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Sample records for lbnl bnct facility

  1. Radiation shielding and patient organ dose study for an accelerator- based BNCT Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, S.V.; Vujic, J.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-10-24

    This study considers the radiation safety aspects of several designs discussed in a previous report of an accelerator-based source of neutrons, based on the [sup 7]Li(p,n) reaction, for a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). determines the optimal radiation shield thicknesses for the patient treatment room. Since this is an experimental facility no moderator or reflector is considered in the bulk wall shield design. This will allow the flexibility of using any postulated moderator/reflector design and assumes sufficient shielding even in the absence of a moderator/reflector. In addition the accelerator is assumed to be capable of producing 100 mA of 2.5 MeV proton beam current. The addition of 1% and 2% [sup 10]B (by weight) to the concrete is also investigated. The second part of this paper determines the radiation dose to the major organs of a patient during a treatment. Simulations use the MIRD 5 anthropomorphic phantom to calculate organ doses from a 20 mA proton beam assuming various envisioned moderator/reflector in place. Doses are tabulated by component and for a given uniform [sup 10]B loading in all organs. These are presented in for a BeO moderator and for an Al/AlF[sub 3] moderator. Dose estimates for different [sup 10]B loadings may be scaled.

  2. Initial Experimental Verification of the Neutron Beam Modeling for the LBNL BNCT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Stone, N.A.; Vuji, J.

    1999-01-19

    In preparation for future clinical BNCT trials, neutron production via the 7Li(p,n) reaction as well as subsequent moderation to produce epithermal neutrons have been studied. Proper design of a moderator and filter assembly is crucial in producing an optimal epithermal neutron spectrum for brain tumor treatments. Based on in-phantom figures-of-merit,desirable assemblies have been identified. Experiments were performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron to characterize epithermal neutron beams created using several microampere of 2.5 MeV protons on a lithium target. The neutron moderating assembly consisted of Al/AlF3 and Teflon, with a lead reflector to produce an epithermal spectrum strongly peaked at 10-20 keV. The thermal neutron fluence was measured as a function of depth in a cubic lucite head phantom by neutron activation in gold foils. Portions of the neutron spectrum were measured by in-air activation of six cadmium-covered materials (Au, Mn, In, Cu, Co, W) with high epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The results are reasonably reproduced in Monte Carlo computational models, confirming their validity.

  3. Characterisation of the TAPIRO BNCT epithermal facility.

    PubMed

    Burn, K W; Colli, V; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Gambarini, G; Rosi, G; Scolari, L

    2004-01-01

    A collimated epithermal beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research has been designed and built at the TAPIRO fast research reactor. A complete experimental characterisation of the radiation field in the irradiation chamber has been performed, to verify agreement with IAEA requirements. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured by means of an activation technique and with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). The fast neutron dose has been determined with gel dosemeters, while the fast neutron spectrum has been acquired by means of a neutron spectrometer based on superheated drop detectors. The gamma-dose has been measured with gel dosemeters and TLDs. For an independent verification of the experimental results, fluxes, doses and neutron spectra have been calculated with Monte Carlo simulations using the codes MCNP4B and MCNPX_2.1.5 with the direct statistical approach (DSA). The results obtained confirm that the epithermal beams achievable at TAPIRO are of suitable quality for BNCT purposes. PMID:15353724

  4. The LBNL Low Background Facility - Services and Recent Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Poon, Alan; Lesko, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described in detail including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects. The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic

  5. BNCT filter design studies for the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in the United States has entered into a new phase with the initiation of clinical trials using neutron sources at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. If these trials are successful at demonstrating the efficacy of BNCT as a viable treatment for glioblastoma multiforme, then there will be an immediate demand for several additional neutron sources in order to treat the several thousand patients currently diagnosed with glioblastomas in the U.S. each year. However, the requirements for an acceptable neutron source for BNCT are rather severe in terms of the need to provide a sufficient number of epithermal neutrons to a patient-accessible location in a reasonable time with minimal thermal-neutron, fast- neutron, and gamma-ray background. A recent study of potential neutron sources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed, which concludes that the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF), also appears very well suited for BNCT. The light-water-cooled reactor is contained in an aluminum pressure vessel and located in a large concrete `bunker` referred to as the Big Beam Shield (BBS). The BBS contains a 77-cm-diameter beam collimator, which permits access to a broad beam neutron flux exceeding 4 x 10[sup ll] Cm[sup -2]s[sup- 1] at the operational power of 1 MW. The collimated beam emerges horizontally onto an unenclosed test pad area on which shield mockups were assembled. The appropriate beam filter and collimator system can be easily constructed in the expansive area previously used for the large shield mockups. Additional engineering of the beam shutter mechanism and the construction of treatment support facilities will be needed but can be easily accommodated on the remote dedicated site. The filter design analysis is provided.

  6. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Program for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) during March 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine, analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination, dosimetry, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, PBF operations.

  7. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively. PMID:26595774

  8. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  9. Design Studies for a High-Repetition-Rate FEL Facility at LBNL.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT, J.; BELKACEM, A.; BYRD, J. M.; FAWLEY, W.; KIRZ, J.; LIDIA, S.; MCCURDY, W.; PADMORE, H.; PENN, G.; POGORELOV, I.; QIANG, J.; ROBIN, D.; SANNIBALE, F.; SCHOENLEIN, R.; STAPLES, J.; STEIER, C.; VENTURINI, M.; WAN, W.; WILCOX, R.; ZHOLENTS, A.

    2007-10-04

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working to address the needs of the primary scientific Grand Challenges now being considered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences: we are exploring scientific discovery opportunities, and new areas of science, to be unlocked with the use of advanced photon sources. A partnership of several divisions at LBNL is working to define the science and instruments needed in the future. To meet these needs, we propose a seeded, high-repetition-rate, free-electron laser (FEL) facility. Temporally and spatially coherent photon pulses, of controlled duration ranging from picosecond to sub-femtosecond, are within reach in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to soft X-ray regime, and LBNL is developing critical accelerator physics and technologies toward this goal. We envision a facility with an array of FELs, each independently configurable and tunable, providing a range of photon-beam properties with high average and peak flux and brightness.

  10. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  11. Evaluation of the effective dose during BNCT at TRR thermal column epithermal facility.

    PubMed

    Jarahi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser; Saleh-Koutahi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    An epithermal neutron beam has been designed for Boron neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the thermal column of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) recently. In this paper the whole body effective dose, as well as the equivalent doses of several organs have been calculated in this facility using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The effective dose has been calculated by using the absorbed doses determined for each individual organ, taking into account the radiation and tissue weighting factors. The ICRP 110 whole body male phantom has been used as a patient model. It was found that the effective dose during BNCT of a brain tumor is equal to 0.90Sv. This effective dose may induce a 4% secondary cancer risk. PMID:26774391

  12. Quality control and quality assurance procedures at the THOR BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Pi-En; Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-12-01

    Various quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) procedures of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beam at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) are established to ensure beam availability and quality. The QC/QA methods mainly employ foil activation and paired ionization chambers, respectively, for beam intensity check and dose assessment. Beam intensity is monitored on-line by using three dead-time corrected fission chambers. In addition to the periodic QC/QA activities regarding beam quality and the monitoring system, the quick QC/QA performed in an all-in-one phantom will be executed less than 70 min before the clinical treatment to guarantee beam quality. The QC/QA procedures have been gradually established and the actual performance satisfied the preset criteria defined for the BNCT facility at THOR. PMID:21605978

  13. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed. PMID:17504745

  14. On-line neutron beam monitoring of the Finnish BNCT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Vesa; Auterinen, Iiro; Helin, Jori; Kosunen, Antti; Savolainen, Sauli

    1999-02-01

    A Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) facility has been built at the FiR 1 research reactor of VTT Chemical Technology in Espoo, Finland. The facility is currently undergoing dosimetry characterisation and neutron beam operation research for clinical trials. The healthy tissue tolerance study, which was carried out in the new facility during spring 1998, demonstrated the reliability and user-friendliness of the new on-line beam monitoring system designed and constructed for BNCT by VTT Chemical Technology. The epithermal neutron beam is monitored at a bismuth gamma shield after an aluminiumfluoride-aluminium moderator. The detectors are three pulse mode U 235-fission chambers for epithermal neutron fluence rate and one current mode ionisation chamber for gamma dose rate. By using different detector sensitivities the beam intensity can be measured over a wide range of reactor power levels (0.001-250 kW). The detector signals are monitored on-line with a virtual instrumentation (LabView) based PC-program, which records and displays the actual count rates and total counts of the detectors in the beam. Also reactor in-core power instrumentation and control rod positions can be monitored via another LabView application. The main purpose of the monitoring system is to provide a dosimetric link to the dose in a patient during the treatment, as the fission chamber count rates have been calibrated to the induced thermal neutron fluence rate and to the absorbed dose rate at reference conditions in a tissue substitute phantom.

  15. Gamma dose measurement in a water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Hsu, P C; Liaw, T F

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that a LiF thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) is used as a gamma dosemeter in a water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at THOR. Based on the TLD neutron sensitivity and neutron fluxes in the water phantom, which were simulated by the MCNP code, TLD-700 was chosen as a gamma dosemeter in this report. For the correction of the neutron influence on TLD-700, the thermal neutron sensitivity to TLD-700 was investigated with MCNP simulation and the thermal neutron flux was measured with gold foils using the cadmium difference technique. The correction to the neutron influence on the TLD was established on the TLD thermal neutron sensitivity. the thermal neutron flux, and the conversion factor from energy deposition in the TLD to the TLD response. By comparing the experimental data with the thermal neutron influence correction, these data are in very good agreement with the MCNP predictions. PMID:11707034

  16. PBF/BNCT (power burst facility/boron neutron capture therapy) program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-06-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during June include progress within the areas of gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination; boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development; noninvasive boron quantification determination; dosimetry; and analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT.

  17. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-05-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during May include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination; boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development; noninvasive boron quantification determination; dosimetry; and analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT.

  18. Dosimetry and radiobiology at the new RA-3 reactor boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility: application to the treatment of experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Nigg, D W; Miller, M; Thorp, S I; Heber, E M; Zarza, L; Estryk, G; Monti Hughes, A; Molinari, A J; Garabalino, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Quintana, J; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2009-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:19380233

  19. Monte Carlo and deterministic analysis of a University of Virginia BNCT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Thomas D.; Hubbard, Thomas R.; Rydin, R. A.; Reynolds, A. B.

    1997-02-01

    A comprehensive effort is underway to design a high- performance BNCT facility at the 2 MW University of Virginia research reactor. This endeavor includes detailed core criticality and leakage calculations, coupled neutron/photon transport analyses, and dosimetry computations. Detailed geometries are modeled with MCNP for both the core and filter, as well as for phantom dosimetry studies, whereas the symmetric and deep-penetration problem of the filter/collimeter design is solved with the DORT code. Final filter configurations are evaluated with both stochastic and deterministic methods, and the results are compared and synthesized. The complementary use of these two computational methods yields a broader insight into the problem than can be achieved by using either method alone. Calculations show that certain adjustments to the core configuration increase the leakage to the filter thereby improving beam performance. Increased performance is also achieved by strategic shaping, placement, and optimization of neutral reflectors and filtering materials in the beam tube. Results of numerous optimization studies, which led to the final beam design, are presented. Ongoing work includes integration of recently developed treatment planning codes from INEL into the dosimetry analyses. New methods of coupling discrete ordinates and adjoint Monte Carlo calculations for medical applications are also under development.

  20. Spatial and spectral characteristics of a compact system neutron beam designed for BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Chkillou, B; Jehouani, A

    2009-04-01

    The development of suitable neutron sources and neutron beam is critical to the success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In this work a compact system designed for BNCT is presented. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source and a moderator/reflector/filter/shield assembly. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimized to maximize the epithermal neutron component which is useful for BNCT treatment of deep seated tumors with the suitably low level of beam contamination. The MCMP5 code has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons, secondary gamma rays originating from (252)Cf source and the primary gamma rays emitted directly by this source at the exit face of the compact system. The fluence rate distributions of such particles were also computed along the central axis of a human head phantom. PMID:19168369

  1. MCNP study for epithermal neutron irradiation of an isolated liver at the Finnish BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Kotiluoto, P; Auterinen, I

    2004-11-01

    A successful boron neutron capture treatment (BNCT) of a patient with multiple liver metastases has been first given in Italy, by placing the removed organ into the thermal neutron column of the Triga research reactor of the University of Pavia. In Finland, FiR 1 Triga reactor with an epithermal neutron beam well suited for BNCT has been extensively used to irradiate patients with brain tumors such as glioblastoma and recently also head and neck tumors. In this work we have studied by MCNP Monte Carlo simulations, whether it would be beneficial to treat an isolated liver with epithermal neutrons instead of thermal ones. The results show, that the epithermal field penetrates deeper into the liver and creates a build-up distribution of the boron dose. Our results strongly encourage further studying of irradiation arrangement of an isolated liver with epithermal neutron fields. PMID:15308144

  2. Tests of photocathodes for high repetition rate x-ray FELs at the APEX facility at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Filippetto, Daniele; Qian, Houjun; Papadopoulos, Christos F.; Wells, Russell; Kramasz, Toby; Padmore, Howard; Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Huang, Ruixuan; Zolotorev, Max; Staples, John W.

    2015-05-01

    After the formidable results of X-ray 4th generation light sources based on free electron lasers around the world, a new revolutionary step is undergoing to extend the FEL performance from the present few hundred Hz to MHz-class repetition rates. In such facilities, temporally equi-spaced pulses will allow for a wide range of previously non-accessible experiments. The Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is devoted to test the capability of a novel scheme electron source, the VHF-Gun, to generate the required electron beam brightness at MHz repetition rates. In linac-based FELs, the ultimate performance in terms of brightness is defined at the injector, and in particular, cathodes play a major role in the game. Part of the APEX program consists in testing high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable to operate at the conditions required by such challenging machines. Results and status of these tests at LBNL are presented.

  3. In-phantom characterisation studies at the Birmingham Accelerator-Generated epIthermal Neutron Source (BAGINS) BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Christopher N; Green, Stuart; Mason, Anna J; Picton, David; Baugh, Gareth; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Yin, Zaizhe; Scott, Malcolm C; Nelson, John M

    2004-11-01

    A broad experimental campaign to validate the final epithermal neutron beam design for the BNCT facility constructed at the University of Birmingham concluded in November 2003. The final moderator and facility designs are overviewed briefly, followed by a summary of the dosimetric methods and presentation of a small subset of the results from this campaign. The dual ionisation chamber technique was used together with foil activation to quantify the fast neutron, photon, and thermal neutron beam dose components in a large rectangular phantom exposed to the beam with a 12 cm diameter beam delimiter in place. After application of a normalisation factor, dose measurements agree with in-phantom MCNP4C predictions within 10% for the photon dose, within 10% for thermal neutron dose, and within 25% for the proton recoil dose along the main beam axis. PMID:15308136

  4. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  5. INEL BNCT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1991-03-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for March 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, a milestone summary, and animal data charts.

  6. INEL BNCT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1991-04-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for April 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, a milestone summary, and animal data charts. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. INEL BNCT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-08-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for August 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  8. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Program for Cancer Treatment bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-12-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during November include progress in several areas. Included are: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine (165 samples were analyzed during the month with 107 additional samples received); Analytical Methodologies Development for BSH Purity Determination (A Phenomonex HPLC column is currently being studied. This column has a higher carbon loading factor (30%) than other reverse-phase columns and allows a higher methanol:water ratio (57:43), which is apparently resulting in a significantly longer column lifetime without degradation); Noninvasive Boron Quantification Determination (A summary report documenting MR properties of BSH, progress to date, and future plans is in preparation); and Dosimetry (Analysis of the August and October 1989 BMRR neutron filter spectrum measurement in the 40-1200 keV energy range has been completed).

  9. Neutron collimator design of neutron radiography based on the BNCT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Li, Yi-Guo; Peng, Dan; Lu, Jin; Zhang, Gao-Long; Zhao, Hang; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Li, Chun-Yang; Liu, Wan-Jin; Hu, Tao; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2014-02-01

    For the research of CCD neutron radiography, a neutron collimator was designed based on the exit of thermal neutron of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) reactor. Based on the Geant4 simulations, the preliminary choice of the size of the collimator was determined. The materials were selected according to the literature data. Then, a collimator was constructed and tested on site. The results of experiment and simulation show that the thermal neutron flux at the end of the neutron collimator is greater than 1.0×106 n/cm2/s, the maximum collimation ratio (L/D) is 58, the Cd-ratio(Mn) is 160 and the diameter of collimator end is 10 cm. This neutron collimator is considered to be applicable for neutron radiography.

  10. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) program for cancer treatment: Volume 3, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1989-03-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during March include: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination; boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development; noninvasive boron quantification determination; dosimetry; and analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT.

  11. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  12. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  13. The Berkeley accelerator space effects facility (BASE) - A newmission for the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    2005-09-06

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the U.S. Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the Cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator and Space Effects (BASE) facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 AMeV ''cocktail'' of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  14. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  15. LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2013-05-29

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  16. LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  17. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2013-05-29

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  18. Characteristics and application of spherical-type activation detectors in neutron spectrum measurements at a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Xiao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-03-01

    A set of spherical-type activation detectors was developed aiming to provide better determination of the neutron spectrum at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) BNCT facility. An activation foil embedded in a specially designed spherical holder exhibits three advantages: (1) minimizing the effect of neutron angular dependence, (2) creating response functions with broadened coverage of neutron energies by introducing additional moderators or absorbers to the central activation foil, and (3) reducing irradiation time because of improved detection efficiencies to epithermal neutron beam. This paper presents the design concept and the calculated response functions of new detectors. Theoretical and experimental demonstrations of the performance of the detectors are provided through comparisons of the unfolded neutron spectra determined using this method and conventional multiple-foil activation techniques.

  19. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment: Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Ackermann, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during March include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue Blood and Urine, Analytical Methodologies Development for BSH (Sodium Borocaptate) Purity Determination, Boron Microscopic (Subcellular) Analytical Development, Noninvasive Boron Quantification Determination, Dosimetry, Analytical Radiation Transport and Interaction Modeling for BNCT, Large Animal Model Studies, and Neutron Source and Facility Preparation.

  20. LBNL LLRF Controls Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-18

    This package provides a complete set of FPGA logic and driver software for the LBNL Interim SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) LLRF (Low Level Radio Frequency) cavity control system, plus a hardware-software cosimulation framework that can demonstrate correct operation of the code. The controls are organized in a traditional three-tier layout. Tier 1 (hardware access): Verilog code targeted at the XC2S15O FPGA that lies at the center of the custom hardware, Includes a direct digital frequencymore » synthesizer (DDS), a low-latency vector PI feedback control loop, four-channel vector waveform capture, and support for on-board housekeeping circuitry. Tier 2 (network presentation): C code targeted at a 32-bit microcontroller, which has a direct connection to both the FPGA and to Ethemet. This layer is itself divided into a HAL (hardware abstraction layer) to mediate access to the FPGA registers, a driver to organize all the application-specific computations (including a waveform curve fit that determines cavity detuning), and a toy network access protocol. Tier 3 (operator interface): A Tcl program that exchanges data with tier 2, and gives the operator a virtual control panel for the hardware In the production SNS installation, the toy network access protocol and tier 3 are replaced with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). The code given here is dramatically smaller and simpler than EPICS, yet gives enough functionality to demonstrate proper operation of an RF cavity. The SNS facility now uses three generations of LLRF control hardware. This package is intended to be used in all of them, but is so far only tested on the second ("Interim") generation hardware. It may also be adaptable to future LLRF projects at LBNL, other National Labs, and worldwide.« less

  1. LBNL LLRF Controls Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, Lawrence R.

    2005-03-18

    This package provides a complete set of FPGA logic and driver software for the LBNL Interim SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) LLRF (Low Level Radio Frequency) cavity control system, plus a hardware-software cosimulation framework that can demonstrate correct operation of the code. The controls are organized in a traditional three-tier layout. Tier 1 (hardware access): Verilog code targeted at the XC2S15O FPGA that lies at the center of the custom hardware, Includes a direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDS), a low-latency vector PI feedback control loop, four-channel vector waveform capture, and support for on-board housekeeping circuitry. Tier 2 (network presentation): C code targeted at a 32-bit microcontroller, which has a direct connection to both the FPGA and to Ethemet. This layer is itself divided into a HAL (hardware abstraction layer) to mediate access to the FPGA registers, a driver to organize all the application-specific computations (including a waveform curve fit that determines cavity detuning), and a toy network access protocol. Tier 3 (operator interface): A Tcl program that exchanges data with tier 2, and gives the operator a virtual control panel for the hardware In the production SNS installation, the toy network access protocol and tier 3 are replaced with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). The code given here is dramatically smaller and simpler than EPICS, yet gives enough functionality to demonstrate proper operation of an RF cavity. The SNS facility now uses three generations of LLRF control hardware. This package is intended to be used in all of them, but is so far only tested on the second ("Interim") generation hardware. It may also be adaptable to future LLRF projects at LBNL, other National Labs, and worldwide.

  2. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  3. Production of Epithermal Neutron Beams for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, P.; Colonna, N.; Santorelli, P.; Variale, V.; Paticchio, V.; Maggipinto, G.

    1999-12-31

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a promising modality for the treatment of malignant tumors, relies on the use of neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. For deep-seated tumors, simulations indicate that the optimal neutron energy is in the epithermal region, and in particular between 1 and 10 keV. Therapeutic neutron beams of high spectral purity could be produced with low-energy accelerators, through a suitable neutron producing reaction. In this talk we present an overview of some recently investigated reactions for the production of intense epithermal neutron beams for BNCT, and their potential use towards the setup of an hospital-based BNCT facility.

  4. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  5. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  6. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. PMID:8887513

  7. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. PBF/BNCT program for cancer treatment: Monthly bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Ackermann, A.L.

    1988-11-01

    This PBF/BNCT Program Monthly Bulletin is the primary vehicle for prompt national and international dissemination of research progress and the development status of tools essential for optimum BNCT clinical application. Accordingly, beginning with this issue, PBF neutron-filter design progress and PBF standby task summaries will be added to the subjects previously reported. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during November include progress within several areas. Topics include: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine, analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantification determination, dosimetry, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, and neutron source and facility preparation.

  9. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland`s Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995.

  10. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment bulletin: Volume 2, No. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III

    1988-12-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during December include progress in several areas. Topics included: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Sodium Borocaptate) purity determination; boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development; noninvasive boron quantification determination; dosimetry; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; and neutron source and facility preparation.

  11. A preliminary study on using the radiochromic film for 2D beam profile QC/QA at the THOR BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Chen, Wei-Lin; Tsai, Pi-En; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-12-01

    The GAFCHROMIC(®) EBT2 dosimetry film has been studied as a rapid QC/QA tool for 2D dose profile mapping in the BNCT beam at THOR. The pixel values of the EBT2 film image were converted to the 2D dose profile using a dose calibration curve obtained by 6-MV X-ray. The reproducibility of the 2D dose profile measured using the EBT2 film in the PMMA phantom was preliminarily found to be acceptable with uncertainties within about ±2 to ±3.5%. It is found that the EBT2 measured dose profile consisted of both gamma-ray components and neutron contributions. Therefore, the dose profile measured using the EBT2 film is significantly different from the neutron flux profile measured using the indirect neutron radiography method. Further study of the influence of neutrons to the response of the EBT2 film is indispensible for the absolute dose profile determination in a BNCT beam. PMID:21570854

  12. Summary of recent BNCT Polish programme and future plans.

    PubMed

    Gryziński, M A; Maciak, M; Wielgosz, M

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present Polish achievements on the ground of BNCT research. Starting from preliminary built therapeutic stand at MARIA reactor going through designing of unique detectors for in-phantom and in-beam measurements for mixed radiation fields and finally coming to boron carriers synthesizing and examination in cellular and animal models. Now it is planned to restart research on boron compounds in specially designed BIMA line, to set up epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT research and education and to improve recombination detectors for neutron beams characterisation. PMID:26293009

  13. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9. Bulletin, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-12-31

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  14. LBNL SecureMessaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pery, Marcia; Agarwal, Deb

    2003-03-17

    The LBNLSecureMessaging application enables collaboration among colocated or geograhically dispersed users by supporting secure synchronous and asynchronous communication. This application is the graphical user interface client that is meant to be used in conjunction with servers (LBNL's PCCEServer and a customized IRC server) to allow group and one-to-one conversations via text-based instant messaging. Conversations may be private (by invitation only) or public (open to any member of a collaboratory group_ and they may be permanent and on-going or temporary and ad hoc. Users may leave notes for other people who are online or offline. By providing presence and awareness information, collaborators can easily locate each other and rendezvous. Written in Java/Swing, this application is cross-platform. To gain access to functionality, users have to be registered with an authorization server (PCCEServer) that maintains an access control list. Thus a collaboration group is comprised of a set of PCCE-registered users. Registered users can log in via either X.509 certificate or a username and password combination. PKI and SSL are used to authenticate servers and clients and to encrypt messages sent over the network. The LBNLSecureMessaging application offers instant messaging capabilities in a secure environment that provides data integrity, privacyk authorization, and authentication.

  15. LBNL SecureMessaging

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-03-17

    The LBNLSecureMessaging application enables collaboration among colocated or geograhically dispersed users by supporting secure synchronous and asynchronous communication. This application is the graphical user interface client that is meant to be used in conjunction with servers (LBNL's PCCEServer and a customized IRC server) to allow group and one-to-one conversations via text-based instant messaging. Conversations may be private (by invitation only) or public (open to any member of a collaboratory group_ and they may be permanentmore » and on-going or temporary and ad hoc. Users may leave notes for other people who are online or offline. By providing presence and awareness information, collaborators can easily locate each other and rendezvous. Written in Java/Swing, this application is cross-platform. To gain access to functionality, users have to be registered with an authorization server (PCCEServer) that maintains an access control list. Thus a collaboration group is comprised of a set of PCCE-registered users. Registered users can log in via either X.509 certificate or a username and password combination. PKI and SSL are used to authenticate servers and clients and to encrypt messages sent over the network. The LBNLSecureMessaging application offers instant messaging capabilities in a secure environment that provides data integrity, privacyk authorization, and authentication.« less

  16. INEL BNCT research program: Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1995. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, physics (treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (large animal models efficacy studies). Design of a reactor based epithermal neutron extraction facility is discussed in detail. Final results of boron magnetic resonance imagining is included for both borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) in rats, and BSH in humans. Design of an epithermal neutron facility using electron linear accelerators is presented, including a treatise on energy removal from the beam target. Information on the multiple fraction injection of BSH in rats is presented.

  17. A New Simplified System for the Evaluation of BNCT Pharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, T.E.; Kabalka, G.W.; Martin, R.C.; Miller, L.F.

    1998-09-13

    A system for testing potential BNCT pharmaceuticals in cell cultures has been developed with the cooperation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee Chemistry Department and the University of Tennessee Nuclear Engineering Department. A BNCT test model has been established with the use of the human lung cancer cell line A 549. These cells were maintained in standard laboratory facilities and subjected to boronated chemicals. Following toxicity studies the human luug cancer cells were exposed to {sup 252}Cf neutron sources provided by the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL The isotope {sup 252}Cf performs effectively for BNCT applications. The neutron spectrum is similar to that of a reactor fission source with an average energy of 2.1 MeV. A 50 mg source of {sup 252}Cf moderated by water provides a source on the order of 1 x 10{sup 9} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at a distance of 3 cm. The half-life of {sup 252}Cf is 2.65 years, and thus may provide a simple and reliable source of neutrons for BNCT in locations without suitable nuclear reactors. The REDC of ORNL stores and processes the U.S. stockpile of {sup 252}Cf.

  18. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core. PMID:19394237

  19. The refinement of dose assessment of the THOR BNCT beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Liu, Hong-Ming; Chou, Wen-Tsae

    2011-12-01

    A refined dose assessment method has been used now in the THOR BNCT facility, which takes into account more delicate corrections, carefully handled calibration factors, and the spectrum- and kerma-weighted k(t) value. The refined method solved the previous problem of negative derived neutron dose in phantom at deeper positions. With the improved dose assessment, the calculated and measured gamma-ray dose rates match perfectly in a 15×15×15 cm(3) PMMA phantom. PMID:21377883

  20. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Darren

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  1. Clinical requirements and accelerator concepts for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Leung, K.N.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-05-01

    Accelerator-based neutron sources are an attractive alternative to nuclear reactors for providing epithermal neutron beams for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Based on clinical requirements and neutronics modeling the use of proton and deuteron induced reactions in {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be targets has been compared. Excellent epithermal neutron beams can be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction at proton energies of {approximately}2.5 MeV. An electrostatic quadrupole accelerator and a lithium target, which can deliver and handle 2.5 MeV protons at beam currents up to 50 mA, are under development for an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. PBF/BNCT Program, February 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1991-03-01

    This report presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the PBF/BNCT Program for February 1991. The report includes information on the BNCT brain tumor and melanoma research programs, technical support and modifications, PBF operations, a milestone summary, and animal data charts.

  3. A feasibility study of the Tehran research reactor as a neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalafi, Hossein; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ezati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Hossnirokh, Ashkan; Shamami, Mehrdad Azizi; Monshizadeh, Mahdi

    2014-08-01

    Investigation on the use of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) as a neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been performed by calculating and measuring energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of neutrons in all external irradiation facilities, including six beam tubes, thermal column, and the medical room. Activation methods with multiple foils and a copper wire have been used for the mentioned measurements. The results show that (1) the small diameter and long length beam tubes cannot provide sufficient neutron flux for BNCT; (2) in order to use the medical room, the TRR core should be placed in the open pool position, in this situation the distance between the core and patient position is about 400 cm, so neutron flux cannot be sufficient for BNCT; and (3) the best facility which can be adapted for BNCT application is the thermal column, if all graphite blocks can be removed. The epithermal and fast neutron flux at the beginning of this empty column are 4.12×10(9) and 1.21×10(9) n/cm(2)/s, respectively, which can provide an appropriate neutron beam for BNCT by designing and constructing a proper Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) structure. PMID:24742535

  4. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; English, G.; Firestone, R.; Giquel, F.; King, M.; Leung, K-N.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-31

    A wide variety of applications ranging from medical (BNCT, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) and basic science (neutron imaging, material studies) to homeland security (explosive detection and nuclear material non-proliferation) are in need of compact, high flux neutron generators. The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing various neutron generators for these applications. These neutron generators employed either the D-D or the D-T fusion reaction for the neutron production. The deuterium or deuterium-tritium gas mixture is ionized in an RF-driven plasma source. The ions are then accelerated to {approx}100 keV energy using high current, high voltage DC-power supply to a target where the 2.45 MeV (for D-D reaction) or 14 MeV (for the D-T reaction) neutrons are generated. The development of two different types of neutron tubes are being discussed in this presentation, namely compact, pulsed operation neutron generators and cw, high yield neutron generators. These generators are currently operating at D-D neutron yields of 108 n/s and 109 n/s respectively. A facility, incorporating the larger neutron generator, has been constructed for Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements.

  5. NDCX-II project commencing at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Kwan, J

    2009-10-22

    Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences approved the NDCX-II project, a second-generation Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment. NDCX-II is a collaborative effort of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in a formal collaboration known as the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion Science (HIFS-VNL). Supported by $11 M of funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, construction at LBNL commenced in July of 2009, with completion anticipated in March of 2012. Applications of this facility will include studies of: the basic physics of the poorly understood 'warm dense matter' regime of temperatures around 1 eV and densities near solid, using uniform, volumetric ion heating of thin foil targets; ion energy coupling into an ablating plasma (such as that which occurs in an inertial fusion target) using beams with time-varying kinetic energy; space-charge-dominated ion beam dynamics; and beam focusing and pulse compression in neutralizing plasma. The machine will complement facilities at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, but will employ lower ion kinetic energies and commensurately shorter stopping ranges in matter. Much of this research will contribute directly toward the collaboration's ultimate goal of electric power production via heavy-ion beam-driven inertial confinement fusion ('Heavy-Ion Fusion', or HIF). In inertial fusion, a target containing fusion fuel is heated by energetic 'driver' beams, and undergoes a miniature thermonuclear explosion. Currently the largest U.S. research program in inertial confinement is at Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF), a multibillion-dollar, stadium-sized laser facility optimized for studying physics issues relevant to nuclear stockpile stewardship. Nonetheless, NIF is expected to establish the fundamental feasibility of

  6. Experimental study on the performance of an epithermal neutron flux monitor for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xingcai; Manabe, Masanobu; Tamaki, Shingo; Liu, Shuangtong; Sato, Fuminobu; Murata, Isao; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-07-01

    The performance of an epithermal neutron (0.5eVBNCT) was experimentally studied by using a prototype monitor in an appropriate neutron field at the intense deuterium-tritium neutron source facility OKTAVIAN of Osaka University, Japan. It was convinced from the experimental results that the developed monitor worked well and the epithermal neutron fluxes in BNCT neutron sources can be measured within 5% by the monitor. PMID:27110926

  7. Quality management in BNCT at a nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Moss, Raymond; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Rassow, Jürgen; Wittig, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Each medical intervention must be performed respecting Health Protection directives, with special attention to Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC). This is the basis of safe and reliable treatments. BNCT must apply QA programs as required for performance and safety in (conventional) radiotherapy facilities, including regular testing of performance characteristics (QC). Furthermore, the well-established Quality Management (QM) system of the nuclear reactor used has to be followed. Organization of these complex QM procedures is offered by the international standard ISO 9001:2008. PMID:21459586

  8. NDCX-II project commencing at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Kwan, J

    2009-10-26

    NDCX-II is the second-generation Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment, capable of accelerating and strongly bunching tens of nanoCoulombs of non-relativistic ions, for applications requiring nanosecond-scale pulses with short stopping ranges. As with the existing NDCX-I at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the new machine is based on the technique of neutralized drift compression, whereby a head-to-tail velocity gradient is imparted to the beam, which then shortens as it drifts in a neutralizing plasma that suppresses space-charge forces. The figure shows the layout of the machine, to be sited at LBNL. It will make extensive use of induction cells and other parts from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It will be extensible and reconfigurable; in the configuration that has received the most emphasis, each pulse will deliver 30-50 nC of Li+ ions at 3 MeV into a mm-scale spot onto a thin-foil target. Pulse compression to {approx} 1 ns begins in the accelerator and finishes in the drift compression line; the beam is manipulated using suitably tailored voltage waveforms in the accelerating gaps. NDCX-II employs novel beam dynamics. To use the 200 kV Blumlein pulsed power from ATA (blue cylinders in the figure), the pulse duration must first be reduced from an initial 500 ns to less than 70 ns. This shortening is accomplished in an initial stage of non-neutral drift compression, downstream of the injector and the first few induction cells (note the spaces between induction cells at the left end of the figure). The compression is rapid enough that fewer than ten long-pulse waveform generators are needed, with Blumleins powering the rest of the acceleration. Extensive particle-in-cell simulation studies have enabled an attractive physics design that meets the stringent cost goal. Snapshots from a simulation video are shown in the figure. Studies on a dedicated test stand are characterizing

  9. Progress In The Development Of A Tomographic SPECT System For Online Dosimetry In BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Burlon, A. A.; Green, S.; Wojnecki, C.; Ghani, Z.

    2010-08-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) the delivered dose to the patient depends both on the neutron beam characteristics and on the 10B body distribution which, in turn, is governed by the tumor specificity of the 10B drug-carrier. BNCT dosimetry is a complex matter due to the several interactions that neutrons can undergo with the different nuclei present in tissue. However the boron capture reaction 10B(n,α)7Li accounts for about 80 % of the total dose in a tumor with 40 ppm in 10B concentration. Present dosimetric methods are indirect, based on drug biodistribution statistical data and subjected to inter and intra-patient variability. In order to overcome the consequences of the concomitant high dosimetric uncertainties, we propose a SPECT (Single Photon Emission Tomography) approach based on the detection of the prompt gamma-ray (478 keV) emitted in 94 % of the cases from 7Li. For this purpose we designed, built and tested a prototype based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillators. Measurements on a head and tumor phantom were performed in the accelerator-based BNCT facility of the University of Birmingham (UK). They result in the first tomographic image of the 10B capture distribution obtained in a BNCT facility.

  10. Progress In The Development Of A Tomographic SPECT System For Online Dosimetry In BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A.; Burlon, A. A.; Green, S.; Wojnecki, C.; Ghani, Z.

    2010-08-04

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) the delivered dose to the patient depends both on the neutron beam characteristics and on the {sup 10}B body distribution which, in turn, is governed by the tumor specificity of the {sup 10}B drug-carrier. BNCT dosimetry is a complex matter due to the several interactions that neutrons can undergo with the different nuclei present in tissue. However the boron capture reaction {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li accounts for about 80 % of the total dose in a tumor with 40 ppm in {sup 10}B concentration. Present dosimetric methods are indirect, based on drug biodistribution statistical data and subjected to inter and intra-patient variability. In order to overcome the consequences of the concomitant high dosimetric uncertainties, we propose a SPECT (Single Photon Emission Tomography) approach based on the detection of the prompt gamma-ray (478 keV) emitted in 94 % of the cases from {sup 7}Li. For this purpose we designed, built and tested a prototype based on LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators. Measurements on a head and tumor phantom were performed in the accelerator-based BNCT facility of the University of Birmingham (UK). They result in the first tomographic image of the 10B capture distribution obtained in a BNCT facility.

  11. Bnct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Ono, K.; Suzuki, M.; Tanaka, H.; Morigi, M. P.

    The purpose of this work is to analyze dose distribution inside tissues. To do this, we performed some MCNP simulations using the neutron flux obtained from the Kyoto University Reactor. We have tried to analyze the behavior of neutrons in different types of tissues in relation to their depth. We have found that the value of dose from neutron interaction with 10B depends not only on 10B concentration inside the tissues (a higher concentration produces a higher dose), but also on the tissue density. In fact, tissues with a density considerably different from that of water receive a lower dose. Another dose contribution is given by the presence of 14N inside tissues: this dose contribution is lower compared with the previous one; it is influenced both by the tissue density and the percentage of nitrogen inside the tissue. Finally, the delivered dose decreases very quickly after a depth of about 4 cm, which implies that boron neutron capture therapy is not an effective therapy for the deepest tumors. However, there are some factors that can be taken into account to reach the deepest zone.

  12. A retrospective on the LBNL PEM project

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Wang, G.C.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman,R.H.; Qi, J.; Virador, P.; Choong, W.S.; Mandelli, E.; Beuville, E.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Krieger, B.; Meddeler, G.

    2004-11-15

    We present a retrospective on the LBNL Positron EmissionMammography (PEM) project, looking back on our design and experiences.The LBNL PEM camera utilizes detector modules that are capable ofmeasuring depth of interaction (DOI) and places them into 4 detectorbanks in a rectangular geometry. In order to build this camera, we had todevelop the DOI detector module, LSO etching, Lumirror-epoxy reflectorfor the LSO array (to achieve optimal DOI), photodiode array, custom IC,rigid-flex readout board, packaging, DOI calibration and reconstructionalgorithms for the rectangular camera geometry. We will discuss thehighlights (good and bad) of these developments.

  13. A retrospective on the LBNL PEM project.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jennifer S; Moses, William W; Wang, Gin-Chung; Derenzo, Stephen E; Huesman, Ronald H; Qi, Jinyi; Virador, Patrick; Choong, Woon-Seng; Mandelli, Emanuele; Beuville, Eric; Pedrali-Noy, Marzio; Krieger, Brad; Meddeler, Gerrit J

    2006-01-01

    We present a retrospective on the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) project, looking back on our design and experiences. The LBNL PEM camera utilizes detector modules that are capable of measuring depth of interaction (DOI) and places them into 4 detector banks in a rectangular geometry. In order to build this camera, we had to develop the DOI detector module, LSO etching, Lumirror-epoxy reflector for the LSO array (to achieve optimal DOI), photodiode array, custom IC, rigid-flex readout board, packaging, DOI calibration and reconstruction algorithms for the rectangular camera geometry. We will discuss the high-lights (good and bad) of these developments. PMID:17645996

  14. Computational study of room scattering influence in the THOR BNCT treatment room.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    BNCT dosimetry has often employed heavy Monte Carlo calculations for the beam characterization and the dose determination. However, these calculations commonly ignored the scattering influence between the radiations and the room structure materials in order to facilitate the calculation speed. The aim of this article attempts to explore how the room scattering affects the physical quantities such as the capture reaction rate and the gamma-ray dose rate under in-phantom and free-air conditions in the THOR BNCT treatment room. The geometry and structure materials of the treatment room were simulated in detail. The capture reaction rates per atom, as well as the gamma-ray dose rate were calculated in various sizes of phantoms and in the free-air condition. Results of this study showed that the room scattering has significant influence on the physical quantities, whether in small phantoms or in the free-air condition. This paper may be of importance in explaining the discrepancies between measurements and calculations in the BNCT dosimetry using small phantoms, in addition to provide a useful consideration with a better understanding of how the room scattering influence acts in a BNCT facility. PMID:24365466

  15. Characteristics of the new THOR epithermal neutron beam for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tung, C J; Wang, Y L; Hsu, F Y; Chang, S L; Liu, Y-W H

    2004-11-01

    A characterization of the new Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam designed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been performed. The facility is currently under construction and expected in completion in March 2004. The designed epithermal neutron flux for 1 MW power is 1.7x10(9)n cm(-2)s(-1) in air at the beam exit, accompanied by photon and fast neutron absorbed dose rates of 0.21 and 0.47 mGys(-1), respectively. With (10)B concentrations in normal tissue and tumor of 11.4 and 40 ppm, the calculated advantage depth dose rate to the modified Snyder head phantom is 0.53RBE-Gymin(-1) at the advantage depth of 85 mm, giving an advantage ratio of 4.8. The dose patterns determined by the NCTPlan treatment planning system using the new THOR beam for a patient treated in the Harvard-MIT clinical trial were compared with results of the MITR-II M67 beam. The present study confirms the suitability of the new THOR beam for possible BNCT clinical trials. PMID:15308158

  16. Progress on the accelerator based SPES-BNCT project at INFN Legnaro

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, J.; Colautti, P.; Pisent, A.; Conte, V.; Moro, D.; De Nardo, L.; Agosteo, S.; Rosi, G.

    2007-02-12

    In the framework of an advanced Exotic Ion Beam facility, named SPES (Study and Production of Exotic Species), that will allow a frontier program both in nuclear and interdisciplinary physics, an intense thermal neutron beam facility, devoted to perform Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experimental treatments on skin melanoma tumor, is currently under construction based on the SPES proton driver. A vast radiobiological investigation in vitro and in vivo has started with the new 10B carriers developed. Special microdosimetric detectors have been constructed to properly measure all the BNCT dose components and their qualities. Both microdosimetric and radiobiological measurements are being performed at the new HYTHOR beam shaping assembly at the Enea-Casaccia TAPIRO reactor.

  17. Using the TREAT reactor in support of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experiments: A feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grasseschi, G.L.; Schaefer, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    The technical feasibility of using the TREAT reactor facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research was assessed. Using one-dimensional neutronics calculations, it was shown that the TREAT core neutron spectrum can be filtered to reduce the undesired radiation (contamination) dose per desired neutron more effectively than can the core spectra from two prominent candidate reactors. Using two-dimensional calculations, it was demonstrated that a non-optimized filter replacing the TREAT thermal column can yield a fluence of desired-energy neutrons more than twice as large as the fluence believed to be required and, at the same time, have a contamination dose per desired neutron almost as low as that from any other candidate facility. The time, effort and cost required to adapt TREAT for a mission supporting BNCT research would be modest.

  18. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  19. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  20. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  1. PBF/BNCT program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III )

    1989-07-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July include progress within the areas of gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine, analytical methodologies development of BSH (Sodium Borocaptate) purity determination, boron microscopic (Subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantification determination, dosimetry.

  2. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  3. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  4. DUSEL-related Science at LBNL -- Program and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Christian; Detweiler, Jason; Freedman, Stuart; Gilchriese, Murdock; Kadel, Richard; Koch, Volker; Kolomensky, Yury; Lesko, Kevin; von der Lippe, Henrik; Marks, Steve; Nomura, Yasunori; Plate, David; Roe, Natalie; Sichtermann, Ernst; Ligeti, Zoltan

    2009-08-01

    The National Science Foundation is advancing the design of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at the former Homestake mine in South Dakota. UC Berkeley and LBNL are leading the design effort for the facility and coordinating the definition and integration of the suite of experiments to be coupled to the facility design in the creation of an MREFC (Major Research Equipment and Facility Construction) proposal. The State of South Dakota has marshaled $120M to prepare the site and begin a modest science program at the 4850 ft level. The first physics experiment is anticipated to begin installation in 2009. The current timetable calls for the MREFC Preliminary Design to be assembled by 2010 to be presented to the National Science Board in 2011. This, in turn, indicates that the earliest DUSEL construction start would be FY2013. The MREFC is estimated (before the inclusion of the long baseline neutrino components) at $500--600M, roughly divided evenly between the experimental program and support for the facility. Construction was estimated at 6--8 years. The DOE and NSF are establishing a Joint Oversight Group (JOG) to coordinate the experimental programs and participation in DUSEL. It is anticipated that the JOG would mirror the similar function for the NSF and DOE participation in the LHC, and that DOE-HEP, DOE-NP, and NSF will all participate in the JOG. In parallel with the NSF efforts, DOE-HEP plans to develop a long baseline neutrino program with neutrino beams created at FNAL and aimed at DUSEL. In the P5 report the focus of the program is to pursue CP violation in the lepton sector. The same detectors can also be used for nucleon decay experiments. DOE has indicated that FNAL would be the ''lead lab'' for the long baseline neutrino program and be charged with designing and implementing the neutrino beamline. BNL is to be charged with designing and implementing the detector. The P5 report also emphasizes the importance of dark matter and

  5. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  6. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-09-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August included: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine (biological samples for boron analysis were received from WSU, including samples from five p-BPA/melanoma dogs and seven BSH plasmapheresis dogs); analytical methodologies development for BSH (borocaptate sodium) purity determination (much effort this month focussed on the effort to develop a procedure for the separation of the optical isomeric forms of p-BPA for future application in melanoma BNCT); boron microscopic analytical development (analysis of SIMS images of boron-treated U-87 cells is complete and results will show cellular concentrations of B, K, Na, and Ca under different drug dosages); noninvasive boron quantification determination (optimization of pulse sequences for {sup 10}BSH MRI may result from the dissolving of double quantum coherence differences between {sup 10}BSH and {sup 11}BSH); and additional measurements have greatly narrowed the previously observed differences between calculated and measured total radiation doses in phantoms.

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1994. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, ICP-AES analysis of biological samples), physics (treatment planning software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of BSH and BPA is presented and results of 21 spontaneous tumor bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are discussed. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Highlights from the First International Workshop on Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources for BNCT are included. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  10. An epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on an ESQ-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Phillips, T.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Neutrons will be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction at proton energies of about 2.5 MeV with subsequent moderation and filtering for shaping epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. Moderator, filter, and shielding assemblies have been modeled using MCNP. Head-phantom dose distributions have been calculated using the treatment planning software BNCT{_}RTPE. The simulation studies have shown that a proton beam current of {approximately} 20 mA is required to deliver high quality brain treatments in about 40 minutes. The results also indicate that significantly higher doses can be delivered to deep-seated tumors in comparison to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor beam. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents desired. A novel power supply utilizing the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the ESQ-accelerator to deliver proton beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A lithium target has been designed which consists of a thin layer of lithium on an aluminum backing. Closely spaced, narrow coolant passages cut into the aluminum allow the removal of a 50kW heat-load by convective water cooling. The system under development is suitable for hospital installation and has the potential for providing neutron beams superior to reactor sources.

  11. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

  12. Carborane-containing metalloporphyrins for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Michiko; Joel, D.D.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Micca, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    For BNCT of malignant brain tumors, it is crucial that there be relatively high boron concentrations in tumor compared with normal tissues within the neutron-irradiated treatment volume. Fairchild and Bond estimated that major advances in BNCT should be possible if ratios of {sup 10}B concentrations in tumor to those in normal tissue (e.g. brain and blood) were at least 5: 1. Given that the only current boron carrier being tested clinically in the U.S., p-boronophenyl-alanine[BPA], yields tumor blood and tumor brain ratios of about 3:1, the criteria for new boronated compounds should be to at least match these ratios and maintain tumor boron concentrations greater than 30 {mu}g B/g. Although previously tested boronated porphyrins have not only matched but surpassed these ratios, it was at a cost of greater toxicity. Chemical and hematological assays of blood analytes; showed marked thrombocytopenia, a decrease to about one-tenth the normal concentration of platelets circulating in the blood, in addition to abnormalities in concentrations of circulating enzymes, that indicated liver toxicity. The physical appearance and behavior of the affected mice were different from those of mice injected with solvent only. Although thrombocytopenia and other toxic effects had disappeared after a few days, previously tested porphyrins would not be safe to infuse into patients for BNCT of potentially hemorrhagic malignant tumors in the brain such as glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma. We synthesized a different boronated porphyrin, tetracarboranylphenylporphyrin, [TCP] and inserted nickel, copper, or manganese into its coordination center. Biological studies of NiTCP in mice and of CuTCP in rats show that these compounds elicit little or no toxicity when given at potentially therapeutic doses.

  13. Secondary Contribution Effects on BNCT Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, E.; Goncalves, M.; Pereira, W.

    2004-10-03

    The aimed of this work consists of evaluating the influence of the dose secondary components (thermal neutrons dose, epithermal neutrons dose, fast neutrons dose and photon dose) in treatment planning with BNCT. MCNP4B Code was used to calculate RBE-Gy doses through the irradiation of the modified Snyder head phantom. A reduction of the therapeutical gain of monoenergetic neutron beans was observed in non invasive treatments, provoked for the predominance of the fast neutron dose component in the skin, showing that the secondary components of dose can to contribute more for to raise the healthy-tissue dose of that in the tumor, reducing the treatment efficiency.

  14. Spatial characterization of BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Viererbl, L

    2004-11-01

    The space distribution of the epithermal neutron flux was determined for the epithermal neutron beams of several NCT facilities in USA (FCB at MIT), Europe (HFR at JRC, Petten; FiR at VTT, Espoo; LVR-15 at NRI, Rez) and Japan (JRR-4 at JAERI, Tokai). Using p-n diodes with (6)Li radiator and the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) the beams were quantified in-air. Axial beam profiles along the beam axes and the radial distributions at two distances from the beam aperture were measured. Except for the well-collimated HFR beam, the spatial characteristics of the other studied beams were found generally similar, which results from their similar designs. PMID:15308191

  15. Small Accelerators for the Next Generation of BNCT Irradiation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Tanaka, K.; Bengua, G.; Hoshi, M.; Nakagawa, Y.

    2005-01-15

    The neutron irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using compact accelerators installed at hospitals was mainly investigated for the usage of direct neutrons from near-threshold {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, and moderated neutrons from 2.5 MeV {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reactions and other reactions. This kind of system can supply the medical doctors and patients with convenience to carry out BNCT in hospitals. The accelerator system would be regarded as the next-generation of BNCT in the near future.

  16. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  17. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  18. A Comparison of Neutron Beams for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas E.; Woollard, Jeffrey E.

    2001-06-17

    The potential of the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) with a fission converter plate (FCP) for clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is evaluated. The evaluation used design methods that were developed for the analysis of the OSU design of an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. The paper compares an FCP epithermal neutron beam, which is based on the OSURR, with the ABNS. Neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates and the boron-10 specific absorbed dose rate were calculated. A major goal of the analysis was to determine if a 500-kW reactor with an FCP can produce a neutron field with sufficient intensity to allow a patient to be treated in an acceptable treatment time with adequate beam quality. The answer obtained was positive, provided that the patient is treated with at least four fractions. Although the quality of the neutron field for the FCP is slightly inferior to that of the ABNS, it was judged to be acceptable.

  19. A plastic scintillator-based 2D thermal neutron mapping system for use in BNCT studies.

    PubMed

    Ghal-Eh, N; Green, S

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a scintillator-based measurement instrument is proposed which is capable of measuring a two-dimensional map of thermal neutrons within a phantom based on the detection of 2.22MeV gamma rays generated via nth+H→D+γ reaction. The proposed instrument locates around a small rectangular water phantom (14cm×15cm×20cm) used in Birmingham BNCT facility. The whole system has been simulated using MCNPX 2.6. The results confirm that the thermal flux peaks somewhere between 2cm and 4cm distance from the system entrance which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:26986813

  20. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during January 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; dosimetry; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support; and PBF operations.

  1. PBF/BNCT program for cancer treatment: Monthly bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Ackermann, A.L.

    1988-10-01

    Highlights of the BNCT Research Programs during October include the progress within several areas. Topics include: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine, analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantification determination, dosimetry, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, and large animal model studies. Activities in the PBF technical support and operations areas are detailed.

  2. 44. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. May 4, 1949. PERSPECTIVE DRAWING, BIRD'S-EYE VIEW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 38. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). December 10, 1948. 1 BEVATRON EXTERIOR PRELIMINARY PERSPECTIVE-BIRD'S-EYE VIEW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. WALL AND WINDOW OVERLOOKING MAGNET ROOM, SECOND STORY OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SIDE OF MAGNET OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 11, 1950. BEV-336. MAGNET CORE SHOWING FOUNDATION AND SUPPORTS. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 25, 1950. BEV-307. BEVATRON MAGNET FOUNDATION. B-51 - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. END OF BEAMLINE LEAVING SHIELDING, MAGNET COILS IN EPOXY, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. FLOOR AND CEILING OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON IN CENTER OF MAGNET ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. MAGNET OF BEAMLINE, EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ENTRANCE TO STAIRWAY TO TUNNEL UNDER MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 29, 1950. BEV-360. GENERAL VIEW, MAGNET ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. February 5, 1954. BEV-681. GENERATOR ROOM FOR BEVATRON MAGNET. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. 6. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 31, 1950. BEV-331. MAGNET ROOM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 4, 1957. BEV-128. PROGRESS--MAGNET REPAIR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 24. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. B-51. November 6, 1961. BEV-2497 ION GUN II, EMERY ZAJEC - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 23. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. March 26, 1953. BEV-551. OVERALL VIEW OF ION GUN. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. January 12, 1950. BEV-195. ION GUN INJECTOR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 30. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-943. ANTI-PROTON EXPERIMENT. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3469 EXTERNAL BEAM EXPERIMENT DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3470 INTERNAL BEAM EXPERIMENT DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 40. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. March, 1949. BEV 4903-00020. GRADING-SITE WORK FOR BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 39. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). December 10, 1948. 2 BEVATRON EXTERIOR PRELIMINARY PERSPECTIVE - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STUB OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ROOF BLOCKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF 51A TO SECOND FLOOR EXTERIOR EXIT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. PUMP MOUNTS, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR MOTORS OPPOSITE SWITCHGEAR RACKS, MECHANIC SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR ROOM, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. REMNANTS OF HYDRAULIC FIXTURES, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CENTRAL SUPPORT COLUMN EXTENDING THROUGH CRANES AND ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR TO SECOND FLOOR OF MECHANICAL WINE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3467. ACCELERATION DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. July 2, 1953. BEV-574. QUADRANT POLE TIP INSTALLATION. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CABLE RACEWAYS, CATWALK, AND WINDOWS OF OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. December 29, 1953. BEV-654. INJECTOR, INJECTOR TANK-WIDE ANGLE; MARIO CAROTTA. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 20, 1958. BEV-1654. OVERALL VIEW WITH PROTON INJECTOR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. November 22, 1963. BEV-3468. INJECTION SYSTEM DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. 51. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 22, 1950. BEV-248. INTERIOR OF BEVATRON BUILDING. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 41. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 29, 1949. BEV-101. BEVATRON AREA LOOKING SOUTHEAST. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 27. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 18, 1958. Bubble Chamber 605. BUBBLE CHAMBER ASSEMBLY - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 57. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. December 29, 1953. BEV-657. WEST TANK OPEN, CLOSE-UP. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 37. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). May, 1986. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA TOPOGRAPHIC MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. 9. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July, 1960. 4BOOQ002. QUADRANT MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. INEL BNCT Program: Bulletin, Volume 5, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-07-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for June, 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and animal data charts. Specific highlights include: final-dosage-form BSH samples were analyzed for purity, with the sample from Centronic Ltd the most free from contamination and oxidation products; MRI spectroscopy will be upgraded to provide a potential for boron resolution of 0.75 cm/pixel; neutron and gamma measurements were made for the HFR epithermal neutron beam; the current status of six spontaneous brain-tumor dogs; production of MoAbs against the pituitary CRF receptor; growth of BL6 in low Phe/Tyr medium; an altered synthetic pathway for carboranyl alanine; and encapsulation of {ital i}-B{sub 20}H{sub 18}{sup 2-} into liposomes for baseline murine studies. 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  13. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, D.; Bussat, J.-M.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L.; Kim, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Wieman, H.; Battaglia, M.; Hooberman, B.; Tompkins, L.

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  14. Organisation and management of the first clinical trial of BNCT in Europe (EORTC protocol 11961).EORTC BNCT study group.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, W; Moss, R; Rassow, J; Stecher-Rasmussen, F; Hideghéty, K; Wolbers, J G; Sack, H

    1999-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is based on the ability of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons and to disintegrate instantaneously producing high LET particles. The only neutron beam available in Europe for such a treatment is based at the European High Flux Reactor HFR at Petten (The Netherlands). The European Commission, owners of the reactor, decided that the potential benefit of the facility should be opened to all European citizens and therefore insisted on a multinational approach to perform the first clinical trial in Europe on BNCT. This precondition had to be respected as well as the national laws and regulations. Together with the Dutch authorities actions were undertaken to overcome the obvious legal problems. Furthermore, the clinical trial at Petten takes place in a nuclear research reactor, which apart from being conducted in a non-hospital environment, is per se known to be dangerous. It was therefore of the utmost importance that special attention is given to safety, beyond normal rules, and to the training of staff. In itself, the trial is an unusual Phase I study, introducing a new drug with a new irradiation modality, with really an unknown dose-effect relationship. This trial must follow optimal procedures, which underscore the quality and qualified manner of performance. PMID:10394415

  15. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-11-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during November include progress in several areas. Included are Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine (All samples currently available from the dog studies have been prepared for analysis); Analytical Methodologies Development for BSH Purity Determination (Further investigations of the 2-mm microbore C18 column continued looking at higher carbon loading and its effect on column lifetime); Boron Microscopic Analytical Development (Six samples of canine oral melanoma were evaluated); Noninvasive Boron Quantification Determination (A new dog-head positioning device is under design to permit more precise alignment of boron concentrations); and Dosimetry (The weak BMRR neutron source strength has not allowed collimation of the filtered beam for the dog irradiations).

  16. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1989-10-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during October include progress in several areas. Included are Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine (Large numbers of samples from Project 2 continue to be processed every month); Analytical Methodologies Development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) Purity Determination (Early results from evaluation of 30-cm Nucleosil C-18 columns indicate resistance to degradation by the mobile phase); Boron Microscopic Analytical Development (Analysis of data from boron-treated, U-87 human glioblastoma cells showed expected increased uptake with increased dosage); Noninvasive Boron Quantification Determination (Successful three-dimensional chemical shift imaging of boron in a canine pituitary-tumor patient has been carried out at EIRMC); and Dosimetry (Additional neutron spectrometry measurements using 2.6 atm. hydrogen, proton recoil chamber were taken at the BMRR to supplement foil activation measurements in an effort to more precisely identify overall characteristics of the fast-neutron contamination and streaming).

  17. Comparisons of TORT and MCNP dose calculations for BNCT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersol, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.; Redmond, E.L., II; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The relative merit of using a deterministic code to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications were examined. The TORT discrete deterministic ordinated code was used in comparison to MCNP4A to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications

  18. Design and construction of a thermal neutron beam for BNCT at Tehran Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalafi, Hossein; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Hossnirokh, Ashkan; Shamami, Mehrdad Azizi; Amini, Sepideh

    2014-12-01

    An irradiation facility has been designed and constructed at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) for the treatment of shallow tumors using Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). TRR has a thermal column which is about 3m in length with a wide square cross section of 1.2×1.2m(2). This facility is filled with removable graphite blocks. The aim of this work is to perform the necessary modifications in the thermal column structure to meet thermal BNCT beam criteria recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency. The main modifications consist of rearranging graphite blocks and reducing the gamma dose rate at the beam exit. Activation foils and TLD700 dosimeter have been used to measure in-air characteristics of the neutron beam. According to the measurements, a thermal flux is 5.6×10(8) (ncm(-2)s(-1)), a cadmium ratio is 186 for gold foils and a gamma dose rate is 0.57Gy h(-1). PMID:25195172

  19. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  20. A virtual model of the patient's head for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminska, Katarzyna; Jezierski, Karol; Osko, Jakub

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work was creating a virtual phantom of a human head for BNCT, as a part of the BNCT programme project. This model is an amplification of the simple model described in earlier publications. It takes into account the major head organs as well as the scalp and skull. The chemical composition of all tissues was modelled according to the recommendations of the ICRP. The organs were parameterized using mathematical formulas based on the human head magnetic resonance images. The model was used for calculating the thermal neutron flux and the injuring (fast neutron, nitrogen and gamma) dose components for the head irradiated using the therapeutic neutron beam, whose parameters were obtained as the result of the modelling of the filter/moderator system for the BNCT therapeutic beam from the MARIA reactor.

  1. INEEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report, CY-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2001-03-01

    This report is a summary of the activities conducted in conjunction with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 2000. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, neutron source design and demonstration, and support the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National BNCT Program goals are the goals of this Program. Contributions from the individual contributors about their projects are included, specifically described are the following, chemistry: analysis of biological samples and an infrared blood-boron analyzer, and physics: progress in the patient treatment planning software, measurement of neutron spectra for the Argentina RA-6 reactor, and recalculation of the Finnish research reactor FiR 1 neutron spectra, BNCT accelerator technology, and modification to the research reactor at Washington State University for an epithermal-neutron beam.

  2. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  3. An in-phantom comparison of neutron fields for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Woollard, J.E.; Blue, T.E.; Capala, J.

    1998-01-01

    Previously, the authors have developed the in-phantom neutron field assessment parameters T and D (Tumor) for the evaluation of epithermal neutron fields for use in BNCT. These parameters are based on an energy-spectrum-dependent neutron normal-tissue RBE and the treatment planning methodology of Gahbauer and his co-workers, which includes the effects of dose fractionation. In this paper, these neutron field assessment parameters were applied to The Ohio State University (OSU) design of an Accelerator Based Neutron Source (ABNS) (hereafter called the OSU-ABNS) and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam (hereafter called the BMRR-ENB), in order to judge the suitability of the OSU-ABNS for BNCT. The BMRR-ENB was chosen as the basis for comparison because it is presently being used in human clinical trials of BNCT and because it is the standard to which other neutron beams are most often compared.

  4. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  5. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  6. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  7. Resumption of JRR-4 and characteristics of neutron beam for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Horiguchi, H; Kishi, T; Motohashi, J; Sasajima, F; Kumada, H

    2011-12-01

    The clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) have been conducted using Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4) at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). On December 28th, 2007, a crack of a graphite reflector in the reactor core was found on the weld of the aluminum cladding. For this reason, specifications of graphite reflectors were renewed; dimensions of the graphite were reduced and gaps of water were increased. All existing graphite reflectors of JRR-4 were replaced by new graphite reflectors. In February 2010 the resumption of JRR-4 was carried out with new graphite reflectors. We measured the characteristics of neutron beam at the JRR-4 Neutron Beam Facility. A cylindrical water phantom of 18.6 cm diameter and 24 cm depth was set in front of the beam port with 1cm gap. TLDs and gold wires were inserted within the phantom when the phantom was irradiated. The results of the measured thermal neutron flux and the gamma dose in water were compared with that of MCNP calculation. The neutron energy spectrum of the calculation model with new reflector had little variation compared to that with old reflector, but intensities of the neutron flux and gamma dose with new reflector were rather smaller than those with old reflector. The calculated results showed the same tendency as that of the experimental results. Therefore, the clinical trials of BNCT in JRR-4 could be restarted. PMID:21621416

  8. Feasibility of the Utilization of BNCT in the Fast Neutron Therapy Beam at Fermilab

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-01

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  9. Feasibility of the utilization of BNCT in the fast neutron therapy beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-23

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  10. Dose-rate scaling factor estimation of THOR BNCT test beam.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Tung, C J; Chen, J C; Wang, Y L; Huang, H C; Zamenhof, R G

    2004-11-01

    In 1998, an epithermal neutron test beam was designed and constructed at the Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) for the purpose of preliminary dosimetric experiments in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A new epithermal neutron beam was designed at this facility, and is currently under construction, with clinical trials targeted in late 2004. Depth dose-rate distributions for the THOR BNCT test beam have been measured by means of activation foil and dual ion chamber techniques. Neutron and structure-induced gamma spectra measured at the test beam exit were configured into a source function for the Monte Carlo-based treatment planning code NCTPlan. Dose-rate scaling factors (DRSFs) were determined to normalize computationally derived dose-rate distributions with experimental measurements in corresponding mathematical and physical phantoms, and to thus enable accurate treatment planning using the NCTPlan code. A similar approach will be implemented in characterizing the new THOR epithermal beam in preparation for clinical studies. This paper reports the in-phantom calculated and experimental dosimetry comparisons and derived DRSFs obtained with the THOR test beam. PMID:15308162

  11. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of accelerator based epithermal neutron yields for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J. R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J. G.; Alburger, D. E.; Zucker, M. S.; Lowenstein, D. I.

    1999-06-01

    At BNL, we have evaluated the beam current required to produce a clinical neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) with an epithermal neutron flux of 1012n/cm2/hr. Experiments were carried out on a Van de Graaff accelerator at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) at Columbia University. A thick Li target was irradiated by protons with energies from 1.8 to 2.5 MeV. The neutron spectra resulting from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, followed by various filter configurations, were determined by measuring pulse height distributions with a gas filled proton recoil spectrometer. These distributions were unfolded into neutron energy spectra using the PSNS code, from which the required beam currents were estimated to be about 5 mA. Results are in good agreement with calculations using the MCNP-4A transport code. In addition comparison was also made between the neutron flux obtained at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (where clinical trials of BNCT are ongoing), and measurements at RARAF, using a 10BF3 detector in a phantom. These results also support the requirement for about 5 mA beam current.

  12. IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube optimization study.

    PubMed

    Belousov, S; Mitev, M; Ilieva, K; Riley, K; Harling, O

    2011-12-01

    An optimization study of IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube is presented. In the study we used the MIT/FCB experience. The enlarging of filter/moderator cross section dimensions and the decreasing of collimator length within the limits of the IRT-Sofia reactor design were analyzed. The influence of beam and reactor core axes non-coincidence on the beam properties was also evaluated. The irradiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon(®)) was also evaluated. The results provide information for making decisions on the IRT-Sofia BNCT beam construction. PMID:21439839

  13. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-05-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- routine operations continue. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  15. Boron Neutron Capture Therapty (BNCT) in an Oral Precancer Model: Therapeutic Benefits and Potential Toxicity of a Double Application of BNCT with a Six-Week Interval

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Monti Hughes; Emiliano C.C. Pozzi; Elisa M. Heber; Silvia Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; Ana J. Molinari; Marcela A. Garabalino; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-11-01

    Given the clinical relevance of locoregional recurrences in head and neck cancer, we developed a novel experimental model of premalignant tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies and demonstrated the partial inhibitory effect of a single application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on tumor development from premalignant tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a double application of BNCT with a 6 week interval in terms of inhibitory effect on tumor development, toxicity and DNA synthesis. We performed a double application, 6 weeks apart, of (1) BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT); (2) BNCT mediated by the combined application of decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and BPA [(GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT] or (3) beam-only, at RA-3 nuclear reactor and followed the animals for 8 months. The control group was cancerized and sham-irradiated. BPA-BNCT, (GB- 10 + BPA)-BNCT and beam-only induced a reduction in tumor development from premalignant tissue that persisted until 8, 3, and 2 months respectively. An early maximum inhibition of 100% was observed for all 3 protocols. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was detected. Reversible mucositis was observed in premalignant tissue, peaking at 1 week and resolving by the third week after each irradiation. Mucositis after the second application was not exacerbated by the first application. DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in premalignant tissue 8 months post-BNCT. A double application of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT, 6 weeks apart, could be used therapeutically at no additional cost in terms of radiotoxicity in normal and dose-limiting tissues.

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, BUILDING 51 ROOF TRUSS, AND CENTRAL RING TRACK FOR MAGNET ROOM CRANE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM TO TOP OF OUTER LAYER OF CONCRETE SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY BETWEEN MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM AND SECOND FLOOR OF OFFICE-AND-SHOP SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. December 17, 1952. BEV-517. MOVING CURVE TANK INTO MAGNET FOR STORAGE. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. 36. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. September 21, 1956. BEV-1154. DISCOVERERS OF ANTI-NEUTRON--(L. to R.) W. WENZEL, B. CORK, G. LAMBERTSON, AND O. PICCIONI, WITH FOCUS MAGNET. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 35. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 27, 1960. BEV-2050. CLYDE WIEGAND; ANTI-PROTON SET-UP. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 34. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-938. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP WITH WORK GROUP; E. SEGRE, C. WIEGAND, E. LOFGREN, O. CHAMBERLAIN, T. YPSILANTIS. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 53. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. June 28, 1950. BEV-268. EXTERIOR OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BEVATRON BUILDING. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Don Bradley, Photographer. January 31, 1963. BEV-3286 ALTERATIONS PROGRESS; OLLIE OLSON, PAT CALLAHAN. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-129). March 2005. ENTRY TO ROOM 24, MAIN FLOOR, OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. 32. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-937. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP, EXTERIOR VIEW. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 31. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-933. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP, INTERIOR VIEW. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-035). March 2005. WEST TANGENT VIEWED FROM INTERIOR OF BEVATRON. EQUIPMENT ACCESS STAIRWAY ON LEFT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-11). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, NORTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. November 15, 1962. BEV-3121. OVERALL VIEW OF LINAC II; GLEN WHITE, FOSS CROSBY, BOB RICHTER. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. 33. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 10, 1958. BEV-1515. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP; BRUCE CORK, GLENN LAMBERTSON. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa/Don Bradley, Photographers. December 4, 1961. BEV-2548. LINAC II DRIFT TUBES. B-64. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00218-12). June 2005. DEEP TUNNEL INTO FOUNDATION UNDER BEVATRON, VIEW OF CART ON RAILS FOR TRANSPORTING EQUIPMENT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August, 1955. XBB 689-5508. BEVATRON MODEL (L. TO R.) WITH L. SMITH, McMILLAN, E.O. LAWRENCE, LOFGREN, BROBECK, AND SEWELL - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 59. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 25, 1957. BEV-1311. VACUUM SNOUT IN NORTH TARGET AREA; BOB RICHTER. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 49. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). June 6, 1949. B51A0354. BEVATRON PLOT PLAN (MASTEN AND HURD) - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 29. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. July, 1959. Morgue 1959-46 (P-1). ALVAREZ BUBBLE CHAMBER GROUP (L. TO R.) HERNANDEZ, McMILLAN, ALVAREZ, GOW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 28. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 1, 1959. Bubble Chamber 722. BUBBLE CHAMBER, WIDE-ANGLE INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 59 - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 26. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). October 24, 1956. 3/8'=1' 4B51S011. BEVATRON SHIELDING FOUNDATION - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 50. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). June 6, 1949. 1/18'=1'. 5N51A002. BEVATRON SUB FLOOR PLAN - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. 22. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). September 29, 1964. 4B51K007 SECOND FLOOR PLAN. B51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 25. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). February 18, 1969. 4B51BK001. EXTERNAL PROTRON BEAM HALL. B51B FIRST FLOOR PLAN. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. 1. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). January 1961. Dwg No. 6B 00D 005 CONTRACT 48 LEASE AND OCCUPANCY MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. 47. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July 15, 1955. B51A0084. BEVATRON CONTROL ROOM CEILING TREATMENT AND RELOCATION OF LIGHTS - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. 60. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). September 20, 1964. 4B51K001A. MAIN FLOOR PLAN B-51-51A - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. 46. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July 15, 1955. B51A0084. BEVATRON CONTROL ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. An update on the clinical trial of BNCT at the BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Capala, J.; Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed more than six decades ago. It is a binary treatment modality that requires selective delivery of a {sup 10}B-labeled compound to a tumor and slow neutron irradiation of the tumor-bearing tissues. In order to improve the penetration of the neutron beam, an epithermal neutron beam was developed at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This epithermal neutron beam can deliver relatively high thermal neutron fluence at depth without severe skin damage. Boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F), a nontoxic boron carrier, was found to preferentially accumulate in tumor cells following intravenous infusion in patients with GBM. In preclinical BNCT studies in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma, BPA-mediated BNCT was shown to be more efficacious than photon irradiation. In 1994, improvements in the neutron beam and in the understanding of the radiobiology of BPA-mediated BNCT led to the initiation of BNCT trials for human GBM at BMRR using BPA-F and epithermal neutrons. The primary objective of the phase I/II clinical trial of BPA-mediated BNCT at BMRR is to evaluate the safety of the BPA-F-mediated BNCT using epithermal neutrons in patients with GBM at a series of escalating BNCT doses. An incidental objective is to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of BNCT at each dose level. For each dose escalation group, the average brain dose (ABD) is escalated, as well as the minimum tumor dose. In summary, the BNCT procedure employed in the phase I/II clinical trial of BPA-F-mediated BNCT for GBM at BNL was found to be safe in all patients. The palliation afforded by a single session of BNCT compares favorably with palliation provided by fractionated photon therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. If no evidence of radiation-induced brain toxicity is found in the current protocol, BNCT radiation dose will be further escalated.

  16. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment: Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Ackermann, A.L.

    1989-02-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during January include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine (large numbers of biological samples continue to be analyzed), analytical methodologies development for BSH (sodium borocaptate) purity determination, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantification determination, and dosimetry.

  17. Use of the CT images for BNCT calculation: development of BNCT treatment planning system and its applications to dose calculation for voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ho; Han, Chi Young; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) treatment planning system (BTPS) was developed for BNCT study and treatment planning. Three kinds of CT images, VHP, PINNACLE and DICOM images, were employed to make voxel phantoms for BNCT patient treatment using the BTPS. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, gamma and boron doses are calculated and background, tissue, and tumour doses for idealised standard reactor neutron field (ISRNF) neutron beam were calculated by using BTPS and MCNP code. It was noted that the total computing times needed for BNCT analysis could be greatly reduced since the BTPS system provides a dose analysis tool and a lengthy MCNP input in a short time. It is, thus, expected that the BTPS can significantly contribute the BNCT study for the treatment of patients. PMID:15353727

  18. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  19. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  20. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  1. Measurement and simulation of the TRR BNCT beam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser; Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Ghods, Hossein; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Haddadi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the configuration of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) thermal column has been modified and a proper thermal neutron beam for preclinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been obtained. In this study, simulations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the BNCT beam parameters including the beam uniformity, the distribution of the thermal neutron dose, boron dose, gamma dose in a phantom and also the Therapeutic Gain (TG). To do this, the entire TRR structure including the reactor core, pool, the thermal column and beam tubes have been modeled using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. To measure in-phantom dose distribution a special head phantom has been constructed and foil activation techniques and TLD700 dosimeter have been used. The results show that there is enough uniformity in TRR thermal BNCT beam. TG parameter has the maximum value of 5.7 at the depth of 1 cm from the surface of the phantom, confirming that TRR thermal neutron beam has potential for being used in treatment of superficial brain tumors. For the purpose of a clinical trial, more modifications need to be done at the reactor, as, for example design, and construction of a treatment room at the beam exit which is our plan for future. To date, this beam is usable for biological studies and animal trials. There is a relatively good agreement between simulation and measurement especially within a diameter of 10 cm which is the dimension of usual BNCT beam ports. This relatively good agreement enables a more precise prediction of the irradiation conditions needed for future experiments.

  2. Neutron/photon physics investigation of brain tumor treatments with BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sung-Joon

    As basis for a preclinical neutron beam evaluation for BNCT of brain tumors, a computational method is developed to calculate the tumor-cell survival probability vs. treatment conditions. Here, a treatment condition is characterized by the spectrum and lateral size of neutron beams, single or bilateral exposure, and the choice of boron drugs. The radiation transport from the neutron source to tumors is carried out by the Monte Carlo method: (1) reactor-based BNCT facility modeling to yield the neutron spectra at an irradiation port; (2) dosimetry to limit the neutron fluence below a tolerance dose; (3) calculation of the 10B(n,/alpha)7Li density in tumors using neutron beams grouped by energy and angle. Finally, from a cell-killing chance by the (n,α) reaction the tumor-cell survival probability is calculated for various treatment conditions. The 10 cm beam penetrates deeper and delivers a higher thermal neutron flux at depth than the 4 cm beam. A near surface tumor could be effectively treated by single exposure with the maximum survival probability of 10-2-10-4 at the most likely range of the cell-killing chance per (n,α) reaction, while a deep tumor should rely upon bilateral exposure to avoid a high cell survival at depth. By reducing either the low or the fast energy wing of the spectrum, the tumor-cell survival can be somewhat decreased, compared to the original spectrum. However, with the both energy wings reduced, the survival probability can be furthermore decreased by factors of 2-10, depending on the treatment conditions.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis: therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA–BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) ? neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA–BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks posttreatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA–BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mgfell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA–BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA–BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA– BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.

  4. Conceptual Design of a Clinical BNCT Beam in an Adjacent Dry Cell of the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Maucec, Marko

    2000-11-15

    The MCNP4B Monte Carlo transport code is used in a feasibility study of the epithermal neutron boron neutron capture therapy facility in the thermalizing column of the 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). To boost the epithermal neutron flux at the reference irradiation point, the efficiency of a fission plate with almost 1.5 kg of 20% enriched uranium and 2.3 kW of thermal power is investigated. With the same purpose in mind, the TRIGA reactor core setup is optimized, and standard fresh fuel elements are concentrated partly in the outermost ring of the core. Further, a detailed parametric study of the materials and dimensions for all the relevant parts of the irradiation facility is carried out. Some of the standard epithermal neutron filter/moderator materials, as well as 'pressed-only' low-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlF{sub 3}, are considered. The proposed version of the BNCT facility, with PbF{sub 2} as the epithermal neutron filter/moderator, provides an epithermal neutron flux of {approx}1.1 x 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}.s, thus enabling patient irradiation times of <60 min. With reasonably low fast neutron and photon contamination ([overdot]D{sub nfast}/{phi}{sub epi} < 5 x 10{sup -13} Gy.cm{sup 2}/n and [overdot]D{sub {gamma}} /{phi}{sub epi} < 3 x 10{sup -13} Gy.cm{sup 2}/n), the in-air performances of the proposed beam are comparable to all existing epithermal BNCT facilities. The design presents an equally efficient alternative to the BNCT beams in TRIGA reactor thermal columns that are more commonly applied. The cavity of the dry cell, a former JSI TRIGA reactor spent-fuel storage facility, adjacent to the thermalizing column, could rather easily be rearranged into a suitable patient treatment room, which would substantially decrease the overall developmental costs.

  5. The EORTC Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Group: achievements and future projects.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, W; Zurlo, A

    2002-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an experimental treatment modality that takes place in a nuclear research reactor. To progress from preclinical studies to patient treatment is a challenge requiring strict quality management and special solutions to licensing, liability, insurance, responsibility and logistics. The European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BNCT group has started the first European clinical trial of BNCT for glioblastoma patients at the European High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, conducted by the Department of Radiotherapy of the University of Essen, Germany. A very strict quality management had to be installed following the European rules on safety and quality assurance for nuclear research reactors, for radioprotection, for radiotherapy and for clinical trials. The EORTC BNCT Group has created a virtual European-wide hospital to handle the complex management of patients treated with BNCT. New clinical trials are currently under development. PMID:11858961

  6. Hybrid photoneutron source optimization for electron accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, F.; Shahriari, M.

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is being studied as a possible radiotherapic treatment for some cancer types. Neutron energy for penetrating into tissue should be in the epithermal range. Different methods are used for neutron production. Electron accelerators are an alternative way for producing neutrons in electron-photon-neutron processes. Optimization of electron/photon and photoneutron targets calculations with respect to electron energy, dimension (radius and thickness) and neutron yield were done by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. According to the results, a hybrid photoneutron source including BeD 2 and Tungsten has been introduced.

  7. Radiation-induced meningiomas after BNCT in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Sogabe, S; Mizobichi, Y; Nakajima, K; Shinji, N; Nakagawa, Y

    2015-12-01

    Of the 180 patients with malignant brain tumors whom we treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) since 1968, only one (0.56%) developed multiple radiation-induced meningiomas. The parasagittal meningioma that had received 42 Gy (w) for BNCT showed more rapid growth on Gd-enhanced MRI scans and more atypical features on histopathologic studies than the temporal convexity tumor that had received 20 Gy (w). Long-term follow up MRI studies are necessary in long-survivors of malignant brain tumors treated by BNCT. PMID:26122975

  8. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  9. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  10. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  11. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na3 [ae-B20H17NH3], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 {+-} 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 {+-} 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  12. SU-E-J-100: Reconstruction of Prompt Gamma Ray Three Dimensional SPECT Image From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy(BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, D; Jung, J; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: In case of simulation, the pixelated SPECT detector, collimator and phantom were simulated using Monte Carlo n particle extended (MCNPX) simulation tool. A thermal neutron source (<1 eV) was used to react with the boron uptake region (BUR) in the phantom. Each geometry had a spherical pattern, and three different BURs (A, B and C region, density: 2.08 g/cm3) were located in the middle of the brain phantom. The data from 128 projections for each sorting process were used to achieve image reconstruction. The ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain a tomographic image with eight subsets and five iterations. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the geometric accuracy of reconstructed image. Results: The OSEM image was compared with the original phantom pattern image. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated as the gross area under each ROC curve. The three calculated AUC values were 0.738 (A region), 0.623 (B region), and 0.817 (C region). The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm and 1.4 cm. Conclusion: The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT SPECT image were estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multiple tumor region should be treated using the BNCT, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from the SPECT could be provided to the BNCT facilities. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research

  13. Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Wang, Jimmy; Maltz, Jonathon S.; Qi, Jinyi; Mandelli, Emanuele; Moses, William W.

    2002-12-19

    We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images.

  14. The LBNL High School Student Research Participation Program (HSSRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, M. A.

    2007-04-01

    The HSSRPP, which has been in operation at LBNL since 2001, places 25-35 students each year in summer research internships at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a multi-purpose Department of Energy laboratory. The paid six-week internships, which are restricted to students who have completed their junior or senior year of high school, are highly sought over, with nearly 300 applications in 2006. With funding from Bechtel, the success of the program has been assessed through surveys and tracking of the student participants. In addition, as part of the application process, the students are asked the essay question, ``If you were in charge of the Science Department at your High School, what changes would you make to motivate more students to pursue careers in science and why?'' The responses of all applicants for 2004-2006 have been analyzed by gender and school district. The results will be discussed.

  15. Feasibility study on the use of uranium in photoneutron target and BSA optimization for Linac based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid; Minoochehr, Abdolhamid; Nedaie, Hasan

    2011-06-01

    A hybrid photoneutron target including natural uranium has been studied for a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator (Linac) based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) facility. In this study the possibility of using uranium to increase the neutron intensity has been investigated by focusing on the time dependence behavior of the build-up and decay of the delayed gamma rays from fission fragments and activation products through photo-fission reactions in the BSA (Beam Shaping Assembly) configuration design. Delayed components of neutrons and photons were calculated. The obtained BSA parameters are in agreement with the IAEA recommendation and compared to the hybrid photoneutron target without U. The epithermal flux in the suggested design is 2.67E9 (n/cm 2s/mA).

  16. Fatal carotid blowout syndrome after BNCT for head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Aihara, T; Hiratsuka, J; Ishikawa, H; Kumada, H; Ohnishi, K; Kamitani, N; Suzuki, M; Sakurai, H; Harada, T

    2015-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and tumor-selective radiation that does not cause serious damage to the surrounding normal tissues. BNCT might be effective and safe in patients with inoperable, locally advanced head and neck cancers, even those that recur at previously irradiated sites. However, carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) is a lethal complication resulting from malignant invasion of the carotid artery (CA); thus, the risk of CBS should be carefully assessed in patients with risk factors for CBS after BNCT. Thirty-three patients in our institution who underwent BNCT were analyzed. Two patients developed CBS and experienced widespread skin invasion and recurrence close to the carotid artery after irradiation. Careful attention should be paid to the occurrence of CBS if the tumor is located adjacent to the carotid artery. The presence of skin invasion from recurrent lesions after irradiation is an ominous sign of CBS onset and lethal consequences. PMID:26282568

  17. Dosimetric feasibility study for an extracorporeal BNCT application on liver metastases at the TRIGA Mainz.

    PubMed

    Blaickner, M; Kratz, J V; Minouchehr, S; Otto, G; Schmidberger, H; Schütz, C; Vogtländer, L; Wortmann, B; Hampel, G

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of explanted livers in the thermal column of the research reactor in Mainz. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 is used to calculate the biologically weighted dose for different ratios of the (10)B-concentration in tumour to normal liver tissue. The simulation results show that dosimetric goals are only partially met. To guarantee effective BNCT treatment the organ has to be better shielded from all gamma radiation. PMID:21872481

  18. INEEL BNCT research program. Annual report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1996. Contributions from the individual investigators about their projects are included, specifically, physics: treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry, measurement of the Finnish research reactor epithermal neutron spectrum, BNCT accelerator technology; and chemistry: analysis of biological samples and preparation of {sup 10}B enriched decaborane.

  19. Application of different TL detectors for the photon dosimetry in mixed radiation fields used for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burgkhardt, B; Bilski, P; Budzanowski, M; Böttger, R; Eberhardt, K; Hampel, G; Olko, P; Straubing, A

    2006-01-01

    Different approaches for the measurement of a relatively small gamma dose in strong fields of thermal and epithermal neutrons as used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) have been studied with various thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs). CaF(2):Tm detectors are insensitive to thermal neutrons but not tissue-equivalent. A disadvantage of applying tissue-equivalent (7)LiF detectors is a strong neutron signal resulting from the unavoidable presence of (6)Li traces. To overcome this problem it is usual to apply pairs of LiF detectors with different (6)Li content. The experimental determination of the thermal neutron response ratio of such a pair at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) operated by PTB enables measurement of the photon dose. In the experimental mixed field of thermal neutrons and photons of the TRIGA reactor at Mainz the photon dose measured with different types of (7)LiF/(nat)LiF TLD pairs agree within a standard uncertainty of 6% whereas the CaF(2):Tm detectors exhibit a photon dose by more than a factor of 2 higher. It is proposed to determine suitable photon energy correction factors for CaF(2):Tm detectors with the help of the (7)LiF/(nat)LiF TLD pairs in the radiation field of interest. PMID:16644976

  20. Error prediction of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Liu, Y H

    2011-12-01

    To predict the neutron influence on various (6)LiF concentration in the LiF-TLD, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was adopted to simulate the energy deposition on a TLD chip with dimensions of 3.2×3.2×0.9 mm. By assuming that the TL response is proportional to the energy deposition on it, the percentage error of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement in mixed (n, γ) fields can be written as: %Error=R(n)/R(g)×100%. Where R(n) and R(g) are the TL responses resulted from neutron and gamma, respectively. Taking the water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) as an example, the (6)LiF concentration for TLD-700 is 0.007%, the magnitude of the neutron flux is ~1×10(9) n/cm(2)/s, the neutron energy is ~4×10(-7) MeV (cadmium cut-off energy), the gamma dose rate is ~3 Gy/h, thus the percentage error can be predicted as 38%. PMID:21489808

  1. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    The primary objectives of the DOE Program at the University of Tennessee Biomedical Imaging Center are the development of new boron-neutron-capture agents as well as the technology to detect boron compounds in-vivo. The detection technology focuses on the development of effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for verifying and measuring BNCT agents in-vivo. A significant portion of the effort is directed toward the design of boron-containing neutron-capture-therapy agents. The UT -- DOE program is unique in that it has access to two state-of-the-art multinuclear magnetic resonance imaging units housed in the Biomedical Imaging Center at the University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville. In addition the UT -- DOE researchers actively collaborate with colleagues at other DOE facilities (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Associated Universities). An important goal of the DOE program at UT is to provide training for students (predoctoral and postdoctoral). The University of Tennessee is one of the very few institutions in the world where students have hands-on'' access to both modern scientific equipment and medical imaging modalities such as the clinical MRI units. The academic nature of the program facilitates collaborative interactions with other DOE programs and helps to insure the continued availability of skilled scientists dedicated to the advancement of diagnostic medical procedures. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Monte Carlo based protocol for cell survival and tumour control probability in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sung-Joon

    1999-02-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the theoretical cell survival probability (nominally, the cell survival fraction) is developed to evaluate preclinical treatment conditions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A treatment condition is characterized by the neutron beam spectra, single or bilateral exposure, and the choice of boron carrier drug (boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boron sulfhydryl hydride (BSH)). The cell survival probability defined from Poisson statistics is expressed with the cell-killing yield, the (n, ) reaction density, and the tolerable neutron fluence. The radiation transport calculation from the neutron source to tumours is carried out using Monte Carlo methods: (i) reactor-based BNCT facility modelling to yield the neutron beam library at an irradiation port; (ii) dosimetry to limit the neutron fluence below a tolerance dose (10.5 Gy-Eq); (iii) calculation of the (n, ) reaction density in tumours. A shallow surface tumour could be effectively treated by single exposure producing an average cell survival probability of - for probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs, while a deep tumour will require bilateral exposure to achieve comparable cell kills at depth. With very pure epithermal beams eliminating thermal, low epithermal and fast neutrons, the cell survival can be decreased by factors of 2-10 compared with

  3. Voxel model in BNCT treatment planning: performance analysis and improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Sara J.; Carando, Daniel G.; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Zamenhof, Robert G.

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to study the performance of treatment planning systems in deriving an accurate dosimetry of the complex radiation fields involved in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of the patient's anatomy is one of the main factors involved in this subject. This work presents a detailed analysis of the performance of the 1 cm based voxel reconstruction approach. First, a new and improved material assignment algorithm implemented in NCTPlan treatment planning system for BNCT is described. Based on previous works, the performances of the 1 cm based voxel methods used in the MacNCTPlan and NCTPlan treatment planning systems are compared by standard simulation tests. In addition, the NCTPlan voxel model is benchmarked against in-phantom physical dosimetry of the RA-6 reactor of Argentina. This investigation shows the 1 cm resolution to be accurate enough for all reported tests, even in the extreme cases such as a parallelepiped phantom irradiated through one of its sharp edges. This accuracy can be degraded at very shallow depths in which, to improve the estimates, the anatomy images need to be positioned in a suitable way. Rules for this positioning are presented. The skin is considered one of the organs at risk in all BNCT treatments and, in the particular case of cutaneous melanoma of extremities, limits the delivered dose to the patient. Therefore, the performance of the voxel technique is deeply analysed in these shallow regions. A theoretical analysis is carried out to assess the distortion caused by homogenization and material percentage rounding processes. Then, a new strategy for the treatment of surface voxels is proposed and tested using two different irradiation problems. For a parallelepiped phantom perpendicularly irradiated with a 5 keV neutron source, the large thermal neutron fluence deviation present at shallow depths (from 54% at 0 mm depth to 5% at 4 mm depth) is reduced to 2% on average

  4. Microdosimetry study of THOR BNCT beam using tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Hsiao, H W; Tung, C-J; Liu, H M; Chou, F I

    2009-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment modality using a nuclear reactor and a boron compound drug. In Taiwan, Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) has been modulated for the basic research of BNCT for years. A new BNCT beam port was built in 2004 and used to prepare the first clinical trial in the near future. This work reports the microdosimetry study of the THOR BNCT beam by means of the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Two self-fabricated TEPCs (the boron-doped versus the boron-free counter wall) were introduced. These dual TEPCs were applied to measure the lineal energy distributions in air and water phantom irradiated by the THOR BNCT mixed radiation field. Dose contributions from component radiations of different linear energy transfers (LETs) were analyzed. Applying a lineal energy dependent biological weighting function, r(y), to the total and individual lineal energy distributions, the effective relative biological effectiveness (RBE), neutron RBE, photon RBE, and boron capture RBE (BNC RBE) were all determined at various depths of the water phantom. Minimum and maximum values of the effective RBE were 1.68 and 2.93, respectively. The maximum effective RBE occurred at 2cm depth in the phantom. The average neutron RBE, photon RBE, and BNC RBE values were 3.160+/-0.020, 1.018+/-0.001, and 1.570+/-0.270, respectively, for the THOR BNCT beam. PMID:19447042

  5. INEL BNCT Research Program, September--October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotain. carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor call culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophonylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  6. INEL BNCT research program, July--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  7. Verification of the accuracy of BNCT treatment planning system THORplan.

    PubMed

    Li, H S; Liu, Y-W H; Lee, C Y; Lin, T Y; Hsu, F Y

    2009-07-01

    THORplan is a treatment planning system developed at Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) purpose. It is recently developed with user-friendly interface using Interactive Data Language. In this article the accuracy of THORplan is verified by comparing results of Snyder phantom calculation with the analytical model results of MCNP. Neutron source from THOR epithermal neutron beam is used as the source for the calculation. The thermal neutron flux calculated by THORplan is very close to the reference results. SERA overestimates thermal neutron flux by 2-5%. NCTPlan underestimates thermal neutron flux by 4-9% in most locations. The total weighted dose calculated by THORplan is accurate to within 3% except at the tissue interface. SERA overestimates the total weighted dose at depth >1.5 cm by 2-5%. NCTPlan underestimates the total weighted dose by approximately 10% at depth >1cm. PMID:19386507

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  9. TIDBIT - the INEL database of BNCT information and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    The INEL Database of BNCT Information and Treatment (TIDBIT) has been under development for several years. Late in 1993, a new software development team took over the project and did and assessment of the current implementation status, and determined that the user interface was unsatisfactory for the expected users and that the data structures were out of step with the current state of reality. The team evaluated several tools that would improve the user interface to make the system easier to use. Uniface turned out to be the product of choice. During 1994, TIDBIT got its name, underwent a complete change of appearance, had a major overhaul to the data structures that support the application, and system documentation was begun. A prototype of the system was demonstrated in September 1994.

  10. INEL BNCT Research Program, May/June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (IBPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  11. INEL BNCT Research Program, January/February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  12. INEL BNCT Research Program, March/April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murino screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor call culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronopheoylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  13. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  14. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  15. Monte Carlo model of the Studsvik BNCT clinical beam: description and validation.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Valerio; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per M; Sköld, Kurt; Montagnini, Bruno; Capala, Jacek

    2003-12-01

    The neutron beam at the Studsvik facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the validation of the related computational model developed for the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code are presented. Several measurements performed at the epithermal neutron port used for clinical trials have been made in order to validate the Monte Carlo computational model. The good general agreement between the MCNP calculations and the experimental results has provided an adequate check of the calculation procedure. In particular, at the nominal reactor power of 1 MW, the calculated in-air epithermal neutron flux in the energy interval between 0.4 eV-10 keV is 3.24 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) (+/- 1.2% 1 std. dev.) while the measured value is 3.30 x 10(9) n cm(-20 s(-1) (+/- 5.0% 1 std. dev.). Furthermore, the calculated in-phantom thermal neutron flux, equal to 6.43 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) (+/- 1.0% 1 std. dev.), and the corresponding measured value of 6.33 X 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) (+/- 5.3% 1 std. dev.) agree within their respective uncertainties. The only statistically significant disagreement is a discrepancy of 39% between the MCNP calculations of the in-air photon kerma and the corresponding experimental value. Despite this, a quite acceptable overall in-phantom beam performance was obtained, with a maximum value of the therapeutic ratio (the ratio between the local tumor dose and the maximum healthy tissue dose) equal to 6.7. The described MCNP model of the Studsvik facility has been deemed adequate to evaluate further improvements in the beam design as well as to plan experimental work. PMID:14713077

  16. Investigating a multi-purpose target for electron linac based photoneutron sources for BNCT of deep-seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Rasouli, Fatemeh S.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies in BNCT have focused on investigating appropriate neutron sources as alternatives for nuclear reactors. As the most prominent facilities, the electron linac based photoneutron sources benefit from two consecutive reactions, (e, γ) and (γ, n). The photoneutron sources designed so far are composed of bipartite targets which involve practical problems and are far from the objective of achieving an optimized neutron source. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple target for a photoneutron source based on an electron linac. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, tungsten is found to have the potential of utilizing as both photon converter and photoneutron target. Besides, it is shown that an optimized dimension for such a target slows-down the produced neutrons toward the desired energy range while keeping them economy, which makes achieving the recommended criteria for BNCT of deep-tumors more available. This multi-purpose target does not involve complicated designing, and can be considered as a significant step toward finding application of photoneutron sources for in-hospital treatments. In order to shape the neutron beam emitted from such a target, the beam is planned to pass through an optimized arrangement of materials composed of moderators, filters, reflector, and collimator. By assessment with the recommended in-air parameters, it is shown that the designed beam provides high intensity of desired neutrons, as well as low background contamination. The last section of this study is devoted to investigate the performance of the resultant beam in deep tissue. A typical simulated liver tumor, located within a phantom of human body, was subjected to the irradiation of the designed spectrum. The dosimetric results, including evaluated depth-dose curves and carried out in-phantom parameters show that the proposed configuration establishes acceptable agreement between the appropriate neutron intensity, and

  17. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  18. Feasibility study of using laser-generated neutron beam for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Rahmani, F; Khalafi, H

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of using a laser-accelerated proton beam to produce a neutron source, via (p,n) reaction, for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications has been studied by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. After optimization of the target material and its thickness, a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) has been designed and optimized to provide appropriate neutron beam according to the recommended criteria by International Atomic Energy Agency. It was found that the considered laser-accelerated proton beam can provide epithermal neutron flux of ∼2×10(6) n/cm(2) shot. To achieve an appropriate epithermal neutron flux for BNCT treatment, the laser must operate at repetition rates of 1 kHz, which is rather ambitious at this moment. But it can be used in some BNCT researches field such as biological research. PMID:26115204

  19. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, α) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg 10B/g blood.

  20. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. PMID:25732097

  1. Optimization of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) proton beam energy for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    The reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7} Be has been proposed as an accelerator-based source of neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). This reaction has a large steep resonance for proton energies of about 2.3 MeV which ends at about 2.5 MeV. It has generally been accepted that one should use 2.5 MeV protons to get the highest yield of neutrons for BNCT. This paper suggests that for BNCT the optimum proton energy may be about 2.3 MeV and that a proton energy of about 2.2 MeV will provide the same useful neutron fluence outside a thinner moderator as the neutron fluence from a 2.5 MeV proton beam with a thicker moderator.

  2. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  3. An international dosimetry exchange for BNCT part II: computational dosimetry normalizations.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K; Albritton, J R; Kiger, W S; Rezaei, A; Sköld, K; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Auterinen, I; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L

    2008-12-01

    The meaningful sharing and combining of clinical results from different centers in the world performing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires improved precision in dose specification between programs. To this end absorbed dose normalizations were performed for the European clinical centers at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (The Netherlands), Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic), VTT, Espoo (Finland), and Studsvik, Nyköping (Sweden). Each European group prepared a treatment plan calculation that was bench-marked against Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dosimetry performed in a large, water-filled phantom to uniformly evaluate dose specifications with an estimated precision of +/-2%-3%. These normalizations were compared with those derived from an earlier exchange between Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and MIT in the USA. Neglecting the uncertainties related to biological weighting factors, large variations between calculated and measured dose are apparent that depend upon the 10B uptake in tissue. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) in normal tissue, differences in the evaluated maximum dose to brain for the same nominal specification of 10 Gy(w) at the different facilities range between 7.6 and 13.2 Gy(w) in the trials using boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery compound and between 8.9 and 11.1 Gy(w) in the two boron sulfhydryl (BSH) studies. Most notably, the value for the same specified dose of 10 Gy(w) determined at the different participating centers using BPA is significantly higher than at BNL by 32% (MIT), 43% (VTT), 49% (JRC), and 74% (Studsvik). Conversion of dose specification is now possible between all active participants and should be incorporated into future multi-center patient analyses. PMID:19175101

  4. Maximizing the Efficacy of Accelerator-Produced Neutrons for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Jay F. Kunze; J. Frank Harmon; Rajat Kudchadker; Chad L. Lee

    2000-06-04

    Production of neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment of malignant brain tumors will best be served if the neutrons can be produced by accelerators rather than nuclear reactors. The neutron production reaction that has been most thoroughly examined using accelerators is {sup 7}Li(n, p){sup 7}Be, generally on a thick lithium target. The threshold for this reactor is 1.88 MeV, and the yield curve for neutron production rises quite rapidly up to 2.3 MeV, where the positive slope is reduced significantly. In considering the design of a neutron production device, it has been traditional to use proton energies in the 2.4- to 2.5-MeV range. Over the last several years, our group has been working with lower-energy protons, just above the threshold for neutron production. The advantage is that the neutrons produced would have much lower energy and hence need much less moderator. The principal disadvantage of operating at these near-threshold energies is that the yield from the target is substantially reduced from that at or near 2.5-MeV proton energy. Table I shows the results of calculations to find an optimum energy for 3-mA proton beam on target. In general, we have concluded that 1.96 to 1.98 MeV is probably optimum for a tumor 5 cm below the skull.

  5. Might iodomethyl-{alpha}-tyrosine be a surrogate for BPA in BNCT?

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Michiko; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    A single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] imaging agent that is an analogue of a boron carrier for boron neutron-capture therapy [BNCT] of cerebral gliomas would be useful for assessing the kinetics of boron uptake in tumors and in the surrounding brain tissues noninvasively. BNCT is based on the interaction of thermalized neutrons with {sup 10}B nuclei in the targeted tumor. For BNCT of brain tumors, it is crucial that {sup 10}B concentrations in radiosensitive regions of the brain be minimal since malignant cells and vital brain tissues are often inter-mingled at the margins of the tumor. Currently, boronophenylalanine [BPA]-mediated BNCT is undergoing preliminary clinical study for postoperative radiotherapy of glioblastorna multiforme at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Investigators in Japan are developing {sup 18}F-fluoroboronophenylaianine [FBPA] as a positron {sup 18}F (T{sub 1/2} = 110 min), which is usually emission tomography [PET] surrogate for BPA. generated at a cyclotron dedicated to PET, is generally a minimally perturbing substitute for the 2-H on the aromatic ring because of its small size and the strong covalent bond it forms with carbon. However, SPECT has potential advantages over PET: (1) SPECT is clinically more widely available at lower cost; (2) most radioisotopes for the synthesis of SPECT agents can be purchased; (3) SPECT is less difficult to implement. It is thought that the quality of images derived from the two techniques would each be sufficiently informative for BNCT treatment planning purposes, provided that the SPECT and PET agents being considered were both pharmacokinetic surrogates for BPA. This study evaluated the use of {sup 123}I alpha methyltyrosine as a surrogate for BPA in BNCT.

  6. A treatment planning comparison of BPA- or BSH-based BNCT of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Accurate delivery of the prescribed dose during clinical BNCT requires knowledge (or reasonably valid assumptions) about the boron concentrations in tumor and normal tissues. For conversion of physical dose (Gy) into photon-equivalent dose (Gy-Eq), relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and/or compound-adjusted biological effectiveness (CBE) factors are required for each tissue. The BNCT treatment planning software requires input of the following values: the boron concentration in blood and tumor, RBEs in brain, tumor and skin for the high-LET beam components, the CBE factors for brain, tumor, and skin, and the RBE for the gamma component.

  7. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  8. Ramping Up the SNS Beam Power with the LBNL Baseline H- source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    LBNL designed and built the Frontend for the Spallation Neutron Source, including its H- source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). This paper discusses the performance of the H- source and LEBT during the commissioning of the accelerator, as well as their performance while ramping up the SNS beam power to 540 kW. Detailed discussions of major shortcomings and their mitigations are presented to illustrate the effort needed to take even a well-designed R&D ion source into operation. With these modifications, at 4% duty factor the LBNL H- source meets the essential requirements that were set at the beginning of the project.

  9. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-03-12

    This summary document describes the results of conceptual design and cost estimates performed by LBNL Engineering staff between October 10, 2003 and March 12, 2004 for the proposed {theta}{sub 13} neutrino experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). This document focuses on the detector room design concept and mechanical engineering issues associated with the neutrino detector structures. Every effort has been made not to duplicate information contained in the last LBNL Engineering Summary Report dated October 10, 2003. Only new or updated information is included in this document.

  10. Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.; Leitner, M.; Kwan, J.W.

    2006-11-13

    This report collects information on cathode contaminants we have gathered in the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand. Information on contaminants is compiled from several sources. The attachment, ''Practical Aspects of Modern Dispenser Cathodes'', is from Heat Wave Corp. (TB-134) and was originally published in Microwave Journal, September 1979. Cathode contamination depends on both material choices and residual gases. Table 1 of TB-134 lists materials that can poison dispenser cathodes. These include reactive residual gases or vapors such as oxygen, water vapor, benzene, chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, silicon, and most metals other than molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and copper. The metals interact with the cathode surface through their vapor pressure. A paper by Nexsen and Turner, J. Appl. Phys. 68, 298-303 (1990) shows the threshold effects of some common residual gases or vapors on cathode performance. The book by Walter H. Kohl, Handbook of Materials and Techniques for Vacuum Devices, also contains useful information on cathodes and poisoning agents. A plot of the vapor pressures and poisoning effect of certain metals (from Kohl) is shown below. Note that the vapor pressure of zinc is 1.1 x 10{sup -8} Torr at 400 K = 127 C, and 2.7 x 10{sup -5} at 500 K = 227 C. By contrast iron reaches a vapor pressure 1 x 10{sup -8} between 800 and 900 C. Therefore it is important to eliminate any brass parts that could exceed a temperature of 100 C. Many structural components of the cathode assembly contain steel. At 500-600 C in an oxygen atmosphere chromium oxide may outgas from the steel. [Cho, et.al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, p. 998 (2001)]. Steel may also contain silicon, and sulfur at low concentrations. Therefore use of steel should be limited or avoided at high temperature near the cathode. Materials that should be avoided in the vicinity of the cathode include brass, silver, zinc, non-OFHC copper, silicates, and sulfur-containing lubricants such

  11. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  12. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: Combined administration of BSH and BPA

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; William Bauer; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70–85 ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  13. Irradiation characteristics of BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons: application to intra-operative BNCT for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-08-21

    A calculation method for the dosage of neutrons by near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be and gamma rays by 7Li(p, p'gamma)7Li was validated through experiments with variable distance between the Li target and the phantom, focusing on large angular dependence. The production of neutrons and gamma rays in the Li target was calculated by Lee's method and their transport in the phantom was calculated using the MCNP-4B code. The dosage in intra-operative boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons was evaluated using the validated calculation method. The effectiveness of the usage of the direct neutrons was confirmed from the existence of the region satisfying the requirements of the protocol utilized in intra-operative BNCT for brain tumours in Japan. The boron-dose enhancer (BDE) introduced in this paper to increase the contribution of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li dose in the living body was effective. The void utilized to increase the dose in deep regions was also effective with BDE. For the investigation of 1.900 MeV proton beams, for example, it was found that intraoperative BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons is feasible. PMID:12222863

  14. "Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Maria E. Itoiz; Silvia I. Thorp; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz

    2011-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that involves the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumors followed by irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam. The minor abundance stable isotope of boron, 10B, interacts with low energy (thermal) neutrons to produce high linear energy transfer (LET) a-particles and 7Li ions. These disintegration products are known to have a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Their short range (<10 {micro}m) would limit the damage to cells containing 10B (1,2). Thus, BNCT would target tumor tissue selectively, sparing normal tissue. Clinical trials of BNCT for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and/or melanoma and, more recently, head and neck tumors and liver metastases, using boronophenylalanine (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborane (BSH) as the 10B carriers, have been performed or are underway in Argentina, Japan, the US and Europe (e.g. 3-8). To date, the clinical results have shown a potential, albeit inconclusive, therapeutic advantage for this technique. Contributory translational studies have been carried out employing a variety of experimental models based on the implantation of tumor cells in normal tissue (e.g. 5).

  15. Radiation effects testing at the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Koga, Rokotura

    2001-10-09

    The effects of ionizing particles on sensitive microelectronics is an important component of the design of systems as diverse as satellites and space probes, detectors for high energy physics experiments and even internet server farms. Understanding the effects of radiation on human cells is an equally important endeavor directed towards future manned missions in space and towards cancer therapy. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Berkeley Laboratory, facilities are available for radiation effects testing (RET) with heavy ions and with protons. The techniques for doing these measurements and the advantages of using a cyclotron will be discussed, and the Cyclotron facilities will be compared with other facilities worldwide. RET of the same part at several facilities of varying beam energy can provide tests of the simple models used in this field and elucidate the relative importance of atomic and nuclear effects. The results and implications of such measurements will be discussed.

  16. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  17. Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on Normal Liver Regeneration: Towards a Novel Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Cardoso; Elisa M. Heber; David W. Nigg; Osvaldo Calzetta; Herman Blaumann; Juan Longhino; Maria E. Itoiz; Eduardo Bumaschny; Emiliano Pozzi; Amanda E.Schwint; Verónica A. Trivillin

    2007-10-01

    The “TAORMINA project” developed a new method for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of human multifocal unresectable liver metastases based on whole liver ex-situ BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), followed by whole liver autograft. This technique involved a high risk, prolonged anhepatic phase. The Roffo Institute liver surgeons (JEC) herein propose a novel technique to pursue ex-situ liver BNCT studies with a drastically lower surgical risk for the patient. The technique would involve, sequentially, ex-situ BNCT of left liver segments II and III, partial liver autograft, and induction of partial atrophy of the untreated right liver. The working hypothesis is that the atrophy of the right, untreated, diseased liver would stimulate regeneration of the left, treated, “cured” liver to yield a healthy liver mass, allowing for the resection of the remaining portion of diseased liver. This technique does not involve an anhepatic phase and would thus pose a drastically lower surgical risk to the patient but requires sine qua non that BNCT should not impair the regenerative capacity of normal hepatocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of therapeutic doses of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 (Na2 10B10H10) or (GB- 10 + BPA) on normal liver regeneration in the Wistar rat employing partial hepatectomy as a regenerative stimulus. BNCT did not cause alterations in the outcome of normal liver regeneration, regenerated liver function or histology. We provide proof of principle to support the development of a novel, promising BNCT technique for the treatment of liver metastases.

  18. Simulation studies of a XUV/soft X-ray harmonic-cascade FEL for the proposed LBNL recirculating linac*

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Zholents, A.

    2003-06-02

    Presently there is significant interest at LBNL in designing and building a facility for ultrafast (i.e. femtosecond time scale) x-ray science based upon a superconducting, recirculating RF linac (see Corlett et al. for more details). In addition to producing synchrotron radiation pulses in the 1-15 keV energy range, we are also considering adding one or more free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines using a harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200 nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse, which together then undergo FEL action in the modulator. We present various results obtained with the GINGER simulation code examining final output sensitivity to initial electron beam parameters. We also discuss the effects of spontaneous emission and shot noise upon this particular cascade approach which can limit the final output coherence.

  19. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  20. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  1. Neutron medical treatment of tumours — a survey of facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. M.; Loeper-Kabasakal, B.; Breitkreutz, H.

    2012-03-01

    Neutron therapy has two branches: Fast Neutron Therapy (FNT) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The mean neutron energies used for FNT range from 2 MeV to 25 MeV whereas the maximum energy for BNCT is about 10 keV. Neutron generators for FNT have been cyclotrons, accelerators and reactors, whereas BNCT is so far bound to reactors. Both therapies use the effects of high-LET radiation (secondary recoil protons and alpha particles, respectively) and can attack otherwise radioresistant tumours, however, with the hazard of adverse effects for irradiated healthy tissue. FNT has been administered to about 30,000 patients world-wide. From formerly 40 facilities, only eight are operational or stand-by today. The reasons for this development have been, on the one hand, related to technical and economical conditions; on the other hand, strong side effects and insufficient proof of clinical results in the early years as well as increasing competition with new clinical methods have reduced patient numbers. In fact, strict observations of indications, appropriate therapy-planning including low-LET radiation, and consequent treatment of side effects have lead to remarkable results in the meantime. BNCT initially was developed for the treatment of extremely aggressive forms of brain tumour, taking advantage of the action of the blood-brain-barrier which allows for a boronated compound to be selectively enriched in tumour cells. Meanwhile, also malignant melanoma (MM) and Head-and-Neck (H&T) tumours are treated because of their relative radioresistance. At present, epithermal beams with sufficient flux are available only at two facilities. Existing research reactors were indispensable in the development of BNCT, but are to be replaced by hospital-based epithermal neutron sources. Clinical results indicate significantly increased survival times, but the number of patients ever treated is still below 1,000. 3D-dose calculation systems have been developed at several facilities

  2. Ramping Up the SNS Beam Power with the LBNL Baseline H{sup -} Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Newland, D.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2009-03-12

    LBNL designed and built the Frontend for the Spallation Neutron Source, including its H{sup -} source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). This paper discusses the performance of the H{sup -} source and LEBT during the commissioning of the accelerator, as well as their performance while ramping up the SNS beam power to 540 kW. Detailed discussions of major shortcomings and their mitigations are presented to illustrate the effort needed to take even a well-designed R and D ion source into operation. With these modifications, at 4% duty factor the LBNL H{sup -} source meets the essential requirements that were set at the beginning of the project.

  3. Near threshold ⁷Li(p,n) ⁷Be reaction as neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2015-12-01

    (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be is an endothermic reaction and working near its threshold (1.88 MeV) has the advantage of neutron spectra with maximum energies of about 100 keV, considerably lower than at higher beam energies, or than using other neutron-producing reactions or as for the uranium fission spectrum, relevant for BNCT based on nuclear reactors. With this primary energy it is much easier to obtain the energies needed for treating deep seated tumors by BNCT (about 10 keV). This work studies bombarding energies up to 2.05 MeV, different beam incidence angles and the effect of the undesirable gamma production via the (7)Li(p,γp') (7)Li reaction. PMID:26235187

  4. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared. PMID:19939825

  5. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  6. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality. PMID:18439836

  7. Hyaluronic acid as a potential boron carrier for BNCT: Preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zaboronok, A; Yamamoto, T; Nakai, K; Yoshida, F; Uspenskii, S; Selyanin, M; Zelenetskii, A; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a nonimmunogenic, biocompatible polymer found in different biological tissues, has the potential to attach to CD44 receptors on the surface of certain cancer cells, where the receptor is overexpressed compared with normal cells. Boron-hyaluronic acid (BHA) was tested for its feasibility as a potential agent for BNCT. BHA with low-viscosity 30 kDa HA could be administered by intravenous injection. The compound showed a certain degree of cytotoxicity and accumulation in C6 rat glioma cells in vitro. Instability of the chelate bonds between boron and HA and/or insufficient specificity of CD44 receptors on C6 cells to BHA could account for the insufficient in vitro accumulation. To ensure the future eligibility of BHA for BNCT experiments, using alternative tumor cell lines and chemically securing the chelate bonds or synthesizing BHA with boron covalently attached to HA might be required. PMID:26302663

  8. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  9. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications. PMID:26278347

  10. Designing of the 14 MeV neutron moderator for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dao-Wen; Lu, Jing-Bin; Yang, Dong; Liu, Yu-Min; Wang, Hui-Dong; Ma, Ke-Yan

    2012-09-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), the ratio of the fast neutron flux to the neutron flux in the tumor (RFNT) must be less than 3%. If a D-T neutron generator is used in BNCT, the 14 MeV neutron moderator must be optimized to reduce the RFNT. Based on the neutron moderation theory and the simulation results, tungsten, lead and diamond were used to moderate the 14 MeV neutrons. Satisfying RFNT of less than 3%, the maximum neutron flux in the tumor was achieved with a three-layer moderator comprised of a 3 cm thick tungsten layer, a 14 cm thick lead layer and a 21 cm thick diamond layer.

  11. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL, Ecology Department

    2013-06-11

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  12. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2007-07-18

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  13. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL, Ecology Dept

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  14. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2008-03-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  15. Nuclear Science and Physics Data from the Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Isotopes Project pages at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been a source of nuclear data and reference information since the mid-nineties. Almost all of the data, the results of analyses, the specialized charts and interfaces, and the extensive bibiographic references are fed to the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and maintained there. The Isotope Project pages at LBNL provide a glimpse of early versions for many of the nuclear data resources.

  16. Application of the new MultiTrans SP3 radiation transport code in BNCT dose planning.

    PubMed

    Kotiluoto, P; Hiisamäki, P; Savolainen, S

    2001-09-01

    Dose planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a complex problem and requires sophisticated numerical methods. In the framework of the Finnish BNCT project, new deterministic three-dimensional radiation transport code MultiTrans SP3 has been developed at VTT Chemical Technology, based on a novel application of the tree multigrid technique. To test the applicability of this new code in a realistic BNCT dose planning problem, cylindrical PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) phantom was chosen as a benchmark case. It is a convenient benchmark, as it has been modeled by several different codes, including well-known DORT and MCNP. Extensive measured data also exist. In this paper, a comparison of the new MultiTrans SP3 code with other methods is presented for the PMMA phantom case. Results show that the total neutron dose rate to ICRU adult brain calculated by the MultiTrans SP3 code differs less than 4% in 2 cm depth in phantom (in thermal maximum) from the DORT calculation. Results also show that the calculated 197Au(n,gamma) and 55Mn(n,gamma) reaction rates in 2 cm depth in phantom differ less than 4% and 1% from the measured values, respectively. However, the photon dose calculated by the MultiTrans SP3 code seems to be incorrect in this PMMA phantom case, which requires further studying. As expected, the deterministic MultiTrans SP3 code is over an order of magnitude faster than stochastic Monte Carlo codes (with similar resolution), thus providing a very efficient tool for BNCT dose planning. PMID:11585221

  17. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment: Volume 3, No. 1: Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during January include progress in: gross boron analysis in tissue blood and urine (approximately 400 biological samples were analyzed, including samples from the first dog with melanoma and the first two dogs from the acute radiation response study at BNL); analytical methodologies development for (Sodium Borocaptate) purity determination (arrival of a new HPLC column allowed good separation of the various boronated species in the BSSB compound), and in several related areas.

  18. An economic model to assess the cost-benefit of BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kulvik, Martti; Hermans, Raine; Linnosmaa, Ismo; Shalowitz, Joel

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a formal model on cost-benefit of new technology in health care, and apply it on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We assume that the patient health benefit from getting cured in acute treatment is always higher than the patient utility resulting from any long term treatment or death. This assumption makes it possible to evaluate the monetary cost impacts of a new technology and relate these measures to the patient health benefit. PMID:26365901

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of spontaneous nasal planum squamous cell carcinoma in felines.

    PubMed

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Heber, Elisa M; Rao, Monica; Cantarelli, María A; Itoiz, Maria E; Nigg, David W; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan; Schwint, Amanda E

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was successfully applied to treat experimental squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the hamster cheek pouch mucosa, with no damage to normal tissue. It was also shown that treating spontaneous nasal planum SCC in terminal feline patients with low dose BNCT is safe and feasible. In an extension of this work, the present study aimed at evaluation of the response of tumor and dose-limiting normal tissues to potentially therapeutic BNCT doses. Biodistribution studies with (10)B-boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in (10)B) as a (10)B carrier were performed on three felines that showed advanced nasal planum SCC without any standard therapeutic option. Following the biodistribution studies, BNCT mediated by (10)BPA was done using the thermalized epithermal neutron beam at the RA-6 Nuclear Reactor. Follow-up included clinical evaluation, assessment of macroscopic tumor and normal tissue response and biopsies for histopathological analysis. The treated animals did not show any apparent radiation-induced toxicity. All three animals exhibited partial tumor control and an improvement in clinical condition. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy was associated with a high (10)B content of the tumor and a small tumor size. BNCT is therefore believed to be potentially effective in the treatment of spontaneous SCC. However, improvement in targeting (10)B into all tumor cells and delivering a sufficient dose at a greater depth are still required for the treatment of deep-seated, large tumors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of the dual mode cellular (e.g. BPA-BNCT) and vascular (e.g. GB-10-BNCT) targeting protocol in a preclinical scenario, employing combinations of (10)B compounds with different properties and complementary uptake mechanisms. PMID:17955256

  20. Assessment of dose rate scaling factors used in NCTPlan treatment planning code for the BNCT beam of THOR.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Liu, M T; Tung, C J; Hsueh Liu, Y W; Chang, C C; Liu, H M; Chou, F I

    2009-07-01

    Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) at Tsing Hua University in Taiwan has been used to investigate the feasibility and to enhance the technology of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for years. A rebuilt epithermal beam port for BNCT at THOR was finished in the summer of 2004, and then researches and experiments were performed to hasten the first clinical treatment case of BNCT in Taiwan in the near future. NCTPlan, a Monte Carlo-based clinical treatment planning code, was used to calculate the dose-rate distributions of BNCT in this work. A self-made Snyder head phantom with a servo-motor control system was irradiated in front of the THOR BNCT beam exit. The phantom was made from a 3mm shell of quartz wool impregnated with acrylic casting resin mounted on an acrylic base, and was filled with water. Gold foils (bare and cadmium-covered) and paired ion chambers (one with graphite wall and filled with CO(2) gas, another with A-150 plastic tissue equivalent wall and filled with tissue equivalent gas) were placed inside the Snyder phantom to measure and estimate the depth-dose distributions in the central axis of the beam. Dose components include the contribution of thermal neutrons, fast neutrons, photons and emitted alpha particles from (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reaction. Comparison and analysis between computed and measured results of depth-dose distributions were made in this work. Dose rate scaling factors (DRSFs) were defined as normalization factors derived individually for each dose component in the BNCT in-phantom radiation field that provide the best agreement between measured and computed data. This paper reports the in-phantom calculated and experimental dosimetry and the determined DRSFs used in NCTPlan code for the BNCT beam of THOR. PMID:19375926

  1. RADIOSYNTHESIS AND CHIRAL SEPARATION OF C-11 LABELED BORONOPHENYLALANINE FOR BNCT STUDIES WITH PET.

    SciTech Connect

    STUDENOV,A.; DING,Y.S.; FERRIERI,R.; MIURA,M.; CODERRE,J.; FOWLER,J.S.

    2001-06-10

    The overall goal of this research is to combine two powerful methodologies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and positron emission tomography (PET), to advance the treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors. BNCT is a method to selectively deliver lethal alpha radiation to a tumor through the administration of a boron-10 containing drug, and irradiation of the tumor area with neutrons [1]. L-Boronophenylalanine (L-{sup 10}BPA) is a boron-10 containing amino acid currently used for BNCT [4]. In order to perform neutron dosimetry, it is essential to determine tumor boron-10 levels in the course of the therapy. PET has the ability to measure the concentration of drugs labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in the human body [2]. 2-Fluoro-4-borono-phenylalanine ([{sup 18}F]FBPA) has been labeled as a surrogate marker for L-BPA for pharmacokinetic studies in brain tumor patients [3]. However, [{sup 18}F]FBPA is a different drug than L-BPA because it contains a fluorine atom. We report here the labeling of L-BPA with C-11, which has the advantage of being chemically identical to L-BPA. Carbon-11 is also well suited to repeated studies within the same PET scanning session.

  2. In-phantom dosimetry for BNCT with Fricke and normoxic-polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Agosteo, S.; Carrara, M.; Gay, S.; Mariani, M.; Pirola, L.; Vanossi, E.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of in-phantom dose distributions and images are important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy treatment planning. The method for spatial determination of absorbed doses in thermal or epithermal neutron fields, based on Fricke-xylenol-orange-infused gel dosimeters in form of layers, has revealed to be very reliable, as gel layer dosimeters give the possibility of obtaining spatial dose distributions and measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields, by means of a properly studied procedure. Quite recently, BNCT has been applied to treat liver metastases; in this work the results of in-phantom dosimetry for explanted liver in BNCT treatments are described. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters in which a polymerization process appears as a consequence of absorbed dose, have been recently tested, because of their characteristic absence of diffusion. In fact, due to the diffusion of ferric ions, Fricke-gel dosimeters require prompt analysis after exposure to avoid spatial information loss. In this work the preliminary results of a study about the reliability of polymer gel in BNCT dosimetry are also discussed. Gel layers have been irradiated in a phantom exposed in the thermal column of the TRIGA MARK II reactor (Pavia). The results obtained with the two kinds of gel dosimeter have been compared.

  3. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  4. Some Recent Developments in Treatment Planning Software and Methodology for BNCT

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nigg, D. W.; Wheeler, F. J.; Wessol, D. E.; et al.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT-rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape, and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  5. Boron-10 quantification and microdosimetric studies in a clinical trial of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kiger, W.S. III; Solares, G.R.; Yam, C.S.

    1996-12-31

    Five boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments have been delivered as part of the New England Deaconess Hospital-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) phase-I BNCT dose-escalation protocol for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. The first four irradiations, in which the boron agent boronophenylalanine (L-BPA) was administered orally in a fruit juice suspension, were done using epithermal neutrons from the MIT research reactor employing four fractions. The fifth irradiation, in which the subject received the fructose form of BPA (BPA-f) via intravenous infusion, was delivered in a single fraction. This paper presents the results from the measurements of {sup 10}B concentrations in tumor, normal tissue, and blood for the subjects who underwent this protocol because, to ascribe potential efficacy to BNCT, it is necessary to show that there is an adequate differential uptake of boron by tumor cells relative to normal cells, These measurements used high-resolution quantitative autoradiography, prompt gamma neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectroscopy.

  6. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT brain tumor treatment based on voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeng-Ning; Lee, Kuo-Wei; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    For BNCT treatments, in addition to tumor target doses, non-negligible doses will result in all the remaining organs of the body. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as the average absorbed doses of each of organs of patients with brain tumor treated in the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The effective doses were evaluated according to the definitions of ICRP Publications 60 and 103 for the reference male and female computational phantoms developed in ICRP Publication 110 by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code with the THOR-Y09 beam source. The effective dose acquired in this work was compared with the results of our previous work calculated for an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom. It was found that the effective dose for the female voxel phantom is larger than that for the male voxel phantom by a factor of 1.2-1.5 and the effective dose for the voxel phantom is larger than that for the mathematical phantom by a factor of 1.3-1.6. For a typical brain tumor BNCT, the effective dose was calculated to be 1.51Sv and the average absorbed dose for eye lenses was 1.07Gy. PMID:24411557

  7. Optimization of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) proton beam energy for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, B.L.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7} Be has been proposed as an accelerator-based source of neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). This reaction has a large steep resonance for proton energies of about 2.3 MeV which ends at about 2.5 MeV. It has generally been accepted that one should use 2.5 MeV protons to get the highest yield of neutrons for BNCT. This paper suggests that for BNCT the optimum proton energy may be about 2.3 MeV and that a proton energy of about 2.2 MeV will provide the same useful neutron flux outside a thinner moderator as the neutron flux from a 2.5 MeV proton beam with a, thicker moderator. These results are based on optimization of the useful neutron spectrum in air at the point of irradiation, not on depth-dose profiles in tissue/tumor.

  8. Some recent developments in treatment planning software and methodology for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT-rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape, and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  9. Some recent developments in treatment planning software and methodology for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Wemple, C.A.; Babcock, R.; Capala, J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past several years/the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape,and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  10. Experimental dosimetry and beam evaluation in a phantom for near lithium threshold accelerator based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudchadker, R. J.; Lee, C. L.; Harker, Y. D.; Harmon, F.

    1999-06-01

    Current accelerator-based neutron source concepts for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are centered on the lithium (p,n) reaction. The near lithium threshold source concept uses proton energies ≲100 keV above the reaction threshold energy (1.88 MeV). For deeply seated brain tumors, epithermal (1 eV to 10 keV) neutrons are needed to penetrate the skull cap and subsequently thermalize at the tumor location. All BNCT neutron sources inherently have thermal, fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. In order to quantify the thermal neutron component, a cylindrical acrylic head phantom has been constructed to simulate the patient's head and neck. BF3 proportional counters have been used to determine the thermal neutron flux (boron dose). The thermal neutron flux component has been compared with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code calculations. Our results indicate a good comparison between the MCNP code calculations and the benchmark experiments performed. The results also indicate that the near threshold neutron concept is competitive with other BNCT neutron sources.

  11. Experimental dosimetry and beam evaluation in a phantom for near lithium threshold accelerator based BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, R. J.; Harmon, F.; Lee, C. L.; Harker, Y. D.

    1999-06-10

    Current accelerator-based neutron source concepts for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are centered on the lithium (p,n) reaction. The near lithium threshold source concept uses proton energies < or approx. 100 keV above the reaction threshold energy (1.88 MeV). For deeply seated brain tumors, epithermal (1 eV to 10 keV) neutrons are needed to penetrate the skull cap and subsequently thermalize at the tumor location. All BNCT neutron sources inherently have thermal, fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. In order to quantify the thermal neutron component, a cylindrical acrylic head phantom has been constructed to simulate the patient's head and neck. BF{sub 3} proportional counters have been used to determine the thermal neutron flux (boron dose). The thermal neutron flux component has been compared with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code calculations. Our results indicate a good comparison between the MCNP code calculations and the benchmark experiments performed. The results also indicate that the near threshold neutron concept is competitive with other BNCT neutron sources.

  12. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation. PMID:24637084

  13. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.; Shan, C.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  14. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group

  15. LBNL Institutional Plan, FY 1996--2001. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The FY 1996-2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  16. On optimizing the {sup 7}Li(p,n) proton beam energy and moderator material for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1996-09-01

    The reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be has been proposed as an accelerator-based source of neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). This reaction has a large steep resonance for proton energies around 2.3 MeV which ends at approximately 2.5 MeV. It is generally accepted that the use of 2.5 MeV protons produces the highest yield of neutrons for BNCT. This paper suggests that for BNCT the optimum proton energy may be as low as 2.2-2.3 MeV. The evaluation of the clinical usefulness of the epithermal neutron beams investigated here has been based on depth-dose distributions in a head phantom.

  17. Development of a new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for operations up to 18 GHz at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Xie, D Z; Benitez, J Y; Caspi, S; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Phair, L W; Prestemon, S O; Strohmeier, M M; Thuillier, T P; Todd, D S

    2014-02-01

    A new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is under development at LBNL to harness the winding techniques of a closed-loop sextupole coil for the next generation ECRIS and to enhance the capability of the 88-in. cyclotron facility. The proposed ECRIS will use a superconducting closed-loop sextupole coil to produce the radial field and a substantial portion of the axial field. The field strengths of the injection, central and extraction regions are adjusted by a three solenoids outside the closed-loop sextupole coil. In addition to maintaining the typical ECRIS magnetic field configuration, this new source will also be able to produce a dustpan-like minimum-B field to explore possible ECRIS performance enhancement. The dustpan-like minimum-B field configuration has about the same strengths for the maximum axial field at the injection region and the maximum radial pole fields at the plasma chamber walls but it can be substantially lower at the extraction region. The dustpan-like minimum-B will have a field maximum Bmax ≥ 2.6 T for operations up to 18 GHz with a ratio of Bmax/Bres ≥ 4 and higher ratios for lower frequencies. The field maxima of this new source can reach over 3 T both at the injection and the plasma chamber walls which could also support operation at 28 GHz. The source will be built of cryogen-free with the magnets directly cooled by cryo-coolers to simplify the cryostat structure. The source design features will be presented and discussed. PMID:24593501

  18. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Neil

    2010-10-20

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a high repetition rate free-electron laser facility proposed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facility will provide multiple FEL lines with varying spectral characteristics to satisfy a broad soft X-ray physics programme. At this stage of the project a number of FEL technologies and concepts are being investigated for possible implementation on the facility. In this report we consider a free-electron laser seeded by a Higher Harmonic Generation (HHG) source in which a high power (and consequently relatively low repetition rate) laser pulse is injected into a chamber of inert gas. Through a process of ionisation and recombination coherent higher harmonics of the laser are emitted from the gas and can be injected into an FEL system as a seed field. Further harmonic upconversion can be done within the FEL system to enable temporally coherent FEL output at wavelengths much shorter than, and pulse energies orders of magnitude higher than, the HHG source emission. The harmonic conversion within the FEL works in the following way. The seed field induces an energy modulation within the electron bunch at the start of the modulator. This energy modulation grows within the modulator due to the FEL interaction and starts to convert into a density modulation, or bunching, at the seed wavelength. However, this bunching also has components at higher harmonics which retain the longitudinal coherence of the initial seed. The beam passes through a magnetic chicane, which shears the longitudinal phase space to maximise the bunching at the required harmonic, then a further undulator which is tuned to this harmonic. If this second undulator is short it acts as a further modulator, and because the beam is pre-bunched at the modulator resonance there is a strong coherent burst of radiation which acts to modulate the electron beam energy in much the same way the input laser seed field acted in the first modulator

  19. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions.

  20. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  1. Distribution of BPA and metabolic assessment in glioblastoma patients during BNCT treatment: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Bergenheim, A Tommy; Capala, Jacek; Roslin, Michael; Henriksson, Roger

    2005-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is dependent on the selective accumulation of boron-10 in tumour cells. To maximise the radiation effect, the neutrons should be delivered when the ratio between the boron concentration in tumour cells to that in normal tissues reaches maximum. However, the pharmacokinetics of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and other boron delivery agents are only partly known. We used microdialysis to investigate the extracellular in vivo kinetics of boron in three intracerebral compartments -- solid tumour, brain adjacent to tumour (BAT), and the normal brain, as well as the subcutaneous tissue before, during, and after BNCT treatment. The findings were compared to the pharmacokinetics of BPA in the blood. We also measured the glucose metabolism and the levels of glutamate and glycerol in those compartments. Four patients were studied, two patients underwent surgical tumour resection and in two a stereotactic biopsy was performed. The patients were given BPA (900 mg/kg body weight) by a 6-h infusion. The infusion was completed approximately 2-3 h before neutron irradiation. In tumour tissue the extracellular concentration of BPA followed that of blood with a maximal concentration of 31.2 ppm and a maximal ratio vs. blood of 1.07. In BAT, the maximal concentration of BPA was 18.0 ppm with the peak level delayed for 4-6 h compared to the peak in blood with a maximal ratio of 1.2. Maximal blood concentration found was 41.0 ppm. The uptake of BPA in the normal brain was considerably lower than that in the blood and tumour tissue. No change in glucose metabolism was observed. The extracellular level of glycerol was increased after treatment in tumour tissue but not in normal brain suggesting a selective acute cytotoxic effect of BNCT on tumour cells. PMID:15735919

  2. Unifying dose specification between clinical BNCT centers in the Americas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, K. J.; Binns, P. J.; Harling, O. K.; Kiger, W. S. III; Gonzalez, S. J.; Casal, M. R.; Longhino, J.; Larrieu, O. A. Calzetta; Blaumann, H. R.

    2008-04-15

    A dosimetry intercomparison between the boron neutron capture therapy groups of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Argentina was performed to enable combined analyses of NCT patient data between the different centers. In-air and dose versus depth measurements in a rectangular water phantom were performed at the hyperthermal neutron beam facility of the RA-6 reactor, Bariloche. Calculated dose profiles from the CNEA treatment planning system NCTPlan that were calibrated against in-house measurements required normalizations of 1.0 (thermal neutrons), 1.13 (photons), and 0.74 (fast neutrons) to match the dosimetry of MIT.

  3. A computational dosimetry tool for the study of tumor doses and skin toxicities in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Gossio, Sebastián; Carando, Daniel G; González, Sara J

    2009-07-01

    A Matlab-based computational tool, named SPHERE, was developed that helps determining tumor and skin doses in BNCT treatments. It was especially designed for cutaneous melanoma treatments and, among its features, it provides a guide for the location and delineation of tumors and a visual representation of superficial dose distributions (for both tumor and normal tissues). It also generates cumulative dose-volume histograms for different volumes of interest and dose-area histograms for skin. A description of the tool is presented, as well as examples of its application. PMID:19386508

  4. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  5. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications.

    PubMed

    Akan, Zafer; Türkmen, Mehmet; Çakir, Tahir; Reyhancan, İskender A; Çolak, Üner; Okka, Muhittin; Kiziltaş, Sahip

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au-Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented. PMID:25746919

  6. Determination of the irradiation field at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Nagels, S; Hampel, G; Kratz, J V; Aguilar, A L; Minouchehr, S; Otto, G; Schmidberger, H; Schütz, C; Vogtländer, L; Wortmann, B

    2009-07-01

    For the application of the BNCT for the excorporal treatment of organs at the TRIGA Mainz, the basic characteristics of the radiation field in the thermal column as beam geometry, neutron and gamma ray energies, angular distributions, neutron flux, as well as absorbed gamma and neutron doses must be determined in a reproducible way. To determine the mixed irradiation field thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) made of CaF(2):Tm with a newly developed energy-compensation filter system and LiF:Mg,Ti materials with different (6)Li concentrations and different thicknesses as well as thin gold foils were used. PMID:19380234

  7. Filter/moderator system for a BNCT beam of epithermal neutrons at nuclear reactor MARIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminska, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a very promising form of cancer therapy, consisting in irradiating a stable isotope of boron (10B) concentrated in tumor cells with a low energy neutron beam. This technique makes it possible to destroy tumor cells, leaving healthy tissues practically unaffected. In order to carry out the therapy in the proper way, the proper range of the neutron beam energy has to be chosen. In this paper we present a filter/moderator system modeled with MCNP code in order to obtain an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT post at MARIA reactor in Swierk.

  8. Bioneutronics: Thermal scattering in organics tissues and its impact on BNCT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramos, R L; Gonçalves-Carralves, M L Sztejnberg; Cantargi, F

    2015-10-01

    Neutron transport calculation is a key factor in BNCT numerical dosimetry assessments where thermal neutron flux is intimately related to the neutron dose, specially, the therapeutic boron dose. In this work, numerical calculations in phantoms were performed to determine the importance of utilizing the appropriate thermal scattering treatment for different organic tissues. Two thermal treatments for the neutron scattering were included in the simulations: hydrogen bounded in bulk water and hydrogen bounded in a lipid like carbon chain (polyethylene). The results showed difference between both thermal treatments that can reach several percent points depending on the type of source and irradiated geometry. PMID:26141296

  9. Reprint of Bioneutronics: Thermal scattering in organics tissues and its impact on BNCT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramos, R L; Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Cantargi, F

    2015-12-01

    Neutron transport calculation is a key factor in BNCT numerical dosimetry assessments where thermal neutron flux is intimately related to the neutron dose, specially, the therapeutic boron dose. In this work, numerical calculations in phantoms were performed to determine the importance of utilizing the appropriate thermal scattering treatment for different organic tissues. Two thermal treatments for the neutron scattering were included in the simulations: hydrogen bounded in bulk water and hydrogen bounded in a lipid like carbon chain (polyethylene). The results showed difference between both thermal treatments that can reach several percent points depending on the type of source and irradiated geometry. PMID:26515135

  10. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-04-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; operator training was conducted and pharmacokinetic data obtained using a laboratory dog; dosimetry development continues on real-time neutron and gamma monitoring to provide treatment control capability; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation -- PBF upgrades, required for environmental, safety, and OSHA compliance, continue; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- training, safety, and preventive maintenance activities continue. 3 figs.

  11. BNCT dose distribution in liver with epithermal D-D and D-T fusion-based neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Bleuel, D L; Nastasi, U; Lou, T P; Reijonen, J; Leung, K-N

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a new application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment has been introduced. Results have indicated that liver tumors can be treated by BNCT after removal of the liver from the body. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compact neutron generators based on (2)H(d,n)(3)He (D-D) or (3)H(t,n)(4)He (D-T) fusion reactions are being developed. Preliminary simulations of the applicability of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion and 14.1 MeV D-T fusion neutrons for in vivo liver tumor BNCT, without removing the liver from the body, have been carried out. MCNP simulations were performed in order to find a moderator configuration for creating a neutron beam of optimal neutron energy and to create a source model for dose calculations with the simulation environment for radiotherapy applications (SERA) treatment planning program. SERA dose calculations were performed in a patient model based on CT scans of the body. The BNCT dose distribution in liver and surrounding healthy organs was calculated with rectangular beam aperture sizes of 20 cm x 20 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm. Collimator thicknesses of 10 and 15 cm were used. The beam strength to obtain a practical treatment time was studied. In this paper, the beam shaping assemblies for D-D and D-T neutron generators and dose calculation results are presented. PMID:15308157

  12. Procedural and practical applications of radiation measurements for BNCT at the HFR Petten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, R. L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Rassow, J.; Morrissey, J.; Voorbraak, W.; Verbakel, W.; Appelman, K.; Daquino, G. G.; Muzi, L.; Wittig, A.; Bourhis-Martin, E.; Sauerwein, W.

    2004-01-01

    Since October 1997, a clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor, Petten, the Netherlands. The trial is a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) protocol (#11 961) and, as such, must be conducted following the highest quality management and procedures, according to good clinical practice and also other internationally accepted codes. The complexity of BNCT involves not only strict international procedures, but also a variety of techniques to measure the different aspects of the irradiation involved when treating the patient. Applications include: free beam measurements using packets of activation foils; in-phantom measurements for beam calibration using ionisation chambers, pn-diodes and activation foils; monitoring of the irradiation beam during patient treatment using fission chambers and GM-counters; boron in blood measurements using prompt gamma ray spectroscopy; radiation protection of the patient and staff using portable radiation dosimeters and personal dosimeters; and in vivo measurements of the boron in the patient using a prompt gamma ray telescope. The procedures and applications of such techniques are presented here, with particular emphasis on the importance of the quality assurance/quality control procedures and its reporting.

  13. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  14. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  15. A comparison between a TESQ accelerator and a reactor as a neutron sources for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    In this work, the performance of an accelerator-based neutron source design has been compared with that of a modern fluoride-filtered reactor-based epithermal beam having near-optimal quality for treatment of deep seated tumors in relation to its applicability for BNCT. The accelerator is a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator which is a design under development at the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) in Buenos Aires, Argentina based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, relatively close to its energy threshold. The reactor is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reactor upgraded with a Fission Converter Beam (MIT-FCB) and improved with an 8 mm thick 6Li filter. The comparison has been done by means of data reported on the MIT-FCB + 6Li filter performance and MCNP simulations on our TESQ design considering the neutron fluxes provided by the two sources and the doses delivered in a human phantom by both devices. The results show a deeper advantage depth (AD) for the TESQ which turns out to be a promising alternative to a reactor-based BNCT treatment.

  16. Boron imaging with a microstrip silicon detector for applications in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, A.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Conti, V.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mascagna, V.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Mozzanica, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2009-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique exploiting the α particles produced after the irradiation of the isotope 10 of boron with thermal neutrons in the capture reaction B(n,α)710Li. It is used to treat tumours that for their features (radioresistance, extension, localization near vital organs) cannot be treated through conventional photon-beams radiotherapy. One of the main limitations of this technique is the lack of specificity (i.e. the ability of localizing in tumour cells, saving the healthy tissues) of the compounds used to carry the 10B isotope in the organs to be treated. This work, developed in the framework of the INFN PhoNeS project, describes the possibility of boron imaging performed exploiting the neutrons photoproduced by a linac (the Clinac 2100C/D of the S. Anna Hospital Radiotherapy Unit in Como, Italy) and detecting the α s with a non-depleted microstrip silicon detector: the result is a 1D scan of the boron concentration. Several boron doped samples have been analysed, from solutions of H3BO3 (reaching a minimum detectable amount of 25 ng of 10B) to biological samples of urine containing BPA and BSH (the two molecules currently used for the clinical trials in BNCT) in order to build kinetic curves (showing the absolute 10B concentration as a function of time). Further measurements are under way to test the imaging system with 10BPA-Fructose complex perfused human lung samples.

  17. BNCT treatment planning of recurrent head-and-neck cancer using THORplan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Ting; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Wang, Ling-Wei

    2011-12-01

    A cooperation program on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) between National Tsing Hua University (NTHU) and Taipei Veterans General Hospital (TPEVGH) was established in 2008. Clinical trial of recurrent head-and-neck cancer is the goal of the program. In this study, treatment plannings of two head-and-neck cancer cases are performed using treatment planning system THORplan developed at NTHU of Taiwan. The patients are assumed to be irradiated under current THOR epithermal neutron beam. The prescription dose is 20 Gy-Eq for at least 80% of tumor volume. The irradiation time to reach the target tumor dose can be kept within 1h. The skin dose is within the limiting dose of 11 Gy-Eq. The spinal cord dose is well within the limiting dose of 10 Gy-Eq. The use of an extension collimator for easier patient positioning is helpful in reducing the dose of eye lens to within the dose limit of 5 Gy-Eq. The irradiation time, however, will increase slightly due to the increase of source-to-tumor distance. The CPU time for treatment planning calculation is ~10 h. With the use of user friendly treatment planning system THORplan, dose planning for BNCT at THOR can be easily performed. PMID:21458281

  18. The therapeutic ratio in BNCT: Assessment using the Rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor and spinal cord models

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Fisher, C.D.; Bywaters, A.; Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    During any radiation therapy, the therapeutic tumor dose is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. The short ranges of the products of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction produced during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) present an opportunity to increase the therapeutic ratio (tumor dose/normal tissue dose) to levels unprecedented in photon radiotherapy. The mixed radiation field produced during BNCT comprises radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) and different relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The short ranges of the two high-LET products of the `B(n,a)`Li reaction make the microdistribution of the boron relative to target cell nuclei of particular importance. Due to the tissue specific distribution of different boron compounds, the term RBE is inappropriate in defining the biological effectiveness of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction. To distinguish these differences from true RBEs we have used the term {open_quotes}compound biological effectiveness{close_quotes} (CBE) factor. The latter can be defined as the product of the true, geometry-independent, RBE for these particles times a {open_quotes}boron localization factor{close_quotes}, which will most likely be different for each particular boron compound. To express the total BNCT dose in a common unit, and to compare BNCT doses with the effects of conventional photon irradiation, multiplicative factors (RBEs and CBEs) are applied to the physical absorbed radiation doses from each high-LET component. The total effective BNCT dose is then expressed as the sum of RBE-corrected physical absorbed doses with the unit Gray-equivalent (Gy-Eq).

  19. Autoradiographic and histopathological studies of boric acid-mediated BNCT in hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits: Specific boron retention and damage in tumor and tumor vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Lin, Y T; Hung, Y H; Liao, J W; Peir, J J; Liu, H M; Lin, Y L; Liu, Y M; Chen, Y W; Chuang, K S; Chou, F I

    2015-12-01

    Hepatoma is a malignant tumor that responds poorly to conventional therapies. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) may provide a better way for hepatoma therapy. In this research, (10)B-enriched boric acid (BA, 99% (10)B) was used as the boron drug. A multifocal hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model was used to study the mechanisms of BA-mediated BNCT. Autoradiography demonstrated that BA was selectively targeted to tumors and tumor vessels. Histopathological examination revealed the radiation damage to tumor-bearing liver was concentrated in the tumor regions during BNCT treatment. The selective killing of tumor cells and the destruction of the blood vessels in tumor masses may be responsible for the success of BA-mediated BNCT for liver tumors. PMID:26372198

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB): Considerations for the application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Spickard, J.H.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    All methods of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in use or envisioned for treatment of brain tumors have an element of ionizing radiation (incident and induced). This paper reviews data on the effects of ionizing radiation on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor-barrier (BTB) and the potential impact of the effects on the delivery techniques of BNCT. The objectives are: review the available technique for BNCT of brain tumors; review the literature on experimental and human studies regarding the effects of ionizing radiation on the BBB; discuss the impact of these effects on the fractionization question for BNCT; and draw conclusions from that information. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  2. RAMPING UP THE SNS BEAM CURRENT WITH THE LBNL BASELINE H- SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two years the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has ramped up the repetition rate, pulse length, and the beam current to reach 540 kW, which has challenged many subsystems including the H- source designed and built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper discusses the major modifications of the H- source implemented to consistently and routinely output the beam current required by the SNS beam power ramp up plan. At this time, 32 mA LINAC beam current are routinely produced, which meets the requirement for 690 kW planned for end of 2008. In June 2008, a 14-day production run used 37 mA, which is close to the 38 mA required for 1.44 MW. A medium energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA was demonstrated on September 2, 2008.

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis in an experimental model: dose–response at five-week follow-up based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Veronica A. Trivilin; Lucas L. Colombo; Andrea Monti Hughes; Silvia I. Thorp; Jorge E. Cardoso; Marcel A. Garabalino; Ana J. Molinari; Elisa M. Heber; Paula Curotto; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose–response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5–8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2–16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 +/- 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 +/- 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 +/- 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 +/- 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 +/- 480 mg for Sham, 960 +/- 620 mg for Beam only, 380 +/- 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 +/- 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.

  5. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of {sup 10}B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed.

  6. Performance evaluation of the source description of the THOR BNCT epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Pi-En; Yu, Hui-Ting; Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Shiang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the performance of the source description of the THOR BNCT beam via different measurement techniques in different phantoms. The measurement included (1) the absolute reaction rate measurement of a set of triple activation foils, (2) the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates measured using the paired ionization chamber method, and (3) the relative reaction rate distributions obtained using the indirect neutron radiography. Three source descriptions, THOR-Y09, surface source file RSSA, and THOR-50C, were tested. The comparison results concluded that THOR-Y09 is a well-tested source description not only for neutron components, but also for gamma-ray component. PMID:21570855

  7. Measuring the stopping power of α particles in compact bone for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, L.; Rodríguez, L. M.; Fregenal, D.; Bernardi, G.; Olivares, C.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; González, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of α particles in thin films of decalcified sheep femur, in the range of 1.5 to 5.0 MeV incident energy, was measured by transmission of a backscattered beam from a heavy target. Additionally, the film elemental composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These data will be used to measure boron concentration in thin films of bone using a spectrometry technique developed by the University of Pavia, since the concentration ratio between healthy tissue and tumor is of fundamental importance in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The present experimental data are compared with numerical simulation results and with tabulated stopping power data of non-decalcified human bone.

  8. a New Method to Measure 10B Uptake in Lung Adenocarcinoma in Hospital Bnct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donegani, E. M.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Capelli, E.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mattera, A.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2010-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique still under development that could become crucial in the fight against some types of cancer (extended ones, located near vital organs or radio resistant). This binary technique requires the administration to the patient of a boron delivery agent and the irradiation with a thermal neutron beam. The high LET particles produced in the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction are exploited to destroy the tumour cells. This work presents a new system based on neutron autoradiography with a non-depleted self-triggering microstrip silicon detector, using a neutron beam produced by a hospital Linac. The system is fast, real time and allows the detection of 10B contents down to 25 ng. The main results on the study of 10B uptake in biological samples will be described in terms of kinetic curves (10B uptake as a function of time).

  9. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  10. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT treatment in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Huang, C K; Tsai, W C; Liu, Y H; Jiang, S H

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as equivalent doses of several organs of an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom according to the definition of ICRP Publication 60 for BNCT treatments of brain tumors in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of the average absorbed dose of each organ. The effective doses for a typical brain tumor treatment with a tumor treatment dose of 20 Gy-eq were evaluated to be 0.59 and 0.35 Sv for the LLAT and TOP irradiation geometries, respectively. In addition to the stochastic effect, it was found that it is also likely to produce deterministic effects, such as cataracts and depression of haematopoiesis. PMID:21530281

  11. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the DOE program at The University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine is the development of effective molecular medicine for use in neutron-capture therapy (NCT). The research focuses primarily on the preparation of new boron-rich NCT agents and the technology to detect them in-vivo. The detection technology involves the development of effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for verifying and measuring NCT agents in-vivo. The synthetic program is directed toward the design of novel boron NCT (BNCT) agents which are targeted to the cell nucleus and gadolinium liposomes targeted to the liver. The UT-DOE program is unique in that it has access to both state-of-the-art whole-body and microscopy MRI instruments.

  12. Neutron spectra measurement and comparison of the HFR and THOR BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to measure the spectra of HB11 (high flux reactor, HFR) and the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beams by multiple activation foils. The self-shielding corrections were made with the aid of MCNP calculations. The initial spectra were adjusted by a sophisticated process named coarse-scaling adjustment using SAND-EX, which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with excellent continuity. The epithermal neutron flux of the THOR beam is about three times of HB11. The thermal neutron flux, boron and gold reaction rates along the central axis of a PMMA phantom are calculated for both adjusted spectra for comparison. PMID:19409798

  13. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. PMID:26302662

  14. Nuclear reactions induced by deuterons and their applicability to skin tumor treatment through BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Roldán, T. del V.; Kreiner, A. J.; Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.

    2008-11-01

    In this work the D(d,n) 3He and 9Be(d,n) 10B reactions have been studied in a low-energy regime as neutron sources for skin tumor treatment in the frame of accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT). The total neutron production and the energy and angular distributions for each reaction at different bombarding energies and for the thick targets considered (TiD 2, Be) have been determined using the available data in the literature. From this information, a feasibility study has been performed by means of MCNP simulations. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes and doses at skin tumor positions (loaded with 40 ppm 10B) which are located on a whole-body human phantom have been simulated for different D 2O moderator depths. The best-case performance shows that a high tumor control probability (TCP) of 99% corresponding to a weighted dose in tumor of 40 Gy can be reached at the tumor position keeping the weighted dose in healthy tissue below 12.5 Gy, by means of the 9Be(d,n) 10B reaction at 1.1 MeV for a deuteron current of 20 mA and a 30 cm D 2O moderator in 52 min. The availability of low-energy neutrons in the 9Be(d,n) 10B reaction from the population of excited levels between 5.1 to 5.2 MeV in 10B and the convenience of a thin beryllium target are discussed. As a complement concerning alternatives to the Li(metal) + p reaction, the neutron yield of refractory lithium compounds (LiH, Li 3N and Li 2O) were calculated and compared with a Li metal target.

  15. Cell death following BNCT: a theoretical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bakeine, J; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Stella, S; Zonta, A; Zonta, C; Altieri, S

    2011-12-01

    In parallel to boron measurements and animal studies, investigations on radiation-induced cell death are also in progress in Pavia, with the aim of better characterisation of the effects of a BNCT treatment down to the cellular level. Such studies are being carried out not only experimentally but also theoretically, based on a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code. Such model assumes that: (1) only clustered DNA strand breaks can lead to chromosome aberrations; (2) only chromosome fragments within a certain threshold distance can undergo misrejoining; (3) the so-called "lethal aberrations" (dicentrics, rings and large deletions) lead to cell death. After applying the model to normal cells exposed to monochromatic fields of different radiation types, the irradiation section of the code was purposely extended to mimic the cell exposure to a mixed radiation field produced by the (10)B(n,α) (7)Li reaction, which gives rise to alpha particles and Li ions of short range and high biological effectiveness, and by the (14)N(n,p)(14)C reaction, which produces 0.58 MeV protons. Very good agreement between model predictions and literature data was found for human and animal cells exposed to X- or gamma-rays, protons and alpha particles, thus allowing to validate the model for cell death induced by monochromatic radiation fields. The model predictions showed good agreement also with experimental data obtained by our group exposing DHD cells to thermal neutrons in the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia; this allowed to validate the model also for a BNCT exposure scenario, providing a useful predictive tool to bridge the gap between irradiation and cell death. PMID:21481595

  16. Confirmation of a realistic reactor model for BNCT dosimetry at the TRIGA Mainz

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegner, Markus; Schmitz, Tobias; Hampel, Gabriele; Khan, Rustam; Blaickner, Matthias; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Böck, Helmuth

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In order to build up a reliable dose monitoring system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the TRIGA reactor in Mainz, a computer model for the entire reactor was established, simulating the radiation field by means of the Monte Carlo method. The impact of different source definition techniques was compared and the model was validated by experimental fluence and dose determinations. Methods: The depletion calculation code ORIGEN2 was used to compute the burn-up and relevant material composition of each burned fuel element from the day of first reactor operation to its current core. The material composition of the current core was used in a MCNP5 model of the initial core developed earlier. To perform calculations for the region outside the reactor core, the model was expanded to include the thermal column and compared with the previously established ATTILA model. Subsequently, the computational model is simplified in order to reduce the calculation time. Both simulation models are validated by experiments with different setups using alanine dosimetry and gold activation measurements with two different types of phantoms. Results: The MCNP5 simulated neutron spectrum and source strength are found to be in good agreement with the previous ATTILA model whereas the photon production is much lower. Both MCNP5 simulation models predict all experimental dose values with an accuracy of about 5%. The simulations reveal that a Teflon environment favorably reduces the gamma dose component as compared to a polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Conclusions: A computer model for BNCT dosimetry was established, allowing the prediction of dosimetric quantities without further calibration and within a reasonable computation time for clinical applications. The good agreement between the MCNP5 simulations and experiments demonstrates that the ATTILA model overestimates the gamma dose contribution. The detailed model can be used for the planning of structural

  17. Reconstitution and Upgrade of the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility in the Basement Medical Room of the MIT Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, Otto, K.; Riley, Kent, J.; Binns, Peter J.

    2004-12-31

    The M-011 thermal neutron beam has been reconstituted and upgraded to provide a high intensity and high quality facility for preclinical and certain clinical studies. Intensities of thermal neutrons in the beam range from 5.0-8.5 x 109 n cm-2 s-1. Beam contamination is at a low level where it has no practical influence on beam performance. New computer controlled dose and beam monitoring systems have been implemented which assure precise dose delivery and redundant safety interlocks. An additional beam shutter and massive shielding in the back of the medical room have been added which significantly reduce room background and now permit staff entry without the necessity for lowering the reactor power. This system is needed for BNCT research by the MIT group as well as other US groups. This need became acute with the closure of the BMRR which previously had the only high quality thermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT in the USA.

  18. Neutron Generators Developed at LBNL for Homeland Security andImaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, Jani

    2006-08-13

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed various types of advanced D-D (neutron energy 2.5 MeV), D-T (14 MeV) and T-T (0-9 MeV) neutron generators for wide range of applications. These applications include medical (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), homeland security (Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, Fast Neutron Activation Analysis and Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy) and planetary exploration with a sub-surface material characterization on Mars. These neutron generators utilize RF induction discharge to ionize the deuterium/tritium gas. This discharge method provides high plasma density for high output current, high atomic species from molecular gases, long life operation and versatility for various discharge chamber geometries. Four main neutron generator developments are discussed here: high neutron output co-axial neutron generator for BNCT applications, point neutron generator for security applications, compact and sub-compact axial neutron generator for elemental analysis applications. Current status of the neutron generator development with experimental data will be presented.

  19. Application of BNCT to the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer recurrences: Research and developments in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gadan, M A; González, S J; Batalla, M; Olivera, M S; Policastro, L; Sztejnberg, M L

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the Argentine BNCT Project a new research line has been started to study the application of BNCT to the treatment of locoregional recurrences of HER2+ breast cancer subtype. Based on former studies, the strategy considers the use of immunoliposomes as boron carriers nanovehicles to target HER2 overexpressing cells. The essential concerns of the current stage of this proposal are the development of carriers that can improve the efficiency of delivery of boron compounds and the dosimetric assessment of treatment feasibility. For this purpose, an specific pool of clinical cases that can benefit from this application was determined. In this work, we present the proposal and the advances related to the different stages of current research. PMID:26164147

  20. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. PMID:24448270

  1. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  2. Capability of NIPAM polymer gel in recording dose from the interaction of (10)B and thermal neutron in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Khajeali, Azim; Reza Farajollahi, Ali; Kasesaz, Yaser; Khodadadi, Roghayeh; Khalili, Assef; Naseri, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    The capability of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose resulting from boron neutron capture reaction in BNCT was determined. In this regard, three compositions of the gel with different concentrations of (10)B were prepared and exposed to gamma radiation and thermal neutrons. Unlike irradiation with gamma rays, the boron-loaded gels irradiated by neutron exhibited sensitivity enhancement compared with the gels without (10)B. It was also found that the neutron sensitivity of the gel increased by the increase of concentration of (10)B. It can be concluded that NIPAM gel might be suitable for the measurement of the absorbed dose enhancement due to (10)B and thermal neutron reaction in BNCT. PMID:26356043

  3. Characterization measurement of a thick CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT - detection efficiency and energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Nakamura, Soichiro; Manabe, Masanobu; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itsuro

    2014-06-01

    Author׳s group is carrying out development of BNCT-SPECT with CdTe device, which monitors the therapy effect of BNCT in real-time. From the design calculations, the dimensions were fixed to 1.5×2×30mm(3). For the collimator it was confirmed that it would have a good spatial resolution and simultaneously the number of counts would be acceptably large. After producing the CdTe crystal, the characterization measurement was carried out. For the detection efficiency an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement was obtained. Also, the detector has a very good energy resolution so that gamma-rays of 478keV and 511keV could be distinguished in the spectrum. PMID:24581600

  4. Feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Minoru . E-mail: msuzuki@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis using Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA), a currently available BNCT treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: The BNCT treatment plans were constructed for 3 patients with MPM using the SERA system, with 2 opposed anterior-posterior beams. The {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumor and normal lung in this study were assumed to be 84 and 24 ppm, respectively, and were derived from data observed in clinical trials. The maximum, mean, and minimum doses to the tumors and the normal lung were assessed for each plan. The doses delivered to 5% and 95% of the tumor volume, D{sub 05} and D{sub 95}, were adopted as the representative dose for the maximum and minimum dose, respectively. Results: When the D{sub 05} to the normal ipsilateral lung was 5 Gy-Eq, the D{sub 95} and mean doses delivered to the normal lung were 2.2-3.6 and 3.5-4.2 Gy-Eq, respectively. The mean doses delivered to the tumors were 22.4-27.2 Gy-Eq. The D{sub 05} and D{sub 95} doses to the tumors were 9.6-15.0 and 31.5-39.5 Gy-Eq, respectively. Conclusions: From a viewpoint of the dose-distribution analysis, BNCT has the possibility to be a promising treatment for MPM patients who are inoperable because of age and other medical illnesses.

  5. Preliminary Ionization Efficiencies of {sup 11}C and {sup 14}O with the LBNL ECR Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.Q.; Cerny, J.; Guo, F.Q.; Joosten, R.; Larimer, R.M.; Lyneis, C.M.; McMahan, P.; Norman, E.B.; O'Neil, J.P.; Powell, J.; Rowe, M.W.; VanBrocklin, H.F.; Wutte, D.; Xu, X.J.; Haustein, P.

    1998-10-05

    High charge states, up to fully stripped {sup 11}C and {sup 14}O ion, beams have been produced with the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (LBNL, ECR and AECR-U) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The radioactive atoms of {sup 11}C and {sup 14}O were collected in batch mode with an LN{sub 2} trap and then bled into the ECR ion sources. Ionization efficiency as high as 11% for {sup 11}C{sup 4+} was achieved.

  6. Positron emission tomography and [18F]BPA: a perspective application to assess tumour extraction of boron in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Cionini, L; Sauerwein, W A; Altieri, S; Solin, O; Minn, H; Salvadori, P A

    2009-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a key imaging tool in clinical practice and biomedical research to quantify and study biochemical processes in vivo. Physiologically active compounds are tagged with positron emitters (e.g. (18)F, (11)C, (124)I) while maintaining their biological properties, and are administered intravenously in tracer amounts (10(-9)-10(-12)M quantities). The recent physical integration of PET and computed tomography (CT) in hybrid PET/CT scanners allows a combined anatomical and functional imaging: nowadays PET molecular imaging is emerging as powerful pharmacological tool in oncology, neurology and for treatment planning as guidance for radiation therapy. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of boron carrier for BNCT and the quantification of (10)B in living tissue were performed by PET in the late nineties using compartmental models based on PET data. Nowadays PET and PET/CT have been used to address the issue of pharmacokinetic, metabolism and accumulation of BPA in target tissue. The added value of the use of L-[(18)F]FBPA and PET/CT in BNCT is to provide key data on the tumour extraction of (10)B-BPA versus normal tissue and to predict the efficacy of the treatment based on a single-study patient analysis. Due to the complexity of a binary treatment like BNCT, the role of PET/CT is currently to design new criteria for patient enrolment in treatment protocols: the L-[(18)F]BPA/PET methodology could be considered as an important tool in newly designed clinical trials to better estimate the concentration ratio of BPA in the tumour as compared to neighbouring normal tissues. Based on these values for individual patients the decision could be made whether BNCT treatment could be advantageous due to a selective accumulation of BPA in an individual tumour. This approach, applicable in different tumour entities like melanoma, glioblastoma and head and neck malignancies, make this methodology as reliable prognostic and therapeutic indicator for

  7. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  8. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  9. Development of High Gradient Laser Wakefield Accelerators Towards Nuclear Detection Applications at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Lin Chen; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Mike; Leemans, Wim P.

    2009-03-10

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  10. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron GR; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Lin, Chen; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Mike; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-09-08

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  11. Simulation of groundwater flow at the LBNL site using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Javandel, Iraj; Jordan, Preston D.

    2003-05-12

    In the late 1980s, groundwater contamination was detected at the site of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A detailed investigation was conducted to locate the source and the extent of the contamination. Interim corrective measures were initiated where appropriate and required, typically directed towards removing the source of contamination, excavating contaminated soil, and limiting further spreading of contaminants. As the first step for predicting the fate of remaining contaminants, a three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was developed for the complex hydrogeological situation. This flow model captured strong variations in thickness, slope, and hydrogeological properties of geologic units, representative of a mountainous groundwater system with accentuated morphology. The flow model accounts for strong seasonal fluctuations in the groundwater table. Other significant factors are local recharge from leaking underground storm drains and significant water re charge from steep hills located upstream. The strong heterogeneous rock properties were calibrated using the inverse simulator ITOUGH2. For validation purposes, the model was calibrated for a time period from 1994 to 1996, and then applied to a period from 1996 to 1998. Comparison of simulated and measured water levels demonstrated that the model accurately represents the complex flow situation, including the significant seasonal fluctuations in water table and flow rate. Paths of particles originating from contaminant plumes in the simulated transient flow fields were obtained to represent advective transport.

  12. On the 252Cf primary and secondary gamma rays and epithermal neutron flux for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassoun, J.; Merzouki, A.; El Morabiti, A.; Jehouani, A.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons and secondary gamma rays originated by 252Cf fission and also the primary gamma rays emitted directly by the 252Cf source at the exit face of a compact system designed for the BNCT. The system consists of a 252Cf source and a moderator/reflector/filter assembly. To study the material properties and configuration possibilities, the MCNP code has been used. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement is optimised to moderate neutrons to epithermal energy and, as far as possible, to get rid of fast and thermal neutrons and photons from the therapeutic beam. To reduce the total gamma contamination and to have a sufficiently high epithermal neutron flux we have used different photon filters of different thickness. Our analysis showed that the use of an appropriate filter leads to a gamma ray flux reduction without affecting the epithermal neutron beam quality at the exit face of the system.

  13. Towards in vivo monitoring of neutron distributions for quality control of BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbakel, W. F. A. R.; Hideghety, K.; Morrissey, J.; Sauerwein, W.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    2002-04-01

    Dose delivery in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complex because several components contribute to the dose absorbed in tissue. This dose is largely determined by local boron concentration, thermal neutron distribution and patient positioning. In vivo measurements of these factors would considerably improve quality control and safety. During therapy, a γ-ray telescope measures the γ-rays emitted following neutron capture by hydrogen and boron in a small volume of the head of a patient. Scans of hydrogen γ-ray emissions could be used to verify the actual distribution of thermal neutrons during neutron irradiation. The method was first tested on different phantoms. These measurements showed good agreement with calculations based on thermal neutron distributions derived from a treatment planning program and from Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) simulations. Next, the feasibility of telescope scans during patient irradiation therapy was demonstrated. Measurements were reproducible between irradiation fractions. In theory, this method can be used to verify the positioning of the patient in vivo and the delivery of thermal neutrons in tissue. However, differences between measurements and calculations based on a routine treatment planning program were observed. These differences could be used to refine the treatment planning. Further developments will be necessary for this method to become a standard quality control system.

  14. Development and verification of THORplan--a BNCT treatment planning system for THOR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh

    2011-12-01

    THORplan is a treatment planning system under continuous development and refinement at Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, for BNCT purpose. New features developed for homogeneous model calculation include material grouping model, and voxel data reconstruction model. Material grouping model is a two-step grouping method, tissue-volume-percent grouping method followed by atom-gram-density grouping method. The root mean square difference of neutron flux due to material grouping is <0.8%. In the voxel data reconstruction model, voxel neutron dose is calculated based on the material composition and dose of individual atom of each voxel, which is calculated by linear interpolation from the dose of individual atom of neighboring cells tallied in MCNP calculation. The detailed voxel model is used to benchmark the accuracy of the new features developed for the homogeneous model calculation. The maximum error of the neutron flux and dose of voxels using the homogeneous cell model is 5% and 7%, respectively. Big improvement of accuracy of voxel dose over the original dose calculation model based on F6 tally is observed at locations containing very heterogeneous compositions. PMID:21497101

  15. In-situ vacuum deposition technique of lithium on neutron production target for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Baba, Y.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Imahori, Y.

    2012-10-01

    For the purpose of avoiding the radiation blistering of the lithium target for neutron production in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) device, trilaminar Li target, of which palladium thin layer was inserted between cupper substrate and Li layer, was newly designed. In-situ vacuum deposition and electrolytic coating techniques were applied to validate the method of fabrication of the Li/Pd/Cu target, and the layered structures of the synthesized target were characterized. In-situ vacuum re-deposition technique was also established for repairing and maintenance for lithium target damaged. Following conclusions were derived; (1) Uniform lithium layers with the thickness from 1.6 nm to a few hundreds nanometer were formed on Pd/Cu multilayer surface by in situ vacuum deposition technique using metallic lithium as a source material. (2) Re-deposition of lithium layer on Li surface can be achieved by in situ vacuum deposition technique. (3) Small amount of water and carbonate was observed on the top surface of Li. But the thickness of the adsorbed layer was less than monolayer, which will not affect the quality of the Li target. (4) The formation of Pd-Li alloy layer was observed at the Pd and Li interface. The alloy layer would contribute to the stability of the Li layer.

  16. Dose calculation and in-phantom measurement in BNCT using response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid

    2011-12-01

    In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) planning validation. If any changes take place in therapeutic neutron beam due to the beam shaping assembly (BSA) change, the dose will be changed so another group of simulations should be carried out for dose calculation. To avoid this time consuming procedure and speed up the dose calculation to help patients not wait for a long time, response matrix method was used. This procedure was performed for neutron beam of the optimized BSA as a reference beam. These calculations were carried out using the MCNPX, Monte Carlo code. The calculated beam parameters were measured for a SNYDER head phantom placed 10 cm away from beam the exit of the BSA. The head phantom can be assumed as a linear system and neutron beam and dose distribution can be assumed as an input and a response of this system (head phantom), respectively. Neutron spectrum energy was digitized into 27 groups. Dose response of each group was calculated. Summation of these dose responses is equal to a total dose of the whole neutron/gamma spectrum. Response matrix is the double dimension matrix (energy/dose) in which each parameter represents a depth-dose resulted from specific energy. If the spectrum is changed, response of each energy group may be differed. By considering response matrix and energy vector, dose response can be calculated. This method was tested for some BSA, and calculations show statistical errors less than 10%. PMID:21450471

  17. PBF/BNCT Program for cancer treatment: Monthly bulletin: Volume 2, No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III

    1988-09-01

    This month's bulletin summarizes the considerable ongoing progress within the various project arms of the PBF/BNCT Program. Continued progress toward institution of the experimental program at BMRR is represented by further calculations modeling the BMRR filter design and predicted output, as well as initial diagnostic workup of the dogs to be used in initiating these studies. A draft for the canine dosimetry measurement plan in support of this is under review. Work with the canine-model system continues with ongoing plasmapheresis experiments and institution of in-vivo sampling of liver tissue for shipping to Cornell for secondary ion microscopy (SIM) studies. The SIM work at Cornell has also expanded in a cooperative fashion with the University of Rochester, looking at human lung tumor cells and spheroids. Activity in the supporting technology projects includes decreased backlog of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, detailed investigation of competing digestion procedures of tissue samples for ICP-AES, and further refinement of QA/QC analytical methodologies. Progress in the development of hardware tools continues with respect to MRI system modification and with expected delivery shortly of the Apollo workstation for use in radiation dosimetry and treatment-planning programs (with potential software collaboration with the University of Utah).

  18. RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC damping rings, FY1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.

    1999-11-01

    This report contains a summary of the R&D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal year19999. These activities include the optimization of the RF design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order (HOMs), by systematic study of the cavity profile, the effect of the beam pipe diameter, nosecone angle and gap, the cross section and position of the HOM damping waveguides and the coupler. The effect of the shape of the HOM waveguides and their intersection with the cavity wall on the local surface heating is also an important factor, since it determines the highest stresses in the cavity body. This was taken into account during the optimization so that the stresses could be reduced at the same time as the HOP damping was improved over previous designs. A new method of calculating the RF heating was employed, using a recently released high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS. This greatly facilitates the thermal and stress analysis of the design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. Preliminary designs are described for the cavity ancillary components including the RF window, HOM loads, and tuners. A preliminary manufacturing plan is included, with an initial estimate of the resource requirements. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either lower the R/Q, for reduced transient response, or lower the residual HOM impedance to reduce coupled-bunch growth rates further still.

  19. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ho, Ching-Yin; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chou, Fong-In; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Yen, Sang-Hue

    2014-06-01

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. PMID:24369888

  20. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a new approach for clear cell sarcoma (CCS) treatment: Trial using a lung metastasis model of CCS.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Minoru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Sakuma, Toshiko; Sasai, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Akisue, Toshihiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In the present study, we established a lung metastasis animal model of CCS and investigated the therapeutic effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA). Biodistribution data revealed tumor-selective accumulation of (10)B. Unlike conventional gamma-ray irradiation, BNCT significantly suppressed tumor growth without damaging normal tissues, suggesting that it may be a potential new therapeutic option to treat CCS lung metastases. PMID:26337135

  2. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

  3. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. PMID:26256647

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant melanoma with special reference to absorbed doses to the normal skin and tumor.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Hiratsuka, J; Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Yoshino, K; Karashima, H; Turu, K; Araki, K; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant melanoma were treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The estimation of absorbed dose and optimization of treatment dose based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in melanoma patients is described. The doses of gamma-rays were measured using small TLDs of Mg2SiO4 (Tb) and thermal neutron fluence was measured using gold foil and wire. The total absorbed dose to the tissue from BNCT was obtained by summing the primary and capture gamma-ray doses and the high LET radiation doses from 10B(n, alpha)7Li and 14N(n,p)14C reactions. The key point of the dose optimization is that the skin surrounding the tumour is always irradiated to 18 Gy-Eq, which is the maximum tolerable dose to the skin, regardless of the 10B-concentration in the tumor. The neutron fluence was optimized as follows. (1) The 10B concentration in the blood was measured 15-40 min after the start of neutron irradiation. (2) The 10B-concentration in the skin was estimated by multiplying the blood 10B value by a factor of 1.3. (3) The neutron fluence was calculated. Absorbed doses to the skin ranged from 15.7 to 37.1 Gy-Eq. Among the patients, 16 out of 22 patients exhibited tolerable skin damage. Although six patients showed skin damage that exceeded the tolerance level, three of them could be cured within a few months after BNCT and the remaining three developed severe skin damage requiring skin grafts. The absorbed doses to the tumor ranged from 15.7 to 68.5 Gy-Eq and the percentage of complete response was 73% (16/22). When BNCT is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma, based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA and radiobiological considerations, promising clinical results have been obtained, although many problems and issues remain to be solved. PMID:14626847

  5. P13.09ADVANCES IN CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Detta, A.; Cruickshank, G.C.; Green, S.; Lockyer, N.P.; Ngoga, D.; Ghani, Z.; Phoenix, B.

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted form of enhanced cellular radiotherapy where preferential accumulation of boron in the cancerous as opposed to adjacent normal cells is able to interact with incident neutrons to cause irreversible alpha particle DNA damage. The key to the implementation of this potentially powerful and selective therapy is the delivery of at least 30ppm 10B within the tumour tissue while minimising superfluous 10B in healthy tissue. It is thus an elegant technique for treating infiltrating tumours such as diffuse gliomas. In order to assess its clinical potential we carried out a pharmacokinetic study in glioblastoma patients where we sought to determine the optimal route of delivering a new formulation of the boronated drug (p-boronophenylalanine, BPA), its pharmacokinetic behaviour, toxicity profile, and cellular uptake. Using a number of analytical techniques, including inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), boron was measured at various times in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumour-related solid tissue spanning 0.5 h pre- and up to 48 h post-BPA infusion in newly-diagnosed patients (n = 10). Blood was sampled through a central catheter whilst the ECF was sampled by parenchymal microdialysis catheters, placed remotely from the tumour site. Urine was collected over the same time period. Tumour and brain-around tumour (BAT) tissue was sampled stereotactically at 2.5 h and 3.5 h post-infusion. IHC expression levels of the BPA transporter molecule, L-amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1), were recorded as % LAT-1 positive cells, and cellular boron levels were estimated as spatially resolved pixels in normalised-to-C+ isotopic SIMS images of the biopsies. There were no toxicity-related issues with this new formulation of BPA given at 375 mg/kg as a 2 h intravenous or intracarotid infusion with or without pre-infusion mannitol-induced BBB

  6. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end [1]. This VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave™ may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power, the

  7. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end].This VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave{sup TM} may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power

  8. Neutron intensity monitor with activation foil for p-Li neutron source for BNCT--Feasibility test of the concept.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Otani, Yuki; Sato, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Proton-lithium (p-Li) reaction is being examined worldwide as a candidate nuclear production reaction for accelerator based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. In this reaction, the emitted neutron energy is not so high, below 1 MeV, and especially in backward angles the energy is as low as about 100 keV. The intensity measurement was thus known to be difficult so far. In the present study, a simple method was investigated to monitor the absolute neutron intensity of the p-Li neutron source by employing the foil activation method based on isomer production reactions in order to cover around several hundreds keV. As a result of numerical examination, it was found that (107)Ag, (115)In and (189)Os would be feasible. Their features found out are summarized as follows: (107)Ag: The most convenient foil, since the half life is short. (115)In: The accuracy is the best at 0°, though it cannot be used for backward angles. And (189)Os: Suitable nuclide which can be used in backward angles, though the gamma-ray energy is a little too low. These would be used for p-Li source monitoring depending on measuring purposes in real BNCT scenes. PMID:26242557

  9. An evaluation on the design of beam shaping assembly based on the D-T reaction for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnal, M.; Liamsuwan, T.; Onjun, T.

    2015-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) can be achieved by using a compact neutron generator such as a compact D-T neutron source, in which neutron energy must be in the epithermal energy range with sufficient flux. For these requirements, a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) is needed. In this paper, three BSA designs based on the D-T reaction for BNCT are discussed. It is found that the BSA configuration designed by Rasouli et al. satisfies all of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) criteria. It consists of 14 cm uranium as multiplier, 23 cm TiF3 and 36 cm Fluental as moderator, 4 cm Fe as fast neutron filter, 1 mm Li as thermal neutron filter, 2.6 cm Bi as gamma ray filter, and Pb as collimator and reflector. It is also found that use of specific filters is important for removing the fast and thermal neutrons and gamma contamination. Moreover, an appropriate neutron source plays a key role in providing a proper epithermal flux.

  10. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  11. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-02-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during February 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, Analytical Methodologies Development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) Purity Determination, Noninvasive Boron Quantitative Determination, Dosimetry, Analytical Radiation Transport and Interaction Modeling, Large Animal Model Studies in that Ten dogs were irradiated to grossly bracket neutron beam only tissue tolerance limits, Neutron Source and Facility Preparation in that the PBF neutron filter and bismuth shielding design revisions, recommended during the preliminary design review, have been incorporated and Administration and Common Support. 1 tab.

  12. Present status of the medical irradiation facility at the Musashi reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Aizawa, O.; Nozaki, T.; Sato, T. )

    1989-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of malignant brain tumors has been efficiently performed since March 1977, and the first human case of malignant melanoma was also successfully treated on July 1987 in our reactor (Musashi reactor, TRIGA-II, 100 kW). To obtain both good irradiation field characteristics and a better irradiation facility, some tests and developments have been continued in accordance with the study of medical and biological irradiations. The results of these evaluations and a new approach are presented.6 references.

  13. Design of a rotating facility for extracorporal treatment of an explanted liver with disseminated metastases by boron neutron capture therapy with an epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L; Kloosterman, J L; van der Hagen, T H J J; van Dam, H; Wittig, A; Malago, M; Sauerwein, W

    2006-07-01

    In 2001, at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia (Italy), a patient suffering from diffuse liver metastases from an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid was successfully treated by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The procedure involved boron infusion prior to hepatectomy, irradiation of the explanted liver at the thermal column of the reactor, and subsequent reimplantation. A complete response was observed. This encouraging outcome stimulated the Essen/Petten BNCT group to investigate whether such an extracorporal irradiation could be performed at the BNCT irradiation facility at the HFR Petten (The Netherlands), which has very different irradiation characteristics than the Pavia facility. A computational study has been carried out. A rotating PMMA container with a liver, surrounded by PMMA and graphite, is simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Due to the rotation and neutron moderation of the PMMA container, the initial epithermal neutron beam provides a nearly homogeneous thermal neutron field in the liver. The main conditions for treatment as reported from the Pavia experiment, i.e. a thermal neutron fluence of 4 x 10(12) +/- 20% cm(-2), can be closely met at the HFR in an acceptable time, which, depending on the defined conditions, is between 140 and 180 min. PMID:16808623

  14. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice. PMID:26122974

  15. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  16. The design of an intense accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam prototype for BNCT using near-threshold reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles L.

    Near-threshold boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) uses proton energies only tens of rev above the (pan) reaction threshold in lithium in order to reduce the moderation requirements of the neutron source. The goals of this research were to prove the feasibility of this near-threshold concept for BNCT applications, using both calculation and experiment, and design a compact neutron source prototype from these results. This required a multidisciplinary development of methods for calculation of neutron yields, head phantom dosimetry, and accelerator target heat removal. First, a method was developed to accurately calculate thick target neutron yields for both near-threshold and higher energy proton beams, in lithium metal as well as lithium compounds. After these yields were experimentally verified, they were used as neutron sources for Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of neutron and photon transport in head phantoms. The theoretical and experimental determination of heat removal from a target backing with multiple fins, as well as numerical calculations of heat deposition profiles based on proton energy loss in target and backing materials, demonstrated that lithium integrity can be maintained for proton beam currents up to 2.5 mA. The final design uses a proton beam energy of 1.95 MeV and has a centerline epithermal neutron flux of 2.2 × 108 n/cm2- sec/mA, an advantage depth of 5.7 cm, an advantage ratio of 4.3, and an advantage depth dose rate of 6.7 RBE- cGy/min/mA, corresponding to an irradiation time of 38 minutes with a 5 mA beam. Moderator, reflector, and shielding weigh substantially less than other accelerator BNCT designs based on higher proton energies, e.g. 2.5 MeV. The near-threshold concept is useful as a portable neutron source for hospital settings, with applications ranging from glioblastomas to melanomas and synovectomy. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  17. Recent Progress at LBNL on Characterization of Laser WakefieldAccelerated Electron Bunches using Coherent Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans, Wim P.; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; van Tilborg,Jeroen; Toth, Csaba

    2007-06-25

    At LBNL, laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can now produce ultra-short electron bunches with energies up to 1 GeV [1]. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma they radiate an intense burst in the terahertz range [2,3] via coherent transition radiation (CTR). Measuring the CTR properties allows non-invasive bunchlength diagnostics [4], a key to continuing rapid advance in LWFA technology. Experimental bunch length characterization for two different energy regimes through bolometric analysis and electro-optic (EO) sampling are presented. Measurements demonstrate both shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters, and femtosecond synchronization between the bunch, the THz pulse, and the laser beam. In addition, this method of CTR generation provides THz pulses of very high peak power suitable for applications. Recent results reveal LWFA to be a promising intense ultrafast THz source.

  18. Investigation on the reflector/moderator geometry and its effect on the neutron beam design in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Rahmani, F; Khalafi, H

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide an appropriate neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), a special Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) must be designed based on the neutron source specifications. A typical BSA includes moderator, reflector, collimator, thermal neutron filter, and gamma filter. In common BSA, the reflector is considered as a layer which covers the sides of the moderator materials. In this paper, new reflector/moderator geometries including multi-layer and hexagonal lattice have been suggested and the effect of them has been investigated by MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. It was found that the proposed configurations have a significant effect to improve the thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio which is an important neutron beam parameter. PMID:26298435

  19. Dosimetric performance evaluation regarding proton beam incident angles of a lithium-based AB-BNCT design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Yi; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-10-01

    The (7)Li(p,xn)(7)Be nuclear reaction, based on the low-energy protons, could produce soft neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT). Based on the fact that the induced neutron field is relatively divergent, the relationship between the incident angle of proton beam and the neutron beam quality was evaluated in this study. To provide an intense epithermal neutron beam, a beam-shaping assembly (BSA) was designed. And a modified Snyder head phantom was used in the calculations for evaluating the dosimetric performance. From the calculated results, the intensity of epithermal neutrons increased with the increase in proton incident angle. Hence, either the irradiation time or the required proton current can be reduced. When the incident angle of 2.5-MeV proton beam is 120°, the required proton current is ∼13.3 mA for an irradiation time of half an hour. PMID:24493784

  20. A micro-PET/CT approach using O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine in an experimental animal model of F98 glioma for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Petroni, D; Panetta, D; Burchielli, S; Bortolussi, Silva; Matteucci, M; Pascali, G; Del Turco, S; Del Guerra, A; Altieri, S; Salvadori, P A

    2011-12-01

    The present study focuses on a micro-PET/CT application to be used for experimental Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), which integrates, in the same frame, micro-CT derived anatomy and PET radiotracer distribution. Preliminary results have demonstrated that (18)F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine (FET)/PET allows the identification of the extent of cerebral lesions in F98 tumor bearing rat. Neutron autoradiography and α-spectrometry on axial tissues slices confirmed the tumor localization and extraction, after the administration of fructose-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Therefore, FET-PET approach can be used to assess the transport, the net influx, and the accumulation of FET, as an aromatic amino acid analog of BPA, in experimental animal model. Coregistered micro-CT images allowed the accurate morphological localization of the radiotracer distribution and its potential use for experimental BNCT. PMID:21458282

  1. An investigation on the use of removal-diffusion theory for BNCT treatment planning: a method for determining proper removal-diffusion parameters.

    PubMed

    Albertson, B J; Blue, T E; Niemkiewicz, J

    2001-09-01

    This paper outlines a method for determining proper removal-diffusion parameters to be used in removal-diffusion theory calculations for the purpose of BNCT treatment planning. Additionally, this paper demonstrates that, given the proper choice of removal-diffusion parameters, removal-diffusion theory may provide an accurate calculation technique for determining absorbed dose distributions for the purpose of BNCT treatment planning. For a four-group, one-dimensional calculation in water, this method was used to determine values for the neutron scattering cross sections, neutron removal cross sections, neutron diffusion coefficients, and extrapolation distances. These values were then used in a one-dimensional DIF3D calculation. The results of the DIF3D calculation showed a maximum deviation of 2.5% from a MCNP calculation performed for the same geometry. PMID:11585220

  2. Neutron beam optimization based on a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for treatment of deep-seated brain tumors by BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Ahmadi, Ganjeh; S. Farhad, Masoudi

    2014-10-01

    Neutron beam optimization for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is investigated using a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Design and optimization have been carried out for the target, cooling system, moderator, filter, reflector, and collimator to achieve a high flux of epithermal neutron and satisfy the IAEA criteria. Also, the performance of the designed beam in tissue is assessed by using a simulated Snyder head phantom. The results show that the optimization of the collimator and reflector is critical to finding the best neutron beam based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Our designed beam has 2.49×109n/cm2s epithermal neutron flux and is suitable for BNCT of deep-seated brain tumors.

  3. A carborane-derivative "click" reaction under heterogeneous conditions for the synthesis of a promising lipophilic MRI/GdBNCT agent.

    PubMed

    Toppino, Antonio; Bova, Maria Elena; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Alberti, Diego; Diana, Eliano; Barge, Alessandro; Aime, Silvio; Venturello, Paolo; Deagostino, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Huisgen reaction has been used to functionalise a carborane cage with a lipophilic moiety and a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) ligand to obtain a new Gd boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. The introduction of the triazole units has been accomplished under both heterogeneous conditions, by the use of a Cu-supported ionic-liquid catalyst, and homogeneous conditions. The ability of the Gd complex of the synthesised ligand to form stable adducts with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) has been evaluated and then MRI has been performed on tumour melanoma cells incubated in the presence of a Gd-complex/LDL imaging probe. It has been concluded that the high amount of intracellular boron necessary to perform BNCT can be reached even in the presence of a relatively low-boron-containing LDL concentration. PMID:23154917

  4. Monte Carlo Calculation of Core Reactivity and Fluxes for the Development of the BNCT Neutron Source at the Kyiv Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzay, Olena; Kalchenko, Oleksandr; Klimova, Nataliya; Razbudey, Volodymyr; Sanzhur, Andriy; Binney, Stephen

    2005-05-24

    The presented results show our consecutive steps in developing a neutron source with parameters required by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR). The main goal of this work was to analyze the influence of installation of different types of uranium converters close to the reactor core on neutron beam characteristics and on level of reactor safety. The general Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP, version 4B, has been used for these calculations.

  5. Boron determination in liver tissue by combining quantitative neutron capture radiography (QNCR) and histological analysis for BNCT treatment planning at the TRIGA Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schütz, C; Brochhausen, C; Altieri, S; Bartholomew, K; Bortolussi, S; Enzmann, F; Gabel, D; Hampel, G; Kirkpatrick, C J; Kratz, J V; Minouchehr, S; Schmidberger, H; Otto, G

    2011-09-01

    The typical primary malignancies of the liver are hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma, whereas colorectal liver metastases are the most frequently occurring secondary tumors. In many cases, only palliative treatment is possible. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) represents a technique that potentially destroys tumor tissue selectively by use of externally induced, locally confined secondary particle irradiation. In 2001 and 2003, BNCT was applied to two patients with colorectal liver metastases in Pavia, Italy. To scrutinize the rationale of BNCT, a clinical pilot study on patients with colorectal liver metastases was carried out at the University of Mainz. The distribution of the (10)B carrier (p-borono-phenylalanine) in the liver and its uptake in cancerous and tumor-free tissue were determined, focusing on a potential correlation between the uptake of p-borono-phenylalanine and the biological characteristics of cancerous tissue. Samples were analyzed using quantitative neutron capture radiography of cryosections combined with histological analysis. Methodological aspects of the combination of these techniques and results from four patients enrolled in the study are presented that indicate that the uptake of p-borono-phenylalanine strongly depends on the metabolic activity of cells. PMID:21692653

  6. Therapy region monitoring based on PET using 478 keV single prompt gamma ray during BNCT: A Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo-Young; Lu, Bo; Yoon, Do-Kun; Hong, Key Jo; Jang, HongSeok; Liu, Chihray; Suh, Tae Suk

    2016-04-01

    We confirmed the feasibility of using our proposed system to extract two different kinds of functional images from a positron emission tomography (PET) module by using an insertable collimator during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Coincidence events from a tumor region that included boron particles were identified by a PET scanner before BNCT; subsequently, the prompt gamma ray events from the same tumor region were collected after exposure to an external neutron beam through an insertable collimator on the PET detector. Five tumor regions that contained boron particles and were located in the water phantom and in the BNCT system with the PET module were simulated with Monte Carlo simulation code. The acquired images were quantitatively analyzed. Based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in the five boron regions, A, B, C, D, and E, the PET and single-photon images were 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center region), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. We were able to acquire simultaneously PET and single prompt photon images for tumor regions monitoring by using an insertable collimator without any additional isotopes. PMID:26970679

  7. High Brightness Electron Beam diode for the DARHT (*) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eylon, Shmuel; Abbott, Steve

    1999-11-01

    An injector for the second axis of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DARHT) is been built at LBNL. The proposed injector consists of a single gap diode extracting 2 kA, 3.5 MV electrons from a thermionic dispenser cathode and powered through a high voltage ceramic insulator column by a Marx generator. The key issues in the design are the control of beam quality to meet the DARHT 2nd axis final focus requirements and to minimize high-voltage breakdown risks. We will present the physics design, preliminary engineering and diagnostics layouts of the injector diode as well as preliminary results on a scaled experiment using the Berkeley RTA facility. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract AC03-76SF00098.

  8. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  9. Power burst facility/boron neutron capture therapy program for cancer treatment. [Borocaptate sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-11-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program in November, 1990 are described. One of our major projects is support of technological development. In this area, progress has been seen in gross boron analysis of biological samples, higher purity borocaptate sodium (BSH), planning of experiments to investigate BSH biochemistry and oxidation products, bidding out for an ion microscope to investigate subcellular distribution of boron, and reduction of the gamma field in the irradiation room due to addition of lithiated polyethylene shielding. No progress was made on noninvasive boron quantitation, because the MRI system used is being upgraded, and the boron MR software must be rewritten. Brandy'' Hoff, a canine patient in the Large Animal Model studies, passed her one year physical and neurological exam. Three of the last four dogs treated for spontaneous brain tumors are doing well. Researchers at the University of Utah are planning human pharmacokinetic studies of BSH. BSH and BSS uptake in exemptions of terminal glioblastoma patients will be investigated. Layout and planning of tasks to begin PBF/BNCT Program reactor modifications have been initiated. The final design review for the bismuth reflector core partition sheet and lower orifice plate was completed on November 20, 1990. Agreements with DOE-ID relating to expenditure of the $13M for the PBF/BNCT Program have been reached. A review of the program by the National Academy of Science was requested by Admiral Watkins and took place in Washington, DC on November 5, 1990. This progress report also contains a summary of the 1990 accomplishments within the melanoma project. 2 figs. (MHB)

  10. Solar Fridges and Personal Power Grids: How Berkeley Lab is Fighting Global Poverty (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Buluswar, Shashi; Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-11-26

    At this November 26, 2012 Science at the Theater, scientists discussed the recently launched LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT) at Berkeley Lab. LIGTT is an ambitious mandate to discover and develop breakthrough technologies for combating global poverty. It was created with the belief that solutions will require more advanced R&D and a deep understanding of market needs in the developing world. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Shashi Buluswar and seven other LIGTT scientists discussed what it takes to develop technologies that will impact millions of people. These include: 1) Fuel efficient stoves for clean cooking: Our scientists are improving the Berkeley Darfur Stove, a high efficiency stove used by over 20,000 households in Darfur; 2) The ultra-low energy refrigerator: A lightweight, low-energy refrigerator that can be mounted on a bike so crops can survive the trip from the farm to the market; 3) The solar OB suitcase: A low-cost package of the five most critical biomedical devices for maternal and neonatal clinics; 4) UV Waterworks: A device for quickly, safely and inexpensively disinfecting water of harmful microorganisms.

  11. High Quality Electron Bunches up to 1 GeV from Laser WakefieldAcceleration at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, Cs.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; van Tilborg, J.; Hooker, S.; Leemans,W.P.; Michel, E.; Cary, J.; Bruhwiler, D.

    2006-07-01

    Experiments at the LOASIS laboratory of LBNL havedemonstrated production of 100 MeV to 1 GeV electron bunches with lowenergy spread and low divergence from laser wakefield acceleration. Theradiation pressure of a 10 TW laser pulse, guided over 10 diffractionranges by a few-mm long plasma density channel, was used to drive anintense plasma wave (wakefield), producing electron bunches with energieson the order of 100 MeV and acceleration gradients on the order of 100GV/m. Beam energy was increased from 100 MeV to 1 GeV by using a few-cmlong guiding channel at lower density, driven by a 40 TW laser,demonstrating the anticipated scaling to higher beam energies. Particlesimulations indicate that the low energy spread beams were produced fromself-trapped electrons through the interplay of trapping, loading, anddephasing. Other experiments and simulations are also underway to controlinjection of particles into the wake, and hence improve beam quality andstability further.

  12. RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings,FY2000/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the R&D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R&D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum.

  13. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  14. Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron, Delia; Sanili, Babak; Weber-Bargioni, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2011-06-06

    Science at the Theater, June 6th, 2011: Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Alex Weber-Bargioni: How can we see things at the nanoscale? Alex is pioneering new methods that provide unprecedented insight into nanoscale materials and molecular interactions. The goal is to create rules for building nanoscale materials. Babak Sanii: Nature is an expert at making nanoscale devices such as proteins. Babak is developing ways to see these biological widgets, which could help scientists develop synthetic devices that mimic the best that nature has to offer. Ting Xu: How are we going to make nanoscale devices? A future in which materials and devices are able to assemble themselves may not be that far down the road. Ting is finding ways to induce a wide range of nanoscopic building blocks to assemble into complex structures. Delia Milliron: The dividends of nanoscience could reshape the way we live, from smart windows and solar cells to artificial photosynthesis and improved medical diagnosis. Delia is at the forefront of converting fundamental research into nanotechnology. Moderated by Jim DeYoreo, interim director of the Molecular Foundry, a facility located at Berkeley Lab where scientists from around the world address the myriad challenges in nanoscience.

  15. Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

    2011-04-28

    Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the field of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the field of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

  16. Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

    2009-09-28

    Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the field of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the field of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

  17. A method for fast evaluation of neutron spectra for BNCT based on in-phantom figure-of-merit calculation.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido

    2003-03-01

    In this paper a fast method to evaluate neutron spectra for brain BNCT is developed. The method is based on an algorithm to calculate dose distribution in the brain, for which a data matrix has been taken into account, containing weighted biological doses per position per incident energy and the incident neutron spectrum to be evaluated. To build the matrix, using the MCNP 4C code, nearly monoenergetic neutrons were transported into a head model. The doses were scored and an energy-dependent function to biologically weight the doses was used. To find the beam quality, dose distribution along the beam centerline was calculated. A neutron importance function for this therapy to bilaterally treat deep-seated tumors was constructed in terms of neutron energy. Neutrons in the energy range of a few tens of kilo-electron-volts were found to produce the best dose gain, defined as dose to tumor divided by maximum dose to healthy tissue. Various neutron spectra were evaluated through this method. An accelerator-based neutron source was found to be more reliable for this therapy in terms of therapeutic gain than reactors. PMID:12674238

  18. Monte-Carlo calculations for the development of a BNCT neutron source at the Kyiv Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Gritzay, O O; Kalchenko, O I; Klimova, N A; Razbudey, V F; Sanzhur, A I; Binney, S E

    2004-11-01

    The results presented in this paper display our continuing steps toward development of a neutron source with parameters required by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at the Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR). The purpose of this work was: 1. calculation of the neutron flux which can be achieved at the greatest possible approach of a patient to the reactor core; 2. analysis of the influence of a nickel collimator and a nickel-60 filter on the characteristics of the neutron beam; 3. creation and validation of the MCNP calculational pattern for an actual core fuel load in the KRR. Results of calculations were carried out by means of the MCNP4C code included: 1. An epithermal neutron flux of 3x10(9)-5x10(9)neutron/cm(2)s with an epithermal-to-fast flux ratio of 80-230 could be obtained at the KRR, using a natural nickel layer on the interior borated polyethylene collimator wall and a (60)Ni filter. 2. Use of the (60)Ni filter may be useful to increase the ratio epithermal-to-fast flux without a substantial decrease in the magnitude of the epithermal neutron flux. 3. The MCNP model proposed in this paper could also be useful for reactor safety calculations. PMID:15308160

  19. Synthesis of lithium nitride for neutron production target of BNCT by in situ lithium deposition and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Baba, Y.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Imahori, Y.

    2012-12-01

    To achieve high performance of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) device, Li3N/Li/Pd/Cu four layered Li target was designed and the structures of the synthesized four layered target were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For the purpose of avoiding the radiation blistering and lithium evaporation, in situ vacuum deposition and nitridation techniques were established for in situ production and repairing maintenance of the lithium target. Following conclusions were derived: Uniform lithium layer of a few hundreds nanometer was formed on Pd/Cu multilayer surface by in situ vacuum deposition technique using metallic lithium as a source material. Lithium nitrides were formed by in situ nitridation reaction by the implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions on the deposited lithium layer surface. The chemical states of the nitridated zone were close to the stoichiometric lithium nitride, Li3N. This nitridated zone formed on surface of four layered lithium target is stable for a long time in air condition. The in situ nitridation is effective to protect lithium target from degradation by unfavorable reactions.

  20. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  1. One stone kills three birds: novel boron-containing vesicles for potential BNCT, controlled drug release, and diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gaojian; Yang, Jingying; Lu, Gang; Liu, Pi Chu; Chen, Qianjin; Xie, Zuowei; Wu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    A new conjugate polymer was prepared by an efficient thiol-ene coupling of one carborane with a linear PEG chain (Mn = 2,000 g/mol), and each carborane was further labeled with a fluorescence rhodamine dye. Such a novel polymer can associate in water to form narrowly distributed spherical vesicles, which were characterized using a range of methods, including laser light scattering, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and TEM. The vesicular structure is potentially multifunctional in biomedical applications, namely, serving as a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, a hydrophilic drug carrier, and a diagnostic imaging fluorescent probe. As expected, either cleaving the thiol-ene linked PEO chain by esterase or destroying carborane by neutron irradiation results in a dismantlement of such a vesicle structure to release its encapsulated drugs. Its potential biomedical applications have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our preliminary results reveal that these small vesicles can be quickly taken up by cells and have an enhanced stability in the bloodstream so that their targeting to specific cancer cells becomes feasible. PMID:24521224

  2. Biokinetic analysis of tissue boron (¹⁰B) concentrations of glioma patients treated with BNCT in Finland.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hippeläinen, E; Auterinen, I; Kankaanranta, L; Kulvik, M; Laakso, J; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Joensuu, H

    2015-12-01

    A total of 98 patients with glioma were treated with BPA-F-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland from 1999 to 2011. Thirty-nine (40%) had undergone surgery for newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 59 (60%) had malignant glioma recurrence after surgery. In this study we applied a closed 3-compartment model based on dynamic (18)F-BPA-PET studies to estimate the BPA-F concentrations in the tumor and the normal brain with time. Altogether 22 patients with recurrent glioma, treated within the context of a clinical trial, were evaluated using their individual measured whole blood (10)B concentrations as an input to the model. The delivered radiation doses to tumor and the normal brain were recalculated based on the modeled (10)B concentrations in the tissues during neutron irradiation. The model predicts from -7% to +29% (average, +11%) change in the average tumor doses as compared with the previously estimated doses, and from 17% to 61% (average, 36%) higher average normal brain doses than previously estimated due to the non-constant tumor-to-blood concentration ratios and considerably higher estimated (10)B concentrations in the brain at the time of neutron irradiation. PMID:26363564

  3. Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Coughlin, Jennifer L.; Mathew, Paul A.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents the results of a review of publicly available information on energy use in health care facilities. The information contained in this document and in the sources cited herein provides the background and context for efforts to reduce energy use and costs in health care. Recognizing the breadth and diversity of relevant information, the author acknowledges that the report is likely not comprehensive. It is intended only to present a broad picture of what is currently known about health care energy use. This review was conducted as part of a 'High Performance Health Care Buildings' research study funded by the California Energy Commission. The study was motivated by the recognition that health care facilities collectively account for a substantial fraction of total commercial building energy use, due in large part to the very high energy intensity of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities. The goal of the study was to develop a roadmap of research, development and deployment (RD&D) needs for the health care industry. In addition to this information review, the road map development process included interviews with industry experts and a full-day workshop at LBNL in March 2009. This report is described as 'Version 1' with the intent that it will be expanded and updated as part of an ongoing LBNL program in healthcare energy efficiency. The document is being released in this form with the hope that it can assist others in finding and accessing the resources described within.

  4. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-02-01

    care, airport, and manufacturing facilities.

  5. L-DOPA Preloading Increases the Uptake of Borophenylalanine in C6 Glioma Rat Model: A New Strategy to Improve BNCT Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Capuani, Silvia Gili, Tommaso; Bozzali, Marco; Russo, Salvatore; Porcari, Paola; Cametti, Cesare; D'Amore, Emanuela; Colasanti, Marco; Venturini, Giorgio; Maraviglia, Bruno; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Pastore, Francesco S.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic modality based on {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, for the treatment of malignant gliomas. One of the main limitations for BNCT effectiveness is the insufficient intake of {sup 10}B nuclei in the tumor cells. This work was aimed at investigating the use of L-DOPA as a putative enhancer for {sup 10}B-drug 4-dihydroxy-borylphenylalanine (BPA) uptake in the C6-glioma model. The investigation was first performed in vitro and then extended to the animal model. Methods and Materials: BPA accumulation in C6-glioma cells was assessed using radiowave dielectric spectroscopy, with and without L-DOPA preloading. Two L-DOPA incubation times (2 and 4 hours) were investigated, and the corresponding effects on BPA accumulation were quantified. C6-glioma cells were also implanted in the brain of 32 rats, and tumor growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. Rats were assigned to two experimental branches: (1) BPA administration; (2) BPA administration after pretreatment with L-DOPA. All animals were sacrificed, and assessments of BPA concentrations in tumor tissue, normal brain, and blood samples were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: L-DOPA preloading induced a massive increase of BPA concentration in C6-glioma cells only after a 4-hour incubation. In the animal model, L-DOPA pretreatment produced a significantly higher accumulation of BPA in tumor tissue but not in normal brain and blood samples. Conclusions: This study suggests the potential use of L-DOPA as enhancer for BPA accumulation in malignant gliomas eligible for BNCT. L-DOPA preloading effect is discussed in terms of membrane transport mechanisms.

  6. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for HER2+ breast cancers: A feasibility study evaluating BNCT for potential role in breast conservation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Peter Anthony

    A novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) regimen for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancers has been proposed as an alternative to whole breast irradiation for breast conservation therapy patients. The proposed therapy regimen is based on the assumed production of boron delivery agents that would be synthesized from compounds of Trastuzumab (Herceptin ®) and oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). The combination of the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody and the high boron loading capability of OPDs has led to the assumption that boron could be delivered to the HER2+ cancer cells at Tumor to Healthy Tissue ratios (T:H) of up to 35:1 and boron concentrations above 50 μg/g. This significantly increased boron delivery efficiency has opened new BNCT possibilities. This proof of concept study examined treatment parameters derived as the results in previous efforts in the context of patient-specific geometry and compared calculated dose results to those observed during actual patient therapy. These results were based on dose calculations performed with a set of calculated Kerma coefficients derived from tissues specific to the regions of interest for breast cancer. A comparison was made of the dose to the tumor region, the patient's skin, and the peripheral organs. The results of this study demonstrated that, given the performance of the proposed boron delivery agent, the BNCT treatment regimen is feasible. The feasibility is based on the findings that the equivalent dose could be delivered to the treatment volume with less dose to the skin and peripheral organs. This is anticipated to improve the treatment outcomes by maintaining local control of tumor cells while reducing dose to healthy tissues.

  7. BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: preliminary clinical experience from a phase I/II trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Wang, S J; Chu, P Y; Ho, C Y; Jiang, S H; Liu, Y W H; Liu, Y H; Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Chou, F I; Yen, S H; Lee, Y L; Chang, C W; Liu, C S; Chen, Y W; Ono, K

    2011-12-01

    To introduce our preliminary experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent Head and Neck cancer patients at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, four patients (M/F=3/1, median age 68 Y/O) were enrolled. BNCT with BPA (400 mg/kg) injected in 2 phases and prescription dose of 12-35 Gy (Eq.)/fraction for 2 fractions at 30 day interval can be given with sustained blood boron concentration and tolerable early toxicities for recurrent H & N cancer. PMID:21478023

  8. RCRA FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  9. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively. PMID:27423022

  10. RADIATION DOSIMETRY IN THE BNCT PATIENT TREATMENT ROOM AT THE BMRR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Medical Research Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BMRR) was a heterogeneous, tank type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was operated on demand at a power level up to 3 mega-watts (MW) for medical and biological research [1]. The reactor first went critical on March 15, 1959, with 17 fresh fuel elements (2.52 kg uranium-235 in a total of 2.7 kg uranium) in the center core. The BMRR had two treatment rooms on opposite sides of the core. It had a predominately thermal neutron beam in the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNE) on the west side of the core. By early 1990, a redesigned beam line had a predominately epithermal neutron beam in the Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (ENIF) on the east side of the core [2]. The ENP was approximately 11 feet by 21 feet in size with its focal point consisting of a bismuth plate mounted in the wall adjacent to the reactor shield about 36 inches above the floor. The beam originated at a shutter constructed of 0.75 inch steel filled with concrete and weighing {approx}21 tons. Access to the ENIF was through a pair of hand operated steel shielding doors, each 42 inches wide, 84 inches high and 5 inches thick. The inner door had a 4-inch thick layer of paraffin on the side facing the reactor. The doors 5000 pounds weighed each. Additional shielding material had been added to the entire beam port at reactor wall within the ENIF. The shielding material consisted of 2-inch thick polyethylene sheets, which were impregnated with 95%-enriched {sup 6}Li in lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The shielding sheets around the port face were designed to allow the insertion of a variety of different beam collimators.

  11. Application of an octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nido-carboranylmethyl)phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as dual sensitizer for BNCT and PDT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The applications of the octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nidocarboranylmethyl) phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as a boron delivery agent in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been investigated. Using F98 Rat glioma cells, we evaluated the cytotox...

  12. In vivo 19F MRI and 19F MRS of 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine fructose complex on a C6 rat glioma model to optimize boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; D'Amore, Emanuela; Lecce, Mario; La Bella, Angela; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Saverio Pastore, Francesco; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary modality used to treat malignant brain gliomas. To optimize BNCT effectiveness a non-invasive method is needed to monitor the spatial distribution of BNCT carriers in order to estimate the optimal timing for neutron irradiation. In this study, in vivo spatial distribution mapping and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine (BPA) were performed using 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI) and 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS). Characteristic uptake of 19F-BPA in C6 glioma showed a maximum at 2.5 h after compound infusion as confirmed by both 19F images and 19F spectra acquired on blood samples collected at different times after infusion. This study shows the ability of 19F MRI to selectively map the bio-distribution of 19F-BPA in a C6 rat glioma model, as well as providing a useful method to perform pharmacokinetics of BNCT carriers.

  13. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h-1. These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  14. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field. PMID:17440252

  15. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling. PMID:24412425

  16. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300 μA. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. PMID:26397967

  17. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  18. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  19. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  20. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  1. Production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a cross section of different solutions to the many unique production problems operators face. Sections address benefit vs. cost options for production facility designs, oil and gas separation processes and equipment, oil treating and desalting systems, and water treating methods and equipment. Papers were selected to give an overall view of factors involved in optimizing the design of cost-effective production facilities.

  2. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  3. Evaluation of the characteristics of boron-dose enhancer (BDE) materials for BNCT using near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be direct neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengua, Gerard; Kobayashi, Tooru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2004-03-01

    The characteristics of a number of candidate boron-dose enhancer (BDE) materials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be direct neutrons were evaluated based on the treatable protocol depth (TPD), defined in this paper. Simulation calculations were carried out by means of MCNP-4B transport code for candidate BDE materials, namely, (C2H4)n, (C2H3F)n, (C2H2F2)n, (C2HF3)n, (C2D4)n, (C2F4)n, beryllium metal, graphite, D2O and 7LiF. Dose protocols applied were those used for intra-operative BNCT treatment for brain tumour currently used in Japan. The maximum TPD (TPDmax) for each BDE material was found to be between 4 cm and 5 cm in the order of (C2H4)n < (C2H3F)n < (C2H2F2)n < (C2HF3)n < beryllium metal < (C2D4)n < graphite < (C2F4)n < D2O < 7LiF. Based on the small and arbitrary variations in the TPDmax for these materials, an explicit advantage of a candidate BDE material could not be established from the TPDmax alone. The dependence of TPD on BDE thickness was found to be influenced by the type of BDE material. For materials with hydrogen, sharp variations in TPD were observed, while those without hydrogen exhibited more moderate fluctuations in TPD as the BDE thickness was varied. The BDE thickness corresponding to TPDmax (BDE(TPDmax)) was also found to depend on the type of BDE material used. Thicker BDE(TPDmax), obtained mostly for BDE materials without hydrogen, significantly reduced the dose rates within the phantom. The TPDmax, the dependence of TPD on BDE thickness and the BDE (TPDmax) were ascertained as appropriate optimization criteria in choosing suitable BDE materials for BNCT. Among the candidate BDE materials considered in this study, (C2H4)n was judged as the suitable material for near-surface tumours and beryllium metal for deeper tumours based on these optimization criteria and other practical considerations.

  4. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ({sup 10}BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. Methods and Materials: The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10{sup 6} MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. Results: The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (P<.001 for MEL-J and A375 vs M8 cells). The in vivo studies showed a maximum average boron concentration of 25.9 ± 2.6 μg/g in tumor, with individual values ranging between 11.7 and 52.0 μg/g of {sup 10}B 2 hours after the injection of BPA. Tumor temperature always decreased as the tumors increased in size, with values ranging between 37°C and 23°C. A significant correlation between tumor temperature and tumor-to-blood boron concentration ratio was found (R{sup 2} = 0.7, rational function fit). The immunohistochemical studies revealed, in tumors with extensive areas of viability, a high number of positive cells for Ki-67, blood vessels of large diameter evidenced by the marker CD31, and a direct logistic correlation between proliferative status and boron concentration difference between tumor and blood (R{sup 2} = 0.81, logistic function fit). Conclusion: We propose that these methods could be suitable for designing new screening protocols applied before melanoma BNCT

  5. ET-14OPTIMISATION OF BORONOPHENYLALANINE (BPA) DELIVERY AND LAT1 EXPRESSION FOR THE CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Garth; Detta, Allah; Green, Stuart; Lockyer, Nick; Ngoga, Desire; Ghani, Zahir; Phoenix, Ben

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted radiotherapy where preferential boron uptake interacts with a neutron beam in cancerous cells causing irreparable alpha DNA damage. This requires the delivery of at least 30 parts per million (ppm) of 10B into tumour tissue and <10ppm 10B in healthy tissue. Renewed interest arises from the advent of ‘accelerator’ technology and the recognition of specific uptake transporter in tumour cells. We report an optimising pharmacokinetic and tissue uptake study in glioblastoma patients to determine the route of delivering a new formulation of (p-boronophenylalanine, BPA), its pharmacokinetics, toxicity profile, and LAT1 dependent cellular uptake for a clinical trial. Using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), boron was measured in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), extracellular fluid (ECFmicrodialysis), and tissue prior to, during and post BPA infusions in newly-diagnosed patients (n = 10). Tumour and brain-around tumour (BAT) tissue were sampled at 2.5h and 3.5h post-infusion. Tumour and BAT, IHC expression levels of the BPA transporter L-amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) were recorded, and cellular boron levels, estimated in SIMS images.LAT1 dependent BPA uptake was also determined. There was no toxicity with BPA given at 375mg/kg as a 2h intravenous or intracarotid infusion with or without pre-infusion mannitol-induced BBB disruption. The Pk profile indicates highest plasma-to-brain concentration gradient from intracarotid infusion and BBB manipulation,with high boron concentrations in the brain compartment. SIMS boron ratio in tumour vs BAT was 0.96 intravenous,1.85 IV + mannitol BBB-D and 2.40 intracarotid cohorts, confirming improved delivery of boron. Tumour and BAT uptake varied, but sustained uptake in BAT (>30ppm boron) indicates potential BNCT targeting after surgery. Tumour boron uptake is governed by LAT-1 behaviour rather than BBB

  6. Planning Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Richard B., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Nine articles give information to help make professionals in health, physical education, recreation, dance, and athletics more knowledgeable about planning facilities. Design of natatoriums, physical fitness laboratories, fitness trails, gymnasium lighting, homemade play equipment, indoor soccer arenas, and dance floors is considered. A…

  7. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

  8. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the DOE program at The University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine is the development of effective molecular medicine for use in neutron-capture therapy (NCT). The research focuses primarily on the preparation of new boron-rich NCT agents and the technology to detect them in-vivo. The detection technology involves the development of effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for verifying and measuring NCT agents in-vivo. The synthetic program is directed toward the design of novel boron NCT (BNCT) agents which are targeted to the cell nucleus and gadolinium liposomes targeted to the liver. The UT-DOE program is unique in that it has access to both state-of-the-art whole-body and microscopy MRI instruments.

  9. Characteristics of BDE dependent on 10B concentration for accelerator-based BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be direct neutrons.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Kobayashi, T; Bengua, G; Nakagawa, Y; Endo, S; Hoshi, M

    2004-11-01

    The characteristics boron-dose enhancer (BDE) was evaluated as to the dependence on the (10)B concentration for BNCT using near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be direct neutrons. The treatable protocol depth (TPD) was utilized as an evaluation index. MCNP-4B calculations were performed for near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be at a proton energy of 1.900MeV and for a polyethylene BDE. Consequently, the TPD was increased by increasing T/N ratio, i.e., the ratio of the (10)B concentration in the tumor ((10)B(Tumor)) to that in the normal tissue ((10)B(Normal)), and by increasing (10)B(Tumor) and (10)B(Normal) for constant T/N ratio. It has been found that the BDE becomes unnecessary from the viewpoint of increasing the TPD, when (10)B(Tumor) is over a certain level. PMID:15308161

  10. Water-soluble carboranyl-phthalocyanines for BNCT. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro tests of the Zn(II)-nido-carboranyl-hexylthiophthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Pietrangeli, Daniela; Rosa, Angela; Pepe, Antonietta; Altieri, Saverio; Bortolussi, Silva; Postuma, Ian; Protti, Nicoletta; Ferrari, Cinzia; Cansolino, Laura; Clerici, Anna Maria; Viola, Elisa; Donzello, Maria Pia; Ricciardi, Giampaolo

    2015-06-28

    The zinc(II) complex of the octa-anionic 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis-(7-methyl-7,8-dicarba-nido-undeca-boran-8-yl)hexyl-thio-6,13,20,27-phthalocyanine (nido-[ZnMCHESPc]Cs8, 7) has been obtained in the form of caesium salt through mild deboronation of the neutral precursor, the closo-[ZnMCHESPc] complex, 6, with CsF. 6 has been synthesized, in turn, by heating a finely ground mixture of the appropriate phthalonitrile and zinc(II) acetate at 180.0 °C. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy, and their structures were assessed by (1)H, (13)C, (11)B, and two-dimensional homo- and hetero-correlated NMR spectroscopy experiments. 7 showed appreciable solubility in water solution, together with a marked tendency to aggregate. Aggregation of 7 in the hydrotropic medium resulted in significant fluorescence quenching. Instead, fluorescence quantum yields (Φ(F)) of 0.14 and 0.08, and singlet oxygen quantum yields (Φ(Δ)) of 0.63 and 0.24 were obtained for 6 and 7, respectively, in a DMF solution. In vitro boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experiments, employing boron imaging techniques as implemented in qualitative and quantitative neutron autoradiography methods, showed that 7 is capable of increasing the boron concentration of two selected cancerous cell lines, the DHD/K12/TRb of rat colon adenocarcinoma and UMR-106 of rat osteosarcoma, with the large-size Cs(+) counter-ions used to neutralize the negatively charged carborane polyhedra not presenting a significant obstacle to the process. Taken together, BNCT and photophysical measurement results indicated that 7 is potentially suitable for bimodal or multimodal anticancer therapy. PMID:25995094

  11. Gamma residual radioactivity measurements on rats and mice irradiated in the thermal column of a TRIGA Mark II reactor for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Protti, Nicoletta; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Alloni, Daniele; Ballarini, Francesca; di Tigliole, Andrea Borio; Bortolussi, Silva; Bruschi, Piero; Cagnazzo, Marcella; Garioni, Maria; Postuma, Ian; Reversi, Luca; Salvini, Andrea; Altieri, Saverio

    2014-12-01

    The current Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experiments performed at the University of Pavia, Italy, are focusing on the in vivo irradiations of small animals (rats and mice) in order to evaluate the effectiveness of BNCT in the treatment of diffused lung tumors. After the irradiation, the animals are manipulated, which requires an evaluation of the residual radioactivity induced by neutron activation and the relative radiological risk assessment to guarantee the radiation protection of the workers. The induced activity in the irradiated animals was measured by high-resolution open geometry gamma spectroscopy and compared with values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. After an irradiation time of 15 min in a position where the in-air thermal flux is about 1.2 × 10(10) cm(-2) s(-1), the specific activity induced in the body of the animal is mainly due to 24Na, 38Cl, 42K, 56Mn, 27Mg and 49Ca; it is approximately 540 Bq g(-1) in the rat and around 2,050 Bq g(-1) in the mouse. During the irradiation, the animal body (except the lung region) is housed in a 95% enriched 6Li shield; the primary radioisotopes produced inside the shield by the neutron irradiation are 3H by the 6Li capture reaction and 18F by the reaction sequence 6Li(n,α)3H → 16O(t,n)18F. The specific activities of these products are 3.3 kBq g(-1) and 880 Bq g(-1), respectively. PMID:25353239

  12. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  13. Final report for the 1996 DOE grant supporting research at the SLAC/LBNL/LLNL B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.; Wright, D.

    1997-08-08

    This final report discusses Department of Energy-supported research funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which was performed as part of a collaboration between LLNL and Prairie View A and M University to develop part of the BaBar detector at the SLAC B Factory. This work focuses on the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) subsystem of BaBar and involves a full range of detector development activities: computer simulations of detector performance, creation of reconstruction algorithms, and detector hardware R and D. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a leading role in the IFR subsystem and has established on-site computing and detector facilities to conduct this research. By establishing ties with the existing LLNL Research Collaboration Program and leveraging LLNL resources, the experienced Prairie View group was able to quickly achieve a more prominent role within the BaBar collaboration and make significant contributions to the detector design. In addition, this work provided the first entry point for Historically Black Colleges and Universities into the B Factory collaboration, and created an opportunity to train a new generation of minority students at the premier electron-positron high energy physics facility in the US.

  14. A state-of-the-art epithermal neutron irradiation facility for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K

    2004-08-21

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the first fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam (FCB) has proven suitable for use in clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The modern facility provides a high intensity beam together with low levels of contamination that is ideally suited for use with future, more selective boron delivery agents. Prescriptions for normal tissue tolerance doses consist of 2 or 3 fields lasting less than 10 min each with the currently available beam intensity, that are administered with an automated beam monitoring and control system to help ensure safety of the patient and staff alike. A quality assurance program ensures proper functioning of all instrumentation and safety interlocks as well as constancy of beam output relative to routine calibrations. Beam line shutters and the medical room walls provide sufficient shielding to enable access and use of the facility without affecting other experiments or normal operation of the multipurpose research reactor at MIT. Medical expertise and a large population in the greater Boston area are situated conveniently close to the university, which operates the research reactor 24 h a day for approximately 300 days per year. The operational characteristics of the facility closely match those established for conventional radiotherapy, which together with a near optimum beam performance ensure that the FCB is capable of determining whether the radiobiological promise of NCT can be realized in routine practice. PMID:15446801

  15. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  16. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations. PMID:23041781

  17. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT. Final progress report, August 1, 1989--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1993-08-01

    Carboranes contain ten boron atoms in a three-dimensional space equivalent to a benzene ring; consequently, the carborane isomers can be utilized to prepare a variety of boron-rich agents for potential use in boron-neutron capture therapy. We developed synthetic methodology suitable for use with carboranes preparing amino acids and other physio-logically active compounds of potential use in BNCT. The methodology involves the conversion of simple carboranes into more complex, reactive organometallic reagents which can then be utilized to prepare agents which will target the nuclei of tumor cells. Specific examples include the projected syntheses of boron analogs of known intercolators such as Diazaquone (AZQ) which have been proven effectiveness in chemotherapy. We have also synthesized and carried out biodistribution studies of gadolinium labeled liposomes (GLL) which were developed in our laboratory. Gadolinium like boron-10, has an excellent neutron cross section and is considered to be of potential use in neutron capture therapy. GLL are constructed by adding gadolinium based amphiphiles.

  18. The radioactive ion beams facility project for the legnaro laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecchio, Luigi B.

    1999-04-01

    In the frame work of the Italian participation to the project of a high intensity proton facility for the energy amplifier and nuclear waste transmutations, LNL is involving in the design and construction of prototypes of the injection system of the 1 GeV linac that consists of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) followed by a 100 MeV linac. This program has been already financially supported and the work is actually in progress. In this context, the LNL has been proposed a project for the construction of a second generation facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by using the ISOL method. The final goal consists in the production of neutron rich RIBs with masses ranging from 80 to 160 by using primary beams of protons, deuterons and light ions with energy of 100 MeV and 100 kW power. This project is proposed to be developed in about 10 years from now and intermediate milestones and experiments are foreseen and under consideration for the next INFN five year plan (1999-2003). In such period of time is proposed the construction of a proton/deuteron accelerator of 10 MeV energy and 10 mA current, consisting of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) and a linac (10 MeV, 10 mA), and of a neutron area dedicated to the RIBs production, to the BNCT applications and to the neutron physics. Some remarks on the production methods will be presented. The possibility of producing radioisotopes by means of the fission induced by neutrons will be investigated and the methods of production of neutrons will be discussed.

  19. R2 REGULATED FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Facility Registry System (FRS) is a centrally managed database that identifies facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. FRS creates high-quality, accurate, and authoritative facility identification records through rigorous...

  20. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, S.; Ahmad, T.; Barth, R. F.; Kabalka, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 (10B) atoms to individual tumor cells. Cell killing results from the 10B (n, α)7Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of 10B atoms are localized in the tumor cells. Intranuclear 10B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of 10B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumor cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as PET and MRI. In this study, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high grade gliomas, recurrent tumors of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumor cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This suggests that it might be advantageous if patients were placed on a

  1. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  2. A new approach to dose estimation and in-phantom figure of merit measurement in BNCT by using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ahangari, R; Afarideh, H

    2011-12-01

    In-phantom figures of merit of the radiobiological dose distribution are the main criteria for evaluation of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) plan and neutron beam evaluation. Since in BNCT there are several reactions, which contribute to the total dose of the tissue, the calculation of the dose distribution is complicated and requires lengthy and time-consuming simulations. Any changes in the beam shaping assembly (BSA) design would lead to the change of the neutron/gamma spectrum at exit of therapeutic window. As a result of any changes in the beam spectrum, the dose distribution in the tissue will be altered; therefore, another set of lengthy and time-consuming simulations to recalculate the dose distribution would have to be performed. This study proposes a method that applies artificial neural network (ANN) for quick dose prediction in order to avoid lengthy calculations. This method allows us to estimate the depth-dose distribution and in-phantom figures of merit for any energy spectrum without performing a complete Monte Carlo code (MCNP) simulation. To train the ANNs for modeling the depth-dose distribution, this study used a database containing 500 simulations of the neutron depth-dose distribution and 280 simulations of the gamma depth-dose distribution. The calculations were carried out by the MCNP for various mono-energetic neutrons, ranging from thermal up to 10 MeV energy and 280 gamma energy group, ranging from 0.01 MeV up to 20 MeV, through the SNYDER head phantom which is located at the exit of the BSA. The trained ANN was capable of establishing a map between the neutron/gamma beam energy and the dose distribution in the phantom as an input and a response, respectively. The current method is founded upon the observation that the dose which is released by the beam of composite energy spectrum can be decomposing into the various energy components which make the neutron/gamma spectrum. Therefore, in this procedure the neutron/gamma energy

  3. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  4. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  5. Near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons on the practical conditions using thick Li-target and Gaussian proton energies for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kenichi; Bengua, Gerard; Nakao, Noriaki; Kosako, Kazuaki

    2014-06-01

    The near threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons generated by incident proton energy having Gaussian distribution with mean energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV, were studied as a practical neutron source for BNCT wherein an RFQ accelerator and a thick Li-target are used. Gaussian energy distributions with the standard deviation of 0, 10, 20 and 40keV for mean proton energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV were surveyed in 0.01MeV increments. A thick liquid Li-target whose dimensions were established in our previous experiments (i.e., 1mm-thick with 50mm width and 50mm length) was considered in this study. The suitable incident proton energy and physical dimensions of Pb layer which serves as a gamma absorber and a Polyethylene layer which is used as a BDE were surveyed by means of the concepts of TPD. Dose distribution were calculated by using MCNP5. A proton beam with mean energy of 1.92MeV and a Gaussian energy distribution with a standard deviation of 20keV at a current of 10mA was selected from the viewpoint of irradiation time and practically achievable proton current. The suitable thicknesses of Pb gamma absorber was estimated to be about 3cm. The estimated thickness of the polyethylene BDE was about 24mm for an ideal proton current of 13mA, and was 18mm for a practical proton current of 10mA. PMID:24491682

  6. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  7. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  8. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  9. New irradiation facility for biomedical applications at the RA-3 reactor thermal column.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Quintana, J; Ojeda, J; Langan, S; Thorp, S; Pozzi, E; Sztejnberg, M; Estryk, G; Nosal, R; Saire, E; Agrazar, H; Graiño, F

    2009-07-01

    A new irradiation facility has been developed in the RA-3 reactor in order to perform trials for the treatment of liver metastases using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). RA-3 is a production research reactor that works continuously five days a week. It had a thermal column with a small cross section access tunnel that was not accessible during operation. The objective of the work was to perform the necessary modifications to obtain a facility for irradiating a portion of the human liver. This irradiation facility must be operated without disrupting the normal reactor schedule and requires a highly thermalized neutron spectrum, a thermal flux of around 10(10) n cm(-2)s(-1) that is as isotropic and uniform as possible, as well as on-line instrumentation. The main modifications consist of enlarging the access tunnel inside the thermal column to the suitable dimensions, reducing the gamma dose rate at the irradiation position, and constructing properly shielded entrance gates enabled by logical control to safely irradiate and withdraw samples with the reactor at full power. Activation foils and a neutron shielded graphite ionization chamber were used for a preliminary in-air characterization of the irradiation site. The constructed facility is very practical and easy to use. Operational authorization was obtained from radioprotection personnel after confirming radiation levels did not significantly increase after the modification. A highly thermalized and homogenous irradiation field was obtained. Measurements in the empty cavity showed a thermal flux near 10(10) n cm(-2)s(-1), a cadmium ratio of 4100 for gold foils and a gamma dose rate of approximately 5 Gy h(-1). PMID:19406651

  10. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  11. HAWAII NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  12. SAMOA NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  13. GUAM NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  14. ARIZONA NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  15. NEVADA NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  16. CALIFORNIA NPDES MAJOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage representing locations of NPDES facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from wastewater treatment facilities that discharge into waters of the US. Wastewater treatment facilitie...

  17. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  18. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  19. The Educational Facilities Charrette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, William W.

    1970-01-01

    The deputy director for the Division of Facilities Development of the U.S. Office of Education discusses a technique for studying and resolving educational facilities development problems within the context of total community planning needs." (Author/AA)

  20. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and