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Sample records for lavas las pataguas

  1. Inverse steptoes in Las Bombas volcano, as an evidence of explosive volcanism in a solidified lava flow field. Southern Mendoza-Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Corina; Prezzi, Claudia; Orgeira, María Julia; Nullo, Francisco; Margonari, Liliana; Németh, Karoly

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe the unusual genesis of steptoes in Las Bombas volcano- Llancanelo Volcanic Field (LVF) (Pliocene - Quaternary), Mendoza, Argentina. Typically, a steptoe forms when a lava flow envelops a hill, creating a well-defined stratigraphic relationship between the older hill and the younger lava flow. In the Llancanelo Volcanic Field, we find steptoes formed with an apparent normal stratigraphic relationship but an inverse age-relationship. Eroded remnants of scoria cones occur in "circular depressions" in the lava field. To express the inverse age-relationship between flow fields and depression-filled cones here we define this landforms as inverse steptoes. Magnetometric analysis supports this inverse age relationship, indicating reverse dipolar magnetic anomalies in the lava field and normal dipolar magnetization in the scoria cones (e.g. La Bombas). Negative Bouguer anomalies calculated for Las Bombas further support the interpretation that the scoria cones formed by secondary fracturing on already solidified basaltic lava flows. Advanced erosion and mass movements in the inner edge of the depressions created a perfectly excavated circular depression enhancing the "crater-like" architecture of the preserved landforms. Given the unusual genesis of the steptoes in LVF, we prefer the term inverse steptoe for these landforms. The term steptoe is a geomorphological name that has genetic implications, indicating an older hill and a younger lava flow. Here the relationship is reversed.

  2. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  3. Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03658 Lava Flows

    These relatively young lava flows are part of Arsia Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.5N, Longitude 242.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Lava Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-04-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite® Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also examining ideas from the "retro" world of science. This was the post-Sputnik era, a time when science was done by actually doing it and not necessarily by lecturing about it. Cliff Swartz, former TPT editor, once mentioned during a presentation at a Texas AAPT meeting, "The world of physics teaching is cyclic, like a swinging pendulum. We as physics teachers jump from `new ideas' back to our old ones, each generation testing what works best for them."

  5. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  6. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 05 April 2002) Olympus Mons stands 26 km above the surrounding plains, which is three times taller than Mt. Everest, and is the tallest volcano in the solar system. Olympus Mons is also wider (585 km) than the state of Arizona. Although these are impressive dimensions an astronaut would find walking these slopes easy, as they are typically only 2 to 5 degrees. This image contains numerous lava flows, leveed lava channels, a discontinuous sinuous rille (thought to be a collapsed lava tube) and lava plains. Close examination of the sinuous rille reveals that portions of the roof of the lava tube have not completely collapsed. All of these features can be seen in basaltic (iron and magnesium rich black rock) volcanic regions on Earth like Hawaii and Iceland. Impact craters are scarce, indicating a relatively young age (several hundred million years old) for these surfaces.

  7. Lava flows and domes

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses emplacement of silicic domes and mafic lava flows. The authors have utilized the combination of field, experimental and theoretical methods to constrain various characteristics of recently-emplaced lavas, including dimensions, growth rates, surface morphology, deformation styles, rheology, and volatile contents. Filed measurements from numerous volcanoes are presented. Focus is on data from Mount St. Helens. The value of such investigations is addressed.

  8. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  9. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  10. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  11. LAVA Applications to Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Housman, Jeff; Barad, Mike; Brehm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Outline: LAVA (Launch Ascent Vehicle Aerodynamics); Introduction; Acoustics Related Applications; LAVA Applications to Open Rotor; Structured Overset Grids; Cartesian Grid with Immersed Boundary; High Speed Case; High Speed Case with Plate Low Speed Case.

  12. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-437, 30 July 2003

    Olympus Mons is the largest volcano on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the lava flows on the middle south flank of the giant volcano. Illuminated from the lower right, this picture is located near 16.4oN, 135.5oW.

  13. Lava Lakes on Io?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Howell, R.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J. S.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; Galileo NIMS Team

    2003-05-01

    At least 152 active volcanic centers have been identified on Jupiter's moon Io [Lopes et al., 2003, submitted to Icarus]. Eruptions at these centers include lava flows (``Promethean" type eruptions), explosive ``Pillanian" eruptions [Keszthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106, 33,025-52] and volcanism confined within patera walls (``Lokian", Lopes et al., 2003). Understanding the Lokian eruption mechanism is particularly important because paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic constructs on Io's surface [Radebaugh et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 33,005-33,020] and patera volcanism is the most common eruption type on Io. We use observations from Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and compare them with images from Galileo's Solid State Imaging system (SSI) to map the distribution of thermal emission at several Ionian paterae. This allows us to examine how thermal emission correlates with visible features, and to investigate how thermal emission varies with time. Galileo's close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 allowed NIMS to observe the volcanoes at relatively high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, observations of the several paterae reveal that the greatest thermal emission occurs at the edges. This can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the base of the patera (caldera) walls, similar to what has been observed at lava lakes on Earth. Comparison with terrestrial analogs shows that several Ionian active paterae, such as Loki, Tupan, and Emakong, have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes on Earth. We discuss these results and their implications for eruption styles and resurfacing on Io. This work was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  14. Lava flows are fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary investigation of the fractal nature of the plan-view shapes of lava flows in Hawaii (based on field measurements and aerial photographs), as well as in Idaho and the Galapagos Islands (using aerial photographs only). The shapes of the lava flow margins are found to be fractals: lava flow shape is scale-invariant. This observation suggests that nonlinear forces are operating in them because nonlinear systems frequently produce fractals. A'a and pahoehoe flows can be distinguished by their fractal dimensions (D). The majority of the a'a flows measured have D between 1.05 and 1.09, whereas the pahoehoe flows generally have higher D (1.14-1.23). The analysis is extended to other planetary bodies by measuring flows from orbital images of Venus, Mars, and the moon. All are fractal and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and pahoehoe values.

  15. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-525, 26 October 2003

    This May 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows lava flows on the lower northern flanks of the large martian volcano, Olympus Mons. Located near 21.9oN, 132.9oW, the image features flows that moved down the north slope, toward the north/northeast (top/upper right). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the left/lower left; the picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  16. Arsia Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image of lava flows to the west of Arsia Mons looks very similar to the lava flows south of Arsia Mons. It is very likely that the flows were occurring at the same time(s) in both areas.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 228.5 East (131.5 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Arsia Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The lava flows from Arsia Mons are some of the youngest flows in the region. The region of flows south of the volcano have had little modification and appear very similar in appearance to Hawaiian lava flows. This VIS image shows typical flows for the region. The flows are long, fairly narrow, overlapping, and with various surface features and textures.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.5, Longitude 240.1 East (119.9 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Eroding Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's image illustrates how radically the wind can affect the surface of Mars. The lava flows in this region have been covered by fine materials, and eroded by the sand blasting action of the wind. In this region the winds are blowing to the west, eroding the lava surface to form small east/west ridges and bumps. Given enough time the winds will change the appearance of the surface to such a large extent that all flow features will be erased.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -11.7, Longitude 220 East (140 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Lava Lakes in Io's Paterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Milazzo, M.; Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Geissler, P.

    2002-05-01

    New Galileo images and Galileo and Cassini temperature data lend credence to previous proposals that some of the paterae on Io contain lava lakes, similar in some ways to those observed on Earth. Galileo's October 2001 I32 flyby produced spectacular new high resolution observations of Io's paterae, their margins, and floors. Images reveal where lavas have filled Emakong Patera and overtopped its margins. Landslides from the peaks of Tohil Mons are not present on the adjacent floor of a dark patera, perhaps because they have slumped into a molten lava pit. Dark lavas have filled and drained back from colorful Tupan Patera, leaving a ring of material on its walls. This patera also shows evidence of interaction between molten sulfur and silicate lavas, a relationship observed at the terrestrial Poas Volcano (Francis et al., 1980, Nature 283, 754-756; Oppenheimer and Stevenson, 1990, La Recherche 21,1088-1090). The extremely uniformly dark materials in many other paterae could also be lava lakes. Pele Volcano on Io, in particular, has previously been considered a lava lake based on several characteristics (Davies et al., 2001, JGR 106,33,079-33,103). Recent analyses of eclipse images of Pele from Cassini reveal average temperatures of 1375 K, with variations on short (~10 minute) timescales, consistent with active fountaining in a lava lake. Similar oscillations around high temperatures over these time scales are seen in terrestrial lava lakes, such as at Kupaianaha (Flynn et al., GRL, 19,6461-6476, 1993) and Erta Ale (Bessard, Caillet and others, in progress). Nightside high resolution (60 m/pixel) images from Galileo I32 reveal a region of overturning and convection, with some areas reaching in excess of 1800 K, verifying very high-temperature components identified in high-resolution NIMS data (Lopes et al., 2001, JGR, 106, 33,053-33,078). This region is ringed with small hotspots, comparable to locations of breakup and fountaining at the margins of many terrestrial

  20. Deriving Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io Using Lava Tube Skylights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The eruption temperature of Io's silicate lavas constrains Io's interior state and composition [1] but reliably measuring this temperature remotely is a challenge that has not yet been met. Previously, we established that eruption processes that expose large areas at the highest temperatures, such as roiling lava lakes or lava fountains, are suitable targets for this task [2]. In this study we investigate the thermal emission from lava tube skylights for basaltic and ultramafic composition lavas. Tube-fed lava flows are known on Io so skylights could be common. Unlike the surfaces of lava flows, lava lakes, and lava fountains which all cool very rapidly, skylights have steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. The thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [3]. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing angle. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. If the skylight is not resolved, observations distributed over weeks that show a stationary and steady hot spot allow the presence of a skylight to be confidently inferred. This inference allows subsequent refining of observation design to improve viewing geometry of the target. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [4]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to

  1. Lava flows and volcanic landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows constitute a large portion of the edifice of basaltic volcanoes. The substantial difference existing between the emplacement dynamics of different basaltic lava flows suggests a relation between the dominant flow dynamic and the overall shape of the ensuing volcano. Starting from the seminal works of Walker (1971, 1973) it is proposed that the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume of lava can be the founding principium at the roots of the emplacement dynamics of lava flows. Within the general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a conceptual model is presented, in which the dynamic of lava flows can evolve in a linear or in a nonlinear regime on the basis of the constraint active on the system: a low constraint promotes a linear dynamic (i.e. fluctuations are damped), a high constraint a nonlinear one (i.e. fluctuations are enhanced). Two cases are considered as end-members for a linear and a nonlinear dynamic in lava flows: the typical "Hawaiian" sheet flow and the classic "Etnean" channelized flow (respectively). In lava flows, the active constraint is directly proportional to the slope of the topography and to the thermal conductivity and thermal capacity of the surrounding environment, and is inversely proportional to the lava viscosity and to the supply rate. The constraint indicates the distance from the equilibrium conditions of the system, and determines the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume. In subaerial flows, the heat dissipated during the emplacement is well approximated by the heat lost through radiation, which can be retrieved through remote-sensing techniques and can be used to correlate dynamic and dissipation. The model presented recombines previously unrelated concepts regarding the dynamics and the thermal regimes observed in different lava flows, providing a global consistent picture. References Walker GPL (1971) Compound and simple lava flows and flood basalts. Bull Volcanol 35:579-590 Walker GPL (1973

  2. Wind, Water, and Lava

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 June 2003

    The three main geological agents acting on the Martian surface are visible in this image, within an outflow channel to the east of the Tharsis volcanos and north of Valles Marineris. In a wide channel previously eroded by water, linear features have been eroded into the rock by the wind. Later, lava flows embayed the streamlined rocks. A second, younger flow lobe is visible at the bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  4. The Lava Morphology Database (LAMDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckyno, R. S.; de Silva, S. L.; Lopes, R. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Many previous investigations of lava morphology have explored the relationship between flow properties (e.g., length, area, thickness) or flow features (e.g. lobation, flow ridging, aspect ratio), and process variables such as lava viscosity, yield strength, temperature, effusion rate, and local slope. Previous studies, however, have focused on individual attributes and features across a limited dataset of lava flows and have often noted the lack of a larger baseline dataset for comparison. Today, ready availability of high spatial and spectral resolution data for Earth’s volcanoes, coupled with computing advances, enable substantially enhanced network interaction between satellite analysis and field investigators around the world. We therefore propose a community effort, the Lava Morphology Database (LAMDA), to develop a comprehensive database for the morphology of terrestrial lava flows of varying composition, using GIS to integrate, georeference, and compare multiple datasets as well as automating many of the basic calculations. In a preliminary effort, we have measured and compiled lava flow features and attributes at 38 volcanoes including flow distance, surface area, aspect ratio, margin lobation, radii of curvature, height, and arc-length, corresponding cleft angle, flow surface ridging wavelength, lobe and landscape level slope, etc. As an example of the utility of this prototype database we present the initial results of an analysis of these data in light of existing viscosity and effusion rate based morphological models. Data resolution, computing power, and the number of field samples that can be practically analyzed have often necessitated that researchers assume that local slopes, viscosities, chemistries, and temperatures are constant across a flow. In contrast, LAMBDA will enable the exploration of factors that impact the emplacement of terrestrial lava flows at a much higher resolution than previous studies, as well as provide an extensive

  5. Lava Flow at Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On July 21, 2007, the world's most active volcano, Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island, produced a new fissure eruption from the Pu'u O'o vent, which fed an open lava channel and lava flows toward the east. Access to the Kahauale'a Natural Area Reserve was closed due to fire and gas hazards. The two Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) nighttime thermal infrared images were acquired on August 21 and August 30, 2007. The brightest areas are the hottest lava flows from the recent fissure eruption. The large lava field extending down to the ocean is part of the Kupaianaha field. The most recent activity there ceased on June 20, but the lava is still hot and appears bright on the images. Magenta areas are cold lava flows from eruptions that occurred between 1969 and 2006. Clouds are cold (black) and the ocean is a uniform warm temperature, and light gray in color. These images are being used by volcanologists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii Volcano Observatory to help monitor the progress of the lava flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud

  6. Selected caves and lava-tube systems in and near Lava Beds National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waters, Aaron Clement; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Rogers, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Much of the north and south flanks of the Medicine Lake shield were built from molten lava transmitted through lava tubes. These tubes formed beneath the congealing surface of basalt flows in somewhat the same way that a brook may continue to flow beneath a cover of its own winter ice. As molten lava emerges from a vent and flows downslope, congealing lava from the top and sides of the central channel often forms a bridge over the lava stream. The sticking together of bits of lava spatter and fragile lava crusts strengthens the bridge in the manner that thin crusts of floating ice raft together to cover a brook during early stages of a winter freeze. Eruption of basalt lava, however, is a much more violent and spasmodic process than the steady gathering of water that feeds a brook. If liquid lava stops rising from its source deep within the earth, the still-molten lava moving beneath the crusted-over top of a lava flow will continue to drain downhill and may ultimately leave an open lavatube cave-often large enough for people to walk through. It is rare, however, to find such a simple scenario recorded intact among the hundreds of lava-tube caves in the monument. Even before the top and walls of a lava flow have time to cool during a pause in lava supply, a new and violent eruption of lava may refill the open tube, overflow its upper end, and spread a new lava flow beside or on top of the first flow. Even if the original tube is large enough to contain the renewed supply of lava, this tube must deliver the new lava beyond the end of its original flow and thus the lava field extends farther and farther downslope. If the gradient of flow flattens, the tube may subdivide into a number of smaller distributaries, which spread laterally over the more gently sloping ground. 

  7. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  8. Factors controlling lava dome morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan; Bridges, Nathan; Griffiths, Ross

    1991-01-01

    Research suggests that variations in lava dome morphology on different planets will depend much more critically on local gravity and the style of eruption than on the magma composition, ambient temperature, or the relative roles of convective and radiative cooling. Eruption style in turn reflects differences in tectonic conditions and the ability of magma to exsolve volatiles. Observed crude correlations between silica content and calculated yield strengths for terrestrial lava flows and domes probably are do to differences in extrusion rate and volatile solubility, rather than intrinsic rheological properties. Thus, even after taking the known effect of gravity into account, observed differences in gross dome morphology on different planets cannot by themselves be directly related to composition. Additional information such as the distribution of surface textures and structures, or spectroscopic data will be needed to conclusively establish dome compositions.

  9. Lava Flows around Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    At first glance, this image of lava flows around the large scarp of Olympus Mons shows little contrast in surface materials due to dust cover, but a closer look reveals textures characteristic of the variable surface roughness associated with different lava flows in this region. The lobate edges of the flows are distinctive, and permit the discrimination of many overlapping individual flows. On small scales, the surfaces of some flows look wrinkly and ropy, indicating a relatively fluid type of lava flow referred to as pahoehoe. Other surfaces appear more rough and broken, and might be referred to as a'a flows, which have higher viscosities and effusion rates compared to pahoehoe flows. The surface textures of lava flows can thus sometimes be used for comparative purposes to infer lava viscosity and effusion rates. There is also a bright streak in the wind shadow of the impact crater in the lower left of the image where dust that settles onto the surface is not easily scoured away.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and

  10. Emplacement of Long Lava Flows: Detailed Topography of the Carrizozo Basalt Lava Flow, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R; Johnston, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Carrizozo flow in south-central New Mexico was examined to obtain detailed topography for a long basaltic lava flow. This information will be helpful in evaluating emplacement models for long lava flows.

  11. Utility of Lava Tubes on Other Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Bryce E.; Billings, T. L.; York, Cheryl Lynn; Gillett, S. L.; Herbert, M. V.

    1998-01-01

    On Mars, as on Earth, lava tubes are found in the extensive lava fields associated with shield volcanism. Lunar lava-tube traces are located near mare-highland boundaries, giving access to a variety of minerals and other resources, including steep slopes, prominent heights for local area communications and observation, large-surface areas in shade, and abundant basalt plains suitable for landing sites, mass-drivers, surface transportation, regolith harvesting, and other uses. Methods for detecting lava tubes include visual observations of collapse trenches and skylights, ground-penetrating radar, gravimetry, magnetometry, seismography, atmospheric effects, laser, lidar, infrared, and human or robotic exploration.

  12. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  13. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management.

  14. The Stability of Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, F.; Llewellin, E. W.; Woods, A. W.; Gladstone, C.

    2007-12-01

    Lava lakes may exhibit complex cycles of filling and draining on time-scales of hours to weeks. Such activity is recorded at Pu`u `O`o, Hawai`i. Other examples, e.g. Erta Ale in Ethiopia, do not display these draining episodes; instead an 'equilibrium' system is observed in which the lake may persist for years. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of lava lakes and identify behavioural regimes distinguished by system geometry and gas content. Laboratory analogue modelling shows that even a simple conduit-lake system, driven by a constant gas flux, can display steady-state equilibrium or cyclic behaviour, depending on the rate of gas flux. A theoretical approach to the same system captures this range of behaviour. By testing the stability of an 'equilibrium' lake to small perturbations, we show that the degree of stability is controlled by the ratio of conduit to lake areas, and the gas volume fraction at the top of the conduit. Despite the simplicity of the modelled system, a rich spectrum of behaviour is found. The model predicts that a stable system must drain over time. This implies that lakes which exhibit ongoing degassing for years or decades (e.g. Erta Ale) either must have an exogenous supply of gas bubbles from depth, or an effective conduit convection mechanism must exist.

  15. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. ‧A‧a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  16. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions. PMID:25514031

  17. Internal fabric development in complex lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Kratinová, Zuzana; Kusbach, Vladimír; Schulmann, Karel

    2009-03-01

    Viscous lava extrusions were modeled using plaster of Paris with admixed magnetite dust which served as a tracer of the internal anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility fabric in model lava domes. Used analogue material showed pseudoplastic behavior and yield strength level proportional to increasing mixing ratio of plaster powder and water. A series of models ranging from simple gravity flows to complex lava domes showing combined endogenous and exogenous growth were created by intrusion of plaster into a sandbox. The similarity of model bodies is compared with natural lava domes on the basis of dynamic scaling analysis. Growth dynamics, exogenous growth and internal fabric development in natural lava domes is critically discussed using the experimental results.

  18. Lava Flows near Pavonis Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 September 2003

    The Tharsis province of Mars was the main center of volcanism on the planet. This THEMIS visible image shows lava flows that appear to be originating from linear vents just east of Pavonis Mons, the middle of the three giant Tharsis volcanoes. A large volume of lava also appears to be flowing out of a smaller series of pits on the far eastern side of the image, towards the bottom.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.1, Longitude 253.1 East (106.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Lava Flows and Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 November 2003

    The striking surface textures observed in this THEMIS image taken south of the volcano Arsia Mons are from different erupted lava flows. Many flows extend for several kilometers and are observed to crosscut previous existing flows. The variable surface textures could result from older and younger lava flows, differences in the composition and vessicularity of magma, or different degrees of weathering.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -20.4, Longitude 242.2 East (117.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Dynamics of the Mount Nyiragongo lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.-Y.; Darrah, T. H.; Tedesco, D.; Eymold, W. K.

    2014-05-01

    The permanent and presently rising lava lake at Mount Nyiragongo constitutes a major potential geological hazard to the inhabitants of the Virunga volcanic region in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda. Based on two field campaigns in June 2010 and 2011, we estimate the lava lake level from the southeastern crater rim (~400 m diameter) and lava lake area (~46,550 m2), which constrains, respectively, the lava lake volume (~9 × 106 m3) and volume flow rate needed to keep the magma in a molten state (0.6 to 3.5 m3 s-1). A bidirectional magma flow model, which includes the characterization of the conduit diameter and funnel-shaped lava lake geometry, is developed to constrain the amount of magma intruded/emplaced within the magmatic chamber and rift-related structures that extend between Mount Nyiragongo's volcanic center and the city of Goma, DRC, since Mount Nyiragongo's last eruption (17 January 2002). Besides matching field data of the lava lake level covering the period 1977 to 2002, numerical solutions of the model indicate that by 2022, 20 years after the January 2002 eruption, between 300 and 1700 × 106 m3 (0.3 to 1.7 km3) of magma could have intruded/emplaced underneath the edifice, and the lava lake volume could exceed 15 × 106 m3.

  1. Lava flow texture LiDAR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Irwin, R. P., III; Fox, J.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. An experienced geologist can distinguish fresh or degraded lava textures (e.g., blocky, a'a and pahoehoe) visually in the field. Lava texture depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Io and remote regions on Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for differentiating lava textures in remote sensing data remains elusive. We present preliminary results comparing properties of lava textures observed in airborne and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne data, in this study, were collected in 2011 by Airborne 1 Corporation and have a ~1m point spacing. The authors collected the terrestrial data during a May 2014 field season. The terrestrial scans have a heterogeneous point density. Points close to the scanner are 1 mm apart while 200 m in the distance points are 10 cm apart. Both platforms offer advantages and disadvantages beyond the differences in scale. Terrestrial scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist sees "on the ground". Airborne scans are a point of view routinely imaged by other remote sensing tools, and can therefore be quickly compared to complimentary data sets (e.g., spectral scans or image data). Preliminary results indicate that LiDAR-derived surface roughness, from both platforms, is useful for differentiating lava textures, but at different spatial scales. As all lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter; rather patterns in surface roughness can be used to differentiate lava surfaces of varied textures. This work will lead to faster and more reliable volcanic mapping efforts for planetary exploration as well as terrestrial

  2. Early life recorded in archean pillow lavas.

    PubMed

    Furnes, Harald; Banerjee, Neil R; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Staudigel, Hubert; de Wit, Maarten

    2004-04-23

    Pillow lava rims from the Mesoarchean Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa contain micrometer-scale mineralized tubes that provide evidence of submarine microbial activity during the early history of Earth. The tubes formed during microbial etching of glass along fractures, as seen in pillow lavas from recent oceanic crust. The margins of the tubes contain organic carbon, and many of the pillow rims exhibit isotopically light bulk-rock carbonate delta13C values, supporting their biogenic origin. Overlapping metamorphic and magmatic dates from the pillow lavas suggest that microbial life colonized these subaqueous volcanic rocks soon after their eruption almost 3.5 billion years ago. PMID:15105498

  3. Lava Flows in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 5, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of the Solis Planum region, southeast of the Tharsis volcanoes. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    Multiple layers of lava flows in this region show temperature differences, as well as some potential compositional differences. The temperature variations between these flows are likely caused by differences in their surface texture. The compositional variation could be due to differences in the make-up of the lava when it erupted onto the surface or might only reflect differences in the amount of dust covering these flows.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -30.1, Longitude 275.9 East (84.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is

  4. Lava Tube Exploration Robot and Payload Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, H. S.; Parness, A. J.; Boston, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Merging science and engineering from the ground up to co-develop a comprehensive instrument/robot package for exploration of and scientific data collection within lava tubes that target analog sites on the Moon and Mars.

  5. Geomagnetic polarity zones for icelandic lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dagley, P.; Wilson, R.L.; Ade-Hall, J. M.; Walker, G.P.L.; Haggerty, S.E.; Sigurgeirsson, T.; Watkins, N.D.; Smith, P.J.; Edwards, J.; Grasty, R.L.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of cores collected from a sequence of lavas in Eastern Iceland has made possible an accurate calculation of the average rate of reversal of the Earth's magnetic field. ?? 1967 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Geomorphic Classification of Lava Flows on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The lava flows on Io are classified into the following categories: broad, filamental, digitate, intercalated, sheet, and contained. Each classification is described according to flow distribution, geomorphology, color, thickness, and source.

  7. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J W; Clowdsley, M S; Nealy, J E; Humes, D H; Clem, J M

    2002-12-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated. PMID:12793728

  8. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Humes, D. H.; Clem, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated.

  9. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  10. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.

    The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  11. Geochemical aspects of some Japanese lavas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.; Martin, W.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    K, Rb, Sr, Ba and rare-earth concentrations in some Japanese lavas have been determined by mass-spectrometric stable-isotope dilution. The samples fall into three rare-earth groups corresponding to tholeiitic, high alumina and alkali basalts. Japanese tholeiites have trace element characteristics similar to those of oceanic ridge tholeiites except for distinctly higher relative concentrations of Ba. Japanese lavas may result from various degrees of partial fusion of amphibole eclogite.

  12. Mineral resources of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas, Lake County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, W.J.; King, H.D.; Gettings, M.E. ); Johnson, F.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The Devel's Garden lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas include approximately 70,940 acres and are underlain entirely by Pleistocene or Holocene lava flows and associated sediments. There is no evidence of hydrothermal alteration in the study areas. No resources were identified in the study areas, but there is low potential for perlite resources in the southern part of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed and the northern half of the Squaw Ridge Lava Bed areas. All three study areas have low potential for geothermal resources and for oil and gas resources.

  13. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  14. Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project: Undergraduate Research Linking Natural and Experimental Basaltic Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Hazlett, R. W.; Wysocki, R.; Bromfield, M. E.; Browne, N. C.; Davis, N. C.; Pelland, C. G.; Rowan, W. L.; Warner, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Undergraduate students in the Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project participated in a month-long investigation of features of basaltic lava flows from two very different perspectives. The first half of the project focused on field relations in basaltic lava flows from the 1984 Krafla Fires eruption in northern Iceland. Students gained valuable experience in the collection of observations and samples in the field leading to hypotheses for the formation of selected features related to lava flow dynamics. Studies focused on a wide range of features including: morphology and heat loss in lava tubes (pyroducts), growth and collapse of lava ponds and overflow deposits, textural changes of lava falls (flow over steep steps), spaced spatter cones from flows over wet ground, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility related to flow kinematics. In the second half of the program students designed, helped execute, documented, and analyzed features similar to those they studied in the field with large-scale (50-250 kg) basaltic lava flows created in the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu). Data collected included video from multiple perspectives, infrared thermal (FLIR) images, still images, detailed measurements of flow dimensions and rates, and samples for textural and magnetic analyses. Experimental lava flow features provided critical tests of hypotheses generated in the field and a refined understanding of the behavior and final morphology of basaltic lava flows. The linked field and experimental studies formed the basis for year-long independent research projects under the supervision of their faculty mentors, leading to senior theses at the students' respective institutions.

  15. Flood lavas on Earth, Io and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Self, S.; Thordarson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Flood lavas are major geological features on all the major rocky planetary bodies. They provide important insight into the dynamics and chemistry of the interior of these bodies. On the Earth, they appear to be associated with major and mass extinction events. It is therefore not surprising that there has been significant research on flood lavas in recent years. Initial models suggested eruption durations of days and volumetric fluxes of order 107 m3 s-1 with flows moving as turbulent floods. However, our understanding of how lava flows can be emplaced under an insulating crust was revolutionized by the observations of actively inflating pahoehoe flows in Hawaii. These new ideas led to the hypothesis that flood lavas were emplaced over many years with eruption rates of the order of 104 m3 s-1. The field evidence indicates that flood lava flows in the Columbia River Basalts, Deccan Traps, Etendeka lavas, and the Kerguelen Plateau were emplaced as inflated pahoehoe sheet flows. This was reinforced by the observation of active lava flows of ??? 100 km length on Io being formed as tube-fed flow fed by moderate eruption rates (102-103 m3 s-1). More recently it has been found that some flood lavas are also emplaced in a more rapid manner. New high-resolution images from Mars revealed 'platy-ridged' flood lava flows, named after the large rafted plates and ridges formed by compression of the flow top. A search for appropriate terrestrial analogues found an excellent example in Iceland: the 1783-1784 Laki Flow Field. The brecciated Laki flow top consists of pieces of pahoehoe, not aa clinker, leading us to call this 'rubbly pahoehoe'. Similar flows have been found in the Columbia River Basalts and the Kerguelen Plateau. We hypothesize that these flows form with a thick, insulating, but mobile crust, which is disrupted when surges in the erupted flux are too large to maintain the normal pahoehoe mode of emplacement Flood lavas emplaced in this manner could have

  16. Mapping of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Carli, Cristian; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Sgavetti, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. MOLA, THEMIS, MOC and OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of this Martian lava field. According to Mars Global Surveyor's MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope <5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes <0,5° and commonly <0,1°. Mars Odyssey/THEMIS VIS and IR images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than ~1500 km. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. On the base of the morphology differences among the flows and through stratigraphic relationships we performed a geological map of the area. MEX/OMEGA spectra were collected in different areas of the lava field. Besides the similar absorption bands OMEGA spectra showed also some differences in reflectance and spectral slope. The spectral map created using the SAM classification reveals that these spectral variations are generally in agreement with the lava flows mapped previously on the base of the flows morphology and stratigraphy. This suggested that such variability is related with different surface textures of the lava flow. Moreover in some cases spectral map highlighted the presence of spectral subunits inside the same stratigraphic unit, due likely to a different mineralogy or rock textures. Therefore spectral analysis revealed useful to improve the geological mapping of the Daedalia Planum region.

  17. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  18. Nornahraun lava morphology and mode of emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Höskuldsson, Armann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Drouin, Vincent; Gallagher, Catherine; Askew, Rob; Moreland, William M.; Dürig, Tobias; Dumont, Stephanie; Þórdarson, Þór

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Nornahraun eruption is the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84, with an estimated lava volume of ~1.15 km3 covering an area of ~83.4 km2 (as of 5 JAN 2015). The eruption provides an unprecedented opportunity to study i) lava morphologies and their emplacement styles, ii) the transition from from open to closed lava pathways and iii) lava pond formation. Tracking of the lava advancement and morphology has been performed by GPS and GoPro cameras installed in 4×4 vehicles as well as video footage. Complimentary observations have been provided from aircraft platforms and by satellite data. Of particular importance for lava morphology observations are 1-12 m/pixel airborne SAR images (x-band). The Nornahraun flow field comprises a continuum of morphologies from pāhoehoe to 'a'ā, which have varied tem-porally and spatially. At the onset of the eruption 31 AUG, lava flows advanced rapidly (400-800 m/hr) from the 1.5 km long fissure as large slabby pāhoehoe [1-3] sheet lobes, 100-500 m wide and 0.3-1 m thick at the flow fronts. By 1 SEPT, the flows began channeling towards the NE constrained by the older Holuhraun I lava field and the to-pography of flood plain itself. A central open channel developed, feeding a 1-2 km wide active 'a'ā frontal lobe that advanced 1-2 km/day. In addition to its own caterpillar motion, the frontal lobe advanced in a series of 30-50 m long breakouts, predominantly slabby and rubbly pāhoehoe [4,5]. These breakouts had initial velocities of 10-30 m/hr and reached their full length within tens of minutes and subsequently inflated over hours. With the continuous advancement of the 'a'ā flow front, the breakouts were incorporated into the 'a'ā flow fronts and seldom preserved. At the margins of the frontal lava lobe, the breakouts were more sporadic, but predominantly rubbly pāhoehoe and slabby pāhoehoe, as at the flow front. The lava flow advanced ENE into Jökulsá á Fjöllum on 7 SEPT

  19. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows.

  20. Fire, Lava Flows, and Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medler, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Richard Wrangham and others argue that cooked food has been obligate for our ancestors since the time of Homo erectus. This hypothesis provides a particularly compelling explanation for the smaller mouths and teeth, shorter intestines, and larger brains that separate us from other hominins. However, natural ignitions are infrequent and it is unclear how earlier hominins may have adapted to cooked food and fire before they developed the necessary intelligence to make or control fire. To address this conundrum, we present cartographical evidence that the massive and long lasting lava flows in the African Rift could have provided our ancestors with episodic access to heat and fire as the front edges of these flows formed ephemeral pockets of heat and ignition and other geothermal features. For the last several million years major lava flows have been infilling the African Rift. After major eruptions there were likely more slowly advancing lava fronts creating small areas with very specific adaptive pressures and opportunities for small isolated groups of hominins. Some of these episodes of isolation may have extended for millennia allowing these groups of early hominins to develop the adaptations Wrangham links to fire and cooked food. To examine the potential veracity of this proposal, we developed a series of maps that overlay the locations of prominent hominin dig sites with contemporaneous lava flows. These maps indicate that many important developments in hominin evolution were occurring in rough spatial and temporal proximity to active lava flows. These maps indicate it is worth considering that over the last several million years small isolated populations of hominins may have experienced unique adaptive conditions while living near the front edges of these slowly advancing lava flows.

  1. LAVA: lithography analysis using virtual access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang; Yang, Rona; Cheng, Jeffery; Chien, Peter; Wen, Victor; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1998-06-01

    A web site allowing remote operation of the SPLAT, SAMPLE, TEMPEST and SIMPL simulators has been developed to promote collaborative work on lithography and in particular on EUV technology. Based on the extensive use of platform independent programming languages, LAVA is accessible from all modern computing platforms. The software supporting the web site is available to others in creating similar web site sites and in making simulators such as those from other universities 'play' together. The web site explores new paradigms in remote operation of lithography simulators and introduces more application-oriented modes of interaction with technologists. The LAVA web site URL is http://cuervo.eecs.berkeley.edu/Volcano/

  2. Experimental Compaction of Pumiceous Dome Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J.; Ashwell, P. A.; Lavalleé, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K. U.; Cole, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    Lava dome stability is reliant on pore pressure, which varies according to the evolution of the permeable porous network. Here, we present experimental results of porosity and permeability evolution during compaction of aphiric (from Ngongotaha volcano) and crystal-bearing (from Tarawera volcano) pumiceous, rhyolitic lavas from Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The Ngongotaha sample has 55 % porosity and is from the crystal-free dome carapace erupted ~200 ka following caldera collapse at Rotorua Caldera. Two sample sets from Tarawera are crystalline, pumiceous clasts from a dome-collapse generated block and ash flow at Okataina Caldera ~1314 AD, and contain 50 and 25 % pores. This study tests the validity of the 'permeable foam' model by comparing properties of the experimentally compacted pumice to denser material seen in the exposed cores of Tarawera and Ngongotaha. Cylindrical samples were deformed under conditions similar to lava dome settings, under a constant, low axial stress of 2.8 MPa at 800-900oC (above the measured calorimetric glass transition temperatures). Deformation ensued to a total axial strain of 60% and the porosity and permeability of the samples were measured at strain increments of 10 %. Samples display different resultant strains under the same applied stress and exhibit strain-hardening behaviour during compaction. The development of textures and microstructures is characterised using petrographic analysis and x-ray computed tomography. Porosity reduces steadily with increasing strain, but reaches a minimum of 20 % porosity at 40-50 % strain (irrespective of starting porosity or crystallinity), after which further strain is accommodated by barrelling of the sample. A rapid reduction in permeability along the primary axis occurs during the initial stage of compression and continues to decrease with increasing strain and densification of the lava. Permeability development differs between lava types due to the influence of crystallinity on the

  3. Toward a model for leveed lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Many lava flows have two distinct volumetric components during emplacement. First, there is a component actively flowing in accordance with Newtonian or other constitutive relations. Second, there may be an inactive, stationary component that is no longer participating in the forward movement of the flow. Such passive components may take the form of flow-confining levees, solidified lateral margins, overspilling, plating, small ponds and sidestreams, or a lava tube. To describe the conservation of flow volume for the active component, governing equations are given and discussed.

  4. Lava tube morphology on Etna and evidence for lava flow emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Pinkerton, Harry

    1999-06-01

    Lava tubes play a pivotal role in the formation of many lava flow fields. A detailed examination of several compound `a`a lava flow fields on Etna confirmed that a complex network of tubes forms at successively higher levels within the flow field, and that tubes generally advance by processes that include flow inflation and tube coalescence. Flow inflation is commonly followed by the formation of major, first-order ephemeral vents which, in turn, form an arterial tube network. Tube coalescence occurs when lava breaks through the roof or wall of an older lava tube; this can result in the unexpected appearance of vents several kilometers downstream. A close examination of underground features allowed us to distinguish between ephemeral vent formation and tube coalescence, both of which are responsible for abrupt changes in level or flow direction of lava within tubes on Etna. Ephemeral vent formation on the surface is frequently recorded underground by a marked increase in size of the tube immediately upstream of these vents. When the lining of an inflated tube has collapsed, `a`a clinker is commonly seen in the roof and walls of the tube, and this is used to infer that inflation has taken place in the distal part of an `a`a lava flow. Tube coalescence is recognised either from the compound shape of tube sections, or from breached levees, lava falls, inclined grooves or other structures on the walls and roof. Our observations confirm the importance of lava tubes in the evolution of extensive pahoehoe and `a`a flow fields on Etna.

  5. Geology of selected lava tubes in the Bend Area, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greely, R.

    1971-01-01

    Longitudinal profiles representing 5872.5 m of mapped lava tubes and a photogeologic map relating lava tubes to surface geology, regional structure and topography are presented. Three sets of lava tubes were examined: (1) Arnold Lava Tube System (7km long) composed of collapsed and uncollapsed tube segments and lava ponds, (2) Horse Lava Tube System (11 km long) composed of parallel and anastomosing lava tube segments, and (3) miscellaneous lava tubes. Results of this study tend to confirm the layered lava hypothesis of Ollier and Brown (1965) for lava tube formation; however, there are probably several modes of formation for lava tubes in general. Arnold System is a single series of tubes apparently formed in a single basalt flow on a relatively steep gradient. The advancing flow in which the tubes formed was apparently temporarily halted, resulting in the formation of lava ponds which were inflated and later drained by the lava tube system. Horse System probably formed in multiple, interconnected flows. Pre-flow gradient appears to have been less than for Arnold System, and resulted in meandrous, multiple tube networks.

  6. 9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF CRENELATED LAVA STONE GUARD WALL AND ROCK CUT OPPOSITE. NOTE CATTLE GUARD ACROSS ROAD PARTIALLY PAVED OVER. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  7. Quantitative constraints on the growth of submarine lava pillars from a monitoring instrument that was caught in a lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, William W.

    2003-11-01

    Lava pillars are hollow, vertical chimneys of solid basaltic lava that are common features within the collapsed interiors of submarine sheet flows on intermediate and fast spreading mid-ocean ridges. They are morphologically similar to lava trees that form on land when lava overruns forested areas, but the sides of lava pillars are covered with distinctive, evenly spaced, thin, horizontal lava crusts, referred to hereafter as "lava shelves." Lava stalactites up to 5 cm long on the undersides of these shelves are evidence that cavities filled with a hot vapor phase existed temporarily beneath each crust. During the submarine eruption of Axial Volcano in 1998 on the Juan de Fuca Ridge a monitoring instrument, called VSM2, became embedded in the upper crust of a lava flow that produced 3- to 5-m-high lava pillars. A pressure sensor in the instrument showed that the 1998 lobate sheet flow inflated 3.5 m and then drained out again in only 2.5 hours. These data provide the first quantitative constraints on the timescale of lava pillar formation and the rates of submarine lava flow inflation and drainback. They also allow comparisons to lava flow inflation rates observed on land, to theoretical models of crust formation on submarine lava, and to previous models of pillar formation. A new model is presented for the rhythmic formation of alternating lava crusts and vapor cavities to explain how stacks of lava shelves are formed on the sides of lava pillars during continuous lava drainback. Each vapor cavity is created between a stranded crust and the subsiding lava surface. A hot vapor phase forms within each cavity as seawater is syringed through tiny cracks in the stranded crust above. Eventually, the subsiding lava causes the crust above to fail, quenching the hot cavity and forming the next lava crust. During the 1998 eruption at Axial Volcano, this process repeated itself about every 2 min during the 81-min-long drainback phase of the eruption, based on the thickness

  8. Seismogenic lavas and explosive eruption forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Y; Meredith, P G; Dingwell, D B; Hess, K-U; Wassermann, J; Cordonnier, B; Gerik, A; Kruhl, J H

    2008-05-22

    Volcanic dome-building episodes commonly exhibit acceleration in both effusive discharge rate and seismicity before explosive eruptions. This should enable the application of material failure forecasting methods to eruption forecasting. To date, such methods have been based exclusively on the seismicity of the country rock. It is clear, however, that the rheology and deformation rate of the lava ultimately dictate eruption style. The highly crystalline lavas involved in these eruptions are pseudoplastic fluids that exhibit a strong component of shear thinning as their deformation accelerates across the ductile to brittle transition. Thus, understanding the nature of the ductile-brittle transition in dome lavas may well hold the key to an accurate description of dome growth and stability. Here we present the results of rheological experiments with continuous microseismic monitoring, which reveal that dome lavas are seismogenic and that the character of the seismicity changes markedly across the ductile-brittle transition until complete brittle failure occurs at high strain rates. We conclude that magma seismicity, combined with failure forecasting methods, could potentially be applied successfully to dome-building eruptions for volcanic forecasting. PMID:18497822

  9. Valleys and Lava Flows near Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has been documenting a variety of landforms in the volcanic Tharsis region, including these valleys and associated lava flows on the plains southeast of Olympus Mons. Lava flows are visible in the upper left quarter of this image, but meandering valleys with streamlined 'islands' dominate the scene. The valleys might have been carved by running water, but extremely fluid lava or mud might also have flowed through the channels. The exact role of each type of fluid--water, mud, or lava--remains to be determined. Illumination is from the right. The area shown is 7.3 km (4.5 mi) wide by 12 km (7.5 mi)long.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  10. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  11. Lava Flows in the Grand Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Over vast expanses of time, natural processes like floods and volcanoes deposit layers of rock on the Earth's surface. To delve down through layers of rock is to explore our planet's history. Sometimes rock layers are exposed through human activity, such as drilling or excavation. Other times, rivers carve through the rock. One of the best, and most well-known, examples of a river exposing ancient rocks is Colorado River in Arizona's Grand Canyon. What fewer people know is that the Grand Canyon also has a history of relatively recent (on geologic time scales) volcanism. The evidence--hardened lava--spills down the canyon walls all the way to the river. On June 22, 2003, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the Grand Canyon, near 36.2 degrees north latitude and 113.2 degrees west longitude. ASTER detects light visible to human eyes as well as 'invisible' infrared light. Because different minerals reflect different portions of the light spectrum, ASTER can see varying mineral compositions of the rocks it observes, as well as detecting vegetation. In this three-dimensional visualization, lava fields appear brownish gray, darker than the layers of limestone, sandstone and other rock in the canyon. Vegetation appears green, and sparsely vegetated areas appear mustard. Water in the Colorado River is blue-purple. Geologists estimate that between 1.8 million and 400,000 years ago, lava flows actually dammed the Colorado River more than a dozen times. Some of the lava dams were as high as 600 meters (about 1,969 feet), forming immense reservoirs. Over time, enough water and sediment built up to push the river flow over the tops of these dams and eventually erode them away. Today, remnants of these lava dams remain throughout the area, along with the much older rock layers they cover. Among the most well known examples of these 'frozen' lava cascades is Lava Falls, which spills down to the

  12. Circulation patterns in active lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, T. C.; Lev, E.

    2014-12-01

    Active lava lakes provide a unique window into magmatic conduit processes. We investigated circulation patterns of 4 active lava lakes: Kilauea's Halemaumau crater, Mount Erebus, Erta Ale and Nyiragongo, and in an artificial "lava lake" constructed at the Syracuse University Lava Lab. We employed visual and thermal video recordings collected at these volcanoes and use computer vision techniques to extract time-dependent, two-dimensional surface velocity maps. The large amount of data available from Halemaumau enabled us to identify several characteristic circulation patterns. One such pattern is a rapid acceleration followed by rapid deceleration, often to a level lower than the pre-acceleration level, and then a slow recovery. Another pattern is periodic asymmetric peaks of gradual acceleration and rapid deceleration, or vice versa, previously explained by gas pistoning. Using spectral analysis, we find that the dominant period of circulation cycles at approximately 30 minutes, 3 times longer than the dominant period identified previously for Mount Erebus. Measuring a complete surface velocity field allowed us to map and follow locations of divergence and convergence, therefore upwelling and downwelling, thus connecting the surface flow with that at depth. At Nyiragongo, the location of main upwelling shifts gradually, yet is usually at the interior of the lake, for Erebus it is usually along the perimeter yet often there is catastrophic downwelling at the interior; For Halemaumau upwelling/downwelling position is almost always on the perimeter. In addition to velocity fields, we developed an automated tool for counting crustal plates at the surface of the lava lakes, and found a correlation, and a lag time, between changes if circulation vigor and the average size of crustal plates. Circulation in the artificial basaltic lava "lake" was limited by its size and degree of foaming, yet we measured surface velocities and identify patterns. Maximum surface velocity

  13. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae `Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, during 2005-2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava-ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava-ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  14. Lava flows composition of the Daedalia Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, Cristian; Giacomini, Lorenza; Sgavetti, Maria; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is a large lava plain, consisting of more than 1500 km lava flows emplaced over an almost flat terrain in the south-east area of Arsia Mons. The morphology of this region has been studied by Giacomini et al. (Planet.SpaceSci., 2009) and revealed the presence of various features indicative of inflation mechanisms. Thirteen morphologic units have been delineated and the stratigraphic relationships among these units have been established by the authors. Several compositional data indicate that most of the Mars surface appears to consist of tholeiitic basalts where rocks previously identified as andesite may be basaltic rocks coated with alteration rinds (McSween et al., Science, 2009). Some primitive alkaline olivine-rich basaltic rocks have been also recognized by rover exploration (McSween et al., J.Geophys.Res., 2006). The visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra contain electronic absorptions characteristic of mafic minerals including pyroxenes and olivine. These minerals, together with plagioclase, are the major components of lava's rocks. We have analyzed data acquired by the OMEGA orbiter spectrometer of the Mars Express mission. Several OMEGA's images have been studied collecting sets of spectra from each of the thirteen geological units. The spectra indicate a relatively uniform composition of the lavas, characterized by two wide absorption bands (I and II) at about 1000 and 2000 nm, respectively. These spectral features are diagnostic of the presence of pyroxenes, and the continuum removed spectra permit us to recognize the presence of two different pyroxenes . The precise minima positions of band I, between 950 and 1000 nm, and of band II, between 1800 and 2000 nm, suggest the presence in this region of low calcium and subcalcium clinopyroxene, like pigeonite and augite, with variable relative abundances. The presence of these types of pyroxenes suggests a tholeiitic composition of the Daedalia Planum long lava flows, in agreement with

  15. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  16. Ice-Confined Basaltic Lava Flows: Review and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I.; Edwards, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Basaltic lavas that are interpreted as having been emplaced in subglacial or ice-confined subaerial settings are known from several localities in Iceland, British Columbia and Antarctica. At least four different types of observations have been used to date to identify emplacement of basaltic lavas in an ice-rich environment: i) gross flow morphology, ii) surface structures, iii) evidence for ice-confined water during emplacement, and iv) lava fracture patterns. Five types of ice-confined lava are identified: sheets, lobes, mounds, linear ridges and sinuous ridges. While the appearance of lavas is controlled by the same factors as in the submarine environment, such as the geometry and configuration of vents and lava tubes, flow rheology and rates, and underlying topography, the presence of ice can lead to distinct features that are specific to the ice-confined setting. Other types have very similar or identical equivalents in submarine environment, albeit with some oversteepening/ice contact surfaces. Ice-confined lavas can form as (1) subaerial or subaqueous lavas emplaced against ice open to the air, (2) subaqueous lavas emplaced into pre-existing sub-ice drainage networks, and (3) subaqueous lavas emplaced into ponded water beneath ice. Their surface structures reflect the relationship between rates of lava flow emplacement at the site of ice-water-lava contact, ice melting and water drainage. Variations in local lava flow rates could be due to lava cooling, constriction, inflation, tube development, ice melting, ice collapse, lava collapse, changes in eruption rate etc. Episodes of higher lava flow rate would favour direct ice contact and plastic compression against the ice, generating oversteepened and/or overthickened chilled margins, cavities in the lava formed by melting of enveloped ice blocks (cryolith cavities) and structures such as flattened pillows and lava clasts embedded into the glassy margins. Melting back of the confining ice generates space to

  17. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  18. Detecting short period variations in lava flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-04-01

    Although the underpinning processes that govern the flow of lava have been recognized for some time, modeling the evolution of lava flow fields remains problematic due to the difficulties in fully constraining inputs to flow models. One of the main parameters controlling the evolution of individual flows is effusion rate, and long period effusion rate changes, such as flow-waning prior to the cessation of an eruption, can now be routinely incorporated in simulations. However, effusion rates commonly vary over a wide range of timescales (from years to minutes) and, for short period changes, neither the cause nor the effects are well understood. Nevertheless, short period changes can result in inaccuracies in the input data for simulations and can be responsible for altering flow directions by either building or breaching flow levees. Hence, understanding the processes involved in such changes is important for flow modeling and, furthermore, could eventually provide insight into flow instabilities within the conduit or variability within degassing processes. Observations of short period (e.g. <1 hr) variations in lava flux have been made previously in the field but associated changes cannot be identified in effusion rate data because of the generally low sampling frequency of such data. During the last week of July 2008, trail cameras were used to obtain dense time series imagery of the active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily. The trail cameras were modified to capture timelapse imagery by adding an interval timer which triggered image capture every 10 minutes. During daylight, the cameras collected 5 M-pixel colour images and, during nighttime, they automatically switched to a 2 M-pixel camera which collected (uncalibrated) black and white infrared images. For the color images, haze, cloud and sunglare combined with the low contrast between the active lava and its surroundings, prevented useful analysis. However, the infrared images captured at night clearly

  19. Flow direction determination of lava flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. I.; Rhodes, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The flow direction technique, previously applied to ash-flow sheets, can be used to determine direction of movement and locate eruptive centers for lava flows. The method provides statistically stronger and more consistent flow direction data for lava than ash-flow tuff. The accuracy and reliability of the technique was established on the porphyritic basaltic andesite of Mount Taylor, New Mexico, which erupted from a known center, the Mount Taylor Amphitheater. The technique was then applied to volcanic units with unknown sources: the John Kerr Peak Quartz Latite and mid-Tertiary andesite flows in the Mogollon Mountains, both in southwestern New Mexico. The flow direction technique indicated flow patterns and suggested source areas for each rock unit. In the Mogollon Mountains flow direction measurements were supported by independent directional criteria such as dips of cross beds, stratigraphic thickening, facies changes, and megascopic textures.-

  20. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  1. Support of LAVA Integration and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Marcus Algernon

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is a part of the Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Analysis (RESOLVE) Payload that will fly to the lunar pole on the Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) in 2019. The purpose of the mission is to characterize the water on the surface and subsurface of the moon in various locations in order to map the distribution. This characterization of water will help to understand how feasible water is as a resource that can be used for drinking water, breathable air, and propellants in future missions. This paper describes the key support activities performed during a 10 week internship; specifically, troubleshooting the Near Infrared Spectrometer for the Surge Tank (NIRST) instrument count loss, contributing to a clamp to be used in the installation of Resistive Temperature Detectors (RTDs) to tubing, performing a failure analysis of the LAVA Fluid Subsystem (FSS), and finalizing trade studies for release.

  2. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  3. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  4. Clinker formation in basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vrie, B.; Loock, S.; Henot, J.

    2007-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows are classified according their surface morphology. They can be either aa, displaying a rough clinkery surface or pahoehoe, displaying a smooth clinkerless surface. These two surface types differ also in their emplacement and rheology, and can be differentiated in a shear-strain rate vs. apparent viscosity diagram (Hon & al., 2003). To understand clinker formation, one way is to see how a pahoehoe lava converts to an aa through shear-viscosity changes. Two possibilities occur: 1) the viscosity can increase (e.g. by levee formation) and clinkers will be formed by torque on the flow edges, or 2) the shear-strain will increase (lava influx increasing, topographic obstacles, slope change) and clinker will be formed by crust-breakage. These two clinker formatting processes are called magmatic fragmentation. Clinker will be formed on the summit and to the edges of the flow and they will appear at the base of its according the caterpillar motion usually associated with flows. However, in the Chaîne des Puys (French), basal clinker appears without top clinker (i.e. a pahoehoe lava flow with basal clinker) and thus another explanation is needed to explain them. Clinker samples were collected in different emplacement contexts and different part of flows. The SEM analysis of these samples and comparisons with ash samples from the literature show classical magmatic fragmentation textures (stepped fractures, non- synchronic fractures) in three aa lava flows. However, in one pahoehoe flow there are typical phreatomagmatic textures (blocky shapes, adhering fine particles). There are also shearing structures, such as microfaults in an intermediate flow. Thus, there are at least three different ways to form clinker: 1) classically by fragmentation at the flow base and the edges; 2) by phreatomagmatism at the base flow; 3) by shearing at the flow base and the edges. Basal shearing structures include fault gauges and welded clasts, indicating possible shear

  5. Using Lava Tube Skylights To Derive Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-11-01

    The eruption temperature of Io’s silicate lavas constrains Io’s interior state and composition [1]. We have examined the theoretical thermal emission from lava tube skylights above basaltic and ultramafic lava channels. Assuming that tube-fed lava flows are common on Io, skylights could also be common. Skylights present steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. We find that the thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [2]. Observations would ideally be at night or in eclipse. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the resulting flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing geometry. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [3]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. References: [1] Keszthelyi et al. (2007) Icarus 192, 491-502 [2] McEwen et al. (2015) The Io Volcano Observer (IVO) LPSC-46 abstract 1627 [3] Ramsey and Harris (2015) IAVCEI-2015, Prague, Cz. Rep., abstract IUGG-3519.

  6. Sampling Elysium lavas (13 deg N, 203 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed Pathfinder landing site presents the opportunity to determine chemical and mineralogical compositions of an Elysium lava flow. The flow is part of a geologic unit of planetary significance. The proposed site appears suitable for landing, and lava surfaces should be accessible to the Pathfinder instruments. By analogy to terrestrial flood basalts, any lava analyzed by Pathfinder is likely to be representative of the entire Elysium province.

  7. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  8. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  9. Geochemical Stratigraphy of Southern Parana' Lava Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, A.; De Min, A.; Marques, L. S.; Nardy, A.; Chiaradia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows of the Paranà Large Igneous Province exhibit significant regional and stratigraphic geochemical variations. While the most notable difference concerns the dominance of low-Ti (TiO2 < 2.0 wt.%) and high-Ti types in the southern and northern part of the province, respectively, detailed analyses of lava flow sequences sampled mostly in drill cores allowed definition of six main groups of chemically distinct flow units. The chemical and possible age differences among these units were then used to define the global time-related evolution of Paranà basaltic magmatism and involvement of distinct mantle-source components. Newly sampled outcropping lava flow sequences from the southern Paranà do however only partially support this picture. Our new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data show that high- and low-Ti basaltic flows are interlayered. In particular, Pitanga type high-Ti basalts are interlayered with Gramado and Esmeralda low-Ti basalts (these latter being present both towards the base and the top of the sequence) in Paranà State, while in Santa Caterina State Gramado flows are interlayered with Urubici-type high-Ti basalts. The interlayering of distinct basaltic magma type requires near-synchronous eruption of chemically strongly different magma types generated from clearly heterogeneous mantle sources and erupted through separated magma plumbing systems, without apparent interaction (mixing) among the distinct basalts. In conclusion, the relative timing of low- and high-Ti magma types seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, as for example Esmeralda or Pitanga basalts, previously considered as quite late and postdating Gramado basalts, are indeed synchronous with them.

  10. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  11. Terrestrial Photogrammetry of Active Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M.; Robson, S.

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve our understanding of how lavas flow, cool and stop, accurate and frequent DEMs and associated temperature measurements of active flows are required. We describe the use of terrestrial photogrammetric techniques which allow detailed measurements to be carried out rapidly, frequently and over relevant spatial scales. Furthermore, the equipment required is sufficiently small and light to be easily deployed in remote areas. Images of lava flows from Etna (Sicily) and Hawai'i have been acquired, representing cases involving different length scales, observation distances and advance rates. On Etna, flow-front regions and distal channels of aa flows were studied over distances of up to 400 m. Advance rates were relatively slow (< 4 m hr-1) over flow-fronts ~7 m in height and up to ~30 m in width. The slow rate of change allowed topographic surfaces to be constructed from images collected from multiple locations using a single camera. Sequential surfaces were uses to monitor variations in the volumetric flux at the flow fronts. On Hawai'i, smaller spatial scales were required (distances <30 m) to cover the advance and subsequent inflation of pahoehoe toes. In contrast to the Etna case, the higher rate of lava advance precluded the use of one roving camera to provide topographic data. Hence, DEMs were generated from image pairs acquired using two synchronised and tripod-mounted cameras. Image pairs were collected every minute and the resulting topography can be used to rectify simultaneously collected thermal data. The different problems associated with data collection and processing in these two cases are discussed. This includes image matching issues and factors resulting from the differences between the rubbly aa and the relatively smooth pahoehoe surfaces.

  12. Chips Off an Old Lava Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Photogeologic and remote sensing studies of the Moon show that many light-colored, smooth areas in the highlands contain craters surrounded by dark piles of excavated debris. The dark deposits resemble the dark basalts that make up the lunar maria. They contain the same diagnostic minerals (especially high-calcium pyroxene) and chemical compositions (high iron oxide) as do mare basalts. The deposits formed when vast amounts of material ejected during the formation of giant impact basins covered pre-existing lava plains. Since the smooth plains are older than the youngest impact basin (about 3.8 billion years old), the lavas must have erupted before formation of the visible maria. In fact, they were visible maria for a while eons ago, but were buried by ejecta when the basins formed. We have samples of these ancient mare basalts. They reside in breccias collected from the lunar highlands. Age dating indicates that the chips have ages of 3.9 billion years and older. The oldest dated mare basalt in the Apollo collection is 4.23 billion years. Now Kentaro Terada (Hiroshima University, Japan), Mahesh Anand (Open University, UK), Anna Sokol and Addi Bischoff (Institute for Planetology, Muenster, Germany), and Yuji Sano (The University of Tokyo, Japan) have determined the age of pieces of an ancient lava flow in a lunar meteorite, Kalahari 009, found in Botswana in 1999. The team dated this very low-titanium mare basalt by using an ion microprobe to measure the isotopic composition of lead and uranium in phosphate minerals. They found that the basalt fragments in the rock have an age of about 4.35 (plus or minus 0.15) billion years. This overlaps with the ages of chemically-distinct igneous rocks from the highlands, indicating that diverse magmas were being produced early in the history of the Moon.

  13. Lava tubes - Potential shelters for habitats. [on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1985-01-01

    Natural caverns occur on the moon in the form of 'lava tubes', which are the drained conduits of underground lava rivers. The inside dimensions of these tubes measure tens to hundreds of meters, and their roofs are expected to be thicker than 10 meters. Consequently, lava tube interiors offer an environment that is naturally protected from the hazards of radiation and meteorite impact. Further, constant, relatively benign temperatures of -20 C prevail. These are extremely favorable environmental conditions for human activities and industrial operations. Significant operational, technological, and economical benefits might result if a lunar base were constructed inside a lava tube.

  14. Determining the Compositions of Extraterrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research project has been to develop techniques that allow the emplacement conditions of volcanic landforms on other planets to be related to attributes that can be remotely detected with available instrumentation. The underlying assumption of our work is that the appearance of a volcano, lava flow, debris avalanche, or exhumed magmatic intrusion can provide clues about the conditions operating when that feature was first emplaced. Magma composition, amount of crustal heat flow, state of tectonic stress, and climatic conditions are among the important variables that can be inferred from the morphology and texture of an igneous body.

  15. Altered former alkalic carbonatite lava from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania: Inferences for calcite carbonatite lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. B.; Garson, M. S.; Roberts, B.

    1987-08-01

    The active volcano Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is well known for its extrusions of alkalic carbonatite lava, first witnessed in 1960. An older carbonatite flow from the volcano was originally also rich in Na and K, but replacement of nyerereite by pirssonite as a result of leaching of these elements (together with soluble components such as SO3, Cl, and Rb) and addition of Ca has resulted in a rock intermediate in bulk composition between the unique 1960 Lengai lavas and calcite-rich carbonatite flows reported from other localities. Further replacement of Na by Ca could theoretically result in a pure calcite rock, and we suggest that the partially altered alkalic lava described here is the “missing link” between lavas that are now calcitic but which had a high alkali content when originally extruded. The suggested link between alkali carbonate precursors and present-day calcium carbonate “lavas” explains the apparent paradox between the existence of calcite-rich “flows” and the experimental evidence that denies the possibility of hot, liquid calcium carbonate.

  16. Topographic Attributes of Three Hawaiian Lava Flows: Implications for Evaluation of Lava Flow Emplacement on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Differential Global Positioning System surveys were carried out recently across portions of three lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. Transects crossed an entire flow in several cases, and in other cases provided detailed information about selected flow margins. The 1907 basalt (a'a) flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa has easy access at several points via the Ocean View Estates road system; flow thickness ranges from about 1 m near the middle of the eastern flow lobe to more than 10 m toward the distal end of this flow. Several components of a benmoreite (alkali-rich basaltic andesite) flow complex from Mauna Kea were examined near the small community of Mana (with permission of the Parker Ranch management), on the western flank of the volcano. The flows are more than 14,000 years old and completely covered with soil more than a meter thick, but flow morphology at the decameter scale remains very evident in aerial photographs; some benmoreite flows have up to 30 m of relief along their middle reaches. A trachyte flow more than 100,000 years old extends down slope from Puu Waawaa, on the northern flank of Hualalai; Puu Anahulu represents a very advanced stage of magmatic differentiation that resulted in a flow complex with more than 120 m of relief at its southern margin. Width/thickness represents a good discriminator between these three Hawaiian lava flows. Unfortunately, width is often the most difficult parameter to measure remotely for flows on other planets. Recent imaging data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft reveal important new details of lava flows in the Tharsis region of Mars, some of which can be combined with elevation information from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The precise topographic characteristics of diverse Hawaiian lava flows provide a new tool for evaluating the potential emplacement conditions for some Martian lava flows, which appear to be more consistent with the basalt to

  17. Lava tube shatter rings and their correlation with lava flux increases at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, which form over active lava tubes. They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression. Prior to this study, shatter rings had not been observed forming, and, thus, were interpreted in many ways. This paper describes the process of formation for shatter rings observed at Kīlauea Volcano during November 2005–July 2006. During this period, tilt data, time-lapse images, and field observations showed that episodic tilt changes at the nearby Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, the shallow magmatic source reservoir, were directly related to fluctuations in the level of lava in the active lava tube, with periods of deflation at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō correlating with increases in the level of the lava stream surface. Increases in lava level are interpreted as increases in lava flux, and were coincident with lava breakouts from shatter rings constructed over the lava tube. The repetitive behavior of the lava flux changes, inferred from the nearly continuous tilt oscillations, suggests that shatter rings form from the repeated rise and fall of a portion of a lava tube roof. The locations of shatter rings along the active lava tube suggest that they form where there is an abrupt decrease in flow velocity through the tube, e.g., large increase in tube width, abrupt decrease in tube slope, and (or) sudden change in tube direction. To conserve volume, this necessitates an abrupt increase in lava stream depth and causes over-pressurization of the tube. More than a hundred shatter rings have been identified on volcanoes on Hawai‘i and Maui, and dozens have been reported from basaltic lava fields in Iceland, Australia, Italy, Samoa, and the mainland United States. A quick study of other basaltic lava fields worldwide, using freely available satellite imagery, suggests that they might be even more common than previously thought. If so, this confirms that episodic

  18. Peralkaline silicate lavas at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaudius, Jurgis; Keller, Jörg

    2006-10-01

    A detailed study of Oldoinyo Lengai has led to the recognition of two major cone-building stages. An early, predominantly phonolitic stage, Lengai I, forms the southern cone. The recent nephelinitic Lengai II developed following a major sector collapse event over Lengai I. Petrography of Lengai II lavas show that nephelinite is combeite- and wollastonite-bearing. All Oldoinyo Lengai lavas are peralkaline and highly evolved in terms of low Mg#, Ni and Cr values. Within the unique Lengai II combeite-wollastonite-nephelinite (CWN) peralkalinity increases with time to extreme values (Na + K)/Al = 2.36. Mineralogical expression of peralkalinity is the presence of combeite and Na-rich clinopyroxene. In addition, exceptionally high Fe 2O 3 (up to 10.28 wt.%) in nepheline is an indicator for alumina deficiency. Combeite also shows high Fe 3+. Phonolite and CWN of Lengai I and Lengai II show similarly enriched LILE and LREE values and generally parallel patterns in PM normalized and REE plots.

  19. Pressure Analysis for LAVA-OVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cendana, Donna Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) and the Oxygen Volatiles Extraction Node (OVEN) are subsystems included in the Regolith Environment Science, and Oxygen Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) payload bound for the Moon in 2019. This Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) has the objective of landing on a shadowed region of the Moons South Pole to collect data and determine whether the resources could be effectively used for space exploration systems. The quantification of the resources will help understand if it can adequately minimize materials carried from Earth by: providing life support, propellants, construction materials or energy supply to the payload or crew. This paper outlines the procedures done for the pressure analysis of the LAVA-OVEN (LOVEN) Integration Testing. The pressure analysis quantifies how much gases and water are present in the sample tested during the Engineering Testing Unit (ETU) phase of instrument development. Ultimately the purpose of these tests is to improve the estimate of the amount of water in each Lunar sample and reduce the time necessary for this estimate. The governing principle that was used for the analysis is the Ideal Gas Law, PV=nRT where P stands for pressure, V for volume, n for number of moles, R being the gas constant and T for temperature. We also estimate the errors involved in these measured and derived quantities since a key objective of the mission is to estimate the quantity of volatiles present in the lunar samples introduced into OVEN.

  20. Crystallization during emplacement of lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal models of lava flows provide a way of estimating emplacement durations and eruption rates of planetary lava flows, which can help constrain magma ascent, rheology and composition. Most of the models that have been developed consider only the effects of cooling by radiation. However, heating due to crystallization can be a large component of the overall heat budget of a flow. Little is known about the amount of crystallization and latent heating during flow advance. Crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were made to quantify and study the effects of crystallization in the 1984 Mauna Loa flow. For flows on Mars, we must assume that the amount of crystallization is similar to that in terrestrial flows and place minimum and maximum bounds on the latent heat effect. Unfortunately, as examples given here show, there can be anywhere from 0 to 60 percent crystallization during flow advance. To improve constraints for Martian flows, we need to search for correlations in terrestrial flows between flow morphology and the amount of crystallization during emplacement.

  1. What factors control the superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoit; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style; lava domes result from intermittent, slow extrusion of viscous lava. Most dome-forming eruptions produce highly microcrystallized and highly- to almost totally-degassed magmas which have a low explosive potential. During lava dome growth, recurrent collapses of unstable parts are the main destructive process of the lava dome, generating concentrated pyroclastic density currents (C-PDC) channelized in valleys. These C-PDC have a high, but localized, damage potential that largely depends on the collapsed volume. Sometimes, a dilute ash cloud surge develops at the top of the concentrated flow with an increased destructive effect because it may overflow ridges and affect larger areas. In some cases, large lava dome collapses can induce a depressurization of the magma within the conduit, leading to vulcanian explosions. By contrast, violent, laterally directed, explosions may occur at the base of a growing lava dome: this activity generates dilute and turbulent, highly-destructive, pyroclastic density currents (D-PDC), with a high velocity and propagation poorly dependent on the topography. Numerous studies on lava dome behaviors exist, but the triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood. Here, seven dome-forming eruptions are investigated: in the Lesser Antilles arc: Montagne Pelée, Martinique (1902-1905, 1929-1932 and 650 y. BP eruptions), Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; in Guatemala, Santiaguito (1929 eruption); in La Chaîne des Puys, France (Puy de Dome and Puy Chopine eruptions). We propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by these key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite

  2. The explosive origin of obsidian lava (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Bindeman, I. N.; Tuffen, H.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing challenge in volcanology has been to explain why explosive eruptions of rhyolite magma transition into outpourings of lava. Many studies suggest that lava is the product of non-explosive processes that allow magmatic vapour to escape in an open-system manner without wholesale fragmentation. Recent eruptions at Chaitén and Cordón Caulle volcanoes have shown that effusive rhyolites are anything but 'non-explosive' and may erupt simultaneously with vigourous pyroclastic fountains for months from a common vent. This behaviour implies that pyroclastic processes play a critical if not dominant role in degassing magma sufficiently such that it erupts effusively. Here we use H-isotope and bulk H2O measurements paired with textural evidence from the 2008 Chaitén and 2011 Cordón Caulle eruptions to demonstrate that effusion requires explosion(s)--lavas are the direct product of brittle deformation that fosters batched degassing into transient pyroclastic channels that repetitively and explosively vent from effusing lava. Evidence for cyclical brecciation and collapse of porous and permeable magmatic foams is abundant in the textures and structures of tuffisites--ash and lapilli-filled pyroclastic channels--found in volcanic bombs at both Chaitén and Cordón Caulle. We have used FTIR and a TCEA-MAT 253 system to precisely measure total water and D/H in erupted glass. Bulk H2O measurements on tuffisite and adjacent bomb obsidian indicate significantly lower H2O (~0.2-1.0 wt.%) in the tuffisite veins. These depletions imply effective local degassing and rapid advective transport of exsolved vapour through the veins. The H-isotopic signatures of tuffisites are also different from the hosting material insofar as being enriched in deuterium (up to -20‰). Such deuterium enrichments are inconsistent with isotope fractionation during both closed- and open-system degassing, but can be explained if an abundant and more primitive volatile phase from less degassed

  3. Cyclic pressurisation of lava dome rocks. Laboratory results and implications for lava dome monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, M. L.; Smith, R.; Sammonds, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Lava domes are frequently subjected to cyclic heating and pressurisation. These processes may weaken the dome rocks, leading to collapse of the lava dome or explosion and extrusion events caused by unplugging of the magma conduit. By subjecting lava dome rocks to cyclic loading and heating in the laboratory, we can investigate how these processes affect the elastic moduli and strength of the dome rocks. These elastic moduli are crucial parameters for determining how the deformation measured at a volcano relates to the pressurisation and stress. Recording acoustic emissions (AE) during these cyclic loading tests can reveal when the cracking and damage occurs and indicate expected patterns in seismicity during cyclic pressurisation of lava domes. For this laboratory investigation of cyclic loading and heating of lava dome rocks, samples with four different extrusion dates within the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St Helens were used. This allowed us to also investigate how the mechanical properties of this lava dome changed with time. For each timed sample, four 62.5 mm long x 25 mm diameter cores were deformed in uniaxial compression. The first sample was simply loaded to failure at a constant rate, to obtain the strength and elastic moduli. Of the remaining three cores from each sample, one was slowly heated and cooled to 900°C and one to 600°C (and the other not heated). The three cores from each sample were then initially loaded to 40 MPa at a constant rate and then unloaded to 5 MPa. They were then sequentially reloaded and unloaded at the same rate with the peak stress in each cycle increased by 5 MPa until failure. For all samples, the core loaded to failure with no cycling was stronger than those subjected to cyclic loading. However, there was no weakening or reduction in elastic moduli seen for the samples subjected to a heating cycle before cyclic loading. The sample extruded in 2004 compared to the later ones from 2005 and 2006, was the weakest at 60 to 70

  4. Small domes on Venus: probable analogs of Icelandic lava shields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, James B.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of observed shapes and volumetric estimates, we interpret small, dome-like features on radar images of Venus to be analogs of Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes. Using morphometric data for venusian domes in Aubele and Slyuta (in press), as well as our own measurements of representative dome volumes and areas from Tethus Regio, we demonstrate that the characteristic aspect ratios and flank slopes of these features are consistent with a subclass of low Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes (LILS ). LILS are slightly convex in cross-section with typical flank slopes of ∼3°. Plausible lava-shield-production rates for the venusian plains suggest formation of ∼53 million shields over the past 0.25 Ga. The cumulative global volume of lava that would be associated with this predicted number of lava shields is only a factor of 3–4 times that of a single oceanic composite shield volcano such as Mauna Loa. The global volume of all venusian lava shields in the 0.5–20-km size range would only contribute a meter of resurfacing over geologically significant time scales. Thus, venusian analogs to LILS may represent the most abundant landform on the globally dominant plains of Venus, but would be insignificant with regard to the global volume of lava extruded. As in Iceland, associated lavas from fissure eruptions probably dominate plains volcanism and should be evident on the higher resolution Magellan radar images.

  5. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  6. Joint analysis of deformation, gravity, and lava lake elevation reveals temporal variations in lava lake density at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Patrick, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We find a tight correlation between (i) changes in lava level within the summit eruptive vent at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, observed for at least 2 years since early 2011, and (ii) ground deformation in the vicinity of the vent. The observed correlation indicates that changing pressure within the shallow magma reservoir feeding the lava lake influences both deformation and lava level. However, those two parameters are related to chamber pressure through different properties, namely, the density of the lava filling the vent (for the lava level) and the size/position of the reservoir plus the elastic parameters of the host rock (for the deformation). Joint analyses in the time and frequency domains of lava level (determined from thermal camera imagery of the lava lake) and tilt measured on a borehole instrument (~2 km from the summit vent) reveal a good correlation throughout the studied period. The highest correlation occurs over periods ranging between 1 and 20 days. The ratio between lava level and tilt is not constant over time, however. Using data from a continuously recording gravimeter located near the rim of the summit eruptive vent, we demonstrate that the tilt-lava level ratio is controlled by the fluctuations in the density of the lava inside the vent (i.e., its degree of vesicularity). A second continuous gravimeter was installed near the summit eruptive vent in 2014, providing a new observation point for gravity change associated with summit lava lave activity to test models developed from the previously existing instrument. In addition, a continuous gravimeter was installed on the rim of the Puu Oo eruptive vent on Kilauea's East Rift Zone in 2013. Puu Oo is connected via the subvolcanic magma plumbing system to the summit eruptive vent and often deforms in concert with the summit. This growing network of continuously recording gravimeters at Kilauea can be used to examine correlations in gravity change associated with variations in eruptive activity

  7. Regional Similarity of Leveed Lava Flows on the Mars Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Steve M.; Glaze, Lori, S.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of lava flow movement are controlled by the fluid interior. Crust, solids, and nondeformable material can only retard the advance or spreading of a lava flow. Figure 1 shows a typical large, channelized lava flow found on the Mars plains. It has been suggested in [I] that such large leveed flows on the Mars plains were emplaced by a balance between the formation and shedding of crust as the flow advances. For the prototypical flow north of Pavonis Mons (Fig. I), such a balance leads to a flow morphology that approximately self-replicates at all locations along the flow path [2,3]. Moreover, most quantitative characteristics of emplacement (e.g., viscosity, volumetric flow rate) of the prototype flow at Pavonis Mons resembled those of large channelized lava flows on Earth. The exception was the relatively long, sustained supply of lava, on the order of a year as opposed to hours or days for terrestrial analogs.

  8. The control of lava flows at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, Franco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa

    Because of intense urbanization, many of the historic lava flows of Mt. Etna, fed by flank eruptions, have caused significant damage to cities, villages and lifelines. The fear of legal consequences for centuries has prevented any intervention on lava flows to reduce damage until 1983, when a lava flow was dangerously approaching a village and authorization was given. In 1983, for the first time in the world, an attempt was made to stop the flow front by diverting the lava out of its natural channel, through a breach opened by blasting the levee. The technique adopted proved very complex and thermally perturbed the lava causing overflows that prevented completion of the initial plan. Only a short partial diversion was obtained, but the desired result was however achieved as most of the lava outflowed, because of the obstruction of a nearby lava tube. The technique was improved in 1992 and a total diversion of the flow was obtained. The construction of oblique earthen barriers to divert the flows towards less damaging paths was successfully employed in 1983 and 2001. In 1992 a large earthen barrier, built orthogonally to the flow direction delayed the flow advance for nearly one month. A positive experience has been therefore acquired at Mt. Etna to protect settlements from lava flows, but some legal questions have not been yet fully solved. From the Civil Protection viewpoint, it is essential that volcanologists improve their capability of reliably assessing the distance that a lava flow may travel and whether the eruption will continue long enough for lava to reach sites of relevant socioeconomic interest.

  9. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  10. Lunar Pit Craters Presumed to be the Entrances of Lava Caves by Analogy to the Earth Lava Tube Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ik-Seon; Yi, Yu; Kim, Eojin

    2014-06-01

    Lava caves could be useful as outposts for the human exploration of the Moon. Lava caves or lava tubes are formed when the external surface of the lava flows cools more quickly to make a hardened crust over subsurface lava flows. The lava flow eventually ceases and drains out of the tube, leaving an empty space. The frail part of the ceiling of lava tube could collapse to expose the entrance to the lava tubes which is called a pit crater. Several pit craters with the diameter of around 100 meters have been found by analyzing the data of SELENE and LRO lunar missions. It is hard to use these pit craters for outposts since these are too large in scale. In this study, small scale pit craters which are fit for outposts have been investigated using the NAC image data of LROC. Several topographic patterns which are believed to be lunar caves have been found and the similar pit craters of the Earth were compared and analyzed to identify caves. For this analysis, the image data of satellites and aerial photographs are collected and classified to construct a database. Several pit craters analogous to lunar pit craters were derived and a morphological pit crater model was generated using the 3D printer based on this database.

  11. Rheological analyses of lava flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Davis, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers obtained 183 profiles of lava flows on Mars using photoclinometry. These photoclinometric profiles were leveled by adjusting them until the levee crests or bases had the same elevations (depending on the situation). Here, researchers report some of the results of their analysis of 27 flows on the flanks of Alba Patera (3 flows), near the summit of Ascraeus Mons (6 flows), the flanks of Arsia Mons (3 flows), and the flanks of Olympus Mons (15 flows). Results suggest that the flows examined to date are not felsic or ultramafic; rather, they probably range from basalts to basaltic andesites. Thus, the suggestion that flows on Olympus Mons and elsewhere may be more silicic than Hawaiian basalts is supported by the researchers' results. These suggestions are testable with suitable measurements of silica contents of the flows.

  12. The longevity of lava dome eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, Robert L.; Ogburn, Sarah E.; Calder, Eliza S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the duration of past, ongoing, and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of ongoing and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding, we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy tailed and composition dependent. We construct objective Bayesian statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and ongoing eruptions that depend on both eruption duration to date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about model parameter values (epistemic uncertainty) and the natural variability of the geologic processes (aleatoric uncertainty). The results are illustrated by presenting likely trajectories for 14 dome-building eruptions ongoing in 2015. Full representation of the uncertainty is presented for two key eruptions, Soufriére Hills Volcano in Montserrat (10-139 years, median 35 years) and Sinabung, Indonesia (1-17 years, median 4 years). Uncertainties are high but, importantly, quantifiable. This work provides for the first time a quantitative and transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for lava dome-forming volcanoes, with wide potential use and transferability to forecasts of other types of eruptions and other adverse events across the geohazard spectrum.

  13. Correlation of the Deccan and Rajahmundry Trap lavas: Are these the longest and largest lava flows on Earth?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Self, S.; Jay, A.E.; Widdowson, M.; Keszthelyi, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that the Rajahmundry Trap lavas, found near the east coast of peninsular India, are remnants of the longest lava flows yet recognized on Earth (??? 1000??km long). These outlying Deccan-like lavas are shown to belong to the main Deccan Traps. Several previous studies have already suggested this correlation, but have not demonstrated it categorically. The exposed Rajahmundry lavas are interpreted to be the distal parts of two very-large-volume pa??hoehoe flow fields, one each from the Ambenali and Mahabaleshwar Formations of the Wai Sub-group in the Deccan Basalt Group. Eruptive conditions required to emplace such long flows are met by plausible values for cooling and eruption rates, and this is shown by applying a model for the formation of inflated pa??hoehoe sheet flow lobes. The model predicts flow lobe thicknesses similar to those observed in the Rajahmundry lavas. For the last 400??km of flow, the lava flows were confined to the pre-existing Krishna valley drainage system that existed in the basement beyond the edge of the gradually expanding Deccan lava field, allowing the flows to extend across the subcontinent to the eastern margin where they were emplaced into a littoral and/or shallow marine environment. These lavas and other individual flow fields in the Wai Sub-group may exceed eruptive volumes of 5000??km3, which would place them amongst the largest magnitude effusive eruptive units yet known. We suggest that the length of flood basalt lava flows on Earth is restricted mainly by the size of land masses and topography. In the case of the Rajahmundry lavas, the flows reached estuaries and the sea, where their advance was perhaps effectively terminated by cooling and/or disruption. However, it is only during large igneous province basaltic volcanism that such huge volumes of lava are erupted in single events, and when the magma supply rate is sufficiently high and maintained to allow the formation of very long lava flows. The Rajahmundry lava

  14. Similarities in basalt and rhyolite lava flow emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, Nathan; James, Mike; Tuffen, Hugh; Vye-Brown, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Here we use field observations of rhyolite and basalt lava flows to show similarities in flow processes that span compositionally diverse lava flows. The eruption, and subsequent emplacement, of rhyolite lava flows is currently poorly understood due to the infrequency with which rhyolite eruptions occur. In contrast, the emplacement of basaltic lava flows are much better understood due to very frequent eruptions at locations such as Mt Etna and Hawaii. The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle in Chile enabled the first scientific observations of the emplacement of an extensive rhyolite lava flow. The 30 to 100 m thick flow infilled a topographic depression with a negligible slope angle (0 - 7°). The flow split into two main channels; the southern flow advanced 4 km while the northern flow advanced 3 km before stalling. Once the flow stalled the channels inflated and secondary flows or breakouts formed from the flow front and margins. This cooling rather than volume-limited flow behaviour is common in basaltic lava flows but had never been observed in rhyolite lava flows. We draw on fieldwork conducted at Cordón Caulle and at Mt Etna to compare the emplacement of rhyolite and basaltic flows. The fieldwork identified emplacement features that are present in both lavas, such as inflation, breakouts from the flow font and margins, and squeeze-ups on the flow surfaces. In the case of Cordón Caulle, upon extrusion of a breakout it inflates due to a combination of continued lava supply and vesicle growth. This growth leads to fracturing and breakup of the breakout surface, and in some cases a large central fracture tens of metres deep forms. In contrast, breakouts from basaltic lava flows have a greater range of morphologies depending on the properties of the material in the flows core. In the case of Mt Etna, a range of breakout morphologies are observed including: toothpaste breakouts, flows topped with bladed lava as well as breakouts of pahoehoe or a'a lava. This

  15. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  16. A comparative Study of Circulation Patterns at Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Einat; Oppenheimer, Clive; Spampinato, Letizia; Hernandez, Pedro; Unglert, Kathi

    2016-04-01

    Lava lakes present a rare opportunity to study magma dynamics in a large scaled-up "crucible" and provide a unique natural laboratory to ground-truth dynamic models of magma circulation. The persistence of lava lakes allows for long-term observations of flow dynamics and of lava properties, especially compared to surface lava flows. There are currently five persistent lava lakes in the world: Halemaumau in Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), Nyiragongo (Congo), Erebus (Antarctica), and Villarica (Chile). Marum and Benbow craters of Ambrym volcano (Vanuatu) and Masaya (Nicaragua) have often hosted lava lakes as well. We use visible-light and thermal infrared time-lapse and video footage collected at all above lakes (except Villarica, where the lake is difficult to observe), and compare the circulation patterns recorded. We calculate lake surface motion from the footage using the optical flow method (Lev et al., 2012) to produce 2D velocity fields. We mined both the surface temperature field and the surface velocity field for patterns using machine learning techniques such as "self-organizing maps (SOMs)" and "principle component analysis (PCA)". We use automatic detection technique to study the configuration of crustal plates at the lakes' surface. We find striking differences among the lakes, in flow direction, flow speed, frequency of changes in flow direction and speed, location and consistency of upwelling and downwelling, and crustal plate configuration. We relate the differences to lake size, shallow conduit geometry, lava viscosity, crystal and gas content, and crust integrity.

  17. Evaluation of Lava Tube Formation Mechanisms Using Three-Dimensional Mapping, and Viscosity Modeling: Lava Beds National Monument, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedecker, J.; Gant, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the relationships between lava tube morphology, lava effusion rate estimates, and the mechanism of lava tube formation. Effusion rate estimates for extinct lava tubes were calculated using a combination of three-dimensional mapping of lava tube caves, and viscosity models utilizing whole-rock compositions (Giordano et al., 2008, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.), and petrographic data (Harris and Allen, 2008, J. Geophys. Res.). The mechanism of lava tube formation was evaluated using measured tube lengths and effusion rate estimates and comparing these data with observations from Hawaiian channel- and tube-fed flows (Pinkerton and Wilson, 1994, J. Volcanol. Geoth. Res.). Three-dimensional map data for lava tube caves were collected using a laser rangefinder to measure the cross-sectional shape and down-tube distance, and a tandem compass/inclinometer to measure the azimuth and inclination between survey stations in the tube. Total tube length consists of the mapped tube length plus the distance between collapse pits and trenches along the trend of the tube. Effusion rates were estimated using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, measured mean cross-sectional radii and slope of lava tubes, and estimated effective viscosities of rock samples collected from mapped tubes at temperatures between 1080-1160 °C and water contents of 0-1 wt.%. A lava density of 1560 g/cm3was used for 0.40 vesicle fraction basalt. There is a positive correlation between measured tube lengths and cross-sectional radii (Fig. 1). We propose that this relationship reflects the positive correlation between flow lengths and effusion rates in active Hawaiian channel-fed flows. Measured tube lengths vs. effusion rate estimates were compared with data for Hawaiian channel-fed flows (Fig. 2). The two data sets overlap and have parallel trends. These results suggest that the lava tube caves studied formed by the roofing-over of channel-fed flows or had segments of channel-fed flow. We propose

  18. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  19. Modelling the thermal effects of spherulite growth in rhyolitic lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, H.; Cordonnier, B.; Castro, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Rhyolitic lava flows, sills and dykes commonly comprise a spherulitic interior enveloped by a glassy carapace. Spherulite crystallisation has long been assumed to be a "passive" process that occurs during cooling of the lava around and below its glass transition temperature (~600-700 °C). It has also been suggested to be self-limiting due to diffusion controlled growth, creating only a small proportion of spherulites embedded in glass (snowflake obsidian). However, textures in rhyolitic lava bodies at Hrafntinnuhryggur, Krafla, Iceland indicate that near-complete spherulite crystallisation can occur, and suggest that parts of the lava spatially associated with zones of spherulite and lithophysae growth may be significantly heated. Evidence for heating includes melting of parts of the glassy lava carapace by lower-viscosity, invading melt of identical composition. Additionally, spherulitic crystal morphologies have been grown experimentally at undercoolings of only 100 °C. As the liquidus temperature of dry rhyolite may approach 1200 °C, this means that spherulites could continue to grow in degassed magma at temperatures of >900 °C, well above the initial magma temperature. We use new constraints on spherulite growth rates to model the thermal effects of spherulite growth within rhyolitic lava bodies, using three growth laws (size- and temperature-dependent, diffusion controlled and linear) and a variety of initial temperatures, nucleation densities and seed nuclei sizes. Models consider both latent heat release due to crystallisation and conductive cooling. Model results indicate that, when lava bodies are sufficiently large, spherulite growth can cause considerable heating (possibly >150 °C), enabling parts of lava bodies to heat to above the initial eruption temperature. This heating can lead to a viscosity reduction of orders of magnitude and trigger vesiculation. Model results indicate that cooling rates of between 10-3 to 10-5 °C/s ought to mark the

  20. Numerical simulation of lava flows: Applications to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Kousoum, Juliana; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    1993-03-01

    Lava flows are the visible expression of the extrusion of volcanic materials on a variety of planetary surfaces. A computer program described by Ishihara et al. appears to be well suited for application to different environments, and we have undertaken tests to evaluate their approach. Our results are somewhat mixed; the program does reproduce reasonable lava flow behavior in many situations, but we have encountered some conditions common to planetary environments for which the current program is inadequate. Here we present our initial efforts to identify the 'parameter space' for reasonable numerical simulations of lava flows.

  1. Numerical simulation of lava flows: Applications to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Kousoum, Juliana; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows are the visible expression of the extrusion of volcanic materials on a variety of planetary surfaces. A computer program described by Ishihara et al. appears to be well suited for application to different environments, and we have undertaken tests to evaluate their approach. Our results are somewhat mixed; the program does reproduce reasonable lava flow behavior in many situations, but we have encountered some conditions common to planetary environments for which the current program is inadequate. Here we present our initial efforts to identify the 'parameter space' for reasonable numerical simulations of lava flows.

  2. Comparative analysis between Payen and Daedalia Planum lava fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Carli, Cristian; Martellato, Elena; Frigeri, Alessandro; Cremonese, Gabriele; Bistacchi, Andrea; Federico, Costanzo

    The Payen volcanic complex is a large Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the back-arc extensional area of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina). From the eastern portion of this volcanic structure huge pahoehoe lava flows were emitted, extending more than 180 km from the feeding vents. These huge flows propagated over the nearly flat surface of the Pampean foreland (ca 0.3° slope). The very low viscosity of the olivine basalt lavas, coupled with the inflation process are the most probable explanation for their considerable length. In an inflation process a thin viscoelastic crust, produced at an early stage, is later inflated by the underlying fluid core, which remains hot and fluid thanks to the thermal-shield effect of the crust. The inflation shows some typical morphological fingerprints like tumuli, lava lobes, lava rises and lava ridges. In order to compare the morphology of the Argentinean Payen flows with lava flows on Mars, MOLA, THEMIS, MOC, MRO/HIRISE, and MEX/OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of Martian flows. Mars Global Surveyor/MOLA data were used to investigate the topographic environment over which flows propagated on Mars in order to detect very low angle slopes where possibly inflation processes could have developed. Then Mars Odyssey/THEMIS and Mars Global Surveyor's MOC data were used to detect Martian lava flows with inflation "fingerprints", whereas OMEGA data were used to obtain some inferences about their composition. Finally the MRO/HIRISE images recently acquired, can provide further details and constraints on surface morphologies and lava fronts. All these data were used to analyze Daedalia Planum lava field, at about 300 km southwest of Arsia Mons, and clear morphological similarities with the longest flows of the Payen lava fields were found. These striking morphological analogies suggest that inflation process is quite common also for the Daedalia field. This is also supported by

  3. Map Showing Lava Inundation Zones for Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Graves, P.; Tincher, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Island of Hawaii is composed of five coalesced basaltic volcanoes. Lava flows constitute the greatest volcanic hazard from these volcanoes. This report is concerned with lava flow hazards on Mauna Loa, the largest of the island shield volcanoes. Hilo lies 58 km from the summit of Mauna Loa, the Kona coast 33 km, and the southernmost point of the island 61 km. Hawaiian volcanoes erupt two morphologically distinct types of lava, aa and pahoehoe. The surfaces of pahoehoe flows are rather smooth and undulating. Pahoehoe flows are commonly fed by lava tubes, which are well insulated, lava-filled conduits contained within the flows. The surfaces of aa flows are extremely rough and composed of lava fragments. Aa flows usually form lava channels rather than lava tubes. In Hawaii, lava flows are known to reach distances of 50 km or more. The flows usually advance slowly enough that people can escape from their paths. Anything overwhelmed by a flow will be damaged or destroyed by burial, crushing, or ignition. Mauna Loa makes up 51 percent of the surface area of the Island of Hawaii. Geologic mapping shows that lava flows have covered more than 40 percent of the surface every 1,000 years. Since written descriptions of its activity began in A.D. 1832, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times. Some eruptions begin with only brief seismic unrest, whereas others start several months to a year following increased seismic activity. Once underway, the eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities. For example, the 1950 flows from the southwest rift zone reached the ocean in approximately three hours. The two longest flows of Mauna Loa are pahoehoe flows from the 50-kilometer-long 1859 and the 48-kilometer-long 1880-81 eruptions. Mauna Loa will undoubtedly erupt again. When it does, the first critical question that must be answered is: Which areas are threatened with inundation? Once the threatened areas are

  4. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  5. Hardened Lava Meets Wind on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its microscopic imager to capture this spectacular, jagged mini-landscape on a rock called 'GongGong.' Measuring only 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across, this surface records two of the most important and violent forces in the history of Mars -- volcanoes and wind.

    GongGong formed billions of years ago in a seething, stirring mass of molten rock. It captured bubbles of gases that were trapped at great depth but had separated from the main body of lava as it rose to the surface. Like taffy being stretched and tumbled, the molten rock was deformed as it moved across an ancient Martian landscape. The tiny bubbles of gas were deformed as well, becoming elongated. When the molten lava solidified, the rock looked like a frozen sponge.

    Far from finished with its life, the rock then withstood billions of years of pelting by small sand grains carried by Martian dust storms that sometimes blanketed the planet. The sand wore away the surface until, little by little, the delicate strands that enclosed the bubbles of gas were breached and the spiny texture we see today emerged.

    Even now, wind continues to deposit sand and dust in the holes and crevices of the rock.

    Similar rocks can be found on Earth where the same complex interplay of volcanoes and weathering occur, whether it be the pelting of rocks by sand grains in the Mojave desert or by ice crystals in the frigid Antarctic.

    GongGong is one of a group of rocks studied by Spirit and informally named by the Athena Science Team to honor the Chinese New Year (the Year of the Dog). In Chinese mythology, GongGong was the god-king of water in the North Land. When he sacrificed his life to knock down Mount BuZhou, he defeated the bad Emperor in Heaven, freed the sun, moon and stars to go from east to west, and caused all the rivers in China to flow from west to east.

    Spirit's microscopic imager took this image during on the rover's 736th day, or sol, of

  6. Athabasca Valles, Mars: A lava-draped channel system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Dundas, C.M.; Russell, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Athabasca Valles is a young outflow channel system on Mars that may have been carved by catastrophic water floods. However, images acquired by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft reveal that Athabasca Valles is now entirely draped by a thin layer of solidified lava - the remnant of a once-swollen river of molten rock. The lava erupted from a fissure, inundated the channels, and drained downstream in geologically recent times. Purported ice features in Athabasca Valles and its distal basin, Cerberus Palus, are actually composed of this lava. Similar volcanic processes may have operated in other ostensibly fluvial channels, which could explain in part why the landers sent to investigate sites of ancient flooding on Mars have predominantly found lava at the surface instead.

  7. Lunar Lava Tubes as Potential Human Settlements and Refuge Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, K. A.; Mardon, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Lava tubes have been detected on the surface of Earth's moon via satellite images. Upon further exploration of these caves through robotic technology and other means, a refuge place for astronauts may be installed.

  8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK FOUNDATION PIERS AND DETAILING AT THE WINDOWS. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. DETAIL OF LAVA BEDROCK WHICH WILL ACT AS BASE SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF LAVA BEDROCK WHICH WILL ACT AS BASE SUPPORT FOR REACTOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 472. Unknown Photographer, 8/23/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Detail of redwood tank on lava rock platform. Trestle and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of redwood tank on lava rock platform. Trestle and steel tanks can be see in right background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  11. Arsia Mons Lava Flows at Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This nighttime IR image is of lava flows from Arsia Mons. The different tones of brightness in the nighttime IR are indicative of the relative ages of the flows in the images. The small circular features are impact craters.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -5.7, Longitude 243.5 East (116.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. A review: Quantitative models for lava flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to review and assess the application of quantitative models (Gratz numerical correlation model, radiative loss model, yield stress model, surface structure model, and kinematic wave model) of lava flows on Mars. These theoretical models were applied to Martian flow data to aid in establishing the composition of the lava or to determine other eruption conditions such as eruption rate or duration.

  13. Automated Search for Lunar Lava Tubes in the Clementine Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Allen G.; Gibbs, A.

    1998-01-01

    A significant problem in computer science, which has become increasingly acute recently, is the automatic extraction and cataloging of desired features from large sets of complex images. Solution of this problem could potentially have broad applicability. As a prototype of this kind of problem, our group has chosen to attempt the automatic retrieval of lava tubes from the Clementine dataset. Lunar lava tubes have long been recognized as desirable locations for the placement of manned lunar bases. Advantages include that (1) little construction is needed; (2) building materials need not be lifted out of Earth's gravity well; (3) the tubes provide natural environmental control; and (4) the tubes provide natural protection from cosmic rays, meteorites, micrometeorites, and impact crater ejecta. Coombs and Hawke identified about 100 probable lava tubes associated with sinuous rilles in the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo photos, primarily in the nearside maria. The lava tubes that are visible to Earth-based telescopes might be too large to provide good candidates for lunar bases. Such lava tubes of large diameter need a great depth of overlying rock to keep from collapsing. Any intact large tubes would lie inconveniently far underground. Most useful would be lava tubes that are too small to be discerned from Earth. The Clementine spacecraft, which mapped the entire surface of the Moon to an unprecedented level of detail in 1994, gives us a view of these smaller lava tubes. Over 1.9 million images in the visible, near infrared, and mid-infrared portions of the spectrum were captured. Our task is to find and catalog the small lava tubes in the Clementine dataset. Of particular interest are small sinuous rifles that contain interruptions, which represent uncollapsed portions of a tube that has partially collapsed. Once cataloged, the candidate base locations can be examined more closely for suitability. Considerations would be proximity to resources, sites of scientific interest

  14. Clinker formation in basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loock, Sébastien; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Hénot, Jean-Marc

    2010-09-01

    Clinker is a term used to describe massive or scoriaceous fragments commonly associated with ‘a‘ā lava flows. Clinker is generally considered to form by fragmentation of an upper vesiculated crust, due to an increase in apparent viscosity and/or to an increase in shear strain rate. Surface clinker is considered to be transported to the flow front and incorporated at the base by caterpillar motion. Clinker that we have observed on a variety of lava flows has very variable textures, which suggests several different mechanisms of formation. In order to study clinker formation, we examined several lava flows from the Chaîne des Puys Central France, where good sections, surface morphology and surface textures are widespread and clearly visible. We observed basal and surface ‘a‘ā clinker that has fragmentation textures similar to those observed in ash formed in eruptions under dry conditions. In two pāhoehoe flows we have observed basal clinker that formed in-situ. Two other flows display clinker features identical to those commonly observed in phreatomagmatic ash, such as adhering particles, blocky shapes, spherical glass and attached microphenocrysts. Another pāhoehoe flow has a flakey, angular basal breccia, with microfaulted and abraded clasts. These were probably formed at a cooled lava base by large amounts of simple shear and consequent intra-lava brittle faulting. Using these observations we propose three different ways of fragmentation. (1) Clinker can form at the surface and eventually produce roll-over basal breccia. (2) Water/lava interactions can form basal clinker by phreatomagmatic fragmentation. Water/lava ratio variations may produce different clinker structures, in a manner similar to observed textural changes in phreatomagmatic eruptions. (3) Clinker can be formed by brittle brecciation during basal simple shear. The different clinker can provide information about the mechanisms and environmental conditions during lava flow emplacement.

  15. Validating Cellular Automata Lava Flow Emplacement Algorithms with Standard Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Connor, L.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Gallant, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major existing need in assessing lava flow simulators is a common set of validation benchmark tests. We propose three levels of benchmarks which test model output against increasingly complex standards. First, imulated lava flows should be morphologically identical, given changes in parameter space that should be inconsequential, such as slope direction. Second, lava flows simulated in simple parameter spaces can be tested against analytical solutions or empirical relationships seen in Bingham fluids. For instance, a lava flow simulated on a flat surface should produce a circular outline. Third, lava flows simulated over real world topography can be compared to recent real world lava flows, such as those at Tolbachik, Russia, and Fogo, Cape Verde. Success or failure of emplacement algorithms in these validation benchmarks can be determined using a Bayesian approach, which directly tests the ability of an emplacement algorithm to correctly forecast lava inundation. Here we focus on two posterior metrics, P(A|B) and P(¬A|¬B), which describe the positive and negative predictive value of flow algorithms. This is an improvement on less direct statistics such as model sensitivity and the Jaccard fitness coefficient. We have performed these validation benchmarks on a new, modular lava flow emplacement simulator that we have developed. This simulator, which we call MOLASSES, follows a Cellular Automata (CA) method. The code is developed in several interchangeable modules, which enables quick modification of the distribution algorithm from cell locations to their neighbors. By assessing several different distribution schemes with the benchmark tests, we have improved the performance of MOLASSES to correctly match early stages of the 2012-3 Tolbachik Flow, Kamchakta Russia, to 80%. We also can evaluate model performance given uncertain input parameters using a Monte Carlo setup. This illuminates sensitivity to model uncertainty.

  16. Lava flow rheology: A comparison of morphological and petrological methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, M. O.; Platz, T.; Hauber, E.; Baratoux, D.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    In planetary sciences, the emplacement of lava flows is commonly modelled using a single rheological parameter (apparent viscosity or apparent yield strength) calculated from morphological dimensions using Jeffreys' and Hulme's equations. The rheological parameter is then typically further interpreted in terms of the nature and chemical composition of the lava (e.g., mafic or felsic). Without the possibility of direct sampling of the erupted material, the validity of this approach has remained largely untested. In modern volcanology, the complex rheological behaviour of lavas is measured and modelled as a function of chemical composition of the liquid phase, fractions of crystals and bubbles, temperature and strain rate. Here, we test the planetary approach using a terrestrial basaltic lava flow from the Western Volcanic Zone in Iceland. The geometric parameters required to employ Jeffreys' and Hulme's equations are accurately estimated from high-resolution HRSC-AX Digital Elevation Models. Samples collected along the lava flow are used to constrain a detailed model of the transient rheology as a function of cooling, crystallisation, and compositional evolution of the residual melt during emplacement. We observe that the viscosity derived from the morphology corresponds to the value estimated when significant crystallisation inhibits viscous deformation, causing the flow to halt. As a consequence, the inferred viscosity is highly dependent on the details of the crystallisation sequence and crystal shapes, and as such, is neither uniquely nor simply related to the bulk chemical composition of the erupted material. This conclusion, drawn for a mafic lava flow where crystallisation is the primary process responsible for the increase of the viscosity during emplacement, should apply to most of martian, lunar, or mercurian volcanic landforms, which are dominated by basaltic compositions. However, it may not apply to felsic lavas where vitrification resulting from

  17. Effect of a fluctuating supply on lava flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, S.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of lava flows emplaced at Mount Etna (Italy) in September 2004 is examined in detail through the analysis of morphometric measurements of flow units. The collected layout of data suggests that the growth of the main channelized flow unit is consistent with a layering of lava blankets which maintains the initial geometry of the channel, although levees are widened and raised. The growth of the flow unit is here related to the overflow of lava pulses which have already been described for the considered lava flows. A simple analytical model describing the evolution of the lava level in a channelized flow unit fed by a fluctuating supply is introduced. The model shows that a fluctuation in the velocity of extrusion of lava at the vent triggers the formation of pulses which become increasingly high with distance from the vent, and are destined to overflow within a given distance. Our results cope well with the observed morphology, characterized by a very flat initial profile followed by a massive increase in flow unit section area between 600 and 700 m downflow from the vent. The inferred emplacement dynamics provides also an explanation for the observed substantial 'loss' of the original flowing mass with increasing distance from the vent.

  18. Studies of vesicle distribution patterns in Hawaiian lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, George P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows are generally vesicular, and the broader facts relating to vesicle distribution have long been established; few studies have yet been made with a view to determining how and when vesicles form in the cooling history of the lava, explaining vesicle shape and size distribution, and gaining enough understanding to employ vesicles as a geological tool. Various avenues of approach exist by which one may seek to gain a better understanding of these ubiquitous structures and make a start towards developing a general theory, and three such avenues have recently been explored. One avenue involves the study of pipe vesicles; these are a well known feature of lava flows and are narrow pipes which occur near the base of many pahoehoe flow units. Another avenue of approach is that presented by the distinctive spongy pahoehoe facies of lava that is common in distal locations on Hawaiian volcanoes. A third avenue of approach is that of the study of gas blisters in lava. Gas blisters are voids, which can be as much as tens of meters wide, where the lava split along a vesicle-rich layer and the roof up-arched by gas pressure. These three avenues are briefly discussed.

  19. Stochastic modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes preliminary three-dimensional geostatistical modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system using a multiple-point geostatistical model. The purpose of this study is to provide a proof-of-concept for this modeling approach. An example of the method is demonstrated using a subset of borehole geologic data and aquifer test data from a portion of the Calico Hills Formation, a lava-flow aquifer system that partially underlies Pahute Mesa, Nevada. Groundwater movement in this aquifer system is assumed to be controlled by the spatial distribution of two geologic units—rhyolite lava flows and zeolitized tuffs. The configuration of subsurface lava flows and tuffs is largely unknown because of limited data. The spatial configuration of the lava flows and tuffs is modeled by using a multiple-point geostatistical simulation algorithm that generates a large number of alternative realizations, each honoring the available geologic data and drawn from a geologic conceptual model of the lava-flow aquifer system as represented by a training image. In order to demonstrate how results from the geostatistical model could be analyzed in terms of available hydrologic data, a numerical simulation of part of an aquifer test was applied to the realizations of the geostatistical model.

  20. Origins and implications of zigzag rift patterns on lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Manga, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The distinctive rift patterns observed on newly formed lava lakes are very likely a product of interaction between heat transfer (cooling of lava) and deformation of the solid crust in response to applied stresses. One common pattern consists of symmetric "zigzag" rifts separating spreading plates. Zigzags can be characterized by two measurable parameters: an amplitude A, and an angle θ between segments that make up the zigzags. Similar patterns are observed in analog wax experiments in which molten wax acts as cooling and solidifying lava. We perform a series of these wax experiments to find the relationship between θ, A, and the cooling rate. We develop a model to explain the observed relationships: θ is determined by a balance of spreading and solidification speeds; the amplitude A is limited by the thickness of the solid wax crust. Theoretical predictions agree well with experimental data; this enables us to scale the model to basaltic lava lakes. If zigzag rifts are observed on the surface of lava lakes, and if physical properties of the lava crust can be measured or inferred by other means, measurements of θ and A make it possible to calculate crust-spreading velocity and crust thickness.

  1. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  2. A Gradual Compositional Change from Samoan Shield to Rejuvenated Lavas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J. G.; Jackson, M. G.; Koppers, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemical evolution of intraplate volcanoes is often compared to the archetypal model derived from Hawaiian volcanoes that involves a mantle plume source with multiple components. In Samoa, a range in rock types, ages, and isotopic compositions have been obtained across a number of volcanic seamounts and islands. However, due to dense vegetation on the islands, stratigraphic relations are not well known, and therefore a sequence for the construction of Samoan volcanoes is not as well-defined as in Hawaii. On the three largest islands, a shield and a rejuvenated stage have been defined, whereas the existence of a post-shield stage has been suggested and questioned (Natland and Turner, 1985). Moreover, the existing shield isotopic compositions (particularly Sr) are distinct, spanning a larger range than in Hawaii. Tutuila only hosts a small amount of rejuvenated lavas, but they are similar to those of Upolu, and there is an isotopic and compositional overlap between Tutuila shield volcanics and the Upolu lavas. On the island of Upolu, roughly half the surface area is covered in rejuvenated lavas, while the other half consists of shield stage lavas. The shield lavas around Fagaloa Bay are compositionally similar to some of the Tutuila lavas. On the island of Savaii, rejuvenated volcanism covers nearly the entire island, showing similar compositions to Upolu rejuvenated volcanism. We here present new data for samples from a deep canyon in the interior of Savaii, which form the missing link in understanding the geochemical sequence of Samoan volcanic construction. In this canyon, an isotopically distinct composition is found that resembles the composition of Fagaloa lavas on Upolu, instead of the extremely radiogenic Sr isotope compositions dredged from the submarine base of Savaii that represent the early shield stage. In Fagaloa Bay, a slope break on the mountainside has been suggested to form the outline of a crater along which late-stage evolved lavas such as

  3. Rheology of lava flows on Mercury: An analog experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally determined the rheological evolution of three basaltic analog compositions appropriate to Mercury's surface, during cooling, and crystallization. Investigated compositions are an enstatite basalt, and two magnesian basalts representing the compositional end-members of the northern volcanic plains with 0.19 wt % (NVP) and 6.26 wt % Na2O (NVP-Na). The viscosity-strain rate dependence of lava was quantified using concentric cylinder viscometry. We measured the viscosities of the crystal-free liquids from 1600°C down to the first detection of crystals. Liquidus temperatures of the three compositions studied are around 1360°C, and all three compositions are more viscous than Hawaiian basalt at the same temperature. The onset of pseudoplastic behavior was observed at crystal fractions ~0.05 to 0.10, which is consistent with previous studies on mafic lavas. We show that all lavas develop detectable yield strengths at crystal fractions around 0.20, beyond which the two-phase suspensions are better described as Herschel-Bulkley fluids. By analogy with the viscosity-strain rate conditions at which the pahoehoe to `a`a transition occurs in Kilauea basalt, this transition is predicted to occur at ~1260 ± 10°C for the enstatite basalt, at ~1285 ± 20°C for the NVP, and at ~1240 ± 40°C for the NVP-Na lavas. Our results indicate that Mercury lavas are broadly similar to terrestrial ones, which suggests that the extensive smooth lava plains of Mercury could be due to large effusion rates (flood basalts) and not to unusually fluid lavas.

  4. Fractal analysis: A new remote sensing tool for lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Many important quantitative parameters have been developed that relate to the rheology and eruption and emplacement mechanics of lavas. This research centers on developing additional, unique parameters, namely the fractal properties of lava flows, to add to this matrix of properties. There are several methods of calculating the fractal dimension of a lava flow margin. We use the 'structured walk' or 'divider' method. In this method, we measure the length of a given lava flow margin by walking rods of different lengths along the margin. Since smaller rod lengths transverse more smaller-scaled features in the flow margin, the apparent length of the flow outline will increase as the length of the measuring rod decreases. By plotting the apparent length of the flow outline as a function of the length of the measuring rod on a log-log plot, fractal behavior can be determined. A linear trend on a log-log plot indicates that the data are fractal. The fractal dimension can then be calculated from the slope of the linear least squares fit line to the data. We use this 'structured walk' method to calculate the fractal dimension of many lava flows using a wide range of rod lengths, from 1/8 to 16 meters, in field studies of the Hawaiian islands. We also use this method to calculate fractal dimensions from aerial photographs of lava flows, using lengths ranging from 20 meters to over 2 kilometers. Finally, we applied this method to orbital images of extraterrestrial lava flows on Venus, Mars, and the Moon, using rod lengths up to 60 kilometers.

  5. The origin and evolution of lavas from Haleakala Crater, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope systematics of lavas from the Maui Volcanic Complex (MVC) are consistent with a three-component petrogenetic mixing model. MVC shield-building (SB) lavas define linear trends on isotope-isotope plots, consistent with two-component mixing between primitive (PM) and enriched (EM) mantle components. The two-component (PM-EM) Hawaiian plume source is variable in composition during production of tholeiite magmas even within a single shield. Sr and Pb isotopic ratios of Haleakala post shield-building (PSB) lavas define a strong positively correlated array that deviates from the SB array towards an unradiogenic end-member. The PSB array may therefore result from time- and volume-dependent binary mixing between Hawaiian plume melts and a depleted (DM) mantle (i.e. MORB source) component. Several trace element ratios in Haleakala PSB lavas are correlated with isotopic compositions but not with major and trace element contents, and therefore appear to reflect changes in source composition. Trace element mixing systematics for these lavas indicate that the DM component must be a melt. The inferred PM component has chondritic ratios for several trace elements, consistent with it representing primitive mantle. The EM component may represent apart of the Hawaiian plume source that was either metasomatized or metasomatically scavenged. Alkalic cap lavas exposed in the northwest wall of Haleakala Crater display systematic, upsection geochemical variations indicative of the repetitive intrusion of discrete magma batches. In contrast, lava compositions within magma batches vary upsection progressively, and geochemical variations are opposite to those observed for interbatch discontinuities.

  6. Lunar Lava Tubes - The Promise of New Orbital Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2009-01-01

    The basaltic plains of the Moon contain lava channels on scales of tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. Many of these channels are segmented, strongly suggesting that some portions include covered lava tubes. Lunar lava tubes are expected to provide unique environments below the harsh lunar surface, maintaining near-isothermal conditions and substantial shielding from solar and galactic radiation. A lava tube has often been suggested as natural shelter for a future human outpost. Previous searches for lunar lava tubes have been limited by a combination of image resolution and completeness of coverage. The five robotic Lunar Orbiter spacecraft combined to photograph essentially the entire lunar surface with a resolution of 60 m, and covered selected sites with resolutions as high as 2 m. The highest-resolution Apollo images, from the mapping and panoramic cameras, covered swaths totaling 16% of the lunar surface, at resolutions of approximately 5 m. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter -- launched in June 2009 to a polar orbit -- carries a suite of instruments that will revolutionize lunar remote sensing, including the identification and characterization of lava tubes. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) system includes a multi-spectral wide-angle camera with a resolution of 70 m, allowing a comprehensive survey of the entire lunar surface. The LROC narrow-angle camera is providing targeted images at resolutions of 0.5 - 2 m, including stereo coverage, which should allow detection of tube entrances and breakdown structures. The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter is producing a global topographic map with a vertical resolution of 1 m and a horizontal resolution of 50 m. These data will be critical to understanding lava dynamics and tube emplacement.

  7. Hidden Outgassing Dynamics at Kilauea (Hawaii) Lava Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Scarlato, P.; Patrick, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava lakes offer unique opportunities for understanding how magmatic volatiles physically escape from low-viscosity, vesicular magma in open-vent conditions, a process often referred to as magma outgassing. Large-scale lava convection movements and meter-scale bubble explosions, sometimes triggered by rock falls, are acknowledged outgassing processes but may not be the only ones. In 2013 we used high-frequency (50-500 Hz) thermal and visible imaging to investigate the short-timescale dynamics of the currently active Halema`uma`u lava lake. At that time, besides the dominant release of large bubbles, three types of peculiar outgassing features were observed on the lava lake surface. The first, diffusely observed throughout the observation experiment, consisted of prolonged (up to seconds) gas venting from 'spot vents'. These vents appeared to open and close without the ejection of material or bubble bursting, and were the site of hot gas emission. Spot vents were located both between and inside cooling plates, and followed the general circulation pattern together with the rest of the lava lake surface. The second feature, observed only once, consisted of the transient wobbling of the whole lava lake surface. This wobbling, with a wavelength of meters to tens of meters, was not related to any external trigger, and dampened soon without apparent consequences on the other lake dynamics. Finally, we observed large (meters) doming areas of the lake surface randomly fluctuating over seconds to minutes. These areas were either stationary or moved independently of the general lake surface circulation, and usually were not affected by other lake surface features (e.g., cooling plate boundaries). These three features, though trivial for the overall lake outgassing, testify that the lava lake has a complex shallow subsurface architecture, in which permeable channels and gas pockets act independently of the more common bubble bursts.

  8. Late Holocene lava flow morphotypes of the northern Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: implications for the description of continental lava fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia, H. F.; Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.; Lindsay, J. M.; El-Masry, N.; Cronin, S. J.; Qaddah, A.; Smith, I. E.

    2013-12-01

    Lava morphotype refers to the surface morphology of a lava flow after solidification. In Saudi Arabia, young and well-preserved mafic lava fields (Harrats) display a wide range of these morphotypes. This study examines those exhibited by four of the post-4500 yrs. BP lava fields in the northern Harrat Rahat (<10 Ma) and describes these lava fields from general characteristics to detailed lava structures. This study also discusses the relationship between rheology and morphotypes, and proposes a preliminary correlation with whole-rock chemical composition. The Harrat Rahat lava fields include one or more lobes that may extend over 20 km from the source, with thicknesses varying between 1-2 m up to 12 m. Each lava flow episode covered areas between ~32 and ~61 km2, with individual volumes estimated between ~0.085 and ~0.29 km3. The whole-rock chemical compositions of these lavas lie between 44.3 to 48.4% SiO2, 9.01-4.28% MgO and 3.13-6.19% NaO+K2O. Seven different morphotypes with several lava structures are documented: Shelly, Slabby, Rubbly-pahoehoe, Platy, Cauliflower, Rubbly-a'a, and Blocky. These may be related to the shear strain and/or apparent viscosity of the lava flows formed from typical pahoehoe (pure or Hawaiian-pahoehoe, or sheet-pahoehoe). The well-preserved lava fields in Harrat Rahat allow the development of a more expanded classification scheme than has been traditionally applied. In addition to the whole-rock composition, these morphotypes may be indicators of other properties such as vesicularity, crystallization, effusion mechanism, as well as significant along-flow variations in topography and lava thickness and temperature that modify the rheology. The linearity of transitions between morphotypes observed in the lava fields suggest that real time forecasting of the evolution of lava flows might be possible.

  9. Petrogenesis of basalt-trachyte lavas from Olmoti Crater, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C., III; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    Olmoti Crater is part of the Plio-Pleistocene Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH) in northern Tanzania to the south of Gregory Rift. The Gregory Rift is part of the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) that stretches some 4000 km from the Read Sea and Gulf of Aden in the north to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. Here, we (1) characterize the chemistry and mineral compositions of lavas from Olmoti Crater, (2) determine the age and duration of Olmoti volcanic activity through 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Olmoti Crater wall lavas and (3) determine the genesis of Olmoti lavas and the relationship to other NVH and EARS volcanics and (4) their correlation with volcanics in the Olduvai and Laetoli stratigraphic sequences. Olmoti lavas collected from the lower part of the exposed crater wall section (OLS) range from basalt to trachyandesite whereas the upper part of the section (OUS) is trachytic. Petrography and major and trace element data reflect a very low degree partial melt origin for the Olmoti lavas, presumably of peridotite, followed by extensive fractionation. The 87Sr/ 86Sr data overlap whereas Nd and Pb isotope data are distinct between OLS and OUS samples. Interpretation of the isotope data suggests mixing of enriched mantle (EM I) with high-μ-like reservoirs, consistent with the model of Bell and Blenkinsop [Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., 1987. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites: implications for mantle heterogeneity. Geology 5, 99-102] for East African carbonatite lavas. The isotope ratios are within the range of values defined by Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB) globally and moderate normalized Tb/Yb ratios (2.3-1.6) in these lavas suggest melting in the lithospheric mantle consistent with other studies in the region. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental-heating analyses of matrix and anorthoclase separates from Olmoti OLS and OUS lavas indicate that volcanic activity was short in duration, lasting ˜200 kyr from 2.01 ± 0.03 Ma to 1.80 ± 0

  10. Analogue experiments as benchmarks for models of lava flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E. C.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2013-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flow advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and on the effusion rate. Fast-computing models have arisen in the past decade in order to predict in near real time lava flow path and rate of advance. This type of model, crucial to mitigate volcanic hazards and organize potential evacuation, has been mainly compared a posteriori to real cases of emplaced lava flows. The input parameters of such simulations applied to natural eruptions, especially effusion rate and topography, are often not known precisely, and are difficult to evaluate after the eruption. It is therefore not straightforward to identify the causes of discrepancies between model outputs and observed lava emplacement, whereas the comparison of models with controlled laboratory experiments appears easier. The challenge for numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement is to model the simultaneous advance and thermal structure of viscous lava flows. To provide original constraints later to be used in benchmark numerical simulations, we have performed lab-scale experiments investigating the cooling of isoviscous gravity currents. The simplest experimental set-up is as follows: silicone oil, whose viscosity, around 5 Pa.s, varies less than a factor of 2 in the temperature range studied, is injected from a point source onto a horizontal plate and spreads axisymmetrically. The oil is injected hot, and progressively cools down to ambient temperature away from the source. Once the flow is developed, it presents a stationary radial thermal structure whose characteristics depend on the input flow rate. In addition to the experimental observations, we have developed in Garel et al., JGR, 2012 a theoretical model confirming the relationship between supply rate, flow advance and stationary surface thermal structure. We also provide

  11. On lava dome growth, with application to the 1979 lava extrusion of the soufrière of St. Vincent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Herbert E.; Shepherd, John B.; Haraldur Sigurdsson, R.; Sparks, Stephen J.

    1982-12-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for the spread of a viscous liquid flowing under its own hydrostatic pressure on a horizontal surface in order to model lava dome formation. Two situations are considered in detail: the spreading of a constant volume of liquid and the case where the amount of liquid is continually increased. Experiments with silicone liquids show close agreement with theory. The formation of a basaltic andesite lava extrusion in 1979 on the crater floor of the Soufrière of St. Vincent (West Indies) provided the motivation for and an application of the model. The extrusion reached a diameter of 868 m and a height of 133 m over a period of 150 days. Over the first 90 days the growth relationships were consistent with those predicted by theory. Application of the theory to the Soufrière dome suggests an effective viscosity of 2 X 10 12 poise for the basaltic andesite lava. The large effective viscosity calculated for the lava may be attributed to the dominant influence of a high-viscosity skin which forms at the margins of the flow as it cools. After 70 days, the rate of growth of the extrusion markedly decreased because a substantial collar of rubble accumulated at the flow front. Due to this collar the growth of the extrusion ceased after 150 days. From approximately two weeks after the initiation of the extrusion, the discharge rate of lava decreased approximately linearly with increasing dome height. This observation suggests that the lava ascended under a decreasing hydrostatic driving pressure and that extrusion ceased when the lava column reached hydrostatic equilibrium.

  12. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  13. Bubbled lava from the floor of the Sea of Okhotsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, G. N.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Rashidov, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    A sample of bubbled lava raised from a submarine volcano in the Sea of Okhotsk was analyzed by means of electron microscopy and the ICP-MS technique. The outside of the sample is flecked with rounded micro- and macrocavities, and the inner part is characterized by a liquation structure. Along with this, the unstructured mass of the rock contains globular particles of nearly the same diameters as the cavities. The lava is close to andesites and volcanic ashes of Kamchatka Peninsula in the macro- and microelemental composition but different in the somewhat increased content of barium, strontium, lithium, niobium, tungsten, uranium, and thorium. It is suggested that the cavities were formed during the eruption of the submarine volcano owing to contact of the boiling gas-saturated lava with seawater accompanied by the ejection of ash, which was spread by marine currents over long distances.

  14. Insights into the dynamics of the Nyiragongo lava lake level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Geirsson, Halldor; Kervyn, Matthieu; Kervyn, François

    2016-04-01

    Nyiragongo volcano, in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, is among the most active volcanoes in Africa and on Earth. Since the first European observations in the late 19th Century, its eruptive activity mostly concentrated into its main crater, with the presence of a persistent lava lake from at least 1928 to 1977 and since 2002. The size, shape and elevation of this lava lake have evolved through time, modifying the topography of the main crater. In January 1977 and 2002, the uppermost magmatic system of Nyiragongo, including the lava lake, was drained during flank eruptions. These flank events caused major disasters, mostly due to the exceptionally fast-moving lava flows and the presence of a dense population living at foot of this volcano. Despite a large scientific interest and societal concern, the study of the eruptive activity of Nyiragongo remains limited by climate and vegetation conditions that, most of the time, limit use of satellite remote sensing techniques, and recurrent armed conflicts in the Kivu region, which sometimes prevent field access to the main crater. Here we focus on the dynamics of the Nyiragongo lava lake level and its relationship with the volcanic plumbing system by describing the historical and recent lava lake activity and presenting new quantitative observations using close-range photogrammetry, a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera (STLC) system and high-resolution satellite SAR and InSAR remote sensing. Results highlight that, contrary to the interpretation found in some recent publications, the lava lake drainages appear to be the consequence and not the cause of the 1977 and 2002 flank eruptions. Two types of short-term lava lake level variations are observed. The first one corresponds to cyclic metre-scale variations attributed to gas piston activity. The STLC data recorded in September 2011 show hour-scale gas piston cycles reaching up to 3.8 m, which are interpreted to be related to gas accumulation and release in the

  15. Gigantic self-confined pahoehoe inflated lava flows in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquare', G.; Bistacchi, A.

    2007-05-01

    The largest lava flows on Earth are pahoehoe basalts emplaced by inflation, a process which can change lava lobes initially a few decimetres thick into large lava sheets several metres thick. Inflation involves the initial formation of a thin, solidified, viscoelastic crust, under which liquid lava is continually added. This thermally efficient endogenous growth process explains the spread of huge volumes of lava over large, almost flat areas, as in the sheet flows which characterise the distal portions of Hawaiian volcanoes or some continental flood basalt provinces. Long, narrow, inflated pahoehoe flows have occasionally been described, either emplaced along pre-existing river channels or confined within topographic barriers. In this contribution we present previously unknown inflated pahoehoe lava flows following very long, narrow pathways over an almost flat surface, with no topographic confinement. Lava, which erupted in Late Quaternary times from the eastern tip of a 60 km long volcanic fissure in Argentina, formed several discrete flows extending as far as 180 km from the source. This fissure was characterized by a long-lasting and complex activity. Alkali-basaltic lava flows were emitted at the two extremities of the fissure system. In the intermediate section of the fissure, the Payun Matru, a great trachitic composite volcano, developed, giving rise to a large caldera which produced large pyroclastic flows. Alkali-basalts predate and postdate the trachitic activity, in fact at the end of the trachitic activity, new basaltic lava flows (mainly aa) were emitted from both ends of the fissure. We studied in details the youngest of the gigantic flows (Pampas Onduladas lava flow), which progressively develops through differing thermally-efficient flow mechanisms. The flow created a large shield volcanic structure at the eastern tip of the E-W fissure and spread to the E forming a very large and thick inflated pahoehoe sheet flow. Leaving the flanks of the

  16. Chasing lava: a geologist's adventures at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.

    2003-01-01

    A lively account of the three years (1969-1972) spent by geologist Wendell Duffield working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at Kilauea, one of the world's more active volcanoes. Abundantly illustrated in b&w and color, with line drawings and maps, as well. Volcanologists and general readers alike will enjoy author Wendell Duffield's report from Kilauea--home of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes. Duffield's narrative encompasses everything from the scientific (his discovery that the movements of cooled lava on a lava lake mimic the movements of the earth's crust, providing an accessible model for understanding plate tectonics) to the humorous (his dog's discovery of a snake on the supposedly snake-free island) to the life-threatening (a colleague's plunge into molten lava). This charming account of living and working at Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, is sure to be a delight.

  17. Mare ridges and lava lakes. [Apollo 17 investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The autointrusive hypothesis of the origin of several vagaries of prominent mare ridges is explained. Data are based on a comparison between the structure of a Hawaiian lava lake and the mare ridges. Resulting data suggest that these ridges may have formed as squeeze-ups and autointrusives in tension fractures over buried topography in the crust of luna lava lakes. Data also suggest that mare ridges may result from: (1) pressure ridges in flows, (2) compressional features resulting from subsidence of mare lava, (3) volcanic ring structures and extrusives, or loccoliths fed by lunar grid controlled dikes, (4) draped topography and fissure eruptives, (5) drag folds or tension-gash dikes caused by wrench faulting at depth, and (6) postmare thrust faults.

  18. Lava Flow Hazard Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory: A Probabilistic Approach to Modeling Lava Flow Inundation with MOLASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.; Connor, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a lava flow hazard assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using a new lava flow code, MOLASSES (MOdular LAva Simulation Software for Earth Science). INL is a nuclear research and development facility located on the eastern Snake River Plain with the potential for lava flow inundation from both monogenetic and polygenetic basaltic eruptions. Previously published inventories of observed surface vents and vents that are buried by younger lava flows and inferred from interpretation of borehole stratigraphy were used to created spatial density maps of vents within the INL region. Monte carlo simulations were run using the MOLASSES code to compare the difference between events initiated using only surface vents and events initiated using both the surface and the buried vents. We find that the inclusion of the buried vent locations drastically increases the number of site inundations and events initiating within INL boundaries. This highlights the need to seek out a more complete eruption record in an area of heavy prehistoric activity to better assess future hazard and associated risk.

  19. Birth of a lava lake: Nyamulagira volcano 2011-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, D.; Campion, R.; Laiolo, M.; Cuoco, E.; Balagizi, C.; Ripepe, M.; Cigolini, C.; Tedesco, D.

    2016-03-01

    Since 1938, Nyamulagira volcano (Democratic Republic of Congo) has operated as a classic pressurized basaltic closed system, characterized by frequent dike-fed flank eruptions. However, on June 24, 2014, an active lava lake was observed in its summit, after a period of 76 years. The small lava lake is now exposed at the bottom of a pit-crater and is rising and growing. Based on satellite-derived infrared (IR) data, SO2 fluxes and periodic field surveys, we provide evidence that the development of the lava lake was gradual and occurred more than 2 years before it was first observed in the field. Notably, this process followed the voluminous 2011-2012 distal flank eruption and was coeval with weakening of the central rock column below the summit. Hence, the opening and development of the pit-crater favoured the continuous rise of fresh magma through the central conduit and promoted the gradual "re-birth" of the Nyamulagira lava lake. Budgeted volumes of magma erupted, and magma degassed at depth indicate that the formation of the lava lake is due to the draining and refilling of a shallow plumbing system (1-2 km depth), probably in response to the rift-parallel 2011-2012 distal eruption. We thus suggest that the transition from lateral to central activity did not result from a substantial change in the magma supply rate but, more likely, from the perturbation of the plumbing system (and related stress field) associated with the distal eruption. The processes observed at Nyamulagira are not unique and suggest that rift-fissure eruptions, in addition to triggering caldera collapses or lava lake drainages, may also induce a progressive resumption of central vent activity. Current activity at Nyamulagira represents a tangible and major hazard for the population living at the base of its southern flank.

  20. Crystallization history of the 1984 Mauna Loa lava flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, Joe; Cashman, Katharine V.; Bonini, Jennifer A.; Hougen, Sarah B.; Pieri, David C.

    1994-01-01

    During a 3-week eruption in 1984, Mauna Loa produced vent lavas that increased in crystallinity from less than 1 to 30%, and 27-km-long flows that increased in crystallinity as they moved downstream. We examined the crystallization history of these lavas using crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis to study the rates of crystallization, viscosity increase, and latent heating. Typical average growth and nucleation rates were 5 x 10(exp -9) cm/s and 5/cu cm/s for microphenocrysts (20- to 500-micron size crystals nucleated in the rift zone) and 5 x 10(exp -8) cm/s and 5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm/s for microlites (1- to 20-micron size crystals nucleated in the channel). These crystallization rates are high compared with those found in other CSD studies of igneous rocks, probably due to highly nonequilibrium conditions brought on by rapid degassing in the rift zone and cooling in the lava channel. Growth and nucleation rates decreased with time at the vent and with distance downstream. The maximum downstream total crystallinity measured is 39% (25% microlites, 14% microphenocrysts) in a quenched sample 14 km from the vent. Growth and nucleation rates cannot be calculated for postemplacement samples, but they place upper limits of 53-58% on the amount of crystallization in the channel 9-20 km from the vent. Crystallization could have been mostly responsible for the 10(exp 5)-fold downstream increase in apparent viscosity, although degassing and increasing incorporation of solid lava fragments also contributed. Another effect of crystallization on the lava flow was the sizeable latent heating (0.01 J/g/s over the first half of the flow length, if the crystallinity of downstream quench samples is representative of the hot fluid core), which may have been counteracted by entrainment of cooler material. Measurements of crystallization are shown to be crucial in the study of lava flow emplacement dynamics.

  1. Recent flood lavas in the Elysium region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    A volcanic origin is presently suggested for the 'Cerberus Formation' region of smooth plains in the southeastern Elysium region of Mars, on the basis of its surface morphology, lobate edges, vents, and an embayment relation of the unit with adjacent, older units. The low viscosity lavas that filled a topographic depression in southeastern Elysium subsequently flowed into western Amazonic Planitia via channels formed by an earlier fluvial episode. A young, upper Amazonian dating is indicated by crater frequencies and stratigraphic relations, implying that large-scale eruptions of low-viscosity lava were still possible late in Martian history.

  2. Determining lava rheology using video velocimetry and flow models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Wysocki, R.; Karson, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Flowing lava is one of the most common surface expressions of magmatic and volcanic processes, and thus provides an opportunity for measuring the physical properties of magma. However, direct and accurate field measurements are difficult to carry out, and thus flow models rely on estimates based from measurements of velocity and temperature made at the flow's surface. We demonstrate here how lava rheology can be assessed remotely using video velocimetry. We apply our method on lava flows of both laboratory and natural scales. Our experimental setup, part of the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu) includes a large furnace capable of melting up to 450 kg of basalt. The lava is poured onto tilted planes or channels made of sand or steel to produce meters-long flows. This experimental setup is probably the only facility that allows such large scale controlled lava flows made of natural basaltic material. We document the lava using a high-resolution video camera, a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) camera and thermocouples. We employ Differential Optical Flow to extract surface velocity fields from video recordings of the experimental and natural flows. This technique uses the time-variations of the spatial gradients of the image intensity to estimate velocity between consecutive frames. An important benefit for using optical flow, compared with other velocimetry methods, is that it outputs a spatially coherent flow field rather than point measurements. We demonstrate that the optical flow results agree with other measures of the flow velocity, and estimate the error due to noise and time-variability to be under 30 percent of the measured velocity. Our forward flow models are obtained by solving the Stokes flow equations using the finite-element method. We explore a range of rheological parameters, including the lava's apparent viscosity, the power-law exponent m and the thermal activation energy. We find that for the high-temperature portion of

  3. Fractal dimension analyses of lava surfaces and flow boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1993-01-01

    An improved method of estimating fractal surface dimensions has been developed. The accuracy of this method is illustrated using artificially generated fractal surfaces. A slightly different from usual concept of linear dimension is developed, allowing a direct link between that and the corresponding surface dimension estimate. These methods are applied to a series of images of lava flows, representing a variety of physical and chemical conditions. These include lavas from California, Idaho, and Hawaii, as well as some extraterrestrial flows. The fractal surface dimension estimations are presented, as well as the fractal line dimensions where appropriate.

  4. Boron isotopic constraints on the source of Hawaiian shield lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Eizo

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic compositions of lavas from three representative Hawaiian shield volcanoes (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Koolau) were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The boron isotopic composition of each sample was analyzed twice, once with and once without acid leaching to evaluate the effect of posteruptive boron contamination. Our acid-leaching procedure dissolved glass, olivine, secondary zeolite, and adsorbed boron; this dissolved boron was completely removed from the residue, which was comprised of plagioclase, pyroxenes, and newly formed amorphous silica. We confirmed that an appropriate acid-leaching process can eliminate adsorbed and incorporated boron contamination from all submarine samples without modifying the original 11B/ 10B ratio. On the other hand, when the sample was weathered, i.e., the olivine had an iddingsite rim, 11B/ 10B of the acid-resistant minerals are also modified, thus it is impossible to get the preeruptive 11B/ 10B value from the weathered samples. Through this elimination and evaluation procedure of posteruptive contamination, preeruptive δ 11B values for the shield lavas are -4.5 to -5.4‰ for Koolau ( N = 8), -3.6 to -4.6‰ for Kilauea ( N = 11), and -3.0 to -3.8‰ for Mauna Loa ( N = 6). Historical Kilauea lavas show a systematic temporal trend for B content and Nb/B coupled with other radiogenic isotopic ratios and trace element ratios, at constant δ 11B, indicating little or no assimilation of crustal materials in these lavas. Uncorrelated B content and δ 11B in Koolau and Mauna Loa lavas may also indicate little or no effect of crustal assimilation in these lavas. The source of KEA-component (identical to the so-called Kea end member in Hawaiian lavas) of the Hawaiian source mantle, represented by Kilauea, should be derived from lower part of subducted oceanic crust or refractory peridotite in the recycled subducted slab. The systematic trend from Kilauea to Koolau—decreasing δ 11B coupled with decreasing

  5. Late-stage flood lavas in the Elysium region, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    In the southeastern part of the Elysium region is a unit that exhibits little texture and a generally low albedo and that has a very low crater frequency. This unit has been mapped as smooth plains material and previously interpreted as an eolian deposit on the basis of Mariner 9 images. More recently, the unit was mapped as material deposited during a channeling episode. The author interprets the smooth plains unit as being a volcanic deposit composed of low viscosity lava flows: both flood lavas and individual flows. The reasons for these conclusions are given and briefly discussed.

  6. Conveying Lava Flow Hazards Through Interactive Computer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D.; Edwards, H. K.; Harnish, E. P.

    2007-12-01

    As part of an Information Sciences senior class project, a software package of an interactive version of the FLOWGO model was developed for the Island of Hawaii. The software is intended for use in an ongoing public outreach and hazards awareness program that educates the public about lava flow hazards on the island. The design parameters for the model allow an unsophisticated user to initiate a lava flow anywhere on the island and allow it to flow down-slope to the shoreline while displaying a timer to show the rate of advance of the flow. The user is also able to modify a range of input parameters including eruption rate, the temperature of the lava at the vent, and crystal fraction present in the lava at the source. The flow trajectories are computed using a 30 m digital elevation model for the island and the rate of advance of the flow is estimated using the average slope angle and the computed viscosity of the lava as it cools in either a channel (high heat loss) or lava tube (low heat loss). Even though the FLOWGO model is not intended to, and cannot, accurately predict the rate of advance of a tube- fed or channel-fed flow, the relative rates of flow advance for steep or flat-lying terrain convey critically important hazard information to the public: communities located on the steeply sloping western flanks of Mauna Loa may have no more than a few hours to evacuate in the face of a threatened flow from Mauna Loa's southwest rift whereas communities on the more gently sloping eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea may have weeks to months to prepare for evacuation. Further, the model also can show the effects of loss of critical infrastructure with consequent impacts on access into and out of communities, loss of electrical supply, and communications as a result of lava flow implacement. The interactive model has been well received in an outreach setting and typically generates greater involvement by the participants than has been the case with static maps

  7. Thermo-Rheological Feedbacks in Silicic Lavas and Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, A. G.; Robert, G.; Andrews, G. D.; Avard, G.; Romine, W. L.; Ye, J.

    2012-12-01

    The rheology of lava is highly dependent on temperature, both directly (via non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of melt viscosity) and indirectly (via increasing crystal content). Rheology feeds back to temperature, because rapidly sheared melts can undergo viscous heating (heat production = viscosity × [strain rate]2), and rapid disequilibrium crystallization can cause heating due to latent heat release (ΔHxt). The heat budget of partially crystalline lava balances these gains with conductive losses controlled by thermal diffusivity (D) and conductivity (k = DρCP, where ρ is density and CP is heat capacity). We measured the apparent viscosity of several crystalline dacitic lavas from Santiaguito, Guatemala and Bezymianny, Kamchatka. At conditions appropriate to lava flows (shear stress ~0.1 to 0.4 MPa, strain rate ~10-8 to 10-5s-1), apparent viscosity is best modeled as a power-law with no yield strength. Viscosity of the flow core, at ~850°C, is estimated ~5×1010 Pa.s. There is no evidence for significant crystallization during flow emplacement at Santiaguito, but viscous heating may be significant ongoing heat source within these flows (~100Wm-3 if most shearing is restricted to a ~1m wide zone), enabling highly viscous lava to travel long distances (~4 km in ~2 yrs for Santiaguito). Extremely high-grade, lava-like welded ignimbrites are deposited by many of the largest explosive eruptions in Earth history with volumes typically ranging between 10 to 1000 km3 and volcanic explosivity indices of 8 to 9. The lava-like and rheomorphic Grey's Landing ignimbrite, Idaho, provides abundant field evidence supporting the upward-migration of a transient, 1 - 2 m thick, sub-horizontal ductile shear zone at the interface between the pyroclastic density current and deposit, through which all of the deposit passed. We test the syn-depositional shear zone model through a combination of rheological experiments and thermo-mechanical modeling. Our results demonstrate that

  8. Field Measurements of the 1983 Royal Gardens Lava Flows, Kilauea Volcano, and 1984 Mauna Loa Lava Flow, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, J.; Zimbelman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models used in the remote determination of lava flow rheology and compositions rely on estimates of such geometric and flow parameters as volume flow rates, levee heights, and channel dimensions, as well as morphologic and structural patterns on the flow surfaces. Quantitative measures of these variables are difficult to obtain, even under optimum conditions. Detailed topographic profiles across several Hawaiian lava flows that were carefully monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey during their emplacement in 1983 were surveyed in order to test various flow emplacement models. Twenty two accurate channel cross sections were constructed by combining these profiles with digitized pre-flow topographic measurements. Levee heights, shear zone widths, and flow depths could then be read directly from the cross sections and input into the models. The profiles were also compared with ones constructed for some Martian lava flows.

  9. Mount St. Helens Lava Domes, Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J.; Anderson, S. W.

    2004-12-01

    When the Mount St. Helens (MSH) lava dome grew from 1980-1986, little was known about how volatiles, vesicularity or crystallinity were distributed in domes, or about overall patterns of growth. Six years of MSH observations, coupled with comparative petrologic, structural, and analog laboratory studies of domes at Soufriere of St. Vincent, Augustine, Redoubt, Merapi, Montserrat, Santiaguito, and elsewhere have provided a much better foundation for evaluating the 2004 eruptive activity. One of the main goals of the earlier studies was to differentiate intrusive processes from those operating when magma ascends near and onto the volcano's surface. Here we use some of our earlier isotopic, petrographic and remote sensing observations of textures and volatiles to speculate about the processes operating in 2004. We earlier linked variations in lava textures to degassing processes operating during ascent and emplacement. MSH lava was extruded in a relatively dense state. When the water content was high enough, hot, ductile lava beneath the quenched outer rind of the dome vesiculated during surface flow, creating a 1 to 2 meter thick scoriaceous carapace. Post-1983 lavas lacked this scoria because the dome had reached a critical size and strength, resulting in lower short-term eruption rates and extensive degassing of lava en route to the surface. Observations of a dense "fin" in October 2004 suggest that this initial dome-building magma experienced thorough degassing as it broke a new path to the crater floor. We also used hydrogen isotope analyses of water in 1980-86 dome samples to infer degassing processes occurring in the source magma chamber and conduit system. Water content and hydrogen isotopic values of dome samples varied according to texture, position on the flow, and repose period prior to eruption. We saw two trends: (1) lava from lobes emplaced after longer repose intervals were deuterium-enriched, and (2) within individual lobes, relatively dry, smooth

  10. Experiments on Natural-Scale Basaltic Lava Flows: Scope and First Results of the Syracuse University Lava Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J.; Wysocki, R.; Kissane, M. T.; Smith, C.; Spencer, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Syracuse University Lava Project creates natural-scale basaltic lava flows for scientific investigations, educational opportunities and artistic projects. Modified furnaces designed for melting and pouring metals are used to create individual basaltic lava flow lobes of up to 450 kg (10-2m2) with the potential to generate much larger flow fields under controlled conditions. At present, the starting material used in 1.1 Ga Keewenan basalt from the Mid-Continent Rift in NW Wisconsin, a relatively uniform, well-characterized tholeiitic-alkalic basalt. Other compositions (andesite, komatiite, carbonatite) are planned for future experiments. Basaltic gravel is heated to 1100° to 1300°C in a crucible resulting in homogeneous, convecting basaltic magma. Lava is poured over a variety of surfaces including rock slabs, wet or dry sand, H2O or CO2 ice, rough or smooth material, and confined or unconfined channels. Resulting lava flows can be dissected for mapping details of morphological and textural variations. Video from various perspectives is used to document flow behavior and evolution. Infrared images constrain flow temperatures. Textural features of flows such as vesicles and plagioclase microlites have vertical and lateral variations similar to those of natural flows. Differing experimental set-ups provide analogs for a wide range of terrestrial, marine, and extraterrestrial lava flows. In an initial series of experiments, basaltic lava flows (50-200 kg) were poured over dry sand at near constant effusion rates (~10-4m3s-1). Flow temperature and slope were varied to produce a range of different flow morphologies. The results show systematic behavior consistent with observations of natural lava flows and analog experiments. At relatively high T (>1200°C) and steeper slopes (>15°) thin, narrow, leveed flows form. At intermediate T and slope, sheet-like, ropey, pahoehoe forms develop. Flows at the lowest T (1100°C) and gentlest slopes (<10°) investigated

  11. OVEN & LAVA Subsystems in the RESOLVE Payload for Resource Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine E.

    2015-01-01

    A short briefing in Power Point of the status of the OVEN subsystem and the LAVA subsystems of the RESOLVE payload being developed under the Resource Prospector mission. The purpose of the mission is to sample and analyze volatile ices embedded in the lunar soil at the poles of the Moon and is expected to be conducted in the 2020 time frame.

  12. Lava flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Horstman, K. C.; Dial, A. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Lava-flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars were studied from moderate-resolution (100-280 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter imagery. Individual eruptive sequences were recognized primarily by stratigraphic relations, density of superimposed impact craters, flow morphology, flow trend, and variations in surface albedo. Nine detailed maps of lava flows based on delineation of flow scarps were compiled for a total area of 7.25 million sq km. Two thirds of this area was covered by mappable flows representing at least 14 distinct eruptive sequences. Assuming a rate of crater production twice that of the moon, the observed range of superimposed crater densities (90 to 3200 craters at least 1 km in diameter per sq km) indicates an age range of 100 m.y. to several billion years for these flows. The youngest lavas are associated with flood lavas filling the depression surrounding the Olympus Mons shield. Flow thicknesses range from less than 5 meters to 20 meters on steeper shield slopes (0.5 to 4.5 deg) and from 20 to 65 meters on relatively flat (less than 0.5 deg slope) terrain.

  13. A Radiation Safety Analysis for Lunar Lava Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAngelis, G.; Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Humes, D. H.; Clem, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is an assessment of the lunar lava tubes physical characteristics and an evaluation of the their actual safety features from the point of view of the ionizing radiation environment as potential habitats for future lunar exploration crews. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Fluctuating supply and emplacement dynamic of channelized lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of lava flows emplaced on Mount Etna (Italy) in September 2004 is examined in detail through the analysis of morphometric measurements of flow units. The growth of the main channelized flow is consistent with a layering of lava blankets which maintains the initial geometry of the channel (although levees are widened and raised), and is here explicitly related to the repeated overflow of lava pulses. A simple analytical model is introduced describing the evolution of the flow level in a channelized flow unit fed by a fluctuating supply. The model, named FLOWPULSE, shows that a fluctuation in the velocity of lava extrusion at the vent triggers the formation of pulses which become increasingly high the farther they are from the vent, and are invariably destined to overflow within a given distance. The FLOWPULSE simulations are in accordance with the observed morphology, characterized by a very flat initial profile followed by a massive increase in flow unit cross-section area between 600 and 700 m downflow. The modeled emplacement dynamics provides also an explanation for the observed substantial "loss" of the original flowing mass with increasing distance from the vent.

  15. Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock stem wall below the windows of the shed-roof addition, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Raman Study of Secondary Minerals in a Recent Lava Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Finizola, A.; Delcher, E.; Raimboux, N.; Veron, E.; Simon, P.; Devouard, B.; Bertil, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present here the technical adaptations made for a field use of a laboratory in situ Raman spectrometer, and the characterization of secondary mineral phases growing in a recent, still hot on some spots, lava tube (2007 Piton de la Fournaise).

  17. Lava Lakes on Io: New Perspectives from Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Lopes, Rosaly M.

    2004-01-01

    Ionian paterae are a class of volcanic feature that are characterized by irregular craters with steep walls, flat floors, and arcuate margins that may or may not exhibit nesting. Loki (310 W, 12 N) is Io's largest patera at approx.200 km in diameter (Figure 1), and may account for 15% of Io's total heat flow. Earth-based infrared data, as well as information collected using the Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and the Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) have been used to interpret Loki s eruption style. Debate continues over whether Loki s occasional (periodic or not) temperature increases are due to an overturning lava lake within the patera, or to an eruption of surface flows on the patera floor. Interpretation of model results and comparisons with active terrestrial lava lakes suggest that Loki behaves quite differently from active lava lakes on Earth, and that surface flows (rather than an overturning lava lake) are a more likely explanation of Loki's thermal brightening.

  18. Rheology of lava flows on Mercury: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The morphology of lava flows is controlled by the physical properties of the lava and its effusion rates, as well as environmental influences such as surface medium, slope and ambient temperature and pressure conditions. The important rheological properties of lavas include viscosity (η) and yield strength (σy), strongly dependent on temperature (T), composition (X), crystal fraction (φc) and vesicularity (φb). The crystal fraction typically increases as temperature decreases, and also influences the residual liquid composition. The rheological behavior of multi-phase lava flows is expressed as different flow morphologies, for example basalt flows transition from smooth pahoehoe to blocky `a`a at higher viscosities and/or strain rates. We have previously quantified the rheological conditions of this transition for Hawaiian basalts, but lavas on Mercury are very different in composition and expected crystallization history. Here we determine experimentally the temperature and rheological conditions of the pahoehoe-`a`a transition for two likely Mercury lava compositions using concentric cylinder viscometry. We detect first crystals at 1302 ºC for an enstatite basalt and 1317 ºC for a basaltic komatiite composition representative of the northern volcanic plains (NVP). In both cases, we observe a transition from Newtonian to pseudo-plastic response at crystal fractions > 10 vol%. Between 30 to 40 vol%, a yield strength (τ0) around 26±6 and 110±6 Pa develops, classifying the two-phase suspensions as Herschel-Bulkley fluids. The measured increase in apparent viscosity (ηapp) ranges from 10 Pa s to 104 Pa s. This change in rheological properties occurs only in a temperature range up to 100 ºC below the liquidus. By analogy with the rheological conditions of the pahoehoe-`a`a transition for Hawaiian basalts, we can relate the data for Mercury to lava flow surface morphology as shown in Figure 1, where the onset of the transition threshold zone (TTZ) for the

  19. Fire and Ice: Lavas on Io, Cryolavas on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M.; Gregg, T. K.; Spencer, J. R.; Mitchell, K. L.; Williams, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanic flows in our solar system are remarkably varied. Io and Titan are particularly good examples of relatively large bodies that have erupted a variety of flows, ranging from basaltic and possibly sulfur and ultramafic lavas on Io to mixtures of water and possibly ammonia and methanol on Titan. These exotic extraterrestrial flows can be much different from the examples we see on Earth, but the similarities are also striking. Understanding their eruption mechanisms is important for better constraining how effusive eruptions behave on Earth under present and past conditions. Io has exceptionally long lava flows, but these are rare compared to the most common form of Ionian volcanism; lava lakes and lava flows that are confined within calderas [Lopes et al., 2004, Icarus; Gregg and Lopes, Icarus, in press]. The largest lava flows on Io can be considered analogues to continental flood basalts on Earth, being hundreds of km long and containing many different flow units. The composition of these flows on Io is thought to be either basaltic or ultramafic. Galileo results showed the largest active flow in the Solar System at Amirani [300 km long; Kezthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106] and recent observations by the New Horizons spacecraft showed a new flow at Masubi that is about 200 km long. Ionian flows at volcanoes such as Masubi, Maui, and Prometheus generate persistently active plumes and the movement of the Prometheus plume has been related to the growth of the lava flow [Kieffer et al. 2000, Science 288]. Sulfur flows are thought to exist on Io, but are largely a by-product of silicic volcanism. On Earth, sulfur flows are rare but have formed from melting hydrothermal sulfur deposits. Flows around Emakong on Io are thought to be sulfur flows [Williams et al., 2001, JGR 106], but to date there are no measurements that can confirm their composition. Ra Patera's flows at the time of the Voyager encounter was thought to be a site of sulfur volcanism [Pieri et al., 1984

  20. Use of VNIR Camera System to Estimate Lava Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present initial results from using a visible and near infrared (VNIR) camera as an optical pyrometer at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The basic concept of pyrometry simply converts the color of incandescent material into a temperature and has been used on Kilauea since the earliest days of regular volcano monitoring. However, these temperatures have always been lower than expected, raising the concern that the emissivity of lava at these wavelengths was not close to a blackbody. We carefully calibrated a system that uses 3 digital cameras with wavelengths similar to the green, red, and near-infrared channels of the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissions and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR instruments by imaging a high-temperature blackbody. Following techniques used to estimate lava temperatures on Jupiter's moon, Io, we obtained relationships between band ratios and blackbody temperatures. The green/red ratio provides good temperature estimates for any reasonable temperature above 1000 °C, while the red/NIR is useful from about 700-1200 °C. We also observed the glow from the lava lake in Halema`uma`u as reflected and scattered from the steam plume above it. We found that the temperatures inferred from the glow are much too high (~1400 °C) from the red/NIR ratios and much too low (<700 °C) from the green/red ratios. One possible explanation is that there are variations in the emissivity of molten lava at these wavelengths. However, we also know that there are wavelength dependent scattering properties of the plume cloud that are consistent with errors in these temperature estimates. Future work examining incandescent lava without the interference of a plume will be needed to better evaluate the emissivity of lava in this wavelength range. However, we have sufficient data to demonstrate the great utility of VNIR data acquired at night for determining if a volcano is actively erupting mafic lava. We propose that

  1. Transitional lava flows as potential analogues for lunar impact melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, Catherine; Hughes, Scott; Hamilton, Christopher; Kobs Nawotniak, Shannon; Garry, William Brent; Skok, John Roma; Elphic, Richard; Carter, Lynn; Bandfield, Joshua; Osinski, Gordon; Lim, Darlene; Heldmann, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits are among the roughest surface materials on the Moon at the decimeter scale, even though they appear smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pāhoehoe and ´a´ā lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. Although there is no perfect archetype for lunar impact melts on Earth, certain terrestrial environments lend themselves as functional analogues. Specifically, a variety of transitional lava flow types develop if the surface of a pāhoehoe-like flow is disrupted, producing ‘slabby’ or ‘rubbly’ flows that are extremely rough at the decimeter scale. We investigated the surface roughness of transitional lava flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument, comparing radar imagery and high-resolution topographic profiles to similar data sets acquired by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter for impact melt deposits on the Moon. Results suggest that the lava flows at COTM have similar radar properties to lunar impact melt deposits, but the terrestrial flows are considerably rougher at the meter scale. It may be that lunar impact melts represent a unique lava type not observed on Earth, whose surface texture is influenced by their high emplacement temperatures and/or cooling in a vacuum. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  2. Formation of perched lava ponds on basaltic volcanoes: Interaction between cooling rate and flow geometry allows estimation of lava effusion rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Parfitt, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Perched lava ponds are infrequent but distinctive topographic features formed during some basaltic eruptions. Two such ponds, each approximately 150 m in diameter, formed during the 1968 eruption at Napau Crater and the 1974 eruption of Mauna Ulu, both on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Each one formed where a channelized, high volume flux lava flow encountered a sharp reduction of slope: the flow spread out radially and stalled, forming a well-defined terminal levee enclosing a nearly circular lava pond. We describe a model of how cooling limits the motion of lava spreading radially into a pond and compare this with the case of a channelized flow. The difference in geometry has a major effect, such that the size of a pond is a good indicator of the volume flux of the lava forming it. Lateral spreading on distal shallow slopes is a major factor limiting the lengths of lava flows.

  3. Mapping of a complex lava flow field using regular surveys with a portable thermal camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, S.; Lodato, L.; Garfi, G.; Spampinato, L.; Andronico, D.

    2003-04-01

    The use of a portable thermal camera has been applied to routine monitoring of the 2002 Etna flank eruption. The eruption started on 27 October with the opening of a field of fissures on the north and south flanks of the volcano. Abundant ash emission from the whole length of the 10 km long fissure covered the lava flow field, making it impossible to approach the active lava even with helicopters. Additionally, the northern lava flows were spreading into a forest, causing fire and impeding routine measures in field and lava flow mapping from the ground. This situation continued for several days. The only way to obtain an approximate mapping of the flow field was to use a thermal camera from helicopter, obtaining inclined images of the lava flow field. This allowed: (1) an estimation of the speed of the spreading lava and (2) of the position of the lava flow fronts, (3) evaluation of effusion rate, (4) daily covered area, and (5) organisation of evacuation plans for people living close to the area affected by flows. All these information were essential for civil protection purposes. Emission of lava flows from the north fissure stopped on 5 November 2002. During the following phase of the eruption, when lava flows spread for over two months only on the southern flank of the volcano, little ash emission from the craters allowed us a better view of the lava flow field. However, since the active flows were spreading on a limited surface, flanking and overlapping each other several times, distinction between active and inactive lava flows was made possible only by using a thermal camera. This device allowed us to distinguish active lava flows, inflating flow fronts, lava tubes and ephemeral vents, giving us a comprehensive view of the evolution of the lava flow field. It also helped us discover new vent opening from the base of the cinder cone, in a way to advice the Civil Protection authorities about the future path of new lava flows.

  4. High-Resolution Imaging of Lava Flow Terrains on Mars by MRO HiRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jaeger, W. L.; McEwen, A. S.; HiRISE Team

    2007-12-01

    Lava flows account for a significant fraction of the surface of Mars and HiRISE has imaged a diverse selection of these areas at resolutions comparable to "air photos" on Earth. Although some lava are extensively impact "gardened" or mantled, many areas retain primary geomorphologic information at meter-scale. Primary characteristics similar to that of late Cenozoic lava flows in arid areas of Earth are visible in the HiRISE images of even some Hesperian lava plains. The extensive mantling by wind-blown deposits in some of the more youthful volcanic terrains (e.g., Tharsis) may, like terrestrial counterparts, be a result of the excessively rough surface trapping mobilized sand. Evidence for lava flow inflation, including lava-rise plateaus and pits and deformation both vertically and laterally of lava crusts, is documented in areas of flood lavas. Other lava flows are clearly fed from surface channels resulting in dispersive flow surface pattern. Lava flows with hummocky surface textures are comparable to terrestrial flows with auto-brecciated and disturbed surfaces, but the Martian flows are often much larger than typical terrestrial examples. Kilometer-scale areas of puzzle-work plates characterize some flood lava flows. The abundance of plate-like and rubbly deformation styles observed at many localities on Mars is consistent with examples of rubbly pahoehoe seen in situ by the Spirit rover. Rubbly pahoehoe may be a common primary surface texture for many areas of plains-like lava flow emplacement such as the Hesperian lava plains. Sinuous rill-like channels headed at distinct vents and collapse pits suggest significant lava erosion and correspondingly high effusion rates. While the Athabasca Valles channel bed forms appear to be associated with major aqueous outflows, the entire region is draped with lava.

  5. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the phonolite lava lake, Erebus volcano, Antarctica: 1972 2004 and comparison with older lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Peter J.; Kyle, Philip R.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2008-11-01

    Mount Erebus, Antarctica, is a large (3794 m) alkaline open-conduit stratovolcano that hosts a vigorously convecting and persistently degassing lake of anorthoclase phonolite magma. The composition of the lake was investigated by analyzing glass and mineral compositions in lava bombs erupted between 1972 and 2004. Matrix glass, titanomagnetite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and fluor-apatite compositions are invariant and show that the magmatic temperature (˜ 1000°C) and oxygen fugacity (ΔlogFMQ = - 0.9) have been stable. Large temperature variations at the lake surface (~ 400-500°C) are not reflected in mineral compositions. Anorthoclase phenocrysts up to 10 cm in length feature a restricted compositional range (An 10.3-22.9Ab 62.8-68.1Or 11.4-27.2) with complex textural and compositional zoning. Anorthoclase textures and compositions indicate crystallization occurs at low degrees of effective undercooling. We propose shallow water exsolution causes crystallization and shallow convection cycles the anorthoclase crystals through many episodes of growth resulting in their exceptional size. Minor variations in eruptive activity from 1972 to 2004 are decoupled from magma compositions. The variations probably relate to changes in conduit geometry within the volcano and/or variable input of CO 2-rich volatiles into the upper-level magma chamber from deeper in the system. Eleven bulk samples of phonolite lava from the summit plateau that range in age from 0 ± 4 ka to 17 ± 8 ka were analyzed for major and trace elements. Small compositional variations are controlled by anorthoclase content. The lavas are indistinguishable from modern bulk lava bomb compositions and demonstrate that Erebus volcano has been erupting lava and tephra from the summit region with the same bulk composition for ˜ 17 ka.

  6. Constraints on Lava Flow Emplacement Derived From Precision Topographic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Bjonnes, E. E.

    2005-12-01

    Precision topography obtained with a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) was used to derive constraints on the physical properties of two lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. We used a Trimble 4800 DGPS to collect positional information across the lava flows with < 2 cm horizontal and < 4 cm vertical precision (but field tests show that points are usually repeatable to < 1 cm both horizontally and vertically). The DGPS data were overlaid on georeferenced aerial and satellite imaging data, allowing us to correlate the measured topographic points to field notes and photographs, as well as to the local setting evident in the vertical images. We combined field and imaging data for the eastern lobe of the 1907 basalt flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, east of the Ocean View Estates subdivision, and for portions of a grass-covered Pleistocene benmoreite flow near Mana on the western flank of Mauna Kea volcano. Measured physical dimensions of the Hawaiian lava flows obtained from the DGPS data were then used to calculate the yield strength, average effusion rate, and effective viscosity of the lavas using published relationships derived from diverse theories of fluid flow. Yield strengths obtained from three different expressions ranged from 5800 to 56000 Pa for the Mauna Loa basalt flow and from 13000 to 28000 Pa for the Mauna Kea benmoreite flow. Total flow length could not be determined for the Mauna Kea flow, but the entire surface portion of the 1907 flow is well exposed; this allowed us to calculate an average effusion rate of 29 m/s and effective viscosities ranging from 17000 to 280000 Pa-s for this flow, broadly consistent with values published for the 1984 basalt flow from the eastern rift zone of Mauna Loa. These results improve our confidence in being able to derive similar constraints on the likely emplacement conditions of lava flows on other planets, such as the enormous lava flows commonly found on the martian, venusian

  7. Highly siderophile element constraints on the genesis of Azorean lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, C. L.; Watanabe, S.; Olson, K. M.; Walker, R. J.; Widom, E.; Hanan, B. B.; Day, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean island basalts (OIB) from the Azores archipelago show incompatible element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic heterogeneity both among different islands and within individual islands. This heterogeneity has commonly been attributed to the presence of a mantle plume delivering diverse recycled materials--including terrigenous sediments, metasomatized subcontinental lithosphere, and oceanic crust--to the melting region beneath the Azores (Turner et al., 1997; Widom and Shirey, 1996; Beier et al., 2007). Despite an abundance of datasets including major and trace element and Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic compositions, the origin of elemental and isotopic heterogeneity in the Azores remains vigorously debated. We report new highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Pd, Pt, Ru, Re) abundance data alongside major and trace element abundance and Nd-Hf-Os-Pb isotope data for a suite of high MgO (8-17 wt%) lavas from the islands of Sao Miguel, Pico, Faial, and Terceira. These lavas span most of the range of incompatible trace element and Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic heterogeneity observed for the Azores. Because HSEs are largely controlled by sulfide, they provide an alternative to the classic perspective of OIB petrogenesis derived from lithophile elements. The results show distinct fractionation patterns for HSEs from different islands at a similar range of MgO contents. Lavas from Pico and Faial have lower absolute HSE abundances (total HSE abundances ~0.001 × CI chondrite; Ir=0.014-0.133 ppb) and are generally more homogeneous than lavas from Terceira and Sao Miguel (total HSE = ~0.003 × CI chondrite; Ir=0.038-0.657 ppb)). Faial and Pico lavas (IrN* = 0.8×0.3, where IrN* = IrN/[(OsN+RuN)0.5] x 100) also commonly lack the positive relative enrichment in Ir observed in Terceira and Sao Miguel lavas (IrN* = 2.4 ×1.1). In contrast to previous studies of OIB in which HSEs are observed to positively correlate with MgO (e.g., Day, 2013), only Re correlates with MgO, as expected given its

  8. Paleointensity and Rock Magnetic Study of Lavas From the Galapagos Islands: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L.

    2009-05-01

    Initial results of paleomagnetic studies of basaltic lava flows from three islands, Isabela, Santa Cruz and Bartra, Galapagos archipielago, focusing on the rock magnetic analyses and preliminary paleointensity determinations, are presented. Remanent magnetizations are well defined and stable to thermal and AF demagnetization. Magnetic susceptibility, remanent magnetization, thermomagnetic curves and coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra are used to analyze magnetic mineralogy and sample selection for paleointensities. Relatively complex mineralogy shown in k-T curves appear correlated to quality in the Thellier- Thellier experiments. Galapagos Islands have formed from intense volcanic activity in the past few million years above the Galapagos hot spot in the Nazca plate, south of Galapagos spreading center. The archipielago consists of 15 islands and numerous islets and seamounts built on a large platform. Active volcanism occurs towards the west and islands get older to the east due to east-southeast Nazca plate motion. Sampling in Isabela concentrated in east and south flanks of Sierra Negra volcano, a structurally complex large caldera that represents the largest Galapagos volcano. Sampling sites are distributed along the shore west of Port Villamil and the east caldera flank with historic activity. Records show eleven eruptions from 1813 to 2005, which translates into intervals roughly from 4-37 yr with eruptions in 1963, 1979, and 2005. Lavas reaching Isabela coast are Late Pleistocene-Holocene. Sampling in Santa Cruz was done along NS transect from Las Bachas beach to Darwin Station and Punta Raton, including the Gemelos craters. Sampling in Bartra is in the southwest part of Salinas beach.

  9. Lava-seawater vapor interaction at the mid-ocean ridge crest: an important volcanic process to explain lava transport and flow morphology on the deep sea floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, W. I.; Perfit, M.; Fornari, D.; Cann, J.; Smith, D.

    2003-12-01

    Eruption of lava from seafloor vents at the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) crest remains a poorly understood phenomena, despite the fact that it is the dominant volcanic process on earth. During the last decade only a handful of MOR eruptions have been documented using either NOAA-PMEL hydrophone detected events or serendipity, and observations of seafloor manifestations of those effusive events did not capture the actual interaction between erupted lava and near-freezing ambient seawater. Because of the great physical and technological obstacles to actually observing volcanic eruption processes in the deep sea, we must rely on the physical and chemical evidence left behind in the cooled seafloor lava flows to deduce the likely processes that occurred. Based on observations and sampling of numerous lava flows from slow to fast-spreading MORs we find a plethora of delicate macroscopic features preserved on the crusts of lava flows and in lava pillars that suggest intense and extensive interactions between hot magma and seawater during seafloor eruptions resulting in a briny vapor phase. Undersides of many lobate and sheet lava crusts have glassy drips (lava stalactites) and flanges (relict bubble walls) that could only have formed in cavities initially filled with a hot vapor at magmatic temperatures as lava was transported across the seafloor. Detailed petrologic observations of the surfaces of drips and flanges, including the presence of molten salt, exotic Cl- and S-bearing secondary silicates, secondary sulfates and almost pure forsterite, suggest that the vapor phase was flashed seawater. This vapor phase is a key to understanding delicate drip structures formed on lava crusts and the mechanisms by which lava is distributed far from eruptive fissures on the deep sea floor. We suggest that vaporized seawater is incorporated at the flow front as lava moves over the seafloor. The vapor rises as streams of bubbles through the lava behind the flow front and then collects

  10. Subglacial lava propagation, ice melting and heat transfer during emplacement of an intermediate lava flow in the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddsson, Björn; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Sigurðsson, Gunnar

    2016-07-01

    During the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in South Iceland, a 3.2-km-long benmoreite lava flow was emplaced subglacially during a 17-day effusive-explosive phase from April 18 to May 4. The lava flowed to the north out of the ice-filled summit caldera down the outlet glacier Gígjökull. The flow has a vertical drop of about 700 m, an area of ca. 0.55 km2, the total lava volume is ca. 2.5·107 m3 and it is estimated to have melted 10-13·107 m3 of ice. During the first 8 days, the lava advanced slowly (<100 m day-1), building up to a thickness of 80-100 m under ice that was initially 150-200 m thick. Faster advance (up to 500 m day-1) formed a thinner (10-20 m) lava flow on the slopes outside the caldera where the ice was 60-100 m thick. This subglacial lava flow was emplaced along meltwater tunnels under ice for the entire 3.2 km of the flow field length and constitutes 90 % of the total lava volume. The remaining 10 % belong to subaerial lava that was emplaced on top of the subglacial lava flow in an ice-free environment at the end of effusive activity, forming a 2.7 km long a'a lava field. About 45 % of the thermal energy of the subglacial lava was used for ice melting; 4 % was lost with hot water; about 1 % was released to the atmosphere as steam. Heat was mostly released by forced convection of fast-flowing meltwater with heat fluxes of 125-310 kWm-2.

  11. Estimates of Lava Eruption Rates at Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian volcanic complex Alba Patera exhibits a suite of well-defined, long and relatively narrow lava flows qualitatively resembling those found in Hawaii. Even without any information on the duration of the Martian flows, eruption rates (total volume discharge/duration of the extrusion) estimates are implied by the physical dimensions of the flows and the likely conjecture that Stephan-Boltzmann radiation is the dominating thermal loss mechanism. The ten flows in this analysis emanate radially from the central vent and were recently measured in length, plan areas, and average thicknesses by shadow measurement techniques. The dimensions of interest are shown. Although perhaps morphologically congruent to certain Hawaiian flows, the dramatically expanded physical dimensions of the Martian flows argues for some markedly distinct differences in lava flow composition for eruption characteristics.

  12. Microscopic and macroscopic assessment of the emplacement of obsidian lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. S.; Williams, M.; Gardner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Rhyolitic obsidian lavas are common in silicic volcanic systems, but quantitative data related to the emplacement of such lavas is rare. To assess the emplacement dynamics of rhyolitic obsidian lavas we measured the 3D orientation of microlites in samples collected systematically across five of the Central Plateau Member lavas of Yellowstone. Eruption volumes and maximum flow distances of targeted lava flows range from 0.01-70 km3 and 0.13-22 km, respectively. The dataset allows us to examine how deformation during emplacement varies with eruption size. Oriented thin sections were prepared from samples thought to be in place (i.e., not rotated by autobrecciation or erosion). In each sample, we petrographically measured the trend and plunge of >130 acicular Fe-Ti oxide microlites. The 3D microlite orientation can be used in two ways to understand the kinematics of emplacement. First, microlite orientations can be used to infer the dominant directions of fluid stretching because microlite long axes align in the direction of local extension. Second, the degree of alignment of a microlite population (i.e., standard deviation of trend and plunge), irrespective of preferred orientation, is dependent on the strain microlites experience during emplacement. We found that microlites are strongly aligned in all samples from all flows. Microlites are aligned roughly parallel to the direction of flow in samples collected near the flow front. Conversely, microlites are generally aligned orthogonal to the flow direction in samples collected from interior portions of the flows. In individual flows, the degree of alignment shows no correlation with distance travelled, instead it has slight random variations. Large- and small-volume flows display indistinguishable degrees of microlite alignment. Microlites provide a indicator of flow direction near flow fronts where strain is imparted by simple shear. In the interior portions of flows, strain is induced by pure shear via flattening

  13. Fractal geometry of some Martian lava flow margins: Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauhanen, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fractal dimension for a few lava flow margins on the gently sloping flanks of Alba Patera were measured using the structured walk method. Fractal behavior was observed at scales ranging from 20 to 100 pixels. The upper limit of the linear part of log(margin length) vs. log(scale) profile correlated well to the margin length. The lower limit depended on resolution and flow properties.

  14. Topographic and Stochastic Influences on Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards, and interpreting the significance of lava morphology on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Active pahoehoe lobes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, were examined on 21-26 February 2006 using oblique time-series stereo-photogrammetry and differential global positioning system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the local discharge rate for peripheral lava lobes was generally constant at 0.0061 +/- 0.0019 m3/s, but the areal coverage rate of the lobes exhibited a periodic increase every 4.13 +/- 0.64 minutes. This periodicity is attributed to the time required for the pressure within the liquid lava core to exceed the cooling induced strength of its margins. The pahoehoe flow advanced through a series of down slope and cross-slope breakouts, which began as approximately 0.2 m-thick units (i.e., toes) that coalesced and inflated to become approximately meter-thick lobes. The lobes were thickest above the lowest points of the initial topography and above shallow to reverse facing slopes, defined relative to the local flow direction. The flow path was typically controlled by high-standing topography, with the zone directly adjacent to the final lobe margin having an average relief that was a few centimeters higher than the lava inundated region. This suggests that toe-scale topography can, at least temporarily, exert strong controls on pahoehoe flow paths by impeding the lateral spreading of the lobe. Observed cycles of enhanced areal spreading and inflated lobe morphology are also explored using a model that considers the statistical likelihood of sequential breakouts from active flow margins and the effects of topographic barriers.

  15. Formation of Hrad Vallis (Mars) by low viscosity lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Joshua P.; Leverington, David W.

    2014-02-01

    Hrad Vallis is a Martian outflow channel previously interpreted as a product of aqueous outbursts from the subsurface, possibly involving mudflows associated with lahar-like events. However, an alternative volcanic hypothesis for the development of the system is worthy of consideration on the basis of (1) the nature of landforms preserved along component channels and adjacent uplands and (2) similarities between the basic properties of this system and large volcanic channels of the inner solar system. Hrad Vallis commences on the distal flanks of the Elysium Mons shield volcano, terminates within extensive volcanic plains, is associated with landforms typical of large volcanic channels, and shows evidence for having been a conduit for large volumes of lava. The properties of this system are consistent with incision by low viscosity lava. Crude thermal estimates suggest that this system could have formed through effusion of as little as ~ 10,900 km3 of magma to the surface, or ~ 6% of the volume of the terrestrial Columbia River Basalt Group. Incision rates of up to several meters per day are estimated for mechanical and thermal processes involving lava flows with depths of 5-20 m and dynamic viscosities of ~ 1 Pa s. Flow of lava within the Hrad Vallis system is predicted to have been fully turbulent and characterized by discharges as great as ~ 865,000 m3/s. Predicted flow conditions are consistent with those previously determined for Athabasca Valles, which also formed as a result of the expulsion of flows from structures associated with Elysium Mons.

  16. Preferential Weathering of Carbonatite Lava at Ol Doinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, C. H.; Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D.; Bosselait, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although carbonatites have been produced since the Archean and are preserved in the geologic record, the East African Rift is home to the only active carbonatite volcano, at Ol Doinyo Lengai. It has long been known that the natrocarbonatites become strongly weathered the first time they are exposed to rain. We studied the weathering patterns in the field and have determined the mineralogical transformations via petrography and XRD. Mass transport is assessed by XRF and ICP-MS analyses. Water preferentially dissolves specific minerals in the pristine lava, permeating through earlier layers of flow to form stalactites, which have differing mineralogical composition. These hang both from the host flow and from the bottom of underlying earlier flows. The weathering product is characterized by trona, a hydrated carbonate mineral, as well as the sodium sulfate mineral aphthitalite. Data from XRD analysis of the carbonatite lava confirm transformation of its original minerals, nyerereite and gregoryite, into secondary hydrated carbonate minerals gaylussite and pirssonite (e.g., Zaitsev and Keller, 2006). This transformation is attributed to the instability of the erupted minerals at atmospheric conditions. Data from XRF analysis indicate a 4-fold increase in the amount of sodium present in the stalactite as well as a 8-fold increase in potassium. Trace element analysis by ICP-MS indicates significantly elevated levels of vanadium, copper, and rubidium in the weathering product, whereas strontium, barium, lanthanum, and cesium are left behind in high concentrations in the carbonatite lava. Our results provide further evidence supporting the proposal by Dawson et al. (1987) that calcium carbonate dominated lava flows result from extensive weathering of sodic carbonatite flows.

  17. An analogue experimental model of depth fluctuations in lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Fred; Woods, Andrew W.; Gladstone, Charlotte

    2006-07-01

    Lava lakes, consisting of molten degassing lava in summit craters of active basaltic volcanoes, sometimes exhibit complex cycles of filling and emptying on time-scales of hours to weeks such as recorded at Pu’u’O’o in Hawaii and Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania. Here we report on a new series of analogue laboratory experiments of two-phase flow in a reservoir-conduit-lava lake system which spontaneously generates oscillations in the depth of liquid within the lake. During the recharge phase, gas supplied from a subsurface reservoir of degassing magma drives liquid magma up the conduit, causing the lake to fill. As the magmastatic pressure in the lake increases, the upward supply of magma, driven by the gas bubbles, falls. Eventually the upflow becomes unstable, and liquid drains downwards from the lake, driven by the magmastatic pressure of the overlying lake, suppressing the ascent of any more bubbles from the chamber. At a later stage, once the lake has drained sufficiently, the descent speed of liquid through the conduit decreases below the ascent speed of the bubbles, and the recharge cycle resumes. Application of a quantitative model of the experiments to the natural system is broadly consistent with field data.

  18. Calculated viscosity-distance dependence for some actively flowing lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, David

    1987-01-01

    The importance of viscosity as a gauge of the various energy and momentum dissipation regimes of lava flows has been realized for a long time. Nevertheless, despite its central role in lava dynamics and kinematics, it remains among the most difficult of flow physical properties to measure in situ during an eruption. Attempts at reconstructing the actual emplacement viscosities of lava flows from their solidified topographic form are difficult. Where data are available on the position of an advancing flow front as a function of time, it is possible to calculate the effective viscosity of the front as a function of distance from the vent, under the assumptions of a steady state regime. As an application and test of an equation given, relevant parameters from five recent flows on Mauna Loa and Kilauea were utilized to infer the dynamic structure of their aggregate flow front viscosity as they advanced, up to cessation. The observed form of the viscosity-distance relation for the five active Hawaiian flows examined appears to be exponential, with a rapid increase just before the flows stopped as one would expect.

  19. The formation of vesicular cylinders in pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. C.; Rust, Alison C.; Vynnycky, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical cylinders of bubble-enriched, chemically evolved volcanic rock are found in many inflated pahoehoe lava flows. We provide a putative theoretical explanation for their formation, based on a description of a crystallising three-phase (liquid, solid, gas) crystal pile in which the water-saturated silicate melt exsolves steam and becomes more silica-rich as it crystallises anhydrous minerals. These cylinders resemble pipes that form in solidifying binary alloys as a result of sufficiently vigorous porous medium convection within the mush. A convection model with the addition of gas bubbles that provide the buoyancy source indicates that the effective Rayleigh number is too low for convection to occur in the mush of a basalt lava flow. However, the formation of gas bubbles during crystallisation means that the base state includes fluid migration up through the crystal mush even without convection. Stability considerations suggest that it is plausible to form a positive feedback where increased local porosity causes increased upwards fluid flow, which brings more silicic melt up and lowers the liquidus temperature, promoting locally higher porosity. Numerical solutions show that there are steady solutions in which cylinders form, and we conclude that this model provides a viable explanation for vesicular cylinder formation in inflated basalt lava flows.

  20. Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Chun, Jon Y.F.; Exposo, Jean; Heliker, Christina; Hodge, Jon; Lockwood, John P.; Vogt, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. Volcano boundaries are shown as heavy, dark bands, reflecting the overlapping of lava flows from adjacent volcanoes along their common boundary. Hazard-zone boundaries are drawn as double lines because of the geologic uncertainty in their placement. Most boundaries are gradational, and the change In the degree of hazard can be found over a distance of a mile or more. The general principles used to place hazard-zone boundaries are discussed by Mullineaux and others (1987) and Heliker (1990). The differences between the boundaries presented here and in Heliker (1990) reflect new data used in the compilation of a geologic map for the Island of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). The primary source of information for volcano boundaries and generalized ages of lava flows for all five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii is the geologic map of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). More detailed information is available for the three active volcanoes. For Hualalai, see Moore and others (1987) and Moore and Clague (1991); for Mauna Loa, see Lockwood and Lipman (1987); and for Kilauea, see Holcomb (1987) and Moore and Trusdell (1991).

  1. Palæomagnetism of Hawaiian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Cox, Allan

    1961-01-01

    PALÆOMAGNETIC investigations of volcanic rocks extruded in various parts of the world during the past several million years have generally revealed a younger sequence of lava flows magnetized nearly parallel to the field of a theoretical geocentric axial dipole, underlain by a sequence of older flows with exactly the opposite direction of remanent magnetization. A 180-degree reversal of the geomagnetic field, occurring near the middle of the Pleistocene epoch, has been inferred by many workers from such results1–3. This is a preliminary report of an investigation of 755 oriented samples collected from 152 lava flows on the island of Hawaii, selected to represent as many stratigraphic horizons as possible. (Sampling details are indicated in Table 1.) This work was undertaken because Hawaii's numerous thick sequences of lava flows, previously mapped as Pliocene to Historic by Stearns and Macdonald4, and afterwards assigned ages ranging from later Tertiary to Recent, by Macdonald and Davis5, appeared to offer an ideal opportunity to examine the most recent reversal of Earth's field.

  2. Key variables influencing patterns of lava dome growth and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, T.; Elsworth, D.; Voight, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Lava domes are conical structures that grow by the infusion of viscous silicic or intermediate composition magma from a central volcanic conduit. Dome growth can be characterized by repeated cycles of growth punctuated by collapse, as the structure becomes oversized for its composite strength. Within these cycles, deformation ranges from slow long term deformation to sudden deep-seated collapses. Collapses may range from small raveling failures to voluminous and fast-moving pyroclastic flows with rapid and long-downslope-reach from the edifice. Infusion rate and magma rheology together with crystallization temperature and volatile content govern the spatial distribution of strength in the structure. Solidification, driven by degassing-induced crystallization of magma leads to the formation of a continuously evolving frictional talus as a hard outer shell. This shell encapsulates the cohesion-dominated soft ductile core. Here we explore the mechanics of lava dome growth and failure using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. This meshless model follows the natural evolution of a brittle carapace formed by loss of volatiles and rheological stiffening and avoids difficulties of hour-glassing and mesh-entangelment typical in meshed models. We test the fidelity of the model against existing experimental and observational models of lava dome growth. The particle-dynamics model follows the natural development of dome growth and collapse which is infeasible using simple analytical models. The model provides insight into the triggers that lead to the transition in collapse mechasnism from shallow flank collapse to deep seated sector collapse. Increase in material stiffness due to decrease in infusion rate results in the transition of growth pattern from endogenous to exogenous. The material stiffness and strength are strongly controlled by the magma infusion rate. Increase in infusion rate decreases the time available for degassing induced crystallization leading to a

  3. Fragmentation Mechanisms Associated with Lacustrine Lava-Water Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Fagents, S. A.; Thordarson, T.; Hamilton, C.

    2015-12-01

    Rootless cones form when degassed lava interacts explosively with water contained in the near-surface substrate, and represents an end-member system that can elucidate mechanisms of magma-water interactions due to the absence of primary degassing-induced fragmentation. The proportion of finely fragmented ejecta (i.e. ash), generated in rootless explosions, even if the volume is small relative to coarser ejecta, may contribute significantly to the explosion energy release. Explosive melt-water experiments indicate that the degree of melt-water mixing and energy release are proportional to the abundance of blocky grains, fragmented by brittle disintegration, which effectively contribute thermal energy to the explosive lava-water interaction. In order to determine the state of the lava at the point of ash-grade fragmentation in rootless explosions we examined grain morphology over the following size ranges: 0.5-0 ϕ (1.41-1 mm, very coarse ash), 1.5-2 ϕ (0.354-0.250 mm, medium ash), and 3.5-4 ϕ (0.088-0.062 mm, very fine ash). We found that rootless ash is composed of blocky, mossy, and fluidal grains with a minor component of aggregates (≤ 2%) and glassy shards (< 35%). Typically, (1) very coarse ash contains blocky (9-58%), mossy (8-36%) and fluidal (28-67%) grains only, (2) medium ash contains blocky (32-76%), mossy (9-39%) and fluidal (15-43%) grains with a minor abundance of glassy shards (≤ 8%), and (3) very fine ash is dominated by blocky clasts (53-80%), with lower shard (12-34%) and fluidal (4-24%) components. We observe that the abundance of fluidal grains decreases while the abundance of blocky grains increases with decreasing grain size. Also, the abundance of blocky grains decreases with increasing stratigraphic height, indicating that as rootless explosions progressed, brittle fragmentation of lava is less pronounced, suggesting that the efficiency of lava-water mixing dropped, most likely due to reduced availability of external water. However, we

  4. The role of crystallinity and viscosity in the formation of submarine lava flow morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. Timothy; White, Scott M.; Colman, Alice; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Sinton, John M.

    2014-09-01

    Submarine lava flow morphology is commonly used to estimate relative flow velocity, but the effects of crystallinity and viscosity are rarely considered. We use digital petrography and quantitative textural analysis techniques to determine the crystallinity of submarine basaltic lava flows, using a set of samples from previously mapped lava flow fields at the hotspot-affected Galápagos Spreading Center. Crystallinity measurements were incorporated into predictive models of suspension rheology to characterize lava flow consistency and rheology. Petrologic data were integrated to estimate bulk lava viscosity. We compared the crystallinity and viscosity of each sample with its flow morphology to determine their respective roles in submarine lava emplacement dynamics. We find no correlation between crystallinity, bulk viscosity, and lava morphology, implying that flow advance rate is the primary control on submarine lava morphology. However, we show systematic variations in crystal size and shape distribution among pillows, lobates, and sheets, suggesting that these parameters are important indicators of eruption processes. Finally, we compared the characteristics of lavas from two different sampling sites with contrasting long-term magma supply rates. Differences between lavas from each study site illustrate the significant effect of magma supply on the physical properties of the oceanic upper crust.

  5. Disruption of tephra fall deposits caused by lava flows during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.; Blake, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations in the USA, Iceland and Tenerife, Canary Islands reveal how processes occurring during basaltic eruptions can result in complex physical and stratigraphic relationships between lava and proximal tephra fall deposits around vents. Observations illustrate how basaltic lavas can disrupt, dissect (spatially and temporally) and alter sheet-form fall deposits. Complexity arises through synchronous and alternating effusive and explosive activity that results in intercalated lavas and tephra deposits. Tephra deposits can become disrupted into mounds and ridges by lateral and vertical displacement caused by movement (including inflation) of underlying pāhoehoe lavas and clastogenic lavas. Mounds of tephra can be rafted away over distances of 100 s to 1,000 s m from proximal pyroclastic constructs on top of lava flows. Draping of irregular topography by fall deposits and subsequent partial burial of topographic depressions by later lavas can result in apparent complexity of tephra layers. These processes, deduced from field relationships, have resulted in considerable stratigraphic complexity in the studied proximal regions where fallout was synchronous or alternated with inflation of subjacent lava sheets. These mechanisms may lead to diachronous contact relationships between fall deposits and lava flows. Such complexities may remain cryptic due to textural and geochemical quasi-homogeneity within sequences of interbedded basaltic fall deposits and lavas. The net effect of these processes may be to reduce the usefulness of data collected from proximal fall deposits for reconstructing basaltic eruption dynamics.

  6. Origin and deformation of high porosity bands in the Takanoobane Rhyolite lava of Aso volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.

    2015-10-01

    In rhyolite lavas, the high porosity bands are often developed. They potentially act as pathways for gas movement to the lava surface. Since explosive activities of lavas are generally considered to be controlled by degassing system, understanding the origin and deformation process of the high porosity bands is important to assessing volcanic hazards. The Takanoobane rhyolite lava in the middle of Kyushu Island in SW Japan is effused at 51 ± 5 ka. The volume, flow length, and thickness are 0.14 km3, > 2 km, and about 90 m, respectively. The central crystalline part of the lava is characterized by the light-colored bands defined by the high porosity zone (HPZ). On the basis of geological and petrographical studies, we revealed that the HPZ was primary formed by ductile-brittle tearing of the lava (known as cavitation). According to the AMS results, the HPZs were subsequently stretched and flattened laterally during the concentric spreading of the lava. This deformation process could stretch the HPZ not only radially but also laterally. This effective stretching developed the HPZ into pervasive thin bands. Since the HPZs act as degassing pathways to the lava surface, the pervasive HPZ bands may play a role in providing volcanic gasses to void spaces created in surface fold hinges of rhyolite lavas. Thus, this degassing system may promote explosive activity of the lava surface.

  7. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  8. Discriminating lava flows of different age within Nyamuragira's volcanic field using spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Canters, Frank; Solana, Carmen; Ma, Weiwei; Chen, Longqian; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    In this study, linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) is used to characterize the spectral heterogeneity of lava flows from Nyamuragira volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo, where vegetation and lava are the two main land covers. In order to estimate fractions of vegetation and lava through satellite remote sensing, we made use of 30 m resolution Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) imagery. 2 m Pleiades data was used for validation. From the results, we conclude that (1) LSMA is capable of characterizing volcanic fields and discriminating between different types of lava surfaces; (2) three lava endmembers can be identified as lava of old, intermediate and young age, corresponding to different stages in lichen growth and chemical weathering; (3) a strong relationship is observed between vegetation fraction and lava age, where vegetation at Nyamuragira starts to significantly colonize lava flows ∼15 years after eruption and occupies over 50% of the lava surfaces ∼40 years after eruption. Our study demonstrates the capability of spectral unmixing to characterize lava surfaces and vegetation colonization over time, which is particularly useful for poorly known volcanoes or those not accessible for physical or political reasons.

  9. Lava flow hazard modeling during the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, Annalisa; Ganci, Gaetana; Calvari, Sonia; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Silva, Sónia V.; Cabral, Jeremias; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing techniques and lava flow forecasting models have been combined to enable a rapid response during effusive crises at poorly monitored volcanoes. Here we used the HOTSAT satellite thermal monitoring system and the MAGFLOW lava flow emplacement model to forecast lava flow hazards during the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption. In many ways this was one of the major effusive eruption crises of recent years, since the lava flows actually invaded populated areas. Combining satellite data and modeling allowed mapping of the probable evolution of lava flow fields while the eruption was ongoing and rapidly gaining as much relevant information as possible. HOTSAT was used to promptly analyze MODIS and SEVIRI data to output hot spot location, lava thermal flux, and effusion rate estimation. This output was used to drive the MAGFLOW simulations of lava flow paths and to continuously update flow simulations. We also show how Landsat 8 OLI and EO-1 ALI images complement the field observations for tracking the flow front position through time and adding considerable data on lava flow advancement to validate the results of numerical simulations. The integration of satellite data and modeling offers great promise in providing a unified and efficient system for global assessment and real-time response to effusive eruptions, including (i) the current state of the effusive activity, (ii) the probable evolution of the lava flow field, and (iii) the potential impact of lava flows.

  10. Controls on lava-snow interactions from propogation styles during the 2012-13 Tolbachik eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Belousov, Alexander; Belousov, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of how volcanism interacts with hydrosphere/cryosphere is critical for understanding the functioning and evolution of the Earth, establishing volcanism-climate linkages, and estimations of related hazards. Until now, no special studies have been focused on interactions between snowpack and advancing incandescent lava during volcanic eruptions, even though snow is the most widely distributed form of solid H2O on the planet. It was thought a priori that snow might melt rapidly in front of active lava flows producing vigorous floods. Here we present results of unique field observations made in the snowpack in front of advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations in the first time demonstrate that in reality heat transfer through lava/snow boundary occurs relatively slowly, so that melting of the majority of the snow pack occurs over the span of several hours-days after emplacement of the lava flows, producing only local and sporadic meltwater floods. Two fundamentally different styles of lava propagation result in two strikingly different responses of snowpack: i) 'a'a lava advancing in a rolling caterpillar-track motion propagates on top of snowpack; the melt water accumulates in (saturates) the layer of snow buried underneath the lava flow and does not interact notably with the lava material, and ii) pahoehoe lava advancing as inflating lobes propagates beneath/inside snowpack, locally generating slowly growing 'snow-domes'; the melt water precipitates down into incandescent lava producing chilling and local thermal shock/quench fragmentation (minor hyaloclastite production). Our observations show that lava-snow interactions can vary significantly depending on styles of flow front advance. Lava flows emplaced over areas covered with snow bear features that can be distinguished in old stratigraphic sequences and used for paleoclimatic reconstructions on Earth, Mars and other planets.

  11. Constraints on Determining the Eruption Style and Composition of Terrestrial Lavas from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert; Glaze, Lori; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The surface temperatures of active lavas relate to cooling rates, chemistry, and eruption style. We analyzed 61 hyperspectral satellite images acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion imaging spectrometer to document the surface temperature distributions of active lavas erupted at 13 volcanoes. Images were selected to encompass the range of common lava eruption styles, specifically, lava fountains, flows, lakes, and domes. Our results reveal temperature distributions for terrestrial lavas that correlate with composition (i.e., a statistically significant difference in the highest temperatures retrieved for mafic lavas and intermediate and felsic lavas) and eruption style. Maximum temperatures observed for mafi c lavas are approx.200 C higher than for intermediate and felsic lavas. All eruption styles exhibit a low-temperature mode at approx.300 C; lava fountains and 'a' a flows also exhibit a higher-temperature mode at approx.700 C. The observed differences between the temperatures are consistent with the contrasting rates at which the lava surfaces are thermally renewed. Eruption styles that allow persistent and pervasive thermal renewal of the lava surface (e.g., fractured crusts on channel-fed 'a' a flows) exhibit a bimodal temperature distribution; eruption styles that do not (e.g., the continuous skin of pahoehoe lavas) exhibit a single mode. We conclude that insights into composition and eruption style can only be gained remotely by analyzing a large spatio-temporal sample of data. This has implications for determining composition and eruption style at the Jovian moon Io, for which no in situ validation is available.

  12. Asymmetric deformation structure of lava spine in Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, T.; Okumura, S.; Matsushima, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2013-12-01

    Lava spine is commonly generated by effusive eruption of crystal-rich, dacitic-andesitic magmas. Especially, deformation rock on surface of lava spine has been related with processes of magma ascent, outgassing, and generation of volcanic earthquake (e.g., Cashman et al. 2008). To reveal the relationships and generation process of the spine, it is needed to understand a spatial distribution of the deformation rock. Here we show the spatial distribution of the deformation rock of lava spine in the Unzen volcano, Japan, to discuss the generation process of the spine. The lava spine in Unzen volcano is elongated in the E-W direction, showing a crest like shape with 150 long, 40 m wide and 50 m high. The lava spine is divided into following four parts: 1) Massive dacite part: Dense dacite with 30 m of maximum thickness, showing slickenside on the southern face; 2) Sheared dacite part: Flow band developed dacite with 1.0 m of maximum thickness; 3) Tuffisite part: Network of red colored vein develops in dacite with 0.5 m of maximum thickness; 4) Breccia part: Dacitic breccia with 10 m of maximum thickness. The Breccia part dominates in the northern part of the spine, and flops over Massive dacite part accross the Sheared dacite and Tuffisite parts. The slickenside on southern face of massive dacite demonstrates contact of solids. The slickenside breaks both of phenocryst and groundmass, demonstrating that the slickenside is formed after significant crystallization at the shallow conduit or on the ground surface. The lineation of the slickenside shows E-W direction with almost horizontal rake angle, which is consistent with the movement of the spine to an east before emplacement. Development of sub-vertical striation due to extrusion was observed on northern face of the spine (Hayashi, 1994). Therefore, we suggest that the spine just at extrusion consisted of Massive dacite, Sheared dacite, Tuffisite, Breccia, and Striation parts in the northern half of the spine. Such a

  13. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of back-arc lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of arc-related magmas can constrain the amount and nature of slab-derived components contributing to their mantle sources because: (i) most geological solids and fluids contain similar concentration of oxygen; and (ii) possible slab components (fluids, melts or rocks from sedimentary, mafic or ultramafic parts of the lithosphere) differ from one another in δ18O values and these distinctive oxygen-isotope compositions can be preserved in deeply subducted materials. Previous laser fluorination oxygen isotope data on back-arc basin basalts (BABB) show slightly but consistently elevated δ18O values (from 5.5 to 6.1 ‰ [1-3]) with respect to mid-ocean ridge basalts or MORB (δ18O = 5.5 ± 0.2 ‰ [4]). The subtle elevations in δ18O characteristic of BABB are generally associated with 'enriched' radiogenic isotope compositions (e.g., high 87Sr/86Sr) and high apparent degrees of melting of their peridotitic sources that may reflect fluxed melting of the mantle by fluids and/or hydrous melts released from subducted oceanic lithosphere [1-3]. These trends could be used to precisely define the sources and amounts of slab- derived components delivered to the back arc mantle. However, two issues demand that this problem be better constrained through further studies. First, the subtle difference in δ18O between MORB and BABB involves comparison of data generated in different laboratories that may not share common standardization; this difference must be demonstrated within a single laboratory using a common set of standards. Second, the trends of δ18O vs. other geochemical indices observed in BABB lavas are based on samples from several relatively small and unrelated suites of lavas. These trends must be documented through study of one or more relatively large and diverse suites of closely related lavas. We are performing new laser-fluorination oxygen isotope measurements of a comprehensive suite of fresh back-arc glasses collected along the Eastern

  14. A meta-analysis of aneurysm formation in laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Peng, Fei; Xu, Dahai; Cheng, Qinghua

    2009-08-01

    Laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) is looked as a particularly promising non-suture method in future. However, aneurysm formation is one of the main reasons delay the clinical application of LAVA. Some scientists investigated the incidence of aneurysms in animal model. To systematically analyze the literature on reported incidence of aneurysm formation in LAVA therapy, we performed a meta-analysis comparing LAVA with conventional suture anastomosis (CSA) in animal model. Data were systematically retrieved and selected from PUBMED. In total, 23 studies were retrieved. 18 studies were excluded, and 5 studies involving 647 animals were included. Analysis suggested no statistically significant difference between LAVA and CSA (OR 1.24, 95%CI 0.66-2.32, P=0.51). Result of meta analysis shows that the technology of LAVA is very close to clinical application.

  15. Temperature Measurements in Carbonatite Lava Lakes and Flows from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Maurice; Keller, Jorg

    1989-07-01

    The petrogenesis of carbonatites has important implications for mantle processes and for the magmatic evolution of mantle melts rich in carbon dioxide. Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is the only active carbonatite volcano on Earth. Its highly alkalic, sodium-rich lava, although different in composition from the more common calcium-rich carbonatites, provides the opportunity for observations of the physical characteristics of carbonatite melts. Temperature measurements on active carbonatitic lava flows and from carbonatitic lava lakes were carried out during a period of effusive activity in June 1988. Temperatures ranged from 491 degrees to 519 degrees C. The highest temperature, measured from a carbonatitic lava lake, was 544 degrees C. These temperatures are several hundred degrees lower than measurements from any silicate lava. At the observed temperatures, the carbonatite melt had lower viscosities than the most fluid basaltic lavas. The unusually low magmatic temperatures were confirmed with 1-atmosphere melting experiments on natural samples.

  16. Temperature measurements in carbonatite lava lakes and flows from oldoinyo lengai, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Krafft, M; Keller, J

    1989-07-14

    The petrogenesis of carbonatites has important implications for mantle processes and for the magmatic evolution of mantle melts rich in carbon dioxide. Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is the only active carbonatite volcano on Earth. Its highly alkalic, sodium-rich lava, although different in composition from the more common calcium-rich carbonatites, provides the opportunity for observations of the physical characteristics of carbonatite melts. Temperature measurements on active carbonatitic lava flows and from carbonatitic lava lakes were carried out during a period of effusive activity in June 1988. Temperatures ranged from 491 degrees to 519 degrees C. The highest temperature, measured from a carbonatitic lava lake, was 544 degrees C. These temperatures are several hundred degrees lower than measurements from any silicate lava. At the observed temperatures, the carbonatite melt had lower viscosities than the most fluid basaltic lavas. The unusually low magmatic temperatures were confirmed with 1-atmosphere melting experiments on natural samples. PMID:17787875

  17. Patterns of behavior in Kilauea's Halema`uma`u lava lake during 2011 and 1911

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    The past three and a half years of activity in the Halema`uma`u vent, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, have provided a robust observational dataset and allowed us to generalize on many aspects of behavior in the lava lake. The current lava lake normally has been 100-150 m in diameter and contained deep (70-220 m) within a slowly enlarging, fume-filled crater. The lava level fluctuates over both long- and short-term intervals, over a total height range of about 150 m. Over the long term (days to weeks) the lava level correlates directly with summit tilt at a consistent rate, sympathetic with the frequent summit deflation-inflation (DI) events, indicating the lava level is related, in large part, to the pressure state of the summit magma reservoir. On a short term, the lava level experiences rise-fall cycles ("gas pistoning") of 10-20 m height changes, with time spans of minutes to hours, which are due to shallow accumulation and release of gas. The lava lake also abruptly dropped about 150 m during the March 2011 east-rift intrusion and Kamoamoa eruption, presumably due to the rapid evacuation of magma from the summit reservoir. The lava surface is composed of large (decameter-scale) crustal plates, whose size is inversely related to the surface migration velocity. The surface crust moves at a relatively slow velocity (often 0.2-1 m/s), similar to velocities at other lava lakes on Kilauea (Mauna Ulu, Kupaianaha) and elsewhere worldwide (Erebus, Erta Ale), and usually in a direction that is maintained for months. Spattering is generally continuous and directly linked to the circulation pattern; spattering normally occurs at the spot of lava downwelling. Spattering intensity correlates directly with seismic tremor levels, suggesting that the bulk of summit tremor is related to gas release from the lava surface. These characteristics of the modern lava lake have both important similarities and differences compared to the Halema`uma`u lava lake observed by

  18. Controls on lava lake level at Halema`uma`u Crater, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Lava level is a fundamental measure of lava lake activity, but very little continuous long-term data exist worldwide to explore this aspect of lava lake behavior. The ongoing summit eruption at Kilauea Volcano began in 2008 and is characterized by an active lava lake within the eruptive vent. Lava level has been measured nearly continuously at Kilauea for several years using a combination of webcam images, laser rangefinder, and terrestrial LIDAR. Fluctuations in lava level have been a common aspect of the eruption and occur over several timescales. At the shortest timescale, the lava lake level can change over seconds to hours owing to two observed shallow gas-related processes. First, gas pistoning is common and is driven by episodic gas accumulation and release from the surface of the lava lake, causing the lava level to rise and fall by up to 20 m. Second, rockfalls into the lake trigger abrupt gas release, and lava level may drop as much as 10 m as a result. Over days, cyclic changes in lava level closely track cycles of deflation-inflation (DI) deformation events at the summit, leading to level changes up to 50 m. Rift zone intrusions have caused large (up to 140 m) drops in lava level over several days. On the timescale of weeks to months, the lava level follows the long-term inflation and deflation of the summit region, resulting in level changes up to 140 m. The remarkable correlation between lava level and deflation-inflation cycles, as well as the long-term deformation of the summit region, indicates that the lava lake acts as a reliable 'piezometer' (a measure of liquid pressure in the magma plumbing system); therefore, assessments of summit pressurization (and rift zone eruption potential) can now be carried out with the naked eye. The summit lava lake level is closely mirrored by the lava level within Pu`u `O`o crater, the vent area for the 30-year-long eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone, which is 20 km downrift of the summit. The coupling of these

  19. Coastal lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.

    1987-01-01

    A major carbonate reef which drowned 13 ka is now submerged 150 m below sea level on the west coast of the island of Hawaii. A 25-km span of this reef was investigated using the submersible Makali'i. The reef occurs on the flanks of two active volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Hualalai, and the lavas from both volcanoes both underlie and overlie the submerged reef. Most of the basaltic lava flows that crossed the reef did so when the water was much shallower, and when they had to flow a shorter distance from shoreline to reef face. Lava flows on top of the reef have protected it from erosion and solution and now occur at seaward-projecting salients on the reef face. These relations suggest that the reef has retreated shoreward as much as 50 m since it formed. A 7-km-wide "shadow zone" occurs where no Hualalai lava flows cross the reef south of Kailua. These lava flows were probably diverted around a large summit cone complex. A similar "shadow zone" on the flank of Mauna Loa volcano in the Kealakekua Bay region is downslope from the present Mauna Loa caldera, which ponds Mauna Loa lava and prevents it from reaching the coastline. South of the Mauna Loa "shadow zone" the - 150 m reef has been totally covered and obscured by Mauna Loa lava. The boundary between Hualalai and Mauna Loa lava on land occurs over a 6-km-wide zone, whereas flows crossing the - 150 m reef show a sharper boundary offshore from the north side of the subaerial transition zone. This indicates that since the formation of the reef, Hualalai lava has migrated south, mantling Mauna Loa lava. More recently, Mauna Loa lava is again encroaching north on Hualalai lava. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Radar Observations of Fissure-fed Basaltic Lava Flows, Craters of the Moon, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, L.; Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in surface roughness of lava flows, estimated from dual polarization, synthetic aperture, X and L band side-looking airborne radar images, were tested as a means of locating fissure vent areas. If lava textures proess from smooth, near-vent shelly pahoehoe to hummocky pahoehoe to aa with distance from fissure vents, then radr images of the lava flows would show a progression from dark to brighter tones due to the flows' increasing radar back-scatter.

  1. Radar observations of fissure-fed basaltic lava flows, Craters of the Moon, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Greeley, R.

    1985-04-01

    Changes in surface roughness of lava flows, estimated from dual polarization, synthetic aperture, X and L band side-looking airborne radar images, were tested as a means of locating fissure vent areas. If lava textures proess from smooth, near-vent shelly pahoehoe to hummocky pahoehoe to aa with distance from fissure vents, then radr images of the lava flows would show a progression from dark to brighter tones due to the flows' increasing radar back-scatter.

  2. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (Approximate True Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  3. Geology of the Tyrrhenus Mons Lava Flow Field, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.

    2014-11-01

    The ancient, eroded Martian volcano Tyrrhenus Mons exhibits a central caldera complex, layered flank deposits dissected by radial valleys, and a 1000+ km-long flow field extending to the southwest toward Hellas Planitia. Past studies suggested an early phase of volcanism dominated by large explosive eruptions followed by subsequent effusive activity at the summit and to the southwest. As part of a new geologic mapping study of northeast Hellas, we are examining the volcanic landforms and geologic evolution of the Tyrrhenus Mons flow field, including the timing and nature of fluvial activity and effects on volcanic units. New digital geologic mapping incorporates THEMIS IR (100 m/pixel) and CTX (5 m/pixel) images as well as constraints from MOLA topography.Mapping results to-date include delineation of the boundaries of the flow field, identification and mapping of volcanic and erosional channels within the flow field, and mapping and analysis of lava flow lobes. THEMIS IR and CTX images allow improved discrimination of the numerous flow lobes that are observed in the flow field, including refinement of the margins of previously known flows and identification of additional and smaller lobes. A prominent sinuous rille extending from Tyrrhenus Mons’ summit caldera is a major feature that supplied lava to the flow field. Smaller volcanic channels are common throughout the flow field; some occur in segments along crests of local topographic highs and may delineate lava tubes. In addition to volcanic channels, the flow field surface is characterized by several types of erosional channels, including wide troughs with scour marks, elongate sinuous channels, and discontinuous chains of elongate pits and troughs. High-resolution images reveal the widespread and significant effects of fluvial activity in the region, and further mapping studies will examine spatial and temporal interactions between volcanism and fluvial processes.

  4. Downflow width behavior of Martian and terrestrial lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitersen, Matthew N.; Crown, David A.

    1999-04-01

    Examination of the downflow width behavior of 59 terrestrial lava flows at Puu Oo (Hawaii) and Glass Mountain (California) and 86 Martian flows at Alba Patera, Tyrrhena Patera, Elysium, and Olympus Mons was completed using aerial photographs, topographic maps, previously published flow maps, and Viking Orbiter images. The examined lava flows exhibit diverse width behavior, from which information about flow processes and conditions was assessed. For Puu Oo flows, no significant correlation was found between the average width of a flow and flow length or average underlying slope. A significant, but weak relationship was found between average width and average flow thickness. In analyses of the downflow width behavior of individual flows, no consistent correlations were observed between width and thickness or underlying slope. When width was analyzed as a function of distance from the source for all flows, a variety of flow width behavioral trends were recognized and quantitatively classified. The most common behavior observed on Earth and Mars involved variations of width (sometimes significant) about a mean without a significant downflow narrowing or widening trend. The distributions of width behavior trends for the Alba Patera and Puu Oo flows examined were similar, with this type of ``constant'' behavior dominating. In contrast, Tyrrhena Patera flows showed a tendency to widen with distance downflow, and silicic flows at Glass Mountain were more likely to narrow. Flows were also subdivided by distance from the vent, and the width behavior of each division classified. Subdivision of flows resulted in significant changes in the classification of width behavior. While width behavior in the medial regions of flows was similar to that over entire flow lengths, proximal regions show more variability (possibly due to greater fluidity of lavas near the vent) and distal regions tend to uniformly narrow (possibly due to limited supply). In certain cases, classification and

  5. Las Vegas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of Las Vegas, NV was acquired on August, 2000 and covers an area 42 km (25 miles) wide and 30 km (18 miles) long. The image displays three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region, with a spatial resolution of 15 m. McCarran International Airport to the south and Nellis Air Force Base to the NE are the two major airports visible. Golf courses appear as bright red areas of worms. The first settlement in Las Vegas (which is Spanish for The Meadows) was recorded back in the early 1850s when the Mormon church, headed by Brigham Young, sent a mission of 30 men to construct a fort and teach agriculture to the Indians. Las Vegas became a city in 1905 when the railroad announced this city was to be a major division point. Prior to legalized gambling in 1931, Las Vegas was developing as an agricultural area. Las Vegas' fame as a resort area became prominent after World War II. The image is located at 36.1 degrees north latitude and 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  7. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 ??m) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. After the lava flow: The importance of external soil sources for plant colonization of recent lava flows in the central Oregon Cascades, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia I.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2013-11-01

    Effusive volcanic eruptions repave landscapes rapidly with lava flows, resetting broad areas of the underlying landscape and ecosystem. The unique physical properties of lava pose interesting challenges for ecologic recovery, as lava is dense, sterile, and generally inhospitable towards life. In this study we examine two sites of recent volcanism in the central Oregon Cascades, notable for the juxtaposition of barren exposed lava and mature forests on lava flows of the same or roughly the same age. We use a combination of LiDAR analyses, field observations, and soil characterization to examine soil and vegetation at these two sites, and find that the presence of an external sediment or soil source, particularly flood-borne deposits or syn- or post-eruptive tephra, greatly facilitates plant establishment, growth, and survival. The nature of the external sources of sediment or soil dictates the geographic extent of forests on these young lava flows: flood-borne deposits cover localized regions near river channels, while tephra can cover large regions. In general, our results suggest that external sources of soil provide a substrate for plants to grow in along with key nutrients and sufficient moisture retention. We conclude that external sources of soil source are key for the initial recovery following an effusive volcanic disturbance, in particular in temperate climates. Thus, unrelated geomorphic processes, such as past glaciations that provide local sources of mobile sediments, or concurrent volcanic processes, such as tephra production, dictate the presence or absence of forests on young lava flows.

  9. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-11-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  10. Low sulfur content in submarine lavas: An unreliable indicator of subaerial eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.S.; Clague, D.A.; Schulz, M.S.; Hein, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Low S content (< 250 ppm) has been used to identify subaerially erupted Hawaiian and Icelandic lavas. Large differences in S content of submarine-erupted lavas from different tectonic settings indicate that the behavior of S is complex. Variations is S abundance in undegassed, submarine-erupted lavas can result from different source compositions, different percentages of partial melting, and crystal fractionation. Low S concentrations in highly vesicular submarine lavas suggest that partial degassing can occur despite great hydrostatic pressure. These processes need to be evaluated before using S content as an indicator of eruption depth.

  11. Observations of actively forming lava tubes and associated structures, Hawaii, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1971-01-01

    A ground examination is made of lave tubes and channels. The surface morphology and the changes noted through lava flow activity are cited, and compared to earlier aerial observations. The lava activity was believed to be caused by a small lava lake exposed by the collapse of a crust covering it. Drainage of the lake was caused by a fissure erruption. New tubes or extensions of existing ones were noted from the flow. Molten lava was not seen in any tubes examined on the ground, but some of the flows were not sufficiently cooled to allow subsurface examination and survey of the tubes.

  12. Basalt models for the Mars penetrator mission: Geology of the Amboy Lava Field, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Bunch, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    Amboy lava field (San Bernardino County, California) is a Holocene basalt flow selected as a test site for potential Mars Penetrators. A discussion is presented of (1) the general relations of basalt flow features and textures to styles of eruptions on earth, (2) the types of basalt flows likely to be encountered on Mars and the rationale for selection of the Amboy lava field as a test site, (3) the general geology of the Amboy lava field, and (4) detailed descriptions of the target sites at Amboy lava field.

  13. LAVA Simulations for the AIAA Sonic Boom Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta , Shayan; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2014-01-01

    Computational simulations using the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework are presented for the First AIAA Sonic Boom Prediction Workshop test cases. The framework is utilized with both structured overset and unstructured meshing approaches. The three workshop test cases include an axisymmetric body, a Delta Wing-Body model, and a complete low-boom supersonic transport concept. Solution sensitivity to mesh type and sizing, and several numerical convective flux discretization choices are presented and discussed. Favorable comparison between the computational simulations and experimental data of nearand mid-field pressure signatures were obtained.

  14. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  15. A new simulation approach for modeling inflated pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Hamilton, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth indicate that when flow rates are very low and emplacement occurs on very low slopes, the process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. We present a new model that incorporates a simulation approach to quantifying the influence of random and ambient factors on the evolving three-dimensional shape and morphology of pahoehoe lobes. To simulate pahoehoe lava emplacement, we consider the movement of small parcels of lava with a volume equal to the size of a typical toe (70 x 70 x 20 cm3). The model develops a set of probabilistic rules for determining the location and direction of movement for each parcel. Unlike the classical random walk of Brownian motion, many parcels may remain dormant, but fluid, for multiple time steps. The net effect of this approach is that parcels tend to accumulate preferentially within the lobe producing cross-sectional topographic profiles with a medial ridge. The randomness of parcel volume transfers within the lobe interior as well as at the margins qualitatively reflects inflation processes observed in the field. This new model predicts that greater than 75% of pahoehoe lobe volume is contributed through inflation for typical lobes. The influences on planform shape and topographic cross-sectional profiles of total volume, source area and shape, topographic confinement, and sequential breakouts at the lobe margins, have been explored with the stochastic model. The model provides a means for assessing the relative importance of these processes through comparisons with field data. A major conclusion of this work is that sequential breakouts at the lobe margins are an important process controlling the final topographic distribution of observed

  16. Structures and facies associated with the flow of subaerial basaltic lava into a deep freshwater lake: The Sulphur Creek lava flow, North Cascades, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, David S.; Scott, Kevin M.

    2009-09-01

    The ca. 8800 14C yrs BP Sulphur Creek lava flowed eastward 12 km from the Schriebers Meadow cinder cone into the Baker River valley, on the southeast flank of Mount Baker volcano. The compositionally-zoned basaltic to basaltic andesite lava entered, crossed and partially filled the 2-km-wide and > 100-m-deep early Holocene remnant of Glacial Lake Baker. The valley is now submerged beneath a reservoir, but seasonal drawdown permits study of the distal entrant lava. As a lava volume that may have been as much as 180 × 10 6 m 3 entered the lake, the flow invaded the lacustrine sequence and extended to the opposite (east) side of the drowned Baker River valley. The volume and mobility of the lava can be attributed to a high flux rate, a prolonged eruption, or both. Basalt exposed below the former level of the remnant glacial lake is glassy or microcrystalline and sparsely vesicular, with pervasive hackly or blocky fractures. Together with pseudopillow fractures, these features reflect fracturing normal to penetrative thermal fronts and quenching by water. A fine-grained hyaloclastite facies was probably formed during quench fragmentation or isolated magma-water explosions. Although the structures closely resemble those developed in lava-ice contact environments, establishing the depositional environment for lava exhibiting similar intense fracturing should be confirmed by geologic evidence rather than by internal structure alone. The lava also invaded the lacustrine sequence, forming varieties of peperite, including sills that are conformable within the invaded strata and resemble volcaniclastic breccias. The peperite is generally fragmental and clast- or matrix-supported; fine-grained and rounded fluidal margins occur locally. The lava formed a thickened subaqueous plug that, as the lake drained in the mid-Holocene, was exposed to erosion. The Baker River then cut a 52-m-deep gorge through the shattered, highly erodible basalt.

  17. Late Holocene lava flow morphotypes of northern Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Implications for the description of continental lava fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia, H.; Németh, K.; Moufti, M. R.; Lindsay, J. M.; El-Masry, N.; Cronin, S. J.; Qaddah, A.; Smith, I. E. M.

    2014-04-01

    A "lava morphotype" refers to the recognizable and distinctive characteristics of the surface morphology of a lava flow after solidification, used in a similar way to a sedimentary facies. This classification method is explored on an example volcanic field in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where copious lava outpourings may represent an important transition between monogenetic and flood basalt fields. Here, young and well-preserved mafic lava fields display a wide range of surface morphologies. We focussed on four post-4500 yrs. BP lava flow fields in northern Harrat Rahat (<10 Ma) and propose a framework for describing systematic changes in morphotypes down-flow. The morphotypes give insight into intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of emplacement, rheology and dominant flow behavior, as well as the occurrence and character of other lava structures. The Harrat Rahat lava flow fields studied extend up to 23 km from the source, and vary between 1-2 m and 12 m in thickness. Areas of the lava flow fields are between ˜32 and ˜61 km2, with individual flow field volumes estimated between ˜0.085 and ˜0.29 km3. They exhibit Shelly-, Slabby-, and Rubbly-pahoehoe, Platy-, Cauliflower-, and Rubbly-a'a, and Blocky morphotypes. Morphotypes reflect the intrinsic parameters of: composition, temperature, crystallinity and volatile-content/vesicularity; along with external influences, such as: emission mechanism, effusion rate, topography and slope control of flow velocity. One morphotype can transition to another in individual flow-units or lobes and they may dominate zones. Not all morphotypes were found in a single lava flow field. Pahoehoe morphotypes are related to the simple mechanical disaggregation of the crust, whereas a'a morphotypes are related to the transitional emergence and subsequent transitional disappearance of clinker. Blocky morphotypes result from fracturing and auto-brecciation. A'a morphotypes (i.e. platy-, cauliflower-, rubbly-a'a) dominate the lava flow

  18. Post-emplacement cooling and contraction of lava flows: InSAR observations and thermal model for lava fields at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Werner; Dumont, Stephanie; Lavallee, Yan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2016-04-01

    Gradual post-emplacement subsidence of lava flows has been observed at various volcanoes, e.g. Okmok volcano in Alaska, Kilauea volcano on Hawaii and Etna volcano on Sicily. In Iceland, this effect has been observed at Krafla volcano and Hekla volcano. The latter was chosen as a case study for investigating subsidence mechanisms, specifically thermal contraction. Effects like gravitational loading, clast repacking or creeping of a hot and liquid core can contribute to subsidence of emplaced lava flows, but thermal contraction is considered being a crucial effect. The extent to which it contributes to lava flow subsidence is investigated by mapping the relative movement of emplaced lava flows and flow substrate, and modeling the observed signal. The slow vegetation in Iceland is advantageous for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and offers great coherence over long periods after lava emplacement, expanding beyond the outlines of lava flows. Due to this reason, InSAR observations over volcanoes in Iceland have taken place for more than 20 years. By combining InSAR tracks from ERS, Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites we gain six time series with a total of 99 interferograms. Making use of the high spatial resolution, a temporal trend of vertical lava movements was investigated over a course of over 23 years over the 1991 lava flow of Hekla volcano, Iceland. From these time series, temporal trends of accumulated subsidence and subsidence velocities were determined in line of sight of the satellites. However, the deformation signal of lava fields after emplacement is vertically dominated. Subsidence on this lava field is still ongoing and subsidence rates vary from 14.8 mm/year in 1995 to about 1.0 mm/year in 2014. Fitting a simple exponential function suggests a exponential decay constant of 5.95 years. Additionally, a one-dimensional, semi-analytical model was fitted to these data. While subsidence due to phase change is calculated analytically

  19. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  20. Absolute paleointensity from Hawaiian lavas younger than 35 ka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valet, J.-P.; Tric, E.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Meynadier, L.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Paleointensity studies have been conducted in air and in argon atmosphere on nine lava flows with radiocarbon ages distributed between 3.3 and 28.2 ka from the Mauna Loa volcano in the big island of Hawaii. Determinations of paleointensity obtained at eight sites depict the same overall pattern as the previous results for the same period in Hawaii, although the overall average field intensity appears to be lower. Since the present results were determined at higher temperatures than in the previous studies, this discrepancy raises questions regarding the selection of low versus high-temperature segments that are usually made for absolute paleointensity. The virtual dipole moments are similar to those displayed by the worldwide data set obtained from dated lava flows. When averaged within finite time intervals, the worldwide values match nicely the variations of the Sint-200 synthetic record of relative paleointensity and confirm the overall decrease of the dipole field intensity during most of this period. The convergence between the existing records at Hawaii and the rest of the world does not favour the presence of persistent strong non-dipole components beneath Hawaii for this period.

  1. Forecasting Lava Dome Eruptions from High Frequency Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Kilburn, C. R.; Sammonds, P. R.

    2005-12-01

    Following its plinian eruption on 18 May 1980, Mount St Helens (Washington State, U.S.A.) entered a period of intermittent lava-dome extrusion until 1986. A re-analysis of the timing of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes and eruptions indicates that: (1) all VT crises resulted in an eruption within 3 weeks (usually less than 10 days), (2) the majority of eruptions had VT precursors, and (3) patterns of precursory seismicity showed significant variations. Thus, although these seismic events could be used to warn of an impending eruption, specific forecasts were subject to significant uncertainty. It is proposed that: (1) Increased seismicity prior to later eruptions are a result of a larger more solidified dome acting as a greater impediment to magma ascent; (2) the consistency of seismic swarms resulting in an eruption indicate that stresses high enough to initiate fracturing in the country rock and lava dome carapace were only achieved once the approach to an eruption had already begun; and (3) discrepancies between models of accelerating rock fracture and the observed seismicity may arise due to a significant amount of the material failing and deforming through ductile mechanisms rather than seismogenic fracture.

  2. Visibility of Active Lava Flows from Venus Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.

    2015-10-01

    I present a model of the signatures of active lava flows observable through spectral windows from orbit and data processing methods for isolating these signatures in near-infrared images.The model estimates the thermal emission of lava flows based on models for the analysis of remote observation of eruptions on Earth and Io, however adjusted to the different thermal environment of the Venus surface. This thermal emission radiation is only partially transmitted through the diffusely scattering cloud layer and moreover diluted over a diameter of 100 km, an area much larger than the size of most flows. Data processing methods to enhance the chance to detect these signatures include corrections for variable cloud opacity using other spectral bands, subtraction of background thermal emission, and spatial filtering. This model and the implementation of the data processing methods for VIRTIS IR data, arguably the most sensitive and extensive applicable dataset, indicate that only very large and intense eruptions could have been detected with existing data.

  3. Recovery of datable charcoal beneath young lavas: lessons from Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockwood, J.P.; Lipman, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Field studies in Hawaii aimed at providing a radiocarbon-based chronology of prehistoric eruptive activity have led to a good understanding of the processes that govern the formation and preservation of charcoal beneath basaltic lava flows. Charcoal formation is a rate-dependent process controlled primarily by temperature and duration of heating, as well as by moisture content, density, and size of original woody material. Charcoal will form wherever wood buried by lava is raised to sufficiently high temperatures, but owing to the availability of oxygen it is commonly burned to ash soon after formation. Wherever oxygen circulation is sufficiently restricted, charcoal will be preserved, but where atmospheric oxygen circulates freely, charcoal will only be preserved at a lower temperature, below that required for charcoal ignition or catalytic oxidation. These factors cause carbonized wood, especially that derived from living roots, to be commonly preserved beneath all parts of pahoehoe flows (where oxygen circulation is restricted), but only under margins of aa. Practical guidelines are given for the recovery of datable charcoal beneath pahoehoe and aa. Although based on Hawaiian basaltic flows, the guidelines should be applicable to other areas. -Authors

  4. Incorporation of seawater into mid-ocean ridge lava flows during emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, S. Adam; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perfit, Michael R.; Ridley, W. Ian; Reed, Mark H.; Cann, Johnson R.

    2006-12-01

    Evidence for the interaction between seawater and lava during emplacement on the deep seafloor can be observed in solidified flows at a variety of scales including rapid quenching of their outer crusts and the formation of lava pillars through the body of the flow. Recently, an additional interaction, incorporation of heated seawater (vapor) into the body of a flow, has been proposed. Large voids and vesicles beneath the surface crusts of mid-ocean ridge crest lobate and sheet lava flows and lava drips found within those cavities have been cited as evidence for this interaction. The voids resulting from this interaction contribute to the high porosity of the shallow ocean crust and play an important role in crustal permeability and hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, and thus it is important to understand their origin. We analyze lava samples from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and intermediate-spreading Galapagos Spreading Center to characterize this process, identify the source of the vapor, and investigate the implications this would have on submarine lava flow dynamics. We find that lava samples that have interacted with a vapor have a zone of increased vesicularity on the underside of the lava crust and a coating of precipitate minerals ( i.e., crystal fringe) that are distinct in form and composition from those crystallized from the melt. We use thermochemical modeling to simulate the reaction between the lava and a vapor and find that only with seawater can we reproduce the phase assemblage we observe within the crystal fringes present in the samples. Model results suggest that large-scale contamination of the lava by mass exchange with the vapor is unlikely, but we observe local enrichment of the lava in Cl resulting from the incorporation of a brine phase separated from the seawater. We suggest that high eruption rates are necessary for seawater incorporation to occur, but the mechanism by which seawater enters the flow has yet to be

  5. Owyhee River intracanyon lava flows: does the river give a dam?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Lisa L.; Brossy, Cooper C.; House, P. Kyle; Safran, Elizabeth B.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Champion, Duane E.; Fenton, Cassandra R.; Bondre, Ninad R.; Orem, Caitlin A.; Grant, Gordon E.; Henry, Christopher D.; Turrin, Brent D.

    2013-01-01

    Rivers carved into uplifted plateaus are commonly disrupted by discrete events from the surrounding landscape, such as lava flows or large mass movements. These disruptions are independent of slope, basin area, or channel discharge, and can dominate aspects of valley morphology and channel behavior for many kilometers. We document and assess the effects of one type of disruptive event, lava dams, on river valley morphology and incision rates at a variety of time scales, using examples from the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon. Six sets of basaltic lava flows entered and dammed the river canyon during two periods in the late Cenozoic ca. 2 Ma–780 ka and 250–70 ka. The dams are strongly asymmetric, with steep, blunt escarpments facing up valley and long, low slopes down valley. None of the dams shows evidence of catastrophic failure; all blocked the river and diverted water over or around the dam crest. The net effect of the dams was therefore to inhibit rather than promote incision. Once incision resumed, most of the intracanyon flows were incised relatively rapidly and therefore did not exert a lasting impact on the river valley profile over time scales >106 yr. The net long-term incision rate from the time of the oldest documented lava dam, the Bogus Rim lava dam (≤1.7 Ma), to present was 0.18 mm/yr, but incision rates through or around individual lava dams were up to an order of magnitude greater. At least three lava dams (Bogus Rim, Saddle Butte, and West Crater) show evidence that incision initiated only after the impounded lakes filled completely with sediment and there was gravel transport across the dams. The most recent lava dam, formed by the West Crater lava flow around 70 ka, persisted for at least 25 k.y. before incision began, and the dam was largely removed within another 35 k.y. The time scale over which the lava dams inhibit incision is therefore directly affected by both the volume of lava forming the dam and the time required for sediment

  6. Reconstruction of lava fields based on 3D and conventional images. Arenal volcano, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, S.; Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    Conventional air photographs, multi-spectral images and a map scale 1:10 000 were used to upgrade Arenal volcano's lava field. Arenal volcano located in NW Costa Rica has been active for 39 years. Fifty two days after the initial explosive events that opened three craters on the west flank, lava flows were erupted from crater A (1050 m) in September, 1968 and continued flowing until November, 1973. These lavas were the most voluminous of the eruption and the effusion rate of lava was relatively high in this period. In April, 1974 lava flows were erupted from crater C (1460 m) and continue to present time. Younger lava flows extended over uncovered ground to the south and southwest in the 1980s and early 1990s and onto the northern slopes in the 1990s and 2000s. Lava flows are becoming shorter and narrower with time. Therefore, the centre of mass of the whole lava flow-field has migrated closer to the vent. Above crater C a cone has been growing steadily, reaching a height of 1670 m, 36 m higher than the prehistoric Arenal cone by 2004. After 39 years of continuous emission of lava flows, the profile of Arenal volcano consists of a duplet of cones whose summits are separated by less than 500 meters. Most of the build up around the new cone comes from varied lava flows. For near 30 years volcano monitoring staff (from OVSICORI-UNA) has recorded field observations of regular and extraordinary events, in paper. Several drafts maps have been used for teaching, academic presentations and for graphic explanations to specific audiences and to the general public. An upgraded version was needed. The purpose of this work is to present the most recent lava flows giving a visual presentation of them by computer methods. Combined SIG techniques (Arc View 3.3) and ERDAS produced a base map in which layers containing the recorded lava flows from the recent 16 years, were depicted. Each lava flow has its own characteristics: direction, year of origin, width, length, surface texture

  7. Lava flow hazard at Nyiragongo Volcano, DRC. 2. Hazard reduction in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Giuseppe D.; Favalli, Massimiliano; Papale, Paolo; Boschi, Enzo; Pareschi, Maria Teresa; Mamou-Mani, Arthur

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Nyiragongo is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world for the risk associated with the propagation of lava flows. In 2002 several vents opened along a huge system of fractures, pouring out lava which reached and destroyed a considerable part of Goma, a town of about 500,000 inhabitants on the shore of Lake Kivu. In a companion paper (Favalli et al. in Bull Volcanol, this issue, 2008) we employed numerical simulations of probable lava flow paths to evaluate the lava flow hazard on the flanks of the volcano, including the neighbouring towns of Goma (DRC) and Gisenyi (Rwanda). In this paper we use numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of significantly reducing the lava flow hazard in the city through the construction of protective barriers. These barriers are added to the DEM of the area as additional morphological elements, and their effect is evaluated by repeating numerical simulations with and without the presence of barriers. A parametric study on barrier location, size, shape and orientation led to the identification of barriers which maximize protection while minimizing their impact. This study shows that the highest hazard area corresponding to eastern Goma, which was largely destroyed by lava flows in 2002, cannot be effectively protected from future lava flows towards Lake Kivu and should be abandoned. On the contrary, the rest of the town can be sheltered from lava flows by means of two barriers that deviate or contain the lava within the East Goma sector. A proposal for the future development of the town is formulated, whereby “new” Goma is completely safe from the arrival of lava flows originating from vents outside its boundaries. The proposal minimizes the risk of further destruction in town due to future lava flows.

  8. Lava flow hazard at Nyiragongo volcano, D.R.C.. 1. Model calibration and hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, Massimiliano; Chirico, Giuseppe D.; Papale, Paolo; Pareschi, Maria Teresa; Boschi, Enzo

    2009-05-01

    The 2002 eruption of Nyiragongo volcano constitutes the most outstanding case ever of lava flow in a big town. It also represents one of the very rare cases of direct casualties from lava flows, which had high velocities of up to tens of kilometer per hour. As in the 1977 eruption, which is the only other eccentric eruption of the volcano in more than 100 years, lava flows were emitted from several vents along a N-S system of fractures extending for more than 10 km, from which they propagated mostly towards Lake Kivu and Goma, a town of about 500,000 inhabitants. We assessed the lava flow hazard on the entire volcano and in the towns of Goma (D.R.C.) and Gisenyi (Rwanda) through numerical simulations of probable lava flow paths. Lava flow paths are computed based on the steepest descent principle, modified by stochastically perturbing the topography to take into account the capability of lava flows to override topographic obstacles, fill topographic depressions, and spread over the topography. Code calibration and the definition of the expected lava flow length and vent opening probability distributions were done based on the 1977 and 2002 eruptions. The final lava flow hazard map shows that the eastern sector of Goma devastated in 2002 represents the area of highest hazard on the flanks of the volcano. The second highest hazard sector in Goma is the area of propagation of the western lava flow in 2002. The town of Gisenyi is subject to moderate to high hazard due to its proximity to the alignment of fractures active in 1977 and 2002. In a companion paper (Chirico et al., Bull Volcanol, in this issue, 2008) we use numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of reducing lava flow hazard through the construction of protective barriers, and formulate a proposal for the future development of the town of Goma.

  9. Crystallization of tholeiitic basalt in Alae Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, D.L.; Wright, T.L.; Moore, J.G.

    1966-01-01

    The eruption of Kilauea Volcano August 21-23, 1963, left 600,000 cubic meters of basaltic lava in a lava lake as much as 15 meters deep in Alae pit crater. Field studies of the lake began August 27 and include repeated core drilling, measurements of temperature in the crust and melt, and precise level surveys of the lake surface. The last interstitial melt in the lake solidified late in September 1964; by mid August 1965 the maximum temperature was 690??C at a depth of 11.5 meters. Pumice air-quenched from about 1140??C contains only 5 percent crystals - clinopyroxene, cuhedral olivine (Fo 80), and a trace of plagioclase, (An 70). Drill cores taken from the zone of crystallization in the lake show that olivine continued crystallizing to about 1070??C; below that it reacts with the melt, becoming corroded and mantled by pyroxene and plagioclase. Below 1070??C, pyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at a constant ratio. Ilmenite first appeared at about 1070??C and was joined by magnetite at about 1050??C; both increased rapidly in abundance to 1000??C. Apatite first appeared as minute needles in interstitial glass at 1000??C. Both the abundance and index of refraction of glass quenched from melt decreased nearly linearly with falling temperature. At 1070??C the quenched lava contains about 65 percent dark-brown glass with an index of 1.61; at 980??C it contains about 8 percent colorless glass with an index of 1.49. Below 980??C, the percentage of glass remained constant. Progressive crystallization forced exsolution of gases from the melt fraction; these formed vesicles and angular pores, causing expansion of the crystallizing lava and lifting the surface of the central part of the lake an average of 19.5 cm. The solidified basalt underwent pneumatolitic alteration, including deposition of cristobalite at 800??C, reddish alteration of olivine at 700??C, tarnishing of ilmenite at 550??C, deposition of anhydrite at 250??C, and deposition of native sulfur at 100??C

  10. Emplacement conditions of the 1256 AD Al-Madinah lava flow field in Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Insights from surface morphology and lava flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Moufti, Mohammed R.; Cappello, Annalisa; Murcia, Hugo; Ganci, Gaetana; Del Negro, Ciro; Procter, Jonathan; Zahran, Hani Mahmoud Ali

    2016-01-01

    Lava flow hazard modelling requires detailed geological mapping, and a good understanding of emplacement settings and the processes involved in the formation of lava flows. Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, is a large volcanic field, comprising about 1000 predominantly small-volume volcanoes most of which have emitted lava flows of various lengths. A few eruptions took place in this area during the Holocene, and they were located in the northern extreme of the Harrat Rahat, a close proximity to critical infrastructure and population living in Al-Madinah City. In the present study, we combined field work, high resolution digital topography and morphometric analysis to infer the emplacement history of the last historical event in the region represented by the 1256 AD Al-Madinah lava flow field. These data were also used to simulate 1256 AD-type lava flows in the Harrat Rahat by the MAGFLOW lava flow emplacement model, which is able to relate the flow evolution to eruption conditions. The 1256 AD lava flow field extent was mapped at a scale of 1:1000 from a high resolution (0.5 m) Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) Digital Terrain Model (DTM), aerial photos with field support. The bulk volume of the lava flow field was estimated at 0.4 km3, while the source volume represented by seven scoria cone was estimated at 0.023 km3. The lava flow covered an area of 60 km2 and reached a maximum length of 23.4 km. The lava flow field comprises about 20.9% of pāhoehoe, 73.8% of 'a'ā, and 5.3% of late-stage outbreaks. Our field observation, also suggests that the lava flows of the Harrat Rahat region are mainly core-dominated and that they formed large lava flow fields by amalgamation of many single channels. These channels mitigated downslope by topography-lava flow and channel-channel interactions, highlighting this typical process that needs to be considered in the volcanic hazard assessment in the region. A series of numerical lava flow simulations was carried out