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Sample records for lawsonia intracellularis antigen

  1. A novel Lawsonia intracellularis autotransporter protein is a prominent antigen.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Clark, Ewan M; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Porter, Megan; Imrie, Lisa; McLean, Kevin; Manson, Erin; Lainson, Alex; Smith, David G E

    2011-08-01

    Investigation of antigenic determinants of the microaerophilic obligate intracellular bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis using a mass spectrometry approach identified a novel bacterial protein present in an extract of cell culture medium aspirated from heavily infected in vitro cell cultures. Western immunoblotting analysis of SDS-PAGE-resolved proteins using immune sera pooled from L. intracellularis-infected pigs revealed the presence of a strongly immunoreactive band of ∼ 72 kDa. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of this component and database mining using a fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequence and the comprehensive GenBank prokaryotic genomic database highlighted the presence of a protein that shares little sequence similarity with other prokaryotic proteins and appears to be highly species specific. Detailed bioinformatic analyses identified the protein as member of the autotransporter protein family of surface-exposed proteins, and the designation LatA (Lawsonia autotransporter protein A) is suggested. Recognition of recombinant LatA on Western blots by a panel of sera from infected and control pigs corresponded 100% with a commercial serodiagnostic that relies on in vitro culture of this fastidious organism. LatA therefore represents a potential candidate for the development of a rapid and species-specific serodiagnostic reagent. PMID:21697340

  2. Lawsonia intracellularis proliferative enteropathy in a foal.

    PubMed

    Feary, D J; Gebhart, C J; Pusterla, N

    2007-03-01

    A weanling foal was diagnosed with proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis based on history, clinical findings of depression, anorexia, weight loss, colic, diarrhea, and ventral edema, and a combination of serology and fecal PCR. An epidemiological investigation on the premises revealed that many of the other foals and adult horses were seropositive for L. intracellularis, despite being clinically normal, and identified a dog as a potential carrier and source of infection for the foal. The foal was successfully treated with a combination of azithromycin and rifampin. PMID:17410971

  3. The seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in horses in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kranenburg, L C; van Ree, H E M I; Calis, A N M; de Pater, M; Buter, G J; van Maanen, C; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaarn, M M

    2011-04-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis is an emerging disease of weanling foals and affects their growth and development. The prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in The Netherlands is not known. The aim of the study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in horses in The Netherlands. Blood samples were taken from healthy foals before and after weaning and from healthy yearlings and mature horses on farms throughout The Netherlands. These samples were analysed for the presence of Lawsonia intracellularis-specific antibodies with a blocking ELISA. White blood cell count, packed cell volume, and total protein concentration were also measured in all foals. Information regarding housing, pasture access, and contact with pig manure on the premises was obtained for all animals. The prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in foals increased significantly from 15% before weaning to 23% after weaning (p = 0.019); it was 89% in yearlings and 99% in horses older than 2 years. There was no significant difference in seroprevalence between the pasture-kept and stable-confined adult horses (97% and 100%, respectively), and there was no significant influence of contact with pig manure. None of the sampled animals showed clinical disease. In conclusion, the results suggest that Lawsonia intracellularis is widespread in The Netherlands and that seropositivity is not necessarily associated with clinical problems. The high seroprevalence in adult horses suggests long-term persistence of antibodies against Lawsonia intracellularis or constant exposure to the bacterium. PMID:21528618

  4. Lawsonia intracellularis and equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Page, Allen E; Slovis, Nathan M; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the etiologic agent for equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE), which typically affects weanling and yearling horses. In North America, EPE cases often occur between August and January, although cases outside of this time frame have been reported. Clinical signs of EPE are usually nonspecific and include lethargy, pyrexia, anorexia, peripheral edema, weight loss, colic, and diarrhea. Diagnosis is based on the presence of hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia along with clinical signs and positive commercial serologic and/or molecular testing. Treatment requires the use of antimicrobials with good intracellular penetration and supportive care to prevent or decrease secondary complications. PMID:25300636

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in tissue sections from pigs.

    PubMed

    Szczotka, A; Stadejek, T; Zmudzki, J; Nowak, A; Osiński, Z; Pejsak, Z

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an immunohistochemical method (IHC) for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis (L. intracellularis) in formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded sections of intestines from pigs and to implement this method in differential diagnosis of swine diseases with diarrhea in postweaning pigs. The study was conducted on 165 sections of intestines (ileum, caecum and colon) collected from 76 pigs, representing 42 Polish pig farms. The animals included in the analysis suffered from diarrhea, with bloody or grey to brown feces, and were suspected of porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE). Sections of intestines were analyzed for the presence of L. intracellularis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and IHC. Among 165 intestinal samples from pigs with diarrhea, L. intracellularis DNA was detected by PCR in 33 (20.0%) samples. In this group, 30 samples (18.2% of all the samples tested) were also found positive in IHC, while only 3 (1.8%) were IHC-negative. One hundred thirty-two (80.0%) samples were negative in both tests. The PCR- and IHC-positive samples originated from 11 pigs, 4- to 20-week old, from 8 farms. L. intracellularis antigen was visualized by IHC mostly in intestinal crypts and/or in mononuclear cells of the lamina propria). The positive signal in epithelial cells was observed close to the luminal borders, creating typical specifically stained rims around the crypt lumina. The results of the present study further confirm the usefulness of IHC in the detection of L. intracellularis antigen in the intestinal tissues. PMID:22439321

  6. An alternative method for cultivation of Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Gebhart, Connie J

    2012-03-01

    An alternative method for the cultivation of Lawsonia intracellularis, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy, was developed using an Original Space Bag inflated with a mixture of gas containing 10% hydrogen, 10% carbon dioxide, and 80% nitrogen. The flexibility of this protocol allows the testing of various environmental conditions for static cultivation of this bacterium and the development of diagnostic techniques. PMID:22219308

  7. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of Lawsonia intracellularis infections.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, F A; Gebhart, C J

    2014-03-01

    Proliferative enteropathy is an infectious disease caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis, and characterized by thickening of the intestinal epithelium due to enterocyte proliferation. The disease is endemic in swine herds and has been occasionally reported in various other species. Furthermore, outbreaks among foals began to be reported on breeding farms worldwide within the past 5 years. Cell proliferation is directly associated with bacterial infection and replication in the intestinal epithelium. As a result, mild to severe diarrhea is the major clinical sign described in infected animals. The dynamics of L. intracellularis infection in vitro and in vivo have been well characterized, but little is known about the genetic basis for the pathogenesis or ecology of this organism. The present review focuses on the recent advances regarding the pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction of L. intracellularis infections. PMID:24476941

  8. Lawsonia intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in foals.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Gebhart, Connie

    2013-11-29

    Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) is a disease of foals caused by the obligate intracellular organism Lawsonia intracellularis. This organism is unique in that it causes proliferation of infected enterocytes, resulting in thickening of the intestinal epithelium, most often the small intestine. This disease affects mainly weanling foals and causes fever, lethargy, peripheral edema, diarrhea, colic and weight loss. The diagnosis of EPE may be challenging and relies on the presence of hypoproteinemia, thickening of segments of the small intestinal wall observed on abdominal ultrasonography, positive serology and molecular detection of L. intracellularis in feces. The epidemiology and genetic basis for pathogenesis for this disease is beginning to be elucidated. Phenotypic traits, genomic features, and gene expression profiles during L. intracellularis infection in vitro and in vivo are presented. In addition, this article reviews the epidemiology, pathological and clinicopathological findings, diagnosis, and control of EPE. PMID:23871678

  9. Lawsonia intracellularis and Porcine Circovirus type-2 infection in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Järveots, T; Saar, T; Põdersoo, D; Rüütel-Boudinot, S; Sütt, S; Tummeleht, L; Suuroja, T; Lindjärv, R

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the reasons of post-weaning distress in Estonian pig herds. Here we examined the natural cases of Lawsonia intracellularis and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) infection and co-infections. The presence of L. intracellularis in swine herds were tested by PCR and by histopathological methods, whereas PCV2 was detected by real-time-PCR and immunohistochemical stainings. Seven of the 11 investigated herds with signs of post-weaning wasting were infected with L. intracellularis and all 11 herds with PCV2. From the analysed samples 22.2% were infected with L. intracellularis and 25% with PCV2. The results of microbiological studies suggested that the piglets suffered from enteritis and pneumonia. Escherichia coli and Pasteurella multocida often aggravated the process of illness. The frequency of L. intracellularis was high in pigs 7-12 weeks old (18.5-42.7%) and PCV2 infection was too high in pigs 7-12 weeks old (24.8-32.7%). E. coli was often a co-factor with L. intracellularis and PCV2. The primary reasons of post weaning wasting were PCV2 and E. coli, later aggravated by L. intracellularis and other pathogens. Our results indicated that different pathogens have an important role in developing post-weaning wasting. Proliferative intestinal inflammation caused by L. intracellularis is mainly characterised by its localization and morphological findings. The main gross lesions were the enlargement of mesenteric lymph nodes and thickening of the wall of ileum. In post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome there are characteristic histological lesions in lymphoid tissues. They consist of a variable degree of lymphocyte depletion, together with histiocytic and/or multinucleate giant cell infiltration. This basic lymphoid lesions is observable in almost all tissues of a single severely affected animal, including lymph nodes, Peyer's patches and spleen. Sporadically, multifocal coagulative necrosis may be observed. PMID:27487502

  10. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control. PMID:25457368

  11. Primary infection protects pigs against re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis in experimental challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Riber, Ulla; Cordes, Henriette; Boutrup, Torsten S; Jensen, Tim K; Heegaard, Peter M H; Jungersen, Gregers

    2011-05-01

    In two separate trials pigs were experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis at 5-6 weeks of age followed by antibiotic treatment and resolution of the primary infection and then re-inoculated at 12-13 weeks of age. A treatment-control group of pigs received the primary infection and antibiotic treatment only, and served as control for the antibiotic treatment of the primary infection. A challenge-control group of pigs received the second inoculation dose only at 12-13 weeks of age to control infectivity of the challenge-dose and susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis at this age. Pigs were monitored for shedding of L. intracellularis in faeces by PCR, and for the development of antibodies and responses of acute phase proteins in serum. The presence of L. intracellularis antigen in the intestinal mucosa was examined in post mortem samples by immunohistochemistry. In both trials primary infected pigs were protected from infection after challenge inoculation as evidenced by absence of faecal shedding of L. intracellularis, lack of changes in acute phase protein concentrations after challenge and with low levels of bacterial antigen in the intestinal mucosa of re-inoculated pigs comparable to that of the treatment-control pigs. In contrast, challenge-control pigs shed L. intracellularis in faeces, had L. intracellularis antigen extensively present within all layers of the intestinal mucosa and developed a significant acute phase protein response in serum after the experimental infection. The acute phase protein response to L. intracellularis infection was detected as an increased rise in the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and haptoglobin from day-6 post infection, and increased serum concentrations of haptoglobin were generally seen 2-3 weeks after inoculation both at 5-6 and 12-13 weeks of age. In conclusion substantial protection against L. intracellularis infection was found in the re-inoculated pigs in contrast to the development of

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Experimental Use in Detection of Antibodies to Lawsonia intracellularis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, J. J.; Eichmeyer, M. A.; Schaeffer, M. L.; McOrist, S.; Harris, D. L.; Roof, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Lawsonia intracellularis was developed and compared with a whole-cell antigen-based immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT). The antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was derived from Percoll gradient purified cultures of L. intracellularis by using a modification of the Westphal hot phenol procedure. The antigen was bound directly to polystyrene 96-well microtiter plates, and the assay was performed in an indirect ELISA format. Specificity and sensitivity values based on 80 known positive and 80 known negative serum samples from controlled experimental trials were 93.7% and 88.7%, respectively. Serological results from a controlled L. intracellularis challenge exposure study confirmed the high specificity and sensitivity of this assay (100% and 99.5%, respectively). Comparisons between the LPS ELISA and the IFAT in detecting anti-Lawsonia antibodies in this controlled study revealed significantly more LPS ELISA-positive pigs than IFAT-positive pigs on days 21, 28, 35, and 42 (P = 0.003, 0.030, 0.002, and 0.006, respectively). This indirect ELISA (LPS ELISA) test is an improved method of detecting antibodies in pigs soon after exposure to L. intracellularis, regardless of isolate type (vaccine or wild type) in experimental studies. The LPS ELISA may be used as a tool to support future research trials on vaccine efficacy and to further understand the immune response induced by L. intracellularis. PMID:15939742

  13. Evidence of host adaptation in Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy, an endemic disease in pigs and an emerging concern in horses. Enterocyte hyperplasia is a common lesion in every case but there are differences regarding clinical and pathological presentations among affected species. We hypothesize that host susceptibility to L. intracellularis infection depends on the species of origin of the bacterial isolate. The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of pigs and horses to L. intracellularis infection using either a porcine or an equine isolate. Materials and methods Twelve foals and eighteen pigs were equally divided into three groups and infected with either a porcine or an equine isolate (109L. Intracellularis/challenged animal), and a saline solution (negative control group). The animals were monitored regarding clinical signs, average of daily weight gain, fecal shedding of the bacteria by PCR and humoral serological response. Results Foals infected with the equine isolate developed moderate to severe clinical signs and maintained a lower average of weight gain compared to control foals. Fecal quantitative PCR in equine isolate-infected foals revealed higher amounts of bacterial DNA associated with longer duration of shedding compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. All four foals infected with the equine isolate demonstrated higher IgG titers in the serum compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. In the pig trial, diarrhea and seroconversion were only observed in animals infected with the porcine isolate. Pathological changes typical of proliferative enteropathy were observed in the necropsied foal infected with equine isolate and in the two necropsied pigs infected with the porcine isolate. Conclusions Evident clinical signs, longer periods of bacterial shedding and stronger serologic immune responses were observed in animals infected with species-specific isolates. These results show that host

  14. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis. PMID:22247145

  15. Risk factors associated with Lawsonia intracellularis in English pig farms.

    PubMed

    Bae, J K; Wieland, B; Sait, M; Longbottom, D; Smith, D G E; Alarcon, P; Wheelhouse, N

    2013-09-01

    Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) caused by the bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis causes considerable economic loss to the pig industry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of L. intracellularis exposure in different age groups of pigs (growers to finishers) within English farms and to identify potential risk factors. Samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study of 147 farms between 2008 and 2009. Twelve samples (six growers and six finishers) from each farm were tested for L. intracellularis by antibody ELISA. At animal level there was a significant positive linear trend between seroprevalence and age in weeks (r(2)=2.65, P<0.001), with seroprevalence lowest (24.73%) at 11 weeks and highest (93.33%) at 24 weeks. At farm level, seroprevalence was significantly lower in growers than finishers (56.80% vs. 94.26%, P<0.001). Farms reporting minor Salmonella problems and those that brought boars onto the farm had higher odds of testing positive in growers (OR 5.69 and 4.31, respectively. On the other hand, farms where producers considered temperature as an important stress factor (OR=0.3) and which had more than two sites on which pigs are kept (OR=0.16) were less likely to test positive in growers. The current study confirmed the high prevalence of L. intracellularis in English pig farms. The potential risk factors and further information of the disease impact on the farm productivity will aid the development of appropriate control strategies through better understanding of the disease. PMID:23683854

  16. Evaluation of Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a group of pigs in a subclinically affected herd from weaning to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Daniel; Kaim, Ute; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Wendt, Michael

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to follow the course of a subclinical Lawsonia (L.) intracellularis infection in a group of 60 pigs on a commercial farm from weaning to slaughter. From 6 to 16 and at 26 weeks of age, rectal faecal samples and blood samples were collected weekly from every pig for examination by PCR and blocking ELISA, respectively. At corresponding times starting at 8 weeks of age, pigs were randomly selected for necropsy (n=51). Intestinal tissues were examined histopathologically and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for L. intracellularis antigen. Infection with L. intracellularis showed a mainly subclinical course. Shedding of L. intracellularis was detected by PCR in three pigs as early as 6 weeks of age and persisted up until 14 weeks of age. In most pigs shedding of L. intracellularis was seen only for 1-2 weeks followed by a rapid serum antibody response. More than 50% of pigs had seroconverted by week 10. At slaughter, 30.8% of investigated animals were still found to be seropositive by ELISA. Of the 60 study animals 39 were found positive by faeces PCR (65.0%), 49 animals were found positive by serology (81.7%), and 35 pigs (68.6%) had positive results by IHC at necropsy. All but one pig were found to be L. intracellularis infected by at least one of the three methods (98.3%). In conclusion, this is the first field study revealing the presence of prominent histological lesions characteristic for L. intracellularis infection and associated positive pathogen specific PCR and immunohistological results even in subclinically infected pigs. Although intestinal alterations disappeared after 3-4 weeks, L. intracellularis was detected by IHC for a longer time, especially in intestinal lymph nodes. PMID:20605375

  17. Association between faecal load of lawsonia intracellularis and pathological findings of proliferative enteropathy in pigs with diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study was designed to investigate correlation between histological findings of Lawsonia intracellularis in porcine cases of diarrhoea and the quantitative detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in faeces. A total of 156 pigs (10 to 70 days post weaning) with diarrhoea were randomly selected from 20 herds: The pigs were subjected to necropsy, histopathology, immunohistochemistry and faecal quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis by real time PCR. Results The median Lawsonia intracellularis excretion was significantly higher in pigs with gross lesions of proliferative enteropathy (median excretion: 5.92 log10 bacteria/g faeces) compared to pigs without gross lesions of proliferative enteropathy (median excretion: <3.3 log10 bacteria/g faeces) (P<0.001). Spearman’s correlation coefficient between the measureable PE lesions and L. intracellularis excretion was 0.50 (P<0.001). A significantly increasing trend in Lawsonia intracellularis excretion level for increasing proliferative enteropathy histopathology and immunohistochemistry scores was demonstrated (P<0.001; P<0.001). Spearman’s correlation coefficient between the histopathology scores and L. intracellularis excretion was 0.67 (P<0.001). Spearman’s correlation coefficient between the IHC scores and L. intracellularis excretion was 0.77 (P<0.001). Conclusions The histological and quantitative PCR detection of Lawsonia intracellularis were correlated in pigs with diarrhoea. Overall the results suggest that clinically important levels for Lawsonia intracellularis excretion in faeces may be established. Such clinical threshold levels may be used in practice to confirm a diagnosis of Lawsonia intracellularis associated diarrhoea. PMID:23092367

  18. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis G.; ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D.; Tatiersky, Laetitia; DeLay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  19. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Luis G; Ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D; Tatiersky, Laetitia; Delay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-09-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  20. Transmission of Lawsonia intracellularis to weanling foals using feces from experimentally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, N; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, D; Vannucci, F A; Mapes, S; White, A; DiFrancesco, M; Gebhart, C

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether feces from rabbits experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis were infectious to foals. Two rabbits were infected with L. intracellularis, while two rabbits served as controls. Eight foals received daily feces from either the infected or the control rabbits. All rabbits and foals were monitored daily for clinical signs for the entire study period (21days for rabbits, 42days for foals). Feces and blood were collected for the PCR detection of L. intracellularis and serologic analysis, respectively. None of the infected rabbits or foals developed clinical signs compatible with proliferative enteropathy. All infected rabbits and foals shed L. intracellularis in their feces and all seroconverted. The results support the role of rabbits as asymptomatic amplifiers of L. intracellularis and their role as sources of infection for susceptible foals. PMID:22841447

  1. Genome Sequence of Lawsonia intracellularis Strain N343, Isolated from a Sow with Hemorrhagic Proliferative Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sait, Michelle; Aitchison, Kevin; Wheelhouse, Nick; Wilson, Kim; Lainson, F Alex; Longbottom, David; Smith, David G E

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE), causing mild or acute hemorrhagic diarrhea in infected animals. Here we report the genome sequence of strain N343, isolated from a sow that died of hemorrhagic PE. N343 contains 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 90 indels compared to the reference strain PHE/MN1-00. PMID:23472224

  2. Genome Sequence of Lawsonia intracellularis Strain N343, Isolated from a Sow with Hemorrhagic Proliferative Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sait, Michelle; Aitchison, Kevin; Wheelhouse, Nick; Wilson, Kim; Lainson, F. Alex; Longbottom, David

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE), causing mild or acute hemorrhagic diarrhea in infected animals. Here we report the genome sequence of strain N343, isolated from a sow that died of hemorrhagic PE. N343 contains 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 90 indels compared to the reference strain PHE/MN1-00. PMID:23472224

  3. Attenuation of virulence of Lawsonia intracellularis after in vitro passages and its effects on the experimental reproduction of porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Beckler, Dana; Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha M; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-02-22

    Non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis variants have been obtained through multiple passages in cell culture but there is no information regarding the number of passages necessary to attenuate a pathogenic isolate. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis after 10, 20 and 40 passages in vitro. Three groups (six animals/group) were inoculated with pure culture of L. intracellularis on passage 10, 20 or 40 and one group with placebo. The animals were monitored for clinical signs, fecal shedding and serological IgG response during 28 days post-inoculation. Gross and histologic lesions and the level of infection based on the amount of L. intracellularis-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa identified by immunohistochemistry were evaluated in two animals from each group on days 14, 21 and 28. Animals inoculated with passages 10 and 20 demonstrated proliferative lesions typical of porcine proliferative enteropathy associated with the presence of Lawsonia-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa. Passage 40-inoculated pigs did not show proliferative lesions or presence of Lawsonia antigen at any time point throughout the study. Similar patterns of the fecal shedding were observed in passage 10 and 20-infected pigs but those infected with passage 40 shed for a short period. Serological IgG responses in passage 10 and 20-inoculated pigs were detected from day 14 post-infection but not at all in passage 40-inoculated animals. These results demonstrate attenuation of the virulence properties of L. intracellularis between 20 and 40 cell passages in vitro. This information will be valuable for design of future experimental models and for studying the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of L. intracellularis virulence. PMID:22939985

  4. Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (L. intracellularis) is a major concern to the pig industry worldwide. Although 8.3 billion pigs are produced each year in China, few reports on the prevalence of L.intracellularis infection are available. The aim of the current study was to estimate the seroprevalence of L. intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China. Results A total of 1060 serum samples were collected from 14 commercial pig farms located throughout China. Animals from all age groups were sampled including pre-weaning piglets, weaners, fattening pigs, adult sows and boars. Antibodies against L. intracellularis were detected using a specific blocking ELISA. Of the 1060 serum samples, 602 were identified as positive using the ELISA test. The apparent seroprevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity was 57% (95% CI 50 to 64%). The true prevalence (that is, prevalence corrected for the imperfect sensitivity and specificity of the testing method) was 77% (95% CI 70 to 83%). Conclusions The highest true prevalence was observed in sows and boars, suggesting that within a herd these stock classes are a reservoir for infection. The prevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity in local breed pigs was significantly less than that in imported breeds. A higher seroprevalence was found in pigs in herds in Central and Northern China, which may correspond to the greater use of the intensive production systems in these areas. We conclude that L. intracellularis is widely prevalent in commercial pigs in China. PMID:24774304

  5. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne T; Nguyen, Lien T M; Jungersen, Gregers

    2011-02-15

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in vitro assay for a direct read-out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evaluate for less severe or immunocompromising infections. Here we investigated the performance of the assay when recombinant co-stimulatory cytokines IL-12 and/or IL-18 were added along with Ag or PBS to cultures of whole-blood from pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis. In pigs recovering from a natural infection, addition of rIL-12 or rIL-18 alone increased the Ag-specific IFN-γ release while addition of both cytokines resulted in increased IFN-γ release also in PBS cultures. In analyses after experimental infections with L. intracellularis, significant increased levels of Ag-specific IFN-γ production were measured in Ag+rIL-18 cultures from infected pigs compared to the background response in PBS+rIL-18 control samples (p<0.01) or to Ag+rIL-18 cultures from non-inoculated control pigs (p<0.05). Flow cytometry identified two lymphocyte subsets as the Ag-specific IFN-γ producers. The highest IFN-γ production was by CD4(+)CD8(+) cells while a more numerous population of CD4(-)CD8(+) cells produced lower amounts of IFN-γ in response to rIL-18 and L. intracellularis Ag. PMID:20889217

  6. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms. PMID:21349664

  7. Immunological responses to vaccination following experimental Lawsonia intracellularis virulent challenge in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M G; Collins, A M; Donahoo, M; Emery, D

    2013-05-31

    Although a live attenuated vaccine has been used extensively to provide immunity against porcine proliferative enteropathy (PE) caused by Lawsonia intracellularis, the nature of the protective response is an area of considerable interest for the control of PE. Two trials investigated immune responses in pigs after oral and intramuscular (IM) vaccination followed by virulent L. intracellularis challenge. After an oral vaccination with 10(5.9) TCID50 organisms, significantly increased serum and mucosal secretions of IgM, IgG and higher mucosal TNF-α and TGF-β1 were detected by day 17, together with a trend towards higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-6. Pigs vaccinated IM produced elevated serum antibody titres but mucosal immune responses were not detected. After challenge with virulent L. intracellularis, non-vaccinated control pigs had higher PE lesion scores and excreted significantly higher numbers of L. intracellularis in faeces than the vaccinated pigs. Reduced intestinal pathology and faecal L. intracellularis shedding were evident in the vaccinated groups. The results indicated that protection was associated with mucosal cytokine and specific IgG and IgA responses after vaccination and that systemic antibody responses were boosted following challenge. However in the search for an immune correlate with protection, a causal association was not evident from a kinetic analysis of immune parameters in serum, ileal pathology and faecal shedding. PMID:23478250

  8. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated proliferative enteritis in weanling foals in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van den Wollenberg, L; Butler, C M; Houwers, D J; de Grootv, M W; Panhuijzen, H; van Maanen, C; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M Sloet

    2011-08-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) is an emerging infectious enteric disease caused by the obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis. EPE was tentatively diagnosed in six weanling foals, aged between 5 and 7 months. Clinical signs included depression, anorexia, ventral oedema, and weight loss. Plasma biochemistry consistently revealed severe hypoproteinaemia. The ante-mortem diagnosis of EPE was based on clinical signs, hypoproteinaemia (6/6), the detection of moderate-to-high titres of L. intracellularis antibody (6/6), and severe thickening of the small intestinal wall on ultrasonography (2/2), or L. intracellularis detected in faeces by PCR (I/2). The first foal died despite treatment and at post-mortem examination the tentative diagnosis was EPE. Three foals from the same farm, which showed similar clinical symptoms were treated with azithromycin and rifampicin; two survived. Post-mortem examination of the foal that died confirmed the tentative clinical diagnosis of EPE on the basis of the lesions found and the detection of L. intracellularis--DNA in the ileum and jejunum. The fifth foal died despite intensive treatment and the post-mortem examination revealed lymphohistiocytic enteritis, typhlitis, and widespread thrombosis in several organs. The sixth foal recovered completely after treatment. This report confirms the presence of clinical L. intracellularis infection in weanling foals in the Netherlands and shows the difficulty in reaching a definitive ante-mortem diagnosis. PMID:22111417

  9. Within-day repeatability for absolute quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis bacteria in feces from growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Pedersen, Klaus H; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Larsen, Lars Erik; Ståhl, Marie; Stege, Helle; Angen, Øystein; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2012-09-01

    Absolute quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is now possible on a routine basis. Poor repeatability of quantification can result in disease status misclassification of individual pigs when a single fecal sample is obtained. The objective of the current study was to investigate overall variation within a day for fecal numbers of L. intracellularis bacteria determined by real-time PCR in growing pigs. From each of 30 pigs with an infection of L. intracellularis, 5 fecal samples were collected within 1 day. A total of 150 fecal samples were obtained and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) testing. Mean fecal dry matter content was 14.3% (standard deviation = 4.5%). Two pigs (6.7%) alternated between being L. intracellularis qPCR positive and negative. For 28 pigs, the excreting levels of L. intracellularis were within the dynamic range of the qPCR assay at all sampling points. For these 28 pigs, the mean excretion level of L. intracellularis was 6.1 log(10) bacteria/g feces (standard deviation = 1.2 log(10) bacteria/g feces). The maximum observed difference between 2 fecal samples from the same pig was 1.1 log(10) bacteria/g feces. The average standard deviation for individual pigs was 0.27 log(10) bacteria/g feces. The average coefficient of variation within pigs was 0.04, ranging from 0.006 to 0.08. The results imply that absolute quantification of L. intracellularis by qPCR has acceptable repeatability within 1 day. However, a population-specific proportion of pigs alternating between positive and negative test results must be expected. PMID:22786973

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity against 10 North American and European Lawsonia intracellularis isolates.

    PubMed

    Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobials against 10 isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis, the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). Antimicrobials tested included carbadox, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, tiamulin, tylosin and valnemulin. The MIC of each antimicrobial against L. intracellularis was determined using a tissue culture system and was identified as the lowest concentration that inhibited 99% of L. intracellularis growth, as compared to the antimicrobial-free control. Each antimicrobial concentration was evaluated for both intracellular and extracellular activity against L. intracellularis, an obligately intracellular bacterium. When tested for intracellular activity, carbadox, tiamulin, and valnemulin were the most active antimicrobials with MICs of < or =0.5microg/ml. Tylosin (MICs ranging from 0.25 to 32microg/ml) and chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 64microg/ml) showed intermediate activities and lincomycin (MICs ranging from 8 to >128mIcog/ml) showed the least activity. When tested for extracellular activity, valnemulin (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 4microg/ml) was the most active against most L. intracellularis isolates. Chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 16 to 64microg/ml), tylosin (MICs ranging from 1 to >128microg/ml), and tiamulin (MICs ranging from 1 to 32microg/ml) showed intermediate activities. Lincomycin (MICs ranging from 32 to >128microg/ml) showed the least activity. Our in vitro results showed that each L. intracellularis isolate had a different antimicrobial sensitivity pattern and these data can be utilized as an in vitro guideline for the further antimicrobial evaluation of field L. intracellularis isolates. PMID:18823723

  11. Effect of the route of administration on the mucosal and systemic immune responses to Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M G; Collins, A M; Dunlop, R H; Emery, D

    2015-04-01

    In an on-farm study, 40 weaned piglets aged 3 weeks were vaccinated with Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine orally, IM or IP while a fourth group remained unvaccinated. All vaccinated animals showed increased serum levels of L. intracellularis-specific IgG antibodies, but significantly elevated concentrations of specific IgG, IgA and cytokines were generated in ileal mucosal secretions from the orally and IP vaccinated pigs when examined at 17 days after vaccination. PMID:25817978

  12. Evaluation of the field efficacy of an avirulent live Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in foals.

    PubMed

    Nogradi, N; Slovis, N M; Gebhart, C J; Wolfsdorf, K E; McCracken, J L; Scoggin, C F; Kass, P H; Mapes, S M; Toth, B; Lundquist, M L; Pusterla, N

    2012-06-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis is an emerging disease with as yet unaddressed preventative measures. The hypothesis of this study was that vaccination will prevent clinical and sub-clinical disease. Weanling Thoroughbreds (n=202) from Central Kentucky were randomly assigned into two groups (vaccinated and non-vaccinated). Vaccinated foals received 30 mL of an avirulent, live L. intracellularis vaccine intra-rectally twice, 30 days apart. Foals were monitored for clinical disease, total solids and average weight gain until yearling age. There was an overall decreased disease incidence on the farms involved in the study that did not differ significantly between the groups. This decreased disease prevalence in the study population may be associated with the ongoing vaccine trial on these farms, as disease prevalence in Central Kentucky did not change in 2009 compared to 2008. PMID:21741284

  13. Efficacy of gallium maltolate against Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Allen, A L; Alcorn, J; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S M; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-12-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy against Lawsonia intracellularis is difficult to evaluate in vitro, thus, the effects of gallium maltolate's (GaM) were investigated in a rabbit model for equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Juvenile (5-6-week-old) does were infected with 3.0 × 10(8) L. intracellularis/rabbit and allocated into three groups (n = 8). One week postinfection, one group was treated with GaM, 50 mg/kg; one, with doxycycline, 5 mg/kg; and one with a sham-treatment (control). Feces and blood were collected daily and weekly, respectively, to verify presence of L. intracellularis fecal shedding using qPCR, and seroconversion using immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. Rabbits were sacrificed after 1 week of treatment to collect intestinal tissues focusing on EPE-affected sections. Intestinal lesions were confirmed via immunohistochemistry. No difference was noted between treatments regarding EPE-lesions in jejunum (P = 0.51), ileum (P = 0.74), and cecum (P = 0.35), or in L. intracellularis fecal shedding (P = 0.64). GaM and doxycycline appear to have similar efficacy against EPE in infected rabbits. PMID:24730377

  14. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in pigs following primary and challenge-exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To investigate immune responses upon re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis, local and peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to primary and challenge inoculations were studied in 22 pigs. Pigs were orally inoculated with virulent L. intracellularis at the age of 5-6 weeks, treated with antibiotics and challenged with a re-inoculation (RE) at the age of 12 weeks. Treatment control (TC) pigs received only the primary inoculation and challenge control (CC) pigs received only the secondary inoculation at 12 weeks of age. Following this regimen, all RE pigs were protected against the re-infection as defined by reduced colonisation and pathology of intestinal mucosa, absence of bacterial shedding and without increase in serum acute phase protein response. In the protected RE pigs, serum IgG responses were variable with both high and low responders. Serum IgA responses were not boosted by the re-inoculation, since identical intestinal IgA responses developed in response to the inoculation in both the susceptible CC pigs and the protected RE pigs. A memory recall cell-mediated immune response developed in RE pigs which was significantly stronger compared to the primary response in age-matched CC pigs as assessed by whole blood IFN-γ assay and by calculation of IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) after flow cytometry. The major IFN-γ producing cells were identified as CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ double positive lymphocytes. The results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses are likely mediators of protective immunity against L. intracellularis, with CD8+ effector cells and CD4+CD8+ double positive memory T cells as main contributors to the antigen-specific IFN-γ production. PMID:22316065

  15. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in pigs following primary and challenge-exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Jensen, Tim K; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    To investigate immune responses upon re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis, local and peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to primary and challenge inoculations were studied in 22 pigs. Pigs were orally inoculated with virulent L. intracellularis at the age of 5-6 weeks, treated with antibiotics and challenged with a re-inoculation (RE) at the age of 12 weeks. Treatment control (TC) pigs received only the primary inoculation and challenge control (CC) pigs received only the secondary inoculation at 12 weeks of age. Following this regimen, all RE pigs were protected against the re-infection as defined by reduced colonisation and pathology of intestinal mucosa, absence of bacterial shedding and without increase in serum acute phase protein response. In the protected RE pigs, serum IgG responses were variable with both high and low responders. Serum IgA responses were not boosted by the re-inoculation, since identical intestinal IgA responses developed in response to the inoculation in both the susceptible CC pigs and the protected RE pigs. A memory recall cell-mediated immune response developed in RE pigs which was significantly stronger compared to the primary response in age-matched CC pigs as assessed by whole blood IFN-γ assay and by calculation of IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) after flow cytometry. The major IFN-γ producing cells were identified as CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ double positive lymphocytes. The results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses are likely mediators of protective immunity against L. intracellularis, with CD8+ effector cells and CD4+CD8+ double positive memory T cells as main contributors to the antigen-specific IFN-γ production. PMID:22316065

  16. Porcine proliferative enteropathy in Estonian pig herds: histopathology and detection of Lawsonia intracellularis by PCR.

    PubMed

    Järveots, Tönu; Saar, Tiiu; Lepp, Elbi; Suuroja, Toivo; Lindjärv, Raivo; Nathues, Heiko; Sütt, Silva; Põdersoo, Diivi

    2011-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteritis in pigs (PPE). This bacterium is difficult to culture from clinical samples and antemortem demonstration is therefore usually performed by PCR on faecal samples. The aim of this study was to elucidate the frequency of L. intracellularis infection in pig herds in Estonia using PCR, histopathological methods and electronmicroscopical studies. The frequency of demonstration of L. intracellularis was highest in 9-12 weeks old pigs (68.1%). It was more frequent in growing pigs with enteritis on small farms where the system of "all-in all-out" was not practiced and where standards of hygiene were poor. Gross and histopathological studies demonstrated that characteristic macroscopic changes associated with PPE were localised to the distal jejunum and ileum.Thickened longitudinal and circumferential folds occurred in the mucosa of the affected regions of the bowel. Samples from pigs aged 4 to 20 weeks exhibited the most intensive inflammatory changes. The distal part of the jejunum, ileum and the upper third of proximal colon and cecum wall were visibly thickened with reduced luminal diameter. Hyperplasia of lymphoid tissue and, in many cases, pseudomembranous or fibrinous inflammation was found. L. intracellularis was detected in 56 young pigs using histopathological methods. Additionally, in 8 of these pigs intracellular bacteria were demonstrated in ilial epithelial cells by transmission electronmicroscopical (TEM) investigation. On the basis of these TEM investigations it was concluded that L. intracellularis causes disturbances of normal growth, differentiation and apoptosis of the epithelial cells of ileum. PMID:21306056

  17. The critical threshold of Lawsonia intracellularis in pig faeces that causes reduced average daily weight gains in experimentally challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Alison M; Barchia, Idris M

    2014-01-31

    Serology indicates that Lawsonia intracellularis infection is widespread in many countries, with most pigs seroconverting before 22 weeks of age. However, the majority of animals appear to be sub-clinically affected, demonstrated by the low reported prevalence of diarrhoea. Production losses caused by sub-clinical proliferative enteropathy (PE) are more difficult to diagnose, indicating the need for a quantitative L. intracellularis assay that correlates well with disease severity. In previous studies, increasing numbers of L. intracellularis in pig faeces, quantified with a real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), showed a strong negative correlation with average daily gain (ADG). In this study, the association between faecal L. intracellularis numbers and PE severity was examined in two L. intracellularis experimental challenge trials (n1=32 and n2=95). The number of L. intracellularis shed in individual faeces was determined by qPCR on days 0, 7, 14, 17 and 21 days post challenge, and average daily gain was recorded over the same period. The severity of histopathological lesions of PE was scored at 21 days post challenge. L. intracellularis numbers correlated well with histopathology severity and faecal consistency scores (r=0.72 and 0.68, respectively), and negatively with ADG (r=-0.44). Large reductions in ADG (131 g/day) occurred when the number of L. intracellularis shed by experimentally challenged pigs increased from 10(7) to 10(8)L. intracellularis, although smaller ADG reductions were also observed (15 g/day) when the number of L. intracellularis increased from 10(6) to 10(7)L. intracellularis. PMID:24388631

  18. Further investigation of exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild and feral animals captured on horse properties with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild birds, mice, rabbits, raccoons, coyotes and squirrels, and feral cats and pigs on 10 farms with confirmed equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Serum samples from all resident foals (417 samples) as well as fecal (461) and serum (106) samples from wild and feral animals were collected for serological and molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. A total of three cats from two farms, three mice from two farms and eight cottontail rabbits from one farm had evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. These animals may be an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as a potential reservoir/amplifier host. PMID:22627048

  19. Interactions between dietary fibre, endo-parasites and Lawsonia intracellularis bacteria in grower-finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Pearce, G P

    1999-11-01

    Samples of faeces and feed were collected from grower and finisher pigs kept on 25 commercial breeder-finisher units in the West-Midlands region of England. Faecal samples were examined for parasite eggs (Ascaris suis, Trichuris suum and strongylid species) using faecal flotation; and for Lawsonia intracellularis bacteria using the polymerase chain reaction. Feed samples were subjected to proximate analysis for energy, protein and fibre content and enzymic colorimetry for levels of non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs). Characteristics relating to housing, feeding and dung disposal systems and husbandry practices were recorded for each farm and assessed for their association with the presence of parasites and L. intracellularis at the herd level. Ascaris eggs were identified in 8% of herds, Trichuris eggs in 20% of herds and in strongylid eggs (Oesophogostomum and/or Hyostrongylus) in 44% of herds. Lawsonia intracellularis was detected in 15% of herds investigated. Herds positive for Trichuris and Ascaris had significantly lower levels of digestible energy and higher levels of neutral detergent fibre, total and insoluble NSPs in their diets than negative herds (p < 0.05). Housing weaners on slatted floors was associated with a significant decreased risk of parasite infection in grower-finishers (odds ratio = 0.09, p = 0.04) compared to housing on solid floors. The use of grower diets high in NSPs was associated with an increased risk of Trichuris infection (odds ratio = 27.6, p = 0.007). There was also an association at the herd level between infection with L. intracellularis and the presence of Trichuris eggs (odds ratio = 17.43, p = 0.069). It is concluded that control of dietary fibre intake (NSPs in particular) for growers and environmental hygiene (dung removal) for weaners appear to be the most important factors controlling parasite infection in grower-finisher pigs in the UK at present. The current move towards more straw based systems is thus likely to

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of two Lawsonia intracellularis isolates associated with proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy and porcine intestinal adenomatosis in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-09-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  1. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  2. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  3. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  4. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Borewicz, Klaudyna A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  5. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D.; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  6. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-11-15

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  7. Characterization of the interferon gamma response to Lawsonia intracellularis using an equine proliferative enteropathy challenge (EPE) model.

    PubMed

    Page, A E; Loynachan, A T; Bryant, U; Stills, H F; Adams, A A; Gebhart, C J; Pusterla, N; Horohov, D W

    2011-09-15

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the etiological agent of infectious intestinal hyperplasia for which several clinical diseases have been described including proliferative enteropathy (PE), intestinal adenomatosis, and ileitis. While initially recognized as the causative agent of PE in pigs, L. intracellularis is now viewed as an emerging cause of intestinal hyperplasia in a wide range of mammalian species, including horses. Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) has been reported worldwide though definitive diagnosis is difficult and the epidemiology of the disease remains poorly understood. Weanlings, in particular, appear to be most at risk for infection, though the reasons for their particular susceptibility is unknown. Using an infectious challenge model for EPE, we demonstrate that EPE, like porcine proliferative enteropathy, can exhibit three clinical forms: classical, subclinical and acute. Out of six pony weanlings, one developed signs of classic EPE, one developed acute EPE, and two developed subclinical EPE. Attempts to induce pharmacological stress through the use of dexamethasone failed to have any effect on outcome. Peripheral blood cells collected from those weanlings that developed clinical EPE exhibited decreased expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) following in vitro stimulation with L. intracellularis. By contrast, those weanlings that did not develop clinical disease generated a robust IFN-γ response. These results indicate IFN-γ likely plays a significant role in protection from disease caused by L. intracellularis in the equid. PMID:21719114

  8. Experimental reproduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in pigs infected with PCV2 alone or concurrently with Lawsonia intracellularis or Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Madson, D M; Roof, M; Layton, S M; Ramamoorthy, S; Meng, X J; Halbur, P G

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus (PCV)-associated disease (PCVAD) has emerged to become one of the most economically important pig diseases globally. One of the less commonly recognized clinical manifestations of PCVAD is PCV2 type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in growing pigs; however, experimental confirmation of the ability of PCV2 alone or PCV2 coinfection with other agent(s) to induce enteritis is lacking. In this study, 120 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) pigs were divided randomly into six groups: controls (negative control pigs), PCV2 (inoculated with PCV2), LAW (inoculated with Lawsonia intracellularis), SALM (inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium), PCV2-LAW (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Lawsonia intracellularis) and PCV2-SALM (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Salmonella typhimurium). One half of the pigs in each group were subject to necropsy examination 14 days postinoculation (dpi) and the remaining pigs were examined at 28 dpi. The average daily weight gain was not different (P>0.05) between groups. Individual pigs inoculated orally with PCV2 regardless of coinfection status (2/10 PCV2, 1/10 PCV2-LAW, 3/10 PCV2-SALM) developed PCVAD with diarrhoea and reduced weight gain or weight loss between 14 and 28 dpi. Those pigs had characteristic microscopic lesions in lymphoid and enteric tissues associated with abundant PCV2 antigen. Enteric lesions were characterized by necrosuppurative and proliferative enteritis with crypt elongation and epithelial hyperplasia in LAW and PCV2-LAW pigs by 14 dpi, ulcerative and necrosuppurative colitis in SALM and PCV2-SALM pigs by 14 dpi, and lymphohistiocytic enteritis with depletion of Peyer's patches in PCV2, PCV2-SALM and PCV2-LAW pigs by 28 dpi. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report documenting that under experimental conditions, PCV2 can induce enteritis independently from other enteric pathogens and that oral challenge is a potentially important route and perhaps the natural route of PCV2 transmission in

  9. Comparative genome sequencing identifies a prophage-associated genomic island linked to host adaptation of Lawsonia intracellularis infections.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Kelley, Molly R; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has also been reported in a variety of other animal species, including nonhuman primates. Comparing the whole genome sequences of a homologous porcine L. intracellularis isolate cultivated for 10 and 60 passages in vitro, we identified a 18-kb prophage-associated genomic island in the passage 10 (pathogenic variant) that was lost in the passage 60 (non-pathogenic variant). This chromosomal island comprises 15 genes downstream from the prophage DLP12 integrase gene. The prevalence of this genetic element was evaluated in 12 other L. intracellularis isolates and in 53 infected animals and was found to be conserved in all porcine isolates cultivated for up to 20 passages and was lost in isolates cultivated for more than 40 passages. Furthermore, the prophage region was also present in 26 fecal samples derived from pigs clinically affected with both acute and chronic forms of the disease. Nevertheless, equine L. intracellularis isolates evaluated did not harbor this genomic island regardless of the passage in vitro. Additionally, fecal samples from 21 clinically affected horses and four wild rabbits trapped in horse farms experiencing PE outbreaks did not show this prophage-associated island. Although the presence of this prophage-associated island was not essential for a virulent L. intracellularis phenotype, this genetic element was porcine isolate-specific and potentially contributed to the ecological specialization of this organism for the swine host. PMID:23826661

  10. Application of real-time PCR for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in fecal samples from pigs.

    PubMed

    Zmudzki, J; Szczotka, A; Podgórska, K; Nowak, A; Grzesiak, A; Dors, A; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and validate real-time PCR method for the quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in porcine feces. Before the optimization process was performed two different extraction methods were compared to select the more efficient one. Based on the results achieved at this stage the boiling procedure was rejected and a commercially available silica-membrane based method was chosen for further analysis. The primers and the Taqman probe for B. hyodysenteriae and L. intracellularis were based on the sequence of NADH oxidase gene and 16S rDNA gene, respectively. The detection limit of the real-time PCR for suspension of feces inoculated with B. hyodysenteriae and L. intracellularis was determined to be 1.5x10(3) CFU/ml and 6.5x10(1) CFU/ml, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that our real-time PCR is able to detect low number of B. hyodysenteriae and L. intracellularis cells which is satisfying in routine diagnosis of swine dysentery and proliferative enteropathy. Therefore, it is possible to identify both subclinically infected pigs and those representing an acute form of mentioned diseases. In summary, the quantitative real-time PCR is useful for routine diagnosis of L. intracellularis and B. hyodysenteriae. Compared to conventional PCR, the new validated quantification method based on real-time PCR is fast and with reduced risk of laboratory contamination. The novel technique is specific and even more sensitive than the previously used one. Furthermore, the new real-time PCR enables quick detection and quantification of both pathogens in fecal samples, which helps to estimate the health status of a pig herd. PMID:22844704

  11. Comparative genome sequencing identifies a prophage-associated genomic island linked to host adaptation of Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has also been reported in a variety of other animal species, including nonhuman primates. Comparing the whole genome sequences of a homologous porcine L. intracellularis isolate cultivated for 10 and 60 passages in vitro, we identified a 18-kb prophage-associated genomic island in the passage 10 (pathogenic variant) that was lost in the passage 60 (non-pathogenic variant). This chromosomal island comprises 15 genes downstream from the prophage DLP12 integrase gene. The prevalence of this genetic element was evaluated in 12 other L. intracellularis isolates and in 53 infected animals and was found to be conserved in all porcine isolates cultivated for up to 20 passages and was lost in isolates cultivated for more than 40 passages. Furthermore, the prophage region was also present in 26 fecal samples derived from pigs clinically affected with both acute and chronic forms of the disease. Nevertheless, equine L. intracellularis isolates evaluated did not harbor this genomic island regardless of the passage in vitro. Additionally, fecal samples from 21 clinically affected horses and four wild rabbits trapped in horse farms experiencing PE outbreaks did not show this prophage-associated island. Although the presence of this prophage-associated island was not essential for a virulent L. intracellularis phenotype, this genetic element was porcine isolate-specific and potentially contributed to the ecological specialization of this organism for the swine host. PMID:23826661

  12. Laser microdissection coupled with RNA-seq analysis of porcine enterocytes infected with an obligate intracellular pathogen (Lawsonia intracellularis)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of proliferative enteropathy. The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has been described in various other species including nonhuman primates. Cell proliferation is associated with bacterial replication in enterocyte cytoplasm, but the molecular basis of the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. We used laser capture microdissection coupled with RNA-seq technology to characterize the transcriptional responses of infected enterocytes and the host-pathogen interaction. Results Proliferative enterocytes was associated with activation of transcription, protein biosynthesis and genes acting on the G1 phase of the host cell cycle (Rho family). The lack of differentiation in infected enterocytes was demonstrated by the repression of membrane transporters related to nutrient acquisition. The activation of the copper uptake transporter by infected enterocytes was associated with high expression of the Zn/Cu superoxide dismutase by L. intracellularis. This suggests that the intracellular bacteria incorporate intracytoplasmic copper and express a sophisticated mechanism to cope with oxidative stress. Conclusions The feasibility of coupling microdissection and RNA-seq was demonstrated by characterizing the host-bacterial interactions from a specific cell type in a heterogeneous tissue. High expression of L. intracellularis genes encoding hypothetical proteins and activation of host Rho genes infers the role of unrecognized bacterial cyclomodulins in the pathogenesis of proliferative enteropathy. PMID:23800029

  13. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  14. Efficacy of a commercial live attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in a large scale field trial in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangshin; Lee, Joong-Bok; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Oh, Yu-Sik; Kim, Man-Ok; Oh, Yu-Ri; Hwang, Min-A; Lee, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) is known as one of the most important risk factors causing economic losses in swine industry worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial oral attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine (Enterisol Ileitis) against PPE under a commercial pig farm condition in Korea. Materials and Methods Thirty two-day-old 672 piglets were randomly allocated into vaccinated and control groups. All piglets in the vaccinated group were inoculated with a commercial attenuated L. intracellularis vaccine as following the manufacturer's instruction. Body weights of all pigs in both groups were measured on the vaccination day and 6, 14, and 20 weeks post vaccination and an average daily weight gain (ADWG) was calculated. Health status was observed biweekly during the whole trial. Results The vaccinated group showed significantly higher body weight (p<0.05) and ADWG (p<0.05) than those of the control group. The vaccinated group had significantly reduced impairments in activity, growth, defecation frequency, and stool hardness (p<0.05). Additional health benefits and improved weight gain by the vaccination produced a 4.2:1 return of investment, and the higher gross margin was $4.80 per pig. Conclusion Our finding suggests that the L. intracellularis vaccine program has effects on the substantial health and economic benefits in the Korean swine industry. PMID:23858405

  15. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sionagh H; Wilson, Alison D; Van Ettinger, Imke; MacIntyre, Neil; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  16. Serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations in pigs with acute, chronic or subclinical Lawsonia intracellularis infection.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Gebhart, Connie J; Lawhorn, Bruce D; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2015-03-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of porcine proliferative enteropathy. The clinical presentation can be acute (i.e. proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy, PHE), chronic (i.e. porcine intestinal adenomatosis, PIA) or subclinical. In humans with chronic enteropathies, low serum folate (vitamin B(9)) and cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) concentrations have been associated with increased serum concentrations of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA), which reflect the availability of both vitamins at the cellular level. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and MMA concentrations in serum samples from pigs with PHE, PIA or subclinical L. intracellularis infection, and in negative controls. Serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and MMA concentrations differed significantly among pigs in the PHE, PIA, subclinical and negative control groups. Serum folate concentrations in the PHE and PIA groups were lower than in the subclinical and negative control groups, while serum cobalamin concentrations were lower in the PIA group than in other groups. Serum concentrations of homocysteine were higher in the PHE, PIA and subclinical groups than in the negative control group. Serum concentrations of MMA were higher in the subclinical and PIA groups than in the control group. These data suggest that pigs infected with L. intracellularis have altered serum cobalamin, folate, homocysteine and MMA concentrations. PMID:25618855

  17. Pooling of porcine fecal samples for quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Johansen, Markku; Jorsal, Sven Erik; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Bækbo, Poul; Angen, Oystein

    2014-03-12

    Procedures in which biological specimens are mixed and tested as 1 sample (pooling) have been applied for various biological specimens and laboratory examinations. The objective of the current study was to investigate agreement between laboratory testing of fecal pools and theoretical values obtained by averaging test results from individual fecal samples in relation to a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test for Lawsonia intracellularis. Ten diarrheic and 10 normal fecal samples were submitted from each of 43 Danish swine herds (n = 860 fecal samples). Pools (n = 43), each containing 20 individual fecal samples from the same herd, were prepared in the laboratory by pooling 10% fecal phosphate buffered saline solutions. All pools and individual fecal samples were subjected to qPCR testing for L. intracellularis. The theoretical number of L. intracellularis in the pools was calculated as the mean number of bacteria from the 20 individual fecal samples contributing to each pool. Agreement between the laboratory testing of pools and theoretical calculations based on individual sample results was evaluated. Pooling resulted in fewer L. intracellularis-positive herds (41.9%) compared with testing 20 fecal samples (53.5%). Agreement between the laboratory and the theoretical pools for dichotomized test results was 100% (95% confidence interval: 91.8-100%). For the quantitative test results, Lin concordance correlation coefficient was 0.997. The mean difference between the laboratory testing and the theoretical values was not different from zero (mean difference = 0.039 log10 bacteria/g feces; P = 0.26). PMID:24621847

  18. Diagnostic performance of fecal quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis-associated proliferative enteropathy in nursery pigs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Stege, Helle; Jensen, Tim K; Guedes, Roberto; Ståhl, Marie; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Larsen, Lars E; Angen, Øystein

    2013-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests for detection and quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis in feces from pigs have been developed. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a fecal qPCR test for detection of nursery pigs with L. intracellularis-associated proliferative enteropathy (PE) under field conditions. Furthermore, the diagnostic performance for different subpopulations of pigs was investigated, including pigs infected or noninfected with Porcine circovirus-2, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Escherichia coli. The diagnostic performance was evaluated in terms of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Data from pigs originating from 20 herds with antibiotic treatment requiring diarrhea outbreaks from a prior study were reused. Before treatment, pigs were randomly selected for histological and immunohistochemical examination of intestinal segments and fecal quantification of L. intracellularis by qPCR. A total of 313 pigs (157 without diarrhea, 156 with diarrhea) were included in the statistical analysis, and 37 pigs (11.8%) were classified as PE positives (defined as proliferative histological lesions in combination with L. intracellularis demonstration by immunohistochemistry). Lawsonia intracellularis was detected by qPCR in feces from 91 pigs (29.1%). A nonparametric receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis provided an area under the ROC curve (0.93) and an optimal cutoff value of 4.8 log10 L. intracellularis bacteria/g feces. This cutoff provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 0.84 and diagnostic specificity of 0.93. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were significantly different between herds (P < 0.0001). Numerically, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were different between subpopulations of pigs, but no significant differences were demonstrated. PMID:23536614

  19. Comparative Transcriptional Analysis of Homologous Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates in Infected Porcine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vannucci, Fabio A.; Foster, Douglas N.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2012-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. This disease affects various animal species, including nonhuman primates, has been endemic in pigs, and is an emerging concern in horses. Non-pathogenic variants obtained through multiple passages in vitro do not induce disease, but bacterial isolates at low passage induce clinical and pathological changes. We hypothesize that genes differentially expressed between pathogenic (passage 10) and non-pathogenic (passage 60) L. intracellularis isolates encode potential bacterial virulence factors. The present study used high-throughput sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptional profiling of a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic homologous L. intracellularis variant during in vitro infection. A total of 401 genes were exclusively expressed by the pathogenic variant. Plasmid-encoded genes and those involved in membrane transporter (e.g. ATP-binding cassette), adaptation and stress response (e.g. transcriptional regulators) were the categories mostly responsible for this wider transcriptional landscape. The entire gene repertoire of plasmid A was repressed in the non-pathogenic variant suggesting its relevant role in the virulence phenotype of the pathogenic variant. Of the 319 genes which were commonly expressed in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic variants, no significant difference was observed by comparing their normalized transcription levels (fold change±2; p<0.05). Unexpectedly, these genes demonstrated a positive correlation (r2 = 0.81; p<0.05), indicating the involvement of gene silencing (switching off) mechanisms to attenuate virulence properties of the pathogenic variant during multiple cell passages. Following the validation of these results by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR using ten selected genes, the present study represents the first report characterizing the transcriptional profile of L. intracellularis. The complexity of the virulence phenotype was

  20. Comparative transcriptional analysis of homologous pathogenic and non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in infected porcine cells.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Foster, Douglas N; Gebhart, Connie J

    2012-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. This disease affects various animal species, including nonhuman primates, has been endemic in pigs, and is an emerging concern in horses. Non-pathogenic variants obtained through multiple passages in vitro do not induce disease, but bacterial isolates at low passage induce clinical and pathological changes. We hypothesize that genes differentially expressed between pathogenic (passage 10) and non-pathogenic (passage 60) L. intracellularis isolates encode potential bacterial virulence factors. The present study used high-throughput sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptional profiling of a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic homologous L. intracellularis variant during in vitro infection. A total of 401 genes were exclusively expressed by the pathogenic variant. Plasmid-encoded genes and those involved in membrane transporter (e.g. ATP-binding cassette), adaptation and stress response (e.g. transcriptional regulators) were the categories mostly responsible for this wider transcriptional landscape. The entire gene repertoire of plasmid A was repressed in the non-pathogenic variant suggesting its relevant role in the virulence phenotype of the pathogenic variant. Of the 319 genes which were commonly expressed in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic variants, no significant difference was observed by comparing their normalized transcription levels (fold change±2; p<0.05). Unexpectedly, these genes demonstrated a positive correlation (r(2) = 0.81; p<0.05), indicating the involvement of gene silencing (switching off) mechanisms to attenuate virulence properties of the pathogenic variant during multiple cell passages. Following the validation of these results by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR using ten selected genes, the present study represents the first report characterizing the transcriptional profile of L. intracellularis. The complexity of the virulence phenotype was

  1. Prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis, Salmonella spp. and Eimeria spp. in healthy and diarrheic pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong Ju; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Dae Geun; Kim, Sang Hun; Min, Wongi; Chang, Hong Hee; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Suk

    2012-02-01

    A total of 170 fresh fecal samples (healthy; n=137, diarrheic; n=33) were collected from pet rabbits. By using PCR and formol-ether concentration method, a total 13/137 healthy rabbit feces were positive for L. intracellularis, 6/137 for Salmonella, and 13/137 for Eimeria. On the other hand, a total 17/33 diarrheic rabbit fecal samples were positive for L. intracellularis, 10/33 for Salmonella, and 21/33 for Eimeria. From these results, more than 20% of clinically normal and 97% of diarrheic rabbits were positive for single or concurrent infection of three pathogens. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the prevalence of the microorganisms L. intracellularis, Salmonella and Eimeria in pet rabbits. PMID:21959895

  2. A follow up study on antibodies against Lawsonia intracellularis in mares and foals from two breeding farms in Germany.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Julia; Schmoll, Friedrich; Uhlig, Albrecht; Schusser, Gerald Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) caused by Lawsonia (L.) intracellularis is an emerging disease in foals, particularly in North America. Since a case report in Germany exists, the objective of this study was to examine the incidence of L. intracellularis-antibodies in healthy horses from two German breeding farms. In group 1, serum samples from 24 (year 1) and 16 (year 2) Haflinger mares and their foals were taken. In group 2, over a period of five months, serum samples of six warmblood mares and foals were collected monthly from birth until the foals became seronegative. Serum samples were tested using an ELISA system. Results are expressed as Percentage of Inhibiton (PI). All adult mares (100%) of both groups were seropositive at each point in time (PI-value > 30). In group 1,7/24 foals (29.2%) in year 1 and 4/16 foals (25%) in year 2 had antibodies.The seropositive foals from year 2 had the same dams as the seropositive foals from year 1. In group 2 five of six foals were seropositive after birth. Antibodies decreased from March to July in mares and foals. In July, all five foals tested negative for the first time between the ages of 82 and 141 days (median 115 days). PI-values of mares were significantly correlated with PI-values of their foals. Higher PI-values were seen in younger foals and early in spring. Loss of antibodies in foals at the age of three to five months could be a risk factor for infection and appearance of EPE. PMID:21848042

  3. Lawsonia intracellularis-specific interferon γ gene expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vaccinated and naturally infected foals.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-05-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Lawsonia intracellularis, the agent of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE), was investigated in vaccinated and naturally infected foals. Interferon (IFN)-γ gene expression was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from vaccinated (n=6) and control foals (n=6) every 30 days for 180 days following first vaccine administration, and from clinically affected foals (n=16) within 7-10 days of diagnosing EPE. Seroconversion (immunoperoxidase monolayer assay titer ≥60) occurred in 5/6 vaccinated foals between 60 and 90 days following the first vaccine administration and these foals remained seropositive for the remaining study period. IFN-γ gene expression in all vaccinated foals was significantly higher (P<0.05) on days 60-180 following first vaccine administration compared to IFN-γ gene expression in control foals. When IFN-γ gene transcription was compared between naturally infected and vaccinated foals, a significant difference (P<0.05) was observed only for day 0. PMID:21689957

  4. Sub-isotypic differences in the immunoglobulin G response to Lawsonia intracellularis in vaccinated, seropositive, and equine proliferative enteropathy-affected horses.

    PubMed

    Page, Allen E; Stills, Harold F; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-15

    In the horse, Lawsonia intracellularis infection results in equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). While upwards of 100% of weanlings on an endemic farm may seroconvert, only a small percentage (approximately 5%) will develop clinical disease. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms likely play a role in resistance to L. intracellularis and the absence of a L. intracellularis-specific IFN-γ response has been associated with the development of EPE. The goal of this study was to determine whether protection from clinical EPE is associated with the induction of a systemic IgG sub-isotypic response consistent with a Th1-type cytokine response. To describe their L. intracellularis/EPE status, horses enrolled in this study were placed into one of three categories: seropositive-only, vaccinated, and presumptive clinical EPE. An existing ELISA method was modified to detect L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a), IgG(b), and IgG(t) antibodies using the mouse anti-equine hybridomas CVS-48, CVS-39, and CVS-40, respectively. Additionally, the existing ELISA method was used to quantify total IgG antibodies specific for L. intracellularis for comparison between the groups. Total L. intracellularis-specific IgG was found to be significantly higher (p<0.05) in presumptive clinical EPE cases (n=21) when compared with seropositive (exposed but unaffected) (n=36) and vaccinated horses (n=27). Further, a similar pattern for IgG(a) was seen in that the presumptive clinical EPE horses had significantly more L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a) (p<0.05) than the seropositive or vaccinated horses. With IgG(b), however, the vaccinated horses had significantly more IgG(b) (p<0.05) than the presumptive clinical or seropositive horses. No L. intracellularis-specific IgG(t) was detected in samples from any of the groups. While the results presented here with respect to IgG(a) response in the presumptive clinical EPE group were expected, a higher concentration of IgG(a) was anticipated in the seropositive

  5. First molecular identification of Entamoeba polecki in a piglet in Japan and implications for aggravation of ileitis by coinfection with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kanamori, Kenta; Sadahiro, Masayuki; Tokoro, Masaharu; Abe, Niichiro; Haritani, Makoto; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    Parasitic Entamoeba spp. are found in many vertebrate species including humans, as well as many livestock including pigs. In pigs, three Entamoeba spp., E. suis, and E. polecki and E. histolytica as zoonotic species, have been identified, but their pathogenicity has not been fully characterized. Here, we report the bacteriological, virological, and histopathological examination of three piglets with chronic diarrhea. Two animals appeared to be additionally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis, which caused a characteristic proliferative ileitis. In the piglet infected with Entamoeba spp., the trophozoites (approximately 10-15 μm with one nucleus in their cytoplasm) invaded into the lamina propria and the disease was worsened by the formation of ulcers and pseudomembranes. Genetic analysis identified the parasite as E. polecki (99.5% identity). Although E. polecki in humans or animals might be less pathogenic in the case of a single infection, coinfections with other pathogens including L. intracellularis may increase the severity of the disease. PMID:25963884

  6. Analysis of bacterial load and prevalence of mixed infections with Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and/or Brachyspira pilosicoli in German pigs with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Gerald; Hillen, Sonja; von Berg, Stephan; Kixmöller, Marion; Willems, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Lawsonia (L.) intracellularis, Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli are important pathogens in domestic pig production world-wide, responsible for porcine intestinal adenomatosis, swine dysentery, and porcine intestinal spirochetosis, respectively. Conventional PCR is the major diagnostic tool in the detection of the three pathogens, but the sole detection of bacterial DNA might lead to misinterpretations of results with respect to their clinical relevance, especially with mixed infections. Thus, the present study targeted the detection and quantification of the three pathogens in samples from herds with a case history of diarrhoea. Herds and samples were selected by the practitioners on a voluntary basis. Results were based on 1176 individual samples from 95 herds from Southern Germany. The pathogens were detected simultaneously by multiplex real-time PCR. The overall prevalence for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli was 12.6%, 8.4% and 3.2% in faecal samples and 48.4%, 24.2% and 31.6% in herds, respectively. Sixty one percent, 82.6%, and 73.4% of herds positive for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae, and B. pilosicoli, respectively, had mixed infections. Median log values of DNA equivalents/g of faeces for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli were 3.3, 5.9 and 3.2, with maxima of 8.3, 8.0 and 6.3, respectively. Within herd prevalence of B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli as well as the load of B. hyodysenteriae were significantly associated with the severity of diarrhoea. PMID:22059295

  7. Use of flow cytometry and PCR analysis to detect 5-carboxyfluoroscein-stained obligate intracellular bacteria Lawsonia intracellularis invasion of McCoy cells.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Milan; Pasternak, J Alex; Ng, Siew Hon; Wilson, Heather L

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we describe a method to quantify invasion of obligate intracellular bacteria, Lawsonia intracellularis, inside McCoy cells. In immunological research, the cell-permeable fluorescent dye 5'-carboxyfluoroscein succidyl ester (CFSE) is commonly used to quantify eukaryotic cellular proliferation. Instead of using it in this traditional way, we stained L. intracellularis with CFSE dye prior to infection of McCoy cells. Flow cytometry was performed to quantify the percentage of eukaryotic cells which had taken up or were associated with fluorescent bacteria. As obligate intracellular bacteria, they cannot replicate outside of eukaryotic cells and thus qPCR analysis was used to quantify bacterial growth. Indirectly, PCR analysis confirmed invasion rather than adherence to the McCoy cell surface. Fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to sort the CFSE(+) (i.e. infected) McCoy cells from the CFSE(-) (i.e. non-infected) McCoy cells and confocal microscopy was used to confirm bacterial invasion and cytosolic localization of CFSE-L. intracellularis. To show that this approach could be used in conjunction with functional assays, we investigated the effect that serum antibodies had on CFSE-bacterial invasion and growth. Instead of blocking invasion, rabbit hyperimmune serum augmented invasion of the bacteria inside McCoy cells and qPCR analysis confirmed bacterial growth over the course of 5days. We conclude that CFSE-labeling of bacteria and qPCR can be used to track and quantify bacterial invasion and may be a valuable tool for studying the invasive properties of bacteria, especially if commercial antibodies are not available. This approach may be adapted for use in other obligate intracellular bacteria and intracellular pathogens. PMID:27154728

  8. The use of quantitative PCR for identification and quantification of Brachyspira pilosicoli, Lawsonia intracellularis and Escherichia coli fimbrial types F4 and F18 in pig feces.

    PubMed

    Ståhl, M; Kokotovic, B; Hjulsager, C K; Breum, S Ø; Angen, Ø

    2011-08-01

    Four quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were evaluated for quantitative detection of Brachyspira pilosicoli, Lawsonia intracellularis, and E. coli fimbrial types F4 and F18 in pig feces. Standard curves were based on feces spiked with the respective reference strains. The detection limits from the spiking experiments were 10(2) bacteria/g feces for Bpilo-qPCR and Laws-qPCR, 10(3)CFU/g feces for F4-qPCR and F18-qPCR. The PCR efficiency for all four qPCR assays was between 0.91 and 1.01 with R(2) above 0.993. Standard curves, slopes and elevation, varied between assays and between measurements from pure DNA from reference strains and feces spiked with the respective strains. The linear ranges found for spiked fecal samples differed both from the linear ranges from pure culture of the reference strains and between the qPCR tests. The linear ranges were five log units for F4-qPCR, and Laws-qPCR, six log units for F18-qPCR and three log units for Bpilo-qPCR in spiked feces. When measured on pure DNA from the reference strains used in spiking experiments, the respective log ranges were: seven units for Bpilo-qPCR, Laws-qPCR and F18-qPCR and six log units for F4-qPCR. This shows the importance of using specific standard curves, where each pathogen is analysed in the same matrix as sample DNA. The qPCRs were compared to traditional bacteriological diagnostic methods and found to be more sensitive than cultivation for E. coli and B. pilosicoli. The qPCR assay for Lawsonia was also more sensitive than the earlier used method due to improvements in DNA extraction. In addition, as samples were not analysed for all four pathogen agents by traditional diagnostic methods, many samples were found positive for agents that were not expected on the basis of age and case history. The use of quantitative PCR tests for diagnosis of enteric diseases provides new possibilities for veterinary diagnostics. The parallel simultaneous analysis for several bacteria in multi-qPCR and the

  9. Investigation of the association of growth rate in grower-finishing pigs with the quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Markku; Nielsen, Maibritt; Dahl, Jan; Svensmark, Birgitta; Bækbo, Poul; Kristensen, Charlotte Sonne; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Jensen, Tim K; Ståhl, Marie; Larsen, Lars E; Angen, Oystein

    2013-01-01

    As a part of a prospective cohort study in four herds, a nested case control study was carried out. Five slow growing pigs (cases) and five fast growing pigs (controls) out of 60 pigs were selected for euthanasia and laboratory examination at the end of the study in each herd. A total of 238 pigs, all approximately 12 weeks old, were included in the study during the first week in the grower-finisher barn. In each herd, approximately 60 pigs from four pens were individually ear tagged. The pigs were weighed at the beginning of the study and at the end of the 6-8 weeks observation period. Clinical data, blood and faecal samples were serially collected from the 60 selected piglets every second week in the observation period. In the killed pigs serum was examined for antibodies against Lawsonia intracellularis (LI) and procine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and in addition PCV2 viral DNA content was quantified. In faeces the quantity of LI cells/g faeces and number of PCV2 copies/g faeces was measured by qPCR. The objective of the study was to examine if growth rate in grower-finishing pig is associated with the detection of LI and PCV2 infection or clinical data. This study has shown that diarrhoea is a significant risk factor for low growth rate and that one log(10) unit increase in LI load increases the odds ratio for a pig to have a low growth rate by 2.0 times. Gross lesions in the small intestine and LI load>log(10)6/g were significant risk factors for low growth. No association between PCV2 virus and low growth was found. PMID:22854321

  10. A randomised clinical trial on the efficacy of oxytetracycline dose through water medication of nursery pigs on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis and average daily weight gain.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Inge; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Holm, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oral treatment with antimicrobials is widely used in pig production for the control of gastrointestinal infections. Lawsonia intracellularis (LI) causes enteritis in pigs older than six weeks of age and is commonly treated with antimicrobials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three oral dosage regimens (5, 10 and 20mg/kg body weight) of oxytetracycline (OTC) in drinking water over a five-day period on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of LI and average daily weight gain (ADG). A randomised clinical trial was carried out in four Danish pig herds. In total, 539 animals from 37 batches of nursery pigs were included in the study. The dosage regimens were randomly allocated to each batch and initiated at presence of assumed LI-related diarrhoea. In general, all OTC doses used for the treatment of LI infection resulted in reduced diarrhoea and LI shedding after treatment. Treatment with a low dose of 5mg/kg OTC per kg body weight, however, tended to cause more watery faeces and resulted in higher odds of pigs shedding LI above detection level when compared to medium and high doses (with odds ratios of 5.5 and 8.4, respectively). No association was found between the dose of OTC and the ADG. In conclusion, a dose of 5mg OTC per kg body weight was adequate for reducing the high-level LI shedding associated with enteropathy, but a dose of 10mg OTC per kg body weight was necessary to obtain a maximum reduction in LI shedding. PMID:26718056

  11. The efficacy of oxytetracycline treatment at batch, pen and individual level on Lawsonia intracellularis infection in nursery pigs in a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Inge; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial consumption in animal husbandry is of great scientific and political concern due to the risk of selection of resistant bacteria. Whilst a reduction in the use of antimicrobials is therefore preferable, the efficacy of treatment must be maintained in order to ensure animal welfare and profitability of pig production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three treatment strategies under field conditions against Lawsonia intracellularis (LI)-related diarrhoea. A randomised clinical trial was carried out in four Danish pig herds, including a total of 520 pigs from 36 nursery batches. A high prevalence of LI was demonstrated in all herds prior to the initiation of the study. Treatment efficacy was assessed by faecal shedding of LI, the occurrence of diarrhoea and average daily weight gain (ADG) after treatment. All strategies were implemented at batch level at presence of LI-related diarrhoea and included daily treatment with 10mg oxytetracycline (OTC) per kilogram of bodyweight for 5 days, though the OTC was administered differently: either by oral treatment of all pigs in a batch, by oral treatment of pigs in diarrhoeic pens only, or by intramuscular treatment of individual diarrhoeic pigs only. The treatment strategies were randomly allocated to batches and were initiated at the presence of diarrhoea. From the included batches, 100% of the trial pigs were medicated in the batch treatment strategy, 87% in the pen treatment strategy and 55% in the individual treatment strategy. All strategies reduced the occurrence of diarrhoea and faecal shedding of LI after treatment. However, batch treatment was found to be most efficient in reducing both high-level LI shedding and diarrhoea when compared to the treatment of diarrhoeic pens or individual diarrhoeic pigs. There was no significant difference identified in ADG between the treatment strategies. In conclusion, batch treatment of all pigs in a section resulted in the highest efficacy

  12. Effect of dietary inclusion of distillers dried grains with solubles, soybean hulls, or a polyclonal antibody product on the ability of growing pigs to resist a Lawsonia intracellularis challenge.

    PubMed

    Whitney, M H; Shurson, G C; Guedes, R C

    2006-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if dietary inclusion of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), soybean hulls, or soybean hulls sprayed with an egg-based, polyclonal antibody product would reduce the incidence or severity of infection, or both, in growing pigs after a Lawsonia intracellularis challenge. One hundred 17-d-old weaned pigs were blocked by sex, ancestry, and BW, and randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatment groups: negative control, unchallenged, corn-soy diet; positive control, challenged, corn-soy diet; 20% DDGS diet (D), challenged; 5% soybean hulls diet (SH), challenged; and SH sprayed with a polyclonal antibody product diet, challenged. Challenged pigs were orally inoculated with 6.4 x 10(8) L. intracellularis organisms after a 4-wk prechallenge feeding period. On d 21 postchallenge, pigs were euthanized, lesions of intestinal mucosa were evaluated, and ileal tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the presence and proliferation rate of L. intracellularis. Challenging pigs with L. intracellularis reduced growth rate, feed intake, and efficiency of gain (P < 0.02) and increased the proportion of internal organ weights relative to BW (P < 0.01). Dietary treatment did not affect growth performance pre- or postchallenge (P > 0.10). Heart, empty stomach, and liver weights were similar among dietary treatments (P > 0.10). Weight of the large intestine as a percentage of BW was increased in D and SH pigs compared with positive control pigs (P < 0.05). Lesion length, prevalence, and severity, and fecal shedding of L. intracellularis were primarily unaffected by dietary treatment (P > 0.10), although ileal lesion length and severity observed tended to be greater in the SH sprayed with polyclonal antibody product diet vs. the D pigs (P < 0.10). Results from a previous study indicated that diet composition may affect length, severity, and prevalence of lesions caused by L. intracellularis in growing pigs subjected to a

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in finishing pigs in Polish farrow-to-finish swine herds.

    PubMed

    Dors, A; Pomorska-Mól, M; Czyżewska, E; Wasyl, D; Pejsak, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the herd-level, within-herd prevalence, the frequency of mixed infections and risk factors for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in selected farrow-to-finish Polish pig herds. A total of 254 pooled fecal samples were collected from 9 to 24 week-old pigs in 70 herds. Real time PCR for detection of L. intracellularis and B. hyodysenteriae was performed. For Salmonella spp. bacteriological examination was performed. The herd-level prevalences of L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. among examined herds were 65.7%, 1.4% and 8.6%, respectively. The within-herd prevalences (in positive herds) for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. were 51.5%, 75.0% and 30.4%, respectively. All herds with diarrhea observed during sampling were infected with L. intracellularis and 60% of herds with no diarrhea at the moment of sampling were infected with L. intracellularis (p=0.035). In herds with more than 200 sows the prevalence of Salmonella spp. was significantly higher compared to herds with less than 200 sows (p=0.027). In herds where all-in/all-out (AIAO) was respected, prevalence of L. intracellularis was significantly lower than in herds where this rule was not kept (p=0.024). Obtained results confirm that L. intracellularis is the major cause of bacterial diarrhea in finishing pigs. The present study identified AIAO and herd size as a risk factor, at the herd level, for L. intracellularis and Salmonella spp., respectively. PMID:26812826

  14. Pharmacokinetics of gallium maltolate in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected and uninfected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Alcorn, J; Allen, A L; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-10-01

    Oral gallium maltolate (GaM) pharmacokinetics (PK) and intestinal tissue (IT) concentrations of elemental gallium ([Ga]) and iron ([Fe]) were investigated in a rabbit model of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). New Zealand white does (uninfected controls and EPE-infected, n = 6/group) were given a single oral GaM dose (50 mg/kg). Serial blood samples were collected from 0 to 216 h post-treatment (PT) and IT samples after euthanasia. Serology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry confirmed, or excluded, EPE. Blood and IT [Ga] and [Fe] were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. PK parameters were estimated through noncompartmental approaches. For all statistical comparisons on [Ga] and [Fe] α = 5%. The Ga log-linear terminal phase rate constant was lower in EPE rabbits vs. uninfected controls [0.0116 ± 0.004 (SD) vs. 0.0171 ± 0.0028 per hour; P = 0.03]; but half-life (59.4 ± 24.0 vs. 39.4 ± 10.8 h; P = 0.12); Cmax (0.50 ± 0.21 vs. 0.59 ± 0.42 μg/mL; P = 0.45); tmax (1.75 ± 0.41 vs. 0.9 ± 0.37 h; P = 0.20); and oral clearance (6.743 ± 1.887 vs. 7.208 ± 2.565 L/h; P = 0.74) were not. IT's [Ga] and [Fe] were higher (P < 0.0001) in controls. In conclusion, although infection reduces IT [Ga] and [Fe], a 48 h GaM dosing interval is appropriate for multidose studies in EPE rabbits. PMID:24628462

  15. Diagnostic and epidemiological features of Lawsonia intracellularis enteropathy in 2 foals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillier, Julie; Picandet, Valérie; Harel, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Desrosiers, Robert; Jean, Daniel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Two clinical cases of equine proliferative enteropathy are described. Both foals had a positive fecal polymerase chain reaction, but shedding of the bacterium stopped < 4 days after therapy was initiated. One foal was serologically positive 3 days after onset of clinical signs and remained positive for more than 6 months. PMID:16898113

  16. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  17. Comparison between the effect of Lawsonia inermis and flubendazole on Strongyloides species using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ayman Nabil; Ahmed, Mona Abdel-Fattah; Hetta, Mona Hafez

    2016-06-01

    Strongyloides species is a helminth of worldwide distribution primarily in tropical and subtropical regions. It is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability for autoinfection so; it may lead to severe systemic manifestations especially in immunosuppressed patients. Chemotherapy is currently considered the best therapeutic option for strongyloidiasis but some drugs are expensive and others have side effects as nausea, diarrhea and headache. Strongyloides larva is resistant to most chemical agents so, search for plant extracts may provide other effective but less expensive treatment. Lawsonia inermis Linn, popularly known as Henna, has been proven to have antihelminthic, antibacterial and antifungal properties. The current study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of Lawsonia inermis on Strongyloides spp. In vitro using scanning electron microscopy. Fifty Strongyloides species. larvae and free living females were incubated with different concentrations of Lawsonia (1, 10, 100 mg/ml), for different incubation periods (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) in comparison to the same concentrations of flubendazole at the same different time points. The results showed that Lawsonia inermis in a concentration of 10 mg/ml incubated with Strongyloides spp. female for 24 h affected the parasite cuticular surface in the form of transverse and longitudinal fissures and transverse depression in comparison to no cuticular change with flubendazole (100 mg/ml). This suggests that Lawsonia inermis may be a promising phytotherapeutic agent for strongyloidiasis. PMID:27413314

  18. Molluscicidal activity of Lawsonia inermis and its binary and tertiary combinations with other plant derived molluscicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Singh, D K

    2001-03-01

    Molluscicidal activity of leaf, bark and seed of Lawsonia inermis against Lymnaea acuminata and Indoplanorbis exustus was studied. Highest toxicity was observed in the seed of Lawsonia inermis. Toxicity of binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the essential oil of cedar (Cedrus deodara Roxh) and neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss), powder from bulb of garlic (Allium sativum Linn), and oleoresin extracted from rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) with Lawsonia inermis and Embelia ribes fruit powder were studied against L. acuminata and I. exustus. L. inermis seed powder in combination with Cedrus deodara oil and Azadirachta indica oil was more toxic than their individual components and other combinations. PMID:11495286

  19. Phytochemical, toxicological and antimicrobial evaluation of lawsonia inermis extracts against clinical isolates of pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emerging resistance of pathogen against the currently available antimicrobial agents demands the search of new antimicrobial agents. The use of medicinal plants as natural substitute is the paramount area of research to overwhelm the drug resistance of infectious agents. Scientists have not made enough effort on the evaluation of safety of medicinal plant yet. Methods In the present study antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis is investigated against clinical isolates of seven bacteria including four Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella spp., Shigella sonnei) and three Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) using disc diffusion method. Four types of Lawsonia inermis extracts were prepared using methanol, chloroform, acetone and water as extraction solvents, while DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) and water as dissolution solvents. The rate and extent of bacterial killing was estimated by time-kill kinetic assay at 1× MIC of each bacterial isolate. The overall safety of Lawsonia inermis extracts was assessed in mice. Results Lawsonia inermis displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains used in the study. The minimum value of MIC for different bacterial strains ranged from 2.31 mg/ml to 9.27 mg/ml. At 1x MIC of each bacterial isolate, 3log10 decrease in CFU was recorded after 6 hours of drug exposure and no growth was observed in almost all tested bacteria after 24 hours of exposure. No sign of toxidrome were observed during in vivo toxicity evaluation in mice at 300 mg/kg concentration. Conclusion In conclusion, the present study provides the scientific rational for medicinal use of Lawsonia inermis. The use of Lawsonia inermis extracts is of great significance as substitute antimicrobial agent in therapeutics. PMID:24289297

  20. Antibacterial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (Henna) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, O; Hasson, SS; El-Hag, AH; Al-Mahrooqi, Z; Al-Hashmi, N; Al-Bimani, Z; Al-Balushi, MS; Al-Jabri, AA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity of henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn) obtained from different regions of Oman against a wide array of micro-organisms. Methods Fresh henna samples were obtained from different regions of Oman as leaves and seeds. 100 g fresh and dry leaves and 50 g of fresh and dry seeds were separately soaked in 500 mL of ethanol for three days, respectively, with frequent agitation. The mixture was filtered, and the crude extract was collected. The crude extract was then heated, at 48 °C in a water bath to evaporate its liquid content. The dry crude henna extract was then tested for its antibacterial activity using well-diffusion antibiotic susceptibility technique. Henna extracts were investigated for their antibacterial activity at different concentrations against a wide array of different micro-organisms including a laboratory standard bacterial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) (P. aeruginosa) and eleven fresh clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). 2-Hydroxy-p-Nathoqinone-Tech (2-HPNT, MW=174.16, C10H6O3) was included as control (at 50% concentration) along with the henna samples tested. Results Henna samples demonstrated antibacterial activity against all isolates but the highest susceptibility was against P. aeruginosa with henna samples obtained from Al-sharqyia region. Conclusions Omani henna from Al-sharqyia region demonstrates high in vitro anti-P. aeruginosa activity compared with many henna samples from different regions of Oman. PMID:23569753

  1. Proteinaceous protease inhibitor from Lawsonia inermis: purification, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Dabhade, Arvind; Patel, Priti; Pati, Ulhas

    2013-10-01

    A thermo-stable, proteinaceous protease inhibitor (LPI) from Lawsonia inermis is reported. The LPI was purified from Lawsonia inermis seeds by subsequent ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Cellulose) and gel permeation chromatography (Sephadex-50). The purified protease inhibitor is effective against a wide range of proteases viz. papain, trypsin, pepsin and metallo-protease. The apparent molecular weight of the protease inhibitor is 19 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The protease inhibitor was found to be stable at 70 degrees C for 30 min. It was also examined for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7926 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 2079; the IC50 values of the purified LPI were 11.4 microg/mL and 16.6 microg/mL respectively. PMID:24354203

  2. Antibacterial activity of Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood Ali; Hassan, Fouzia; Ullah, Hanif; Karim, Sabiha; Baseer, Abdul; Abid, Mobasher Ali; Ubaidi, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Present study deals with the demonstration of the antibacterial activity of very common medicinal plants of Pakistani origin i.e., Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus. The extracts were prepared in crude form by the use of hydro-alcoholic solution and were screened for antibacterial activity against various bacterial species by disk diffusion method. Assay was performed using clinical isolates of B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Crude extract of Phyllantus emblica fruit exhibited strong activity against standard cultures of all studied bacteria. Lawsonia alba showed good activity against standard cultures of all the used microorganisms. Coriandrum sativum was effective only against Bacillus cereus, while Cucumis sativus and Culinaris medic showed poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa only. Hence, Phyllantus emblica exhibited strong antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria it means that Phyllantus emblica extract contains some compounds which have broad spectrum of bactericidal activity. PMID:24147363

  3. The Abortificient Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lawsonia Inermis on BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esteki, Ramin; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the traditional beliefs of certain cultures, Lawsonia inermis has been reported to cause the abortion or termination of an undesirable pregnancy. The present study was undertaken with the goal of studying the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on abortion in pregnant BALB/c mice in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Methods This research study used an experimental methodology and was conducted in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Forty female BALB/c mice (30–40 gm, 8–12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 4 groups. One male mouse was included for each two female mice (1:2) and they were maintained in a protective cage habitat. Pregnancy of the mice was confirmed by means of a vaginal smear. The doses of 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg of the hydroalcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis were injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice beginning on the first day and continuing through the seventh day of pregnancy. The control group did not receive any treatment, but was left completely unadministered. On the eighteenth day of pregnancy, the uterine tubes of mice were removed. The subsequent embryonic absorption is considered to be an abortion. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22 using Fisher’s exact test and the Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Results Abortions were observed more often in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). The mean of the serum estrogen level was significantly higher in the case control groups (p< 0.01) and the mean of progesterone level was also significantly lower in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). Conclusion The use of Lawsonia inermis during pregnancy may cause abortion and therefore it should be considered as contraindication or use with caution. PMID:27504174

  4. New potent accelerator of neurite outgrowth from Lawsonia inermis flower under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Souichi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yano, Mamiko; Akiyama, Masanori; Imai, Kayo; Kimura, Tomohito; Nakata, Akiko; Tani, Miyuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed accelerative effects on nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells under non-fasting conditions. To elucidate the active constituents responsible for the neuronal differentiation, we conducted a search of the constituents and examined their accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. We isolated a new acetophenone glycoside, inermioside A, which exerted a significant accelerative effect on neurite outgrowth. We also confirmed the activities of nine known compounds, including quercetin and lalioside. In addition, we found that quercetin, one of the active constituents, increased Vav3 mRNA expression. PMID:26936787

  5. Alpha amylase enzyme inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effect of Lawsonia inermis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Hasan; Mahbub, Nasir Uddin; Khan, Md Forhad; Hana, Humayera Kabir; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Previously it was reported elsewhere that Lawsonia inermis have anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect in experimental animals. The in vitro porcine alpha amylase inhibitory effect was investigated of this plant methanolic extracts and consequently hypoglycemic effect by quantitatively determining the maltose from the maltose standard curve while the anti-inflammatory effect by acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. Acarbose (10 microg mL(-1)) and Diclofenac sodium (20 mg kg(-1)) were used as reference hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively, for this study. The methanolic leaves extract of the plant significantly inhibited (60.97% compared to untreated) enzymatic activity of the amylase at 10 microg mL(-1) dose (p < 0.05) also reduced the chemically induced nociceptive pain stimuli significantly at all doses (p < 0.01). Carbohydrates, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and tannins were found to have in phytochemical screening of the extract which are thought to bring these effects. For the conclusive purpose, it is suggesting from the result that the pharmacological properties of this Lawsonia inermis can elicit hypoglycemic effect by inhibiting alpha-amylase enzyme and can reduce neurogenic pain stimulus. It gives the notion that how this group of patient would be therapeutically benefitted by decreasing both these effects by the same agent which is easy available. PMID:24506051

  6. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  7. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  8. Antioxidant Activity and Teratogenicity Evaluation of Lawsonia Inermis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Seifi, Neda; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Sedighi, Mehrnoosh; Kheiri, Soleiman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Lawsonia inermis is a medicinal plant with abortive properties. There has been no scientific study to evaluate the teratogenicity of this plant. This study was performed to determine the antioxidant activity and the possible side effect of L. inermis hydroalcoholic extract on development of congenital abnormalities in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 120 female mature BALB/c mice were assigned to four groups and after mating and confirming the vaginal plug, the animals in the first group (G1) were kept with no intervention, and the second (G2), third (G3) and fourth (G4) groups were intraperitoneally (ip) injected with respectively saline (0.3 ml), and 10 and 100 mg/kg of L. inermis extract (for 7 days). On the 19th day, caesarean section was performed on the mice and embryos were examined for abnormalities. Their height and weight were measured. Data were analysed by ANOVA and post-hoc least significant difference tests. Results There were significant differences between G3 and G4, and G1 (p<0.001); no significant difference was seen between G3 and G4. At 100 mg/kg dose of L. inermis, the parietal bones were absent in 90% of embryos and more extra ribs were observed in both G3 and G4 (p = 0.01). Conclusion L. inermis may have teratogenicity and should be used cautiously during pregnancy. PMID:26155492

  9. Preparation of antibacterial PVA and PEO nanofibers containing Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Avci, H; Monticello, R; Kotek, R

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about health issues and environmental pollution stimulate research to find new health and hygiene related products with healing properties and minimum negative effect on the environment. Development of new, natural antibacterial agents has become one of the most important research areas to combat some pathogens such as Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, algae, yeast, and some microorganisms which cause serious human infections. Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts for preparation of antibacterial poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers via electrospinning technique were investigated. PEO and PVA based electrospun fibers containing henna extract were verified by the appearance of FTIR peaks corresponding to the pure extract. Our study demonstrates that 2.793 wt.% Li in PVA and PEO based solutions showed bactericidal effects against Staphylococcus aureus and bacteriostatic action to Escherichia coli. Concentrations of henna leaf extract strongly impacted antibacterial activities against both bacteria. Henna leaves have a great potential to be used as a source of a potent eco-friendly antimicrobial agent. PMID:23758488

  10. SPME-GC-MS analysis of commercial henna samples (Lawsonia inermis L.).

    PubMed

    Mengoni, Tamara; Peregrina, Dolores Vargas; Censi, Roberta; Cortese, Manuela; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Maggi, Filippo; Di Martino, Piera

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a characterisation of volatile constituents from different commercial batches of henna (Lawsonia inermis) leaves of different geographic origin. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the purpose. A total of 72 components were identified by GC-MS in the headspace of different henna samples which proved to differ considerably from each other, because they were characterised by different classes of components, mainly aliphatic compounds (9.0-64.7%), terpenoids (5.8-45.5%) and aromatics (7.9-45.2%), with alkanes (0.9-18.5%), aldehydes (2.1-18.8%) and carboxylic acids (3.1-29.3%), monoterpenes (3.4-30.0%) and sesquiterpenes (0.8-23.7%) and phenyl propanoids (0.6-43.1%), being the most abundant, respectively. Major representatives of these groups were n-hexadecane (0.5-4.7%), (2E)-hexenal (0.5-11.7%) and acetic acid (2.8-24.5%), limonene (0.8-14.7%), carvol (3.8-7.1%), geranyl acetone (1.4-7.9%) and (E)-caryophyllene (3.3-8.4%), and (E)-anethole (0.6-35.0%), respectively. We assume that factors such as the manufacturing process, the storage conditions and the different geographic origin of the samples may contribute to such variability. PMID:26181510

  11. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and CNS depressant activities of methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nesa, Luthfun; Munira, Shirajum; Mollika, Shabnam; Islam, Monirul; choin, Habibullah; Chouduri, Aktar Uzzaman; Naher, Nazmun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study was carried out to assess the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activity of the methanolic extract of the Lawsonia inermis barks (MELIB). Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of MEBLI were studied using carrageenan-induced inflammatory method at the dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg b.wt., p.o. Analgesic activity was measured using acetic acid-induced writhing model and formalin-induced licking and biting in mice. The CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the reduction of locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field and hole cross tests at a dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Results: Statistical analysis showed that dose of 500 mg/kg exhibited higher analgesic activity against acetic acid-induced pain in mice than the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Furthermore, doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg caused higher percent of protection (91.16% and 95.03%, respectively) of licking and biting of formalin-induced mice than diclophenac sodium (70.72%). The Lawsonia inemis methanolic extract (300 and 500 mg/kg) also exhibited sustained inhibition (54.97% and 65.56%) of paw edema at the 4th hour compared with standard indomethacin (74.17%). Besides, the plant extract also had significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent CNS depressant activity. Conclusion: this study recommends that the methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks has significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant properties. PMID:25068143

  12. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, S.; Vivek, P.; Arumanayagam, T.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-07-01

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC.

  13. [Hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of henna (Lawsonia inermis) decoction by a young girl with G6PD deficiency].

    PubMed

    Perinet, I; Lioson, E; Tichadou, L; Glaizal, M; de Haro, L

    2011-06-01

    Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is a shrub bearing leaves that are crushed and used for cosmetic purposes in Asia and Africa. In several countries, henna decoction is ingested as a traditional drug to induce abortion. One component of Henna, known as Lawsone, can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient patients after cutaneous exposure or ingestion. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of severe hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of Henna decoction to induce abortion. This complication led to diagnosis of partial moderate G6PD-deficiency in the 17-year-old patient living in Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This report emphasizes the life-threatening hazards associated with some plant extracts used as traditional medicines. PMID:21870562

  14. Polyphenolic contents and antioxidant activities of Lawsonia inermis leaf extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Zohourian, Tayyebeh Haleh; Quitain, Armando T; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-01-01

    Extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal extraction of Lawsonia inermis leaves were evaluated for the presence of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. Extraction experiments were performed in temperature-controlled mode at a range of 100 to 200 degrees C, and extraction time of 5 to 30 min, and microwave-controlled mode at a power from 300-700 W, in irradiation time of 30 to 120 s. Polyphenolic contents were measured using Folin-Ciocalteau method, while antioxidant properties were analyzed using DPPH radical scavenging activities (RSA) expressed in BHA equivalents. Results showed that best values of RSA were obtained at mild temperature range of 100-120 degrees C. Controlling microwave power at short irradiation time gave better results than temperature-controlled treatment as well. Furthermore, comparison with the result obtained at room temperature confirmed that the use of microwave was more effective for extracting polar components that normally possess higher antioxidant activities. PMID:24428109

  15. Inhibitors of melanogenesis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells from flower buds of Lawsonia inermis (Henna).

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Souichi; Oda, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Seikou; Liu, Jiang; Onishi, Koko; Kawabata, Miki; Miki, Hisako; Himuro, Yugo; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed significant inhibitory activity toward melanogenesis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. Among the constituents isolated from the methanolic extract, luteolin, quercetin, and (±)-eriodictyol showed stronger inhibitory activity than the reference compound, arbutin. Several structure-activity relationships of the flavonoids were suggested, and OGlc

  16. 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.

    PubMed

    Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Mikaelyan, Aram; Gregor, Ivan; McHardy, Alice C; Tringe, Susannah Green; Hugenholtz, Phil; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Termite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis. PMID:26914459

  17. Effects of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Musab Awad; Eldin, Imad Mohamed Taj; Mohammed, Abd-Elwahab Hassan; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural products with therapeutic properties such as plants, minerals, and animal products, for many years, were the main sources of drugs for the treatment of numerous diseases; hence selection of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) to study its hepatoprotective activity was considered. Objectives: This was an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: The L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract, which obtained by maceration, was orally administered in doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg to the tested animals to assess its effects on serum levels of hepatotoxicity parameters, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, and total proteins along with histopathological liver sections examination, while silymarin (25 mg/kg), a potent hepatoprotective drug, was used as standard control. Results: The two doses of the plant extract showed dose-dependent hepatoprotective effect, as evident by the significant reduction (P < 0.05) in serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin along with the improvement in histopathological liver sections compared to CCl4-only treated animals. Conclusion: As experimentally evident, it could be concluded that this plant material could provide a hepatoprotective effect that could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. PMID:27069719

  18. Antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis L. from Jaffna

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaseelan, E Christy; Jenothiny, S; Pathmanathan, MK; Jeyadevan, JP

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reveal the antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted different cold organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis (L. against) some pathogenic bacteria. Methods Powders of fruits, flowers and leaves of L. inermis were continuously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate and ethanol at ambient temperature. The dried extracts were prepared into different concentrations and tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method, and also the extracts were tested to determine the available phytochemicals. Results Except DCM extract of flower all other test extracts revealed inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria and their inhibitory effect differed significantly (P<0.05). The highest inhibitory effect was showed by ethyl acetate extract of flower against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), and ethyl acetate extract of fruit on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flower, fruit and leaf expressed inhibition even at 1 mg/100 µl against all test bacteria. Among the tested phytochemicals flavonoids were detected in all test extracts except DCM extract of flower. Conclusions The study demonstrated that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of fruit and flower of L. inermis are potentially better source of antibacterial agents compared to leaf extracts of respective solvents. PMID:23569850

  19. Safety and efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract from Lawsonia inermis leaves on lipid profile in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Verma, Nishikant; Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dyslipidemia is one of the most common risk factor for cardiac-related disorders in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, low high density lipoprotein and elevated low density lipoprotein concentration. Aim: To explore the effect of Lawsonia inermis hydroalcoholic extract (LIHE) for diabetic dyslipidemic activity along with its safety profile. Materials and Methods: LIHE administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg in rats after induction of hyperglycemia by alloxan. Insulin (1 IU/kg), glibenclamide (2.5 mg/kg), and metformin (100 mg/kg) were used as positive control and 1% gum acacia as normal control. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's t-test. Results: The percentage reduction in blood glucose level of LIHE at dose of 400 mg/kg was 39.08% on day 21 when compared to baseline (day 0), which is comparable to glibenclamide (44.77%) and metformin (46.30%). Decrease in blood glucose level exhibited significant improvement in lipid profile, plasma albumin, total plasma protein and serum creatinine. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated that LIHE significantly improved lipid and lipoprotein pattern observed in diabetic rats and this could be due to improvement in insulin secretion or action, thus has potential to be used in treatment of diabetes mellitus associated dyslipidemia. PMID:26730149

  20. Antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Hammarstrom, S; Shively, J E; Paxton, R J; Beatty, B G; Larsson, A; Ghosh, R; Bormer, O; Buchegger, F; Mach, J P; Burtin, P

    1989-09-01

    The epitope reactivities of 52 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against carcinoembryonic antigen from 11 different research groups were studied using competitive solid-phase immunoassays. About 60% of all possible combinations of Mabs as inhibitors and as the primary binding antibody were investigated. The inhibition data were analyzed by a specially developed computer program "EPITOPES" which measures concordance and discordance in inhibition patterns between Mabs. The analysis showed that 43 of the 52 Mabs (83%) could be classified into one of five essentially noninteracting epitope groups (GOLD 1-5) containing between four and 15 Mabs each. The epitopes recognized by the Mabs belonging to groups 1 to 5 were peptide in nature. With one or two possible exceptions non-classifiable Mabs were either directed against carbohydrate epitopes (4 Mabs) or were inactive in the tests used. Within epitope groups GOLD 1, 4, and 5 two partially overlapping subgroups were distinguished. Mabs with a high degree of carcinoembryonic antigen specificity generally belonged to epitope groups GOLD 1 and 3. PMID:2474375

  1. Lousicidal activity of synthesized silver nanoparticles using Lawsonia inermis leaf aqueous extract against Pediculus humanus capitis and Bovicola ovis.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Sampath; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Bagavan, Asokan; Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Elango, Gandhi; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Velayutham, Kanayairam

    2012-11-01

    In the present work, we describe inexpensive, nontoxic, unreported and simple procedure for synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using leaf aqueous extract of Lawsonia inermis as eco-friendly reducing and capping agent. The aim of the present study was to assess the lousicidal activity of synthesized Ag NPs against human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), and sheep body louse, Bovicola ovis Schrank (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae). Direct contact method was conducted to determine the potential of pediculocidal activity and impregnated method was used with slight modifications to improve practicality and efficiency of tested materials of synthesized Ag NPs against B. ovis. The synthesized Ag NPs characterized with the UV showing peak at 426 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra clearly shows that the diffraction peaks in the pattern indexed as the silver with lattice constants. XRD analysis showed intense peaks at 2θ values of 38.34°, 44.59°, 65.04°, and 77.77° corresponding to (111), (200), (220), and (311) Bragg's reflection based on the fcc structure of Ag NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of Ag NPs exhibited prominent peaks at 3,422.13, 2,924.12, 2,851.76, 1,631.41, 1,381.60, 1,087.11, and 789.55 cm(-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph showed mean size of 59.52 nm and aggregates of spherical shape Ag NPs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) showed the complete chemical composition of the synthesized Ag NPs. In pediculocidal activity, the results showed that the optimal times for measuring percent mortality effects of synthesized Ag NPs were 26, 61, 84, and 100 at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min, respectively. The average percent mortality for synthesized Ag NPs was 33, 84, 91, and 100 at 10, 15, 20, and 35 min, respectively against B. ovis. The maximum activity was observed in the aqueous leaf extract of L. inermis, 1 mM AgNO(3) solution, and synthesized Ag NPs against P. humanus

  2. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003349.htm Rotavirus antigen test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The rotavirus antigen test detects rotavirus in the feces. This ...

  3. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  4. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  5. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  6. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  7. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  8. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  9. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  10. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  11. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnadas, Deepa Kolaseri; Bai, Fanqi; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    The identification of cancer testis (CT) antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1), melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3), and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1) in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy.

  12. Modulatory effect of henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis) on drug metabolising phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation and chemically induced skin and forestomach papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Rao, A R; Yadava, P K

    2003-03-01

    Henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis), commonly known as Mehndi is cultivated throughout India and is a very popular natural dye to color hand and hair. It is an integral part of indigenous culture, and is also known for its medicinal value. The effect of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of 80% ethanolic extract of the fresh leaves of Lawsonia inermis were examined on drug metabolizing phase-I and phase-II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 7 weeks old Swiss albino mice. Also anticarcinogenic potential of Henna leaf extract was studied adopting the protocol of benzo(a)pyrene induced forestomach and 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and croton oil-promoted skin papillomagenesis. Our primary findings reveal the 'duel-acting' nature of henna leaf as deduced from its potential to induce only the phase-II enzyme activity, associated mainly with carcinogen detoxification in liver of mice and inhibit the phase I enzyme activities. The hepatic glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase specific activities were elevated above basal (p < 0.005) level by Lawsonia inermis extract treatment. With reference to antioxidant enzymes the investigated doses were effective in increasing the hepatic glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities significantly (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005) at both the dose levels. Reduced glutathione (GSH) measured as non-protein sulphydryl was found to be significantly elevated in liver (p < 0.005) and in all the extrahepatic organs studied (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Among the extrahepatic organs examined (forestomach, kidney and lung) glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase level were increased in a dose independent manner (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Chemopreventive response was measured by the average number of papillomas per mouse (tumor burden) as well as percentage of tumor bearing animals and tumor multiplicity. There was a

  13. Human leucocyte antigens in tympanosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dursun, G; Acar, A; Turgay, M; Calgüner, M

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between certain HLA antigens and tympanosclerosis. The serum concentrations of HLA antigens were measured by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique in patients with tympanosclerosis and compared with a healthy control group. The serum levels of HLA-B35 and -DR3 were significantly higher in the patients with tympanosclerosis. This result suggests that certain types of HLA antigens may play an important role as an indicator or mediator in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:9088683

  14. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  15. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  16. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  17. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  18. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  19. Altering the antigenicity of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H; Alexander, S; Getzoff, E D; Tainer, J A; Geysen, H M; Lerner, R A

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the binding interaction between antigen and antibody we need to distinguish protein residues critical to the binding energy and mechanism from residues merely localized in the interface. By analyzing the binding of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant wild-type and mutant myohemerythrin (MHr) proteins, we were able to test the role of individual critical residues at the highly antigenic site MHr-(79-84), within the context of the folded protein. The results directly show the existence of antigenically critical residues, whose mutations significantly reduce antibody binding to the folded protein, thus verifying peptide-based assignments of these critical residues and demonstrating the ability of buried side chains to influence antigenicity. Taken together, these results (i) distinguish the antigenic surface from the solvent-exposed protein surface before binding, (ii) support a two-stage interaction mechanism allowing inducible changes in protein antigens by antibody binding, and (iii) show that protein antigenicity can be significantly reduced by alteration of single critical residues without destroying biological activity. Images PMID:1373498

  20. Antigen Retrieval Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Shi, Yan; Taylor, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    As a review for the 20th anniversary of publishing the antigen retrieval (AR) technique in this journal, the authors intend briefly to summarize developments in AR-immunohistochemistry (IHC)–based research and diagnostics, with particular emphasis on current challenges and future research directions. Over the past 20 years, the efforts of many different investigators have coalesced in extending the AR approach to all areas of anatomic pathology diagnosis and research and further have led to AR-based protein extraction techniques and tissue-based proteomics. As a result, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue collections are now seen as a literal treasure of materials for clinical and translational research to an extent unimaginable just two decades ago. Further research in AR-IHC is likely to focus on tissue proteomics, developing a more efficient protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue based on the AR principle, and combining the proteomics approach with AR-IHC to establish a practical, sophisticated platform for identifying and using biomarkers in personalized medicine. PMID:21339172

  1. Natural Selection Promotes Antigenic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christopher J.; Ros, Vera I. D.; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed ‘cassettes’ that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections

  2. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  3. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Results: Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27–33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusion: Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug. PMID:26997722

  4. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  5. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    PubMed

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation. PMID:20865427

  6. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  7. Proteolysis, proteasomes and antigen presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Rock, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins presented to the immune system must first be cleaved to small peptides by intracellular proteinases. Proteasomes are proteolytic complexes that degrade cytosolic and nuclear proteins. These particles have been implicated in ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and in the processing of intracellular antigens for cytolytic immune responses.

  8. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  9. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  11. [Polyagglutinability due to Hempas antigen].

    PubMed

    Rochant, H; Gerbal, A

    1976-03-01

    A new antigen has been recently discoverd in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. The acronyme Hempas was proposed for this disease as a remind of the main morphological feature of erythroblasts (hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity) and the characteristic serological findings (positive acidified serum test). The patients red cells are agglutinated and lysed by an IgM cold reacting antibody present in the serum of most normal subjects and not previously recognized. This behaviour is thus reminding of cells carrying antigens such as T, Tn, Cad or acquired B. As for T and Tn cells, sialic acid and electrophoretic mobility are reduced, but in contrast, agglutinability of Hempas cells is enhanced by enzyme treatment. Agglutination by anti H and anti Pr specific reagents is reduced. I and mainly i activity are strongly increased. The relationship between the membrane abnormalities of Hempas red cells and the failure of normoblasts to divide their cytoplasm i still largely unknown. PMID:788106

  12. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  13. Viruses, cytokines, antigens, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gianani, R; Sarvetnick, N

    1996-01-01

    To explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, we hypothesize that following an infection the immune response spreads to tissue-specific autoantigens in genetically predisposed individuals eventually determining progression to disease. Molecular mimicry between viral and self antigens could, in some instances, initiate autoimmunity. Local elicitation of inflammatory cytokines following infection probably plays a pivotal role in determining loss of functional tolerance to self autoantigens and the destructive activation of autoreactive cells. We also describe the potential role of interleukin 10, a powerful B-cell activator, in increasing the efficiency of epitope recognition, that could well be crucial to the progression toward disease. PMID:8637859

  14. Recombinant hepatitis B triple antigen vaccine: Hepacare.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Zuckerman, Arie J

    2002-08-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus is a public health problem throughout the world. Hepatitis B vaccines are now included in national immunization programmes of infants and/or adolescents in 129 countries. Current single antigen vaccines, that are plasma-derived or produced by recombinant DNA technology are highly effective, but between 5-10% or more of healthy immunocompetent subjects do not mount an antihepatitis B surface antibody protective response and others respond poorly (hyporesponders). The inclusion of pre-S1 and -S2 components of hepatitis B surface antigen in addition to the single antigen (triple antigen) in a novel vaccine, Hepacare, Medeva Pharma Plc, Speke, UK, overcomes nonresponsiveness and hyporesponsiveness in a significant number of individuals. The triple antigen is indicated for vaccination of nonresponders (and hyporesponders) to the current single antigen vaccines and for persons who require rapid protection against hepatitis B infection. PMID:12901552

  15. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  16. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  17. HLA antigens in cardiomyopathic Chilean chagasics.

    PubMed Central

    Llop, E; Rothhammer, F; Acuña, M; Apt, W

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of HLA antigens in a sample of 124 Chagas serologically positive Chilean individuals was studied. The sample was subdivided according to the presence or absence of chagasic cardiomyopathy, in order to search for genetic differences associated with this pathological condition. The frequency of antigen B40 in the presence of antigen Cw3 was found to be significantly lower in subjects with cardiomyopathy. We tentatively suggest that the presence of these antigens among noncardiomyopathics is associated with a decreased susceptibility to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy in the Chilean population. PMID:3189340

  18. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  19. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  20. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  1. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  2. Diagnotic value of some Fasciola gigantica antigens.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Said; El-Bahy, Mohammad; Hassan, Ali; Shalaby, Hatem; Gupta, Neelima

    2015-09-01

    The present study was aimed to select the specificity of antigens for Fasciola gigantica depending on its diagnostic utility and field applications. The tested antigens were coproantigen, excretory-secretory (ES) antigen and egg antigen. Coproantigen and Copro Hyperimmune serum were able to reflect the lowest level of cross-reaction with other tested F. gigantica antigens. By using SDS-PAGE, a structural homology was observed in F. gigantica ES and egg antigens. Intense cross reaction was observed between ES and egg antigens by ELISA technique even when there was no cross-reaction with coproantigen. The 27.6 kDa band proved to be the most specific in F. gigantica coproantigen and was different from the band at the same molecular weight by ES antigen. The results conclude that coproantigens show specific diagnostic ability for Fasciola and have low numbers of cross-reaction proteins reflecting its high specificity. Moreover, detection of coproantigen in faeces offers a new potential for diagnostics as compared to serum samples. This fact holds promise for a more accurate diagnostic technique in the near future for suspected Fasciola infection. PMID:26345056

  3. Antigenic composition of Litomosoides carini.

    PubMed

    Enayat, M S

    1976-07-01

    Three different phosphate buffered saline extracts of Litomosoides carini were prepared and examined by gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis and disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using sera from infected cotton rats and antisera from hyperimmunized rabbits. Using disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, up to 22 protein, 6 lipoprotein and 4 glycoprotein bands were identified. A minimum of 8 precipitin lines were detected by gel diffusion and a maximum of 11 precipitin arcs by immunoelectrophoresis when pooled rabbit antiserum was used. Using infected cotton rat sera, fewer number of precipitin lines and arcs were detected. Two precipitin arcs did not have a counterpart on examination against pooled rabbit antiserum. The importance of these two specific antigenic components for use in immunodiagnosis of human filariasis has been discussed. PMID:823514

  4. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody. PMID:26496237

  5. Antigen-induced suppression of the in vitro lymphocyte response to different antigens and mitogens

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Göran; Kashiwagi, Noboru

    1972-01-01

    Certain concentrations of antigen stimulated DNA synthesis in sensitized human lymphocytes cultivated in vitro, higher and lower concentrations being less stimulatory. The simultaneous addition of two antigens in low concentrations to the same cells caused an additive response. The decreased response to a high antigen dose did not affect the capacity of the cells to respond to the simultaneous addition of another antigen, as determined at the population level as well as at the cellular level by autoradiography. Presumably specific immunological paralysis was induced by high antigen doses. Addition of low antigen doses for 1–3 days to human sensitized lymphocytes cultivated in vitro resulted in decreased DNA synthesis as a response to the same antigen added in an optimal dose. Suppression of DNA synthesis was not caused by induction of tolerance or antibody suppression, because the cells also failed to respond to an unrelated antigen and to non-specific mitogens, such as PHA and ALS. Most likely the suppressed response after antigen pretreatment represents a phenomenon analogous to antigenic competition, although this term is not appropriate, since there need not be competition between antigens for a detectable effect. No soluble mediators of suppression could be demonstrated in the supernatant of suppressed cultures. PMID:5026855

  6. Tiny T antigen: an autonomous polyomavirus T antigen amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M I; Yoo, W; Mda, N Y; Folk, W R

    1997-01-01

    Three mRNAs from the murine polyomavirus early region encode the three well-characterized tumor antigens. We report the existence of a fourth alternatively spliced mRNA which encodes a fourth tumor antigen, tiny T antigen, which comprises the amino-terminal domain common to all of the T antigens but is extended by six unique amino acid residues. The amount of tiny T antigen in infected cells is small because of its short half-life. Tiny T antigen stimulates the ATPase activity of Hsc70, most likely because of its DnaJ-like motif. The common amino-terminal domain may interface with chaperone complexes to assist the T antigens in carrying out their diverse functions of replication, transcription, and transformation in the appropriate cellular compartments. PMID:9223500

  7. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  8. Non-antigenic and antigenic interventions in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rydén, Anna KE; Wesley, Johnna D; Coppieters, Ken T; Von Herrath, Matthias G

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells. Current T1D therapies are exclusively focused on regulating glycemia rather than the underlying immune response. A handful of trials have sought to alter the clinical course of T1D using various broad immune-suppressors, e.g., cyclosporine A and azathioprine.1–3 The effect on β-cell preservation was significant, however, these therapies were associated with unacceptable side-effects. In contrast, more recent immunomodulators, such as anti-CD3 and antigenic therapies such as DiaPep277, provide a more targeted immunomodulation and have been generally well-tolerated and safe; however, as a monotherapy there appear to be limitations in terms of therapeutic benefit. Therefore, we argue that this new generation of immune-modifying agents will likely work best as part of a combination therapy. This review will summarize current immune-modulating therapies under investigation and discuss how to move the field of immunotherapy in T1D forward. PMID:24165565

  9. Further characterization of filarial antigens by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, S.; Galahitiyawa, S. C.; Ismail, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of an antigen isolated from sera of Wuchereria bancrofti-infected patients and Setaria digitata antigen SD2-4 is reported. Both antigens showed carbohydrate (glycoprotein) staining. The W. bancrofti antigen had an apparent relative molecular mass of 35 000 while the S. digitata antigen SD2-4 migrated at the marker dye position on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS treatment of these antigens did not abolish the precipitation reaction with antibody. In the case of W. bancrofti antigen, SDS treatment probably exposed hitherto hidden antigen epitopes. PMID:6354508

  10. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  11. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases

    PubMed Central

    Brehony, C; Hill, DM; Lucidarme, J; Borrow, R; Maiden, MC

    2016-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  12. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  13. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  14. Seroprevalence of porcine proliferative enteropathy among wild boars in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of the wild boar as a reservoir of Lawsonia intracellularis was assessed by investigating the seroprevalence of this pathogen among wild boars in the Republic of Korea. The extent of exposure to L. intracellularis among wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) was monitored by a country-wide serological survey using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. Results In this study, antibodies to L. intracellularis were observed in 165 of 716 clinically healthy wild boars tested. The overall apparent prevalence calculated directly from the sample and the true prevalence calculated based on the accuracy of the test method were 23.0% (95% confidence interval: 20.0-26.3%) and 25.6% (95% confidence interval: 23.9-27.2%), respectively. Serologically positive animals were found in all the tested provinces. Conclusions Our results confirm that L. intracellularis is present in the wild boar population worldwide, even in Far East Asia. Despite the high seroprevalence shown in wild boars, further studies are warranted to evaluate their potential as a reservoir species because seroprevalence does not prove ongoing infection nor shedding of the bacteria in amounts sufficient to infect other animals. It should also be determined whether the wild boar, like the domestic pig, is a natural host of L. intracellularis. PMID:24393381

  15. Overexpressed oncogenic tumor-self antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Robert K; Bright, Jennifer D; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Overexpressed tumor-self antigens represent the largest group of candidate vaccine targets. Those exhibiting a role in oncogenesis may be some of the least studied but perhaps most promising. This review considers this subset of self antigens by highlighting vaccine efforts for some of the better known members and focusing on TPD52, a new promising vaccine target. We shed light on the importance of both preclinical and clinical vaccine studies demonstrating that tolerance and autoimmunity (presumed to preclude this class of antigens from vaccine development) can be overcome and do not present the obstacle that might have been expected. The potential of this class of antigens for broad application is considered, possibly in the context of low tumor burden or adjuvant therapy, as is the need to understand mechanisms of tolerance that are relatively understudied. PMID:25483660

  16. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  17. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  18. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  19. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  20. The 65-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M

    1987-01-01

    The immune response of the host to the antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays the key role in determining immunity from infection with as well as the pathogenicity of this organism. A 65-kilodalton (kDa) protein has been identified as one of the medically important antigens of M. tuberculosis. The gene encoding this antigen was isolated from a lambda gt11-M. tuberculosis recombinant DNA library using monoclonal antibodies directed against the 65-kDa antigen as the specific probes. The nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined, and a 540-amino-acid sequence was deduced. This sequence was shown to correspond to that of the 65-kDa antigen by constructing a plasmid in which this open reading frame was fused to the lacZ gene. The resulting fusion protein reacted specifically with the anti-65-kDa protein antibodies. A second long open reading frame was found downstream of the 65-kDa antigen gene which could encode a protein of 517 amino acids. This putative protein contained 29 tandemly arranged partial or complete matches to a pentapeptide sequence. Images PMID:3029018

  1. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  2. Serological response to in vitro-shed antigen(s) of Tritrichomonas foetus in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Bondurant, R H; van Hoosear, K A; Corbeil, L B; Bernoco, D

    1996-01-01

    We developed a serological assay for detection of (l) an erythrocyte-adhering molecule(s) shed by the bovine venereal pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus and (II) serum antibodies to this antigen(s) in exposed cattle. Sera from exposed and unexposed cattle were tested for their ability to induce complement-mediated lysis of bovine erythrocytes that had been previously incubated overnight at room temperature in pH-adjusted supernatants of T. foetus culture media. Eight of 180 serum specimens from six groups of presumably unexposed cows or heifers showed a positive (> or = 1:2) hemolytic titer (specificity = 95.6%). Thirteen of 14 females in two experimentally infected groups showed a positive hemolytic titer following infection (sensitivity = 94%). In experimentally infected heifers, there was little correlation (r2 = 0.33) between serum hemolytic titers with respect to shed antigen and titers obtained in serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in which whole T. foetus served as the antigen. Serum hemolytic titers rose 3 to 4 weeks sooner than did previously described vaginal mucus immunoglobulin G1 or immunoglobulin A titers with respect to whole-cell antigen or TF1.17 subunit antigen, respectively. Among 14 chronically infected bulls, only 6 (43%) showed a positive hemolytic titer. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to show a specific serological response in the host to an in vitro-shed antigen(s) of T. foetus and suggests a useful diagnostic test for potentially exposed herds. PMID:8807209

  3. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  4. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  5. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  6. Antigen-specific vaccines for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines targeting pathogens are generally effective and protective because based on foreign non-self antigens which are extremely potent in eliciting an immune response. On the contrary, efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still disappointing. One of the major reasons for such poor outcome, among others, is the difficulty of identifying tumor-specific target antigens which should be unique to the tumors or, at least, overexpressed on the tumors as compared to normal cells. Indeed, this is the only option to overcome the peripheral immune tolerance and elicit a non toxic immune response. New and more potent strategies are now available to identify specific tumor-associated antigens for development of cancer vaccine approaches aiming at eliciting targeted anti-tumor cellular responses. In the last years this aspect has been addressed and many therapeutic vaccination strategies based on either whole tumor cells or specific antigens have been and are being currently evaluated in clinical trials. This review summarizes the current state of cancer vaccines, mainly focusing on antigen-specific approaches. PMID:25483639

  7. Antigenic Properties of N Protein of Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus causes two important rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. Twenty-four species that represent sero- and genotypes have been registered within the genus Hantavirus by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Among the viral proteins, nucleocapsid (N) protein possesses an immunodominant antigen. The antigenicitiy of N protein is conserved compared with that of envelope glycoproteins. Therefore, N protein has been used for serological diagnoses and seroepidemiological studies. An understanding of the antigenic properties of N protein is important for the interpretation of results from serological tests using N antigen. N protein consists of about 430 amino acids and possesses various epitopes. The N-terminal quarter of N protein bears linear and immunodominant epitopes. However, a serotype-specific and multimerization-dependent antigenic site was found in the C-terminal half of N protein. In this paper, the structure, function, and antigenicity of N protein are reviewed. PMID:25123683

  8. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  9. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits. PMID:16557798

  10. Immunochemical characterization of Ancylostoma caninum antigens.

    PubMed

    Schnieder, T; Kohlmetz, C; Epe, C; Stoye, M

    1996-06-01

    Adult worms of Ancylostoma caninum were dissected and manually separated into cephalic glands, cervical glands, intestine, esophagus and cuticula. These fractions as well as third stage larvae were fractionated with Triton X-114 into water soluble (hydrophilic), Triton soluble (hydrophobic) and unsoluble proteins. These fractions were characterized by immunoblotting with serum from rabbits immunized either with a pool of cervical, cephalic glands and intestine, or the esophagus fraction as well as with sera from percutaneously infected dogs and rabbits. Immunodominant antigens were found that reacted with dog or rabbit post infection sera and could be suited as antigens in serodiagnostic tests. Hidden antigens were found in the several fractions. Those from esophagus and intestine could be vaccine candidates that will be tested in immunization trials. PMID:8688863

  11. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    PubMed

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. PMID:26872546

  12. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  13. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  14. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  15. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  16. Antigenic liposomes displaying CD22 ligands induce antigen-specific B cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Matthew S.; Pfrengle, Fabian; Rademacher, Christoph; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Gale, Andrew J.; von Drygalski, Annette; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies confer humoral immunity but can also be harmful when they target an autoantigen, alloantigen, allergen, or biotherapeutic. New strategies are needed for antigen-specific suppression of undesired antibody responses, particularly to T cell–dependent protein antigens, because they elicit T cell help. Here we show that liposomal nanoparticles, displaying both antigen and glycan ligands of the inhibitory coreceptor CD22, induce a tolerogenic program that selectively causes apoptosis in mouse and human B cells. These SIGLEC-engaging tolerance-inducing antigenic liposomes (STALs, where SIGLEC is defined as sialic acid–binding Ig-like lectin) induced robust antigen-specific tolerance to protein antigens in mice, preventing subsequent immune response to challenge with the same antigen. Since development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII is a serious problem in treatment of hemophilia A patients, we investigated the potential of this approach for inducing tolerance to FVIII in a hemophilia mouse model. STALs prevented formation of inhibitory FVIII antibodies, allowing for effective administration of FVIII to hemophilia mice to prevent bleeding. These findings suggest that STALs could be used to eliminate or prevent harmful B cell–mediated immune responses. PMID:23722906

  17. Cytostructural Localization of a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Donald R.; Batsakis, John G.

    1980-10-01

    Tumor cell membrane glycoproteins may be involved in the induction of tumor immunity or in the escape of tumors from immunologic defense mechanisms. Forty-four benign and malignant breast lesions were examined for the presence of a carbohydrate precursor antigen (T antigen) of the human blood group system MN. T antigen was demonstrated by means of an immunohistochemical technique to detect tissue binding of peanut agglutinin, a plant lectin, with affinity for T antigen. Malignant breast lesions showed a pattern of T antigen expression different from that of benign breast tissues. A possible role for T antigen in the modulation of the immune response to breast carcinoma is suggested.

  18. Antigen binding and capping by lymphocytes of genetic nonresponder mice.

    PubMed

    Dunham, E K; Unanue, E R; Benacerraf, B

    1972-08-01

    Radioautographic study of the binding of GAT-(125)I to spleen cells of genetic responder and nonresponder mice demonstrates that among mice not injected with antigen all strains have approximately the same number of antigen-binding cells; after injection with antigen the number of antigen-binding cells increases in responders but not in nonresponders. Nonresponders are shown to make antibody after injection with GAT complexed with an immunogenic carrier, demonstrating the presence of potentially functional B cells in responders and nonresponders alike. When incubated in the warm, antigen-binding cells of both responders and nonresponders concentrate antigen at one pole of the cell, forming caps. PMID:5043419

  19. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  20. Human humoral responses to antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: immunodominance of high-molecular-mass antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Laal, S; Samanich, K M; Sonnenberg, M G; Zolla-Pazner, S; Phadtare, J M; Belisle, J T

    1997-01-01

    The selection of antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for most studies of humoral responses in tuberculosis patients has been restricted to molecules that were either immunodominant in immunized animals or amenable to biochemical purification rather than those that were reactive with the human immune system. Delineation of antigens that elicit humoral responses during the natural course of disease progression in humans has been hindered by the presence of cross-reactive antibodies to conserved regions on ubiquitous prokaryotic antigens in sera from healthy individuals and tuberculosis patients. The levels of cross-reactive antibodies in the sera were reduced by preadsorption with Escherichia coli lysates, prior to studying their reactivity against a large panel of M. tuberculosis antigens to which the human immune system may be exposed during natural infection and disease. Thus, reactivity against pools of secreted, cellular, and cell wall-associated antigens of M. tuberculosis was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results suggested that the secreted protein preparation contained antigens most frequently recognized by the humoral responses of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The culture filtrate proteins were subsequently size fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, characterized by reaction with murine monoclonal antibodies to known antigens of M. tuberculosis by an ELISA, and assessed for reactivity with tuberculous and nontuberculous sera. Results show that a secreted antigen of 88 kDa elicits a strong antibody response in a high percentage of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This and other antigens identified on the basis of their reactivity with patient sera may prove useful for developing serodiagnosis for tuberculosis. PMID:9008280

  1. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngoepe, Ernest; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Wandeler, Alex; Sabeta, Claude

    2014-01-01

    There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5%) and Mokola virus (0.5%). Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones. PMID:25685866

  2. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  4. Virion and soluble antigens of japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Eckels, K H; Hetrick, F M; Russell, P K

    1975-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virions contain a 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope glycoprotein antigen that can be solubilized with sodium lauryl sulfate and separated from other virion structural polypeptides and viral ribonucleic acid by gel filtration chromatography. The 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope protein is the major antigen responsible for cross-reactivity of the virion in complement fixation tests with other closely related arboviruses. A naturally occurring soluble complement-fixing antigen is found in Japanese encephalitis mouse brain preparations after removal of particulate antigens. After partial purification by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing, the 53 X 10-3-molecular weight soluble complement-fixing antigen is more type specific than the Japanese encephalitis envelope antigen in complement fixation tests. Further, the Japanese encephalitis soluble complement-fixing antigen is stable to treatment with sodium lauryl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, whereas virion complement-fixing antigens are unstable after this treatment. Images PMID:47312

  5. Identification of genes encoding Schistosoma mansoni antigens using an antigenic sequence tag strategy.

    PubMed

    Zouain, C S; Azevedo, V A; Franco, G R; Pena, S D; Goes, A M

    1998-12-01

    Another approach for the identification of genes that code for antigenic products is described using an antigenic sequence tag (AST) strategy. A Schistosoma mansoni adult worm cDNA library was screened with affinity chromatography-purified immunoglobulins from infected human sera and a mild oxidation treatment with sodium periodate. From 1 or both ends of 30 cDNA clones, 30 ASTs were obtained. Of these, 22 were previously known Sm antigens. One clone had matches with entries for other organisms in the databases and 6 had homology with Sm-expressed sequence tags (EST) entries. These clones, together with another 1 that had no significant database matches, were considered new antigenic genes in S. mansoni. The strategy proved to be efficient for the identification of genes that could be used for immunological studies and evaluation as vaccine candidates. PMID:9920341

  6. Bacterial antigen detection in body fluids: methods for rapid antigen concentration and reduction of nonspecific reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Doskeland, S O; Berdal, B P

    1980-01-01

    We sought procedures which would allow a rapid concentration in high yield of bacterial antigens from tissue fluids of patients and which could be applied also to protein-rich fluids like serum. Ethanol precipitation at a subzero temperature with albumin added as an antigen coprecipitant made it possible to achieve a more than 20-fold concentration of antigen in 15 min and a 200-fold concentration in 45 min. Heat-stable antigens could be concentrated from protein-rich fluids (like serum) after the sample had been deproteinized by boiling. Such heating (100 degrees C, 3 min) also liberated bacterial polysaccharides from antibody complexes and elminated the nonspecific interference of serum in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:7372801

  7. Isolation and antigenicity of a 45-kilodalton Paracoccidioides brasiliensis immunodominant antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed human antibody responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cellular antigens by the immunoblot technique to identify specific cellular components and to investigate the existence of antigen profile differences among serological responses of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients. Among the 64 PCM serum samples analyzed, a relatively homogeneous immunoglobulin G response to P. brasiliensis antigens was observed. The polypeptide with a mass of 45 kDa was the most clinically important, since antibody to this antigen was detectable in 90.6% of PCM patients studied and the six individuals who did not produce antibody were either at the end of treatment or in the posttherapy period and had shown clinical recovery. These facts suggested that the presence of this antibody may be an indicator of active disease. The 45-kDa antigen was also the most specific antigen of the PCM humoral immune response, since it reacted with only 2 of 79 (2.5%) heterologous serum samples tested: 1 histoplasmosis case and 1 tuberculosis case. This polypeptide was isolated from gels by electroelution and, when tested by an immunoradiometric assay and immunoblotting, maintained its reactivity with PCM sera and also with anti-P. brasiliensis polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits at the same sensitivity levels as those obtained in immunoblotting with a crude antigen. Since in our assays the 45-kDa polypeptide was the major P. brasiliensis antigen and seemed to be specific for PCM, its use in alternative diagnostic methods is promising, especially in patients suspected of having the juvenile clinical form of PCM often associated with negative double-immunodiffusion results. Images PMID:1612736

  8. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  9. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  10. Mapping Antigenic Motifs in the Trypomastigote Small Surface Antigen from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Balouz, Virginia; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Cánepa, Gaspar E.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Volcovich, Romina; Gonzalez, Nicolás; Altcheh, Jaime; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The trypomastigote small surface antigen (TSSA) is a mucin-like molecule from Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which displays amino acid polymorphisms in parasite isolates. TSSA expression is restricted to the surface of infective cell-derived trypomastigotes, where it functions as an adhesin and engages surface receptors on the host cell as a prerequisite for parasite internalization. Previous results have established TSSA-CL, the isoform encoded by the CL Brener clone, as an appealing candidate for use in serology-based diagnostics for Chagas disease. Here, we used a combination of peptide- and recombinant protein-based tools to map the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL at maximal resolution. Our results indicate the presence of different partially overlapping B-cell epitopes clustering in the central portion of TSSA-CL, which contains most of the polymorphisms found in parasite isolates. Based on these results, we assessed the serodiagnostic performance of a 21-amino-acid-long peptide that spans TSSA-CL major antigenic determinants, which was similar to the performance of the previously validated glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TSSA-CL fusion molecule. Furthermore, the tools developed for the antigenic characterization of the TSSA antigen were also used to explore other potential diagnostic applications of the anti-TSSA humoral response in Chagasic patients. Overall, our present results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL and support this molecule as an excellent target for molecular intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:25589551

  11. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  12. Comparison of Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Cercarial Antigens and Soluble Egg Antigens for Serodiagnosing Schistosome Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Mike; Aitken, Cara; Bailey, Wendi; Ji, Minjun; Dawson, Emily; Gilis, Henk; Spence, Grant; Alexander, Claire; van Gool, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni cercarial antigen preparation (cercarial transformation fluid – SmCTF) was evaluated for detection of anti-schistosome antibodies in human sera in 4 collaborating laboratories. The performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. mansoni egg antigens (SmSEA) in an indirect enzyme-immunoassay (ELISA) antigen assay, the latter being used routinely in 3 of the 4 participating laboratories to diagnose S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. In the fourth laboratory the performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. japonicum egg antigens (SjSEA) in ELISA for detection of anti-S. japonicum antibodies. In all 4 laboratories the results given by SmCTF in ELISA were very similar to those given by the antigen preparation routinely used in the respective laboratory to detect anti-schistosome antibodies in human infection sera. In so far as the ELISA results from SmCTF are thus so little different from those given by schistosome egg antigens and also cheaper to produce, the former is a potentially useful new diagnostic aid for schistosomiasis. PMID:23029577

  13. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  14. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  15. Immunity to Intracellular Salmonella Depends on Surface-associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Claudi, Beatrice; Mazé, Alain; Schemmer, Anne K.; Kirchhoff, Dennis; Schmidt, Alexander; Burton, Neil; Bumann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23093937

  16. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  17. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  18. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  19. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  20. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Seibert fractions by immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Hansen, D; Schecter, G; Slutkin, G; Hopewell, P; Affronti, L; Echenberg, D F

    1986-01-01

    Seibert fractions prepared from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrates were evaluated by immunoblotting with a serum pool from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Antibody activity was observed primarily with antigens in the polysaccharide II and A protein fractions; these fractions were further evaluated by immunoblotting with sera from individual patients with tuberculosis, from individuals without tuberculosis and positive for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test, and from individuals negative for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test. The antigens identified in the protein A fraction, a 32,000-molecular-weight antigen and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen, reacted with antibody found in sera from all patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from over 25% of the control individuals. A 10,000-molecular-weight antigen, a 30,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight antigen, and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen were observed in the polysaccharide II fraction; these antigens reacted with serum antibody from 70% or more of the patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from 20 to 70% of the control individuals. One of the antigens, with a molecular weight ranging from 17,000 to 28,000 in the polysaccharide II fraction, reacted with antibody in 64% of the sera from patients with tuberculosis but with only 1 of 15 control normal sera. This antigen may elicit an antibody response specifically associated with tuberculosis. Images PMID:3088029

  1. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  2. The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the signal transduction and antigen processing functions of the B cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Chaohong; FALLEN, Margaret K.; MILLER, Heather; UPADHYAYA, Arpita; SONG, Wenxia

    2014-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is the sensor on the B cell surface that surveys foreign molecules (antigen) in our bodies and activates B cells to generate antibody responses upon encountering cognate antigen. The binding of antigen to the BCR induces signaling cascades in the cytoplasm, which provides the first signal for B cell activation. Subsequently, BCRs internalize and target bound antigen to endosomes, where antigen is processed into T cell recognizable forms. T helper cells generate the second activation signal upon binding to antigen presented by B cells. The optimal activation of B cells requires both signals, thereby depending on the coordination of BCR signaling and antigen transport functions. Antigen binding to the BCR also induces rapid remodeling of the cortical actin network of B cells. While being initiated and controlled by BCR signaling, recent studies reveal that this actin remodeling is critical for both the signaling and antigen processing functions of the BCR, indicating a role for actin in coordinating these two pathways. Here we will review previous and recent studies on actin reorganization during BCR activation and BCR-mediated antigen processing, and discuss how actin remodeling translates BCR signaling into rapid antigen uptake and processing while providing positive and negative feedback to BCR signaling. PMID:24999354

  3. Three types of response to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, D N; McManus, I C; Stanford, J L; Thomas, A; Abeyagunawardana, D V

    1987-11-01

    Responses to pathogenic and environmental mycobacteria were assessed in 2680 children in India and Sri Lanka using quadruple skin-testing with new tuberculins. Statistical analysis of the results, by fitting a log-linear mixture model, confirmed the presence of three different categories of response: category 2 non-responders (about 55%) did not react to any component of the mycobacteria; category 3 responders (about 40%) were sensitive to the species-specific group iv antigens; and category 1 responders (about 5%) were sensitive to the group i antigens which are common to all mycobacteria. The proportions of the three response categories vary with age and with BCG status. BCG vaccination and increasing age act independently to decrease the proportion of category 2 non-responders and increase the proportion of category 3 individuals. BCG vaccination and increasing age interact to increase the proportion of category 1 responders. PMID:3443158

  4. Yeast retrotransposon particles as antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kingsman, A J; Burns, N R; Layton, G T; Adams, S E

    1995-05-31

    The development of technologies to produce recombinant proteins for use in the pharmaceutical industry has made substantial advances, in particular in the area of generating antigens containing multiple copies of important immunological regions. One such antigen-carrier system is based on the ability of a protein encoded by the yeast retrotransposon, Ty, to self-assemble into virus-like particles. Ty-fusion proteins retain this ability to form particles, and a range of hybrid VLPs carrying a variety of heterologous antigens have been produced and shown to induce potent immune responses. In particular, hybrid VLPs carrying the core protein p24 of HIV (p24-VLPs) have been shown to induce antibody and T-cell proliferative responses in both experimental animals and human volunteers, and immunization of rabbits with VLPs carrying the principal neutralizing determinant of HIV (V3-VLPs) resulted in the induction of neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell proliferation. Further studies with V3-VLPs have shown that this particulate antigen stimulates enhanced V3-specific lymphoproliferative responses as compared to whole recombinant gp120 or to V3 peptide conjugated to albumin. The V3-VLPs also induce potent CTL responses following immunization of mice in the absence of adjuvant. These responses are MHC class I restricted and are mediated by CD8-positive cells. These observations therefore demonstrate that hybrid Ty-VLPs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses against HIV and suggest that these immunogens may be important in combatting AIDS and other infections. PMID:7625653

  5. Murine lung immunity to a soluble antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, D.N.; Bice, D.E.; Siegel, D.W.; Schuyler, M.R. Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM )

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that soluble antigen triggers antigen-specific immunity in the respiratory tract in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen, the authors examined the development of local and systemic immunity in C57BL/6 mice after intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of a soluble, large molecular weight protein neoantigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Specific anti-KLH IgG and IgM first appeared in the sera of mice on day 7 after primary immunization by i.t. instillation of KLH, with specific serum antibody concentrations remaining elevated at day 11. Cultured spleen cells obtained from mice after primary immunization released only low levels of specific IgM, and no specific IgG. No specific antibody was released by cell populations derived from the lungs of animals undergoing primary immunization. When presensitized mice were given an i.t. challenge with KLH, responses differed markedly from those following primary immunization. Lung-associated lymph node cell populations from challenged mice released greater amounts of specific antibody earlier than did cell populations, which after primary immunization had not released detectable amounts of specific antibody in vitro, released easily detectable amounts of specific antibody after challenge. Thus, i.t. instillation of soluble KLH generates specific immunity in mice in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen. Specific responses following primary immunization occur largely within draining lung-associated lymph nodes. In contrast, presensitized animals challenged i.t. with soluble KLH mount secondary antibody responses in both lung and lung-associated lymph nodes.

  6. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  7. Antigenic Distance Measurements for Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Selection

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is one of the major options to counteract the effects of influenza diseases. Selection of an effective vaccine strain is the key to the success of an effective vaccination program since vaccine protection can only be achieved when the selected influenza vaccine strain matches the antigenic variants causing future outbreaks. Identification of an antigenic variant is the first step to determine whether vaccine strain needs to be updated. Antigenic distance derived from immunological assays, such as hemagglutination inhibition, is commonly used to measure the antigenic closeness between circulating strains and the current influenza vaccine strain. Thus, consensus on an explicit and robust antigenic distance measurement is critical in influenza surveillance. Based on the current seasonal influenza surveillance procedure, we propose and compare three antigenic distance measurements, including Average antigenic distance (A-distance), Mutual antigenic distance (M-distance), and Largest antigenic distance (L-distance). With the assistance of influenza antigenic cartography, our simulation results demonstrated that M-distance is a robust influenza antigenic distance measurement. Experimental results on both simulation and seasonal influenza surveillance data demonstrate that M-distance can be effectively utilized in influenza vaccine strain selection. PMID:22063385

  8. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  9. The antigenic composition of Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Fuchs, N; Sonda, S; Hehl, A

    1999-08-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which causes neosporosis, namely stillbirth and abortion in cattle, and neuromuscular disease in dogs. Although N. caninum is phylogenetically and biologically closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, it is antigenically clearly distinct. In analogy to T. gondii, three stages have been identified. These are: (i) asexually proliferating tachyzoites; (ii) tissue cysts harbouring slowly dividing bradyzoites; and (iii) oocysts containing sporozoites. The sexually produced stage of this parasite has only recently been identified, and has been shown to be shed with the faeces from dogs orally infected with N. caninum tissue cysts. Thus dogs are definitive hosts of N. caninum. Tachyzoites can be cultivated in vitro using similar techniques as previously described for T. gondii. Methods for generating tissue cysts containing N. caninum bradyzoites in mice, and purification of these cysts, have been developed. A number of studies have been undertaken to identify and characterise at the molecular level specific antigenic components of N. caninum in order to improve serological diagnosis and to enhance the current view on the many open questions concerning the cell biology of this parasite and its interactions with the host on the immunological and cellular level. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview on the approaches used for detection of antigens in N. caninum. The studies discussed here have had a great impact in the elucidation of the immunological and pathogenetic events during infection, as well as the development of potential new immunotherapeutic tools for future vaccination against N. caninum infection. PMID:10576569

  10. Developmental expression of autoimmune target antigens during organogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, T; Eishi, Y

    1991-01-01

    A common factor existing among autoimmune target antigens was sought in association with their developmental expression during organogenesis. Autoimmunity against a certain organ was experimentally induced in rats by deliberate immunization with whole tissue extract of the respective organ. Histopathological changes in a target organ of the immunized rats were recorded, and tissue specificity of the raised autoantibodies was immunohistologically examined with tissue sections of normal adult rats. These immune sera were also reacted with tissue sections of a target organ in each stage of organogenesis, and the time of first expression of the target antigen was determined for each immune serum. As a result, induced autoantibodies were directed only to a limited number of tissue antigens, such as thyroid follicular antigens [gestation day 17 (17 GD)], salivary ductal antigens (18 GD), anterior pituitary antigens (21 GD), gastric parietal cell antigens (22 GD), neural myelin antigens (2 days after birth), retinal photo-receptor cell antigens (3 days after birth) and testicular germ cell antigens (4 weeks after birth). They were first expressed on the day indicated in parentheses. Comparing with the development of the immune system, which was monitored by demonstrating CD4- and/or CD8-positive cells in the developing thymus and spleen, a common feature of these potential autoimmune target antigens was found to be that they were expressed either in parallel with, or after, but never before, the development of the immune system. This observation might suggest why only a limited number of self antigens can be autoimmune target antigens among the enormously large number of antigen determinants existing in the whole extract of each organ. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1769700

  11. Antigenic mosaic of Methanosarcinaceae: partial characterization of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 surface antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Garberi, J C; Macario, A J; De Macario, E C

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas were constructed with spleen cells from mice immunized against Methanosarcina barkeri 227. The reaction with the resulting monoclonal antibodies identified two antigenic determinants. Determinant 8A is present in M. barkeri 227, where it is accessible to antibody on whole bacterial cells. 8A is undetectable in (or absent from) M. barkeri R1M3, an immunologically closely related strain. Determinant 8C is present in both strains, but with M. barkeri 227 it is found only in extracts and cannot be demonstrated in whole cells. It therefore appears to be hidden. A soluble form of antigen 8A (antigen 227) was obtained treating whole M. barkeri 227 cells with absolute methanol. This antigen was further purified by affinity chromatography with antibody 8A. Chemical and immunochemical analyses of these preparations showed that antigen 227 is a high-molecular-weight (4 X 10(5)) structure composed mainly of one carbohydrate, glucose, and small amounts of amino acids. Its solubility properties suggest that this molecule is associated with a lipid moiety. PMID:2413005

  12. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  13. Equine proliferative enteropathy--a review of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, N; Gebhart, C J

    2013-07-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) is a disease of foals caused by the obligate intracellular organism Lawsonia intracellularis. This emerging disease affects mainly weanling foals and causes fever, lethargy, peripheral oedema, diarrhoea, colic and weight loss. The diagnosis of EPE may be challenging and relies on the presence of hypoproteinaemia, thickening of segments of the small intestinal wall observed upon abdominal ultrasonography, positive serology and molecular detection of L. intracellularis in faeces. Although the clinical entity, diagnostic approach and treatment of EPE are well established and described, the epidemiology for this disease has remained largely unaddressed. This article focuses on new developments in the field of EPE, including epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:23662705

  14. Reduced level of sex-specific antigen (H-Y antigen) on lymphocytes in some patients with bilateral cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Fedder, J; Hansen, L G; Hjort, T

    1989-01-01

    Sex-specific (Sxs) antigen on the surface of nucleated cells from normal human males seems to be essential for the formation of testes. The relative quantity of the antigen on lymphocytes was evaluated by absorption experiments in a complement-dependent cytotoxicity test or in an ELISA technique using antisera against Sxs antigen produced by immunization of female rats. Lymphocytes from 13 normal males were Sxs-antigen positive, and cells from 12 normal females were characterized as Sxs-antigen negative. However, in the testing of lymphocytes from nine boys with bilateral cryptorchidism, only six revealed a normal male absorption pattern, whereas the antigen level on cells from three boys, all of them with normal karyotype, was reduced compared with the normal male level. No correlation between Sxs-antigen level and testosterone response after treatment with hCG could be demonstrated. PMID:2565709

  15. Genetic Mapping of the Antigenic Determinants of Two Polysaccharide K Antigens, K10 and K54, in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ørskov, Ida; Nyman, Kate

    1974-01-01

    The genes controlling synthesis of the Escherichia coli acidic polysaccharide capsular antigens K10 and K54 were transferred by conjugation to E. coli strains of other serotypes. The genes concerned with these K antigen determinants showed genetic linkage with the serA locus. We propose to name the K antigen-controlling gene kpsA. The genetic determinants of the two K antigens could also be transferred to enteropathogenic serotypes, even though such strains have never been found in nature with special acidic polysaccharide K antigens. A noncapsulated derivative, K−, of the K10 strain can transfer the genetic determinant of the K antigen, demonstrating the probable existence of another chromosomal locus involved in the production of such acidic polysaccharide K antigens. PMID:4138850

  16. Antigen-specificity using chimeric antigen receptors: the future of regulatory T-cell therapy?

    PubMed

    Boardman, Dominic; Maher, John; Lechler, Robert; Smyth, Lesley; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2016-04-15

    Adoptive regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy using autologous Tregs expandedex vivois a promising therapeutic approach which is currently being investigated clinically as a means of treating various autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. Despite this, early results have highlighted the need for potent Tregs to yield a substantial clinical advantage. One way to achieve this is to create antigen-specific Tregs which have been shown in pre-clinical animal models to have an increased potency at suppressing undesired immune responses, compared to polyclonal Tregs. This mini review outlines where Treg therapy currently stands and discusses the approaches which may be taken to generate antigen-specific Tregs, including the potential use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), for future clinical trials. PMID:27068938

  17. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis. PMID:26342828

  18. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans. PMID:21670078

  19. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand. PMID:27101782

  20. MHC Class II Auto-Antigen Presentation is Unconventional

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade; Kim, AeRyon

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, helper T cells can be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed, human leukocyte antigens class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen-processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen-processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing, and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for auto-antigenic epitopes, which were not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:26257739

  1. Protamine-based nanoparticles as new antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Peleteiro Olmedo, Mercedes; González-Fernández, África; Alonso Fernández, María José; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2015-11-01

    The use of biodegradable nanoparticles as antigen delivery vehicles is an attractive approach to overcome the problems associated with the use of Alum-based classical adjuvants. Herein we report, the design and development of protamine-based nanoparticles as novel antigen delivery systems, using recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen as a model viral antigen. The nanoparticles, composed of protamine and a polysaccharide (hyaluronic acid or alginate), were obtained using a mild ionic cross-linking technique. The size and surface charge of the nanoparticles could be modulated by adjusting the ratio of the components. Prototypes with optimal physicochemical characteristics and satisfactory colloidal stability were selected for the assessment of their antigen loading capacity, antigen stability during storage and in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept studies. In vitro studies showed that antigen-loaded nanoparticles induced the secretion of cytokines by macrophages more efficiently than the antigen in solution, thus indicating a potential adjuvant effect of the nanoparticles. Finally, in vivo studies showed the capacity of these systems to trigger efficient immune responses against the hepatitis B antigen following intramuscular administration, suggesting the potential interest of protamine-polysaccharide nanoparticles as antigen delivery systems. PMID:26455338

  2. Cross-Reactivity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Antigen Detection Enzyme Immunoassay with Fungal Antigen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Rimek, Dagmar; Singh, Jagpal; Kappe, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    We studied the specificity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Ag enzyme immunoassay by using 130 isolates of 63 clinically relevant fungal species. Antigen extracts of seven Candida spp. (Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, and C. tropicalis) repeatedly yielded positive reactions (>0.5 ng/ml). Geotrichum candidum and Fusarium verticillioides were found to yield borderline-positive reactions (0.25 to 0.50 ng/ml). Antigen preparations from the other 54 fungal species, including yeasts, molds, dermatophytes, and dimorphic fungi, did not cross-react in the assay. PMID:12843102

  3. Epidemiological survey of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in swine farms in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fei-Fei; Yang, De-Quan; Ju, Hou-Bin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jian; Liu, Pei-Hong; Zhou, Jin-Ping

    2013-11-01

    An epidemiological survey of porcine diarrheal disease prevalence between September 2011 and January 2012 revealed that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) contributed to outbreaks of diarrhea in pig farms in Shanghai, China. The distribution profile of 10 PEDV strains revealed three distinct genotypes coexisting in the same pig farm. Two of the ten field strains that were isolated exhibited a distinct evolution from the others. In addition to PEDV, other enteric pathogens, including porcine kobuvirus, porcine teschovirus and Lawsonia intracellularis, were identified. PMID:23685898

  4. The molecular basis of antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Germain, R N; Sant, A J; Braunstein, N S; Ronchese, F

    1988-01-01

    We have used a multifactorial approach to investigate the relationship between the structure of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded cell surface molecules (Ia) and the recognition of Ia-bound peptide antigens by clonally distributed alpha beta heterodimeric T cell receptors (TCR). Four distinct parameters of Ia structure-function--1) control of Ia assembly and transport to the surface membrane; 2) serological reactivity with panels of monoclonal antibodies; 3) ability to present peptide antigens to T cells for functional activation; and 4) differential peptide binding independent of the TCR--have been measured. This has allowed assignment of allelically polymorphic subregions or individual residues to locations in a model class II molecular structure and attribution to these subregions and residues of specific functions such as control of alpha beta chain interaction and protein folding, antigenic peptide binding, or TCR binding. The results of these analyses have provided an internally consistent picture of the class II molecule that fits well with a hypothetical model for Ia derived by analogy from the recently solved HLA class I crystal structure. They have also given us the first clear definition of specific peptide binding residues within the general peptide binding region of Ia and have revealed an unexpected asymmetry in the structure-function relationships of the putative alpha and beta chain helical regions. Overall, the results of these studies indicate the critical importance of multi-parameter analysis in creating useful molecular models using non-chemical techniques. They also suggest that hypotheses about TCR-Ia interaction may have to take into account a significant asymmetry in the function of the two major polymorphic regions of histocompatibility molecules. PMID:3269359

  5. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages. PMID:19637876

  6. How to Make a Non-Antigenic Protein (Auto) Antigenic: Molecular Complementarity Alters Antigen Processing and Activates Adaptive-Innate Immunity Synergy.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that complementary proteins and peptides form complexes with increased antigenicity and/or autoimmunogenicity. Five case studies are highlighted: 1) diphtheria toxin-antitoxin (antibody), which induces immunity to the normally non-antigenic toxin, and autoimmune neuritis; 2) tryptophan peptide of myelin basic protein and muramyl dipeptide ("adjuvant peptide"), which form a complex that induces experimental allergic encephalomyelitis; 3) an insulin and glucagon complex that is far more antigenic than either component individually; 4) various causes of experimental autoimmune myocarditis such as C protein in combination with its antibody, or coxsackie B virus in combination with the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor; 5) influenza A virus haemagglutinin with the outer membrane protein of the Haemophilus influenzae, which increases antigenicity. Several mechanisms cooperate to alter immunogenicity. Complexation alters antigen processing, protecting the components against proteolysis, altering fragmentation and presenting novel antigens to the immune system. Complementary antigens induce complementary adaptive immune responses (complementary antibodies and/or T cell receptors) that produce circulating immune complexes (CIC). CIC stimulate innate immunity. Concurrently, complementary antigens stimulate multiple Toll-like receptors that synergize to over-produce cytokines, which further stimulate adaptive immunity. Thus innate and adaptive immunity form a positive feedback loop. If components of the complex mimic a host protein, then autoimmunity may result. Enhanced antigenicity for production of improved vaccines and/or therapeutic autoimmunity (e.g., against cancer cells) might be achieved by using information from antibody or TCR recognition sites to complement an antigen; by panning for complements in randomized peptide libraries; or using antisense peptide strategies to design complements. PMID:26179268

  7. Biofunctionalizing nanofibers with carbohydrate blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Barr, Katie; Kannan, Bhuvaneswari; Korchagina, Elena; Popova, Inna; Ryzhov, Ivan; Henry, Stephen; Bovin, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and simple method of biofunctionalising nylon, cellulose acetate, and polyvinyl butyral electrospun nanofibers with blood group glycans was achieved by preparing function-spacer-lipid constructs and simply contacting them to fibers with a piezo inkjet printer. A series of water dispersible amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs were synthesized representing a range ABO and related blood group antigens. After immediate contact of the amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs with nanofiber surfaces they self-assembled and were detectable by enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27388774

  8. Nonclassical T Cells and Their Antigens in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Lepore, Marco; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    T cells that recognize nonpeptidic antigens, and thereby are identified as nonclassical, represent important yet poorly characterized effectors of the immune response. They are present in large numbers in circulating blood and tissues and are as abundant as T cells recognizing peptide antigens. Nonclassical T cells exert multiple functions including immunoregulation, tumor control, and protection against infections. They recognize complexes of nonpeptidic antigens such as lipid and glycolipid molecules, vitamin B2 precursors, and phosphorylated metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. Each of these antigens is presented by antigen-presenting molecules other than major histocompatibility complex (MHC), including CD1, MHC class I–related molecule 1 (MR1), and butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) molecules. Here, we discuss how nonclassical T cells participate in the recognition of mycobacterial antigens and in the mycobacterial-specific immune response. PMID:25059739

  9. Characterization of the major outer membrane antigens of Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Wannemuehler, M J; Hubbard, R D; Greer, J M

    1988-01-01

    Outer membrane extracts of Treponema hyodysenteriae were used to evaluate the antibody responses in immunized or convalescent pigs. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis identified antibodies in sera reactive with 14- to 19-kilodalton (kDa) antigens. Reactivity against these antigens could be removed only by absorption of sera with butanol-water-extracted endotoxin from the homologous strain of T. hyodysenteriae. Treatment of the outer membrane extracts with 0.1 M sodium meta-periodate, but not with proteinase K, abolished reactivity with both outer membrane and endotoxin antigens (14 and 19 kDa). These results indicate that swine vaccinated with the outer membrane extract of T. hyodysenteriae develop antibody responses to outer membrane antigens qualitatively similar to those of swine convalescing from active infection, especially antibodies against low-molecular-mass antigens. The nature of the 14- to 19-kDa antigens appears consistent with that of treponemal endotoxin and lipopolysaccharide. Images PMID:2460406

  10. Antigenic diversity of lipooligosaccharides of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Gupta, M R; Dudas, K C; Murphy, T F; Apicella, M A

    1987-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae are an antigenically heterogeneous group of macromolecules. Immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition studies with phenol-water-extracted LOS and absorbed antisera specific for the oligosaccharide portion of the LOS identified six LOS strain-specific antigens. To facilitate screening large numbers of strains to search for LOS antigenic heterogeneity, a system utilizing proteinase K whole cell digests in Western blots was developed. Seventy-two nontypable H. influenzae LOS extracts were analyzed in this Western blot assay. Thirty-seven of these extracts could be segregated into 10 antigenically distinct LOS groups based on immunologic recognition by one or more of the rabbit antisera. Thirty-five of the strains did not contain these LOS antigens. These results demonstrate that antigenic differences exist among the LOS of nontypable H. influenzae strains, and this heterogeneity has the potential to be used to establish an LOS-based serogrouping system. Images PMID:3549563

  11. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects. PMID:26842127

  12. Characterization of the cellular antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast form.

    PubMed Central

    Casotto, M

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic components of the yeast extract of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Linder 2511 cultured for 3, 8, 20, 30, and 60 days were examined by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. The 3-day extract was chosen for characterization of the antigenic components because its stability did not vary with time and it contained all antigens identified by patient sera. Antibodies to cross-reacting antigens of P. brasiliensis extracts were detected in sera from patients with histoplasmosis, candidiasis, and aspergillosis. The 58-, 57-, 21-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) antigens were specific for P. brasiliensis, while the 48- and 45-kDa antigens were specific for paracoccidioidomycosis. The Western blot technique is a useful tool for the diagnosis of disease and revealed heterogeneity in the responses of patient sera. The combination of the 58-, 57-, and 45-kDa proteins confirmed a diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (87% of the cases). Images PMID:2380351

  13. Overview of Plant-Made Vaccine Antigens against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Marina; Corigliano, Mariana G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of vaccine antigens against malaria produced in plants. Plant-based expression systems represent an interesting production platform due to their reduced manufacturing costs and high scalability. At present, different Plasmodium antigens and expression strategies have been optimized in plants. Furthermore, malaria antigens are one of the few examples of eukaryotic proteins with vaccine value expressed in plants, making plant-derived malaria antigens an interesting model to analyze. Up to now, malaria antigen expression in plants has allowed the complete synthesis of these vaccine antigens, which have been able to induce an active immune response in mice. Therefore, plant production platforms offer wonderful prospects for improving the access to malaria vaccines. PMID:22911156

  14. Antigenic relationship between the common antigen (OEP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Y; Homma, J Y

    1978-01-01

    Antibodies were found by the OEP-passive hemagglutination test to cross-react with the common antigen (OEP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sera of rabbits immunized with two serotype (Inaba and Ogawa) strains of Vibrio cholerae. The titer in the OEP-passive hemagglutination reaction rose later than did the agglutinin titer and reached a peak of 640 to 1,280. The titers of OEP antibody formation in rabbits immunized with V. cholerae were almost the same as that of P. aeruginosa. The common antigen of P. aeruginosa was confirmed to exist serologically in both strains of V. cholerae as determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody test and the agar gel precipitin test. Passive immunization with the V. cholerae immune rabbit serum significantly protected mice against P. aeruginosa infection. Purified antibodies cross-reacting with the OEP of P. aeruginosa derived from the V. cholerae immune rabbit sera by OEP-coupled affinity chromatography protected mice against P. aeruginosa infection as compared with the control group, which was injected with 100 microgram of immunoglobin G not containing OEP antibody. The purified antibodies (2.5 microgram per mouse) protected animals challenged with approximately 10,000 50% lethal doses in the control group. Consequently, the common antigen (OEP) of P. aeruginosa proved to be a common antigen of V. cholerae both serologically and in possessing infection protective properties. PMID:75846

  15. Pentabody-mediated antigen delivery induces antigen-specific mucosal immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghua; Zheng, Wenju; Kuolee, Rhonda; Hirama, Tomoko; Henry, Matthew; Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Fjällman, Ted; Chen, Wangxue; Zhang, Jianbing

    2009-05-01

    An efficient immunization system is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT) are among the strongest adjuvants tested in experimental animals but their use in humans has been hindered by their toxicity. On the other hand, the role of their non-toxic B-subunits, CTB or LTB, in enhancing mucosal immune response is not clear. We propose here a novel strategy for the induction of mucosal immune responses. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) against a model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) were raised from the antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with BSA, pentamerized by fusing the sdAbs to CTB, generating the so-called pentabodies. These pentabodies were used to deliver the antigen by mixing the two components and administering the mixture to mice intranasally. One construct was equivalent to CT in helping induce mucosal immune response. It was also found that this ability was probably due to its high affinity to BSA, providing some insight into the controversial role of CTB in mucosal immunization: at least for BSA, the model antigen BSA employed in this study, CTB has to be tightly linked to the antigen to have adjuvant/immune-enhancing effect. PMID:19269688

  16. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (β-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to β-lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with β-lactamase in Freund’s adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund’s adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. PMID:16754878

  17. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Saveanu, Loredana; Stratikos, Efstratios; Vourloumis, Dionisios

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases, ERAP1 and ERAP2, as well as Insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) play key roles in antigen processing, and have recently emerged as biologically important targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural and substrate-selectivity data for these enzymes, we have rationally designed a new series of inhibitors that display low micromolar activity. The selectivity profile for these three highly homologous aminopeptidases provides a promising avenue for modulating intracellular antigen processing. PMID:23916253

  18. The 18-kilodalton antigen secreted by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed Central

    Latgé, J P; Moutaouakil, M; Debeaupuis, J P; Bouchara, J P; Haynes, K; Prévost, M C

    1991-01-01

    One of the major antigens secreted in vitro by Aspergillus fumigatus is an 18-kDa basic protein which has been purified by cation-exchange chromatography. It is recognized by sera from aspergilloma patients. It is also the major circulating antigen found in urine of patients with invasive aspergillosis. Our results indicated that this antigen has potential for the diagnosis of both aspergilloma and invasive aspergillosis. Images PMID:1855978

  19. Strain-specific virulence-associated antigen of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W A; Leong, J K; Hough, D M

    1975-01-01

    A strain-specific virulence-associated antigen has been found in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain F-62. Using immunodiffusion in agar gel, it has been shown that the antigen is distinguishable from endotoxin and the virulence-associated toxic protein. It does not appear to be derived from pili. The antigen was not detected in T1 and/or T2 colony type cultures of 10 other isolates. It exhibited a possible partial immunological relationship with an antigen found in one additional strain. It was susceptible to digestion with Pronase and trypsin. Images PMID:804445

  20. The known unknowns of antigen processing and presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Jatin M.; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2009-01-01

    The principal components of both MHC class I and class II antigen processing and presentation pathways are well known. Within dendritic cells, these pathways are tightly regulated by Toll-like receptor signalling and include features, such as cross-presentation, that are not seen in other cell types. The exact mechanisms involved in the subcellular trafficking of antigens remain poorly understood and in some cases are controversial. Recent data suggest that diverse cellular machineries including autophagy participate in antigen processing and presentation, though their relative contributions remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we highlight some emerging themes of antigen processing and presentation that we believe merit further attention. PMID:18641646

  1. Charged polylactide co-glycolide microparticles as antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Kazzaz, Jina; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Chesko, James; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2004-04-01

    Polymeric microparticles with encapsulated antigens have become well-established in the last decade as potent antigen delivery systems and adjuvants, with experience being reported from many groups. However, the authors have recently shown that an alternative approach involving charged polylactide co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles with surface adsorbed antigen(s) can also be used to deliver antigen into antigen-presenting cell populations. The authors have described the preparation of cationic and anionic PLG microparticles that have been used to adsorb a variety of agents, to include plasmid DNA, recombinant proteins and adjuvant active oligonucleotides. These novel PLG microparticles were prepared using a w/o/w solvent evaporation process in the presence of the anionic surfactants, such as dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, or cationic surfactants, such as hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide. Antigen binding to the charged PLG microparticles was influenced by both electrostatic interaction and other mechanisms, including hydrophobic interactions. Adsorption of antigens to microparticles resulted in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses in comparison with alternative approaches. The surface adsorbed microparticle formulation offers an alternative way of delivering antigens as a vaccine formulation. PMID:15102598

  2. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  3. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Mycobacteria spp., they have the potential for use as reagents in the purification of Nocardia antigens. Images PMID:2405017

  5. [The HLA antigen system in patients with pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Kleĭner, A I; Makotchenko, V M; Nabrinskiĭ, S I; Prilipskaia, N I; Tkach, S I

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic HLA spectra, loci A, B and C, were explored in 102 patients suffering from pneumoconiosis of workers exposed to dust in machine building. Significant frequency differences were discovered in some antigens and their complexes (AI; A I B 8; Bw35 Cw4) between the patients and control group subjects (112 healthy persons). The patients with uncomplicated pneumoconiosis and coniotuberculosis manifested appreciable differences in the antigenic HLA spectra. The authors propose an algorithm of predicting risk at pneumoconiosis as well as risk at coniotuberculosis, resting on the results of the typing of the antigenic HLA spectra. PMID:1523545

  6. Identification of Protective Antigens for Vaccination against Systemic Salmonellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bumann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50–200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing. PMID:25157252

  7. Cathepsin G: roles in antigen presentation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Burster, Timo; Macmillan, Henriette; Hou, Tieying; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Contributions from multiple cathepsins within endosomal antigen processing compartments are necessary to process antigenic proteins into antigenic peptides. Cysteine and aspartyl cathepsins have been known to digest antigenic proteins. A role for the serine protease, Cathepsin G (CatG), in this process has been described only recently, although CatG has long been known to be a granule-associated proteolytic enzyme of neutrophils. In line with a role for this enzyme in antigen presentation, CatG is found in endocytic compartments of a variety of antigen presenting cells. CatG is found in primary human monocytes, B cells, myeloid dendritic cells 1 (mDC1), mDC2, plasmacytoid DC (pDC), and murine microglia, but is not expressed in B cell lines or monocyte-derived DC. Purified CatG can be internalized into endocytic compartments in CatG non-expressing cells, widening the range of cells where this enzyme may play a role in antigen processing. Functional assays have implicated CatG as a critical enzyme in processing of several antigens and autoantigens. In this review, historical and recent data on CatG expression, distribution, function and involvement in disease will be summarized and discussed, with a focus on its role in antigen presentation and immune-related events. PMID:19910052

  8. Antigenic composition of single nano-sized extracellular blood vesicles.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Anush; Ivanova, Oxana; Vasilieva, Elena; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important in normal physiology and are altered in various pathologies. EVs produced by different cells are antigenically different. Since the majority of EVs are too small for routine flow cytometry, EV composition is studied predominantly in bulk, thus not addressing their antigenic heterogeneity. Here, we describe a nanoparticle-based technique for analyzing antigens on single nano-sized EVs. The technique consists of immuno-capturing of EVs with 15-nm magnetic nanoparticles, staining captured EVs with antibodies against their antigens, and separating them from unbound EVs and free antibodies in a magnetic field, followed by flow analysis. This technique allows us to characterize EVs populations according to their antigenic distribution, including minor EV fractions. We demonstrated that the individual blood EVs carry different sets of antigens, none being ubiquitous, and quantified their distribution. The physiological significance of antigenically different EVs and their correlation with different pathologies can now be directly addressed. From the clinical editor: This study reports a nanoparticle-based technique for analyzing antigens on single nano-sized extracellular vehicles (EV). The technique consists of immuno-capturing of EVs with 15-nm magnetic nanoparticles, followed by staining the captured EVs with antibodies and separating them via a magnetic field, followed by flow analysis. This technique enables studies of antigenic properties of individual EVs that conventionally can only be studied in bulk. PMID:25481806

  9. Stimulation of human lymphocytes by Herpes simplex virus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Starr, S E; Karatela, S A; Shore, S L; Duffey, A; Nahmias, A J

    1975-01-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with laboratory evidence of prior infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or type 2 demonstrated transformation (av antigens. Higher stimulation indexes were obtained when lymphocytes were incubated with the homologous as compared with the heterologous antigen. Higher mean lymphocyte stimulation indexes were also demonstrated in seropositive as compared with seronegative individuals. Lymphocytes from children with HSV-1 stomatitis usually became responsive to HSV-1 antigen within 2 to 6 weeks after the onset of illness. Lymphocytes from infants with neonatal HSV-2 infection were stimulated by HSV-2 antigen. PMID:163788

  10. Protein kinase activity associated with simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, J D; Spangler, G; Livingston, D M

    1979-01-01

    Incubation of simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen-containing immunoprecipitates with [gamma-32P]ATP results in the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into large T antigen. Highly purified preparations of large T antigen from a SV40-transformed cell line, SV80, are able to catalyze the phosphorylation of a known phosphate acceptor, casein. The kinase activity migrates with large T antigen through multiple purification steps. Sedimentation analysis under non-T-antigen-aggregating conditions reveals that kinase activity and the immunoreactive protein comigrate as a 6S structure. The kinase activity of purified preparations of large T antigen can be specifically adsorbed to solid-phase anti-T IgG, and partially purified T antigen from a SV40 tsA transformation is thermolabile in its ability to phosphorylate casein when compared to comparably purified wild-type T antigen. These observations indicate that the SV40 large T antigen is closely associated with protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) activity. Images PMID:223152