to the sustainability of science software and to practices that improve scientific community capabilities for science software sustainability. As science becomes increasingly digital and therefore, dependent on software, improving community practices for sustainable science software will contribute to the sustainability of science. Members of the Earth science informatics community, including scientific data producers and distributers, end-user scientists, system and application developers, and data center managers, use science software regularly and face the challenges and the opportunities that science software presents for the sustainability of science. To gain insight on practices needed for the sustainability of science software from the science software experiences of the Earth science informatics community, an interdisciplinary group of 300 community members were asked to engage in simultaneous roundtable discussions and report on their answers to questions about the requirements for improving scientific software sustainability. This paper will present an analysis of the issues reported and the conclusions offered by the participants. These results provide perspectives for science software sustainability practices and have implications for actions that organizations and their leadership can initiate to improve the sustainability of science software.

  3. Uncertainty evaluation of EnPIs in industrial applications as a key factor in setting improvement actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Emilia, G.; Di Gasbarro, D.; Gaspari, A.; Natale, E.

    2015-11-01

    A methodology is proposed assuming high-level Energy Performance Indicators (EnPIs) uncertainty as quantitative indicator of the evolution of an Energy Management System (EMS). Motivations leading to the selection of the EnPIs, uncertainty evaluation techniques and criteria supporting decision-making are discussed, in order to plan and pursue reliable measures for energy performance improvement. In this paper, problems, priorities, operative possibilities and reachable improvement limits are examined, starting from the measurement uncertainty assessment. Two different industrial cases are analysed with reference to the following aspects: absence/presence of energy management policy and action plans; responsibility level for the energy issues; employees’ training and motivation in respect of the energy problems; absence/presence of adequate infrastructures for monitoring and sharing of energy information; level of standardization and integration of methods and procedures linked to the energy activities; economic and financial resources for the improvement of energy efficiency. A critic and comparative analysis of the obtained results is realized. The methodology, experimentally validated, allows developing useful considerations for effective, realistic and economically feasible improvement plans, depending on the specific situation. Recursive application of the methodology allows getting reliable and resolved assessment of the EMS status, also in dynamic industrial contexts.

  4. Improving student performance in an introductory biology majors course: A social action project in the scholarship of teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Sara Lang Ketchum

    This social action study followed an introductory biology course for a three-year period to determine whether changes in teaching personnel, instructional techniques and reorientation to student-centered learning would impact student performance. The course was redirected from a traditional lecture-laboratory format to one emphasizing active learning inquiry methods. Student retention, achievement, and failure were observed for three years in addition to one year prior, and one year following, the study. The study examined the two semester introductory biology course required of all biology majors and those intending a career in science, medicine or dentistry. During the first semester of the study, the dropout rate decreased from 46% to 21%. Prior to the study, 39% of the students completing the course received a grade of D or F while only 4% received a grade of B or above. During the first semester of the study 14% of the students received a grade of D or F while 46% received a B, B+ or A grade. Similar results were seen in other semesters of the study. A statistical comparison of student retention and performance was carried out using grade data for classes taught by the original faculty, the action study faculty and the post-study faculty. The differences between the original faculty and the action study faculty were statistically significant. Effect size calculations indicated large differences between the action study faculty and the two other faculty groups in terms of student retention, achievement and failure. The results are attributed to both the personnel change and, more significantly, the change in teaching methods and emphasis on student-active learning. Comparison between the pre- and post-study teams showed less dramatic effect sizes than when the action study data were compared with the data from either other team. Nevertheless, the post-study results showed that although the retention rate dropped during the year after the study, the improvement

  5. Continuum behavior of lattice QED, discretized with one-sided lattice differences, in one-loop order

    SciTech Connect

    Sadooghi, N.; Rothe, H.J.

    1997-06-01

    A lattice action for QED is considered, where the derivatives in the Dirac operator are replaced by one-sided lattice differences. A systematic expansion in the lattice spacing of the one-loop contribution to the fermion self-energy, vacuum polarization tensor, and vertex function is carried out for an arbitrary choice of one-sided lattice differences. It is shown that only the vacuum polarization tensor possesses the correct continuum limit, while the fermion self-energy and vertex function receive noncovariant contributions. A lattice action, discretized with a fixed choice of one-sided lattice differences, therefore, does not define a renormalizable field theory. The noncovariant contributions can, however, be eliminated by averaging the expression over all possible choices of one-sided lattice differences. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Bottomonium spectrum from lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Meinel, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Recently, realistic lattice QCD calculations with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action have been performed by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. Here, results for the bottomonium spectrum computed on their gauge configurations of size 24{sup 3}x64 with a lattice spacing of approximately 0.11 fm and four different values for the light quark mass are presented. Improved lattice nonrelativistic QCD is used to treat the b quarks inside the bottomonium. The results for the radial and orbital energy splittings are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements, indicating that systematic errors are small. The calculation of the {upsilon}(2S)-{upsilon}(1S) energy splitting provides an independent determination of the lattice spacing. For the most physical ensemble it is found to be a{sup -1}=1.740(25)(19) GeV, where the first error is statistical/fitting and the second error is an estimate of the systematic errors due to the lattice nonrelativistic QCD action.

  7. Action research to improve methods of delivery and feedback in an Access Grid Room environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The principal aim was to improve the student learning experience, given the new environment. The specific aspects of the course delivery that the study focused on included presentation of materials and provision of opportunities for interaction between the students and between students and lecturers. The practical considerations in the delivery of distance learning are well documented in the literature, and similar problems arise in the Access Grid Room environment; in particular, those of limited access to face-to-face interaction and the reduction in peer support. The nature of the Access Grid Room classes implies that students studying the same course can be physically situated in different cities, and possibly in different countries. When studying, it is important that students have opportunity to discuss new concepts with others; particularly their peers and their lecturer. The Access Grid Room environment also presents new challenges for the lecturer, who must learn new skills in the delivery of materials. The unique nature of Access Grid Room technology offers unprecedented opportunity for effective course delivery and positive outcomes for students, and was developed in response to a need to be able to interact with complex data, other students and the instructor, in real-time, at a distance and from multiple sites. This is a relatively new technology and as yet there has been little or no studies specifically addressing the use and misuse of the technology. The study found that the correct placement of cameras and the use of printed material and smart boards were all crucial to the student experience. In addition, the

  8. Fucoidan Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Exhibits Anti-Fatigue Action in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Wei, Li; Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan (FCD) is a well-known bioactive constituent of seaweed extract that possess a wide spectrum of activities in biological systems, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and modulation of immune systems. However, evidence on the effects of FCD on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. Therefore, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of FCD on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR mice from three groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered FCD for 21 days at 0, 310 and 620 mg/kg/day, which were, respectively, designated the vehicle, FCD-1X and FCD-2X groups. The results indicated that the FCD supplementations increased the grip strength (p = 0.0002) and endurance swimming time (p = 0.0195) in a dose-depend manner. FCD treatments also produced dose-dependent decreases in serum levels of lactate (p < 0.0001) and ammonia (p = 0.0025), and also an increase in glucose level (p < 0.0001) after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, FCD supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. Therefore, we suggest that long-term supplementation with FCD can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue. PMID:25558908

  9. Fucoidan supplementation improves exercise performance and exhibits anti-fatigue action in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Wei, Li; Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan (FCD) is a well-known bioactive constituent of seaweed extract that possess a wide spectrum of activities in biological systems, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and modulation of immune systems. However, evidence on the effects of FCD on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. Therefore, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of FCD on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR mice from three groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered FCD for 21 days at 0, 310 and 620 mg/kg/day, which were, respectively, designated the vehicle, FCD-1X and FCD-2X groups. The results indicated that the FCD supplementations increased the grip strength (p = 0.0002) and endurance swimming time (p = 0.0195) in a dose-depend manner. FCD treatments also produced dose-dependent decreases in serum levels of lactate (p < 0.0001) and ammonia (p = 0.0025), and also an increase in glucose level (p < 0.0001) after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, FCD supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. Therefore, we suggest that long-term supplementation with FCD can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue. PMID:25558908

  10. Vitamin E Analogue Improves Rabbit Sperm Quality during the Process of Cryopreservation through Its Antioxidative Action

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhendong; Fan, Xiaoteng; Lv, Yinghua; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Chuning; Zhang, Pengfei; Zeng, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in high concentration of reactive oxygen species which is detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of vitamin E analogue to freezing extender can facilitate the cryosurvival of spermatozoa in rabbits, and how vitamin E protects spermatozoa against damages during the process of preservation. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of Trolox (a vitamin E analogue). The level of radical oxygen species (ROS) in spermatozoa that was exposed to Trolox was significantly lower than that of the control during each step of the process of preservation. The percentage of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with lipid peroxidation in the Trolox treatments was significantly lower than that of the control. The motility, intact acrosome, membrane integrity and mitochondrial potentials of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of 200 μM Trolox were significantly higher than those of the control. These observations suggest that addition of vitamin E to a freezing extender leads to higher integrity of acrosome, plasma membrane and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as higher motility. Vitamin E protects spermatozoa through its capacity to quench ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation during the process of preservation. Addition of Trolox is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry. PMID:26700473

  11. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators. PMID:18692581

  12. Threat to the point: improving the value of comparative extinction risk analysis for conservation action.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kris A; Verde Arregoitia, Luis D; Davidson, Ana; Di Marco, Moreno; Di Fonzo, Martina M I

    2014-02-01

    Comparative extinction risk analysis is a common approach for assessing the relative plight of biodiversity and making conservation recommendations. However, the usefulness of such analyses for conservation practice has been questioned. One reason for underperformance may be that threats arising from global environmental changes (e.g., habitat loss, invasive species, climate change) are often overlooked, despite being widely regarded as proximal drivers of species' endangerment. We explore this problem by (i) reviewing the use of threats in this field and (ii) quantitatively investigating the effects of threat exclusion on the interpretation and potential application of extinction risk model results. We show that threat variables are routinely (59%) identified as significant predictors of extinction risk, yet while most studies (78%) include extrinsic factors of some kind (e.g., geographic or bioclimatic information), the majority (63%) do not include threats. Despite low overall usage, studies are increasingly employing threats to explain patterns of extinction risk. However, most continue to employ methods developed for the analysis of heritable traits (e.g., body size, fecundity), which may be poorly suited to the treatment of nonheritable predictors including threats. In our global mammal and continental amphibian extinction risk case studies, omitting threats reduced model predictive performance, but more importantly (i) reduced mechanistic information relevant to management; (ii) resulted in considerable disagreement in species classifications (12% and 5% for amphibians and mammals, respectively, translating to dozens and hundreds of species); and (iii) caused even greater disagreement (20-60%) in a downstream conservation application (species ranking). We conclude that the use of threats in comparative extinction risk analysis is important and increasing but currently in the early stages of development. Priorities for future studies include improving uptake

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 1 recruits muscle microvasculature and improves insulin's metabolic action in the presence of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chai, Weidong; Zhang, Xingxing; Barrett, Eugene J; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) acutely recruits muscle microvasculature, increases muscle delivery of insulin, and enhances muscle use of glucose, independent of its effect on insulin secretion. To examine whether GLP-1 modulates muscle microvascular and metabolic insulin responses in the setting of insulin resistance, we assessed muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity, and blood flow in control insulin-sensitive rats and rats made insulin-resistant acutely (systemic lipid infusion) or chronically (high-fat diet [HFD]) before and after a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (3 mU/kg/min) with or without superimposed systemic GLP-1 infusion. Insulin significantly recruited muscle microvasculature and addition of GLP-1 further expanded muscle MBV and increased insulin-mediated glucose disposal. GLP-1 infusion potently recruited muscle microvasculature in the presence of either acute or chronic insulin resistance by increasing muscle MBV. This was associated with an increased muscle delivery of insulin and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation. Muscle insulin sensitivity was completely restored in the presence of systemic lipid infusion and significantly improved in rats fed an HFD. We conclude that GLP-1 infusion potently expands muscle microvascular surface area and improves insulin's metabolic action in the insulin-resistant states. This may contribute to improved glycemic control seen in diabetic patients receiving incretin-based therapy. PMID:24658303

  14. EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (PD153035) Improves Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Action in High-Fat Diet–Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Patricia O.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Mourão, Rosa H.; de Souza, Claudio T.; Pauli, Jose R.; Cintra, Dennys E.; Schenka, André; Rocco, Silvana A.; Rittner, Roberto; Franchini, Kleber G.; Vassallo, José; Velloso, Lício A.; Carvalheira, José B.; Saad, Mario J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In obesity, an increased macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue occurs, contributing to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediates both chemotaxis and proliferation in monocytes and macrophages. However, the role of EGFR inhibitors in this subclinical inflammation has not yet been investigated. We investigated, herein, in vivo efficacy and associated molecular mechanisms by which PD153035, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved diabetes control and insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of PD153035 was investigated on insulin sensitivity, insulin signaling, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity in tissues of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and also on infiltration and the activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in these mice. RESULTS PD153035 treatment for 1 day decreased the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 in the stroma vascular fraction, suggesting that this drug reduces the M1 proinflammatory state in ATMs, as an initial effect, in turn reducing the circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6, and initiating an improvement in insulin signaling and sensitivity. After 14 days of drug administration, there was a marked improvement in glucose tolerance; a reduction in insulin resistance; a reduction in macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and in TNF-α, IL-6, and free fatty acids; accompanied by an improvement in insulin signaling in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue; and also a decrease in insulin receptor substrate-1 Ser307 phosphorylation in JNK and inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKKβ) activation in these tissues. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with PD153035 improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and signaling and reduces subclinical inflammation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:19696185

  15. A euclidean lattice formulation of D = 5 maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Anosh

    2016-06-01

    We construct lattice action for five-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. This supersymmetric lattice formulation can be used to explore the non-perturbative regime of the continuum target theory, which has a known gravitational dual.

  16. Excited Baryons from the FLIC Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wally; Hedditch, J N; Leinweber, D B; Williams, A G; Zanoti, J; Zhang, J B

    2002-06-01

    Masses of positive and negative parity excited nucleons and hyperons are calculated in quenched lattice QCD using an order (a{sup 2}) improved gluon action and a fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed with fat links. The results are in agreement with earlier N* simulations with improved actions, and exhibit a clear mass splitting between the nucleon and its parity partner, as well as a small mass splitting between the low-lying J{sup P}=1/2{sup -}N* states. Study of different Lambda interpolating fields suggests a similar splitting between the lowest two 1/2{sup -}Lambda* states, although the empirical mass suppression of the Lambda*(1405) is not seen.

  17. Madelung energy of Yukawa lattices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P C N; Apolinario, S W S

    2012-10-01

    We propose a method to obtain an approximate closed form expression for the Madelung energy (ME) of Yukawa lattices. Such a method is applied for lattices of different topologies and dimensions. The obtained Madelung energies have a satisfactory accuracy for all ranges of the screening parameter κ of the Yukawa potential, and it becomes exact in the asymptotic limits κ→0 and κ→+∞. For instance, for the triangular lattice, the maximum relative error of the ME given by the method is about 0.0047. Also, satisfactory results are obtained for the one-component plasma limit. The Madelung constants of the two-dimensional hexagonal BN and square NaCl and the three-dimensional cubic NaCl crystals are estimated with a relative error of 0.004, 0.006, and 0.03, respectively. Finally, different ways to improve the method are presented and discussed. PMID:23214705

  18. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Graft Improves Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats through Neurotrophic and Pro-Angiogenic Actions

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Olivier; Sid, Selim; Schoenen, Jean; Franzen, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Numerous strategies have been managed to improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) but an optimal strategy doesn't exist yet. Actually, it is the complexity of the injured spinal cord pathophysiology that begets the multifactorial approaches assessed to favour tissue protection, axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this context, it appears that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could take an interesting part. The aim of this study is to graft MSCs after a spinal cord compression injury in adult rat to assess their effect on functional recovery and to highlight their mechanisms of action. We found that in intravenously grafted animals, MSCs induce, as early as 1 week after the graft, an improvement of their open field and grid navigation scores compared to control animals. At the histological analysis of their dissected spinal cord, no MSCs were found within the host despite their BrdU labelling performed before the graft, whatever the delay observed: 7, 14 or 21 days. However, a cytokine array performed on spinal cord extracts 3 days after MSC graft reveals a significant increase of NGF expression in the injured tissue. Also, a significant tissue sparing effect of MSC graft was observed. Finally, we also show that MSCs promote vascularisation, as the density of blood vessels within the lesioned area was higher in grafted rats. In conclusion, we bring here some new evidences that MSCs most likely act throughout their secretions and not via their own integration/differentiation within the host tissue. PMID:22745769

  20. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  1. Improved room-temperature luminescence of core-shell InGaAs/GaAs nanopillars via lattice-matched passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolibus, Katarzyna; Scofield, Adam C.; Gradkowski, Kamil; Ochalski, Tomasz J.; Kim, Hyunseok; Huffaker, Diana L.; Huyet, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Optical properties of GaAs/InGaAs/GaAs nanopillars (NPs) grown on GaAs(111)B were investigated. Employment of a mask-etching technique allowed for an accurate control over the geometry of NP arrays in terms of both their diameter and separation. This work describes both the steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of these structures as a function of the ensemble geometry, composition of the insert, and various shell compounds. The effects of the NP geometry on a parasitic radiative recombination channel, originating from an overgrown lateral sidewall layer, are discussed. Optical characterization reveals a profound influence of the core-shell lattice mismatch on the carrier lifetime and emission quenching at room temperature. When the lattice-matching conditions are satisfied, an efficient emission from the NP arrays at room temperature and below the band-gap of silicon is observed, clearly highlighting their potential application as emitters in optical interconnects integrated with silicon platforms.

  2. Connection Between the Lattice Boltzmann Equation and the Beam Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun; Luo, Li-Shi

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze and compare the lattice Boltzmann equation with the beam scheme in details. We notice the similarity and differences between the lattice Boltzmann equation and the beam scheme. We show that the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann equation is indeed second order in space. We discuss the advantages and limitations of lattice Boltzmann equation and the beam scheme. Based on our analysis, we propose an improved multi-dimensional beam scheme.

  3. Hadronic Vacuum Polarization Contribution to g-2 from the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner, Xu Feng, Marcus Petschlies, Karl Jansen

    2012-05-01

    We give a short description of the present situation of lattice QCD simulations. We then focus on the computation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon using lattice techniques. We demonstrate that by employing improved observables for the muon anomalous magnetic moment, a significant reduction of the lattice error can be obtained. This provides a promising scenario that the accuracy of lattice calculations can match the experimental errors.

  4. Improving reproductive health status. The Chinese government has been developing new programs in line with the ICPD Program of Action.

    PubMed

    Li, H

    1998-01-01

    This article describes China's efforts to implement the 1994 ICPD Program of Action, and the prospects for Chinese population and family planning (FP) in the 21st century. Since the late 1970s, FP has been identified as an essential, strategic national program. By the 1990s, FP was recognized as important throughout Chinese society and IEC, services, and management of FP were strengthened. FP programs went through 5 phases: initial phase (1953-61); experimental phase (1962-70); expansion (1971-78); promotion and implementation nationwide (1979-90); and steady improvement (since 1991). Strict FP policies were adopted due to a large population size, poor economic base, uneven development, and underdeveloped productivity. Despite FP achievements, there are still major problems. Population increases at a rate of 20 million births/year, or 13 million surplus births/year. China has per capita arable land of only 0.078 hectares, which is under 25% of the world average. Freshwater is under 20% of the world average. Surplus labor amounts to 190 million workers, and the number is increasing due to market reforms. Remote and poor areas lack FP and it is a major challenge to improve literacy and health. Society must support a growing elderly population. 50 million are poverty stricken, mostly in remote areas with high illiteracy, morbidity, and fertility. Sex ratios are imbalanced and China's population is expected to reach 1.5 billion by 2020. New program approaches include linking FP promotion with socioeconomic development, and meeting reproductive health needs over the life cycle. PMID:12294060

  5. The charm quark on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    1993-03-01

    We formulate lattice fermions in a way that encompasses Wilson fermions as well as the static and non-relativistic approximations. In particular, we treat mqα systematically ( mq is the fermion mass) showing show how to understand the Wilson action as an effective action for systems with p≪ mq. The results show how to extract matrix elements and the spectrum from simulations with mqa ≈ 1, which is relevant for the charm quark.

  6. 77 FR 32172 - Environmental Assessment: Notice of Final Federal Actions on Improvements to U.S. 60 in Union and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project... advising the public of final actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the... INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that the FHWA has taken final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C....

  7. Calculating the Isgur-Wise function on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.W. . Dept. of Physics); Shen, Y. . Dept. of Physics); Soni, A. )

    1992-01-01

    We calculate the Isgur-Wise function by measuring the heavy-heavy meson transition matrix element on the lattice. The standard Wilson action is used for both the heavy and light quarks. Our first numerical results are presented.

  8. Calculating the Isgur-Wise function on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.W.; Shen, Y.; Soni, A.

    1992-12-31

    We calculate the Isgur-Wise function by measuring the heavy-heavy meson transition matrix element on the lattice. The standard Wilson action is used for both the heavy and light quarks. Our first numerical results are presented.

  9. Lattice invariants for knots

    SciTech Connect

    Janse Van Rensburg, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    The geometry of polygonal knots in the cubic lattice may be used to define some knot invariants. One such invariant is the minimal edge number, which is the minimum number of edges necessary (and sufficient) to construct a lattice knot of given type. In addition, one may also define the minimal (unfolded) surface number, and the minimal (unfolded) boundary number; these are the minimum number of 2-cells necessary to construct an unfolded lattice Seifert surface of a given knot type in the lattice, and the minimum number of edges necessary in a lattice knot to guarantee the existence of an unfolded lattice Seifert surface. In addition, I derive some relations amongst these invariants. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Role of Training in Improving Peer Assessment Skills amongst Year Six Pupils in Primary School Writing: An Action Research Enquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Stuart Ian

    2015-01-01

    Peer assessment is where students assess the quality of a peer's work. Studies have demonstrated its positive impact on learning yet most of these are in higher education. This study used training to improve the quality of written feedback in a year six primary school classroom. Action Research was selected as a research strategy given the need to…

  11. Improving Governance, Leadership, and Learning in New Jersey. State Action for Education Leadership Project (SAELP) Forum, January 28-29, 2003. Field Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleistein, Stacey, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    New Jersey is one of fifteen states selected by the Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund to receive a planning and implementation grant for setting a reform agenda for a series of state policies that are designed to improve educational leadership and student learning. Under this grant, the State Action for Education Leadership Project (SAELP)…

  12. A Call to Action to Improve Math Placement Policies and Processes: Six Policy Recommendations to Increase STEM Student Aspirations and Success While Decreasing Racial and Income Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.; Cullinane, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    This call to action is based on a simple but important premise: The nation cannot allow college placement policies, processes, and instruments to undermine promising efforts to increase student success in mathematics and increase attainment of STEM credentials. Efforts to redesign math pathways hold great promise for improving the teaching and…

  13. Patient engagement and patient support programs in allergy immunotherapy: a call to action for improving long-term adherence.

    PubMed

    Demoly, Pascal; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Sastre, Joaquin; Wahn, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Allergy immunotherapy (AIT) is acknowledged to produce beneficial mid- and long-term clinical and immunologic effects and increased quality of life in patients with allergic respiratory diseases (such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma). However, poor adherence to AIT (due to intentional and/or non-intentional factors) is still a barrier to achieving these benefits. There is an urgent need for patient support programs (PSPs) that encompass communication, educational and motivational components. In the field of AIT, a PSP should be capable of (1) improving adherence, (2) boosting patient engagement, (3) explaining how AIT differs from pharmacological allergy treatments; (4) increasing health literacy about chronic, progressive, immunoglobulin-E-mediated immune diseases, (5) helping the patient to understand and manage local or systemic adverse events, and (6) providing and/or predicting local data on aeroallergen levels. We reviewed the literature in this field and have identified a number of practical issues to be addressed when implementing a PSP for AIT: the measurement of adherence, the choice of technologies, reminders, communication channels and content, the use of "push" messaging and social networks, interactivity, and the involvement of caregivers and patient leaders. A key issue is "hi-tech" (i.e. approaches based mainly on information technology) vs. "hi-touch" (based mainly on interaction with humans, i.e. family members, patient mentors and healthcare professionals). We conclude that multistakeholder PSPs (combining patient-, provider and society-based actions) must now be developed and tested with a view to increasing adherence, efficacy and safety in the field of AIT. PMID:27478445

  14. General chemistry courses that can affect achievement: An action research study in developing a plan to improve undergraduate chemistry courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shweikeh, Eman

    Over the past 50 years, considerable research has been dedicated to chemistry education. In evaluating principal chemistry courses in higher education, educators have noted the learning process for first-year general chemistry courses may be challenging. The current study investigated perceptions of faculty, students and administrators on chemistry education at three institutions in Southern California. Via action research, the study sought to develop a plan to improve student engagement in general chemistry courses. A mixed method was utilized to analyze different perceptions on key factors determining the level of commitment and engagement in general chemistry education. The approach to chemistry learning from both a faculty and student perspective was examined including good practices, experiences and extent of active participation. The research study considered well-known measures of effective education with an emphasis on two key components: educational practices and student behavior. Institutional culture was inclusively assessed where cognitive expectations of chemistry teaching and learning were communicated. First, the extent in which faculty members are utilizing the "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education" in their instruction was explored. Second, student attitudes and approaches toward chemistry learning were examined. The focus was on investigating student understanding of the learning process and the structure of chemistry knowledge. The seven categories used to measure students' expectations for learning chemistry were: effort, concepts, math link, reality link, outcome, laboratory, and visualization. This analysis represents the views of 16 faculty and 140 students. The results validated the assertion that students need some competencies and skills to tackle the challenges of the chemistry learning process to deeply engage in learning. A mismatch exists between the expectations of students and those of the faculty

  15. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  16. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  17. Flat Band Quastiperiodic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua; Flach, Sergej; Danieli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Translationally invariant lattices with flat bands (FB) in their band structure possess irreducible compact localized flat band states, which can be understood through local rotation to a Fano structure. We present extension of these quasi-1D FB structures under incommensurate lattices, reporting on the FB effects to the Metal-Insulator Transition.

  18. Continuous partition lattice

    PubMed Central

    Björner, Anders

    1987-01-01

    A continuous analogue to the partition lattices is presented. This is the metric completion of the direct limit of a system of embeddings of the finite partition lattices. The construction is analogous to von Neumann's construction of a continuous geometry over a field F from the finite-dimensional projective geometries over F. PMID:16593874

  19. Honeycomb lattices with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Meryl A.; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a variant of the honeycomb lattice in which we create defects by randomly exchanging adjacent bonds, producing a random tiling with a distribution of polygon edges. We study the percolation properties on these lattices as a function of the number of exchanged bonds using an alternative computational method. We find the site and bond percolation thresholds are consistent with other three-coordinated lattices with the same standard deviation in the degree distribution of the dual; here we can produce a continuum of lattices with a range of standard deviations in the distribution. These lattices should be useful for modeling other properties of random systems as well as percolation.

  20. Renormalization of the chromomagnetic operator on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, M.; Costa, M.; Frezzotti, R.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Meloni, D.; Panagopoulos, H.; Simula, S.; ETM Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We present our study of the renormalization of the chromomagnetic operator, OCM , which appears in the effective Hamiltonian describing Δ S =1 transitions in and beyond the Standard Model. We have computed, perturbatively to one loop, the relevant Green's functions with two (quark-quark) and three (quark-quark-gluon) external fields, at nonzero quark masses, using both the lattice and dimensional regularizations. The perturbative computation on the lattice is carried out using the maximally twisted-mass action for the fermions, while for the gluons we employed the Symanzik improved gauge action for different sets of values of the Symanzik coefficients. We have identified all the operators which can possibly mix with OCM , including lower-dimensional and nongauge invariant operators, and we have calculated those elements of the mixing matrix which are relevant for the renormalization of OCM. We have also performed numerical lattice calculations to determine nonperturbatively the mixings of the chromomagnetic operator with lower-dimensional operators, through proper renormalization conditions. For the first time, the 1 /a2-divergent mixing of the chromomagnetic operator with the scalar density has been determined nonperturbatively with high precision. Moreover, the 1 /a -divergent mixing with the pseudoscalar density, due to the breaking of parity within the twisted-mass regularization of QCD, has been calculated nonperturbatively and found to be smaller than its one-loop perturbative estimate. The QCD simulations have been carried out using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2 +1 +1 dynamical quarks, which include in the sea, besides two light mass degenerate quarks, also the strange and charm quarks with masses close to their physical values.

  1. Dynamic Optical Lattices of Subwavelength Spacing for Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimbene, Sylvain; Goldman, Nathan; Cooper, Nigel R.; Dalibard, Jean

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing lattice potentials of subwavelength spacing for ultracold atoms. It is based on spin-dependent optical lattices with a time-periodic modulation. We show that the atomic motion is well described by the combined action of an effective, time-independent lattice of small spacing, together with a micromotion associated with the time modulation. A numerical simulation shows that an atomic gas can be adiabatically loaded into the effective lattice ground state, for time scales comparable to the ones required for adiabatic loading of standard optical lattices. We generalize our scheme to a two-dimensional geometry, leading to Bloch bands with nonzero Chern numbers. The realization of lattices of subwavelength spacing allows for the enhancement of energy scales, which could facilitate the achievement of strongly correlated (topological) states.

  2. Improving governance action by an advanced water modelling system applied to the Po river basin in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, Cinzia; Del Longo, Mauro; Pecora, Silvano; Puma, Francesco; Vezzani, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    decisions regarding water management in order to prevent major impacts. The Board is made of experts from public administrations with a strong involvement of stakeholders representative of different uses. The Dews- Po was intensively used by the Technical Board as decision support system during the 2012 summer event, providing tools to understand the on-going situation of water availability and use across the basin, helping to evaluate water management choices in an objective way, through what-if scenarios considering withdrawals reduction and increased releases from regulated Alpine lakes. A description of the use of Dews- Po system within the Technical Board is given, especially focusing on those elements, prone to be considered "good management indicators", which proved to be most useful in ensuring the success of governance action. Strength and improvement needs of the system are then described

  3. Improving HIV Surveillance Data for Public Health Action in Washington, DC: A Novel Multiorganizational Data-Sharing Method

    PubMed Central

    Smart, JC

    2016-01-01

    Background The National HIV/AIDS Strategy calls for active surveillance programs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to more accurately measure access to and retention in care across the HIV care continuum for persons living with HIV within their jurisdictions and to identify persons who may need public health services. However, traditional public health surveillance methods face substantial technological and privacy-related barriers to data sharing. Objective This study developed a novel data-sharing approach to improve the timeliness and quality of HIV surveillance data in three jurisdictions where persons may often travel across the borders of the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. Methods A deterministic algorithm of approximately 1000 lines was developed, including a person-matching system with Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS) variables. Person matching was defined in categories (from strongest to weakest): exact, very high, high, medium high, medium, medium low, low, and very low. The algorithm was verified using conventional component testing methods, manual code inspection, and comprehensive output file examination. Results were validated by jurisdictions using internal review processes. Results Of 161,343 uploaded eHARS records from District of Columbia (N=49,326), Maryland (N=66,200), and Virginia (N=45,817), a total of 21,472 persons were matched across jurisdictions over various strengths in a matching process totaling 21 minutes and 58 seconds in the privacy device, leaving 139,871 uniquely identified with only one jurisdiction. No records matched as medium low or low. Over 80% of the matches were identified as either exact or very high matches. Three separate validation methods were conducted for this study, and they all found ≥90% accuracy between records matched by this novel method and traditional matching methods. Conclusions This study illustrated a novel data-sharing approach that may facilitate timelier and better

  4. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  5. An exploratory study of heavy domain wall fermions on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, P.; Jüttner, A.; Marinković, M. Krstić; Sanfilippo, F.; Spraggs, M.; Tsang, J. T.

    2016-04-01

    We report on an exploratory study of domain wall fermions (DWF) as a lattice regularisation for heavy quarks. Within the framework of quenched QCD with the tree-level improved Symanzik gauge action we identify the DWF parameters which minimise discretisation effects. We find the corresponding effective 4 d overlap operator to be exponentially local, independent of the quark mass. We determine a maximum bare heavy quark mass of am h ≈ 0 .4, below which the approximate chiral symmetry and O(a)-improvement of DWF are sustained. This threshold appears to be largely independent of the lattice spacing. Based on these findings, we carried out a detailed scaling study for the heavy-strange meson dispersion relation and decay constant on four ensembles with lattice spacings in the range 2 .0-5 .7 GeV. We observe very mild a 2 scaling towards the continuum limit. Our findings establish a sound basis for heavy DWF in dynamical simulations of lattice QCD with relevance to Standard Model phenomenology.

  6. Effects of flavor-symmetry violation from staggered fermion lattice simulations of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel; Nayak, Saroj; Skinner, Andrew

    2011-01-15

    We analyze the effects of flavor splitting from staggered fermion lattice simulations of a low-energy effective theory for graphene. Both the unimproved action and the tadpole-improved action with a Naik term show significant flavor-symmetry breaking in the spectrum of the Dirac operator. Note that this is true even in the vicinity of the second-order phase transition point where it has been argued that the flavor-symmetry breaking should be small due to the continuum limit being approached. We show that at weaker couplings the flavor splitting is drastically reduced by stout link smearing, while this mechanism is ineffective at the stronger couplings relevant to suspended graphene. We also measure the average plaquette and describe how it calls for a reinterpretation of previous lattice Monte Carlo simulation results, due to tadpole improvement. After taking into account these effects, we conclude that previous lattice simulations are possibly indicative of an insulating phase, although the effective number of light flavors could be effectively less than two due to the flavor-splitting effects. If that is true, then simulations with truly chiral fermions (such as overlap fermions) are needed in order to settle the question.

  7. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  8. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  9. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  10. B -meson decay constants from 2 +1 -flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, N. H.; Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the B -meson decay constants fB , fBs , and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈0.11 , 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ≈290 MeV ; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O (αsa ) . We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain fB0=199.5 (12.6 ) MeV , fB+=195.6 (14.9 ) MeV , fBs=235.4 (12.2 ) MeV , fBs/fB0=1.197 (50 ) , and fBs/fB+=1.223 (71 ) , where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. These results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross-check of other three-flavor determinations of B -meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  11. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-06-01

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  12. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-W.

    2007-06-13

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  13. QED vacuum polarization on a momentum lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, H.; Lafrance, R.; Marleau, L. )

    1992-12-15

    We study the effect of a momentum ([ital k]) lattice as a regulator of quantum field theory. An an example, we compute the vacuum polarization in noncompact (linearized) QED from [ital k]-lattice perturbation theory to one-loop order and study the continuum limit. The amplitude has a finite part plus logarithmically, linearly, and quadratically divergent terms. The amplitude violates gauge invariance (Ward identity) and Lorentz (Euclidean) invariance and is nonlocal. For example, the linear term [similar to][Lambda][vert bar][ital k][vert bar] is nonlocal. Renormalization requires nonlocal counterterms, which is not inconsistent because the original action on the [ital k] lattice already has a nonlocality. We explicitly give the counterterms, which render the amplitude Lorentz and gauge invariant to recover the standard result.

  14. Camera placement in integer lattices (extended abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Kranakis, Evangelos

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for studying an art gallery problem (the camera placement problem) in the infinite lattice (L sup d) of d tuples of integers are considered. A lattice point A is visible from a camera C positioned at a vertex of (L sup d) if A does not equal C and if the line segment joining A and C crosses no other lattice vertex. By using a combination of probabilistic, combinatorial optimization and algorithmic techniques the position they must occupy in the lattice (L sup d) in the order to maximize their visibility can be determined in polynomial time, for any given number s less than or equal to (5 sup d) of cameras. This improves previous results for s less than or equal to (3 sup d).

  15. Action Research for School Improvement: Studies on Able, Gifted and Talented Learners, Homework and White Working-Class Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggall, Anna, Ed.; Churches, Richard, Ed.; Elwick, Alex, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This report is based on seven action research projects undertaken by teachers in CfBT academies in the school year 2012/13. The schools received research support that included training in research methods and undertook a smallscale research project within one of three thematic strands. Schools chose the themes for their research themselves and…

  16. The Quality of Teacher Educators in the European Policy Debate: Actions and Measures to Improve the Professionalism of Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snoek, Marco; Swennen, Anja; van der Klink, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how the contemporary European policy debate addresses the further development of the quality of teacher educators. A classification framework based on the literature on professionalism was used to compare European and Member State policy actions and measures on the quality of teacher educators through an analysis of seven…

  17. Using Group Counseling to Improve the Attendance of Elementary School Students with High Rates of Absenteeism: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Landman, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The foundations of academic and social learning are laid in the early years of school, and attendance is critical to school success. However, research suggests that chronic absenteeism is a significant problem at the elementary school level (Chang & Romero, 2008; Romero & Lee, 2007). This paper presents the results of an action research study…

  18. Charm physics with a nonperturbatively determined relativistic heavy quark action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huey-Wen

    We explore the methodology of a nonperturbative approach on the lattice to heavy quark calculations. We discuss the application of the regularization-independent (RI) scheme of Rome/Southampton to determining the normalization of heavy quark operators nonperturbatively using the Fermilab action. We study the fermion action needed to accurately describe the low-energy physics of systems including heavy quarks in lattice QCD, even when the heavy fermion mass m is on the order of, or larger than, the inverse lattice spacing: m ≥ 1/a. We carry out an expansion through first order in | p⃗ |a and all orders in ma, refining the analysis of the Fermilab and Tsukuba groups. We demonstrate that the spectrum of heavy quark bound states can be determined accurately through | p⃗ |a and (ma)n for arbitrary exponent n by using a lattice action containing only three unknown coefficients: m0, zeta and cP (a generalization of cSW), which are functions of ma. We propose to determine the coefficients of the relativistic heavy quark action by matching the finite-volume on-shell spectrum with one determined in an exact relativistic theory. The matching relativistic amplitudes may be determined from finite-volume step-scaling recursion. The results will be presented from a step-scaling determination of the coefficients in the relativistic heavy quark action. By matching finite-volume heavy-heavy and heavy-light meson masses, we attempt to determine the three parameters ( m0, zeta, cP) in the on-shell-improved heavy quark action. These calculations are carried out on 163 and 243 spatial volumes for a heavy quark mass approximately that of the charm quark. We use nonperturbative coefficients obtained from the step-scaling method to calculate the charmed meson spectrum on 243, a -1 = 2.4 GeV lattices. The charmonium state masses, including radial excited states, are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed spectrum. We find the hyperfine splitting is 77.8(15) MeV with

  19. 78 FR 64592 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Stehekin Valley Road Improvement Project From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Improvement Project From the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan: Chelan County, Washington AGENCY... Improvement project from the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan in Chelan County, Washington. This... Decision, NPS Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and...

  20. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  1. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  2. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  3. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  4. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  5. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  6. Breakdown of adiabaticity when loading ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, Jakub; Delande, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Realistic simulations of current ultracold atom experiments in optical lattices show that the ramping up of the optical lattice is significantly nonadiabatic, implying that experimentally prepared Mott insulators are not really in the ground state of the atomic system. The nonadiabaticity is even larger in the presence of a secondary quasiperiodic lattice simulating “disorder.” Alternative ramping schemes are suggested that improve the adiabaticity when the disorder is not too large.

  7. Weak coupling tests of lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, E.

    1984-01-01

    For many arbitrary lattices with arbitrary SU(N) actions, the perturbative value of ..lambda../sub latt//..lambda../sub MOM/ can be estimated from the Monte Carlo data at weak coupling by analyzing the perturbative expansions for various Wilson loop ratios. Here, general loop ratios including those of polygons and parallelograms are considered. The lowest order perturbative expansions are calculated and some applications to the Monte Carlo data are presented.

  8. Improved crystal quality of GaN film with the in-plane lattice-matched In0.17Al0.83N interlayer grown on sapphire substrate using pulsed metal—organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Lin-An; Xue, Jun-Shuai; Cao, Rong-Tao; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2014-06-01

    We report on an improvement in the crystal quality of GaN film with an In0.17Al0.83N interlayer grown by pulsed metal—organic chemical vapor deposition, which is in-plane lattice-matched to GaN films. The indium composition of about 17% and the reductions of both screw and edge threading dislocations (TDs) in GaN film with the InAlN interlayer are estimated by high resolution X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements are employed to understand the mechanism of reduction in TD density. Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicate that the InAlN interlayer can improve the crystal quality of GaN film, and verify that there is no additional residual stress induced into the GaN film with InAlN interlayer. Atomic force microscopy measurement shows that the InAlN interlayer brings in a smooth surface morphology of GaN film. All the results show that the insertion of the InAlN interlayer is a convenient method to achieve excellent crystal quality in GaN epitaxy.

  9. Renormalization of operators for excited-state hadrons in lattice QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekaterina Mastropas, David Richards

    2012-04-01

    One of the primary aims of lattice QCD is to accurately compute the spectrum of hadronic excitations from first principles. However, obtaining an accurate resolution of excited states using methods of lattice QCD is not a trivial problem due to faster decay of excited-states correlation functions in Euclidean space in comparison to those of ground states. To overcome this difficulty, anisotropic lattices with a finer temporal discretization are used. To go beyond the spectrum, in order to study the properties of the states, one needs to compute corresponding matrix elements. Thus, for example, the quark distribution amplitudes in mesons are given by matrix elements of quark bilinear operators, while in baryons, the corresponding quark distribution amplitudes are related to matrix elements of three-quark operators. To relate the matrix elements calculated on the lattice to those in the continuum, and hence to relate to the measured experimentally, it is necessary to evaluate matching coefficients. In this work we describe the calculation of the matching coefficients using perturbation theory for the improved anisotropic-clover fermion action used for our studies of excited states.

  10. Understanding Teacher Effectiveness: Significant State Data Capacity Is Required to Measure and Improve Teacher Effectiveness. Data for Action 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    States are increasingly focused on understanding and improving teacher effectiveness. There are several funding opportunities that incentivize states to use data to inform measurements of teacher effectiveness. Local, state, and federal efforts support using data to improve teacher preparation programs. Preparation programs seek "access to data…

  11. How to build up the actionable knowledge base: the role of ‘best fit’ framework synthesis for studies of improvement in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Andrew; Carroll, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Increasing recognition of the role and value of theory in improvement work in healthcare offers the prospect of capitalising upon, and consolidating, actionable lessons from synthesis of improvement projects and initiatives. We propose that informed use of theory can (i) provide a mechanism by which to collect and organise data from a body of improvement work, (ii) offer a framework for analysis and identification of lessons learnt and (iii) facilitate an evaluation of the feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability of improvement programmes. Improvement practitioners can benefit from using an underpinning external structure as a lens by which to examine the specific achievements of their own projects alongside comparable initiatives led by others. We demonstrate the utility of a method known as ‘best fit framework synthesis’ (BFFS) in offering a ubiquitous and versatile means by which to collect, analyse and evaluate improvement work in healthcare. First reported in 2011, BFFS represents a pragmatic, flexible approach to integrating theory with findings from practice. A deductive phase, where a review team seeks to accommodate a substantial part of the data, is followed by an inductive phase, in which the team explores data not accommodated by the framework. We explore the potential for BFFS within improvement work by drawing upon the evidence synthesis methodology literature and practical examples of improvement work reported in BMJ Quality and Safety (2011–2015). We suggest four variants of BFFS that may have particular value in synthesising a body of improvement work. We conclude that BFFS, alongside other approaches that seek to optimise the contribution of theory to improvement work, represents one important enabling mechanism by which to establish the rigour and scientific credentials of the emerging discipline of ‘improvement science’. PMID:26306609

  12. How to build up the actionable knowledge base: the role of 'best fit' framework synthesis for studies of improvement in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andrew; Carroll, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Increasing recognition of the role and value of theory in improvement work in healthcare offers the prospect of capitalising upon, and consolidating, actionable lessons from synthesis of improvement projects and initiatives. We propose that informed use of theory can (i) provide a mechanism by which to collect and organise data from a body of improvement work, (ii) offer a framework for analysis and identification of lessons learnt and (iii) facilitate an evaluation of the feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability of improvement programmes. Improvement practitioners can benefit from using an underpinning external structure as a lens by which to examine the specific achievements of their own projects alongside comparable initiatives led by others. We demonstrate the utility of a method known as 'best fit framework synthesis' (BFFS) in offering a ubiquitous and versatile means by which to collect, analyse and evaluate improvement work in healthcare. First reported in 2011, BFFS represents a pragmatic, flexible approach to integrating theory with findings from practice. A deductive phase, where a review team seeks to accommodate a substantial part of the data, is followed by an inductive phase, in which the team explores data not accommodated by the framework. We explore the potential for BFFS within improvement work by drawing upon the evidence synthesis methodology literature and practical examples of improvement work reported in BMJ Quality and Safety (2011-2015). We suggest four variants of BFFS that may have particular value in synthesising a body of improvement work. We conclude that BFFS, alongside other approaches that seek to optimise the contribution of theory to improvement work, represents one important enabling mechanism by which to establish the rigour and scientific credentials of the emerging discipline of 'improvement science'. PMID:26306609

  13. $$B\\to Kl^+l^-$$ decay form factors from three-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2016-01-27

    We compute the form factors for the B → Kl+l- semileptonic decay process in lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles with 2+1 flavors of sea quark, generated by the MILC Collaboration. The ensembles span lattice spacings from 0.12 to 0.045 fm and have multiple sea-quark masses to help control the chiral extrapolation. The asqtad improved staggered action is used for the light valence and sea quarks, and the clover action with the Fermilab interpretation is used for the heavy b quark. We present results for the form factors f+(q2), f0(q2), and fT(q2), where q2 is the momentum transfer, together with a comprehensivemore » examination of systematic errors. Lattice QCD determines the form factors for a limited range of q2, and we use the model-independent z expansion to cover the whole kinematically allowed range. We present our final form-factor results as coefficients of the z expansion and the correlations between them, where the errors on the coefficients include statistical and all systematic uncertainties. Lastly, we use this complete description of the form factors to test QCD predictions of the form factors at high and low q2.« less

  14. B →K l+l- decay form factors from three-flavor lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Foley, J.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Jain, R. D.; Komijani, J.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Liu, Yuzhi; Mackenzie, P. B.; Meurice, Y.; Neil, E. T.; Qiu, Si-Wei; Simone, J. N.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-01-01

    We compute the form factors for the B →K l+l- semileptonic decay process in lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles with 2 +1 flavors of sea quark, generated by the MILC Collaboration. The ensembles span lattice spacings from 0.12 to 0.045 fm and have multiple sea-quark masses to help control the chiral extrapolation. The asqtad improved staggered action is used for the light valence and sea quarks, and the clover action with the Fermilab interpretation is used for the heavy b quark. We present results for the form factors f+(q2), f0(q2), and fT(q2), where q2 is the momentum transfer, together with a comprehensive examination of systematic errors. Lattice QCD determines the form factors for a limited range of q2, and we use the model-independent z expansion to cover the whole kinematically allowed range. We present our final form-factor results as coefficients of the z expansion and the correlations between them, where the errors on the coefficients include statistical and all systematic uncertainties. We use this complete description of the form factors to test QCD predictions of the form factors at high and low q2.

  15. Excited-state spectroscopy of triply-bottom baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of baryons containing three b quarks is calculated in nonperturbative QCD, using the lattice regularization. The energies of ten excited bbb states with J{sup P} = 1/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +}, 5/2{sup +}, 7/2{sup +}, 1/2{sup -}, and 3/2{sup -} are determined with high precision. A domain-wall action is used for the up-, down- and strange quarks, and the bottom quarks are implemented with NRQCD. The computations are done at lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.11 fm and a {approx} 0.08 fm, and the results demonstrate the improvement of rotational symmetry as a is reduced. A large lattice volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3} is used, and extrapolations of the bbb spectrum to realistic values of the light sea-quark masses are performed. All spin-dependent energy splittings are resolved with total uncertainties of order 1 MeV, and the dependence of these splittings on the couplings in the NRQCD action is analyzed.

  16. Unquenched B meson decay constants and neutral B meson-antineutral B meson mixing parameters from chiral lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktik, Oleg

    In this thesis, we present the first 2+1 dynamical flavor lattice calculation of the B meson decay constants, fBd and fBs , as well as B0 - B0 mixing parameters in the infinite heavy quark mass limit. We use the chirality-preserving domain-wall formulation for light quarks. We employ an improved lattice formulation of the static approximation for heavy quarks and the Iwasaki gauge action for gluons. An important part of this thesis is the perturbative calculation which relates lattice operators to their continuum counterparts in the MS(NDR) scheme. This calculation had not been done previously for the aforementioned choice of lattice action, and it is discussed in detail in this thesis. Combining our numerical work with the results of the perturbative calculation, we obtain fstatBd = 231(10) +18-23 MeV, fstatBs = 261(10)(22) MeV, and for the mixing parameters, fstatBd BstatBd mb = 237(13) +19-26 MeV, fstatBs BstatBs mb = 262(12)(22) MeV, and xi ( fstatBs BstatBs )/( fstatBd BstatBd ) = 1.11(7) +13-4 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  17. Measuring on Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2009-12-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well introduce a general notion of product. To illustrate the generic utility of this novel lattice-theoretic foundation of measure, the sum and product rules are applied to number theory. Further application of these concepts to understand the foundation of quantum mechanics is described in a joint paper in this proceedings.

  18. Nucleon scalar and tensor charges from lattice QCD with light Wilson quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Negele, J. W.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.; Engelhardt, M.; Krieg, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present 2+1 flavor lattice QCD calculations of the nucleon scalar and tensor charges. Using the BMW clover-improved Wilson action with pion masses between 149 and 356 MeV and three source-sink separations between 0.9 and 1.4 fm, we achieve good control over excited-state contamination and extrapolation to the physical pion mass. As a consistency check, we also present results from calculations using unitary domain wall fermions with pion masses between 297 and 403 MeV, and using domain wall valence quarks and staggered sea quarks with pion masses between 293 and 597 MeV.

  19. Development of an object oriented lattice QCD code "Bridge++"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Aoki, S.; Aoyama, T.; Kanaya, K.; Matsufuru, H.; Motoki, S.; Namekawa, Y.; Nemura, H.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukita, N.

    2014-06-01

    We are developing a new lattice QCD code set "Bridge++" aiming at extensible, readable, and portable workbench for QCD simulations, while keeping a high performance at the same time. Bridge++ covers conventional lattice actions and numerical algorithms. The code set is constructed in C++ with an object oriented programming. In this paper we describe fundamental ingredients of the code and the current status of development.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, E J

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape. PMID:26651812

  1. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, E. J.

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape.

  2. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Brodsky, Tim; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z.; McLoughlin, Ryan; Stansky, Elena; Fussell, Leila; Sheppard, Aaron; DiSanto-Rose, Maria; Kershaw, Erin E.; Reynolds, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD) regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD). The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression. PMID:26397111

  3. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity.

    PubMed

    Brestoff, Jonathan R; Brodsky, Tim; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z; McLoughlin, Ryan; Stansky, Elena; Fussell, Leila; Sheppard, Aaron; DiSanto-Rose, Maria; Kershaw, Erin E; Reynolds, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD) regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD). The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression. PMID:26397111

  4. The leading hadronic vacuum polarisation on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Della Morte, Michele; Wittig, Hartmut; Jaeger, Benjamin; Juettner, Andreas

    2011-05-23

    After discussing the relevance of a first principles theory-prediction of the hadronic vacuum polarisation for Standard Model tests, the theoretical challenges for its computation in lattice QCD are reviewed. New ideas that will potentially improve the quality of lattice simulations will be introduced and the status of ongoing simulations will be presented briefly.

  5. Efficiency Improvement of Action Acquisition in Two-Link Robot Arm Using Fuzzy ART with Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Naoki; Taniguchi, Kenji

    An efficient learning method using Fuzzy ART with Genetic Algorithm is proposed. The proposed method reduces the number of trials by using a policy acquired in other tasks because a reinforcement learning needs a lot of the number of trials until an agent acquires appropriate actions. Fuzzy ART is an incremental unsupervised learning algorithm in responce to arbitrary sequences of analog or binary input vectors. Our proposed method gives a policy by crossover or mutation when an agent observes unknown states. Selection controls the category proliferation problem of Fuzzy ART. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified with the simulation of the reaching problem for the two-link robot arm. The proposed method achieves a reduction of both the number of trials and the number of states.

  6. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  7. Improved neonatal survival after participatory learning and action with women’s groups: a prospective study in rural eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Swati Sarbani; Mahapatra, Rajendra; Rath, Shibanand; Bajpai, Aparna; Singh, Vijay; Rath, Suchitra; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Gope, Raj Kumar; Sinha, Rajesh; Costello, Anthony; Pagel, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether a women’s group intervention involving participatory learning and action has a sustainable and replicable effect on neonatal survival in rural, eastern India. Methods From 2004 to 2011, births and neonatal deaths in 36 geographical clusters in Jharkhand and Odisha were monitored. Between 2005 and 2008, these clusters were part of a randomized controlled trial of how women’s group meetings involving participatory learning and action influence maternal and neonatal health. Between 2008 and 2011, groups in the original intervention clusters (zone 1) continued to meet to discuss post-neonatal issues and new groups in the original control clusters (zone 2) met to discuss neonatal health. Logistic regression was used to examine neonatal mortality rates after 2008 in the two zones. Findings Data on 41 191 births were analysed. In zone 1, the intervention’s effect was sustained: the cluster-mean neonatal mortality rate was 34.2 per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval, CI: 28.3–40.0) between 2008 and 2011, compared with 41.3 per 1000 live births (95% CI: 35.4–47.1) between 2005 and 2008. The effect of the intervention was replicated in zone 2: the cluster-mean neonatal mortality rate decreased from 61.8 to 40.5 per 1000 live births between two periods: 2006–2008 and 2009–2011 (odds ratio: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.57–0.83). Hygiene during delivery, thermal care of the neonate and exclusive breastfeeding were important factors. Conclusion The effect of participatory women’s groups on neonatal survival in rural India, where neonatal mortality is high, was sustainable and replicable. PMID:24052679

  8. The Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health Partnership Study: Multisector Partnerships in US Counties with Improving Health Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas R.; Siemering, Kirstin Q.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Multisector partnerships are promoted as a mechanism to improve population health. This study explored the types and salient features of multisector partnerships in US counties with improving population health metrics. Methods We used the “Framework for Understanding Cross-Sector Collaborations” proposed by Bryson, Crosby, and Stone to guide data collection and interpretation. Comparative case studies were conducted in 4 counties selected on the basis of population, geographic region, an age-adjusted mortality decline better than the US average, and stable per capita income. Data were collected through website and report reviews and through in-depth interviews with key informants (N = 59) representing multiple sectors. County reports were developed and cross-case themes related to partnership types and salient features were derived. Results Multisector collaboration was common in all 4 counties despite substantial variations in population, geographic size, demographic diversity, and other characteristics. Most partnerships were formed by professionals and organizations to improve delivery of health and social services to vulnerable populations or to generate policy, system, and environment changes. Multisector collaboration was valued in all cases. Outcomes attributed to partnerships included short- and long-term effects that contributed to improved population health. Conclusion The Bryson, Crosby, and Stone model is a useful framework for conducting case study research on multisector partnerships. Outcomes attributed to the multisector partnerships have the potential to contribute to improvement in population health. Further study is needed to confirm whether multisector partnerships are necessary for improving population health within counties and to understand which partnership characteristics are critical for success. PMID:24406092

  9. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of a Comprehensive Teaching Program, Based on Questioning, to Improve Tactical Actions in Young Footballers.

    PubMed

    Práxedes, Alba; Moreno, Alberto; Sevil, Javier; García-González, Luis; Del Villar, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of a comprehensive teaching program, based on questioning on decision making, and execution in football. The intervention program, based on teaching games for understanding model and including the application of questioning in a context of modified games, was applied during 21 training sessions. A quasi-experimental study with a prepost design with 18 male football players (M = 10.7 year, SD = 0.6) was developed over 18 weeks. Participants were divided into experimental group (n = 9) and control group (n = 9). A total of 1532 actions were observed (1120 passes and 412 dribbling). Results showed that after applying the intervention program, the players in the experimental group showed better decision making in the pass and dribbling actions, and better execution in the pass action, compared with the players from the control group. These results suggest that the application of questioning in a context of modified games must be taken into account to promote tactical training in young footballers and to improve their tactical behavior. PMID:27207601

  10. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  11. Theoretical Foundations of Conducting Needs Analysis for Performance Improvement in Organizations: Definition Clarification and a Framework for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pershing, James A.; Lee, Sung Heum; Chung, Jaesam

    2000-01-01

    Clarifies the basic terminology of needs analysis, proposes a framework for conducting needs analyses, and discusses trends and issues in needs analysis as they apply to improving performance in organizations. Topics include needs; needs assessment; needs analysis; training requirements analysis; needs analysis plan; perception analysis, including…

  12. Synthesis of Papers and Actions and Further Research to Improve Response of Crop System Models to Water Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As stated in the Preface, the purpose of this book is to document “Recent advances in understanding and modeling of water stress (water deficit) effects on plant growth and developmental processes”, so that this information can be used to improve models of crop response to water stress for use in op...

  13. [Team Care for Patient Safety, TeamSTEPPS to Improve Nontechnical Skills and Teamwork--Actions to Become an HRO].

    PubMed

    Kaito, Ken

    2015-07-01

    It is important to develop safer medical systems and follow manuals of medical procedures for patient safety. However, these approaches do not always result in satisfactory results because of many human factors. It is known that defects of nontechnical skills are more important than those of technical skills regarding medical accidents and incidents. So, it is necessary to improve personal nontechnical skills and compensate for each other's defects based on a team approach. For such purposes, we have implemented TeamSTEPPS to enhance performance and patient safety in our hospital. TeamSTEPPS (team strategies and tools to enhance performance and patient safety) is a useful method to improve the nontechnical skills of each member and the team. In TeamSTEPPS, leadership to share mental models among the team, continuous monitoring and awareness for team activities, mutual support for workload and knowledge, and approaches to complete communication are summarized to enhance teamwork and patient safety. Other than improving nontechnical skills and teamwork, TeamSTEPPS is also very important as a High Reliability Organization (HRO). TeamSTEPPS is worth implementing in every hospital to decrease medical errors and improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. PMID:26591437

  14. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  15. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  16. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  17. Convex Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A "convex" polygon is one with no re-entrant angles. Alternatively one can use the standard convexity definition, asserting that for any two points of the convex polygon, the line segment joining them is contained completely within the polygon. In this article, the author provides a solution to a problem involving convex lattice polygons.

  18. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  19. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  20. Using mode of action information to improve regulatory decision-making: an ECETOC/ILSI RF/HESI workshop overview.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Neil; Bausen, Melanie; Boobis, Alan R; Cohen, Samuel M; Embry, Michelle; Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia; Greim, Helmut; Lewis, Richard; Bette Meek, M E; Mellor, Howard; Vickers, Carolyn; Doe, John

    2011-03-01

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC), the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Research Foundation (RF), and the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) hosted a workshop in November 2009 to review current practice in the application of mode of action (MOA) considerations in chemical risk assessment. The aim was to provide a rationale for a more general, but flexible approach and to propose steps to facilitate broader uptake and use of the MOA concept. There was consensus amongst the workshop participants that it will require substantial effort and cooperation from the multiple disciplines involved to embrace a common, consistent, and transparent approach. Setting up a repository of accepted MOAs and associated guidance concerning appropriate data to support specific MOAs for critical effects would facilitate categorization of chemicals and allow predictions of toxicity outcomes by read-across. This should in future contribute to the reduction of toxicity testing in animals. The workshop participants also acknowledged the value and importance of human data and the importance of integrating information from biological pathway analyses into current MOA/human relevance frameworks. PMID:21401325

  1. Reversion of steatosis by SREBP-1c antisense oligonucleotide did not improve hepatic insulin action in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Vitto, M F; Luz, G; Luciano, T F; Marques, S O; Souza, D R; Pinho, R A; Lira, F S; Cintra, D E; De Souza, C T

    2012-11-01

    The literature has associated hepatic insulin action with NAFLD. In this sense, treatments to revert steatosis and improve hepatic insulin action become important. Our group has demonstrated that inhibition of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins-1c (SREBP-1c) reverses hepatic steatosis. However, insulin signals after NAFLD reversion require better investigation. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the reversal of NAFLD by SREBP-1c inhibitor results in improvement in the hepatic insulin signal in obesity mice. After installation/achievement of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, Swiss mice were divided into 3 groups: i) Lean, ii) D-IHS, diet-induced hepatic steatosis [no treatment with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)], and iii) RD-IHS, reversion of diet-induced hepatic steatosis (treated with ASO). The mice were treated with ASO SREBP-1c as previously described by our group. After ASO treatment, one set of animals was anesthetized and used for in vivo test, and another mice set was anesthetized and used for histology and Western blot analysis. Reversion of diet-induced hepatic steatosis did not change blood glucose, glucose decay constant (k(ITT)), body weight, or serum insulin levels. In addition, results showed that the protocol did not improve insulin pathway signaling, as confirmed by the absence of changes in IR, IRS1, Akt and Foxo1 phosphorylation in hepatic tissue. In parallel, no alterations were observed in proinflammatory molecules. Thus, our results suggest that the inhibition of SREBP-1c reverts steatosis, but without improving insulin hepatic resistance. PMID:22932913

  2. Improving Diversity and Educational Outreach at the K-14 level: A Call to Action for the AGU Membership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F. R.; Johnson, R.

    2002-12-01

    In 2002, the Subcommittee on Diversity (SD) of the Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) submitted a Diversity Plan to the leadership of AGU. This plan outlines specific programs and goals that AGU can follow to help improve diversity in the Earth and space sciences. Diversity issues are key components to improve the human resource potential in the geosciences. As women are the majority population, and racial and ethnic minorities are experiencing the largest growing segment of the United States population, it is within our best interest to actively recruit and retain these populations into our dynamic fields of study. The SD recognizes that the strength of the AGU lies within its membership. Composed of some of the brightest and talented scientists in the world, the AGU members are leaders and pioneers in our understanding of the Earth System. Yet, many, if not most, people within underrepresented communities are not aware of the relevance that the Earth and space sciences play in their lives. In this discussion, we will discuss the importance of the AGU membership in the Diversity Plan. In addition, we will outline specific things that AGU members can do to improve access of US students and citizenry to Earth and space science education. These steps require that AGU members become active advocates in the public, especially at the K-14 level.

  3. Human ergology that promotes participatory approach to improving safety, health and working conditions at grassroots workplaces: achievements and actions.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Participatory approaches are increasingly applied to improve safety, health and working conditions of grassroots workplaces in Asia. The core concepts and methods in human ergology research such as promoting real work life studies, relying on positive efforts of local people (daily life-technology), promoting active participation of local people to identify practical solutions, and learning from local human networks to reach grassroots workplaces, have provided useful viewpoints to devise such participatory training programmes. This study was aimed to study and analyze how human ergology approaches were applied in the actual development and application of three typical participatory training programmes: WISH (Work Improvement for Safe Home) with home workers in Cambodia, WISCON (Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites) with construction workers in Thailand, and WARM (Work Adjustment for Recycling and Managing Waste) with waste collectors in Fiji. The results revealed that all the three programmes, in the course of their developments, commonly applied direct observation methods of the work of target workers before devising the training programmes, learned from existing local good examples and efforts, and emphasized local human networks for cooperation. These methods and approaches were repeatedly applied in grassroots workplaces by taking advantage of their the sustainability and impacts. It was concluded that human ergology approaches largely contributed to the developments and expansion of participatory training programmes and could continue to support the self-help initiatives of local people for promoting human-centred work. PMID:25665213

  4. Advances in the translational genomics of neuroblastoma: From improving risk stratification and revealing novel biology to identifying actionable genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kristopher R; Maris, John M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal malignancy that commonly affects young children and is remarkably heterogenous in its malignant potential. Recently, the genetic basis of neuroblastoma has come into focus and not only has catalyzed a more comprehensive understanding of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis but also has revealed novel oncogenic vulnerabilities that are being therapeutically leveraged. Neuroblastoma is a model pediatric solid tumor in its use of recurrent genomic alterations, such as high-level MYCN (v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma-derived homolog) amplification, for risk stratification. Given the relative paucity of recurrent, activating, somatic point mutations or gene fusions in primary neuroblastoma tumors studied at initial diagnosis, innovative treatment approaches beyond small molecules targeting mutated or dysregulated kinases will be required moving forward to achieve noticeable improvements in overall patient survival. However, the clonally acquired, oncogenic aberrations in relapsed neuroblastomas are currently being defined and may offer an opportunity to improve patient outcomes with molecularly targeted therapy directed toward aberrantly regulated pathways in relapsed disease. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about neuroblastoma genetics and genomics, highlighting the improved prognostication and potential therapeutic opportunities that have arisen from recent advances in understanding germline predisposition, recurrent segmental chromosomal alterations, somatic point mutations and translocations, and clonal evolution in relapsed neuroblastoma. PMID:26539795

  5. Chiral lattice fermions with correct vacuum polarization and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, C. )

    1991-04-15

    An action for chiral lattice fermions is proposed, which avoids the Nielsen-Ninomiya theorem by virtue of its nonlocality and nonbilinearity. The action is constructed by eliminating the extra fermion modes with a gauge-violating Majorana-type Wilson mass, which is then rendered invariant by an integration over gauge transformations. The free propagator is calculated, and the one-loop vacuum polarization is shown to be identical to that for Wilson fermions, even at nonzero lattice spacing. Also the chiral anomaly is shown to be the same as for Wilson fermions in the continuum limit.

  6. Anabolic growth hormone action improves submaximal measures of physical performance in patients with HIV-associated wasting.

    PubMed

    Esposito, John G; Thomas, Scott G; Kingdon, Lori; Ezzat, Shereen

    2005-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses the muscle loss allegedly responsible for diminished aerobic capacity and increased fatigue in patients with HIV-associated wasting. This study examined whether submaximal measures of physical performance can be used as objective measures of the functional impact of GH treatment-induced anabolism. We randomized 27 HIV-positive men [mean (SD) age, 43.9 (7.2) yr; body mass, 71.9 (10.4) kg; BMI, 23.1 (2.8) kg/m2] with unintentional weight loss despite antiretroviral therapy to receive GH (6 mg) or placebo in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with a 3-mo washout. Lean body mass (LBM), maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2 peak), ventilatory threshold (VeT), 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and work, profile of mood states (POMS) fatigue and vigor scores, and Nottingham health profile (NHP) energy and physical mobility scores were measured. LBM significantly increased after 3 mo of GH treatment vs. placebo (means +/- SE, 3.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.4 kg; P < 0.001). VeT significantly improved (17.6 +/- 3.7 vs. -5.9 +/- 2.5%; P < 0.001), but Vo2 peak did not change significantly. 6MWT distance improved (24.9 +/- 9.7 vs. 19.9 +/- 11.6 m; P > 0.05) and 6MWT work increased significantly more after 3 mo of GH treatment (33.3 +/- 8.8 vs. 16.5 +/- 7.5 kJ; P < 0.05). POMS scores of fatigue and vigor and the NHP score of energy improved, yet the changes were not statistically significant. GH treatment improved VeT linearly to the increase in LBM (r =0.43, P = 0.037) and 6MWT work (r = 0.51, P = 0.008), and the increase in 6MWT work correlated with increase in LBM (r = 0.45, P = 0.024). Improvement in 6MWT work above the median (27.3 kJ) showed a decrease in fatigue (r = -0.62, P = 0.024). We concluded that GH treatment-induced LBM gains in HIV-associated wasting were functionally relevant, as determined by effort-independent submaximal measures of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. PMID:15886228

  7. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems. PMID:26986435

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  9. Improvement of thermoelectric properties induced by uniquely ordered lattice field in Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ming Hao, Yanming; Wang, Gangzhi

    2014-07-01

    In this study, it was found that uniquely ordered lattice field favors transport of carriers but hinder that of phonons. The n-Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array film was successfully achieved by a simple ion beam assisted deposition technique. This oriented pillar array structure is clear with pillar diameter of about 30 nm, exhibiting a uniquely ordered lattice field. The properties of the ordered Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array were greatly enhanced in comparison with those of the ordinary film. The Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array with a thermoelectric dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT=1.28 was obtained at room temperature. The in-plane transport mechanisms of the ordered pillar array and the ordinary structures, lattice field model, are proposed and investigated. The specially ordered lattice field is the main reason for the properties enhancement observed in the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} film. Introduction of such ordered lattice field into TE films is therefore a very promising approach. - Graphical abstract: In this study, it was found that uniquely ordered lattice field favors transport of carriers but hinder that of phonons. The Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array film with a thermoelectric dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT=1.28 was obtained at room temperature. The in-plane transport mechanisms of the ordered pillar array and the ordinary structures, the lattice field model, are proposed and investigated. The specially ordered lattice field is the main reason for the properties enhancement observed in the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array. Introduction of such uniquely ordered lattice field into TE films is therefore a very promising approach. In (a) TEM and (b) HRTEM images of the ordered Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} column array. - Highlights: • Uniquely ordered Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2.5} pillar array was achieved by an IBAD method. • The pillar array with an ordered lattice field

  10. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  11. Environmental enrichment has antidepressant-like action without improving learning and memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Meulendijks, Didier; Douma, Tessa N; Bink, Diewertje I; Breuer, Megan E; Westphal, Koen G C; Olivier, Berend; Oosting, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    Depression, especially in the elderly, is associated with poor cognitive functioning. Exercise has received much attention in the treatment for depression and also dementia. Here we studied the effect of an enriched environment combined with voluntary exercise (EE/VE) on the olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat. The OBX rat is hyperactive in an open field, which is normalized by chronic antidepressant treatment, and suffers from learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophic factors are thought to be involved in the antidepressant action of EE/VE. Hyperactivity and cognitive functioning (both hippocampal dependent and independent tasks) were investigated before and after EE/VE. We quantified hippocampal mRNA levels of the neurotrophic factors BDNF, VGF and VEGF. VEGF receptor (FLK-1) inhibition was achieved by i.c.v administration of the antagonist SU5416 during the period of EE/VE. OBX almost completely blocked fear memory acquired either 48 h or 28 days before surgery. EE/EV normalized OBX-induced hyperactivity in open field, while having no effect on the decrease in hippocampal dependent learning and memory. VEGF mRNA levels in hippocampus were significantly increased both in OBX and control rats following EE/VE. OBX reduced BDNF mRNA levels, but EE did not reverse this. Inhibition of the FLK-1 receptor did not suppress EE/VE induced normalization of the hyperactivity of the OBX rat. The lack of effect of EE/VE on cognitive parameters, while normalizing hyperactivity, suggests different neuronal mechanisms underlying OBX-induced behavioral changes. Since EE/VE still normalizes the OBX-induced hyperactivity while the FLK-1 receptor was blocked, we assume that VEGF is not obligatory for the antidepressant effect of EE/VE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21807004

  12. Lattice Boltzmann methods in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Parmigiani, Andrea; Su, Yanqing

    2014-05-01

    Numerical models often offer the only possible approach to study the complex non-linear dynamics of geodynamical processes that are difficult or impossible to scale for laboratory experiments. The development of improved computer resources has allowed the emergence of large-scale parallel computations in Earth Sciences. These resources have lead to an increasing complexity in models where a greater number of adjustable parameters arise. Although the increasing number of free parameters offers a greater flexibility to fit satisfyingly the set of available constraints (e.g. geochemical, structural) it also provides new challenges in terms of the size of the parameter space and non-uniqueness of model solutions. Another significant challenge associated with state-of-the-art models is that their complexity is in general associated with the addition of parameterizations of the unresolved (small) scale processes. This trend calls for the development of complementary high-performance models to constrain the physics at small-scales where mass, momentum and energy exchanges at interfaces between different phases control the dynamics in heterogeneous media. We argue that more attention should be devoted to the development of multiphase numerical modeling at the granular (pore) scale to investigate the dynamical behavior of heterogeneous media and the emergence of feedbacks that influence the response of these media at much greater scales. The lattice Boltzmann method is a paradigm that emerged almost three decades ago. It is based on kinetic theory and follows a bottom-up approach that contrast the top-down strategy of standard methods such as Finite Volumes, FEM and Finite Differences. Lattice Boltzmann is ideally suited to handle the complex dynamics of multiphase systems at small spatial scales and is very efficient for parallel programing. In this presentation, we discuss the development of different lattice Boltzmann models developed in our group over the last years

  13. The Fermilab lattice information repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Kriss, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Over the years, it has become increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice and machine information repository with the capability of keeping track of revision information could be of great value. This is especially true in the context of a large accelerator laboratory like Fermilab with six rings and sixteen beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, constantly subject to modifications, improvements and even major redesign. While there exist a handful of potentially suitable revision systems--both freely available and commercial--our experience has shown that expecting beam physicists to become fully conversant with complex revision system software used on an occasional basis is neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the FNAL lattice repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. The FNAL repository has been operational since September 2004; the unique architecture of ''Subversion'' has been a key ingredient of the technical success of its implementation.

  14. Antimicrobial activity, improved cell selectivity and mode of action of short PMAP-36-derived peptides against bacteria and Candida.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yinfeng; Yang, Yang; Lyu, Xiting; Dong, Na; Shan, Anshan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently attracted a great deal of attention as promising antibiotic candidates, but some obstacles such as toxicity and high synthesis cost must be addressed before developing them further. For developing short peptides with improved cell selectivity, we designed a series of modified PMAP-36 analogues. Antimicrobial assays showed that decreasing chain length in a certain range retained the high antimicrobial activity of the parental peptide and reduced hemolysis. The 18-mer peptide RI18 exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against both bacteria and fungi, and its hemolytic activity was observably lower than PMAP-36 and melittin. The selectivity indexes of RI18 against bacteria and fungi were improved approximately 19-fold and 108-fold, respectively, compared to PMAP-36. In addition, serum did not affect the antibacterial activity of RI18 against E. coli but inhibited the antifungal efficiency against C. albicans. Flow cytometry and electron microscopy observation revealed that RI18 killed microbial cells primarily by damaging membrane integrity, leading to whole cell lysis. Taken together, these results suggest that RI18 has potential for further therapeutic research against frequently-encountered bacteria and fungi. Meanwhile, modification of AMPs is a promising strategy for developing novel antimicrobials to overcome drug-resistance. PMID:27251456

  15. Improvement actions in waste management systems at the provincial scale based on a life cycle assessment evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Rigamonti, L. Falbo, A.; Grosso, M.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • LCA was used for evaluating the performance of four provincial waste management systems. • Milano, Bergamo, Pavia and Mantova (Italy) are the provinces selected for the analysis. • Most of the data used to model the systems are primary. • Significant differences were found among the provinces located in the same Region. • LCA was used as a decision-supporting tool by Regione Lombardia. - Abstract: This paper reports some of the findings of the ‘GERLA’ project: GEstione Rifiuti in Lombardia – Analisi del ciclo di vita (Waste management in Lombardia – Life cycle assessment). The project was devoted to support Lombardia Region in the drafting of the new waste management plan by applying a life cycle thinking perspective. The present paper mainly focuses on four Provinces in the Region, which were selected based on their peculiarities. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was adopted as the methodology to assess the current performance of the integrated waste management systems, to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each of them and to design their perspective evolution as of year 2020. Results show that despite a usual business approach that is beneficial to all the provinces, the introduction of technological and management improvements to the system provides in general additional energy and environmental benefits for all four provinces. The same improvements can be easily extended to the whole Region, leading to increased environmental benefits from the waste management sector, in line with the targets set by the European Union for 2020.

  16. Naloxone improves functional recovery of myocardial stunning in conscious dogs through its action on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Weber, T P; Stypmann, J; Meissner, A; Hartlage, M G; Van Aken, H; Rolf, N

    2001-04-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that naloxone, but not its quarternary salt, naloxone methiodide (which does not enter the central nervous system), improves recovery from myocardial stunning in conscious dogs. Twenty dogs were chronically instrumented for measurement of heart rate, left atrial, aortic and left ventricular pressure (LVP), LV dP x dtmax(-1) and myocardial wall thickening fraction (WTF). Regional myocardial blood flow was determined with coloured microspheres. Occluder around the left anterior descending artery (LAD) allowed induction of reversible LAD ischaemia. Each of the 20 dogs underwent two LAD ischaemic challenges. Experiments (performed on separate days, in crossover fashion) were: (i) 10 min of LAD occlusion after application of naloxone 63 microg kg(-1) or naloxone methiodide 63 microg kg(-1) and (ii) occlusion without naloxone or naloxone methiodide. WTF was measured at baseline and until complete recovery occurred. LAD ischaemia significantly reduced LAD WTF with (mean (SD) 54 (15)% lower than baseline) and without naloxone (55 (16)% lower than baseline), without significant haemodynamic differences. Between I to 30 min of reperfusion, WTF was significantly higher with naloxone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in WTF with or without naloxone methiodide. We conclude that naloxone improved recovery from myocardial stunning in conscious dogs, and that this was centrally mediated. PMID:11573630

  17. Antimicrobial activity, improved cell selectivity and mode of action of short PMAP-36-derived peptides against bacteria and Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yinfeng; Yang, Yang; Lyu, Xiting; Dong, Na; Shan, Anshan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently attracted a great deal of attention as promising antibiotic candidates, but some obstacles such as toxicity and high synthesis cost must be addressed before developing them further. For developing short peptides with improved cell selectivity, we designed a series of modified PMAP-36 analogues. Antimicrobial assays showed that decreasing chain length in a certain range retained the high antimicrobial activity of the parental peptide and reduced hemolysis. The 18-mer peptide RI18 exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against both bacteria and fungi, and its hemolytic activity was observably lower than PMAP-36 and melittin. The selectivity indexes of RI18 against bacteria and fungi were improved approximately 19-fold and 108-fold, respectively, compared to PMAP-36. In addition, serum did not affect the antibacterial activity of RI18 against E. coli but inhibited the antifungal efficiency against C. albicans. Flow cytometry and electron microscopy observation revealed that RI18 killed microbial cells primarily by damaging membrane integrity, leading to whole cell lysis. Taken together, these results suggest that RI18 has potential for further therapeutic research against frequently-encountered bacteria and fungi. Meanwhile, modification of AMPs is a promising strategy for developing novel antimicrobials to overcome drug-resistance. PMID:27251456

  18. Engaging Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) clinical staff to lead practice improvement: the PICU Participatory Action Research Project (PICU-PAR)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite considerable efforts, engaging staff to lead quality improvement activities in practice settings is a persistent challenge. At British Columbia Children’s Hospital (BCCH), the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) undertook a new phase of quality improvement actions based on the Community of Practice (CoP) model with Participatory Action Research (PAR). This approach aims to mobilize the PICU ‘community’ as a whole with a focus on practice; namely, to create a ‘community of practice’ to support reflection, learning, and innovation in everyday work. Methodology An iterative two-stage PAR process using mixed methods has been developed among the PICU CoP to describe the environment (stage 1) and implement specific interventions (stage 2). Stage 1 is ethnographic description of the unit’s care practice. Surveys, interviews, focus groups, and direct observations describe the clinical staff’s experiences and perspectives around bedside care and quality endeavors in the PICU. Contrasts and comparisons across participants, time and activities help understanding the PICU culture and experience. Stage 2 is a succession of PAR spirals, using results from phase 1 to set up specific interventions aimed at building the staff’s capability to conduct QI projects while acquiring appropriate technical skills and leadership capacity (primary outcome). Team communication, information, and interaction will be enhanced through a knowledge exchange (KE) and a wireless network of iPADs. Relevance Lack of leadership at the staff level in order to improve daily practice is a recognized challenge that faces many hospitals. We believe that the PAR approach within a highly motivated CoP is a sound method to create the social dynamic and cultural context within which clinical teams can grow, reflect, innovate and feel proud to better serve patients. PMID:24401288

  19. Statistics of lattice animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walder; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-07-01

    The scaling behavior of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, modeled by lattice animals on simple hypercubic lattices. For the simulations, we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2⩽d⩽9. The partition sum (number of different animals) and gyration radii are estimated. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4, and ⩾8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d⩾3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann morphodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian Guo

    2014-08-01

    Morphological change due to sediment transport is a common natural phenomenon in real flows. It involves complex processes of erosion and deposition such as those along beaches and in river beds, imposing a strong strain on human beings. Studying and understanding morphodynamic evolution are essential to protect living environment. Although there are conventional numerical methods like finite difference method and finite volume method for forecast of morphological change by solving flow and morphodynamic equations, the methods are too complex/inefficient to be applied to a real large scale problem. To overcome this, a lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate morphological evolution under flows. It provides an alternative way of studying morphodynamics at the full advantages of the lattice Boltzmann methodology. The model is verified by applications to the evolution of one and two dimensional sand dunes under shallow water flows.

  1. Predictions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S.; Allison, I.F.; Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.; Davies, C.T.H.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; Freeland, E.D.; Gottlieb, Steven; Gray, A.; Gregor, E.; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Maresca, F.; Menscher, D.; Nobes, M.; Okamoto, M.; Oktay, M.B.; /Fermilab /Glasgow U. /Columbia U. /Washington U., St. Louis /Utah U. /DePaul U. /Art Inst. of Chicago /Indiana U. /Ohio State U. /Arizona U. /APS, New York /U. Pacific, Stockton /Illinois U., Urbana /Cornell U., LEPP /Simon Fraser U. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-09-01

    In the past year, we calculated with lattice QCD three quantities that were unknown or poorly known. They are the q{sup 2} dependence of the form factor in semileptonic D {yields} K/{nu} decay, the decay constant of the D meson, and the mass of the B{sub c} meson. In this talk, we summarize these calculations, with emphasis on their (subsequent) confirmation by experiments.

  2. Multipole plasmonic lattice solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kou Yao; Ye Fangwei; Chen Xianfeng

    2011-09-15

    We theoretically demonstrate a variety of multipole plasmonic lattice solitons, including dipoles, quadrupoles, and necklaces, in two-dimensional metallic nanowire arrays with Kerr-type nonlinearities. Such solitons feature complex internal structures with an ultracompact mode size approaching or smaller than one wavelength. Their mode sizes and the stability characteristics are studied in detail within the framework of coupled mode theory. The conditions to form and stabilize these highly confined solitons are within the experimentally achievable range.

  3. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2007-09-05

    Recent advances in lattice field theory, in computer technology and in chiral perturbation theory have enabled lattice QCD to emerge as a powerful quantitative tool in understanding hadron structure. I describe recent progress in the computation of the nucleon form factors and moments of parton distribution functions, before proceeding to describe lattice studies of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). In particular, I show how lattice studies of GPDs contribute to building a three-dimensional picture of the proton, I conclude by describing the prospects for studying the structure of resonances from lattice QCD.

  4. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  5. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  6. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  7. Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 in two-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 are analyzed in full (unquenched) lattice QCD. We construct 2x2 cross correlators from flavor SU(3) octet and singlet baryon operators, and diagonalize them so as to extract information of two low-lying states for each parity. The two-flavor CP-PACS gauge configurations are used, which are generated in the renormalization-group improved gauge action and the O(a)-improved quark action. Three different {beta}'s, {beta}=1.80, 1.95, and 2.10, are employed, whose corresponding lattice spacings are a=0.2150, 0.1555, and 0.1076 fm. For each cutoff, we use four hopping parameters, ({kappa}{sub val},{kappa}{sub sea}), which correspond to the pion masses ranging about from 500 MeV to 1.1 GeV. Results indicate that there are two negative-parity {Lambda} states nearly degenerate at around 1.6 GeV, while no state as low as {Lambda}(1405) is observed. By decomposing the flavor components of each state, we find that the lowest (1st-excited) negative-parity state is dominated by flavor-singlet (flavor-octet) component. We also discuss meson-baryon components of each state, which has drawn considerable attention in the context of multiquark pictures of {Lambda}(1405).

  8. Improvement of urban lake water quality by removal of Escherichia coli through the action of the bivalve Anodonta californiensis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Niveen S; Dodd, Hanna; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Horne, Alexander J; Boehm, Alexandria B; Luthy, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    High levels of fecal indicator bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can be indicative of poor water quality. The use of shellfish to reduce eutrophication has been proposed, but application of bivalves to reduce bacterial levels has not been extensively reported. Removal of E. coli by the native freshwater mussel Anodonta californiensis was studied using laboratory batch systems and field-based flow-through systems. Batch systems were utilized to determine the fate and inactivation of E. coli after uptake by the mussel. Batch experiments demonstrated that uptake patterns followed first order kinetics and E. coli was inactivated with less than 5% of the initial colonies recoverable in fecal matter or tissue. Flow-through systems located at an urban impaired lake in San Francisco, CA were utilized to determine uptake kinetics under environmentally relevant conditions. The bivalves maintained a 1-log removal of E. coli for the duration of exposure. The calculated uptake rates can be used in conjunction with hydrologic models to determine the number of bivalves needed to maintain removal of E. coli in different freshwater systems. The outcomes of this study support the use of native freshwater bivalves to achieve the co-benefits of rehabilitating a freshwater ecosystem and improving water quality via reduction of E. coli in contaminated freshwater systems. PMID:25587628

  9. Entropy of unimodular lattice triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Johannes F.; Krüger, Benedikt; Mecke, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Triangulations are important objects of study in combinatorics, finite element simulations and quantum gravity, where their entropy is crucial for many physical properties. Due to their inherent complex topological structure even the number of possible triangulations is unknown for large systems. We present a novel algorithm for an approximate enumeration which is based on calculations of the density of states using the Wang-Landau flat histogram sampling. For triangulations on two-dimensional integer lattices we achieve excellent agreement with known exact numbers of small triangulations as well as an improvement of analytical calculated asymptotics. The entropy density is C=2.196(3) consistent with rigorous upper and lower bounds. The presented numerical scheme can easily be applied to other counting and optimization problems.

  10. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  11. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  12. A Mechanical Lattice Aid for Crystallography Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amezcua-Lopez, J.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a 3-dimensional mechanical lattice with adjustable telescoping mechanisms. Discusses the crystalline state, the 14 Bravais lattices, operational principles of the mechanical lattice, construction methods, and demonstrations in classroom. Provides lattice diagrams, schemes of the lattice, and various pictures of the lattice. (YP)

  13. Improving maternity care in the Dominican Republic: a pilot study of a community-based participatory research action plan by an international healthcare team.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jennifer; Gossett, Sarah; Burgos, Rosa; Cáceres, Ramona; Tejada, Carmen; Dominguez García, Luis; Ambrosio Rosario, Angel; Almonte, Asela; Perez, Lydia J

    2015-05-01

    This article is a report of the process and results of a feasibility pilot study to improve the quality of maternity care in a sample of 31 women and their newborns delivering in a public, tertiary hospital in the Dominican Republic. The pilot study was the first "action step" taken as a result of a formative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study conducted between 2008 and 2010 by an interdisciplinary, international partnership of U.S. academic researchers, Dominican medical/nursing personnel, and Dominican community health workers. Health personnel and community health workers separately identified indicators most important to measure quality of antepartum maternity care: laboratory and diagnostic studies and respectful, interpersonal communication. At the midpoint and the completion of data collection, the CBPR team evaluated the change in quality indicators to assess improvement in care. The pilot study supports the idea that joint engagement of community health workers, health personnel, and academic researchers with data creation and patient monitoring is motivating for all to continue to improve services in the cultural context of the Dominican Republic. PMID:24793488

  14. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in two dimensional lattice super QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Catterall, Simon; Veernala, Aarti

    2015-10-02

    We report on a non-perturbative study of two dimensional N=(2,2) super QCD. Our lattice formulation retains a single exact supersymmetry at non-zero lattice spacing, and contains Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of a U(Nc) gauge group. The lattice action we employ contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which is also invariant under the exact lattice supersymmetry. This work constitutes the first numerical study of this theory which serves as a toy model for understanding some of the issues that are expected to arise in four dimensional super QCD. As a result, we present evidence that the exact supersymmetry breaks spontaneouslymore » when Nf < Nc in agreement with theoretical expectations.« less

  15. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in two dimensional lattice super QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Veernala, Aarti

    2015-10-02

    We report on a non-perturbative study of two dimensional N=(2,2) super QCD. Our lattice formulation retains a single exact supersymmetry at non-zero lattice spacing, and contains Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of a U(Nc) gauge group. The lattice action we employ contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which is also invariant under the exact lattice supersymmetry. This work constitutes the first numerical study of this theory which serves as a toy model for understanding some of the issues that are expected to arise in four dimensional super QCD. As a result, we present evidence that the exact supersymmetry breaks spontaneously when Nf < Nc in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  16. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  17. Deconfining phase transition and the continuum limit of lattice quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, S. A.; Kuti, J.; Toussaint, D.; Kennedy, A. D.; Meyer, S.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale Monte Carlo calculation is presented of the deconfining phase-transition temperature in lattice quantum chromodynamics without fermions. By using the Wilson action, it is found that the transition temperature as a function of the lattice coupling g is consistent with scaling behavior dictated by the perturbative beta function for 6/g-squared greater than 6.15.

  18. OPTIMIZING THE DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR TRIPLE BEND ACHROMATIC LATTICES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER, S.L.; BENGTSSON, J.

    2006-06-26

    The Triple Bend Achromatic (TBA) lattice has the potential for lower natural emittance per period than the Double Bend Achromatic (DBA) lattice for high brightness light sources. However, the DBA has been chosen for 3rd generation light sources more often due to the higher number of undulator straight section available for a comparable emittance. The TBA has considerable flexibility in linear optics tuning while maintaining this emittance advantage. We have used the tune and chromaticity flexibility of a TBA lattice to minimize the lowest order nonlinearities to implement a 3rd order achromatic tune, while maintaining a constant emittance. This frees the geometric sextupoles to counter the higher order nonlinearities. This procedure is being used to improve the nonlinear dynamics of the TBA as a proposed lattice for NSLS-II facility. The flexibility of the TBA lattice will also provide for future upgrade capabilities of the beam parameters.

  19. Accurate lattice parameter measurements of stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinders, Gregory; Cardinaels, Thomas; Binnemans, Koen; Verwerft, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents and discusses lattice parameter analyses of pure, stoichiometric UO2. Attention was paid to prepare stoichiometric samples and to maintain stoichiometry throughout the analyses. The lattice parameter of UO2.000±0.001 was evaluated as being 547.127 ± 0.008 pm at 20 °C, which is substantially higher than many published values for the UO2 lattice constant and has an improved precision by about one order of magnitude. The higher value of the lattice constant is mainly attributed to the avoidance of hyperstoichiometry in the present study and to a minor extent to the use of the currently accepted Cu Kα1 X-ray wavelength value. Many of the early studies used Cu Kα1 wavelength values that differ from the currently accepted value, which also contributed to an underestimation of the true lattice parameter.

  20. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  1. COST Action TU1206 "SUB-URBAN - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Diarmad; de Beer, Johannes; Lawrence, David; van der Meulen, Michiel; Mielby, Susie; Hay, David; Scanlon, Ray; Campenhout, Ignace; Taugs, Renate; Eriksson, Ingelov

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable urbanisation is the focus of SUB-URBAN, a European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action TU1206 - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities. This aims to transform relationships between experts who develop urban subsurface geoscience knowledge - principally national Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs), and those who can most benefit from it - urban decision makers, planners, practitioners and the wider research community. Under COST's Transport and Urban Development Domain, SUB-URBAN has established a network of GSOs and other researchers in over 20 countries, to draw together and evaluate collective urban geoscience research in 3D/4D characterisation, prediction and visualisation. Knowledge exchange between researchers and City-partners within 'SUB-URBAN' is already facilitating new city-scale subsurface projects, and is developing a tool-box of good-practice guidance, decision-support tools, and cost-effective methodologies that are appropriate to local needs and circumstances. These are intended to act as catalysts in the transformation of relationships between geoscientists and urban decision-makers more generally. As a result, the importance of the urban sub-surface in the sustainable development of our cities will be better appreciated, and the conflicting demands currently placed on it will be acknowledged, and resolved appropriately. Existing city-scale 3D/4D model exemplars are being developed by partners in the UK (Glasgow, London), Germany (Hamburg) and France (Paris). These draw on extensive ground investigation (10s-100s of thousands of boreholes) and other data. Model linkage enables prediction of groundwater, heat, SuDS, and engineering properties. Combined subsurface and above-ground (CityGML, BIMs) models are in preparation. These models will provide valuable tools for more holistic urban planning; identifying subsurface opportunities and saving costs by reducing uncertainty in

  2. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  3. Static potential and local color fields in unquenched lattice QCD{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Trottier, Howard D.; Wong, Kit Yan

    2005-09-01

    String breaking by dynamical quarks in three-dimensional lattice QCD is analyzed through measurements of the potential and the local color-electric field strength generated by a static quark-antiquark pair. Simulations were done for unquenched SU(2) color with two flavors of staggered light quarks. An improved gluon action was used, which allows simulations to be done on coarse lattices, providing an extremely efficient means to access the large quark separations and long propagation times at which string breaking occurs. The static sources were generated using Wilson loop operators, hence no light valence quarks are present in the resulting trial states. Results give unambiguous evidence of string breaking. First the static potential is shown to saturate at twice the heavy-light meson mass at large separations. Then it is demonstrated that the local color-electric field strength in the region between the heavy quarks tends towards vacuum values at large separations, the first time that this most graphic effect of quark vacuum polarization on the confining flux-tube has been realized in lattice QCD. Implications of these results for unquenched simulations of four-dimensional QCD are drawn.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of QCD at zero and at finite temperature from the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, G. S.; Bruckmann, F.; Constantinou, M.; Costa, M.; Endrődi, G.; Katz, S. D.; Panagopoulos, H.; Schäfer, A.

    2012-11-01

    The response of the QCD vacuum to a constant external (electro)magnetic field is studied through the tensor polarization of the chiral condensate and the magnetic susceptibility at zero and at finite temperature. We determine these quantities using lattice configurations generated with the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and Nf=1+1+1 flavors of stout smeared staggered quarks with physical masses. We carry out the renormalization of the observables under study and perform the continuum limit both at T>0 and at T=0, using different lattice spacings. Finite size effects are studied by using various spatial lattice volumes. The magnetic susceptibilities χf reveal a spin-diamagnetic behavior; we obtain at zero temperature χu=-(2.08±0.08)GeV-2, χd=-(2.02±0.09)GeV-2 and χs=-(3.4±1.4)GeV-2 for the up, down and strange quarks, respectively, in the MS¯ scheme at a renormalization scale of 2 GeV. We also find the polarization to change smoothly with the temperature in the confinement phase and then to drastically reduce around the transition region.

  5. Thermodynamics of lattice OCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic consequences of QCD are explored in the framework of lattice gauge theory. Attention is focused upon the nature of the chiral symmetry restoration transition at finite temperature and at finite baryon density, and possible strategies for identifying relevant thermodynamic phases are discussed. Some numerical results are presented on the chiral symmetry restoration in the SU(2) gauge theory at high baryon density. The results suggest that with T approx. = 110 MeV there is a second order restoration transition at the critical baryon density n/sub B//sup c/ approx. = 0.62 fm/sup -3/.

  6. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  7. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  8. On lattice protein structure prediction revisited.

    PubMed

    Dotu, Ivan; Cebrián, Manuel; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is regarded as a highly challenging problem both for the biology and for the computational communities. In recent years, many approaches have been developed, moving to increasingly complex lattice models and off-lattice models. This paper presents a Large Neighborhood Search (LNS) to find the native state for the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model on the Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) lattice or, in other words, a self-avoiding walk on the FCC lattice having a maximum number of H-H contacts. The algorithm starts with a tabu-search algorithm, whose solution is then improved by a combination of constraint programming and LNS. The flexible framework of this hybrid algorithm allows an adaptation to the Miyazawa-Jernigan contact potential, in place of the HP model, thus suggesting its potential for tertiary structure prediction. Benchmarking statistics are given for our method against the hydrophobic core threading program HPstruct, an exact method which can be viewed as complementary to our method. PMID:21358007

  9. Multiple Lattice Model for Influenza Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Liccardo, Antonella; Fierro, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral differences among age classes, together with the natural tendency of individuals to prefer contacts with individuals of similar age, naturally point to the existence of a community structure in the population network, in which each community can be identified with a different age class. Data on age-dependent contact patterns also reveal how relevant is the role of the population age structure in shaping the spreading of an infectious disease. In the present paper we propose a simple model for epidemic spreading, in which a contact network with an intrinsic community structure is coupled with a simple stochastic SIR model for the epidemic spreading. The population is divided in 4 different age-communities and hosted on a multiple lattice, each community occupying a specific age-lattice. Individuals are allowed to move freely to nearest neighbor empty sites on the age-lattice. Different communities are connected with each other by means of inter-lattices edges, with a different number of external links connecting different age class populations. The parameters of the contact network model are fixed by requiring the simulated data to fully reproduce the contact patterns matrices of the Polymod survey. The paper shows that adopting a topology which better implements the age-class community structure of the population, one gets a better agreement between experimental contact patterns and simulated data, and this also improves the accordance between simulated and experimental data on the epidemic spreading. PMID:26513580

  10. Scalar meson spectroscopy with lattice staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeTar, Carleton; Fu Ziwen; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2007-11-01

    With sufficiently light up and down quarks the isovector (a{sub 0}) and isosinglet (f{sub 0}) scalar meson propagators are dominated at large distance by two-meson states. In the staggered-fermion formulation of lattice quantum chromodynamics, taste-symmetry breaking causes a proliferation of two-meson states that further complicates the analysis of these channels. Many of them are unphysical artifacts of the lattice approximation. They are expected to disappear in the continuum limit. The staggered-fermion fourth-root procedure has its purported counterpart in rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory (rS{chi}PT). Fortunately, the rooted theory provides a strict framework that permits the analysis of scalar meson correlators in terms of only a small number of low-energy couplings. Thus the analysis of the point-to-point scalar meson correlators in this context gives a useful consistency check of the fourth-root procedure and its proposed chiral realization. Through numerical simulation we have measured correlators for both the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0} channels in the 'Asqtad' improved staggered-fermion formulation in a lattice ensemble with lattice spacing a=0.12 fm. We analyze those correlators in the context of rS{chi}PT and obtain values of the low-energy chiral couplings that are reasonably consistent with previous determinations.

  11. Lattice polymer automata

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S. |; Smith, J.R. |

    1995-05-01

    We present a new style of molecular dynamics and self-assembly simulation, the Lattice Polymer Automaton (LPA). In the LPA all interactions, including electromagnetic forces, are decomposed and communicated via propagating particles, {open_quotes}photons.{close_quotes} The monomer-monomer bondforces, the molecular excluded volume forces, the longer range intermolecular forces, and the polymer-solvent interactions may all be modeled with propagating particles. The LPA approach differs significantly from both of the standard approaches, Monte Carlo lattice methods and Molecular Dynamics simulations. On the one hand, the LPA provides more realism than Monte Carlo methods, because it produces a time series of configurations of a single molecule, rather than a set of causally unrelated samples from a distribution of configurations. The LPA can therefore be used directly to study dynamical properties; one can in fact watch polymers move in real time. On the other hand, the LPA is fully discrete, and therefore much simpler than traditional Molecular Dynamics models, which are continuous and operate on much shorter time scales. Due to this simplicity it is possible to simulate longer real time periods, which should enable the study of molecular self-organization on workstations supercomputers are not needed.

  12. Evolving Data Use Policy in Trinidad and Tobago: The Search for Actionable Knowledge on Educational Improvement in a Small Island Developing State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Lisle, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a single-country case study of the use of large scale assessment (LSA) data to generate actionable knowledge at school and system levels. Actionable knowledge is data-informed insight into school and system processes that can be used to direct corrective action. The analysis is framed from the perspective of the country's…

  13. KRAM, A lattice physics code for modeling the detailed depletion of gadolinia isotopes in BWR lattice designs

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.; Baratta, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Lattice physics codes are used to deplete the burnable isotopes present in each lattice design, calculate the buildup of fission products, and generate the few-group cross-section data needed by the various nodal simulator codes. Normally, the detailed depletion of gadolinia isotopes is performed outside the lattice physics code in a one-dimensional environment using an onion-skin model, such as the method used in MICBURN. Results from the onion-skin depletion, in the form of effective microscopic absorption cross sections for the gadolinia, are then used by the lattice physics code during the lattice-depletion analysis. The reactivity of the lattice at any point in the cycle depends to a great extent on the amount of gadolinia present. In an attempt to improve the modeling of gadolinia depletion from fresh boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel designs, the electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) lattice-physics code CPM-2 has been modified extensively. In this paper, the modified code KRAM is described, and results from various lattice-depletion analyses are discussed in comparison with results from standard CPM-2 and CASMO-2 analyses.

  14. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  15. Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-09-01

    The experimental realization of correlated quantum phases with ultracold gases in optical lattices and their theoretical understanding has witnessed remarkable progress during the last decade. In this review we introduce basic concepts and tools to describe the many-body physics of quantum gases in optical lattices. This includes the derivation of effective lattice Hamiltonians from first principles and an overview of the emerging quantum phases. Additionally, state-of-the-art numerical tools to quantitatively treat bosons or fermions on different lattices are introduced.

  16. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  17. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  18. Conformal field theories, representations and lattice constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, L.; Goddard, P.; Montague, P.

    1996-07-01

    An account is given of the structure and representations of chiral bosonic meromorphic conformal field theories (CFT's), and, in particular, the conditions under which such a CFT may be extended by a representation to form a new theory. This general approach is illustrated by considering the untwisted and Z 2-twisted theories, ℋ( Λ) andtilde H(Λ ) respectively, which may be constructed from a suitable even Euclidean lattice Λ. Similarly, one may construct latticesΛ _C andtilde Λ _C by analogous constructions from a doubly-even binary codeC. In the case whenC is self-dual, the corresponding lattices are also. Similarly, ℋ( Λ) andtilde H(Λ ) are self-dual if and only if Λ is. We show thatH(Λ _C ) has a natural “triality” structure, which induces an isomorphismH(tilde Λ _C ) ≡tilde H(Λ _C ) and also a triality structure ontilde H(tilde Λ _C ). ForC the Golay code,tilde Λ _C is the Leech lattice, and the triality ontilde H(tilde Λ _C ) is the symmetry which extends the natural action of (an extension of) Conway's group on this theory to the Monster, so setting triality and Frenkel, Lepowsky and Meurman's construction of the natural Monster module in a more general context. The results also serve to shed some light on the classification of self-dual CFT's. We find that of the 48 theories ℋ( Λ) andtilde H(Λ ) with central charge 24 that there are 39 distinct ones, and further that all 9 coincidences are accounted for by the isomorphism detailed above, induced by the existence of a doubly-even self-dual binary code.

  19. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifies it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.

  20. Physical symmetry and lattice symmetry in the lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.; Chen, S.; Jin, S.; Martinez, D.

    1997-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is regarded as a specific finite difference discretization for the kinetic equation of the discrete velocity distribution function. We argue that for finite sets of discrete velocity models, such as LBM, the physical symmetry is necessary for obtaining the correct macroscopic Navier-Stokes equations. In contrast, the lattice symmetry and the Lagrangian nature of the scheme, which is often used in the lattice gas automaton method and the existing lattice Boltzmann methods and directly associated with the property of particle dynamics, is not necessary for recovering the correct macroscopic dynamics. By relaxing the lattice symmetry constraint and introducing other numerical discretization, one can also obtain correct hydrodynamics. In addition, numerical simulations for applications, such as nonuniform meshes and thermohydrodynamics can be easily carried out and numerical stability can be ensured by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewey condition and using the semi-implicit collision scheme. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Preclinical safety profile of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1): Mechanism of action of its cytotoxic component retained with improved tolerability

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, Kirsten Achilles; Flagella, Kelly; Beyer, Joseph; Tibbitts, Jay; Kaur, Surinder; Saad, Ola; Yi, Joo-Hee; Girish, Sandhya; Dybdal, Noel; Reynolds, Theresa

    2013-12-01

    Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is the first antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) approved for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. The therapeutic premise of ADCs is based on the hypothesis that targeted delivery of potent cytotoxic drugs to tumors will provide better tolerability and efficacy compared with non-targeted delivery, where poor tolerability can limit efficacious doses. Here, we present results from preclinical studies characterizing the toxicity profile of T-DM1, including limited assessment of unconjugated DM1. T-DM1 binds primate ErbB2 and human HER2 but not the rodent homolog c-neu. Therefore, antigen-dependent and non-antigen-dependent toxicity was evaluated in monkeys and rats, respectively, in both single- and repeat-dose studies; toxicity of DM1 was assessed in rats only. T-DM1 was well tolerated at doses up to 40 mg/kg (∼ 4400 μg DM1/m{sup 2}) and 30 mg/kg (∼ 6000 μg DM1/m{sup 2}) in rats and monkeys, respectively. In contrast, DM1 was only tolerated up to 0.2 mg/kg (1600 μg DM1/m{sup 2}). This suggests that at least two-fold higher doses of the cytotoxic agent are tolerated in T-DM1, supporting the premise of ADCs to improve the therapeutic index. In addition, T-DM1 and DM1 safety profiles were similar and consistent with the mechanism of action of DM1 (i.e., microtubule disruption). Findings included hepatic, bone marrow/hematologic (primarily platelet), lymphoid organ, and neuronal toxicities, and increased numbers of cells of epithelial and phagocytic origin in metaphase arrest. These adverse effects did not worsen with chronic dosing in monkeys and are consistent with those reported in T-DM1-treated patients to date. - Highlights: • T-DM1 was well tolerated in preclinical studies in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. • T-DM1 is associated with bone marrow/hematologic, hepatic, and neuronal toxicities. • T-DM1 toxicities are related to DM1 mechanisms of action and pharmacologic

  2. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  3. Spin foam models for quantum gravity from lattice path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzom, Valentin

    2009-09-15

    Spin foam models for quantum gravity are derived from lattice path integrals. The setting involves variables from both lattice BF theory and Regge calculus. The action consists in a Regge action, which depends on areas, dihedral angles and includes the Immirzi parameter. In addition, a measure is inserted to ensure a consistent gluing of simplices, so that the amplitude is dominated by configurations that satisfy the parallel transport relations. We explicitly compute the path integral as a sum over spin foams for a generic measure. The Freidel-Krasnov and Engle-Pereira-Rovelli models correspond to a special choice of gluing. In this case, the equations of motion describe genuine geometries, where the constraints of area-angle Regge calculus are satisfied. Furthermore, the Immirzi parameter drops out of the on-shell action, and stationarity with respect to area variations requires spacetime geometry to be flat.

  4. A mercury optical lattice clock at LNE-SYRTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sarlo, L.; Favier, M.; Tyumenev, R.; Bize, S.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the development of an optical lattice clock based on mercury and the results obtained since the 7 th SFSM. We briefly present a new solution for the cooling laser system and an improved lattice trap that allows us to interrogate a few thousand atoms in parallel. This translates into a fractional short term stability of 1.2 x 10-15 at the clock frequency of 1.129 PHz.

  5. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  6. Characterization of projection lattices of Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Szambien, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The classical lattices of projections of Hilbert spaces over the real, the complex or the quaternion number field are characterized among the totality of irreducible, complete, orthomodular, atomic lattices satisfying the covering property. To this end, so-called paratopological lattices are introduced, i.e, lattices carrying a topology that renders the lattice operations restrictedly continuous.

  7. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  8. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  9. Advances in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, D.W.; Owens, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in lattice gauge theory. Topics covered include fermion Monte Carlo algorithms, portrait of a proton, critical behavior in QCD, the standard Higgs-model on the lattice, analytic calculation of mass gaps, and simulation of discrete Euclidean quantum gravity.

  10. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/alpha, where alpha is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit alpha yields 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  12. The EMMA Main Ring Lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg,J.S.

    2008-02-21

    I give a brief introduction to the purpose and goals of the EMMA experiment and describe how they will impact the design of the main EMMA ring. I then describe the mathematical model that is used to describe the EMMA lattice. Finally, I show how the different lattice configurations were obtained and list their parameters.

  13. Optical-lattice Hamiltonians for relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2011-03-15

    We show how interpenetrating optical lattices containing Bose-Fermi mixtures can be constructed to emulate the thermodynamics of quantum electrodynamics (QED). We present models of neutral atoms on lattices in 1+1, 2+1, and 3+1 dimensions whose low-energy effective action reduces to that of photons coupled to Dirac fermions of the corresponding dimensionality. We give special attention to (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) and discuss how two of its most interesting features, chiral symmetry breaking and Chern-Simons physics, could be observed experimentally.

  14. Time for action-Improving the design and reporting of behaviour change interventions for antimicrobial stewardship in hospitals: Early findings from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter; Peden, Claire; Charani, Esmita; Marwick, Charis; Michie, Susan

    2015-03-01

    There is strong evidence that self-monitoring and feedback are effective behaviour change techniques (BCTs) across a range of healthcare interventions and that their effectiveness is enhanced by goal setting and action planning. Here we report a summary of the update of a systematic review assessing the application of these BCTs to improving hospital antibiotic prescribing. This paper includes studies with valid prescribing outcomes published before the end of December 2012. We used a structured method for reporting these BCTs in terms of specific characteristics and contacted study authors to request additional intervention information. We identified 116 studies reporting 123 interventions. Reporting of BCTs was poor, with little detail of BCT characteristics. Feedback was only reported for 17 (13.8%) of the interventions, and self-monitoring was used in only 1 intervention. Goals were reported for all interventions but were poorly specified, with only three of the nine characteristics reported for ≥50% of interventions. A goal threshold and timescale were specified for just 1 of the 123 interventions. Only 29 authors (25.0%) responded to the request for additional information. In conclusion, both the content and reporting of interventions for antimicrobial stewardship fell short of scientific principles and practices. There is a strong evidence base regarding BCTs in other contexts that should be applied to antimicrobial stewardship now if we are to further our understanding of what works, for whom, why and in what contexts. PMID:25630430

  15. Multireflection boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina; d'Humières, Dominique

    2003-12-01

    We present a general framework for several previously introduced boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models, such as the bounce-back rule and the linear and quadratic interpolations. The objectives are twofold: first to give theoretical tools to study the existing link-type boundary conditions and their corresponding accuracy; second to design boundary conditions for general flows which are third-order kinetic accurate. Using these new boundary conditions, Couette and Poiseuille flows are exact solutions of the lattice Boltzmann models for a Reynolds number Re=0 (Stokes limit) for arbitrary inclination with the lattice directions. Numerical comparisons are given for Stokes flows in periodic arrays of spheres and cylinders, linear periodic array of cylinders between moving plates, and for Navier-Stokes flows in periodic arrays of cylinders for Re<200. These results show a significant improvement of the overall accuracy when using the linear interpolations instead of the bounce-back reflection (up to an order of magnitude on the hydrodynamics fields). Further improvement is achieved with the new multireflection boundary conditions, reaching a level of accuracy close to the quasianalytical reference solutions, even for rather modest grid resolutions and few points in the narrowest channels. More important, the pressure and velocity fields in the vicinity of the obstacles are much smoother with multireflection than with the other boundary conditions. Finally the good stability of these schemes is highlighted by some simulations of moving obstacles: a cylinder between flat walls and a sphere in a cylinder. PMID:14754343

  16. Ray propagation in nonuniform random lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Anna; Franceschetti, Massimo; Massa, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    The problem of optical ray propagation in a nonuniform random half-plane lattice is considered. An external source radiates a planar monochromatic wave impinging at an angle θ on a half-plane random grid where each cell can be independently occupied with probability qj=1-pj,j being the row index. The wave undergoes specular reflections on the occupied cells, and the probability of penetrating up to level k inside the lattice is analytically estimated. Numerical experiments validate the proposed approach and show improvement upon previous results that appeared in the literature. Applications are in the field of remote sensing and communications, where estimation of the penetration of electromagnetic waves in disordered media is of interest.

  17. Exploring Flavor Physics with Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Daping; Fermilab/MILC Collaborations Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Standard Model has been a very good description of the subatomic particle physics. In the search for physics beyond the Standard Model in the context of flavor physics, it is important to sharpen our probes using some gold-plated processes (such as B rare decays), which requires the knowledge of the input parameters, such as the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements and other nonperturbative quantities, with sufficient precision. Lattice QCD is so far the only first-principle method which could compute these quantities with competitive and systematically improvable precision using the state of the art simulation techniques. I will discuss the recent progress of lattice QCD calculations on some of these nonpurturbative quantities and their applications in flavor physics. I will also discuss the implications and future perspectives of these calculations in flavor physics.

  18. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, Richard J.; Waterman, David G.; Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-10-01

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of data. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from microcrystals of ∼1 µm in size. A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ∼1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling.

  19. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  20. Kenneth Wilson and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

  1. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  2. After-Action Reports: Capturing Lessons Learned and Identifying Areas for Improvement. Lessons Learned from School Crises and Emergencies. Volume 2, Issue 1, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This issue of "Lessons Learned" addresses after-action reports, which are an integral part of the emergency preparedness planning continuum and support effective crisis response. After-action reports have a threefold purpose. They…

  3. Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Jesse; Allen, Rodney F.

    This booklet, a general guide to citizen eco-action, discusses a plan of action on community environmental problems. It offers factors to be considered in any community eco-action situation, but it is not a rigid set of rules. An overview identifies seven key ideas of environmental issues, including the universal participation of all humans in the…

  4. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about interactions between an animal body and complex terrestrial terrain like sand and boulders during legless, undulatory travel (e.g. snake locomotion). We study the locomotor performance of Mojave shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactisoccipitalis , ~ 35 cm long) using a simplified model of heterogeneous terrain: symmetric lattices of obstacles. To quantify performance we measure mean forward speed and slip angle, βs, defined as the angle between the instantaneous velocity and tangent vectors at each point on the body. We find that below a critical peg density the presence of granular media results in high speed (~ 60 cm/s), low average slip (βs ~6°) snake performance as compared to movement in the same peg densities on hard ground (~ 25 cm/s and βs ~15°). Above this peg density, performance on granular and hard substrates converges. Speed on granular media decreases with increasing peg density to that of the speed on hard ground, while speed on hard ground remains constant. Conversely, βs on hard ground trends toward that on granular media as obstacle density increases.

  5. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  6. Lattice QCD clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, D.; Mackenzie, Paul B.; Singh, Anitoj; Simone, Jim; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    As part of the DOE SciDAC ''National Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Computing'' project, Fermilab builds and operates production clusters for lattice QCD simulations. This paper will describe these clusters. The design of lattice QCD clusters requires careful attention to balancing memory bandwidth, floating point throughput, and network performance. We will discuss our investigations of various commodity processors, including Pentium 4E, Xeon, Opteron, and PPC970. We will also discuss our early experiences with the emerging Infiniband and PCI Express architectures. Finally, we will present our predictions and plans for future clusters.

  7. Quantum vortices in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Vignolo, P.; Fazio, R.; Tosi, M. P.

    2007-08-15

    A vortex in a superfluid gas inside an optical lattice can behave as a massive particle moving in a periodic potential and exhibiting quantum properties. In this paper we discuss these properties and show that the excitation of vortex dynamics in a two-dimensional lattice can lead to striking measurable changes in its dynamic response. It would be possible by means of Bragg spectroscopy to carry out the first direct measurement of the effective vortex mass. In addition, the experiments proposed here provide an alternative way to study the pinning to the underlying lattice and the dissipative damping.

  8. Reliability analysis of interdependent lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limiao, Zhang; Daqing, Li; Pengju, Qin; Bowen, Fu; Yinan, Jiang; Zio, Enrico; Rui, Kang

    2016-06-01

    Network reliability analysis has drawn much attention recently due to the risks of catastrophic damage in networked infrastructures. These infrastructures are dependent on each other as a result of various interactions. However, most of the reliability analyses of these interdependent networks do not consider spatial constraints, which are found important for robustness of infrastructures including power grid and transport systems. Here we study the reliability properties of interdependent lattices with different ranges of spatial constraints. Our study shows that interdependent lattices with strong spatial constraints are more resilient than interdependent Erdös-Rényi networks. There exists an intermediate range of spatial constraints, at which the interdependent lattices have minimal resilience.

  9. Lower Dimension Vacuum Defects in Lattice Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V.I.

    2005-04-01

    We overview lattice data on d = 0, 1, 2, 3 dimensional vacuum defects in lattice four-dimensional SU(2) (SU(3)) gluodynamics. In all the cases, defects have a total volume which scales in physical units (with zero fractal dimension). In the case of d = 1, 2, the defects are distinguished by ultraviolet divergent non-Abelian action as well. This sensitivity to the ultraviolet scale allows us to derive strong constraints from the continuum theory on the properties of the defects, which turn out to be satisfied by the lattice data. We discuss a classification scheme of the defects which allows us to (at least) visualize the defect properties in a simple and unified way. A not-yet-checked relation of the defects to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is suggested by the scheme. Finally, we present some arguments that the defects considered could become fundamental variables of a dual formulation of the theory.

  10. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, Richard J.; Waterman, David G.; Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ∼1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling. PMID:25286849

  11. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gildea, Richard J.; Waterman, David G.; Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-09-27

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ~1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can bemore » obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling.« less

  12. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, Richard J.; Waterman, David G.; Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-09-27

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ~1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling.

  13. A service-level action research intervention to improve identification and treatment of cannabis and related mental health issues in young Indigenous Australians: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bohanna, India; Bird, Katrina; Copeland, Jan; Roberts, Nicholas; Clough, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regular cannabis use is associated with negative mental health impacts including psychosis, depression and anxiety. Rates of cannabis use have increased in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in northern Australia within the last two decades, presenting a significant increased risk to young people's mental health in these regions. Improved screening, early detection and treatment for cannabis-related mental health issues are urgently required. This paper describes a service-level action research intervention and evaluation protocol for use in the few services where it is possible to engage young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Methods/Design The protocol is being developed in two services where youth mental health is core business: a primary healthcare centre and a youth service in the Cairns and hinterland region, far north Queensland. The protocol calls first for baseline data to be collected using staff and client surveys; network mapping; and analysis of screening, treatment and referral rates. The protocol's intervention phase is driven by service needs identified from baseline data. Intervention strategies focus on implementing/enhancing cannabis screening instruments and processes in line with current best practice; enhancing networks with external drug and mental health services; developing culturally acceptable training and resources; developing activities aiming to reduce cannabis use in young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients using the services. The protocol requires implementation of the multilevel intervention within each service for 1 year, with follow-up data then collected and compared to baseline. Process evaluation identifies the more effective intervention strategies and documents the challenges to be overcome for full implementation. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was provided by The James Cook University, Human Research Ethics Committee. Ethics Approval Number H5322. Peer

  14. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  15. GMUGLE: A goal lattice constructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2001-08-01

    Goal lattices are a method for ordering the goals of a system and associating with each goal the value of performing that goal in terms of how much it contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goal of a system. This paper presents a progress report on the development of a web-based implementation of the George Mason University Goal Lattice Engine (GMUGLE). GMUGLE allows a user to interactively create goal lattices, add/delete goals, and specify their ordering relations through a web-based interface. The database portion automatically computes the GLB and LUB of pairs of goals which have been entered to form them into a lattice. Yet to be implemented is the code to input goal values, automatically apportion the values among included goals, and accrue value among the included goals.

  16. Lattice Tube Model of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Jayanth R.; Cieplak, Marek; Maritan, Amos

    2004-11-01

    We present a new lattice model for proteins that incorporates a tubelike anisotropy by introducing a preference for mutually parallel alignments in the conformations. The model is demonstrated to capture many aspects of real proteins.

  17. Neutral B-meson mixing from three-flavor lattice quantum chromodynamics: Determination of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Evans, R. T.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Hetrick, J. E.; Jain, R.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Oktay, M. B.; Simone, J. N.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.

    2012-08-01

    We study SU(3)-breaking effects in the neutral Bd-B¯d and Bs-B¯s systems with unquenched Nf=2+1 lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We calculate the relevant matrix elements on the MILC collaboration’s gauge configurations with asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. For the valence light-quarks (u, d, and s) we use the asqtad action, while for b quarks we use the Fermilab action. We obtain ξ=fBsBBs/fBdBBd=1.268±0.063. We also present results for the ratio of bag parameters BBs/BBd and the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |Vtd|/|Vts|. Although we focus on the calculation of ξ, the strategy and techniques described here will be employed in future extended studies of the B mixing parameters ΔMd,s and ΔΓd,s in the standard model and beyond.

  18. Energy of infinite vortex lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Doria, M.M.; Kadtke, J.B.

    1989-05-15

    An expression is derived for the energy density of a lattice of point vortices (or other logarithmic objects) having an arbitrary number of vortices of arbitrary strengths in an arbitrary unit cell. The result is expressed in the form of a rapidly convergent series well suited for numerical evaluation. The effects of separately changing the shape and dimensions of the unit cell are shown for simple cases, and the energy of the triangular lattice is calculated as a function of slip displacement.

  19. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  20. Fully relativistic lattice Boltzmann algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Romatschke, P.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.

    2011-09-15

    Starting from the Maxwell-Juettner equilibrium distribution, we develop a relativistic lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm capable of handling ultrarelativistic systems with flat, but expanding, spacetimes. The algorithm is validated through simulations of a quark-gluon plasma, yielding excellent agreement with hydrodynamic simulations. The present scheme opens the possibility of transferring the recognized computational advantages of lattice kinetic theory to the context of both weakly and ultrarelativistic systems.

  1. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  2. Transport in Sawtooth photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimann, Steffen; Morales-Inostroza, Luis; Real, Bastián; Cantillano, Camilo; Szameit, Alexander; Vicencio, Rodrigo A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate, theoretically and experimentally, a photonic realization of a Sawtooth lattice. This special lattice exhibits two spectral bands, with one of them experiencing a complete collapse to a highly degenerate flat band for a special set of inter-site coupling constants. We report the ob- servation of different transport regimes, including strong transport inhibition due to the appearance of the non-diffractive flat band. Moreover, we excite localized Shockley surfaces states, residing in the gap between the two linear bands.

  3. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27517766

  4. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  5. Green-Schwarz superstring on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, M. S.; Forini, V.; Leder, B.; Vescovi, E.

    2016-07-01

    We consider possible discretizations for a gauge-fixed Green-Schwarz action of Type IIB superstring. We use them for measuring the action, from which we extract the cusp anomalous dimension of planar N=4 SYM as derived from AdS/CFT, as well as the mass of the two AdS excitations transverse to the relevant null cusp classical string solution. We perform lattice simulations employing a Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm and two Wilson-like fermion discretizations, one of which preserves the global SO(6) symmetry the model. We compare our results with the expected behavior at various values of g=√{λ }/4π . For both the observables, we find a good agreement for large g, which is the perturbative regime of the sigma-model. For smaller values of g, the expectation value of the action exhibits a deviation compatible with the presence of quadratic divergences. After their non-perturbative subtraction the continuum limit can be taken, and suggests a qualitative agreement with the non-perturbative expectation from AdS/CFT. Furthermore, we detect a phase in the fermion determinant, whose origin we explain, that for small g leads to a sign problem not treatable via standard reweigthing. The continuum extrapolations of the observables in the two different discretizations agree within errors, which is strongly suggesting that they lead to the same continuum limit. Part of the results discussed here were presented earlier in [1].

  6. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  7. Action Research in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Action research places a powerful tool for school improvement in the hands of teachers. By highlighting the outcomes that are possible and presenting clear steps in the research process, this book is one to encourage anyone who is seeking to implement evidence-based school improvement. Eileen Piggot-Irvine uses her Problem Resolving Action…

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C

    1980-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations done for four-dimensional lattice gauge systems are described, where the gauge group is one of the following: U(1); SU(2); Z/sub N/, i.e., the subgroup of U(1) consisting of the elements e 2..pi..in/N with integer n and N; the eight-element group of quaternions, Q; the 24- and 48-element subgroups of SU(2), denoted by T and O, which reduce to the rotation groups of the tetrahedron and the octahedron when their centers Z/sub 2/, are factored out. All of these groups can be considered subgroups of SU(2) and a common normalization was used for the action. The following types of Monte Carlo experiments are considered: simulations of a thermal cycle, where the temperature of the system is varied slightly every few Monte Carlo iterations and the internal energy is measured; mixed-phase runs, where several Monte Carlo iterations are done at a few temperatures near a phase transition starting with a lattice which is half ordered and half disordered; measurements of averages of Wilson factors for loops of different shape. 5 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  9. Nucleon generalized parton distributions from full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Haegler, Ph.; Musch, B.; Schroers, W.; Edwards, R. G.; Richards, D. G.; Engelhardt, M.; Fleming, G. T.; Orginos, K.; Renner, D. B.

    2008-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the lowest moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions in N{sub f}=2+1 lattice QCD using domain-wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks. Our investigation includes helicity dependent and independent generalized parton distributions for pion masses as low as 350 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm){sup 3}, for a lattice spacing of 0.124 fm. We use perturbative renormalization at one-loop level with an improvement based on the nonperturbative renormalization factor for the axial vector current, and only connected diagrams are included in the isosinglet channel.

  10. Neutral B-meson mixing from unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Albertus, C.; Flynn, J. M.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Aoki, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Wennekers, J.; Christ, N. H.; Dumitrescu, T. T.; Loktik, O.; Izubuchi, T.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a method for calculating the neutral B-meson decay constants and mixing matrix elements in unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks. Our computation is performed on the '2+1' flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice spacing of a{approx_equal}0.11 fm (a{sup -1}=1.729 GeV) and a lattice spatial volume of approximately (1.8 fm){sup 3}. We simulate at three different light sea quark masses with pion masses down to approximately 430 MeV, and extrapolate to the physical quark masses using a phenomenologically-motivated fit function based on next-to-leading order heavy-light meson SU(2) chiral perturbation theory. For the b-quarks, we use an improved formulation of the Eichten-Hill action with static link-smearing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We also improve the heavy-light axial current used to compute the B-meson decay constant to O({alpha}{sub s}pa) using one-loop lattice perturbation theory. We present initial results for the SU(3)-breaking ratios f{sub B{sub s}}/f{sub B{sub d}} and {xi}=f{sub B{sub s{radical}}}(B{sub B{sub s}})/f{sub B{sub d{radical}}}(B{sub B{sub d}}), thereby demonstrating the viability of the method. For the ratio of decay constants, we find f{sub B{sub s}}/f{sub B{sub d}}=1.15(12) and for the ratio of mixing matrix elements, we find {xi}=1.13(12), where in both cases the errors reflect the combined statistical and systematic uncertainties, including an estimate of the size of neglected O(1/m{sub b}) effects.

  11. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors from lattice QCD using a nearly physical pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Negele, J. W.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.; Engelhardt, M.; Krieg, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors using pion masses mπ=149, 202, and 254 MeV and an action with clover-improved Wilson quarks coupled to smeared gauge fields, as used by the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal Collaboration. Particular attention is given to the removal of the effects of excited-state contamination by calculations at three source-sink separations and the use of the summation and generalized pencil-of-function methods. The combination of a calculation at the nearly physical mass mπ=149 MeV in a large spatial volume (mπLs=4.2) and the removal of excited-state effects yields agreement with experiment for the electric and magnetic form factors GE(Q2) and GM(Q2) up to Q2=0.5 GeV2.

  12. Liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive system as a strategy to improve the prophylactic action of Syngonanthus nitens (Bong.) Ruhland against infection by Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; Calixto, Giovana; de Toledo, Luciani Gaspar; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2015-01-01

    ), these values decreased to 62.5 to 31.2 µg/mL, demonstrating that incorporation into the formulation potentiated the action of SNE. Additionally, the time kill assays showed that both forms of SNE were capable of controlling growth, thereby suggesting a possible fungistatic mechanism. Unloaded SNE was not active against C. krusei biofilms, but FE was active against a clinical strain (CKV2). In vivo analysis showed that FE was able to prevent the development of infection following 10 days of administration. We concluded that the formulation developed in this study was an important vehicle for the delivery of SNE based on the improved antifungal activity in all in vitro and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, the extract incorporated into the system may serve as an important prophylactic agent against vaginal infections caused by C. krusei. PMID:26719688

  13. Mechanical Testing of IN718 Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Whittenberger, John D.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Lattice block construction produces a flat, structurally rigid panel composed of thin ligaments of material arranged in a three-dimensional triangulated truss-like structure. Low-cost methods of producing cast metallic lattice block panels are now available that greatly expand opportunities for using this unique material system in today's high-performance structures. Additional advances are being made in NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program to extend the lattice block concept to superalloy materials. Advantages offered by this combination include high strength, light weight, high stiffness, and elevated temperature capabilities. Recently under UEET, the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was investment cast into lattice block panels with great success. To evaluate casting quality and lattice block architecture merit, individual ligaments, and structural subelement specimens were extracted from the panels. Tensile tests, structural compression, and bending strength tests were performed on these specimens. Fatigue testing was also completed for several bend test specimens. This paper first presents metallurgical and optical microscopy analysis of the castings. This is followed by mechanical test results for the tensile ligament tests and the subelement compression and bending strength tests, as well as for the fatigue tests that were performed. These tests generally showed comparable properties to base IN718 with the same heat treatment, and they underscored the benefits offered by lattice block materials. These benefits might be extended with improved architecture such as face sheets.

  14. The moment ⟨x ⟩u -d of the nucleon from Nf=2 lattice QCD down to nearly physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Gläßle, Benjamin; Göckeler, Meinulf; Najjar, Johannes; Rödl, Rudolf H.; Schäfer, Andreas; Schiel, Rainer W.; Sternbeck, André; Söldner, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    We present an update of our analysis [1] which includes additional ensembles at different quark masses, lattice spacings and volumes, all with high statistics. We use Nf=2 mass-degenerate quark flavors, employing the nonperturbatively improved clover action. The lattice matrix elements are converted to the MS ¯ scheme via renormalization factors determined nonperturbatively in the RI' -MOM scheme. We have systematically investigated excited state contributions, in particular, at the smallest, near physical, pion mass. While our results (with much increased precision) are consistent with Ref. [1], comparing to previous determinations we find that excited state contributions can be significant if the quark smearing is not suitably optimized, in agreement with other recent studies. The difference with respect to the value for ⟨x ⟩u-d extracted from experimental data is reduced but not resolved. Using lattice sizes in the range L mπ˜3.4 - 6.7 , no significant finite volume effects have been observed. Performing a controlled continuum limit that may remove the discrepancy will require simulations at lattice spacings a <0.06 fm .

  15. Lattice QCD calculation of form factors describing the rare decays B→K*ℓ+ℓ- and Bs→ϕℓ+ℓ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Ronald R.; Liu, Zhaofeng; Meinel, Stefan; Wingate, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    The rare decays B0→K*0μ+μ- and Bs→ϕμ+μ- are now being observed with enough precision to test Standard Model predictions. A full understanding of these decays requires accurate determinations of the corresponding hadronic form factors. Here we present results of lattice QCD calculations of the B→K* and Bs→ϕ form factors. We also determine the form factors relevant for the decays Bs→K*ℓν and Bs→K¯*0ℓ+ℓ-. We use full-QCD configurations including 2+1 flavors of sea quarks using an improved staggered action, and we employ lattice nonrelativistic QCD to describe the bottom quark.

  16. A search for good lattice rules based on the reciprocal lattice generator matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.; Newman, W.

    1989-01-01

    The search for cost-effective lattice rules is a time-consuming and difficult process. After a brief overview of some of the lattice theory relevant to these rules, a new approach to this search is suggested. This approach is based on a classification of lattice rules using the upper triangular lattice form'' of the reciprocal lattice generator matrix. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Approaches to the sign problem in lattice field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattringer, Christof; Langfeld, Kurt

    2016-08-01

    Quantum field theories (QFTs) at finite densities of matter generically involve complex actions. Standard Monte Carlo simulations based upon importance sampling, which have been producing quantitative first principle results in particle physics for almost forty years, cannot be applied in this case. Various strategies to overcome this so-called sign problem or complex action problem were proposed during the last thirty years. We here review the sign problem in lattice field theories, focusing on two more recent methods: dualization to worldline type of representations and the density-of-states approach.

  18. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (I) Single Hadron Correlation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold,Konstantinos Orginos,Silas R. Beane,Will Detmold,William Detmold,Thomas C. Luu,Konstantinos Orginos,Assumpta Parreno,Martin J. Savage,Aaron Torok,Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of high-statistics calculations of correlation functions generated with single-baryon interpolating operators on an ensemble of dynamical anisotropic gauge-field configurations generated by the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using a tadpole-improved clover fermion action and Symanzik-improved gauge action. A total of 292,500 sets of measurements are made using 1194 gauge configurations of size 20^3 x 128 with an anisotropy parameter \\xi= b_s/b_t = 3.5, a spatial lattice spacing of b_s=0.1227\\pm 0.0008 fm, and pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Ground state baryon masses are extracted with fully quantified uncertainties that are at or below the ~0.2%-level in lattice units. The lowest-lying negative-parity states are also extracted albeit with a somewhat lower level of precision. In the case of the nucleon, this negative-parity state is above the N\\pi threshold and, therefore, the isospin-1/2 \\pi N s-wave scattering phase-shift can be extracted using Luescher's method. The disconnected contributions to this process are included indirectly in the gauge-field configurations and do not require additional calculations. The signal-to-noise ratio in the various correlation functions is explored and is found to degrade exponentially faster than naive expectations on many time-slices. This is due to backward propagating states arising from the anti-periodic boundary conditions imposed on the quark-propagators in the time-direction. We explore how best to distribute computational resources between configuration generation and propagator measurements in order to optimize the extraction of single baryon observables.

  19. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (I) Single Hadron Correlation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-03-23

    We present the results of high-statistics calculations of correlation functions generated with single-baryon interpolating operators on an ensemble of dynamical anisotropic gauge-field configurations generated by the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using a tadpole-improved clover fermion action and Symanzik-improved gauge action. A total of 292, 500 sets of measurements are made using 1194 gauge configurations of size 20{sup 3} x 128 with an anisotropy parameter {zeta} = b{sub s}/b{sub t} = 3.5, a spatial lattice spacing of b{sub s} = 0.1227 {+-} 0.0008 fm, and pion mass of M{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV. Ground state baryons masses are extracted with fully quantified uncertainties that are at or below the {approx} 0.2%-level in lattice units. The lowest-lying negative-parity states are also extracted albeit with a somewhat lower level of precision. In the case of the nucleon, this negative-parity state is above the N{pi} threshold and, therefore, the isospin-1/2 {pi}N s-wave scattering phase-shift can be extracted using Luescher's method. The disconnected contributions to this process are included indirectly in the gauge-field configurations and do not require additional calculations. The signal-to-noise ratio in the various correlation functions is explored and is found to degrade exponentially faster than naive expectations on many time-slices. This is due to backward propagating states arising from the anti-periodic boundary conditions imposed on the quark-propagators in the time-direction. We explore how best to distribute computational resources between configuration generation and propagator measurements in order to optimize the extraction of single baryon observables.

  20. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.