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Sample records for ldrd project final

  1. THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

  2. Final report for LDRD project learning efficient hypermedia navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang; Laguna, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the work performed under the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}Learning Efficient Hypermedia Navigation.{close_quotes} The bulk of the work is contained in the software developed for the WWW and a copy of the software demonstrating its use has been submitted to the LDRD office.

  3. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  4. Final report on LDRD project "proliferation-resistant fuel cycles"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N W; Hassberger, J A

    1999-02-25

    This report provides a summary of LDRD work completed during 1997 and 1998 to develop the ideas and concepts that lead to the Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) program proposals to the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI). The STAR program consists of a team of three national laboratories (LLNL, ANL, and LANL), three universities, (UC Berkeley, TAMU, and MIT) and the Westinghouse Research Center. Based on the LLNL work and their own efforts on related work this team prepared and integrated a package of twelve proposals that will carry the LDRD work outlined here into the next phase of development. We are proposing to develop a new nuclear system that meets stringent requirements for a high degree of safety and proliferation resistance, and also deals directly with the related nuclear waste and spent fuel management issues.

  5. Tiger LDRD final report

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    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  6. FY2003 LDRD Final Annual Report Article: Pathogen Pathway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2003-11-10

    Understanding virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens is vital to anticipating biological threats and to improving detectors, vaccines, and treatments. This project will characterize factors responsible for virulence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague and a biothreat agent, which has an inducible Type III secretion virulence mechanism also found in other animal, plant, and human pathogens. Our approach relies on genomic and proteomic characterization of Y. pestis in addition to a bioinformatic infrastructure. Scientific and technical capabilities developed in this project can be applied to other microbes of interest. This work will establish a significant new direction for biodefense at LLNL and expand our national and international scientific collaborations.

  7. Fabrications of PVDF gratings :final report for LDRD project 79884.

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. A. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Carr, Dustin Wade; Bogart, Gregory R.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to do some preliminary studies and process development on electroactive polymers to be used for tunable optical elements and MEMS actuators. Working in collaboration between Sandia National Labs and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, we have successfully developed a process for applying thin films of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) onto glass substrates and patterning these using a novel stamping technique. We observed actuation in these structures in static and dynamic measurements. Further work is needed to characterize the impact that this approach could have on the field of tunable optical devices for sensing and communication.

  8. FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Radiation Biodosimetry LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-ERD-076

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; A.Coleman, M; Lehmann, J; Manohar, C F; Marchetti, F; Mariella, R; Miles, R; Nelson, D O; Wyrobek, A J

    2006-02-03

    been, these methods are not suitable. The best current option for triage radiation biodosimetry is self-report of time to onset of emesis after the event, a biomarker that is subject to many false positives. The premise of this project is that greatly improved radiation dosimetry can be achieved by research and development directed toward detection of molecular changes induced by radiation in cells or other biological materials. Basic research on the responses of cells to radiation at the molecular level, particularly of message RNA and proteins, has identified biomolecules whose levels increase (or decrease) as part of cellular responses to radiation. Concerted efforts to identify markers useful for triage and clinical applications have not been reported as yet. Such studies would scan responses over a broad range of doses, below, at and above the threshold of clinical significance in the first weeks after exposure, and would collect global proteome and/or transcriptome information on all tissue samples accessible to either first responders or clinicians. For triage, the goal is to identify those needing medical treatment. Treatment will be guided by refined dosimetry. Achieving this goal entails determining whether radiation exposure was below or above the threshold of concern, using one sample collected within days of an event, with simple devices that first responders either use or distribute for self-testing. For the clinic, better resolution of dose and tissue damage is needed to determine the nature and time sensitivity of therapy, but multiple sampling times may be acceptable and clinical staff and equipment can be utilized. Two complementary areas of research and development are needed once candidate biomarkers are identified, validation of the biomarker responses and validation of devices/instrumentation for detection of responses. Validation of biomarkers per se is confirmation that the dose, time, and tissue specific responses meet the reporting

  9. Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

    2005-11-01

    LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

  10. Final LDRD Report for Projects %23 52797 and %23 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects %23 52797 and %23 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  11. A configuration space toolkit for automated spatial reasoning: Technical results and LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    A robot`s configuration space (c-space) is the space of its kinematic degrees of freedom, e.g., the joint-space of an arm. Sets in c-space can be defined that characterize a variety of spatial relationships, such as contact between the robot and its environment. C-space techniques have been fundamental to research progress in areas such as motion planning and physically-based reasoning. However, practical progress has been slowed by the difficulty of implementing the c-space abstraction inside each application. For this reason, we proposed a Configuration Space Toolkit of high-performance algorithms and data structures meeting these needs. Our intent was to develop this robotics software to provide enabling technology to emerging applications that apply the c-space abstraction, such as advanced motion planning, teleoperation supervision, mechanism functional analysis, and design tools. This final report presents the research results and technical achievements of this LDRD project. Key results and achievements included (1) a hybrid Common LISP/C prototype that implements the basic C-Space abstraction, (2) a new, generic, algorithm for constructing hierarchical geometric representations, and (3) a C++ implementation of an algorithm for fast distance computation, interference detection, and c-space point-classification. Since the project conclusion, motion planning researchers in Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center have been using the CSTk libcstk.so C++ library. The code continues to be used, supported, and improved by projects in the ISRC.

  12. Final report on LDRD Project: The double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Moon, J.S.; Blount, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ``Double Electron Layer Tunneling Transistor.`` The main goal of this project was to investigate whether the recently discovered phenomenon of 2D-2D tunneling in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells (DQWs), investigated in a previous LDRD, could be harnessed and implemented as the operating principle for a new type of tunneling device the authors proposed, the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT). In parallel with this main thrust of the project, they also continued a modest basic research effort on DQW physics issues, with significant theoretical support. The project was a considerable success, with the main goal of demonstrating a working prototype of the DELTT having been achieved. Additional DELTT advances included demonstrating good electrical characteristics at 77 K, demonstrating both NMOS and CMOS-like bi-stable memories at 77 K using the DELTT, demonstrating digital logic gates at 77 K, and demonstrating voltage-controlled oscillators at 77 K. In order to successfully fabricate the DELTT, the authors had to develop a novel flip-chip processing scheme, the epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) technique. This technique was latter improved so as to be amenable to electron-beam lithography, allowing the fabrication of DELTTs with sub-micron features, which are expected to be extremely high speed. In the basic physics area they also made several advances, including a measurement of the effective mass of electrons in the hour-glass orbit of a DQW subject to in-plane magnetic fields, and both measurements and theoretical calculations of the full Landau level spectra of DQWs in both perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields. This last result included the unambiguous demonstration of magnetic breakdown of the Fermi surface. Finally, they also investigated the concept of a far-infrared photodetector based on photon assisted tunneling in a DQW. Absorption calculations showed a

  13. Overview of Stellarator Divertor Studies: Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-069

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    Fenstermacher, M E; Rognlien, T D; Koniges, A; Unmansky, M; Hill, D N

    2003-01-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 01-ERD-069 entitled Stellarator Divertor Studies. This project has contributed to the development of a three-dimensional edge-plasma modeling and divertor diagnostic design capabilities at LLNL. Results are demonstrated by sample calculations and diagnostic possibilities for the edge plasma of the proposed U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment device. Details of the work are contained in accompanying LLNL reports that have been accepted for publication.

  14. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  15. Final report of LDRD project: Electromagnetic impulse radar for detection of underground structures

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.; Aurand, J.; Buttram, M.; Zutavern, F.; Brown, D.; Helgeson, W.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the LDRD project titled: Electromagnetic impulse radar for the detection of underground structures. The project met all its milestones even with a tight two year schedule and total funding of $400 k. The goal of the LDRD was to develop and demonstrate a ground penetrating radar (GPR) that is based on high peak power, high repetition rate, and low center frequency impulses. The idea of this LDRD is that a high peak power, high average power radar based on the transmission of short impulses can be utilized effect can be utilized for ground penetrating radar. This direct time-domain system the authors are building seeks to increase penetration depth over conventional systems by using: (1) high peak power, high repetition rate operation that gives high average power, (2) low center frequencies that better penetrate the ground, and (3) short duration impulses that allow for the use of downward looking, low flying platforms that increase the power on target relative to a high flying platform. Specifically, chirped pulses that are a microsecond in duration require (because it is difficult to receive during transmit) platforms above 150 m (and typically 1 km) while this system, theoretically could be at 10 m above the ground. The power on target decays with distance squared so the ability to use low flying platforms is crucial to high penetration. Clutter is minimized by time gating the surface clutter return. Short impulses also allow gating (out) the coupling of the transmit and receive antennas.

  16. Final report on LDRD project :leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas; Ongstand, Andrea; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Montano, Victoria A.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''Leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits''. Leaky-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer new possibilities for integration of microcavity lasers to create optical microsystems. A leaky-mode VCSEL output-couples light laterally, in the plane of the semiconductor wafer, which allows the light to interact with adjacent lasers, modulators, and detectors on the same wafer. The fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs based on effective index modification was proposed and demonstrated at Sandia in 1999 but was not adequately developed for use in applications. The aim of this LDRD has been to advance the design and fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs to the point where initial applications can be attempted. In the first and second years of this LDRD we concentrated on overcoming previous difficulties in the epitaxial growth and fabrication of these advanced VCSELs. In the third year, we focused on applications of leaky-mode VCSELs, such as all-optical processing circuits based on gain quenching.

  17. Final Report on LDRD Project: High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SERKLAND, DARWIN K.; GEIB, KENT M.; BLANSETT, ETHAN L.; KARPEN, GARY D.; PEAKE, GREGORY M.; HARGETT, TERRY; MONTANO, VICTORIA; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; ALLERMAN, ANDREW A.; RIENSTRA, JEFFREY L.

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications.'' The goal of this LDRD has been to address the future needs of focal-plane-array (FPA) sensors by exploring the use of high-bandwidth fiber-optic interconnects to transmit FPA signals within a satellite. We have focused primarily on vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) based transmitters, due to the previously demonstrated immunity of VCSELs to total radiation doses up to 1 Mrad. In addition, VCSELs offer high modulation bandwidth (roughly 10 GHz), low power consumption (roughly 5 mW), and high coupling efficiency (greater than -3dB) to optical fibers. In the first year of this LDRD, we concentrated on the task of transmitting analog signals from a cryogenic FPA to a remote analog-to-digital converter. In the second year, we considered the transmission of digital signals produced by the analog-to-digital converter to a remote computer on the satellite. Specifically, we considered the situation in which the FPA, analog-to-digital converter, and VCSEL-based transmitter were all cooled to cryogenic temperatures. This situation requires VCSELs that operate at cryogenic temperature, dissipate minimal heat, and meet the electrical drive requirements in terms of voltage, current, and bandwidth.

  18. Final report on LDRD project: Simulation/optimization tools for system variability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Bierbaum; R. F. Billau; J. E. Campbell; K. D. Marx; R. J. Sikorski; B. M. Thompson; S. D. Wix

    1999-10-01

    >This work was conducted during FY98 (Proposal Number 98-0036) and FY99 (Proposal Number 99-0818) under the auspices of the Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Electrical simulation typically treats a single data point in the very large input space of component properties. For electrical simulation to reach its full potential as a design tool, it must be able to address the unavoidable variability and uncertainty in component properties. Component viability is strongly related to the design margin (and reliability) of the end product. During the course of this project, both tools and methodologies were developed to enable analysis of variability in the context of electrical simulation tools. Two avenues to link relevant tools were also developed, and the resultant toolset was applied to a major component.

  19. LDRD Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Price, D.; Shepherd, R.; White, W.; Walling, R.; More, R.

    1995-03-16

    The goal of this project is to develop a 100-fs pulse length laser capable of heating solid density plasmas to near-kilovolt temperatures before hydrodynamic decompression of the target can take place, and to experimentally determine the properties of these plasmas with it. The authors have successfully developed the laser for this work and measured plasma production and laser absorption with it. This work has demonstrated the capacity to produce solid-density plasmas. Future experiments are described.

  20. Final LDRD report :

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Ermanoski, Ivan; Hogan, Roy E.,; McDaniel, Anthony H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid progress, solar thermochemistry remains high risk; improvements in both active materials and reactor systems are needed. This claim is supported by studies conducted both prior to and as part of this project. Materials offer a particular large opportunity space as, until recently, very little effort apart from basic thermodynamic analysis was extended towards understanding this most fundamental component of a metal oxide thermochemical cycle. Without this knowledge, system design was hampered, but more importantly, advances in these crucial materials were rare and resulted more from intuition rather than detailed insight. As a result, only two basic families of potentially viable solid materials have been widely considered, each of which has significant challenges. Recent efforts towards applying an increased level of scientific rigor to the study of thermochemical materials have provided a much needed framework and insights toward developing the next generation of highly improved thermochemically active materials. The primary goal of this project was to apply this hard-won knowledge to rapidly advance the field of thermochemistry to produce a material within 2 years that is capable of yielding CO from CO2 at a 12.5 % reactor efficiency. Three principal approaches spanning a range of risk and potential rewards were pursued: modification of known materials, structuring known materials, and identifying/developing new materials for the application. A newly developed best-of-class material produces more fuel (9x more H2, 6x more CO) under milder conditions than the previous state of the art. Analyses of thermochemical reactor and system efficiencies and economics were performed and a new hybrid concept was reported. The larger case for solar fuels was also further refined and documented.

  1. Final Report for LDRD Project on Rapid Problem Setup for Mesh-Based Simulation (Rapsodi)

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    Brown, D L; Henshaw, W; Petersson, N A; Fast, P; Chand, K

    2003-02-07

    Under LLNL Exploratory Research LDRD funding, the Rapsodi project developed rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that require computational representations of complex geometry. Many simulation projects at LLNL involve the solution of partial differential equations in complex 3-D geometries. A significant bottleneck in carrying out these simulations arises in converting some specification of a geometry, such as a computer-aided design (CAD) drawing to a computationally appropriate 3-D mesh that can be used for simulation and analysis. Even using state-of-the-art mesh generation software, this problem setup step typically has required weeks or months, which is often much longer than required to carry out the computational simulation itself. The Rapsodi project built computational tools and designed algorithms that help to significantly reduce this setup time to less than a day for many realistic problems. The project targeted rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that use mixed-element unstructured meshes, overset meshes or Cartesian-embedded boundary (EB) meshes to represent complex geometry. It also built tools that aid in constructing computational representations of geometry for problems that do not require a mesh. While completely automatic mesh generation is extremely difficult, the amount of manual labor required can be significantly reduced. By developing novel, automated, component-based mesh construction procedures and automated CAD geometry repair and cleanup tools, Rapsodi has significantly reduced the amount of hand crafting required to generate geometry and meshes for scientific simulation codes.

  2. RF/microwave properties of nanotubes and nanowires : LDRD Project 105876 final report.

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    Scrymgeour, David; Lee, Mark; Hsu, Julia W. P.; Highstrete, Clark

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 105876 was a research project whose primary goal was to discover the currently unknown science underlying the basic linear and nonlinear electrodynamic response of nanotubes and nanowires in a manner that will support future efforts aimed at converting forefront nanoscience into innovative new high-frequency nanodevices. The project involved experimental and theoretical efforts to discover and understand high frequency (MHz through tens of GHz) electrodynamic response properties of nanomaterials, emphasizing nanowires of silicon, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes. While there is much research on DC electrical properties of nanowires, electrodynamic characteristics still represent a major new frontier in nanotechnology. We generated world-leading insight into how the low dimensionality of these nanomaterials yields sometimes desirable and sometimes problematic high-frequency properties that are outside standard model electron dynamics. In the cases of silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes, evidence of strong disorder or glass-like charge dynamics was measured, indicating that these materials still suffer from serious inhomogeneities that limit there high frequency performance. Zinc oxide nanowires were found to obey conventional Drude dynamics. In all cases, a significant practical problem involving large impedance mismatch between the high intrinsic impedance of all nanowires and nanotubes and high-frequency test equipment had to be overcome.

  3. Millimeter- and submillimeter-wave nanoscience : LDRD project 122359 final report.

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    Lee, Mark

    2008-09-01

    LDRD Project 122359 was a nine-month, late-start effort that pursued initial experiments studying the fundamental electrodynamic response properties of various nanomaterials from millimeter-wave (above roughly 30 GHz) up to submillimeter-wave (above roughly 0.1 THz) frequencies. The nine months of this project's duration produced two main empirical findings. First, Fourier transform reflectance spectroscopy on SrTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals from 0.2 to 10 THz frequency showed signatures of two optical phonons that correspond to known optical modes in bulk crystal SrTiO{sub 3}. However, quantitative differences between the nanoparticle and bulk spectra suggest that one or both of these phonons may shift frequency and weaken in nanoparticles relative to bulk crystal. Second, heavily doped n-type GaAs nanowires were synthesized for the purpose of creating high frequency diodes to study non-linear frequency conversion properties of compound semiconductor nanowires. It was found that incorporation of a heavy concentration of dopants interferes with the growth of these nanowires. While DC measurements showed reasonable diode-like current-voltage properties, the current state-of-the-art material properties of these nanowires are still unsuitable for millimeter-wave testing and applications.

  4. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E. Eric; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  5. LDRD project final report : hybrid AI/cognitive tactical behavior framework for LVC.

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    Djordjevich, Donna D.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Brannon, Nathan Gregory; Hart, Brian E.; Hart, Derek H.; Little, Charles Quentin; Oppel, Fred John III; Linebarger, John Michael; Parker, Eric Paul

    2012-01-01

    This Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) sought to develop technology that enhances scenario construction speed, entity behavior robustness, and scalability in Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) simulation. We investigated issues in both simulation architecture and behavior modeling. We developed path-planning technology that improves the ability to express intent in the planning task while still permitting an efficient search algorithm. An LVC simulation demonstrated how this enables 'one-click' layout of squad tactical paths, as well as dynamic re-planning for simulated squads and for real and simulated mobile robots. We identified human response latencies that can be exploited in parallel/distributed architectures. We did an experimental study to determine where parallelization would be productive in Umbra-based force-on-force (FOF) simulations. We developed and implemented a data-driven simulation composition approach that solves entity class hierarchy issues and supports assurance of simulation fairness. Finally, we proposed a flexible framework to enable integration of multiple behavior modeling components that model working memory phenomena with different degrees of sophistication.

  6. LDRD LW Project Final Report:Resolving the Earthquake Source Scaling Problem

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    Mayeda, K; Felker, S; Gok, R; O'Boyle, J; Walter, W R; Ruppert, S

    2004-02-10

    The scaling behavior of basic earthquake source parameters such as the energy release per unit area of fault slip, quantitatively measured as the apparent stress, is currently in dispute. There are compelling studies that show apparent stress is constant over a wide range of moments (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001, Ide et al. 2003). Other equally compelling studies find the apparent stress increases with moment (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993; Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001; Richardson and Jordan, 2002). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for attenuation, radiation inhomogeneities, bandwidth and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. As one part of our LDRD project we convened a one-day workshop on July 24, 2003 in Livermore to review the current state of knowledge on this topic and discuss possible methods of resolution with many of the world's foremost experts.

  7. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-FS-009 Gigapixel Surveillance Camera

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    Marrs, R E; Bennett, C L

    2010-04-20

    The threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction add urgency to the development of new techniques for surveillance and intelligence collection. For example, the United States faces a serious and growing threat from adversaries who locate key facilities underground, hide them within other facilities, or otherwise conceal their location and function. Reconnaissance photographs are one of the most important tools for uncovering the capabilities of adversaries. However, current imaging technology provides only infrequent static images of a large area, or occasional video of a small area. We are attempting to add a new dimension to reconnaissance by introducing a capability for large area video surveillance. This capability would enable tracking of all vehicle movements within a very large area. The goal of our project is the development of a gigapixel video surveillance camera for high altitude aircraft or balloon platforms. From very high altitude platforms (20-40 km altitude) it would be possible to track every moving vehicle within an area of roughly 100 km x 100 km, about the size of the San Francisco Bay region, with a gigapixel camera. Reliable tracking of vehicles requires a ground sampling distance (GSD) of 0.5 to 1 m and a framing rate of approximately two frames per second (fps). For a 100 km x 100 km area the corresponding pixel count is 10 gigapixels for a 1-m GSD and 40 gigapixels for a 0.5-m GSD. This is an order of magnitude beyond the 1 gigapixel camera envisioned in our LDRD proposal. We have determined that an instrument of this capacity is feasible.

  8. Scrape-Off-Layer Flow Studies in Tokamaks: Final Report of LDRD Project 09-ERD-025

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Allen, S L; Ellis, R M; Porter, G D; Nam, S K; Weber, T R; Umansky, M V; Howard, J

    2011-11-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 09-ERD-025 entitled Scrape-Off-Layer Flow Studies in Tokamaks. This project has lead to implementation of the new prototype Fourier Transform Spectrometer edge plasma flow diagnostic on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General Atomics, acquisition of carbon impurity concentration and flow data, and demonstration that the resulting data compare reasonably well with LLNL's edge plasma transport code UEDGE. Details of the work are contained in attached published papers, while the most recent results that are being written-up for publication are summarized in the report. Boundary plasma flows in tokamak fusion devices are key in determining the distribution of fuel and impurity ions, with tritium build-up in the walls an especially critical operational issue. The intrusion of impurity ions to the hot plasma core region can result in serious energy-loss owing to line radiation. However, flow diagnostic capability has been severely limited in fusion-relevant hot edge plasmas where Langmuir-type probes cannot withstand the high heat flux and traditional Doppler spectroscopy has limited resolution and signal strength. Thus, new edge plasma flow diagnostic capabilities need to be developed that can be used in existing and future devices such as ITER. The understanding of such flows requires simulation with 2-dimensional transport codes owing to the geometrical complexity of the edge region in contact with material surfaces and the large number of interaction physical processes including plasma flow along and across the magnetic field, and coupling between impurity and neutral species. The characteristics of edge plasma flows are substantially affected by cross-magnetic-field drifts (ExB/B{sup 2} and BxVB/B{sup 2}), which are known to introduce substantial convergence difficulty for some cases. It is important that these difficulties be overcome so that drifts can be included in transport models, both

  9. Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is

  10. FY08 LDRD Final Report A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media LDRD Project Tracking Code: 05-ERD-079

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, A

    2009-01-29

    The LDRD project 'A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media' developed several improvements to the traditional finite difference technique for seismic wave propagation, including a summation-by-parts discretization which is provably stable for arbitrary heterogeneous materials, an accurate treatment of non-planar topography, local mesh refinement, and stable outflow boundary conditions. This project also implemented these techniques in a parallel open source computer code called WPP, and participated in several seismic modeling efforts to simulate ground motion due to earthquakes in Northern California. This research has been documented in six individual publications which are summarized in this report. Of these publications, four are published refereed journal articles, one is an accepted refereed journal article which has not yet been published, and one is a non-refereed software manual. The report concludes with a discussion of future research directions and exit plan.

  11. Final report on LDRD project : coupling strategies for multi-physics applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Moffat, Harry K.; Carnes, Brian; Hooper, Russell Warren; Pawlowski, Roger P.

    2007-11-01

    Many current and future modeling applications at Sandia including ASC milestones will critically depend on the simultaneous solution of vastly different physical phenomena. Issues due to code coupling are often not addressed, understood, or even recognized. The objectives of the LDRD has been both in theory and in code development. We will show that we have provided a fundamental analysis of coupling, i.e., when strong coupling vs. a successive substitution strategy is needed. We have enabled the implementation of tighter coupling strategies through additions to the NOX and Sierra code suites to make coupling strategies available now. We have leveraged existing functionality to do this. Specifically, we have built into NOX the capability to handle fully coupled simulations from multiple codes, and we have also built into NOX the capability to handle Jacobi Free Newton Krylov simulations that link multiple applications. We show how this capability may be accessed from within the Sierra Framework as well as from outside of Sierra. The critical impact from this LDRD is that we have shown how and have delivered strategies for enabling strong Newton-based coupling while respecting the modularity of existing codes. This will facilitate the use of these codes in a coupled manner to solve multi-physic applications.

  12. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  13. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  14. Neurons to algorithms LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Aimone, James Bradley; Warrender, Christina E.; Trumbo, Derek

    2013-09-01

    Over the last three years the Neurons to Algorithms (N2A) LDRD project teams has built infrastructure to discover computational structures in the brain. This consists of a modeling language, a tool that enables model development and simulation in that language, and initial connections with the Neuroinformatics community, a group working toward similar goals. The approach of N2A is to express large complex systems like the brain as populations of a discrete part types that have specific structural relationships with each other, along with internal and structural dynamics. Such an evolving mathematical system may be able to capture the essence of neural processing, and ultimately of thought itself. This final report is a cover for the actual products of the project: the N2A Language Specification, the N2A Application, and a journal paper summarizing our methods.

  15. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  16. RF/Microwave properties and applications of directly assembled nanotubes and nanowires: LDRD project 102662 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Theresa (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Vallett, Aaron (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Jones, Frank E.; Talin, Albert Alec; Highstrete, Clark

    2006-11-01

    LDRD Project 102662 provided support to pursue experiments aimed at measuring the basic electrodynamic response and possible applications of carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires at radiofrequency to microwave frequencies, approximately 0.01 to 50 GHz. Under this project, a method was developed to integrate these nanomaterials onto high-frequency compatible co-planar waveguides. The complex reflection and transmission coefficients of the nanomaterials was studied as a function of frequency. From these data, the high-frequency loss characteristics of the nanomaterials were deduced. These data are useful to predict frequency dependence and power dissipation characteristics in new rf/microwave devices incorporating new nanomaterials.

  17. Tactical Deployment and Management of Autonomous Agents, LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.

    2007-11-16

    This is the final report for FY07 for this ongoing LDRD. The project involves deriving a behavioral framework, algorithms, and science underlying a complex-adaptive network of cooperating sensors that secures the computational infrastructure of a multi-enterprise cooperative organization.

  18. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  19. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  20. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  1. Characterizing the emissivity of materials under dynamic compression (final report for LDRD project 79877).

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2007-10-01

    Temperature measurements are crucial to equation of state development, but difficult to perform reliably. In the case of infrared pyrometry, a large uncertainty comes from the fact that sample emissivity (the deviation from a blackbody) is unknown. In this project, a method for characterizing the emissivity of shocked materials was developed. By coupling infrared radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source to a gas gun system, broad spectrum emissivity changes were studied to a peak stress of 8 GPa. Emissivity measurements were performed on standard metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Pt) as well as a high emissivity coating developed at Sandia.

  2. Intelligent tools and process development for robotic edge finishing: LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a project undertaken to develop an agile automated, high-precision edge finishing system, for fabricating precision parts. The project involved re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing work-cell. The resulting work-cell may serve as prototype for production systems to be integrated in highly flexible automated production lines. The system removes burrs formed in the machining process and produces precision chamfers. The system uses an expert system to predict the burr size from the machining history. Within the CAD system, tool paths are generated for burr removal and chamfer formation. Then, the optimal grinding process is automatically selected from a database of processes. The tool trajectory and the selected process definition is then downloaded to a robotic control system to execute the operation. The robotic control system implements a hybrid fuzzy logic-classical control scheme to achieve the desired performance goals regardless of tolerance and fixturing errors. This report describes the system architecture and the system`s performance.

  3. Final report for the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) control plane security LDRD project.

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Michalski, John T.; Tarman, Thomas David; Black, Stephen P.; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-09-01

    As rapid Internet growth continues, global communications becomes more dependent on Internet availability for information transfer. Recently, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new protocol, Multiple Protocol Label Switching (MPLS), to provide high-performance data flows within the Internet. MPLS emulates two major aspects of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology. First, each initial IP packet is 'routed' to its destination based on previously known delay and congestion avoidance mechanisms. This allows for effective distribution of network resources and reduces the probability of congestion. Second, after route selection each subsequent packet is assigned a label at each hop, which determines the output port for the packet to reach its final destination. These labels guide the forwarding of each packet at routing nodes more efficiently and with more control than traditional IP forwarding (based on complete address information in each packet) for high-performance data flows. Label assignment is critical in the prompt and accurate delivery of user data. However, the protocols for label distribution were not adequately secured. Thus, if an adversary compromises a node by intercepting and modifying, or more simply injecting false labels into the packet-forwarding engine, the propagation of improperly labeled data flows could create instability in the entire network. In addition, some Virtual Private Network (VPN) solutions take advantage of this 'virtual channel' configuration to eliminate the need for user data encryption to provide privacy. VPN's relying on MPLS require accurate label assignment to maintain user data protection. This research developed a working distributive trust model that demonstrated how to deploy confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation in the global network label switching control plane. Simulation models and laboratory testbed implementations that demonstrated this concept were developed, and results

  4. Climate system modeling on massively parallel systems: LDRD Project 95-ERP-47 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.; Dannevik, W.P.; Chan, B.; Duffy, P.B.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Wehner, M.F.

    1996-12-01

    Global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss are some of the major climate-related issues presently being addressed by climate and environmental scientists. Because unexpected changes in the climate could have significant effect on our economy, it is vitally important to improve the scientific basis for understanding and predicting the earth`s climate. The impracticality of modeling the earth experimentally in the laboratory together with the fact that the model equations are highly nonlinear has created a unique and vital role for computer-based climate experiments. However, today`s computer models, when run at desired spatial and temporal resolution and physical complexity, severely overtax the capabilities of our most powerful computers. Parallel processing offers significant potential for attaining increased performance and making tractable simulations that cannot be performed today. The principal goals of this project have been to develop and demonstrate the capability to perform large-scale climate simulations on high-performance computing systems (using methodology that scales to the systems of tomorrow), and to carry out leading-edge scientific calculations using parallelized models. The demonstration platform for these studies has been the 256-processor Cray-T3D located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our plan was to undertake an ambitious program in optimization, proof-of-principle and scientific study. These goals have been met. We are now regularly using massively parallel processors for scientific study of the ocean and atmosphere, and preliminary parallel coupled ocean/atmosphere calculations are being carried out as well. Furthermore, our work suggests that it should be possible to develop an advanced comprehensive climate system model with performance scalable to the teraflops range. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01

    large (on the order of electron volts) and may have important consequences for various SWNT applications. Finally, the adsorption of NMPs onto single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied experimentally. The nanotubes were sonicated in the presence of the nucleotides at various weight fractions and centrifuged before examining the ultraviolet absorbance of the resulting supernatant. A distinct Langmuir adsorption isotherm was obtained for each nucleotide. All of the nucleotides differ in their saturation value as well as their initial slope, which we attribute to differences both in nucleotide structure and in the binding ability of different types or clusters of tubes. Results from this simple system provide insights toward development of dispersion and separation methods for nanotubes: strongly binding nucleotides are likely to help disperse, whereas weaker ones may provide selectivity that may be beneficial to a separation process.

  6. Final report for LDRD project {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the research performed under the laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}, funded FY94-6. We describe the goals of the research, motivate and list our improvements to the state of the art in multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny (evolutionary tree) construction, but leave technical details to the six publications resulting from this work. At least three algorithms for phylogeny construction or tree consensus have been implemented and used by researchers outside of Sandia.

  7. Final report on LDRD project 105967 : exploring the increase in GaAs photodiode responsivity with increased neutron fluence.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Cich, Michael Joseph; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Fleming, Robert M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Wrobel, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    A previous LDRD studying radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications led to the result that increased neutron irradiation from a fast-burst reactor caused increased responsivity in GaAs photodiodes up to a total fluence of 4.4 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (1 MeV Eq., Si). The silicon photodiodes experienced significant degradation. Scientific literature shows that neutrons can both cause defects as well as potentially remove defects in an annealing-like process in GaAs. Though there has been some modeling that suggests how fabrication and radiation-induced defects can migrate to surfaces and interfaces in GaAs and lead to an ordering effect, it is important to consider how these processes affect the performance of devices, such as the basic GaAs p-i-n photodiode. In this LDRD, we manufactured GaAs photodiodes at the MESA facility, irradiated them with electrons and neutrons at the White Sands Missile Range Linac and Fast Burst Reactor, and performed measurements to show the effect of irradiation on dark current, responsivity and high-speed bandwidth.

  8. Hardness Assurance for Low-Energy Proton-Induced Single-Event Effects: Final report for LDRD Project 173134

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson

    2015-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes three publications that resulted from a two-year LDRD. The three publications address a recently emerging reliability issue: namely, that low-energy protons (LEPs) can cause single-event effects (SEEs) in highly scaled microelectronics. These publications span from low to high technology readiness levels. In the first, novel experiments were used to prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for LEP-induced SEEs. In the second, a simple method was developed to calculate expected on-orbit error rates for LEP effects. This simplification was enabled by creating (and characterizing) an accelerated space-like LEP environment in the laboratory. In the third publication, this new method was applied to many memory circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to study the general importance of LEP effects, in terms of their contribution to the total on-orbit SEE rate.

  9. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  10. FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N; Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Sharpe, R; Jandhyala, V; Champagne, N; Rockway, J D; Pingenot, J

    2007-03-08

    This is the final report for LDRD 01-ERD-005. The Principle Investigator was Robert Sharpe. Collaborators included Niel Madsen, Benjamin Fasenfest, John D. Rockway, of the Defense Sciences Engineering Division (DSED), Vikram Jandhyala and James Pingenot from the University of Washington, and Mark Stowell of the Center for Applications Development and Software Engineering (CADSE). It should be noted that Benjamin Fasenfest and Mark Stowell were partially supported under other funding. The purpose of this LDRD effort was to enhance LLNL's computational electromagnetics capability in the area of broadband radiation and scattering. For radiation and scattering problems our transient EM codes are limited by the approximate Radiation Boundary Conditions (RBC's) used to model the radiation into an infinite space. Improved RBC's were researched, developed, and incorporated into the existing EMSolve finite-element code to provide a 10-100x improvement in the accuracy of the boundary conditions. Section I provides an introduction to the project and the project goals. Section II provides a summary of the project's research and accomplishments as presented in the attached papers.

  11. Final Report: CNC Micromachines LDRD No.10793

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR., BERNHARD; BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; BIEG, LOTHAR F.; ALLEN, JAMES J.

    2003-04-01

    The three-year LDRD ''CNC Micromachines'' was successfully completed at the end of FY02. The project had four major breakthroughs in spatial motion control in MEMS: (1) A unified method for designing scalable planar and spatial on-chip motion control systems was developed. The method relies on the use of parallel kinematic mechanisms (PKMs) that when properly designed provide different types of motion on-chip without the need for post-fabrication assembly, (2) A new type of actuator was developed--the linear stepping track drive (LSTD) that provides open loop linear position control that is scalable in displacement, output force and step size. Several versions of this actuator were designed, fabricated and successfully tested. (3) Different versions of XYZ translation only and PTT motion stages were designed, successfully fabricated and successfully tested demonstrating absolutely that on-chip spatial motion control systems are not only possible, but are a reality. (4) Control algorithms, software and infrastructure based on MATLAB were created and successfully implemented to drive the XYZ and PTT motion platforms in a controlled manner. The control software is capable of reading an M/G code machine tool language file, decode the instructions and correctly calculate and apply position and velocity trajectories to the motion devices linear drive inputs to position the device platform along the trajectory as specified by the input file. A full and detailed account of design methodology, theory and experimental results (failures and successes) is provided.

  12. Hydrodynamics of maneuvering bodies: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ``Hydrodynamics of Maneuvering Bodies`` LDRD project was to develop a Lagrangian, vorticity-based numerical simulation of the fluid dynamics associated with a maneuvering submarine. Three major tasks were completed. First, a vortex model to simulate the wake behind a maneuvering submarine was completed, assuming the flow to be inviscid and of constant density. Several simulations were performed for a dive maneuver, each requiring less than 20 cpu seconds on a workstation. The technical details of the model and the simulations are described in a separate document, but are reviewed herein. Second, a gridless method to simulate diffusion processes was developed that has significant advantages over previous Lagrangian diffusion models. In this model, viscous diffusion of vorticity is represented by moving vortices at a diffusion velocity, and expanding the vortices as specified by the kinematics for a compressible velocity field. This work has also been documented previously, and is only reviewed herein. The third major task completed was the development of a vortex model to describe inviscid internal wave phenomena, and is the focus of this document. Internal wave phenomena in the stratified ocean can affect an evolving wake, and thus must be considered for naval applications. The vortex model for internal wave phenomena includes a new formulation for the generation of vorticity due to fluid density variations, and a vortex adoption algorithm that allows solutions to be carried to much longer times than previous investigations. Since many practical problems require long-time solutions, this new adoption algorithm is a significant step toward making vortex methods applicable to practical problems. Several simulations are described and compared with previous results to validate and show the advantages of the new model. An overview of this project is also included.

  13. Microwave to millimeter-wave electrodynamic response and applications of semiconductor nanostructures: LDRD project 67025 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric Arthur; Lee, Mark; Averitt, R. D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Highstrete, Clark; Taylor, A. J.; Padilla, W. J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, S. James (University of California Santa Barbara)

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  14. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  15. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  16. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  17. Final report on grand challenge LDRD project : a revolution in lighting : building the science and technology base for ultra-efficient solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Robert Guild; Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Thoma, Steven George; Gee, James Martin; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Burdick, Brent A.; Salamone, Angelo, L., Jr.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Elliott, Russell D.; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Abrams, Billie Lynn; Wendt, Joel Robert; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Kurtz, Steven Ross; Cole, Phillip James; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm; Kerley, Thomas M.; Norman, Adam K.; Tallant, David Robert; Woessner, Stephen Matthew; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Moffat, Harry K.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Emerson, John Allen; Kaplar, Robert James; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wright, Alan Francis; Gonzales, Rene Marie; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Garcia, Marie L.; Allen, Mark S.; Southwell, Edwin T.; Bauer, Tom M.; Monson, Mary Ann; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Simmons, Jerry A.; Boyack, Kevin W.; Jones, Eric Daniel; Moran, Michael P.; Pinzon, Marcia J.; Pinson, Ariane O.; Miksovic, Ann E.; Wang, George T.; Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Missert, Nancy A.; Koleske, Daniel David; Rahal, Nabeel M.

    2004-06-01

    This SAND report is the final report on Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD Project 27328, 'A Revolution in Lighting -- Building the Science and Technology Base for Ultra-Efficient Solid-state Lighting.' This project, which for brevity we refer to as the SSL GCLDRD, is considered one of Sandia's most successful GCLDRDs. As a result, this report reviews not only technical highlights, but also the genesis of the idea for Solid-state Lighting (SSL), the initiation of the SSL GCLDRD, and the goals, scope, success metrics, and evolution of the SSL GCLDRD over the course of its life. One way in which the SSL GCLDRD was different from other GCLDRDs was that it coincided with a larger effort by the SSL community - primarily industrial companies investing in SSL, but also universities, trade organizations, and other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories - to support a national initiative in SSL R&D. Sandia was a major player in publicizing the tremendous energy savings potential of SSL, and in helping to develop, unify and support community consensus for such an initiative. Hence, our activities in this area, discussed in Chapter 6, were substantial: white papers; SSL technology workshops and roadmaps; support for the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), DOE and Senator Bingaman's office; extensive public relations and media activities; and a worldwide SSL community website. Many science and technology advances and breakthroughs were also enabled under this GCLDRD, resulting in: 55 publications; 124 presentations; 10 book chapters and reports; 5 U.S. patent applications including 1 already issued; and 14 patent disclosures not yet applied for. Twenty-six invited talks were given, at prestigious venues such as the American Physical Society Meeting, the Materials Research Society Meeting, the AVS International Symposium, and the Electrochemical Society Meeting. This report contains a summary of these science and technology advances and breakthroughs

  18. Final report for LDRD project 11-0029 : high-interest event detection in large-scale multi-modal data sets : proof of concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson

    2011-09-01

    Events of interest to data analysts are sometimes difficult to characterize in detail. Rather, they consist of anomalies, events that are unpredicted, unusual, or otherwise incongruent. The purpose of this LDRD was to test the hypothesis that a biologically-inspired anomaly detection algorithm could be used to detect contextual, multi-modal anomalies. There currently is no other solution to this problem, but the existence of a solution would have a great national security impact. The technical focus of this research was the application of a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) to the problem of anomaly detection. One aspect of BECCA in particular was discovered to be critical to improved anomaly detection capabilities: it's feature creator. During the course of this project the feature creator was developed and tested against multiple data types. Development direction was drawn from psychological and neurophysiological measurements. Major technical achievements include the creation of hierarchical feature sets created from both audio and imagery data.

  19. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchak, Dena

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  20. Self organizing software research : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-01-01

    We have made progress in developing a new statistical mechanics approach to designing self organizing systems that is unique to SNL. The primary application target for this ongoing research has been the development of new kinds of nanoscale components and hardware systems. However, this research also enables an out of the box connection to the field of software development. With appropriate modification, the collective behavior physics ideas for enabling simple hardware components to self organize may also provide design methods for a new class of software modules. Our current physics simulations suggest that populations of these special software components would be able to self assemble into a variety of much larger and more complex software systems. If successful, this would provide a radical (disruptive technology) path to developing complex, high reliability software unlike any known today. This high risk, high payoff opportunity does not fit well into existing SNL funding categories, as it is well outside of the mainstreams of both conventional software development practices and the nanoscience research area that spawned it. This LDRD effort was aimed at developing and extending the capabilities of self organizing/assembling software systems, and to demonstrate the unique capabilities and advantages of this radical new approach for software development.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Annual Report FY 2013 LDRD Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2014-03-01

    The FY 2013 LDRD Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL’s technical capabilities support the current and future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL—it provides a means for the Laboratory to maintain scientific and technical vitality while funding highly innovative, high-risk science and technology research and development (R&D) projects. The program enhances technical capabilities at the Laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities to explore proof-of-principle ideas, advanced studies of innovative concepts, and preliminary technical analyses. Established by Congress in 1991, the LDRD Program proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, national and international awards, and publications.

  2. Risk assessment meta tool LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a risk analysis meta tool--a tool that enables security analysts both to combine and analyze data from multiple other risk assessment tools on demand. Our approach was based on the innovative self-assembling software technology under development by the project team. This technology provides a mechanism for the user to specify his intentions at a very high level (e.g., equations or English-like text), and then the code self-assembles itself, taking care of the implementation details. The first version of the meta tool focused specifically in importing and analyzing data from Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) force-on-force simulation. We discuss the problem, our approach, technical risk, and accomplishments on this project, and outline next steps to be addressed with follow-on funding.

  3. LDRD final report : autotuning for scalable linear algebra.

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Marker, Bryan

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress made as part of a one year lab-directed research and development (LDRD) project to fund the research efforts of Bryan Marker at the University of Texas at Austin. The goal of the project was to develop new techniques for automatically tuning the performance of dense linear algebra kernels. These kernels often represent the majority of computational time in an application. The primary outcome from this work is a demonstration of the value of model driven engineering as an approach to accurately predict and study performance trade-offs for dense linear algebra computations.

  4. Automated visual direction : LDRD 38623 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Mobile manipulator systems used by emergency response operators consist of an articulated robot arm, a remotely driven base, a collection of cameras, and a remote communications link. Typically the system is completely teleoperated, with the operator using live video feedback to monitor and assess the environment, plan task activities, and to conduct the operations via remote control input devices. The capabilities of these systems are limited, and operators rarely attempt sophisticated operations such as retrieving and utilizing tools, deploying sensors, or building up world models. This project has focused on methods to utilize this video information to enable monitored autonomous behaviors for the mobile manipulator system, with the goal of improving the overall effectiveness of the human/robot system. Work includes visual servoing, visual targeting, utilization of embedded video in 3-D models, and improved methods of camera utilization and calibration.

  5. Covert air vehicle 2003 LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Callow, Diane Schafer; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-11-01

    This report describes the technical work carried out under a 2003 Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a covert air vehicle. A mesoscale air vehicle that mimics a bird offers exceptional mobility and the possibility of remaining undetected during flight. Although some such vehicles exist, they are lacking in key areas: unassisted landing and launching, true mimicry of bird flight to remain covert, and a flapping flight time of any real duration. Current mainstream technology does not have the energy or power density necessary to achieve bird like flight for any meaningful length of time; however, Sandia has unique combustion powered linear actuators with the unprecedented high energy and power density needed for bird like flight. The small-scale, high-pressure valves and small-scale ignition to make this work have been developed at Sandia. We will study the feasibility of using this to achieve vehicle takeoff and wing flapping for sustained flight. This type of vehicle has broad applications for reconnaissance and communications networks, and could prove invaluable for military and intelligence operations throughout the world. Initial tests were conducted on scaled versions of the combustion-powered linear actuator. The tests results showed that heat transfer and friction effects dominate the combustion process at 'bird-like' sizes. The problems associated with micro-combustion must be solved before a true bird-like ornithopter can be developed.

  6. Massive graph visualization : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Brian Neil; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2007-10-01

    Graphs are a vital way of organizing data with complex correlations. A good visualization of a graph can fundamentally change human understanding of the data. Consequently, there is a rich body of work on graph visualization. Although there are many techniques that are effective on small to medium sized graphs (tens of thousands of nodes), there is a void in the research for visualizing massive graphs containing millions of nodes. Sandia is one of the few entities in the world that has the means and motivation to handle data on such a massive scale. For example, homeland security generates graphs from prolific media sources such as television, telephone, and the Internet. The purpose of this project is to provide the groundwork for visualizing such massive graphs. The research provides for two major feature gaps: a parallel, interactive visualization framework and scalable algorithms to make the framework usable to a practical application. Both the frameworks and algorithms are designed to run on distributed parallel computers, which are already available at Sandia. Some features are integrated into the ThreatView{trademark} application and future work will integrate further parallel algorithms.

  7. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or

  8. Nanoporous Silica Templated HeteroEpitaxy: Final LDRD Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce; Koleske, Daniel; Rowen, Adam M.; Williams, John Dalton; Fan, Hongyou; Arrington, Christian L.

    2006-11-01

    This one-year out-of-the-box LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, and the UV curable epoxy, SU-8. Use of SU-8 as a growth mask represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist patterns and pilot work on using SU-8 as a DUV negative resist, another significant potential result. While the late start nature of this project pushed some of the initial research goals out of the time table, significant progress was made. 3 Acknowledgements This work was performed in part at the Nanoscience %40 UNM facility, a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant ECS 03-35765). Sandia is multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United Stated Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported under the Sandia LDRD program (Project 99405). 4

  9. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  10. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  11. Advanced polychromator systems for remote chemical sensing (LDRD project 52575).

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Allen, James Joe

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop a programmable diffraction grating fabricated in SUMMiT V{trademark}. Two types of grating elements (vertical and rotational) were designed and demonstrated. The vertical grating element utilized compound leveraged bending and the rotational grating element used vertical comb drive actuation. This work resulted in two technical advances and one patent application. Also a new optical configuration of the Polychromator was demonstrated. The new optical configuration improved the optical efficiency of the system without degrading any other aspect of the system. The new configuration also relaxes some constraint on the programmable diffraction grating.

  12. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  13. Shock compression of liquid helium and helium-hydrogen mixtures : development of a cryogenic capability for shock compression of liquid helium on Z, final report for LDRD Project 141536.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Andrew J.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Shelton, Keegan P.; Hanson, David Lester

    2010-10-01

    This final report on SNL/NM LDRD Project 141536 summarizes progress made toward the development of a cryogenic capability to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples for high accuracy equation-of-state (EOS) measurements on the Z current drive. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations, but it is difficult to condense LHe samples at very low temperatures (<3.5 K) for experimental studies on gas guns, magnetic and explosive compression devices, and lasers. We have developed a conceptual design for a cryogenic LHe sample system to generate quiescent superfluid LHe samples at 1.5-1.8 K. This cryogenic system adapts the basic elements of a continuously operating, self-regulating {sup 4}He evaporation refrigerator to the constraints of shock compression experiments on Z. To minimize heat load, the sample holder is surrounded by a double layer of thermal radiation shields cooled with LHe to 5 K. Delivery of LHe to the pumped-He evaporator bath is controlled by a flow impedance. The LHe sample holder assembly features modular components and simplified fabrication techniques to reduce cost and complexity to levels required of an expendable device. Prototypes have been fabricated, assembled, and instrumented for initial testing.

  14. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  15. LDRD Final Report: Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.

    1999-12-01

    For a wide variety of scientific and engineering problems the desired solution corresponds to an optimal set of objective function parameters, where the objective function measures a solution's quality. The main goal of the LDRD ''Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems'' was the development of new robust and efficient optimization algorithms that can be used to find globally optimal solutions to complex optimization problems. This SAND report summarizes the technical accomplishments of this LDRD, discusses lessons learned and describes open research issues.

  16. Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes - FY-98 Final Report for LDRD 2349

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, Glen Frank; Nelson, Lee Orville; Grandy, Jon Drue; Zuck, Larry Douglas; Kong, Peter Chuen Sun; Anderson, Gail

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of LDRD #2349, Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes, was to develop a set of tools that would allow the user to, based on the chemical composition of a waste stream to be immobilized, predict the durability (leach behavior) of the final waste form and the phase assemblages present in the final waste form. The objectives of the project were: • investigation, testing and selection of thermochemical code • development of auxiliary thermochemical database • synthesis of materials for leach testing • collection of leach data • using leach data for leach model development • thermochemical modeling The progress toward completion of these objectives and a discussion of work that needs to be completed to arrive at a logical finishing point for this project will be presented.

  17. Building more powerful less expensive supercomputers using Processing-In-Memory (PIM) LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Richard C.

    2009-09-01

    This report details the accomplishments of the 'Building More Powerful Less Expensive Supercomputers Using Processing-In-Memory (PIM)' LDRD ('PIM LDRD', number 105809) for FY07-FY09. Latency dominates all levels of supercomputer design. Within a node, increasing memory latency, relative to processor cycle time, limits CPU performance. Between nodes, the same increase in relative latency impacts scalability. Processing-In-Memory (PIM) is an architecture that directly addresses this problem using enhanced chip fabrication technology and machine organization. PIMs combine high-speed logic and dense, low-latency, high-bandwidth DRAM, and lightweight threads that tolerate latency by performing useful work during memory transactions. This work examines the potential of PIM-based architectures to support mission critical Sandia applications and an emerging class of more data intensive informatics applications. This work has resulted in a stronger architecture/implementation collaboration between 1400 and 1700. Additionally, key technology components have impacted vendor roadmaps, and we are in the process of pursuing these new collaborations. This work has the potential to impact future supercomputer design and construction, reducing power and increasing performance. This final report is organized as follow: this summary chapter discusses the impact of the project (Section 1), provides an enumeration of publications and other public discussion of the work (Section 1), and concludes with a discussion of future work and impact from the project (Section 1). The appendix contains reprints of the refereed publications resulting from this work.

  18. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-ERD-069: Discovering the Unknown Mechanism(s) of Virulence in a BW, Class A Select Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E

    2003-02-06

    The goal of this proposed effort was to assess the difficulty in identifying and characterizing virulence candidate genes in an organism for which very limited data exists. This was accomplished by first addressing the finishing phase of draft-sequenced F. tularensis genomes and conducting comparative analyses to determine the coding potential of each genome; to discover the differences in genome structure and content, and to identify potential genes whose products may be involved in the F. tularensis virulence process. The project was divided into three parts: (1) Genome finishing: This part involves determining the order and orientation of the consensus sequences of contigs obtained from Phrap assemblies of random draft genomic sequences. This tedious process consists of linking contig ends using information embedded in each sequence file that relates the sequence to the original cloned insert. Since inserts are sequenced from both ends, we can establish a link between these paired-ends in different contigs and thus order and orient contigs. Since these genomes carry numerous copies of insertion sequences, these repeated elements ''confuse'' the Phrap assembly program. It is thus necessary to break these contigs apart at the repeated sequences and individually join the proper flanking regions using paired-end information, or using results of comparisons against a similar genome. Larger repeated elements such as the small subunit ribosomal RNA operon require verification with PCR. Tandem repeats require manual intervention and typically rely on single nucleotide polymorphisms to be resolved. Remaining gaps require PCR reactions and sequencing. Once the genomes have been ''closed'', low quality regions are addressed by resequencing reactions. (2) Genome analysis: The final consensus sequences are processed by combining the results of three gene modelers: Glimmer, Critica and Generation. The final gene models are submitted to a battery of homology searches and

  19. Interface physics in microporous media : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Knutson, Chad E.; Noble, David R.; Aragon, Alicia R.; Chen, Ken Shuang; Giordano, Nicholas J.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Liu, Yihong

    2008-09-01

    This document contains a summary of the work performed under the LDRD project entitled 'Interface Physics in Microporous Media'. The presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, which can carry non-zero stresses, distinguishes multiphase flows from more readily understood single-phase flows. In this work the physics active at these interfaces has been examined via a combined experimental and computational approach. One of the major difficulties of examining true microporous systems of the type found in filters, membranes, geologic media, etc. is the geometric uncertainty. To help facilitate the examination of transport at the pore-scale without this complication, a significant effort has been made in the area of fabrication of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional micromodels. Using these micromodels, multiphase flow experiments have been performed for liquid-liquid and liquid-gas systems. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has been utilized to provide high resolution, three-dimensional reconstructions as well as time resolved, two-dimensional reconstructions. Computational work has focused on extending lattice Boltzmann (LB) and finite element methods for probing the interface physics at the pore scale. A new LB technique has been developed that provides over 100x speed up for steady flows in complex geometries. A new LB model has been developed that allows for arbitrary density ratios, which has been a significant obstacle in applying LB to air-water flows. A new reduced order model has been developed and implemented in finite element code for examining non-equilibrium wetting in microchannel systems. These advances will enhance Sandia's ability to quantitatively probe the rich interfacial physics present in microporous systems.

  20. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.; Al-Ayat, R.; Walter, W. R.

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  1. LDRD final report on new homogeneous catalysts for direct olefin epoxidation (LDRD 52591).

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Karen; Smythe, Nicole A.; Moore, Joshua T.; Stewart, Constantine A.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Miller, James Edward; Kornienko, Alexander (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology); Denney, Melanie C. (University of Washington); Cetto, Kara L.

    2006-02-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel homogeneous epoxidation catalyst system that uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant, a ''Holy Grail'' in catalysis. While olefins (alkenes) that do not contain allylic hydrogens can be epoxidized directly using heterogeneous catalysts, most olefins cannot, and so a general, atom-efficient route is desired. While most of the work performed on this LDRD has been on pincer complexes of late transition metals, we also scouted out metal/ligand combinations that were significantly different, and unfortunately, less successful. Most of the work reported here deals with phosphorus-ligated Pd hydrides [(PCP)Pd-H]. We have demonstrated that molecular oxygen gas can insert into the Pd-H bond, giving a structurally characterized Pd-OOH species. This species reacts with oxygen acceptors such as olefins to donate an oxygen atom, although in various levels of selectivity, and to generate a [(PCP)Pd-OH] molecule. We discovered that the active [(PCP)Pd-H] active catalyst can be regenerated by addition of either CO or hydrogen. The demonstration of each step of the catalytic cycle is quite significant. Extensions to the pincer-Pd chemistry by attaching a fluorinated tail to the pincer designed to be used in solvents with higher oxygen solubilities are also presented.

  2. The final LDRD report for the project entitled: {open_quotes}Enhanced analysis of complex gas mixtures by pattern recognition of microsensor array signals{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1996-09-01

    Microsensors do not have the selectivity to chemical species available in large laboratory instruments. This project employed arrays of catalytically gated silicon microsensors with different catalysts to create data streams which can be analyzed by pattern recognition programs. One of the most significant accomplishments of the program was the demonstration of that mixtures of H{sub 2} with the oxidants NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} could distinguished from one another by the use of different catalytic metals on the Sandia Robust Hydrogen (SRH) sensors and the newly developed pattern recognition algorithm. This sensor system could be used to identify explosive gas mixtures and analyze exhaust streams for pollution control.

  3. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  4. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    SciTech Connect

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer chains.

  5. FY06 LDRD Final Report Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulla, G M

    2007-02-13

    The goal of the data intensive LDRD was to investigate the fundamental research issues underlying the application of High Performance Computing (HPC) resources to the challenges of data intensive computing. We explored these issues through four targeted case studies derived from growing LLNL programs: high speed text processing, massive semantic graph analysis, streaming image feature extraction, and processing of streaming sensor data. The ultimate goal of this analysis was to provide scalable data management algorithms to support the development of a predictive knowledge capability consistent with the direction of Aurora.

  6. LDRD 102610 final report new processes for innovative microsystems engineering with predictive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Mitchell, Scott A.; Thomas, Stephen W.

    2007-08-01

    This LDRD Final report describes work that Stephen W. Thomas performed in 2006. The initial problem was to develop a modeling, simulation, and optimization strategy for the design of a high speed microsystem switch. The challenge was to model the right phenomena at the right level of fidelity, and capture the right design parameters. This effort focused on the design context, in contrast to other Sandia efforts focus on high-fidelity assessment. This report contains the initial proposal and the annual progress report. This report also describes exploratory work on micromaching using femtosecond lasers. Steve's time developing a proposal and collaboration on this topic was partly funded by this LDRD.

  7. Final Report for the Virtual Reliability Realization System LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    DELLIN, THEODORE A.; HENDERSON, CHRISTOPHER L.; O'TOOLE, EDWARD J.

    2000-12-01

    Current approaches to reliability are not adequate to keep pace with the need for faster, better and cheaper products and systems. This is especially true in high consequence of failure applications. The original proposal for the LDRD was to look at this challenge and see if there was a new paradigm that could make reliability predictions, along with a quantitative estimate of the risk in that prediction, in a way that was faster, better and cheaper. Such an approach would be based on the underlying science models that are the backbone of reliability predictions. The new paradigm would be implemented in two software tools: the Virtual Reliability Realization System (VRRS) and the Reliability Expert System (REX). The three-year LDRD was funded at a reduced level for the first year ($120K vs. $250K) and not renewed. Because of the reduced funding, we concentrated on the initial development of the expertise system. We developed an interactive semiconductor calculation tool needed for reliability analyses. We also were able to generate a basic functional system using Microsoft Siteserver Commerce Edition and Microsoft Sequel Server. The base system has the capability to store Office documents from multiple authors, and has the ability to track and charge for usage. The full outline of the knowledge model has been incorporated as well as examples of various types of content.

  8. Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry LDRD 13-0144 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.; Ebeida, Mohamed Salah; Romero, Vicente J.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Abdelkader, Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    This SAND report summarizes our work on the Sandia National Laboratory LDRD project titled "Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry" which was project #165617 and proposal #13-0144. This report merely summarizes our work. Those interested in the technical details are encouraged to read the full published results, and contact the report authors for the status of the software and follow-on projects.

  9. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  10. Network discovery, characterization, and prediction : a grand challenge LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    This report is the final summation of Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD project No.119351, 'Network Discovery, Characterization and Prediction' (the 'NGC') which ran from FY08 to FY10. The aim of the NGC, in a nutshell, was to research, develop, and evaluate relevant analysis capabilities that address adversarial networks. Unlike some Grand Challenge efforts, that ambition created cultural subgoals, as well as technical and programmatic ones, as the insistence on 'relevancy' required that the Sandia informatics research communities and the analyst user communities come to appreciate each others needs and capabilities in a very deep and concrete way. The NGC generated a number of technical, programmatic, and cultural advances, detailed in this report. There were new algorithmic insights and research that resulted in fifty-three refereed publications and presentations; this report concludes with an abstract-annotated bibliography pointing to them all. The NGC generated three substantial prototypes that not only achieved their intended goals of testing our algorithmic integration, but which also served as vehicles for customer education and program development. The NGC, as intended, has catalyzed future work in this domain; by the end it had already brought in, in new funding, as much funding as had been invested in it. Finally, the NGC knit together previously disparate research staff and user expertise in a fashion that not only addressed our immediate research goals, but which promises to have created an enduring cultural legacy of mutual understanding, in service of Sandia's national security responsibilities in cybersecurity and counter proliferation.

  11. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Schultz, Peter A.; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen M.; Tucker, Garritt J.

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled %22Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations.%22 During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel

  12. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  13. Noncontact surface thermometry for microsystems: LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Mark (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Beecham, Thomas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Graham, Samuel (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-10-01

    We describe a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort to develop and apply laser-based thermometry diagnostics for obtaining spatially resolved temperature maps on working microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The goal of the effort was to cultivate diagnostic approaches that could adequately resolve the extremely fine MEMS device features, required no modifications to MEMS device design, and which did not perturb the delicate operation of these extremely small devices. Two optical diagnostics were used in this study: microscale Raman spectroscopy and microscale thermoreflectance. Both methods use a low-energy, nonperturbing probe laser beam, whose arbitrary wavelength can be selected for a diffraction-limited focus that meets the need for micron-scale spatial resolution. Raman is exploited most frequently, as this technique provides a simple and unambiguous measure of the absolute device temperature for most any MEMS semiconductor or insulator material under steady state operation. Temperatures are obtained from the spectral position and width of readily isolated peaks in the measured Raman spectra with a maximum uncertainty near {+-}10 K and a spatial resolution of about 1 micron. Application of the Raman technique is demonstrated for V-shaped and flexure-style polycrystalline silicon electrothermal actuators, and for a GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. The potential of the Raman technique for simultaneous measurement of temperature and in-plane stress in silicon MEMS is also demonstrated and future Raman-variant diagnostics for ultra spatio-temporal resolution probing are discussed. Microscale thermoreflectance has been developed as a complement for the primary Raman diagnostic. Thermoreflectance exploits the small-but-measurable temperature dependence of surface optical reflectivity for diagnostic purposes. The temperature-dependent reflectance behavior of bulk silicon, SUMMiT-V polycrystalline silicon films and metal surfaces is

  14. LDRD final report : robust analysis of large-scale combinatorial applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Robert D.; Morrison, Todd; Hart, William Eugene; Benavides, Nicolas L.; Greenberg, Harvey J.; Watson, Jean-Paul; Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2007-09-01

    Discrete models of large, complex systems like national infrastructures and complex logistics frameworks naturally incorporate many modeling uncertainties. Consequently, there is a clear need for optimization techniques that can robustly account for risks associated with modeling uncertainties. This report summarizes the progress of the Late-Start LDRD 'Robust Analysis of Largescale Combinatorial Applications'. This project developed new heuristics for solving robust optimization models, and developed new robust optimization models for describing uncertainty scenarios.

  15. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  16. Low-Altitude Airbursts and the Impact Threat - Final LDRD Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark B.; Crawford, David A.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this nine-week project was to advance the understanding of low-altitude airbursts by developing the means to model them at extremely high resolution in order to span the scales of entry physics as well as blast wave and plume formation. Small asteroid impacts on Earth are a recognized hazard, but the full nature of the threat is still not well understood. We used shock physics codes to discover emergent phenomena associated with low-altitude airbursts such as the Siberian Tunguska event of 1908 and the Egyptian glass-forming event 29 million years ago. The planetary defense community is beginning to recognize the significant threat from such airbursts. Low-altitude airbursts are the only class of impacts that have a significant probability of occurring within a planning time horizon. There is roughly a 10% chance of a megaton-scale low-altitude airburst event in the next decade.The first part of this LDRD final project report is a preprint of our proceedings paper associated with the plenary presentation at the Hypervelocity Impact Society 2007 Symposium in Williamsburg, Virginia (International Journal of Impact Engineering, in press). The paper summarizes discoveries associated with a series of 2D axially-symmetric CTH simulations. The second part of the report contains slides from an invited presentation at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2007 meeting in San Francisco. The presentation summarizes the results of a series of 3D oblique impact simulations of the 1908 Tunguska explosion. Because of the brevity of this late-start project, the 3D results have not yet been written up for a peer-reviewed publication. We anticipate the opportunity to eventually run simulations that include the actual topography at Tunguska, at which time these results will be published.3

  17. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  18. Behavior-aware decision support systems : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Gary B.; Homer, Jack; Chenoweth, Brooke N.; Backus, George A.; Strip, David R.

    2007-11-01

    As Sandia National Laboratories serves its mission to provide support for the security-related interests of the United States, it is faced with considering the behavioral responses that drive problems, mitigate interventions, or lead to unintended consequences. The effort described here expands earlier works in using healthcare simulation to develop behavior-aware decision support systems. This report focuses on using qualitative choice techniques and enhancing two analysis models developed in a sister project.

  19. FY05 LDRD Final Report, A Revolution in Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Balhorn, R; Barty, A; Barsky, D; Bogan, M; Chung, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; Ishii, H; London, R; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Segelke, B; Szoke, A; Szoke, H; Trebes, J; Wootton, A; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Lejon, S; der Spoel, D v; Howells, M; He, H; Spence, J; Nugent, K; Ingerman, E

    2006-01-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are currently under development and will provide a peak brightness more than 10 orders of magnitude higher than modern synchrotrons. The goal of this project was to perform the fundamental research to evaluate the possibility of harnessing these unique x-ray sources to image single biological particles and molecules at atomic resolution. Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental verification where possible, they showed that it should indeed be possible to record coherent scattering patterns from single molecules with pulses that are shorter than the timescales for the degradation of the structure due to the interaction with those pulses. They used these models to determine the effectiveness of strategies to allow imaging using longer XFEL pulses and to design validation experiments to be carried out at interim ultrafast sources. They also developed and demonstrated methods to recover three-dimensional (3D) images from coherent diffraction patterns, similar to those expected from XFELs. The images of micron-sized test objects are the highest-resolution 3D images of any noncrystalline material ever formed with x-rays. The project resulted in 14 publications in peer-reviewed journals and four records of invention.

  20. Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

  1. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    The goal of this project was to investigate the utility of parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in the simulation of laser plasma interaction (LPI). The scope of work included the development of new numerical methods and parallel implementation strategies. The primary deliverables were (1) parallel adaptive algorithms to solve a system of equations combining plasma fluid and light propagation models, (2) a research code implementing these algorithms, and (3) an analysis of the performance of parallel AMR on LPI problems. The project accomplished these objectives. New algorithms were developed for the solution of a system of equations describing LPI. These algorithms were implemented in a new research code named ALPS (Adaptive Laser Plasma Simulator) that was used to test the effectiveness of the AMR algorithms on the Laboratory's large-scale computer platforms. The details of the algorithm and the results of the numerical tests were documented in an article published in the Journal of Computational Physics [2]. A principal conclusion of this investigation is that AMR is most effective for LPI systems that are ''hydrodynamically large'', i.e., problems requiring the simulation of a large plasma volume relative to the volume occupied by the laser light. Since the plasma-only regions require less resolution than the laser light, AMR enables the use of efficient meshes for such problems. In contrast, AMR is less effective for, say, a single highly filamented beam propagating through a phase plate, since the resulting speckle pattern may be too dense to adequately separate scales with a locally refined mesh. Ultimately, the gain to be expected from the use of AMR is highly problem-dependent. One class of problems investigated in this project involved a pair of laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. Under certain conditions, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other via a resonant interaction with an ion acoustic wave in the crossing region. AMR provides an

  2. Parallel Computation Chemistry Using Constraints: Final Report, LDRD 97-0301, Case 3504140000

    SciTech Connect

    Todd D. Plantenga

    1998-11-01

    Computer modeling to estimate material properties, design chem/bio sensors, and evaluate protein-protein interactions all require solving force field equations for molecular structures that contain tens of thousands of covalently connected atoms. Potential energy minimization is a key step in the calculation, but stiff covalent bonding forces make optimization difficult and expensive. This two-year LDRD developed two classes of advanced minimization algorithms that were specialized for chemistry applications and distributed computing machines. The project led to two successful algorithms that were implemented in three Sandia computational chemistry codes to support various users.

  3. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data

  4. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  5. LDRD final report: Physical simulation of nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project whose objective was to initiate a research program for developing a fundamental understanding of multiphase multicomponent subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media and to develop parallel processing computational tools for numerical simulation of such problems. The main achievement of this project was the successful development of a general-purpose, unstructured grid, multiphase thermal simulator for subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media implemented for use on massively parallel (MP) computers via message-passing and domain decomposition techniques. The numerical platform provides an excellent base for new and continuing project development in areas of current interest to SNL and the DOE complex including, subsurface nuclear waste disposal and cleanup, groundwater availability and contamination studies, fuel-spill transport for accident analysis, and DNAPL transport and remediation.

  6. FY07 LDRD Final Report Synthesis under High Pressure and Temperature of New Metal Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, J C; Sadigh, B; Aberg, D; Zaug, J M; Goncharov, A F

    2008-09-23

    The original aim of this LDRD was to determine with unprecedented precision the melting curve of iron to geophysically relevant pressures. In the course of developing much of the technology and techniques required to obtain this information we have encountered and studied novel chemical reactions some of whose products are stable or metastable under ambient conditions. Specifically we have synthesized nitrides of the platinum group metals including platinum, iridium, and palladium. We have also carried out in depth first principles theoretical investigations into the nature of these materials. We believed that the scientific impact of continuing this work would be greater than that of the original goals of this project. Indeed the work has led to a number of high profile publications with additional publications in preparation. While nitrides of the transition metals are generally of tremendous technological importance, those of the noble metals in particular have enjoyed much experimental and theoretical attention in the very short time since they were first synthesized. The field was and clearly remains open for further study. While the scientific motivation for this research is different from that originally proposed, many of the associated methods in which we have now gained experience are similar or identical. These include use of the diamond anvil cell combined with technologies to generate high temperatures, the in-situ technique of Raman scattering using our purpose-built, state-of-the-art system, analytical techniques for determining the composition of recovered samples such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and finally synchrotron-based techniques such as x-ray diffraction for structural and equation of state determinations. Close interactions between theorists and experimentalists has and will continue to allow our group to rapidly and reliably interpret complicated results on the structure and dynamics of these compounds and also additional novel

  7. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldnt lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  8. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldnt lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  9. Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

    2005-11-01

    We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

  10. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  11. Nanoporous films for epitaxial growth of single crystal semiconductor materials : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, Adam M.; Koleske, Daniel David; Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Burckel, David Bruce; Williams, John Dalton; Arrington, Christian L.; Steen, William Arthur

    2007-10-01

    This senior council Tier 1 LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, photolithographically patterned SU-8 and carbonized SU-8 structures. Use of photolithographically defined growth templates represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  12. ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

  13. FPGAs in High Perfomance Computing: Results from Two LDRD Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith D; Ulmer, Craig D.; Thompson, David; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2006-11-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been used as alternative computational de-vices for over a decade; however, they have not been used for traditional scientific com-puting due to their perceived lack of floating-point performance. In recent years, there hasbeen a surge of interest in alternatives to traditional microprocessors for high performancecomputing. Sandia National Labs began two projects to determine whether FPGAs wouldbe a suitable alternative to microprocessors for high performance scientific computing and,if so, how they should be integrated into the system. We present results that indicate thatFPGAs could have a significant impact on future systems. FPGAs have thepotentialtohave order of magnitude levels of performance wins on several key algorithms; however,there are serious questions as to whether the system integration challenge can be met. Fur-thermore, there remain challenges in FPGA programming and system level reliability whenusing FPGA devices.4 AcknowledgmentArun Rodrigues provided valuable support and assistance in the use of the Structural Sim-ulation Toolkit within an FPGA context. Curtis Janssen and Steve Plimpton provided valu-able insights into the workings of two Sandia applications (MPQC and LAMMPS, respec-tively).5

  14. Robust Planning for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots in Unstructured, Dynamic Environments: An LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    EISLER, G. RICHARD

    2002-08-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Robust Planning for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots In Unstructured, Dynamic Environments (AutoNav)''. The project goal was to develop an algorithmic-driven, multi-spectral approach to point-to-point navigation characterized by: segmented on-board trajectory planning, self-contained operation without human support for mission duration, and the development of appropriate sensors and algorithms to navigate unattended. The project was partially successful in achieving gains in sensing, path planning, navigation, and guidance. One of three experimental platforms, the Minimalist Autonomous Testbed, used a repetitive sense-and-re-plan combination to demonstrate the majority of elements necessary for autonomous navigation. However, a critical goal for overall success in arbitrary terrain, that of developing a sensor that is able to distinguish true obstacles that need to be avoided as a function of vehicle scale, still needs substantial research to bring to fruition.

  15. Real-time discriminatory sensors for water contamination events :LDRD 52595 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Carrejo-Simpkins, Kimberly; Wheeler, David Roger; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Goodin, Andrew M.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Chambers, William Clayton; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Showalter, Steven Kedrick

    2005-10-01

    The gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} developed by Sandia can detect volatile organics and semi-volatiles organics via gas phase sampling . The goal of this three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to adapt the components and concepts used by the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} system towards the analysis of water-borne chemicals of current concern. In essence, interfacing the gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} with water to bring the significant prior investment of Sandia and the advantages of microfabrication and portable analysis to a whole new world of important analytes. These include both chemical weapons agents and their hydrolysis products and disinfection by-products such as Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). THMs and HAAs are currently regulated by EPA due to health issues, yet water utilities do not have rapid on-site methods of detection that would allow them to adjust their processes quickly; protecting consumers, meeting water quality standards, and obeying regulations more easily and with greater confidence. This report documents the results, unique hardware and devices, and methods designed during the project toward the goal stated above. It also presents and discusses the portable field system to measure THMs developed in the course of this project.

  16. Validated modeling of distributed energy resources at distribution voltages : LDRD project 38672.

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Mark E.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    2004-03-01

    A significant barrier to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) onto the power grid is uncertainty on the part of utility engineers regarding impacts of DER on their distribution systems. Because of the many possible combinations of DER and local power system characteristics, these impacts can most effectively be studied by computer simulation. The goal of this LDRD project was to develop and experimentally validate models of transient and steady state source behavior for incorporation into utility distribution analysis tools. Development of these models had not been prioritized either by the distributed-generation industry or by the inverter industry. A functioning model of a selected inverter-based DER was developed in collaboration with both the manufacturer and industrial power systems analysts. The model was written in the PSCAD simulation language, a variant of the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), a code that is widely used and accepted by utilities. A stakeholder team was formed and a methodology was established to address the problem. A list of detailed DER/utility interaction concerns was developed and prioritized. The list indicated that the scope of the problem significantly exceeded resources available for this LDRD project. As this work progresses under separate funding, the model will be refined and experimentally validated. It will then be incorporated in utility distribution analysis tools and used to study a variety of DER issues. The key next step will be design of the validation experiments.

  17. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and

  18. Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

  19. High accuracy integrated global positioning system/inertial navigation system LDRD: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.E.; Meindl, M.A.; Fellerhoff, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report contains the results of a Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate the integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) technologies toward the goal of optimizing the navigational accuracy of the combined GPSANS system. The approach undertaken is to integrate the data from an INS, which has long term drifts, but excellent short term accuracy, with GPS carrier phase signal information, which is accurate to the sub-centimeter level, but requires continuous tracking of the GPS signals. The goal is to maintain a sub-meter accurate navigation solution while the vehicle is in motion by using the GPS measurements to estimate the INS navigation errors and then using the refined INS data to aid the GPS carrier phase cycle slip detection and correction and bridge dropouts in the GPS data. The work was expanded to look at GPS-based attitude determination, using multiple GPS receivers and antennas on a single platform, as a possible navigation aid. Efforts included not only the development of data processing algorithms and software, but also the collection and analysis of GPS and INS flight data aboard a Twin Otter aircraft. Finally, the application of improved navigation system accuracy to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) target location is examined.

  20. LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Liu, Kaijun; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2012-07-17

    We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

  1. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A.; Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  2. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  3. Advances in radiation modeling in ALEGRA :a final report for LDRD-67120, efficient implicit mulitgroup radiation calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kurecka, Christopher J.; McClarren, Ryan; Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-01

    The original LDRD proposal was to use a nonlinear diffusion solver to compute estimates for the material temperature that could then be used in a Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculation. At the end of the first year of the project, it was determined that this was not going to be effective, partially due to the concept, and partially due to the fact that the radiation diffusion package was not as efficient as it could be. The second, and final year, of the project focused on improving the robustness and computational efficiency of the radiation diffusion package in ALEGRA. To this end, several new multigroup diffusion methods have been developed and implemented in ALEGRA. While these methods have been implemented, their effectiveness of reducing overall simulation run time has not been fully tested. Additionally a comprehensive suite of verification problems has been developed for the diffusion package to ensure that it has been implemented correctly. This process took considerable time, but exposed significant bugs in both the previous and new diffusion packages, the linear solve packages, and even the NEVADA Framework's parser. In order to manage this large suite of problem, a new tool called Tampa has been developed. It is a general tool for automating the process of running and analyzing many simulations. Ryan McClarren, at the University of Michigan has been developing a Spherical Harmonics capability for unstructured meshes. While still in the early phases of development, this promises to bridge the gap in accuracy between a full transport solution using IMC and the diffusion approximation.

  4. Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Maboudian, Roya

    2004-12-01

    Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may extend the usefulness of MEMS in Sandia National Laboratories' applications. For example, using polycrystalline silicon, wear is an important issue in microengines, temperature degradation is of concern in thermal actuators and the characteristics of resonators can be extended with the same lithography technology. Two methods of depositing poly-SiC from a 1,3-disilabutane source at 650 C to 800 C by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were demonstrated. These include a blanket method in which the material is made entirely out of poly-SiC and a method to coat previously released and fabricated polysilicon MEMS. This deposition method is much simpler to use than previous methods such as high temperature LPCVD and atmospheric CVD. Other major processing issues that were surmounted in this LDRD with the poly-SiC film include etching, doping, and residual strain control. SiC is inert and as such is notoriously difficult to etch. Here, an HBr-based chemistry was demonstrated for the first time to make highly selective etching of SiC at high etch rates. Nitrogen was incorporated from an NH3 gas source, resulting in high conductivity films. Residual strain and strain gradient were shown to depend on deposition parameters, and can be made negative or

  5. Final report for the mobile node authentication LDRD project.

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, John T.; Lanzone, Andrew J.

    2005-09-01

    In hostile ad hoc wireless communication environments, such as battlefield networks, end-node authentication is critical. In a wired infrastructure, this authentication service is typically facilitated by a centrally-located ''authentication certificate generator'' such as a Certificate Authority (CA) server. This centralized approach is ill-suited to meet the needs of mobile ad hoc networks, such as those required by military systems, because of the unpredictable connectivity and dynamic routing. There is a need for a secure and robust approach to mobile node authentication. Current mechanisms either assign a pre-shared key (shared by all participating parties) or require that each node retain a collection of individual keys that are used to communicate with other individual nodes. Both of these approaches have scalability issues and allow a single compromised node to jeopardize the entire mobile node community. In this report, we propose replacing the centralized CA with a distributed CA whose responsibilities are shared between a set of select network nodes. To that end, we develop a protocol that relies on threshold cryptography to perform the fundamental CA duties in a distributed fashion. The protocol is meticulously defined and is implemented it in a series of detailed models. Using these models, mobile wireless scenarios were created on a communication simulator to test the protocol in an operational environment and to gather statistics on its scalability and performance.

  6. LDRD final report on massively-parallel linear programming : the parPCx system.

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, Ojas; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the research and development performed from October 2002 to September 2004 at Sandia National Laboratories under the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ''Massively-Parallel Linear Programming''. We developed a linear programming (LP) solver designed to use a large number of processors. LP is the optimization of a linear objective function subject to linear constraints. Companies and universities have expended huge efforts over decades to produce fast, stable serial LP solvers. Previous parallel codes run on shared-memory systems and have little or no distribution of the constraint matrix. We have seen no reports of general LP solver runs on large numbers of processors. Our parallel LP code is based on an efficient serial implementation of Mehrotra's interior-point predictor-corrector algorithm (PCx). The computational core of this algorithm is the assembly and solution of a sparse linear system. We have substantially rewritten the PCx code and based it on Trilinos, the parallel linear algebra library developed at Sandia. Our interior-point method can use either direct or iterative solvers for the linear system. To achieve a good parallel data distribution of the constraint matrix, we use a (pre-release) version of a hypergraph partitioner from the Zoltan partitioning library. We describe the design and implementation of our new LP solver called parPCx and give preliminary computational results. We summarize a number of issues related to efficient parallel solution of LPs with interior-point methods including data distribution, numerical stability, and solving the core linear system using both direct and iterative methods. We describe a number of applications of LP specific to US Department of Energy mission areas and we summarize our efforts to integrate parPCx (and parallel LP solvers in general) into Sandia's massively-parallel integer programming solver PICO (Parallel Interger and Combinatorial Optimizer). We

  7. Development of highly integrated magetically and electrostatically actuated micropumps : LDRD 64709 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Hendrix, Jason R.; Zwolinski, Andrew

    2003-12-01

    The pump and actuator systems designed and built in the SUMMiT{trademark} process, Sandia's surface micromachining polysilicon MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabrication technology, on the previous campus executive program LDRD (SAND2002-0704P) with FSU/FAMU (Florida State University/Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University) were characterized in this LDRD. These results demonstrated that the device would pump liquid against the flow resistance of a microfabricated channel, but the devices were determined to be underpowered for reliable pumping. As a result a new set of SUMMiT{trademark} pumps with actuators that generate greater torque will be designed and submitted for fabrication. In this document we will report details of dry actuator/pump assembly testing, wet actuator/pump testing, channel resistance characterization, and new pump/actuator design recommendations.

  8. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  9. Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred; Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G.; Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L.; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

  10. Vapor-liquid phase behavior of the iodine-sulfur water-splitting process : LDRD final report for FY03.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year LDRD project that was undertaken to better understand the equilibrium behavior of the iodine-water-hydriodic acid system at elevated temperature and pressure. We attempted to extend the phase equilibrium database for this system in order to facilitate development of the iodine-sulfur water-splitting process to produce hydrogen to a commercial scale. The iodine-sulfur cycle for thermochemical splitting of water is recognized as the most efficient such process and is particularly well suited to coupling to a high-temperature source of process heat. This study intended to combine experimental measurements of vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium and equation-of-state modeling of equilibrium solutions using Sandia's Chernkin software. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments were conducted to a limited extent. The Liquid Chernkin software that was developed as part of an earlier LDRD project was enhanced and applied to model the non-ideal behavior of the liquid phases.

  11. FY04 LDRD Final Report Stroke Sensor Development Using Microdot Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J C; Wilson, T S; Alvis, R M; Paulson, C N; Setlur, U S; McBride, M T; Brown, S B; Bearinger, J P; Colston, B W

    2005-11-15

    major thrust area for the Medical Technology Program (M-division). Through MTP, LLNL has a sizable investment and recognizable expertise in stroke treatment research. The proposed microdot array sensor for stroke will complement this existing program in which mechanical devices are being designed for removing the thrombus. The following list of stroke projects and their relative status shows that MTP has a proven track record of taking ideas to industry: The goal of this LDRD funded project was to develop and demonstrate a minimally invasive optical fiber-based sensor for rapid and in-vivo measurements of multiple stroke biomarkers (e.g. pH and enzyme). The development of this sensor also required the development of a new fabrication technology for attaching indicator chemistries to optical fibers. A benefit of this work is to provide clinicians with a tool to assess vascular integrity of the region beyond the thrombus to determine whether or not it is safe to proceed with the removal of the clot. Such an assessment could extend the use of thrombolytic drug treatment to acute stroke victims outside the current rigid temporal limitation of 3 hours. Furthermore, this sensor would also provide a tool for use with emerging treatments involving the use of mechanical devices for removing the thrombus. The sensor effectively assesses the risk for reperfusion injury.

  12. Enhanced Vapor-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media - LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Webb, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, an investigation into the existence of enhanced vapor-phase diffusion (EVD) in porous media has been conducted. A thorough literature review was initially performed across multiple disciplines (soil science and engineering), and based on this review, the existence of EVD was found to be questionable. As a result, modeling and experiments were initiated to investigate the existence of EVD. In this LDRD, the first mechanistic model of EVD was developed which demonstrated the mechanisms responsible for EVD. The first direct measurements of EVD have also been conducted at multiple scales. Measurements have been made at the pore scale, in a two- dimensional network as represented by a fracture aperture, and in a porous medium. Significant enhancement of vapor-phase transport relative to Fickian diffusion was measured in all cases. The modeling and experimental results provide additional mechanisms for EVD beyond those presented by the generally accepted model of Philip and deVries (1957), which required a thermal gradient for EVD to exist. Modeling and experimental results show significant enhancement under isothermal conditions. Application of EVD to vapor transport in the near-surface vadose zone show a significant variation between no enhancement, the model of Philip and deVries, and the present results. Based on this information, the model of Philip and deVries may need to be modified, and additional studies are recommended.

  13. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Wilk, P; Becker, J; Wang, T

    2008-02-08

    We have measured neutron capture cross sections intended to address defense science problems including mix and the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU), and provide details about statistical decay of excited nuclei. A major part of this project included developing the ability to produce radioactive targets. The cross-section measurements were made using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, the detector array called DANCE (The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for astrophysics and stockpile stewardship. DANCE is at the leading edge of neutron capture physics and represents a major leap forward in capability. The detector array was recently built with LDRD money. Our measurements are a significant part of the early results from the new experimental DANCE facility. Neutron capture reactions are important for basic nuclear science, including astrophysics and the statistics of the {gamma}-ray cascades, and for applied science, including stockpile science and technology. We were most interested in neutron capture with neutron energies in the range between 1 eV and a few hundred keV, with targets important to basic science, and the s-process in particular. Of particular interest were neutron capture cross-section measurements of rare isotopes, especially radioactive isotopes. A strong collaboration between universities and Los Alamos due to the Academic Alliance was in place at the start of our project. Our project gave Livermore leverage in focusing on Livermore interests. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory did not have a resident expert in cross-section measurements; this project allowed us to develop this expertise. For many radionuclides, the cross sections for destruction, especially (n,{gamma}), are not well known, and there is no adequate model that describes neutron capture. The modeling problem is significant because, at low energies where capture reactions are important, the neutron

  14. Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

  15. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  16. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F.

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  17. Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for standoff explosives detection : LDRD 138733 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Linker, Kevin Lane

    2009-09-01

    Continued acts of terrorism using explosive materials throughout the world have led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially technologies that have a potential for remote or standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the benefit of the possible use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff explosives detection equipment. Standoff detection of explosives is currently one of the most difficult problems facing the explosives detection community. Increased domestic and troop security could be achieved through the remote detection of explosives. An effective remote or standoff explosives detection capability would save lives and prevent losses of mission-critical resources by increasing the distance between the explosives and the intended targets and/or security forces. Many sectors of the US government are urgently attempting to obtain useful equipment to deploy to our troops currently serving in hostile environments. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the potential benefits of utilizing quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff detection systems. This report documents the potential opportunities that Sandia National Laboratories can contribute to the field of QCL development. The following is a list of areas where SNL can contribute: (1) Determine optimal wavelengths for standoff explosives detection utilizing QCLs; (2) Optimize the photon collection and detection efficiency of a detection system for optical spectroscopy; (3) Develop QCLs with broader wavelength tunability (current technology is a 10% change in wavelength) while maintaining high efficiency; (4) Perform system engineering in the design of a complete detection system and not just the laser head; and (5) Perform real-world testing with explosive materials with commercial prototype detection systems.

  18. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  19. Development of a cryogenic EOS capability for the Z Pulsed Radiation Source: Goals and accomplishments of FY97 LDRD project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Johnston, R.R.; Asay, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Experimental cryogenic capabilities are essential for the study of ICF high-gain target and weapons effects issues involving dynamic materials response at low temperatures. This report describes progress during the period 2/97-11/97 on the FY97 LDRD project ``Cryogenic EOS Capabilities on Pulsed Radiation Sources (Z Pinch)``. The goal of this project is the development of a general purpose cryogenic target system for precision EOS and shock physics measurements at liquid helium temperatures on the Z accelerator Z-pinch pulsed radiation source. Activity during the FY97 LDRD phase of this project has focused on development of a conceptual design for the cryogenic target system based on consideration of physics, operational, and safety issues, design and fabrication of principal system components, construction and instrumentation of a cryogenic test facility for off-line thermal and optical testing at liquid helium temperatures, initial thermal testing of a cryogenic target assembly, and the design of a cryogenic system interface to the Z pulsed radiation source facility. The authors discuss these accomplishments as well as elements of the project that require further work.

  20. Filtered Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for multi-parameter thermal-fluids measurements : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation-based life-cycle-engineering and the ASCI program have resulted in models of unprecedented size and fidelity. The validation of these models requires high-resolution, multi-parameter diagnostics. Within the thermal-fluids disciplines, the need for detailed, high-fidelity measurements exceeds the limits of current engineering sciences capabilities and severely tests the state of the art. The focus of this LDRD is the development and application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for high-resolution, nonintrusive measurement of gas-phase velocity and temperature. With FRS, the flow is laser-illuminated and Rayleigh scattering from naturally occurring sources is detected through a molecular filter. The filtered transmission may be interpreted to yield point or planar measurements of three-component velocities and/or thermodynamic state. Different experimental configurations may be employed to obtain compromises between spatial resolution, time resolution, and the quantity of simultaneously measured flow variables. In this report, we present the results of a three-year LDRD-funded effort to develop FRS combustion thermometry and Aerosciences velocity measurement systems. The working principles and details of our FRS opto-electronic system are presented in detail. For combustion thermometry we present 2-D, spatially correlated FRS results from nonsooting premixed and diffusion flames and from a sooting premixed flame. The FRS-measured temperatures are accurate to within {+-}50 K (3%) in a premixed CH4-air flame and within {+-}100 K for a vortex-strained diluted CH4-air diffusion flame where the FRS technique is severely tested by large variation in scattering cross section. In the diffusion flame work, FRS has been combined with Raman imaging of the CH4 fuel molecule to correct for the local light scattering properties of the combustion gases. To our knowledge, this is the first extension of FRS to nonpremixed combustion and the first use of joint FRS

  1. Biomimetic air sampling for detection of low concentrations of molecules and bioagents : LDRD 52744 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Robert Clark

    2003-12-01

    Present methods of air sampling for low concentrations of chemicals like explosives and bioagents involve noisy and power hungry collectors with mechanical parts for moving large volumes of air. However there are biological systems that are capable of detecting very low concentrations of molecules with no mechanical moving parts. An example is the silkworm moth antenna which is a highly branched structure where each of 100 branches contains about 200 sensory 'hairs' which have dimensions of 2 microns wide by 100 microns long. The hairs contain about 3000 pores which is where the gas phase molecules enter the aqueous (lymph) phase for detection. Simulations of diffusion of molecules indicate that this 'forest' of hairs is 'designed' to maximize the extraction of the vapor phase molecules. Since typical molecules lose about 4 decades in diffusion constant upon entering the liquid phase, it is important to allow air diffusion to bring the molecule as close to the 'sensor' as possible. The moth acts on concentrations as low as 1000 molecules per cubic cm. (one part in 1e16). A 3-D collection system of these dimensions could be fabricated by micromachining techniques available at Sandia. This LDRD addresses the issues involved with extracting molecules from air onto micromachined structures and then delivering those molecules to microsensors for detection.

  2. Fusion of radar data to extract 3-dimensional objects LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, R.; Hensley, B.; Carande, R.; Burkhart, G.; Ledner, R.

    1997-03-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) is a very promising technology for remote mapping of 3-Dimensional objects. In particular, 3-D maps of urban areas are extremely important to a wide variety of users, both civilian and military. However, 3-D maps produced by traditional optical stereo (stereogrammetry) techniques can be quite expensive to obtain, and accurate urban maps can only be obtained with a large amount of human-intensive interpretation work. IFSAR has evolved over the last decade as a mapping technology that promises to eliminate much of the human-intensive work in producing elevation maps. However, IFSAR systems have only been robustly demonstrated in non-urban areas, and have not traditionally been able to produce data with enough detail to be of general use in urban areas. Sandia Laboratories Twin Otter IFSAR was the first mapping radar system with the proper parameter set to provide sufficiently detailed information in a large number of urban areas. The goal of this LDRD was to fuse previously unused information derived from IFSAR data in urban areas that can be used to extract accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) over wide areas without intensive human interaction.

  3. LDRD final report: Automated planning and programming of assembly of fully 3D mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the results of assembly planning research under the LDRD. The assembly planning problem is that of finding a sequence of assembly operations, starting from individual parts, that will result in complete assembly of a device specified as a CAD model. The automated assembly programming problem is that of automatically producing a robot program that will carry out a given assembly sequence. Given solutions to both of these problems, it is possible to automatically program a robot to assemble a mechanical device given as a CAD data file. This report describes the current state of our solutions to both of these problems, and a software system called Archimedes 2 we have constructed to automate these solutions. Because Archimedes 2 can input CAD data in several standard formats, we have been able to test it on a number of industrial assembly models more complex than any before attempted by automated assembly planning systems, some having over 100 parts. A complete path from a CAD model to an automatically generated robot program for assembling the device represented by the CAD model has also been demonstrated.

  4. III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

  5. Project Adobe. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Curen, Sallie A.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of Project Adobe, the New Mexico Parent Training and Information Center, which provides information, support, education and training to families with school-aged children with disabilities in their local communities. Achievements include: (1) completion and printing of a booklet on the…

  6. CORSICA: A comprehensive simulation of toroidal magnetic-fusion devices. Final report to the LDRD Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crotinger, J.A.; LoDestro, L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Tarditi, A.; Casper, T.A.; Hooper, E.B.

    1997-03-21

    In 1992, our group began exploring the requirements for a comprehensive simulation code for toroidal magnetic fusion experiments. There were several motivations for taking this step. First, the new machines being designed were much larger and more expensive than current experiments. Second, these new designs called for much more sophisticated control of the plasma shape and position, as well as the distributions of energy, mass, and current within the plasma. These factors alone made it clear that a comprehensive simulation capability would be an extremely valuable tool for machine design. The final motivating factor was that the national Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) had recently received High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge funding to model turbulent transport in tokamaks, raising the possibility that first-principles simulations of this process might be practical in the near future. We felt that the best way to capitalize on this development was to integrate the resulting turbulence simulation codes into a comprehensive simulation. Such simulations must include the effects of many microscopic length- and time-scales. In order to do a comprehensive simulation efficiently, the length- and time- scale disparities must be exploited. We proposed to do this by coupling the average or quasistatic effects from the fast time-scales to a slow-time-scale transport code for the macroscopic plasma evolution. In FY93-FY96 we received funding to investigate algorithms for computationally coupling such disparate-scale simulations and to implement these algorithms in a prototype simulation code, dubbed CORSICA. Work on algorithms and test cases proceeded in parallel, with the algorithms being incorporated into CORSICA as they became mature. In this report we discuss the methods and algorithms, the CORSICA code, its applications, and our plans for the future.

  7. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest

  8. LDRD final report : leveraging multi-way linkages on heterogeneous data.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Leveraging Multi-way Linkages on Heterogeneous Data' which ran from FY08 through FY10. The goal was to investigate scalable and robust methods for multi-way data analysis. We developed a new optimization-based method called CPOPT for fitting a particular type of tensor factorization to data; CPOPT was compared against existing methods and found to be more accurate than any faster method and faster than any equally accurate method. We extended this method to computing tensor factorizations for problems with incomplete data; our results show that you can recover scientifically meaningfully factorizations with large amounts of missing data (50% or more). The project has involved 5 members of the technical staff, 2 postdocs, and 1 summer intern. It has resulted in a total of 13 publications, 2 software releases, and over 30 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun, with more potential projects in development.

  9. Final report summary of LDRD 02-LW-022''Quantum Vibrations in Molecules: A New Frontier in Computational Chemistry''

    SciTech Connect

    Glaesemann, K R

    2004-01-22

    With the trend towards needing information about chemistry at conditions significantly different from 298K and 1 atm., methods need to be developed to generate and interpret this data. This demand for information about chemistry at extreme conditions comes from many fields. The study of atmospheric chemistry requires knowledge of unusual species that are formed when molecules are exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Studying of energetic materials requires knowledge of the thermochemical and structural properties of a myriad of chemical species under a wide range of temperatures. Basic scientific understanding of the very nature of a chemical bond requires detailed information. Studying these problems computationally requires multiple capabilities. The methodology used must provide both high accuracy and computational efficiency. Studying extreme chemistry also suffers from all the challenges of studying chemistry under non-extreme conditions. Therefore, either a new method must be developed or an old method must be applied in an innovative way. The method we have chosen to use is path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for the nuclear degrees of freedom and ab initio electronic structure methods for the electronic degrees of freedom. PIMC and ab initio electronic structure are methods of treating the quantum nature of particles. These methods have been chosen, because an accurate treatment requires treating both the electrons and the nuclei as quantum particles. We developed new ''projected'' methods that reduce the computational demands. These methods along with PIMC in general are described in two Journal of Chemical Physics articles (UCRL-JC-144960 and UCRL-JC-147423). This methodology was implemented into a PIMC code developed as part of this LDRD. The code was parallelized in order to utilize the computational resources of LLNL.

  10. Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, Erica L.; Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S.; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2012-05-01

    This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

  11. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward; Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh; Bai, Feng; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  12. LDRD Final Report-New Directions for Algebraic Multigrid: Solutions for Large Scale Multiphysics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, V E

    2003-02-06

    The purpose of this research project was to investigate, design, and implement new algebraic multigrid (AMG) algorithms to enable the effective use of AMG in large-scale multiphysics simulation codes. These problems are extremely large; storage requirements and excessive run-time make direct solvers infeasible. The problems are highly ill-conditioned, so that existing iterative solvers either fail or converge very slowly. While existing AMG algorithms have been shown to be robust and stable for a large class of problems, there are certain problems of great interest to the Laboratory for which no effective algorithm existed prior to this research.

  13. Final Report Sustained Spheromak Physics Project FY 1997 - FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Hill, D.N.

    2000-02-29

    This is the final report on the LDRD SI-funded Sustained Spheromak Physics Project for the years FY1997-FY1999, during which the SSPX spheromak was designed, built, and commissioned for operation at LLNL. The specific LDRD project covered in this report concerns the development, installation, and operation of specialized hardware and diagnostics for use on the SSPX facility in order to study energy confinement in a sustained spheromak plasma configuration. The USDOE Office of Fusion Energy Science funded the construction and routine operation of the SSPX facility. The main distinctive feature of the spheromak is that currents in the plasma itself produce the confining toroidal magnetic field, rather than external coils, which necessarily thread the vacuum vessel. There main objective of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Project was to test whether sufficient energy confinement could be maintained in a spheromak plasma sustained by DC helicity injection. Achieving central electron temperatures of several hundred eV would indicate this. In addition, we set out to determine how the energy confinement scales with T{sub c} and to relate the confinement time to the level of internal magnetic turbulence. Energy confinement and its scaling are the central technical issues for the spheromak as a fusion reactor concept. Pending the outcome of energy confinement studies now under way, the spheromak could be the basis for an attractive fusion reactor because of its compact size, simply-connected magnetic geometry, and potential for steady-state current drive.

  14. FY08 LDRD Final Report Probabilistic Inference of Metabolic Pathways from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    SciTech Connect

    D'haeseleer, P

    2009-03-01

    Metagenomic 'shotgun' sequencing of environmental microbial communities has the potential to revolutionize microbial ecology, allowing a cultivation-independent, yet sequence-based analysis of the metabolic capabilities and functions present in an environmental sample. Although its intensive sequencing requirements are a good match for the continuously increasing bandwidth at sequencing centers, the complexity, seemingly inexhaustible novelty, and 'scrambled' nature of metagenomic data is also proving a tremendous challenge for analysis. In fact, many metagenomics projects do not go much further than providing a list of novel gene variants and over- or under-represented functional gene categories. In this project, we proposed to develop a set of novel metagenomic sequence analysis tools, including a binning method to group sequences by species, inference of phenotypes and metabolic pathways from these reconstructed species, and extraction of coarse-grained flux models. We proposed to closely collaborate with the DOE Joint Genome Institute to align these tools with their metagenomics analysis needs and the developing IMG/M metagenomics pipeline. Results would be cross-validated with simulated metagenomic data using a testing platform developed at the JGI.

  15. THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P

    2011-11-28

    This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

  16. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  17. Final report for the endowment of simulator agents with human-like episodic memory LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Lippitt, Carl Edward; Thomas, Edward Victor; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schaller, Mark J.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2003-12-01

    This report documents work undertaken to endow the cognitive framework currently under development at Sandia National Laboratories with a human-like memory for specific life episodes. Capabilities have been demonstrated within the context of three separate problem areas. The first year of the project developed a capability whereby simulated robots were able to utilize a record of shared experience to perform surveillance of a building to detect a source of smoke. The second year focused on simulations of social interactions providing a queriable record of interactions such that a time series of events could be constructed and reconstructed. The third year addressed tools to promote desktop productivity, creating a capability to query episodic logs in real time allowing the model of a user to build on itself based on observations of the user's behavior.

  18. FY05 LDRD Final Report Sensor Fusion for Regional Monitoring of Nuclear Materials with Ubiquitous Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S E; Craig, W W

    2006-02-15

    The detection of the unconventional delivery of a nuclear weapon or the illicit transport of fissile materials is one of the most crucial, and difficult, challenges facing us today in national security. A wide array of radiation detectors are now being deployed domestically and internationally to address this problem. This initial deployment will be followed by radiation detection systems, composed of intelligent, networked devices intended to supplement the choke-point perimeter systems with more comprehensive broad-area, or regional coverage. Cataloging and fusing the data from these new detection systems will clearly be one of the most significant challenges in radiation-based security systems. We present here our results from our first 6 months of effort on this project. We anticipate the work will continue as part of the Predictive Knowledge System Strategic Initiative.

  19. FY08 LDRD Final Report LOCAL: Locality-Optimizing Caching Algorithms and Layouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P

    2009-02-27

    This project investigated layout and compression techniques for large, unstructured simulation data to reduce bandwidth requirements and latency in simulation I/O and subsequent post-processing, e.g. data analysis and visualization. The main goal was to eliminate the data-transfer bottleneck - for example, from disk to memory and from central processing unit to graphics processing unit - through coherent data access and by trading underutilized compute power for effective bandwidth and storage. This was accomplished by (1) designing algorithms that both enforce and exploit compactness and locality in unstructured data, and (2) adapting offline computations to a novel stream processing framework that supports pipelining and low-latency sequential access to compressed data. This report summarizes the techniques developed and results achieved, and includes references to publications that elaborate on the technical details of these methods.

  20. Scalable Entity-Based Modeling of Population-Based Systems, Final LDRD Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A J; Smith, S G; Vassilevska, T K; Jefferson, D R

    2005-01-27

    The goal of this project has been to develop tools, capabilities and expertise in the modeling of complex population-based systems via scalable entity-based modeling (EBM). Our initial focal application domain has been the dynamics of large populations exposed to disease-causing agents, a topic of interest to the Department of Homeland Security in the context of bioterrorism. In the academic community, discrete simulation technology based on individual entities has shown initial success, but the technology has not been scaled to the problem sizes or computational resources of LLNL. Our developmental emphasis has been on the extension of this technology to parallel computers and maturation of the technology from an academic to a lab setting.

  1. LDRD Final Report for''Tactical Laser Weapons for Defense'' SI (Tracking Code 01-SI-011)

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Zapata, L

    2002-01-30

    The focus of this project was a convincing demonstration of two new technological approaches to high beam quality; high average power solid-state laser systems that would be of interest for tactical laser weapon applications. Two pathways had been identified to such systems that built on existing thin disk and fiber laser technologies. This SI was used as seed funding to further develop and vet these ideas. Significantly, the LLNL specific enhancements to these proposed technology paths were specifically addressed for devising systems scaleable to the 100 kW average power level. In the course of performing this work we have established an intellectual property base that protects and distinguishes us from other competitive approaches to the same end.

  2. FY00 LDRD Final Report High Power IFE Driver Component Development 00-SI-009

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeau, C; Schaffers, K; Tassano, J; Waide, P; Bayramian, A

    2001-02-26

    We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for target physics research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 {micro}m wavelength. Currently, this review concentrates on the critical development and production of Yb:S-FAP crystals. After solving many defect issues that can be present in the crystals, reproducibility is the final issue that needs to be resolved. We have enlisted the help of national experts and have strongly integrated two capable commercial crystal growth companies (Litton-Airton/Synoptics and Scientific Materials) into the effort, and have solicited the advice of Robert Morris (retired from Allied Signal), a recognized international expert in high temperature oxide growth.

  3. Exploring the Feasibility of Fabricating Micron-Scale Components Using Microcontact Printing LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS, RAMONA L.; RITCHEY, M. BARRY; STOKES, ROBERT N.; CASIAS, ADRIAN L.; ADAMS, DAVID P.; OLIVER, ANDREW D.; EMERSON, JOHN A.

    2003-06-01

    Many microfabrication techniques are being developed for applications in microelectronics, microsensors, and micro-optics. Since the advent of microcomponents, designers have been forced to modify their designs to include limitations of current technology, such as the inability to make three-dimensional structures and the need for piece-part assembly. Many groups have successfully transferred a wide variety of patterns to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional substrates using microcontact printing. Microcontact printing is a technique in which a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is patterned onto a substrate by transfer printing. The patterned layer can act as an etch resist or a foundation upon which to build new types of microstructures. We created a gold pattern with features as small as 1.2 {micro}m using microcontact printing and subsequent processing. This approach looks promising for constructing single-level structures such as microelectrode arrays and sensors. It can be a viable technique for creating three-dimensional structures such as microcoils and microsprings if the right equipment is available to achieve proper alignment, and if a means is available to connect the final parts to other components in subsequent assembly operations. Microcontact printing provides a wide variety of new opportunities in the fabrication of microcomponents, and increases the options of designers.

  4. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes at High Pressures LDRD Final Report 03-ERD-047

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W J; Cynn, H

    2004-02-16

    This goal of this project was to perform feasibility experiments and measurements of the fundamental interactions between hydrogen and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) at high pressures. High-pressure is an adjustable experimental parameter for tuning interaction strengths, thereby elucidating and providing insights into the fundamental nature of the H{sub 2}/SWNT system. We have developed and utilized systems and methodologies to make x-ray scattering, optical spectroscopic and electrical transport measurements. These activities have been productive in demonstrating capabilities and measuring properties of SWNTs under high-pressure conditions. We have also developed strong cooperative and complementary relationships with academic research colleagues at Stanford University. Building on these results and relationships, we hope to continue and expand our research as co-investigators in a joint Harvard-LLNL-Stanford proposal to the DOE ''Grand Challenge'' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage (Solicitation No. DE-PS36-03GO93013). Hydrogen storage is an active research topic with important basic science implications and a crucial enabling technology for advanced energy systems. Measurements of the H{sub 2} storage capacity indicate that it may achieve or exceed the storage capacity level (6.5 wt-%) mandated by the DOE hydrogen plan for fielding a hydrogen-fueled vehicle. The H{sub 2}/SWNT system has been the subject of intensive study and controversy regarding this storage capacity, with various conflicting measurements ranging from 1 wt-% up to values exceeding 7 wt-%[1-5]. The mechanism and details of the hydrogen storage in SWNT systems is poorly understood and several key questions have not been definitively determined including: (1) importance of SWNT structural parameters (tube length, diameter, end termination, bundling); (2) adsorption sites, mechanism, and binding energy; and (3) optimal storage capacity and conditions. This project sought to

  5. Electromagnetic simulation of electronic packaging designs (95-ERP-003). 1995 LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    The primary focus of the project summarized in this report has been to evaluate the performance of the 3D, time-domain electromagnetic code DS13D in the simulation of structures used in microwave microelectronics circuits. We`ve adopted two test cases, coaxial and stripline transmission lines, for which well-known results are available so that results obtained with DS13D could be easily and accurately checked. Our goals have been three-fold: (1) To develop specialized mode-launching capabilities for single-mode signals typically found in test geometries and the diagnostics necessary to evaluate the performance of the code in modeling the propagation of those signals. (2) To analyze the effect of different zoning schemes on the accuracy with which the code models the propagation of signals through the geometries by checking against known analytic results and calculations performed with other codes. (3) To examine the effect of code modifications aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the simulations. The calculated transmission line impedance was chosen as the primary means of evaluating code performance. Since the lowest-order propagating modes for the test cases were transverse electromagnetic (TEM) modes, the computation of impedance was reasonably straightforward. Both time- and frequency-domain values (the latter obtained from the code output by post-processing with a discrete Fourier transform) were obtained and compared.

  6. Designed supramolecular assemblies for biosensors and photoactive devices. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.Z.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.; Cesarano, J.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of supramolecular assemblies for applications in biosensors and biodevices. The supramolecular assemblies are based on membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films composed of naturally-occurring or synthetic lipids, which contain electrically and/or photochemically active components. The LB films are deposited onto electrically-active materials (metal, semiconductors). The active components film components (lipo-porphyrins) at the surface function as molecular recognition sites for sensing proteins and other biomolecules, and the porphyrins and other components (e.g., fullerenes) incorporated into the films serve as photocatalysts and vectorial electron-transport agents. Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) methods are used to tailor the structure of these film components to optimize function. Molecular modeling is also used to predict the location, orientation, and motion of these molecular components within the films. The result is a variety of extended, self-assembled molecular structures that serve as devices for sensing proteins and biochemicals or as other bioelectronic devices.

  7. LDRD final report on nanocomposite materials based on hydrocarbon-bridged siloxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Bates, S.E.; Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Emerson, J.A.; Curro, J.G.

    1997-05-01

    Silicones [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers] are environmentally safe, nonflammable, weather resistant, thermally stable, low T{sub g} materials which are attractive for general elastomer applications because of their safety and their performance over a wide temperature range. However, PDMS is inherently weak due to its low glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and lack of stress crystallization. The major goal of this project was to create a family of reinforced elastomers based on silsesquioxane/PDMS networks. Polydimethylsiloxane-based (PDMS) composite materials containing a variety of alkylene-arylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were synthesized in order to probe short chain and linkage effects in bimodal polymer networks. Monte Carlo simulations on the alkylene-bridged silsesquioxane/PDMS system predicted that the introduction of the silsesquioxane short chains into the long chain PDMS network would have a significant reinforcing effect on the elastomer. The silsesquioxane-PDMS networks were synthesized and evaluated. Analysis of the mechanical properties of the resulting materials indicated that use of the appropriate silisesquioxane generated materials with greatly enhanced properties. Arylene and activated alkylene systems resulted in materials that showed superior adhesive strength for metal-to-metal adhesion.

  8. Mesoscale wide-bandwidth linear magnetic actuators : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence Anthony

    2004-02-01

    As MEMS transducers are scaled up in size, the threshold is quickly crossed to where magnetoquasistatic (MQS) transducers are superior for force production compared to electroquasistatic (EQS) transducers. Considerable progress has been made increasing the force output of MEMS EQS transducers, but progress with MEMS MQS transducers has been more modest. A key reason for this has been the difficulty implementing efficient lithographically-fabricated magnetic coil structures. The contribution of this study is a planar multilayer polyphase coil architecture which provides for the lithographic implementation of efficient stator windings suitable for linear magnetic machines. A millimeter-scale linear actuator with complex stator windings was fabricated using this architecture. The stators of the actuator were fabricated using a BCB/Cu process, which does not require replanarization of the wafer between layers. The prototype stator was limited to thin copper layers (3 {micro}m) due to the use of evaporated metal at the time of fabrication. Two layers of metal were implemented in the prototype, but the winding architecture naturally supports additional metal layer pairs. It was found in laboratory tests that the windings can support very high current densities of 4 x 10{sup 9}A/m{sup 2} without damage. Force production normal to the stator was calculated to be 0.54 N/A. For thin stators such as this one, force production increases approximately linearly with the thickness of the windings and a six-layer stator fabricated using a newly implemented electroplated BCB/Cu process (six layers of 15 {micro}m thick metal) is projected to produce approximately 8.8 N/A.

  9. Final Report and Documentation for the Optical Backplane/Interconnect for High Speed Communication LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    ROBERTSON, PERRY J.; CHEN, HELEN Y.; BRANDT, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; PIERSON, LYNDON G.; WITZKE, EDWARD L.; GASS, KARL

    2001-03-01

    Current copper backplane technology has reached the technical limits of clock speed and width for systems requiring multiple boards. Currently, bus technology such as VME and PCI (types of buses) will face severe limitations are the bus speed approaches 100 MHz. At this speed, the physical length limit of an unterminated bus is barely three inches. Terminating the bus enables much higher clock rates but at drastically higher power cost. Sandia has developed high bandwidth parallel optical interconnects that can provide over 40 Gbps throughput between circuit boards in a system. Based on Sandia's unique VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) technology, these devices are compatible with CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) chips and have single channel bandwidth in excess of 20 GHz. In this project, we are researching the use of this interconnect scheme as the physical layer of a greater ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) based backplane. There are several advantages to this technology including small board space, lower power and non-contact communication. This technology is also easily expandable to meet future bandwidth requirements in excess of 160 Gbps sometimes referred to as UTOPIA 6. ATM over optical backplane will enable automatic switching of wide high-speed circuits between boards in a system. In the first year we developed integrated VCSELs and receivers, identified fiber ribbon based interconnect scheme and a high level architecture. In the second year, we implemented the physical layer in the form of a PCI computer peripheral card. A description of future work including super computer networking deployment and protocol processing is included.

  10. Suppression of electron emission from metal electrodes : LDRD 28771 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Ives, Harry Crockett, III; Johnson, David J.; Fowler, William E.

    2003-11-01

    This research consisted of testing surface treatment processes for stainless steel and aluminum for the purpose of suppressing electron emission over large surface areas to improve the pulsed high voltage hold-off capabilities of these metals. Improvements to hold-off would be beneficial to the operation of the vacuum-insulator grading rings and final self-magnetically insulated transmission line on the ZR-upgrade machine and other pulsed power applications such as flash radiograph and pulsed-microwave machines. The treatments tested for stainless steel include the Z-protocol (chemical polish, HVFF, and gold coating), pulsed E-beam surface treatments by IHCE, Russia, and chromium oxide coatings. Treatments for aluminum were anodized and polymer coatings. Breakdown thresholds also were measured for a range of surface finishes and gap distances. The study found that: (1.) Electrical conditioning and solvent cleaning in a filtered air environment each improve HV hold-off 30%. (2.) Anodized coatings on aluminum give a factor of two improvement in high voltage hold-off. However, anodized aluminum loses this improvement when the damage is severe. Chromium oxide coatings on stainless steel give a 40% and 20% improvement in hold-off before and after damage from many arcs. (3.) Bare aluminum gives similar hold-off for surface roughness, R{sub a}, ranging from 0.08 to 3.2 {micro}m. (4.) The various EBEST surfaces tested give high voltage hold-off a factor of two better than typical machined and similar to R{sub a} = 0.05 {micro}m polished stainless steel surfaces. (5.) For gaps > 2 mm the hold-off voltage increases as the square root of the gap for bare metal surfaces. This is inconsistent with the accepted model for metals that involves E-field induced electron emission from dielectric inclusions. Micro-particles accelerated across the gap during the voltage pulse give the observed voltage dependence. However the similarity in observed breakdown times for large and small

  11. Understanding and predicting metallic whisker growth and its effects on reliability : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Grant, Richard P.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Pillars, Jamin; Susan, Donald Francis; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Yelton, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    review of previous literature on Sn whisker crystallography. The overall texture of the Sn films was also analyzed by EBSD. Finally, a short Appendix is included at the end of this report, in which the X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results are discussed and compared to the EBSD analyses of the overall textures of the Sn films. Sections 2, 3, and 4 have been or will be submitted as stand-alone papers in peer-reviewed technical journals. A bibliography of recent Sandia Sn whisker publications and presentations is included at the end of the report.

  12. FY07 LDRD Final Report A Fracture Mechanics and Tribology Approach to Understanding Subsurface Damage on Fused Silica during Grinding and Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Wong, L L; Steele, R A; Feit, M D; Davis, P J; Walmer, C D

    2008-02-05

    The objective of this work is to develop a solid scientific understanding of the creation and characteristics of surface fractures formed during the grinding and polishing of brittle materials, specifically glass. In this study, we have experimentally characterized the morphology, number density, and depth distribution of various surface cracks as a function of various grinding and polishing processes (blanchard, fixed abrasive grinding, loose abrasive, pitch polishing and pad polishing). Also, the effects of load, abrasive particle (size, distribution, foreign particles, geometry, velocity), and lap material (pitch, pad) were examined. The resulting data were evaluated in terms of indentation fracture mechanics and tribological interactions (science of interacting surfaces) leading to several models to explain crack distribution behavior of ground surfaces and to explain the characteristics of scratches formed during polishing. This project has greatly advanced the scientific knowledge of microscopic mechanical damage occurring during grinding and polishing and has been of general interest. This knowledge-base has also enabled the design and optimization of surface finishing processes to create optical surfaces with far superior laser damage resistance. There are five major areas of scientific progress as a result of this LDRD. They are listed in Figure 1 and described briefly in this summary below. The details of this work are summarized through a number of published manuscripts which are included this LDRD Final Report. In the first area of grinding, we developed a technique to quantitatively and statistically measure the depth distribution of surface fractures (i.e., subsurface damage) in fused silica as function of various grinding processes using mixtures of various abrasive particles size distributions. The observed crack distributions were explained using a model that extended known, single brittle indentation models to an ensemble of loaded, sliding

  13. Peer-to-peer architectures for exascale computing : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Minnich, Ronald G.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Rudish, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    P architectures give us a starting point for crafting applications and system software for exascale. In the context of the Internet, P2P applications (e.g., file sharing, botnets) have already solved this problem for 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} nodes. Usually based on a fractal distributed hash table structure, these systems have proven robust in practice to constant and unpredictable outages, failures, and even subversion. For example, a recent estimate of botnet turnover (i.e., the number of machines leaving and joining) is about 11% per week. Nonetheless, P2P networks remain effective despite these failures: The Conficker botnet has grown to {approx} 5 x 10{sup 6} peers. Unlike today's system software and applications, those for next-generation exascale machines cannot assume a static structure and, to be scalable over millions of nodes, must be decentralized. P2P architectures achieve both, and provide a promising model for 'fault-oblivious computing'. This project aimed to study the dynamics of P2P networks in the context of a design for exascale systems and applications. Having no single point of failure, the most successful P2P architectures are adaptive and self-organizing. While there has been some previous work applying P2P to message passing, little attention has been previously paid to the tightly coupled exascale domain. Typically, the per-node footprint of P2P systems is small, making them ideal for HPC use. The implementation on each peer node cooperates en masse to 'heal' disruptions rather than relying on a controlling 'master' node. Understanding this cooperative behavior from a complex systems viewpoint is essential to predicting useful environments for the inextricably unreliable exascale platforms of the future. We sought to obtain theoretical insight into the stability and large-scale behavior of candidate architectures, and to work toward leveraging Sandia's Emulytics platform to test promising candidates in a realistic (ultimately {ge} 10{sup 7

  14. LDRD-LW Final Report: 07-LW-041 "Magnetism in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: New Physics at the Nanoscale"

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; Lee, J I; McCall, S K

    2009-10-19

    ), with particular emphasis on elucidating small changes in the d-electron count. Characterizing changes in the d-electron density can yield important insight into the mechanisms of magnetism in materials. As the three attached manuscripts illustrate (presented in preprint form to ensure no infringement of copyright), each of these milestones was successfully illustrated and the results published in the scientific literature during the course of the project. The research team members were able to determine, from a series of XAS, XMCD and SQUID magnetometry measurements, that CdSe NCs are paramagnetic and that the magnitude of magnetic susceptibility is dependent upon the type of organic molecule used to passivate the NC surface (i.e. the observed magnetism results, at least in part, from a surface effect that is not intrinsic to the NCs). In addition, they identified that the mechanism by which the magnetic susceptibility is modified - via {pi} back-donation of d-electrons to the organic ligands from the Cd atoms. These findings demonstrate that the magnetic properties are related to the surface Cd atoms and illustrate the means by which the magnetic behavior can be manipulated for specific technological applications. Two of the papers published during the course of the LW project do not contain magnetometry data, but focus on the evolution in electronic structure of the CdSe NCs as a function of particle size. These measurements were crucial in developing an understanding of the electronic behavior of the NCs and, ultimately, in assigning the p back-donation mechanism for inducing controllable paramagnetic behavior. Significantly, the research team has also filed a patent application based upon their research: 'Method for Creating Ligand Induced Paramagnetism in Nanocrystalline Structures' Docket: IL-11858. It is noted that both LDRD-LW and Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) funding is acknowledged in the attached manuscripts. As such, is important to indicate that

  15. LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, P.; Benson, D.A.; Barton, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Two new failure analysis techniques have been developed for backside and front side localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. These scanning optical microscopy techniques take advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The methods utilize the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detect shorts. Initial investigations demonstrated the feasibility of TIVA and Seebeck Effect Imaging (SEI). Subsequent improvements have greatly increased the sensitivity of the TIVA/SEI system, reducing the acquisition times by more than 20X and localizing previously unobserved defects. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed. The system improvements, non-linear response of IC defects to heating, modeling of laser heating and examples using the improved system for failure analysis are presented.

  16. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  17. Project BEST Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankratz, David; Friedenberg, Joan

    Project BEST (Building Energy Systems Technology), a bilingual vocational training program, operated at Oakton Community College between March 1986 and September 1987. The purpose of the project was to provide 60 limited English proficient (LEP) Hispanic and Polish adults with sufficient vocational skills, English language skills, and appropriate…

  18. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  19. Project ACORDE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Marjorie L.

    A report is presented on the evaluation and redevelopment of an 11-module course of instruction in restorative dentistry conducted under Project Acorde. The major learning goals for students were: acquisition of the necessary skills and knowledge of appropriate tools and materials; and self-appraisal of one's own work in performing the various…

  20. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hubsch, Tristan

    2013-06-20

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  1. ACCESS Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The ACCESS project addressed the development, testing, and demonstration of the proposed advanced technologies and the associated emission and fuel economy improvement at an engine dynamometer and on a full-scale vehicle. Improve fuel economy by 25% with minimum performance penalties Achieve SULEV level emissions with gasoline Demonstrate multi-mode combustion engine management system

  2. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Small, R. Justin; Bryan, Frank; Tribbia, Joseph; Park, Sungsu; Dennis, John; Saravanan, R.; Schneider, Niklas; Kwon, Young-Oh

    2015-06-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. This project was only possible due to the highly scalable aspect of the CAM Spectral Element dynamical core, and the significant resources allocated at Yellowstone and NERSC for which we are grateful.

  3. Geothermal Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-31

    The project was designed to take 95/sup 0/F water from an existing well and process it through a heat exchanger carrying supply water for our boiler make up and domestic hot water systems. The temperature of this water runs from 55/sup 0/F to 65/sup 0/F. In operation it was possible to raise the temperature of this water an average of approximately 12/sup 0/F. The amount of energy captured was recorded and it was found that one can capture approximately 199 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/Mo. Using current energy costs and a boiler efficiency factor of .8 a potential annual savings of approximately $11,104/year was calculated. The total cost of the project was $31,893.68. Using these figures a simple pay back period of 2.9 years was calculated.

  4. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bogucz, E A

    2010-12-13

    This project pursued innovations to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial and residential buildings. For commercial buildings, the project developed a testbed for “intelligent nested environmental systems technologies (iNEST),” which monitor and control energy flows and IEQ across a cascade of spaces from individuals’ desktops to office suites to floors to whole buildings. An iNEST testbed was constructed at Syracuse University and was used to assess the use of devices such as personal badges and CO2 sensors to study how reduced energy use and improved IEQ could be achieved. For residential buildings, resources were targeted in support of DoE’s Builders Challenge Program and to recruit Syracuse, NY builders. Three homes in Syracuse’s Near Westside neighborhood were also registered under the program by Syracuse University team, with an additional home registered by one of the builders. Findings from the work at the iNEST testbed facility, and results from other related projects were disseminated through Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems (SyracuseCoE) 2008 Annual Symposium, the 9th International Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference & Exhibition, and through SyracuseCoE’s website and eNewsletters to inform the broader community of researchers, designers and builders. These public communication activities helped enhance the understanding of high performance buildings and facilitate further market acceptance.

  5. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

    2008-11-12

    The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

  6. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Podzorov, Vitaly

    2012-10-28

    The scope of this project is to investigate fundamental aspects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) grown at the surface of organic semiconductors and other electronic materials, recently discovered in our group (Fig. 1) [1]. Understanding the growth mechanism and structure of these SAMs, as well as investigating the effect of SAM-induced high surface conductivity, are the main thrusts of the project. An additional thrust of the project is to find new ways of surface doping or surface gating of novel semiconductors, in which electronic traps at the interface would be passivated. Molecular self assembly is an exciting research area of modern materials science, playing an important role in a variety of emerging applications, such as organic and molecular electronics, bioengineering, sensors and actuators. The current effort in this field has been focused on two experimental platforms: SAMs on metals (e.g., Au) and SAMs on inorganic oxides (e.g., SiO2). We have recently discovered the third platform, molecular self-assembly at the surface of carbon-based electronic materials (organic semiconductors, graphene and CNTs), which opens new opportunities for fundamental research and applications (Fig. 1) [1, 2, 3]. One of the most intriguing aspects of the new discovery is that formation of an FTS self-assembled monolayer on these materials induces a high-density mobile charges, with n up to 1014 cm-2, resulting in a large surface conductivity, σ ≈ 10-5 S·square-1 [1]. The effect is due to an interfacial electron transfer from the semiconductor to the SAM, resulting in a 0.54 V potential drop across the 1.3 nm-thick SAM, as recently revealed by Kelvin probe microscopy in rubrene [4].

  7. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  8. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670.

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Dale Robert; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-11-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting).

  9. 4-wave mixing for phase-matching free nonlinear optics in quantum cascade structures : LDRD 08-0346 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, Dan G.; Yang, Zhenshan; Waldmueller, Ines

    2010-10-01

    Optical nonlinearities and quantum coherences have the potential to enable efficient, high-temperature generation of coherent THz radiation. This LDRD proposal involves the exploration of the underlying physics using intersubband transitions in a quantum cascade structure. Success in the device physics aspect will give Sandia the state-of-the-art technology for high-temperature THz quantum cascade lasers. These lasers are useful for imaging and spectroscopy in medicine and national defense. Success may have other far-reaching consequences. Results from the in-depth study of coherences, dephasing and dynamics will eventually impact the fields of quantum computing, optical communication and cryptology, especially if we are successful in demonstrating entangled photons or slow light. An even farther reaching development is if we can show that the QC nanostructure, with its discrete atom-like intersubband resonances, can replace the atom in quantum optics experiments. Having such an 'artificial atom' will greatly improve flexibility and preciseness in experiments, thereby enhancing the discovery of new physics. This is because we will no longer be constrained by what natural can provide. Rather, one will be able to tailor transition energies and optical matrix elements to enhance the physics of interest. This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring optical nonlinearities in intersubband devices. Experimental and theoretical investigations were made to develop a fundamental understanding of light-matter interaction in a semiconductor system and to explore how this understanding can be used to develop mid-IR to THz emitters and nonclassical light sources.

  10. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  11. The Trine Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Jon R.; And Others

    The final report describes the Trine Project which addressed three needs in the education of handicapped children: the need for an alternate writing system, the need for communication, and the need for access to general purpose computers used in the schools. The project had three major objectives: (1) to design a low-cost portable writing and…

  12. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  13. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carrick M. Eggleston

    2003-12-12

    This report provides a description of the main accomplishments of the EMSP funded research, including products such as conference presentations and publications (including those still in preparation). The purpose of this study was to better understand the chemical interactions between dissolved aqueous contaminants and carbonate minerals occurring as coatings on mineral grains in the vadose zone beneath the Hanford reserve. This information is important for construction of improved reactive transport models intended to predict the subsurface migration of contaminants. We made improvements to the hydrothermal atomic force microscope (HAFM) design to be used in this project. The original HAFM was built with funding from the U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Improvements include operating limits of 70 bars and 170 C, from an original limit of 12 bars and 150 C. This product is patented. We completed a series of studies of magnesite, MgCO3, because this mineral is structurally equivalent to calcite but reacts much more slowly, allowing us to study carbonate reactivity under pH conditions (i.e., low pH) that are much more problematic for studies of calcite but which are nevertheless relevant to in-situ conditions. We found that dissolving magnesite exhibits a dramatic change in step orientation, and therefore etch pit shape, as pH is lowered through 4.2 to 3 and 2. This change in step orientation is NOT accompanied by an increase in step velocity with decreasing pH. We also found that, after growing magnesite on a magnesite substrate, the newly grown magnesite dissolved much more readily than the underlying substrate magnesite, and exhibited far larger etch pit densities. This effect may have been related to the rate of growth or to the presence of an Fe impurity in the growth solutions. We studied the dissolution of magnesite and calcite (104) surfaces under a wider variety of conditions with a new hydrodynamically defined hydro thermal AFM fluid cell, and we

  14. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Darren

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  15. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  16. Physicians Training Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    This final report describes the accomplishments and activities of a project which developed, implemented, and evaluated training activities for medical students, pediatric residents, and practicing physicians to enhance their understanding of and involvement with early intervention and the special education system in Connecticut. The training…

  17. Multihandicapped Blind. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lloyd

    The final report of the Garden Grove unified school district project for 1969 through 1972 (funded through Title III) involving six multiply handicapped, legally blind children, 7- to 10-years-old, who were previously excluded from special education (SE) classes is presented. Described as the main procedural objective is development of a…

  18. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  19. Two dimensional point of use fuel cell : a final LDRD project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Hickner, Michael A.; Gross, Matthew L.

    2011-03-01

    The Proliferation Assessment (program area - Things Thin) within the Defense Systems and Assessment Investment Area desires high energy density and long-lived power sources with moderate currents (mA) that can be used as building blocks in platforms for the continuous monitoring of chemical, biological, and radiological agents. Fuel cells can be an optimum choice for a power source because of the high energy densities that are possible with liquid fuels. Additionally, power generation and fuel storage can be decoupled in a fuel cell for independent control of energy and power density for customized, application-driven power solutions. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are explored as a possible concept to develop into ultrathin or two-dimensional power sources. New developments in nanotechnology, advanced fabrication techniques, and materials science are exploited to create a planar DMFC that could be co-located with electronics in a chip format. Carbon nanotubes and pyrolyzed polymers are used as building block electrodes - porous, mechanically compliant current collectors. Directed assembly methods including surface functionalization and layer-by-layer deposition with polyelectrolytes are used to pattern, build, and add functionality to these electrodes. These same techniques are used to incorporate nanoscale selective electrocatalyst into the carbon electrodes to provide a high density of active electron transfer sites for the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. The resulting electrodes are characterized in terms of their physical properties, electrocatalytic function, and selectivity to better understand how processing impacts their performance attributes. The basic function of a membrane electrode assembly is demonstrated for several prototype devices.

  20. Final report :LDRD project 84269 supramolecular structures of peptide-wrapped carbon nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are unique nanoscale building blocks for a variety of materials and applications, from nanocomposites, sensors and molecular electronics to drug and vaccine delivery. An important step towards realizing these applications is the ability to controllably self-assemble the nanotubes into larger structures. Recently, amphiphilic peptide helices have been shown to bind to carbon nanotubes and thus solubilize them in water. Furthermore, the peptides then facilitate the assembly of the peptide-wrapped nanotubes into supramolecular, well-aligned fibers. We investigate the role that molecular modeling can play in elucidating the interactions between the peptides and the carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution. Using ab initio methods, we have studied the interactions between water and CNTs. Classical simulations can be used on larger length scales. However, it is difficult to sample in atomistic detail large biomolecules such as the amphiphilic peptide of interest here. Thus, we have explored both new sampling methods using configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations, and also coarse-grained models for peptides described in the literature. An improved capability to model these inorganichiopolymer interfaces could be used to generate improved understanding of peptide-nanotube self-assembly, eventually leading to the engineering of new peptides for specific self-assembly goals.

  1. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jungk, John Michael; Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M.; Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  2. Final report LDRD project 105816 : model reduction of large dynamic systems with localized nonlinearities.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Hetmaniuk, Ulrich L.; Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2009-10-01

    Advanced computing hardware and software written to exploit massively parallel architectures greatly facilitate the computation of extremely large problems. On the other hand, these tools, though enabling higher fidelity models, have often resulted in much longer run-times and turn-around-times in providing answers to engineering problems. The impediments include smaller elements and consequently smaller time steps, much larger systems of equations to solve, and the inclusion of nonlinearities that had been ignored in days when lower fidelity models were the norm. The research effort reported focuses on the accelerating the analysis process for structural dynamics though combinations of model reduction and mitigation of some factors that lead to over-meshing.

  3. Geomechanics of penetration : experimental and computational approaches : final report for LDRD project 38718.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Fossum, Arlo Frederick; Rivas, Raul R.; Bronowski, David R.; Preece, Dale S.

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to increase our understanding of which properties of geomaterials most influence the penetration process with a goal of improving our predictive ability. Two primary approaches were followed: development of a realistic, constitutive model for geomaterials and designing an experimental approach to study penetration from the target's point of view. A realistic constitutive model, with parameters based on measurable properties, can be used for sensitivity analysis to determine the properties that are most important in influencing the penetration process. An immense literature exists that is devoted to the problem of predicting penetration into geomaterials or similar man-made materials such as concrete. Various formulations have been developed that use an analytic or more commonly, numerical, solution for the spherical or cylindrical cavity expansion as a sort of Green's function to establish the forces acting on a penetrator. This approach has had considerable success in modeling the behavior of penetrators, both as to path and depth of penetration. However the approach is not well adapted to the problem of understanding what is happening to the material being penetrated. Without a picture of the stress and strain state imposed on the highly deformed target material, it is not easy to determine what properties of the target are important in influencing the penetration process. We developed an experimental arrangement that allows greater control of the deformation than is possible in actual penetrator tests, yet approximates the deformation processes imposed by a penetrator. Using explosive line charges placed in a central borehole, we loaded cylindrical specimens in a manner equivalent to an increment of penetration, allowing the measurement of the associated strains and accelerations and the retrieval of specimens from the more-or-less intact cylinder. Results show clearly that the deformation zone is highly concentrated near the borehole, with almost no damage occurring beyond 1/2 a borehole diameter. This implies penetration is not strongly influenced by anything but the material within a diameter or so of the penetration. For penetrator tests, target size should not matter strongly once target diameters exceed some small multiple of the penetrator diameter. Penetration into jointed rock should not be much affected unless a discontinuity is within a similar range. Accelerations measured at several points along a radius from the borehole are consistent with highly-concentrated damage and energy absorption; At the borehole wall, accelerations were an order of magnitude higher than at 1/2 a diameter, but at the outer surface, 8 diameters away, accelerations were as expected for propagation through an elastic medium. Accelerations measured at the outer surface of the cylinders increased significantly with cure time for the concrete. As strength increased, less damage was observed near the explosively-driven borehole wall consistent with the lower energy absorption expected and observed for stronger concrete. As it is the energy absorbing properties of a target that ultimately stop a penetrator, we believe this may point the way to a more readily determined equivalent of the S number.

  4. FY09 Final Report for LDRD Project: Understanding Viral Quasispecies Evolution through Computation and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C

    2009-11-12

    In FY09 they will (1) complete the implementation, verification, calibration, and sensitivity and scalability analysis of the in-cell virus replication model; (2) complete the design of the cell culture (cell-to-cell infection) model; (3) continue the research, design, and development of their bioinformatics tools: the Web-based structure-alignment-based sequence variability tool and the functional annotation of the genome database; (4) collaborate with the University of California at San Francisco on areas of common interest; and (5) submit journal articles that describe the in-cell model with simulations and the bioinformatics approaches to evaluation of genome variability and fitness.

  5. Final report for LDRD Project 93633 : new hash function for data protection.

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, Timothy John; Dautenhahn, Nathan; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Tolk, Keith Michael; Orman, Hilarie; Walker, Andrea Mae; Malone, Sean; Lee, Eric; Neumann, William Douglas; Cordwell, William R.; Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Anderson, Eric; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Collins, Michael Joseph; McDonald, Timothy Scott; Caskey, Susan Adele

    2009-03-01

    The security of the widely-used cryptographic hash function SHA1 has been impugned. We have developed two replacement hash functions. The first, SHA1X, is a drop-in replacement for SHA1. The second, SANDstorm, has been submitted as a candidate to the NIST-sponsored SHA3 Hash Function competition.

  6. Final report on LDRD project : outstanding challenges for AlGaInN MOCVD.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Russell, Michael J.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2005-03-01

    The AlGaInN material system is used for virtually all advanced solid state lighting and short wavelength optoelectronic devices. Although metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has proven to be the workhorse deposition technique, several outstanding scientific and technical challenges remain, which hinder progress and keep RD&A costs high. The three most significant MOCVD challenges are: (1) Accurate temperature measurement; (2) Reliable and reproducible p-doping (Mg); and (3) Low dislocation density GaN material. To address challenge (1) we designed and tested (on reactor mockup) a multiwafer, dual wavelength, emissivity-correcting pyrometer (ECP) for AlGaInN MOCVD. This system simultaneously measures the reflectance (at 405 and 550 nm) and emissivity-corrected temperature for each individual wafer, with the platen signal entirely rejected. To address challenge (2) we measured the MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation phase diagram from 65-115 C, at typical MOCVD concentrations. Results indicate that it requires temperatures of 80-100 C in order to prevent MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation. Modification and testing of our research reactor will not be complete until FY2005. A new commercial Veeco reactor was installed in early FY2004, and after qualification growth experiments were conducted to improve the GaN quality using a delayed recovery technique, which addresses challenge (3). Using a delayed recovery technique, the dislocation densities determined from x-ray diffraction were reduced from 2 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} to 4 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. We have also developed a model to simulate reflectance waveforms for GaN growth on sapphire.

  7. Final report on LDRD project : narrow-linewidth VCSELs for atomic microsystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2011-09-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are well suited for emerging photonic microsystems due to their low power consumption, ease of integration with other optical components, and single frequency operation. However, the typical VCSEL linewidth of 100 MHz is approximately ten times wider than the natural linewidth of atoms used in atomic beam clocks and trapped atom research, which degrades or completely destroys performance in those systems. This report documents our efforts to reduce VCSEL linewidths below 10 MHz to meet the needs of advanced sub-Doppler atomic microsystems, such as cold-atom traps. We have investigated two complementary approaches to reduce VCSEL linewidth: (A) increasing the laser-cavity quality factor, and (B) decreasing the linewidth enhancement factor (alpha) of the optical gain medium. We have developed two new VCSEL devices that achieved increased cavity quality factors: (1) all-semiconductor extended-cavity VCSELs, and (2) micro-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (MECSELs). These new VCSEL devices have demonstrated linewidths below 10 MHz, and linewidths below 1 MHz seem feasible with further optimization.

  8. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  9. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model evaluation in situations of high

  10. LDRD final report on high power broadly tunable Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers for improved chemical species detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.; Fuller, Charles T.; Samora, Sally; Klem, John Frederick; Young, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of our project was to examine a novel quantum cascade laser design that should inherently increase the output power of the laser while simultaneously providing a broad tuning range. Such a laser source enables multiple chemical species identification with a single laser and/or very broad frequency coverage with a small number of different lasers, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based chemical detection systems. In our design concept, the discrete states in quantum cascade lasers are replaced by minibands made of multiple closely spaced electron levels. To facilitate the arduous task of designing miniband-to-miniband quantum cascade lasers, we developed a program that works in conjunction with our existing modeling software to completely automate the design process. Laser designs were grown, characterized, and iterated. The details of the automated design program and the measurement results are summarized in this report.

  11. Physics and Advanced Technologies LDRD Final Report:Adaptive Optics Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, S; Max, C; Macintosh, B; Grossman, A

    2004-01-21

    This focus of this project was the investigation of the planets Uranus and Neptune and Saturn's moon Titan using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy at the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescopes. These bodies share a common type of atmosphere, one that is rich in methane and has a hydrocarbon haze layer produced by methane photolysis. Neptune and Uranus have atmospheric features which change on short timescales; we have investigated their altitude, composition, and connection to events occurring deeper in the planets' tropospheres. Titan has a solid surface located under its atmosphere, the composition of which is still quite uncertain. With spectra that sample the vertical structure of the atmosphere and narrowband observations that selectively probe Titan's surface we have determined the surface reflectivity of Titan at near-infrared wavelengths.

  12. LDRD 99-ERI-010 Final Report: Sapphire: Scalable Pattern Recognition for Large-Scale Scientific Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C

    2002-01-30

    There is a rapidly widening gap between our ability to collect data and our ability to explore, analyze, and understand the data. As a result, useful information is overlooked, and the potential benefits of increased computational and data gathering capabilities only partially realized. This problem of data overload is becoming a serious impediment to scientific advancement in areas as diverse as counter-proliferation, the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), astrophysics, computer security, and climate modeling, where vast amounts of data are collected through observations or simulations. To improve the way in which scientists extract useful information from their data, we are developing a new generation of tools and techniques based on data mining. Data mining is the semi-automated discovery of patterns, associations, anomalies, and statistically significant structures in data. It consists of two steps--in data pre-processing, we extract high-level features from the data, and in pattern recognition, we use the features to identify and characterize patterns in the data. In this project, our focus is on developing scalable algorithms for the pattern recognition task of classification. Our goal is to improve the performance of these algorithms, without sacrificing accuracy. We are demonstrating these techniques using an astronomy application, namely the detection of radio-emitting galaxies with a bent-double morphology in the FIRST survey. Our research has been incorporated into software to make it easily accessible to LLNL scientists. The author describes their accomplishments in each of these three areas.

  13. FY06 LDRD Final Report Next-generation x-ray optics: focusing hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M; Soufli, R

    2007-03-01

    The original goal of our research was to open up a new class of scientific experiments by increasing the power of newly available x-ray sources by orders of magnitude. This was accomplished by developing a new generation of x-ray optics, based on hard x-ray (10-200 keV) reflective and diffractive focusing elements. The optical systems we envision begin with a core reflective optic, which has the ability to capture and concentrate x-rays across a wide range of energies and angles band, combined with diffractive optics, based on large-scale multilayer structures, that will further enhance the spatial, spectral and temporal resolving power of the system. Enabling technologies developed at LLNL such as precise mounting of thermally formed substrates, smoothing techniques and multilayer films of ultra-high reflectance and precision were crucial in the development and demonstration of our research objectives. Highlights of this phase of the project include: the design and fabrication of a concentrator optic for the Pleiades Thomson X-ray source located at LLNL, smoothing of glass substrates through application of polyimide films, and the design, fabrication and testing of novel volume multilayers structures. Part of our research into substrate smooth led to the development of a new technique (patent pending) to construct high-quality, inexpensive x-ray optics. This innovation resulted in LLNL constructing a x-ray optic for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and allowed LLNL to join the international experiment.

  14. Project WORKSMART. A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NashvilleREAD, Nashville, TN.

    Project WORKSMART was a Nashville, Tennessee-based workplace literacy project to provide an exemplary multidimensional workplace literacy program while simultaneously demonstrating products and practices that promote lifelong learning that can be customized and replicated in diverse work environments. The project was a partnership between…

  15. 2013 SRNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, S.

    2014-03-07

    This report demonstrates the execution of our LDRD program within the objectives and guidelines outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the DOE Order 413.2b. The projects described within the report align purposefully with SRNL’s strategic vision and provide great value to the DOE. The diversity exhibited in the research and development projects underscores the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) mission and enhances that mission by developing the technical capabilities and human capital necessary to support future DOE-EM national needs. As a multiprogram national laboratory, SRNL is applying those capabilities to achieve tangible results for the nation in National Security, Environmental Stewardship, Clean Energy and Nuclear Materials Management.

  16. Universal bioprocessor LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Luongo, Kenneth N., 1960-; Reichmuth, David S.; Cummings, Eric B.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Sabounchi, Poorya; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Syed, Yusef; Ponce, Pierre; Salmi, Allen J.; VandeVreugde, James E.

    2006-11-01

    Microsystems pose unparalleled opportunity in the realm of real-time sample analysis for multiple applications, including Homeland Security monitoring devices, environmental monitoring, and biomedical diagnostics. The need for a universal means of processing, separating, and delivering a sample within these devices is a critical need if these systems are to receive widespread implementation in the industry and government sectors. Efficient particle separation and enrichment techniques are critical for a range of analytical functions including pathogen detection, sample preparation, high-throughput particle sorting, and biomedical diagnostics. Previously, using insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) in microfluidic glass devices, we demonstrated simultaneous particle separation and concentration. As an alternative to glass, we evaluate the performance of similar iDEP structures produced in polymer-based microdevices and their enhancement through dynamic surface coatings. There are numerous processing and operational advantages that motivate our transition to polymers such as the availability of numerous innate chemical compositions for tailoring performance, mechanical robustness, economy of scale, and ease of thermoforming and mass manufacturing. The polymer chips we have evaluated are fabricated through an injection molding process of the commercially available cyclic olefin copolymer Zeonor{reg_sign}. We demonstrate that the polymer devices achieve the same performance metrics as glass devices. Additionally, we show that the nonionic block copolymer surfactant Pluronic F127 has a strong interaction with the cyclic olefin copolymer at very low concentrations, positively impacting performance by decreasing the magnitude of the applied electric field necessary to achieve particle trapping. The presence of these dynamic surface coatings, therefore, lowers the power required to operate such devices and minimizes Joule heating. The results of this study demonstrate that polymeric microfluidic devices with surfactant coatings for insulator-based dielectrophoresis provide an affordable engineering strategy for selective particle enrichment and sorting.

  17. Educational Information Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Walter J.

    The CardPac System of Educational Accounting project developed instruments and procedures for collecting information about aspects of the elementary and secondary educational programs in Iowa. This project included the development of a bank of educational information that will transcribe, integrate, and store information centrally for purposes of…

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1969

    This project sought to develop a set of tests for the assessment of the basic literacy and occupational cognizance of pupils in those public elementary and secondary schools, including vocational schools, receiving services through Federally supported educational programs and projects. The assessment is to produce generalizable average scores for…

  19. Project TIME. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroyer, Connie J.; Payne, David L.

    Project TIME (Training Initiative for Manufacturing Employees) was an 18-month National Workplace Literacy Program conducted by Lord Fairfax Community College in conjunction with an automotive parts plant and Triplett Technical and Business Institute in Virginia. Project TIME had three primary objectives: to help employees obtain the basic…

  20. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 2: LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-05-19

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2002, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''To make programs succeed today and to ensure the vitality of the Laboratory tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in new technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program (Volume I) and the LDRD program (Volume II). This report summarizes the LDRD portion of Engineering's Technology Program. LDRD is the vehicle for researching and developing those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2002, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology for national security applications.

  1. Landfill gas project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The methane gas recovered from the landfill is used for space heating and water heating for the Florence-Lauderdale Humane Shelter 600 feet from the well head. The project to date and future development are described briefly. (MHR)

  2. Insulated siding project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Research and development on the nibbed vinyl insulative siding product has been completed. The product has been tested and evaluated in response to the issues raised by the first and second stage reviewers in the OERI invention review process. The production run machine design has been completed, prototyped and evaluated and the agreement for full-scale production. Final evaluation and testing of the machine's flawless part production was integral to the manufacture and preparation of samples for purposes of final tests in the Ball State CERES laboratories.

  3. Green Schools Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Verdict, M.

    2000-09-27

    The Alliance to Save Energy has responded to interest in the Green Schools concept from the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. The Alliance conducted a train-the-trainers workshop in Augusta, Maine March 17--18, 1999. This work is part of a Green Schools replication project leveraged by funds from another source, NORDAX, which contributed $80,000 to provide partial support to staff at the Maine Energy Education Project (MEEP), Vermont Energy Education Program (VEEP), and New Hampshire Governor's Office to develop Green Schools Projects. DOE funds were used to conduct training, develop a network of state and local government, business and school partners to support school efficiency activities in those three states.

  4. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  5. Montana Faxnet Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brander, Linda L.

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Montana Faxnet Project, which was created to design and demonstrate a statewide document delivery network utilizing telefacsimile equipment that would create equitable access for all Montanans accessing and retrieving information, and reduce the waiting time for requested materials…

  6. Project Open Door. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verheyden-Hilliard, Mary Ellen

    The major purpose of Project Open Door was to design, develop, test, and disseminate a portable module for vocational educators and others to use with junior high school students in pre-vocational exploration free of sex stereotyping. The module produced contained a slide presentation with accompanying cassette tape and a leader's guide. An…

  7. Collection Analysis Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Wanda; And Others

    The Collection Analysis Project (CAP) was undertaken in response to one of the major recommendations of the University at Stony Brook Libraries' strategic plan. It is the first step in promoting the necessary change to bring collection management and development into conformity with accepted professional practice, and make it more responsive to…

  8. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Orval D.

    During 1972-73, Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) involved 1,350 Indian students in 60 classrooms at Sells, Topowa, San Carlos, Rice, Many Farms, Hotevilla, Peach Springs, and Sacaton. Primary objectives were: (1) improvement in reading skills, (2) development of cultural awareness, and (3) providing for the Special Education…

  9. Anthropometric Training Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego State Coll., CA.

    The Anthropometric Training Project was aimed at providing a training program for select students to develop research competency in an area relating body type, composition, anthropometric assessment, and physical performance measures. The program involves interdisciplinary cooperation in training through seminars, laboratory practice, and…

  10. Computer Conferencing Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Donald R.; And Others

    This report of a 3-year project discusses the results of the testing of computer conferencing and e-mail (electronic mail) at Montgomery College (Maryland) over a period of four semesters. The product was designed to answer the following questions: (1) Could computer conferencing or e-mail increase access? (2) Would the quality of the instruction…

  11. Spray casting project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  12. California Prison Gang Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Eric

    A project investigated the cultural life, ideology, and education systems of particular prison gangs. It focused on recent changes in the gang system regarding gang education, organizational structure, and the balance of power in prisons and in relations with street gangs. Finally, the project assessed California's response to its prison gangs, in…

  13. Model Tech Prep Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Maryland Educational Consortium, La Plata.

    The Southern Maryland Educational Consortium's Tech Prep Model Demonstration project is described in this final report. The consortium members are Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's county school districts and Charles County Community College in southern Maryland. The project is based on a 4 + 2 model in which ninth-grade students develop career…

  14. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.

  15. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  16. Project "Flashlight" Planning Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrmann, Stephen C.

    This final report describes results of a planning grant for the "Flashlight" project, an effort to develop, test, and disseminate evaluation procedures that a postsecondary institution or department could use to periodically assess its evolving educational strategies, in particular strategies supported by use of computing, video, and…

  17. Pregnant Adolescent Substance Abuse Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James

    This document is the final report on the Pregnant Adolescent Substance Abuse Project (PASAP) conducted in Prince Georges County (Maryland) in 1987 and 1988. The PASAP consisted of two components that operated independently: an Early Intervention Program that increased the proportion of pregnant adolescent substance users who were using various…

  18. Computational Biology: A Strategic Initiative LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Barksy, D; Colvin, M

    2002-02-07

    The goal of this Strategic Initiative LDRD project was to establish at LLNL a new core capability in computational biology, combining laboratory strengths in high performance computing, molecular biology, and computational chemistry and physics. As described in this report, this project has been very successful in achieving this goal. This success is demonstrated by the large number of referred publications, invited talks, and follow-on research grants that have resulted from this project. Additionally, this project has helped build connections to internal and external collaborators and funding agencies that will be critical to the long-term vitality of LLNL programs in computational biology. Most importantly, this project has helped establish on-going research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, the Physics and Applied Technology Directorate, and the Computation Directorate. These groups include three laboratory staff members originally hired as post-doctoral researchers for this strategic initiative.

  19. SRNL LDRD ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-29

    The Laboratory Director is pleased to have the opportunity to present the 2008 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This is my first opportunity to do so, and only the second such report that has been issued. As will be obvious, SRNL has built upon the excellent start that was made with the LDRD program last year, and researchers have broken new ground in some important areas. In reviewing the output of this program this year, it is clear that the researchers implemented their ideas with creativity, skill and enthusiasm. It is gratifying to see this level of participation, because the LDRD program remains a key part of meeting SRNL's and DOE's strategic goals, and helps lay a solid scientific foundation for SRNL as the premier applied science laboratory. I also believe that the LDRD program's results this year have demonstrated SRNL's value as the EM Corporate Laboratory, having advanced knowledge in a spectrum of areas, including reduction of the technical risks of cleanup, separations science, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials, and many others. The research in support of Energy Security and National and Homeland Security has been no less notable. SRNL' s researchers have shown again that the nascent LDRD program is a sound investment for DOE that will pay off handsomely for the nation as time goes on.

  20. Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gili, J.A.; Poston, V.K.

    1993-11-01

    This is the final report of the Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project, which was funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The project had two objectives: (a) to develop and demonstrate a prototype of production-scale equipment for the dry, horizontal consolidation and packaging of spent nuclear fuel rods from commercial boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies, and (b) to report the development and demonstration results to the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. This report summarizes the activities and conclusions of the project management contractor, EG&G Idaho, Inc., and the fabrication and testing contractor, NUS Corporation (NUS). The report also presents EG&G Idaho`s assessments of the equipment and procedures developed by NUS.

  1. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Kollet, S; Chow, F; Granvold, P; Duan, Q

    2007-02-23

    This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4) a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these

  2. A Complexity Science-Based Framework for Global Joint Operations Analysis to Support Force Projection: LDRD Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  3. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Felter, T E; Searson, P C; Chen, M

    2005-02-03

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting.

  4. Adaptive Optics Views of the Hubble Deep Fields Final report on LLNL LDRD Project 03-ERD-002

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Gavel, D; Pennington, D; Gibbard, S; van Dam, M; Larkin, J; Koo, D; Raschke, L; Melbourne, J

    2007-02-17

    We used laser guide star adaptive optics at the Lick and Keck Observatories to study active galactic nuclei and galaxies, with emphasis on those in the early Universe. The goals were to observe large galaxies like our own Milky Way in the process of their initial assembly from sub-components, to identify central active galactic nuclei due to accreting black holes in galaxy cores, and to measure rates of star formation and evolution in galaxies. In the distant universe our focus was on the GOODS and GEMS fields (regions in the Northern and Southern sky that include the Hubble Deep Fields) as well as the Extended Groth Strip and COSMOS fields. Each of these parts of the sky has been intensively studied at multiple wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the XMM Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and several ground-based telescopes including the Very Large Array radio interferometer, in order to gain an unbiased view of a significant statistical sample of galaxies in the early universe.

  5. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  6. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  7. Final Report for LDRD Project ''A New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL''

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Bergman, D J; Dignon, J E; Connell, P S

    2002-01-31

    Observations of global temperature records seem to show less warming than predictions of global warming brought on by increasing concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. One of the reasonable explanations for this apparent inconsistency is that the increasing concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols may be partially counteracting the effects of greenhouse gases. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the solar radiation, directly change the planetary albedo. Aerosols, unlike CO{sub 2}, may also have a significant indirect effect by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Increases in CCN can result in clouds with more but smaller droplets, enhancing the reflection of solar radiation. Aerosol direct and indirect effects are a strong function of the distributions of all aerosol types and the size distribution of the aerosol in question. However, the large spatial and temporal variabilities in the concentration, chemical characteristics, and size distribution of aerosols have made it difficult to assess the magnitude of aerosol effects on atmospheric radiation. These variabilities in aerosol characteristics as well as their effects on clouds are the leading sources of uncertainty in predicting future climate variation. Inventory studies have shown that the present-day anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of fine particle mass primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Parts of our earlier studies have been focused on developing an understanding of global sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol abundances and investigating their climate effects [Chuang et al., 1997; Penner et al., 1998]. We have also modeled aerosol optical properties to account for changes in the refractive indices with relative humidity and dry aerosol composition [Grant et al., 1999]. Moreover, we have developed parameterizations of cloud response to aerosol abundance for use in global models to evaluate the importance of aerosol/cloud interactions on climate forcing [Chuang and Penner, 1995]. Our research has been recognized as one of a few studies attempting to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate in the IPCC Third Assessment Report [IPCC, 2001]. Our previous assessments of aerosol climate effects were based on a general circulation model (NCAR CCM1) fully coupled to a global tropospheric chemistry model (GRANTOUR). Both models, however, were developed more than a decade ago. The lack of advanced physics representation and techniques in our current models limits us from further exploring the interrelationship between aerosol, cloud, and climate variation. Our objective is to move to a new era of aerosol/cloud/climate modeling at LLNL by coupling the most advanced chemistry and climate models and by incorporating an aerosol microphysics module. This modeling capability will enable us to identify and analyze the responsible processes in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions and therefore, to improve the level of scientific understanding for aerosol climate effects. This state-of-the-art coupled models will also be used to address the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural emissions in the spatial pattern of aerosol climate forcing in order to assess the potential of human induced climate change.

  8. Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

    2000-01-01

    A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

  9. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E.; Gourley, M.F.; Bellum, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  10. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  11. Metastability and Delta-Phase Retention in Plutonium Alloys Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-029

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J; Schwartz, A J; Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Wall, M A; Wolfer, W G; Haslam, J J; Moore, K T

    2004-02-11

    The {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in Pu-Ga alloys is intriguing for both scientific and technological reasons. On cooling, the ductile fcc {delta}-phase transforms martensitically to the brittle monoclinic {alpha}'-phase at approximately -120 C (depending on composition). This exothermic transformation involves a 20% volume contraction and a significant increase in resistivity. The reversion of {alpha}' to {delta} involves a large temperature hysteresis beginning just above room temperature. In an attempt to better understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics responsible for these unusual features, we have investigated the {delta} {leftrightarrow} {alpha}' phase transformations in a Pu-0.6 wt% Ga alloy using a combination of experimental and modeling techniques.

  12. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  13. Final Report for the NERI Project

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Lee

    2009-03-31

    This final report summarizes the research activities during the entire performance period of the NERI grant, including the extra 9 months granted under a no-cost time extension. Building up on the 14 quarterly reports submitted through October 2008, we present here an overview of the research accomplishments under the five tasks originally proposed in July 2004, together with citations for publications resulting from the project. The AFCI-NERI project provided excellent support for two undergraduate and 10 graduates students at the University of Michigan during a period of three years and nine months. Significant developments were achieved in three areas: (1) Efficient deterministic fuel cycle optimization algorithms both for PWR and SFR configurations, (2) Efficient search algorithm for PWR equilibrium cycles, and (3) Simplified Excel-based script for dynamic fuel cycle analysis of diverse cycles. The project resulted in a total of 8 conference papers and three journal papers, including two that will be submitted shortly. Three pending publications are attached to the report.

  14. Governor's Energy Project, final project report, March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The report documents the early period of the Governors Energy Project, operated under the auspices of the National Governors Association (NGA) from January 1, 1974 through June 30, 1977, and outlines the context within which NHA's energy program began. Further, the general goals, objectives, and tasks of the project are delineated, and the process and product-oriented mechanisms or techniques used by the Project to fulfill its goals, objectives, and tasks are addressed. Finally, the major outcomes and lessons learned with regard to the development, implementation, and maintenance of the intermediary role in the intergovernmental system in addressing nationwide problems, including those with scientific content, are considered. Results reveal that two types of energy information and expertise-sharing took place: State to State, and State to others. Further, the capability of States to develop energy-related policies based in science and technology was enhanced, and State energy offices were strengthened. Federal support is said to be crucial in initiating projects requiring catalytic and coordinative functions.

  15. Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-04-02

    Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

  16. The LiveWire Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T.; Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

  17. N-STAR/IMAGE Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, R.K.

    1993-06-30

    This is the final report on the N*IMAGE project. It contains a brief abstract of the project background, objectives, efforts taken to achieve the objectives, and publications provided. The Soviet Union has devolved into various autonomous republics, each having individual nationalistic agendas, yet retaining many of the indigenous capabilities and facilities that were present prior to the dissolution of the USSR. Military forces, especially nuclear, still exist in spite of the changes in the overarching control hierarchy. The Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS] has been created, ostensibly maintaining control over the strategic forces of the now-defunct Soviet Union. These changes have created an identifiable need to understand the old forces in a new context. It is important to understand the political, social, and economic structures that bear on the new environment. Information on the individual republics and former Soviet Union is coming in at a staggering rate; it must be assimilated and analyzed while being careful not to lose those existing data points and analysis of Soviet information that are still relevant. The objective of the proposed FSRC work was to provide user-friendly, automated analytical tools to assist the analyst in assessing various aspects of Russia and CIS Nuclear Weapons. For each, the data package includes an extensive, free-form, interactive database system (N-STAR), a hierarchical structure of questions which lead an analyst through the essential elements of the related decisionmaking process (IMAGE), and an instruction manual explaining the use of the systems and their interrelationships. Relevant data su porting the analysis will be available in a standard format on the same system, facilitating data fusion and assessment. These analyst tools are in the form of Macintosh-compatible software systems (N-STAR and IMAGE) along with supporting documentation.

  18. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 470.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL... Projects § 470.311 Final project approval. (a) The Office of Personnel Management will consider all timely...) The Office of Personnel Management shall provide a copy of the final version of the project plan...

  19. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 470.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL... Projects § 470.311 Final project approval. (a) The Office of Personnel Management will consider all timely...) The Office of Personnel Management shall provide a copy of the final version of the project plan...

  20. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 470.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL... Projects § 470.311 Final project approval. (a) The Office of Personnel Management will consider all timely...) The Office of Personnel Management shall provide a copy of the final version of the project plan...

  1. What Can Students Learn from Final Year Research Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Final year research projects are a feature of most biosciences undergraduate courses. However, in a climate of increasing student numbers there is growing interest in providing alternatives to such resource-intensive projects. This interest raises some key questions. In particular, what do students learn from traditional final year projects and…

  2. The Education North Evaluation Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, E. J.; McIntosh, R. G.

    The Education North Evaluation Project monitored operation of the Education North Project (a 1978-82 project aimed at encouraging parents, teachers, and other community members in small, isolated northern Alberta communities to work together in improving the quality of education for school-aged children), assessed project outcomes, and developed…

  3. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  4. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S.

    2007-11-01

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three

  5. The Midwest State Archives Guide Project: An Evaluation. [Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Max J.; And Others

    This document serves as the final report to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) of the work of the Midwest State Archives Guide Project. The project involved the state archives in Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, and was expected to contribute to a projected national guide project database, though when…

  6. The PIE Institute Project: Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark; Carroll, Becky; Helms, Jen; Smith, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) Institute project was funded in 2005 by the National Science Foundation (NSF). For the past three years, Inverness Research has served as the external evaluator for the PIE project. The authors' evaluation efforts have included extensive observation and documentation of PIE project activities; ongoing…

  7. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  8. 78 FR 26063 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Final Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Hobble Creek Restoration Project Final Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary... with the Final Environmental Assessment--East Hobble Creek Restoration Project. These two agencies have... Restoration Project. The Final Environmental Assessment has been completed in conjunction with the June...

  9. Rural Textile Workers Literacy Enhancement Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This document consists of the final report and sample curricula from the Rural Textile Workers Literacy Enhancement Project. The final report details how the project was initiated in April 1993 to help employees of five textile and apparel manufacturing companies in southeastern Alabama improve their literacy and numeracy skills. A second…

  10. Tools for characterizing biomembranes : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Stevens, Mark; Holland, Gregory P.; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2007-10-01

    A suite of experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy tools were developed to investigate lipid structure and dynamics in model membrane systems. By utilizing both multinuclear and multidimensional NMR experiments a range of different intra- and inter-molecular contacts were probed within the membranes. Examples on pure single component lipid membranes and on the canonical raft forming mixture of DOPC/SM/Chol are presented. A unique gel phase pretransition in SM was also identified and characterized using these NMR techniques. In addition molecular dynamics into the hydrogen bonding network unique to sphingomyelin containing membranes were evaluated as a function of temperature, and are discussed.

  11. LDRD 93-ERP-166 Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.; Lee, F.D.

    1995-07-01

    In this article, recent measurements made with LIFTIRS, the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, are presented. The experience gained with this instrument has produced a variety of insights into the tradeoffs-between signal to noise ratio (SNR), spectral resolution and temporal resolution for time multiplexed Fourier transform imaging spectrometers. This experience has also clarified the practical advantages and disadvantages of Fourier transform hyperspectral imaging spectrometers regarding adaptation to varying measurement requirements on SNR vs spectral resolution, spatial resolution and temporal resolution.

  12. LDRD final report on nonflammable deterrent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Rand, P.B.; Shepodd, T.

    1997-05-01

    Dispensable materials, such as sticky foams and rigid polyurethane foams, have been used as access deterrent systems by DOE security since the 1970`s. While these have been very effective systems, they also have some intrinsic problems such as toxicity, flammability and a limited range of temperature in which they remain functional. Current trends to use less-than-lethal methods to gain advantage in military and civilian conflict scenarios demand that new and better deterrent materials be designed. The most effective sticky foam is a hydrocarbon-based material which is composed of high molecular weight polymers, low molecular weight tackifying agents, fire retardants and foam stabilizing surfactants. In order to expand and fully utilize sticky foam technology, a truly nonflammable analog is required. To this end, this work involves first generation development of silicone-based deterrent systems. Two basic types of silicone systems were evaluated. First, systems based on commercial resins were prepared using a variety of thixotropic materials, plasticizers and formulation strategies. Second, systems were prepared using in situ sol-gel techniques to rapidly promote gelation in blends of functionalized silicone polymers. The resulting materials were evaluated for their foamability using non-CFC foaming agents and found to be suitable for foam formation. The properties of these sticky materials can be tailored by virtue of the formulation flexibility; thus, they represent a new class of nontoxic, nonflammable deterrents with a wide temperature range of use.

  13. LDRD Final Report - 01-FS-004

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A J

    2002-01-23

    This report describes the results from an experimental program to investigate the feasibility of laser produced MeV protons as a diagnostic of electric fields or shock compressed materials. The experimental campaign was very successful, and has led to substantial advances in the characterization and optimization of proton sources from ultra-intense laser-solid interaction. This is a subject of the highest scientific interest [1] and is highly relevant to developing its use as a possible NIF implosion diagnostic and other applications relevant to stockpile stewardship.

  14. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  15. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations show that R141b hydrate is stable at temperatures up to 265K, while the isomer hydrate is only stable up to 150K. Despite hydrogen bonding between guest and host, R141b molecules rotated freely within the water cage. The Raman spectrum of R141b in both the pure and hydrate phases was also compared with vibrational analysis from both computational methods. In particular, the frequency of the C-Cl stretch mode (585 cm{sup -1}) undergoes a shift to higher frequency in the hydrate phase. Raman spectra also indicate that this peak undergoes splitting and intensity variation as the temperature is decreased from 4 C to -4 C.

  16. Final LDRD Report for Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B; Klein, R

    2004-02-13

    Extreme conditions of density and temperature of interest to DNT are similar to conditions of low-altitude atmospheres of neutron stars. Consequently, HED experimental capabilities being developed at LLNL (NIF, petawatt lasers) will open the door to laboratory studies of neutron star atmospheres. This capability will seed a new era in the study of extreme physics generated by strongly radiation dominated flows and laser-plasma interactions for the laboratory study of distant astrophysical phenomena. Indeed as has been noted by the recent Davidsen report on Frontiers of HEDPP (p. 85) ''Accretion disks and atmospheres of neutron stars likely fall in the radiation-dominated regimes, where the radiation pressure dominates the particle pressure. Unique dynamics can ensue in such a radiation dominated plasma, especially in the presence of turbulent flows and magnetic fields. With the next generation of HED facilities such as ZR, NIF, coupled with ultra-intense laser ''heater beams'', it may become possible to create radiation-dominated plasma conditions in the laboratory relevant to neutron star (and black hole) accretion dynamics''. With the recent advent of the Rossi XTE time-resolved x-ray satellite, we have entered a new era in our ability to probe the physics and dynamics of neutron stars and black holes on rapid timescales not previously possible. With RXTE, we have diagnosed the dynamics occurring near the surface of a neutron star on timescales less than a millisecond, and have discovered a new phenomena, photon bubble instabilities, in an a accreting X-ray pulsar Centaurus X-3, some 30,000 light years across the galaxy. (Jerningan, Klein and Arons, ApJ, 2000) We in fact, predicted this instability in simulations with time-dependent 2D radiation-hydrodynamics codes that we had developed. (Klein et al. ApJ 1996a, 1996b) Strongly magnetized neutron stars accrete mass from a nearby normal star that is in orbit with the neutron star. The mass is transferred by way of an accretion disk and eventually finds its way onto the surface of the neutron star, where it is channeled by the strong magnetic fields (typically dipolar) onto polar caps that occupy a small surface ({approx}1 km{sup 2}) area on the neutron star. Photon Bubbles are a violent radiation-hydrodynamic instability whereby low density bubbles (buoyant with respect to the surrounding optically thick plasma flow) fill up with hot 10 keV radiation, grow non-linearly and cause the plasma to become turbulent. The instability occurs when the radiation force on matter exceeds the gravitational force, a regime called super Eddington accretion. As has been shown with a linear stability analysis (Arons ApJ 1992), the low density regions in the midst of surrounding optically thick gas, experience a net flux of radiation and increase in buoyancy. If the magnetic field is appreciable (B > 10{sup 8} Gauss,) a conductive increase in internal energy gives unstable growth with respect to the optically thick surrounding regions. This instability appears as an entropy mode in the accreting plasma. While some aspects of these flows are peculiar to the strongly magnetized neutron stars, most are not. Much of the phenomenology is expected in all super-Eddington flows, whether in accretion powered pulsars, low mass X-ray binaries or in the disks around black holes in active galactic nuclei. The main purpose of our feasibility grant of $75,000 for FY 2003 was to begin the study of the feasibility of generating, in a laboratory plasma, conditions that would mimic the conditions present in the low lying atmosphere of a magnetized neutron star that could potentially give rise to photon bubble instabilities, and eventually permit us to probe the physics of accreting, magnetized compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. This would provide a unique way to explore some of the most exotic astrophysical phenomena in the universe, using powerful high energy density lasers such as NIF and petawatt laboratory platforms.

  17. Transportation Energy Pathways LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, Garrett; Reichmuth, David; Westbrook, Jessica; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Yoshimura, Ann S.; Peterson, Meghan; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Guzman, Katherine Dunphy; Edwards, Donna M.; Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions between the USlight-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources through the year2050. An important capability of our model is the ability to conduct parametric analyses. Others have reliedupon scenario-based analysis, where one discrete set of values is assigned to the input variables and used togenerate one possible realization of the future. While these scenarios can be illustrative of dominant trendsand tradeoffs under certain circumstances, changes in input values or assumptions can have a significantimpact on results, especially when output metrics are associated with projections far into the future. Thistype of uncertainty can be addressed by using a parametric study to examine a range of values for the inputvariables, offering a richer source of data to an analyst.The parametric analysis featured here focuses on a trade space exploration, with emphasis on factors thatinfluence the adoption rates of electric vehicles (EVs), the reduction of GHG emissions, and the reduction ofpetroleum consumption within the US LDV fleet. The underlying model emphasizes competition between13 different types of powertrains, including conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs), conventional hybrids(HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles(BEVs).We find that many factors contribute to the adoption rates of EVs. These include the pace of technologicaldevelopment for the electric powertrain, battery performance, as well as the efficiency improvements inconventional vehicles. Policy initiatives can also have a dramatic impact on the degree of EV adoption. Theconsumer effective payback period, in particular, can significantly increase the market penetration rates ifextended towards the vehicle lifetime.Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas

  18. Migrant Education Dropout Prevention Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The Migrant Education Region 1 of the Santa Clara County Office of Education organized a project to examine the conditions of 1454 migrant students in a sample of northern California schools. The project had two primary components: (1) the collection and analysis of information about migrant students, their family and school situations, and their…

  19. Northern Native Languages Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnaby, Barbara; And Others

    The Northern Native Language Project was constituted in June 1979 to produce a report which would present information on the present situation regarding language education schools in the project area of Ontario (James Bay, Nakina, and Sioux Lookout) and to make recommendations concerning appropriate action for the future. The introduction of the…

  20. Basic/Technical Literacy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White River Vocational Technical School, Newport, AR.

    The Basic/Technical Literacy project at White River Vocational Technical School in Arkansas implemented a comprehensive curriculum to raise students' basic reading and technical literacy levels in their chosen skill area. During the project, master vocabulary lists for each skill area were developed, and self-test worksheets and study guides were…

  1. FIP Interim Review Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitbeck, John K.

    The Family Independence Project (FIP) Interim Review Project in Washington was mounted in order to give preliminary information on the progress of the FIP program compared to Assistance for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) site activity, for management planning, and to document short-term outcomes and trends for policy considerations. A…

  2. Community College Technical Mathematics Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Samuel L.

    The purpose of the research project was to develop an applied or technical mathematics curriculum which would meet the needs of vocational-technical students at the community college level. The research project was divided into three distinct phases: Identifying the mathematical concepts requisite for job-entry competencies in each of the…

  3. Skill Standards and Certification Project. Final Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Lake Coll., Irving, TX.

    This document contains the report of a project conducted to make the concept of a world-class work force a reality. The project was intended to design a comprehensive strategy to link elements from the state's existing vocational-technical education, job training, adult education, tech prep, and apprenticeship programs with the components of SCANS…

  4. Northeast Regional Education Planning Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast Regional Exchange Steering Committee, Boston, MA.

    Created to facilitate the dissemination of information between researchers and the educational community, the Northeast Regional Exchange steering committee has defined needs, determined agency qualifications, identified priorities, undertaken a series of minigrant projects, and developed plans for the extension of these projects and a study of…

  5. VTAE Economic Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzke, Elizabeth

    A project was undertaken to redefine the role of vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE) in economic development in Wisconsin. Included among the objectives of the project were the following: to produce a statewide plan for economic development identifying new linkages among business, industry, labor, and the VTAE system; to develop…

  6. Case Decision Project. Final Report (Process Evaluation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Garry

    The goal of the Case Decision Project (CDP) was to develop a method to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of program management in child protective services in Texas. At the onset of the project, workers across the state had no uniform method of obtaining case information. Therefore, an automated case investigation system was developed.…

  7. Project Final Report: HPC-Colony II

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Terry R; Kale, Laxmikant V; Moreira, Jose

    2013-11-01

    This report recounts the HPC Colony II Project which was a computer science effort funded by DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research office. The project included researchers from ORNL, IBM, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The topic of the effort was adaptive system software for extreme scale parallel machines. A description of findings is included.

  8. Informed Instruction in Mathematics. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John; And Others

    This report describes the results of a three-year study, the Informed Instruction Project, that investigated different approaches to mathematics instruction for students with learning disabilities and at-risk for special education services. The project focused on two strands of inquiry: (1) the effects of a computer-based diagnostic assessment…

  9. New and Emerging Occupations Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    This document reports a project to define, identify, and describe new and emerging occupations in Nebraska and disseminate that information to vocational education program and curriculum planners. Chapter 1 describes the background, problem, and purpose of the project. Chapter 2 sets forth the objectives and discusses procedures for developing a…

  10. Project D. E. A. F. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hairston, Ernest E.

    Project D.E.A.F., its introduction and background, purpose, clientele, methodology, and activities, are described. Project D.E.A.F. was established by an expansion grant from the Rehabilitation Service Administration of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, in cooperation with the Ohio Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation for the purpose…

  11. ADD Special Projects Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortham, Jocelyn F.

    The purpose of this five-year project was to prepare administrators, general and special education teachers, and parents to meet the needs of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD). The project developed five self-instructional ADHD inservice preparation manuals for national and state dissemination and implemented an ADHD…

  12. Montana Labor Mobility Project-6716. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Employment Service, Helena.

    The report is concerned with the third labor mobility project of the Montana State Employment Service. As it had done previously, the project originally intended undertaking relocation of unemployed persons registered with ES offices throughout the state. However, a large layoff of copper miners in the State during the Spring of 1968 made it…

  13. Tellin' Stories Project. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Mary F.

    The Tellin' Stories Project in Washington, DC, was developed to increase the involvement of economically disadvantaged, often limited English-speaking parents in the educational process of their children. The project connected parents, educators, schools, and communities. The third-year evaluation process consisted of these activities: a focus…

  14. Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centro De La Comunidad, Inc., New London, CT.

    During its second year, the Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project recruited eighth and ninth grade Hispanic youth for a four-week cycle, after-school, career exploratory program at Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical School, Groton, Connecticut. A series of career education workshops was the other major project activity. Supportive…

  15. Science for the Eighties: Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magidson, Errol M.

    This report summarizes the goals, objectives, and activities of a project conducted at Kennedy-King College to provide the time and resources for instructors to develop multi-media curriculum materials for use in biology, psychology, and social science courses. Introductory material outlines project objectives in terms of resource development and…

  16. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark David; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesota's Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  17. The final focus test beam project

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 {mu}m. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Project Future Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY.

    Project Future was a 3-year project begun in 1994 as a partnership between the Jefferson County Public Schools and Futura Plastics and Engineering, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky. The project targeted the workplace basic skills of plastic injection molding production workers. The skills classes improved the general education of the workers with…

  19. Smart Gun Technology project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

  20. Pagosa Springs geothermal project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-19

    This booklet discusses some ideas and methods for using Colorado geothermal energy. A project installed in Pagosa Springs, which consists of a pipeline laid down 8th street with service to residences retrofitted to geothermal space heating, is described. (ACR)

  1. Final Year Engineering Projects in Australia and Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, H.; Goh, S.

    2010-01-01

    The paper starts by emphasising that final year engineering projects are regarded important in the training and education of professional engineers in Australia and Europe. The sources of projects available to students were also mentioned. Some Australian universities insist on individual projects but some not, each with their own reasons.…

  2. Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Joanne B.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project, a 4-year federally supported project to identify children who have deaf-blindness and to provide technical assistance in the development of educational services for these children. Major accomplishments of the project included:…

  3. Project Pride. Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Judy

    Project Pride was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project for Haitian-born students. The project was in its fifth and final year in 1993-94 at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn (New York). Participating students (n=158) received instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), native language arts (NLA), and the…

  4. 2+2+2 Dissemination Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane, Diana; And Others

    An overview is provided in this three-part final report of a project designed to disseminate information to assist California high schools, Regional Occupation Programs, and colleges in developing and strengthening 2+2+2 programs. Part I reviews the following project objectives: (1) hire a project coordinator and technical assistant; (2) develop a…

  5. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 470.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PROJECTS Regulatory Requirements Pertaining to Demonstration Projects § 470.311 Final project approval. (a) The Office of Personnel Management will consider all...

  6. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 470.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PROJECTS Regulatory Requirements Pertaining to Demonstration Projects § 470.311 Final project approval. (a) The Office of Personnel Management will consider all...

  7. The NICU Follow-Through Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Forrest C.; Hedlund, Rodd E.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the NICU Follow-Through Project, a 3-year project designed to help hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and community developmental centers serving infants with disabilities or very low birth weights (VLBW) replicate the project's innovative and successful training components.…

  8. NYU Ultracomputer project. Final project summary, 1979-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, A.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses the following on the Ultracomputer project: simulation studies; network analysis; prototype hardware; VSLI design; coordination algorithms; systems software; application software; and compiler development.

  9. Preservation Planning Project Study Team. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Libraries.

    This final report is a product of a comprehensive 14-month Preservation Planning Program (PPP) self-study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Libraries, working with the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) Office of Management Studies. The PPP is designed to put self-help tools into the hands of library staff responsible for developing…

  10. Javanese-English Dictionary Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Elinor Clark

    The purpose of the research covered by this final report was to produce a Javanese-English dictionary, the first ever to exist. Source materials were of two major kinds: (1) pre-Revolution sources: the two most recetnly published Javanese dictionaries (see Bibliography, Pigeaud and Poerwadarminta), predating the 1945 Indonesian war for…

  11. Math Network Curriculum Project. Project Summary; Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco State Univ., CA.

    This document summarizes the work of the Math Curriculum Project at San Francisco State University. The project developed seven curriculum units for the middle school mathematics program, using microcomputers as a problem solving tool to foster mathematical thinking and develop insights into mathematical concepts. They also created a prototype…

  12. Workplace Environmental Literacy Project (WELP). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Orange County Community Coll. District, Fullerton, CA.

    A project was conducted to determine formal and informal competencies based on an expanded definition of workplace environmental literacy. A secondary goal was to develop a compact between employers and training program graduates whereby graduates would have preferential access to employment opportunities. Issues that arose during the…

  13. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  14. Language Integrated Technology Project Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiegemeier, Lois

    The goal of the Language Integrated Technology Grant Project (LIT) consortium was to help provide critical components of successful reading programs through a combination of proven computer/print programs and teacher training. Through leadership provided by the Educational Service District 113 (Olympia, Washington), the LIT consortium of schools…

  15. Jefferson County Adult Reading Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

    The 1980-81 Jefferson County (Kentucky) Adult Reading Program served 601 students functioning below 6.0 grade level during the 1980-81 year. The project's instructional methods and materials were developed based on the experiences of the program for the previous two years. The program was considered a success not only from the viewpoint of the…

  16. Employer Needs Assessment Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinman, Debra G.

    In the summer and spring of 1980 Mercer County Community College undertook a large-scale employer needs assessment project, during which 1,140 Mercer County employers were contacted in order to: (1) assess employers' practices and preferences in the recruitment of personnel; (2) determine employer satisfaction with the College's ability to educate…

  17. Workplace Skills Enhancement Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Private Industry Council, Seattle, WA.

    The Workplace Skills Enhancement Project was provided by the Seattle-King County Private Industry Council in Partnership with the Employment Opportunities Center and the Refugee Federation Service Center. Of the 150 participants in the program, 137 were Asian. Workplace literacy training was generally advertised as a voluntary program available to…

  18. Elderly Service Workers' Training Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Dexter; Cap, Orest

    The Elderly Service Workers' Training Project (ESWTP) was designed to identify the problems encountered by human service workers in their daily contact with older adults. A needs assessment (mail survey and structured personal interview) was conducted throughout Manitoba to identify and document the scope of human service workers' on-the-job…

  19. Labor Exchange Skills Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Eleanor; Hendrickson-Larson, Joanna; Hoppe, Ruth; Paige, Bruce; Rosenow, Steve

    The Labor Exchange Skills Project, which was conducted under the sponsorship and direction of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, was designed to develop a labor exchange skills database (ETA) that would improve the usability of many Department of Labor applications and products developed by other public and…

  20. Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

  1. Graduate/Employer Followup Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohanneson, Greg; And Others

    A project was undertaken to explore the prospects of conducting employer followup surveys concerning the graduates of a selected vocational program and to devise a procedure that would categorize the small number of employers to be sampled in such a way that useful data for possible program change could be obtained and analyzed. During the…

  2. Trucking Industry Training Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanburn, Donald D.

    The report was prepared under a grant made to investigate the possibilities of establishing an organized system of training for the trucking industry. It discusses attempts to disseminate information on training, learned through operation of an experimental and demonstration project in Pico Rivera, California. It discusses problems of compliance…

  3. Microprocessors in Education Research Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avons, S. E.; And Others

    This 3-year research project, centered on the cognitive psychology of child-computer interaction, focused on the use of microcomputers for teaching specific topics in mathematics and science. In particular, issues arising from the use of computer-based simulations to promote learning (including the nature of the information displayed, the degree…

  4. Southeast geysers effluent pipeline project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, M.

    1998-01-15

    The project concept originated in 1990 with the convergence of two problems: (1) a need for augmented injection to mitigate declining reservoir productivity at the Geysers; and (2) a need for a new method of wastewater disposal for Lake County communities near the The Geysers. A public/private partnership of Geysers operators and the Lake County Sanitation District (LACOSAN) was formed in 1991 to conduct a series of engineering, environmental, and financing studies of transporting treated wastewater effluent from the communities to the southeast portion of The Geysers via a 29-mile pipeline. By 1994, these evaluations concluded that the concept was feasible and the stakeholders proceeded to formally develop the project, including pipeline and associated facilities design; preparation of an environmental impact statement; negotiation of construction and operating agreements; and assembly of $45 million in construction funding from the stakeholders, and from state and federal agencies with related program goals. The project development process culminated in the system`s dedication on October 16, 1997. As of this writing, all project components have been constructed or installed, successfully tested in compliance with design specifications, and are operating satisfactorily.

  5. American History Laboratory Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William R.

    The results of an experimental project in American history which introduced to students the methods of historical investigation in specific historical areas through small group research rather than through the college survey course are described in this report. Discussed are (1) the course organization, consisting of two semester units in which…

  6. College Cost Containment Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Darrell

    In response to serious concerns about the dramatic increases in college and university costs, the Department of Education solicited proposals in May 1987 for innovative projects to explore means of cost reduction or containment which promise significant cost savings, whether accrued in the short- or long-term. The solicitation for cost containment…

  7. Project Stretch Final Narrative Report. Year III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    In June, 1979, the American Camping Association implemented Project STRETCH (Strategies to Try out Resources to Enhance the Training of Camp Directors serving the Handicapped), a nationwide in-service training program for personnel providing services to handicapped children and youth in regularly and specially designed camping and outdoor…

  8. Coal Manpower Projections: 1980. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clague, Ewan

    The National Petroleum Council has projected a 1980 bituminous coal production of 910 million tons. On that basis, the study estimates the manpower which will be required to produce that volume of coal. On the assumption of a productivity increase of two percent per year from 1974 onwards, the 1980 coal output will require a work force of…

  9. Project Reach: Final Report--Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Samuel D.

    The second year of Project Reach, a Federally funded two-year program, pursued two tactics for increasing the adult basic education (ABE) program relevance and effectiveness in South Bend, Indiana: (1) the training/hiring of ABE students as media paraprofessionals, and (2) a media enrollment campaign of various media promotions (television/radio…

  10. Physically Handicapped in Science: Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maureen B.; And Others

    A two-year project was conducted by St. Mary's Junior College to improve the science literacy of visually-impaired students (VIS) through the adaptation of instructional methods and materials. A four-step process was used: (1) learning materials were reviewed to identify problem areas; (2) preliminary adaptations were made based on the review; (3)…

  11. VTAE Professional Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbusch, Mark; Baldus, Lorayne

    A project was undertaken to coordinate up-to-date staff professional development on a regional or state basis in the state of Wisconsin. An earlier study had recommended more specific information and hiring of a staff development coordinator. The "Coordination of Efforts in the Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) System for Specific…

  12. Virginia Labor Mobility Pilot Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Employment Commission, Richmond. Research, Statistics, and Information Div.

    The Appalachian region of Southwest Virginia was selected as a surplus labor area in a pilot project to show the effectiveness of using financial assistance to increase mobility and reduce unemployment. Most of the workers were relocated in Alexandria, Newport News, Richmond, and Petersburg. Of the 920 unemployed workers interviewed, 200 were…

  13. The MICA Project: A Final Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roecks, Alan L.

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation of the MICA project (management of instruction with computer assistance) revealed that the supporting software system was efficient and cost-effective, the instruction was adequate, there was no difference in student achievement, and few changes were necessary in order to implement the program. (Author/IRT)

  14. Vermont gasifier project. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report presents an engineering status report for the Vermont gasifier project. Technical areas of concern are discussed with the cyclone performance, agglomeration problems in the combustor, particlate emissions, valve design, deflagration venting, gasifier and combustion blower surge control, and other related areas. Attachments pertaining to the drawing and specification register are included.

  15. ADD Teacher Inservice Project. Final Grant Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Mark C.; Schulz, Eldon G.

    The report describes activities and achievements of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) Teacher Inservice Project. The inservice program was developed using a formal process to identify the critical issues related to ADD awareness, assessment, and intervention. Program content was designed to address critical issues identified in the research…

  16. Native Hawaiian Educational Assessment Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamehameha Schools/Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate, Honolulu, HI.

    This report documents the educational needs of Native Hawaiians across ecosystem levels. Identifying the unique educational needs of Native Hawaiians and effective Native American and local programs that meet the unique educational needs of native Hawaiians, this project works within certain parameters: (1) part of a continuous needs assessment,…

  17. Final Report, SD-265; Project TACT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Systems Command, L.G. Hanscom Field, MA. Electronic Systems Div.

    The project objective has been to determine what creative thought processes can best take advantage of new technology in computer hardware and software. The plan has been to acquire or develop on-line computer systems of significant mathematical power, and to explore their use in vivo in teaching and research situations. The main product of…

  18. Minewater heat recovery project. Final Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of three sections: (1) Design, experimental testing and performance analysis of the 20-ft long DBHE (Downhole Bundle Heat Exchanger); (2) Modified design of mine water heat exchanger; and (3) Performance tests on mine water heat exchanger. Appendices summarize design calculations, discuss the scope of the work tasks, and present a diary of the progress throughout the research and development project.

  19. HOSPITALITY EDUCATION CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOMMER, CAROLYN

    THE PURPOSE OF THE PROJECT WAS TO GAIN INFORMATION USEFUL IN DEVELOPING PROGRAMS FOR PREPARING PERSONS FOR EMPLOYMENT IN OCCUPATIONS INVOLVING HOME ECONOMICS KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS AND FOR PREPARING TEACHERS. THE INITIAL CURRICULUM IN HOSPITALITY EDUCATION, TRAINING IN TRADE AND PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS PROVIDING FOOD, LODGING, AND RECREATION,…

  20. Bilingual Adult Basic Education Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Janet Roth

    The Bilingual Adult Basic Education Project provided bilingual life skills instruction, counseling, and informational services to approximately 150 non-English-dominant adults across Pennsylvania by means of contracts to local education agencies. Students were pre- and post-tested in English and/or their native language to measure their growth in…

  1. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  2. Final performance report for Project JEM

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.J.; Jenkins, S.

    1997-12-31

    Project JEM (Jarvis Enhancement of Males) is a pre-college program directed toward stimulating disadvantaged, talented African American males in grades four, five, and six to attend college and major in mathematics, science, computer science, or related technical areas needed by the US Department of Energy. Twenty young African American male students were recruited from Gladewater Independent School District (ISD), Longview ISD, Hawkins ISD, Tyler ISD, Winona ISD and big Sandy ISD. Students enrolled in the program range from ages 10 to 13 and are in grades four, five and six. Student participants in the 1997 Project JEM Program attended Saturday Academy sessions and a four week intensive, summer residential program. The information here provides a synopsis of the activities which were conducted through each program component.

  3. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  4. Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Bolling

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

  5. Fuel Cell Forklift Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Clifton C

    2013-10-23

    This project addresses the DOE’s priorities related to acquiring data from real-world fuel cell operation, eliminating non-technical barriers, and increasing opportunities for market expansion of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. The project involves replacing the batteries in a complete fleet of class-1 electric lift trucks at FedEx Freight’s Springfield, MO parcel distribution center with 35 Plug Power GenDrive fuel cell power units. Fuel for the power units involves on-site hydrogen handling and dispensing equipment and liquid hydrogen delivery by Air Products. The project builds on FedEx Freight’s previous field trial experience with a handful of Plug Power’s GenDrive power units. Those trials demonstrated productivity gains and improved performance compared to battery-powered lift trucks. Full lift truck conversion at our Springfield location allows us to improve the competitiveness of our operations and helps the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and toxic battery material use. Success at this distribution center may lead to further fleet conversions at some of our distribution centers.

  6. Baltimore residential assistance demonstration project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the request of the City of Baltimore for assistance in developing the Global Action Plan (GAP) EcoTeam Program, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided GAP with $10,000 for a one-year demonstration project. The results of this action are as follows: four EcoTeams were established representing 28 households and 47 people; the self reported resource savings to date per household are on average: energy savings--9%, auto emission reduction--16%, solid waste reduction--52%, water savings--25%, dollar savings--$174; the initial seed team (prior to this funding) replicated and started 2 new teams, one of those teams replicated and started 2 more teams, the other team did not replicate; 4 volunteer coaches were recruited to coach each of these teams; a volunteer coordinator was recruited to provide local guidance for this demonstration project and help GAP reach out to the Fairfield low-income neighborhood, the volunteer coordinator was unable to establish any EcoTeams in this neighborhood as their priorities were establishing a neighborhood action team and addressing immediate health-related environmental issues; the volunteers have communicated information about this demonstration project among many community and Baltimore government leaders to solicit support for a full campaign and to assess the level of that support.

  7. Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Trisha Frank

    2005-03-31

    The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percent of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.

  8. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  9. DOE-EPSCOR SPONSORED PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jianting

    2010-03-11

    Concern over the quality of environmental management and restoration has motivated the model development for predicting water and solute transport in the vadose zone. Soil hydraulic properties are required inputs to subsurface models of water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone. Computer models are now routinely used in research and management to predict the movement of water and solutes into and through the vadose zone of soils. Such models can be used successfully only if reliable estimates of the soil hydraulic parameters are available. The hydraulic parameters considered in this project consist of the saturated hydraulic conductivity and four parameters of the water retention curves. To quantify hydraulic parameters for heterogeneous soils is both difficult and time consuming. The overall objective of this project was to better quantify soil hydraulic parameters which are critical in predicting water flows and contaminant transport in the vadose zone through a comprehensive and quantitative study to predict heterogeneous soil hydraulic properties and the associated uncertainties. Systematic and quantitative consideration of the parametric heterogeneity and uncertainty can properly address and further reduce predictive uncertainty for contamination characterization and environmental restoration at DOE-managed sites. We conducted a comprehensive study to assess soil hydraulic parameter heterogeneity and uncertainty. We have addressed a number of important issues related to the soil hydraulic property characterizations. The main focus centered on new methods to characterize anisotropy of unsaturated hydraulic property typical of layered soil formations, uncertainty updating method, and artificial neural network base pedo-transfer functions to predict hydraulic parameters from easily available data. The work also involved upscaling of hydraulic properties applicable to large scale flow and contaminant transport modeling in the vadose zone and

  10. Raft River aquaculture project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beleau, M.H.; Woiwode, J.G.

    1980-07-01

    The commercial potential for geothermal aquaculture was evaluated for 2 years at the Department of Energy's Raft River geothermal site in southcentral Idaho. Common carp '(Cyprinus carpio) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were selected as culture species. Objectives of the study included investigation of: (1) growth rates; (2) nutrition trials; (3) histological and physiological parameters; (4) bioaccumulation of heavy metals; and (5) reproductive capacity. The second year project efforts were primarily studying the effects of geothermal water on the reproductive capacity of common carp by: (1) determining the effects of geothermal water on gonadal development of common carp; and (2) determining the effects of geothermal water on common carp embryogenesis.

  11. Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, Bernie

    2013-05-31

    The primary objective for the Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project is to provide another source of base-load renewable energy in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). To accomplish this, Chena Hot Springs Resort (Chena) drilled a re-injection well to 2700 feet and a production well to 2500 feet. The re-injection well allows a greater flow of water to directly replace the water removed from the warmest fractures in the geothermal reservoir. The new production will provide access to warmer temperature water in greater quantities.

  12. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  13. Combined Final Report for Colony II Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Laxmikant; Jones, Terry; Moreira, Jose

    2013-10-23

    (This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

  14. Final Report. Montpelier District Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jessie; Motyka, Kurt; Aja, Joe; Garabedian, Harold T.

    2015-03-30

    The City of Montpelier, in collaboration with the State of Vermont, developed a central heat plant fueled with locally harvested wood-chips and a thermal energy distribution system. The project provides renewable energy to heat a complex of state buildings and a mix of commercial, private and municipal buildings in downtown Montpelier. The State of Vermont operates the central heat plant and the system to heat the connected state buildings. The City of Montpelier accepts energy from the central heat plant and operates a thermal utility to heat buildings in downtown Montpelier which elected to take heat from the system.

  15. Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

    2006-09-14

    The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

  16. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a

  17. Solar Total Energy Project final test report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Final rapid reactivation project environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-10

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Rapid Reactivation Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to increase production of neutron generators from the current capability of 600 units per year up to 2,000 units per year. The project would use existing buildings and infrastructure to the maximum extent possible to meet the additional production needs. The increased production levels would necessitate modifications and additions involving a total area of approximately 26,290 gross square feet at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Technical Area 1. Additional production equipment would be procured and installed. The no-action alternative would be to continue production activities at the current capability of 600 units per year. The EA analyzes effects on health, safety, and air quality, resulting from construction and operation and associated cumulative effects. A detailed description of the proposed action and its environmental consequences is presented in the EA.

  19. Physics of Correlated Systems, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Chris H.

    2014-06-25

    The funding of this DOE project has enabled the P.I. and his collaborators to tackle a number of problems involving nonperturbatively coupled atomic systems, including their interactions with each other and/or with an external electromagnetic field of the type provided by either a continuous-wave or a femtosecond short-pulse laser. The progress includes a new, deeper understanding of an old and famous theory of autoionization lineshapes, developed initially by Ugo Fano in 1935 and later extended in a highly cited 1961 article; the new result specifically is that in a collaboration with the Heidelberg group we have been able to demonstrate an unexpectedly simple behavior in the time domain that is relevant for modern short-pulse lasers. This study also demonstrates a way to modify and even control the lineshapes of unstable atomic and molecular energy levels.

  20. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  1. (Solar Greenhouse Employment Project). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A project is presented that used workshops to develop the means for the building of low cost passive solar space and water heating devices for farm communities in Pittsboro, North Carolina. Not only the farm community, but also small town and urban people have enthusiastically participated. The reason for the participation in these efforts has been their availability as well as because the devices are low cost and they produce energy savings directly or indirectly. People have come together in workshops to build, for themselves, or others, devices (i.e., vertical wall collectors, window box collectors, bread box hot water heaters and solar greenhouses) that directly impact energy utilization. The frustration however has been that data on energy savings is anecdotal and that the participation of the agriculture community has been residentially related and not agriculturally related.

  2. Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    SHERWOOD, KENT

    2002-10-01

    The Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project explores new, unique and improved materials integrated with innovative manufacturing techniques that promise substantial economic enhancements for the fabrication of wind turbine blades. The primary objectives promote the development of advanced wind turbine blade manufacturing in ways that lower blade costs, cut rotor weight, reduce turbine maintenance costs, improve overall turbine quality and increase ongoing production reliability. Foam Matrix (FMI) has developed a wind turbine blade with an engineered foam core, incorporating advanced composite materials and using Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) processes to form a monolithic blade structure incorporating a single molding tool. Patented techniques are employed to increase blade load bearing capability and insure the uniform quality of the manufactured blade. In production quantities, FMI manufacturing innovations may return a sizable per blade cost reduction when compared to the cost of producing comparable blades with conventional methods.

  3. First Years Together. Final Project Report. Project Enlightenment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake County Public School System, Raleigh, NC.

    First Years Together (FYT), a 3-year service and training demonstration project, provided services to 32 high risk or preterm babies and their parents in order to overcome the emotional and developmental effects of hospitalization and a worrisome start. Service was initiated shortly before each baby's discharge from the intensive care unit and…

  4. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  5. Potable water standards project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Styron, C.E.; Meyer, H.E.

    1981-04-07

    Under regulations known as the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations, Title 40 - Code of Federal Regulations, Part 141, which became effective on June 24, 1977, the new standard for tritium in public drinking water (20 nCi/l) was 50 times lower than the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) in use by DOE. At that time it was apparent from data collected in the environmental surveillance program that three Mound wells and nine nearby private and community wells would be out of compliance, in some cases by a factor as high as four. Recognizing that previous actions taken to reduce the levels of tritium in airborne and liquid effluents would have to be supplemented by intensive efforts in order to bring tritium concentrations in local drinking water supplies into compliance with the EPA standard, the Potable Water Standards Project was initiated. A six-phase program was developed for achieving the goals of the project. Phase I had three parts: analyze all pertinent historical data on geohydrology and tritium in the environment for clues to the source or sources of tritium reaching the aquifer; determine needs for additional data to identify the source(s) of tritium; and define and initiate a rainout monitoring program to obtain data to be used in Phase III. Research in the other five phases was divided into the following categories: conduct a field program involving additional test borings, observation wells, and monitoring to obtain required data to identify source(s); model data, evaluate results, and identify source(s) of tritium; develop a program of corrective action to curtail or eliminate the source(s) of tritium; implement the program of corrective action; and evaluate subsequent monitoring data to ensure that correction has been achieved. (JGB)

  6. Assessment and Improvement of Related Services (AIRS) Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Robert A.; Hirata, Glenn T.

    The document presents the final report of the Assessment and Improvement of Related Services (AIRS) Project, an effort to assess the impact and effectiveness of special education related services in Hawaii. Each of the four project objectives focused on accomplishment of one of the evaluation types specified in the Context-Input-Process-Product…

  7. Multi-County Assessment of Adult Needs Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLennan Community Coll., TX.

    The document is a summarized final report of the Multi-County Assessment of Adult Needs Project (MAP) which took place in central Texas (Bosque, Falls, Hill, and McLennan Counties). It summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the project and contains all materials except Attachments 1 and 2, the reports on Phase I (Survey of Adult…

  8. Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Donald R.; Wolf, Lawrence J.

    Project SET (Science and Engineering for Technicians) developed a series of study guides designed to teach generic science and engineering skills to students interested in becoming technicians. An entire 2-year curriculum is encompassed by these guides, geared for 2-year college students. Described in this final report are the project's rationale,…

  9. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  10. Minnesota Deaf-Blind Technical Assistance Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloos, Eric

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the 3-year federally supported Minnesota Deaf-Blind Technical Assistance Project. The project provided training and technical assistance, information sharing, and support services to families of children with deaf-blindness. Activities and accomplishments included: collaboration with…

  11. Latin American Literacy Partnership Project. Final Formative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, David L. E.

    This final evaluation of the 1991-92 program year of the Latin American literacy Project, designed to foster English language literacy in Spanish-speaking families in Canada, is intended as a formative report, American Literacy Project is intended as a formative report, assessing the changes in the students' language proficiency and the progress…

  12. Project GROW. Final Project Report, January 1989 to June 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY.

    This document contains a final project report and curriculum modules from Project GROW, which measured the impact of training on the self-esteem and career awareness of homeless and single parents/displaced homemakers before and after program completion. Project GROW resulted from Project WORTH (Work Opportunity Readiness for the Homeless). The…

  13. HIP densification project. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Finkelstein, W.

    1997-08-29

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

  14. Ice Load Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Brown, Thomas; Byrne, Alex

    2014-10-30

    As interest and investment in offshore wind projects increase worldwide, some turbines will be installed in locations where ice of significant thickness forms on the water surface. This ice moves under the driving forces of wind, current, and thermal effects and may result in substantial forces on bottom-fixed support structures. The North and Baltic Seas in Europe have begun to see significant wind energy development and the Great Lakes of the United States and Canada may host wind energy development in the near future. Design of the support structures for these projects is best performed through the use of an integrated tool that can calculate the cumulative effects of forces due to turbine operations, wind, waves, and floating ice. The dynamic nature of ice forces requires that these forces be included in the design simulations, rather than added as static forces to simulation results. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard[2] for offshore wind turbine design and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard[3] for offshore structures provide requirements and algorithms for the calculation of forces induced by surface ice; however, currently none of the major wind turbine dynamic simulation codes provides the ability to model ice loads. The scope of work of the project described in this report includes the development of a suite of subroutines, collectively named IceFloe, that meet the requirements of the IEC and ISO standards and couples with four of the major wind turbine dynamic simulation codes. The mechanisms by which ice forces impinge on offshore structures generally include the forces required for crushing of the ice against vertical-sided structures and the forces required to fracture the ice as it rides up on conical-sided structures. Within these two broad categories, the dynamic character of the forces with respect to time is also dependent on other factors such as the velocity and thickness of the moving ice

  15. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30

    In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and

  16. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  17. SMAP Verification and Validation Project - Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murry, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) released the Decadal Survey of Earth science. In the future decade, the survey identified 15 new space missions of significant scientific and application value for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to undertake. One of these missions was the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission that NASA assigned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 2008. The goal of SMAP1 is to provide global, high resolution mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw states. The SMAP project recently passed its Critical Design Review and is proceeding with its fabrication and testing phase.Verification and Validation (V&V) is widely recognized as a critical component in system engineering and is vital to the success of any space mission. V&V is a process that is used to check that a system meets its design requirements and specifications in order to fulfill its intended purpose. Verification often refers to the question "Have we built the system right?" whereas Validation asks "Have we built the right system?" Currently the SMAP V&V team is verifying design requirements through inspection, demonstration, analysis, or testing. An example of the SMAP V&V process is the verification of the antenna pointing accuracy with mathematical models since it is not possible to provide the appropriate micro-gravity environment for testing the antenna on Earth before launch.

  18. Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-13

    Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

  19. Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

  20. Innovative subsurface stabilization project -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.G.; Zdinak, A.P.; Bishop, C.W.

    1996-11-01

    This is a report of results of applying four innovative grouting materials and one commercially available material for creating monoliths out of buried waste sites using jet grouting. The four innovative materials included a proprietary water-based epoxy, an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory-developed two-component grout that resembles hematite when cured with soil, molten low-temperature paraffin, and a proprietary iron oxide cement-based grout called TECT. The commercial grout was Type-H high-sulfate-resistant cement. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In addition to the grouting studies, specially designed field-scale permeameters were constructed to perform full-scale controlled mass balance hydraulic conductivity studies. An ungrouted field-scale permeameter contained simulated buried waste and soil and was left ungrouted, and a second identical field-scale permeameter was grouted with commercial-grade Type-H cement. The field demonstrations were performed in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Cold Test Pit is adjacent to the laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. At the complex, 2 million ft{sup 3} of transuranic waste is commingled with 6--8 million ft{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial, and improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final waste disposition. This report gives results of grouting, coring, hydraulic conductivity, and destructive examination of the grouted buried waste matrix.

  1. Colorado Better Buildings Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Strife, Susie; Yancey, Lea

    2013-12-30

    The Colorado Better Buildings project intended to bring new and existing energy efficiency model programs to market with regional collaboration and funding partnerships. The goals for Boulder County and its program partners were to advance energy efficiency investments, stimulate economic growth in Colorado and advance the state’s energy independence. Collectively, three counties set out to complete 9,025 energy efficiency upgrades in 2.5 years and they succeeded in doing so. Energy efficiency upgrades have been completed in more than 11,000 homes and businesses in these communities. Boulder County and its partners received a $25 million BetterBuildings grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the summer of 2010. This was also known as the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants program. With this funding, Boulder County, the City and County of Denver, and Garfield County set out to design programs for the residential and commercial sectors to overcome key barriers in the energy upgrade process. Since January 2011, these communities have paired homeowners and business owners with an Energy Advisor – an expert to help move from assessment to upgrade with minimal hassle. Pairing this step-by-step assistance with financing incentives has effectively addressed many key barriers, resulting in energy efficiency improvements and happy customers. An expert energy advisor guides the building owner through every step of the process, coordinating the energy assessment, interpreting results for a customized action plan, providing a list of contractors, and finding and applying for all available rebates and low-interest loans. In addition to the expert advising and financial incentives, the programs also included elements of social marketing, technical assistance, workforce development and contractor trainings, project monitoring and verification, and a cloud-based customer data system to coordinate among field

  2. Final Technical Report. Project Boeing SGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Thomas E.

    2014-12-31

    Boeing and its partner, PJM Interconnection, teamed to bring advanced “defense-grade” technologies for cyber security to the US regional power grid through demonstration in PJM’s energy management environment. Under this cooperative project with the Department of Energy, Boeing and PJM have developed and demonstrated a host of technologies specifically tailored to the needs of PJM and the electric sector as a whole. The team has demonstrated to the energy industry a combination of processes, techniques and technologies that have been successfully implemented in the commercial, defense, and intelligence communities to identify, mitigate and continuously monitor the cyber security of critical systems. Guided by the results of a Cyber Security Risk-Based Assessment completed in Phase I, the Boeing-PJM team has completed multiple iterations through the Phase II Development and Phase III Deployment phases. Multiple cyber security solutions have been completed across a variety of controls including: Application Security, Enhanced Malware Detection, Security Incident and Event Management (SIEM) Optimization, Continuous Vulnerability Monitoring, SCADA Monitoring/Intrusion Detection, Operational Resiliency, Cyber Range simulations and hands on cyber security personnel training. All of the developed and demonstrated solutions are suitable for replication across the electric sector and/or the energy sector as a whole. Benefits identified include; Improved malware and intrusion detection capability on critical SCADA networks including behavioral-based alerts resulting in improved zero-day threat protection; Improved Security Incident and Event Management system resulting in better threat visibility, thus increasing the likelihood of detecting a serious event; Improved malware detection and zero-day threat response capability; Improved ability to systematically evaluate and secure in house and vendor sourced software applications; Improved ability to continuously monitor

  3. Final Report on Atomic Database Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J., Gui, Z., and Moses, G.A.

    2006-07-18

    Atomic physics in hot dense plasmas is essential for understanding the radiative properties of plasmas either produced terrestrially such as in fusion energy research or in space such as the study of the core of the sun. Various kinds of atomic data are needed for spectrum analysis or for radiation hydrodynamics simulations. There are many atomic databases accessible publicly through the web, such as CHIANTI (an atomic database for spectroscopic diagnostics for astrophysical plasmas) from Naval Research Laboratory [1], collaborative development of TOPbase (The Opacity Project for astrophysically abundant elements) [2], NIST atomic spectra database from NIST [3], TOPS Opacities from Los Alamos National Laboratory [4], etc. Most of these databases are specific to astrophysics, which provide energy levels, oscillator strength f and photoionization cross sections for astrophysical elements ( Z=1-26). There are abundant spectrum data sources for spectral analysis of low Z elements. For opacities used for radiation transport, TOPS Opacities from LANL is the most valuable source. The database provides mixed opacities from element for H (Z=1) to Zn (Z=30) The data in TOPS Opacities is calculated by the code LEDCOP. In the Fusion Technology Institute, we also have developed several different models to calculate atomic data and opacities, such as the detailed term accounting model (DTA) and the unresolved transition array (UTA) model. We use the DTA model for low-Z materials since an enormous number of transitions need to be computed for medium or high-Z materials. For medium and high Z materials, we use the UTA model which simulates the enormous number of transitions by using a single line profile to represent a collection of transition arrays. These models have been implemented in our computing code JATBASE and RSSUTA. For plasma populations, two models are used in JATBASE, one is the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model and the second is the non-LTE model. For the

  4. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our

  5. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

    2010-01-04

    This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

  6. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

  7. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.; Tovesson, Fredrik K.; Sierk, Arnold John

    2014-02-06

    The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents the progress made against the goals agreed to as part of the 2013 review.

  8. The Skills Enhancement Literacy Project of Hawaii. Final Program Model. Final Performance Report. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Manoa. Coll. of Education.

    The Skills Enhancement Literacy Project of Hawaii (SELPH) was a demonstration workplace literacy partnership between the College of Education, University of Hawaii-Manoa and the ITT Sheraton Hotels. Four Sheraton Hotels in Waikiki participated in the project. The program was planned, staff and volunteers were recruited, and marketing strategies…

  9. National Traffic Safety Documentation Center Project Definition Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    A project definition study was conducted for the development, implementation and operation of a National Traffic Safety Documentation Center. Included in this final comprehensive report are: (1) the results of nationwide surveys of users and sources of traffic safety information; (2) a review of relevant information technology in terms of the…

  10. Leading Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools Project: A Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the final report on a research project that investigated the ways in which curriculum innovation can be led successfully in primary schools. Data gathering included 40 semi-structured interviews in 10 successful primary schools in England of varying sizes and types and in a range of geographical and social locations. Findings…

  11. Expressive Arts Project for Young Children with Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutinger, Patricia L.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Expressive Arts Project for Young Children with Disabilities, which developed and evaluated a CD-ROM, ArtSpace. The program, developed on a Macintosh platform, allows the child to either view or make art. It offers real time video, music especially produced to accompany images,…

  12. Oklahoma Deaf-Blind Technical Assistance Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Jan, Comp.

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Oklahoma Deaf-Blind Technical Assistance Project, an effort to systematically provide training, resource provision and technical assistance (TA) to approximately 120-155 children and youth with deaf-blindness, their families, educators and service providers. The overall impact…

  13. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  14. Final-Year Education Projects for Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme provides an opportunity for students in their final year of the chemistry degree course at the University of Reading to choose an educational project as an alternative to practical research. The undergraduates work in schools where they can be regarded as role models and offer one way of inspiring pupils to…

  15. The Pittsburgh Science Technology Society Project: A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, George E., Ed.

    This final report on the inservice education of secondary science teachers for the teaching of science via Science Technology Society (STS) materials lists the major objectives of the project as: (1) write four instructional modules with a science, society and technology focus which address special concerns and needs of the underserved and…

  16. Tom Green County Library Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavricka, D. Karen

    The final report of the Tom Green Country Library System (Texas) literacy project details progress toward achievement of 11 objectives. Objectives of the literacy outreach program were to: (1) increase Hispanic enrollment; (2) increase Black enrollment; (3) provide free child care for 4 students to attend 50 tutoring sessions; (4) provide…

  17. Human Relations Training for Educators. Final Evaluation. Project Upper Cumberland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, J. L.

    Project Upper Cumberland was a three year endeavor which served 16 Tennessee counties. The final report and evaluation, in three documents, summarizes the three innovative programs which it engendered: (1) teacher inservice training, emphasizing human relations; (2) a pilot cultural arts program (art, music, drama) for grades 1-12; and (3) a pilot…

  18. Georgia Deafblind Project, 1995-1999. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Exceptional Students Div.

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a 4-year federally funded project designed to meet the critical need in Georgia to provide effective practices in the delivery of educational services to children and youth with deafblindness from birth through 21 years of age and to their families and service providers. Results of the…

  19. Skills Conversion Project: Chapter 2, Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    This final report describes the Skills Conversion Project conducted by The National Society of Professional Engineers under contract to the Department of Labor to study methods of utilizing the large pool of highly skilled unemployed technicians and professional personnel who were formerly employed in the aerospace and defense industries. If…

  20. Learning in Science Project (Form 1-4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand).

    The Learning in Science Project investigated teaching and learning in science at the Form 1 to 4 level to identify some of the key difficulties in this subject area and to find ways of overcoming such difficulties. Included in this final report are: (1) brief accounts of the three major phases of the research; (2) a list of papers derived from the…

  1. Tekton Corporation's Wood Waste Briquetting Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-31

    The purpose of the Wood Waste Briquetting Project was to evaluate and at the same time, develop markets for wood waste briquetted heating fuel and waste wood briquetting equipment. To this end the DOE Northeast Regional Appropriate Technology Small Grant Program awarded Tekton Corporation $31,085 to set up prototype fuel factory to produce, distribute, and test-market densified wood waste fuel which Tekton named ''Tekfuel.'' Tekton set up the plant and fulfilled the project goals during the winter of 1979 to 1980. This final report discusses the project under the following topics: (1) introduction; (2) general overview of briquetting; (3) description of Tekton's Fuel Plant; (4) report on project performance; (5) results of promotional efforts; (6) cost analysis of project; (7) statistical analysis of consumer questionnaires; and (8) prognosis for the future of briquetting. 11 refs.

  2. Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collar, Craig

    2015-09-14

    This document represents the final report for the Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, located in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The Project purpose was to license, permit, and install a grid-connected deep-water tidal turbine array (two turbines) to be used as a platform to gather operational and environmental data on tidal energy generation. The data could then be used to better inform the viability of commercial tidal energy generation from technical, economic, social, and environmental standpoints. This data would serve as a critical step towards the responsible advancement of commercial scale tidal energy in the United States and around the world. In late 2014, Project activities were discontinued due to escalating costs, and the DOE award was terminated in early 2015. Permitting, licensing, and engineering design activities were completed under this award. Final design, deployment, operation, and monitoring were not completed. This report discusses the results and accomplishments achieved under the subject award.

  3. Special Education Simulation and Consultation Project: Special Training Project. Final Report. Part I: Results and Learnings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batten, Murray O.; Burello, Leonard C.

    Presented is the final report of the Special Education Simulation and Consultation (SECAC) Project designed to provide simulation-based inservice training to Michigan building principals. Part I reviews project goals, objectives, procedures, results, and learnings. It is explained that the training employed the Special Education Administrators…

  4. The Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project: Final Report, Final Evaluation Report, Final Evaluation Report Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlands Consortium.

    The reports presented in this document describe the results of the first 2 years of the Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project (MCSSP) (October 1, 1988-December 31, 1990). The first report summarizes the major accomplishments of the MCSSP, including: (1) the installation of communications satellites at schools in Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi,…

  5. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

  6. Retrospective on the Seniors' Council Tier 1 LDRD portfolio.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, William Parker

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the Tier 1 LDRD portfolio, administered by the Seniors Council between 2003 and 2011. 73 projects were sponsored over the 9 years of the portfolio at a cost of $10.5 million which includes $1.9M of a special effort in directed innovation targeted at climate change and cyber security. Two of these Tier 1 efforts were the seeds for the Grand Challenge LDRDs in Quantum Computing and Next Generation Photovoltaic conversion. A few LDRDs were terminated early when it appeared clear that the research was not going to succeed. A great many more were successful and led to full Tier 2 LDRDs or direct customer sponsorship. Over a dozen patents are in various stages of prosecution from this work, and one project is being submitted for an R and D 100 award.

  7. Shawmut hydroelectric redevelopment project. Final technical and construction cost report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-08-01

    This report describes the major steps undertaken by the Central Maine Power Company to redevelop an old existing lowhead (19 to 23 ft) hydroelectric station and, at the same time, demonstrate the commercial viability of such a venture. The report addresses the process of site selection, preliminary conceptual design for determining economic viability, licensing and the regulatory process, final design, and project construction with the objective of presenting to the reader a technical and economical guide useful for a similar undertaking.

  8. Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project, Final Document Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.; Wold, Sheryl (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This CD ROM contains a compilation of the final documents of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AAIT) project, which was an eight-year (1996 to 2004), $400M project managed by the Airspace Systems Program office, which was part of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. AAIT focused on developing advanced automation tools and air traffic management concepts that would help improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System, while maintaining or enhancing safety. The documents contained in the CD are final reports on AAIT tasks that serve to document the project's accomplishments over its eight-year term. Documents include information on: Advanced Air Transportation Technologies, Autonomous Operations Planner, Collaborative Arrival Planner, Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management Concept Elements 5, 6, & 11, Direct-To, Direct-To Technology Transfer, Expedite Departure Path, En Route Data Exchange, Final Approach Spacing Tool - (Active and Passive), Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor, Multi Center Traffic Management Advisor Technology Transfer, Surface Movement Advisor, Surface Management System, Surface Management System Technology Transfer and Traffic Flow Management Research & Development.

  9. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  10. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  11. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  12. Final report of LDRD project : compact ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray sources for advanced materials studies, 3D nanoimaging, and attosecond x-ray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Rhodes, Charles Kirkham; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Experimental evidence and corresponding theoretical analyses have led to the conclusion that the system composed of Xe hollow atom states, that produce a characteristic Xe(L) spontaneous emission spectrum at 1 {at} 2.9 {angstrom} and arise from the excitation of Xe clusters with an intense pulse of 248 nm radiation propagating in a self-trapped plasma channel, closely represents the ideal situation sought for amplification in the multikilovolt region. The key innovation that is central to all aspects of the proposed work is the controlled compression of power to the level ({approx} 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3}) corresponding to the maximum achieved by thermonuclear events. Furthermore, since the x-ray power that is produced appears in a coherent form, an entirely new domain of physical interaction is encountered that involves states of matter that are both highly excited and highly ordered. Moreover, these findings lead to the concept of 'photonstaging', an idea which offers the possibility of advancing the power compression by an additional factor of {approx} 10{sup 9} to {approx} 10{sup 29} W/cm{sup 3}. In this completely unexplored regime, g-ray production ({h_bar}{omega}{sub {gamma}} {approx} 1 MeV) is expected to be a leading process. A new technology for the production of very highly penetrating radiation would then be available. The Xe(L) source at {h_bar}{omega}{sub x} {approx} 4.5 keV can be applied immediately to the experimental study of many aspects of the coupling of intense femtosecond x-ray pulses to materials. In a joint collaboration, the UIC group and Sandia plan to explore the following areas. These are specifically, (1) anomalous electromagnetic coupling to solid state materials, (2) 3D nanoimaging of solid matter and hydrated biological materials (e.g. interchromosomal linkers and actin filaments in muscle), and (3) EMP generation with attosecond x-rays.

  13. Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary [and] Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication contains the following: (1) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary (January 2006); and (2) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909 (January 2005). In 2003, the legislature and governor enacted House Bill 1909 to create a pilot project on competency-based transfer…

  14. Programmable SAW development :Sandia/NASA project final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-10-01

    This report describes a project to develop both fixed and programmable surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlators for use in a low power space communication network. This work was funded by NASA at Sandia National Laboratories for fiscal years 2004, 2003, and the final part of 2002. The role of Sandia was to develop the SAW correlator component, although additional work pertaining to use of the component in a system and system optimization was also done at Sandia. The potential of SAW correlator-based communication systems, the design and fabrication of SAW correlators, and general system utilization of those correlators are discussed here.

  15. Final Report for USGS NEHRP Project 08HQGR0022

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A. J.

    2015-09-29

    This is the final report for United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) Project 08HQGR0022, entitled “Quantifying Uncertainties in Ground Motion Simulations for Scenario Earthquakes on the HaywardRodgers Creek Fault System Using the USGS 3D Seismic Velocity Model and Realistic Pseudodynamics Ruptures”. Work for this project involved three-dimensional (3D) simulations of ground motions for Hayward Fault (HF) earthquakes. We modeled moderate events on the HF and used them to evaluate the USGS 3D model of the San Francisco Bay Area. We also contributed to ground motions modeling effort for a large suite of scenario earthquakes on the HF. Results were presented at conferences (see appendix) and in one peer-reviewed publication (Aagaard et al., 2010).

  16. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  17. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project: Public final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This Public Final Design Report describes the 70 MW(e) Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant under construction in Brilliant, Ohio. This project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-87 MC24132.000. The project is also receiving costsharing from the State of Ohio. This award is being administered by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project is the first utility-scale demonstration project in the US. Its objective is to demonstrate that the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. Detailed design of the plant began in May 1987, leading to the start of construction in April 1988. First coal fire occurred in November 1990, and the three-year test program began in February 1991.

  18. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  19. A Special Education Management System: ESEA Title III, Project No. 1328. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the final report on a 3-year project sponsored by the Santa Cruz County, California Office of Education to develop a pupil assessment instrument listing behavioral characteristics of physically exceptional children (K-12) and to implement a program management system to serve 1,200 mentally retarded, educationally handicapped…

  20. Ferrocyanide safety project ferrocyanide aging studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Alderson, E.V.

    1996-06-01

    This final report gives the results of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from FY 1992 to FY 1996 on the Ferrocyanide Aging Studies, part of the Ferrocyanide Safety Project. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project was initiated as a result of concern raised about the safe storage of ferrocyanide waste intermixed with oxidants, such as nitrate and nitrite salts, in Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). In the laboratory, such mixtures can be made to undergo uncontrolled or explosive reactions by heating dry reagents to over 200{degrees}C. In 1987, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, included an environmental impact analysis of potential explosions involving ferrocyanide-nitrate mixtures. The EIS postulated that an explosion could occur during mechanical retrieval of saltcake or sludge from a ferrocyanide waste tank, and concluded that this worst-case accident could create enough energy to release radioactive material to the atmosphere through ventilation openings, exposing persons offsite to a short-term radiation dose of approximately 200 mrem. Later, in a separate study (1990), the General Accounting Office postulated a worst-case accident of one to two orders of magnitude greater than that postulated in the DOE EIS. The uncertainties regarding the safety envelope of the Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste tanks led to the declaration of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) in October 1990.

  1. Multi-attribute criteria applied to electric generation energy system analysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Drennen, Thomas E.; Zuffranieri, Jason V.; Paananen, Orman Henrie; Jones, Scott A.; Ortner, Juergen G.; Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Valdez, Maximo M.

    2005-10-01

    This report began with a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve Sandia National Laboratories multidisciplinary capabilities in energy systems analysis. The aim is to understand how various electricity generating options can best serve needs in the United States. The initial product is documented in a series of white papers that span a broad range of topics, including the successes and failures of past modeling studies, sustainability, oil dependence, energy security, and nuclear power. Summaries of these projects are included here. These projects have provided a background and discussion framework for the Energy Systems Analysis LDRD team to carry out an inter-comparison of many of the commonly available electric power sources in present use, comparisons of those options, and efforts needed to realize progress towards those options. A computer aid has been developed to compare various options based on cost and other attributes such as technological, social, and policy constraints. The Energy Systems Analysis team has developed a multi-criteria framework that will allow comparison of energy options with a set of metrics that can be used across all technologies. This report discusses several evaluation techniques and introduces the set of criteria developed for this LDRD.

  2. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  3. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  4. Laser Spray Fabrication for Net-Shape Rapid Product Realization LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Jeantette, F.P.; Keicher, D.M.; Oliver, M.S.; Reckaway, D.E.; Romero, J.A.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.D.

    1999-04-01

    The primary purpose of this LDRD project was to characterize the laser deposition process and determine the feasibility of fabricating complex near-net shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Process characterization provided direction in developing a system to fabricate complex shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Our goal for this LDRD was to develop a system that is robust and provides a significant advancement to existing technologies (e.g., polymeric-based rapid prototyping, laser welding). Development of the process will allow design engineers to produce functional models of their designs directly from CAD files. The turnaround time for complex geometrical shaped parts will be hours instead of days and days instead of months. With reduced turnaround time, more time can be spent on the product-design phase to ensure that the best component design is achieved. Maturation of this technology will revolutionize the way the world produces structural components.

  5. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Conceptual Design Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  6. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  7. Final Status Survey for the Largest Decommissioning Project on Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.W.; Miller, J.; Quayle, D.

    2006-07-01

    To assist the United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) re-industrialization efforts at its gaseous diffusion site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, known as the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the US DOE awarded a 6-year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) contract to BNG America (formerly BNFL Inc.) in 1997. The ETTP 3-Building D and D Project included the removal and disposition of the materials and equipment from the K-33, K-31, and K-29 Gaseous Diffusion Plant buildings. The three buildings comprise more than 4.8 million square feet (446,000 square meters) of floor surface area and more than 350 million pounds (148 million kilograms) of hazardous and radioactively contaminated material, making it the largest nuclear D and D project in progress anywhere in the world. The logistical hurdles involved in a project of this scope and magnitude required an extensive amount of Engineering and Health Physics professionals. In order to accomplish the Final Status Survey (FSS) for a project of this scope, the speed and efficiency of automated survey equipment was essential. Surveys of floors, structural steel and ceilings up to 60 feet (18 meters) were required. The FSS had to be expanded to include additional remediation and surveys due to characterization surveys and assumptions regarding the nature and extent of contamination provided by the US DOE. Survey design and technical bases had to consider highly variable constituents; including uranium from depleted to low enrichment, variable levels of Technetium-99 and transuranic nuclides, which were introduced into the cascade during the 1960's when recycled uranium (RU) from Savannah River was re-enriched at the facility. The RU was transported to unexpected locations from leaks in the cascade by complex building ventilation patterns. The primary survey tool used for the post remediation and FSS was the Surface Contamination Monitor (SCM) and the associated Survey Information Management System (SIMS

  8. Agricultural Energy Curriculum Development Project. Research and Development Project in Career Education, Vocational. Final Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacholz, Marlin

    A project was conducted to develop energy instructional units which would fit into each year of a three-year farm business management curriculum. Four curriculum units which focus on fertilizer management in crop production were developed. The first unit was designed to develop farmers' awareness of energy as a vital resource to their businesses…

  9. 76 FR 2949 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Project in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Construction Project in the State of Washington. Those actions grant approval for the project. DATES: By this... Construction Project. The project includes constructing pontoons sufficient to replace the existing traffic... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Project in...

  10. LDRD final report on "Pumping up CO2 and conversion into useful molecules" (LDRD 105932).

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Dickie, Diane A.

    2009-11-01

    Group 12 metal cyclam complexes and their derivatives as well as (octyl){sub 2}Sn(OMe){sub 2} were examined as potential catalysts for the production of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using CO{sub 2} and methanol. The zinc cyclams will readily take up carbon dioxide and methanol at room temperature and atmospheric pressure to give the metal methyl carbonate. The tin exhibited an improvement in DMC yields. Studies involving the reaction of bis-phosphino- and (phosphino)(silyl)-amido group 2 and 12 complexes with CO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} were performed. Notable results include formation of phosphino-substituted isocyanates, fixation of three moles of CO{sub 2} in an unprecedented [N(CO{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sup 3-} anion, and rapid splitting of CS{sub 2} by main group elements under extremely mild conditions. Similar investigations of divalent group 14 silyl amides led to room temperature splitting of CO{sub 2} into CO and metal oxide clusters, and the formation of isocyanates and carbodiimides.

  11. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  12. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Holbert, Connie; Petrolino, Joseph; Watkins, Bart; Irick, David

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engine's commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector was

  13. Final-Year Projects as a Major Element in the IE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitner, G.; Rozenes, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-perspective view of the final-year project of an industrial engineering and management (IEM) department. The final year project is a major element of a 4-year curriculum within any engineering discipline. Such a project gives the student an opportunity to use and implement methods, techniques and tools that he or she…

  14. Project Familia. Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Research.

    Project Familia was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII project in its second year in 1993-94 in New York City. Project Familia served 77 children at 3 schools who were identified as limited English proficient, special education students in prekindergarten through fifth grade and their parents. The project provided after-school…

  15. Pre-Vocational Occupation Education Project: End of Budget Period Report and Final Project Report; ESEA Title III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Program Planning and Development.

    The end of budget period and final project report describes a California project intended to promote the adoption or adaptation of a prevocational education program for secondary level educable mentally handicapped (EMH) students. Data are presented on staff development, the nature and results of the project's dissemination and demonstration…

  16. Hawaii Demonstration Project to Avert Unintended Teenage Pregnancy: 1978-1982. Final Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt-Merin, Marta; Sutter, Sharon Kingdon

    This final report provides a descriptive overview of three approaches which the Hawaii Demonstration Project initiated to reduce unintended teenage pregnancies. Project evaluation findings are summarized; both qualitative and quantitative data are presented for a comprehensive picture of the project and its input. Project limitations and successes…

  17. The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS). Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulton, Bruce R.

    The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS) prepared interactive CD-ROM discs containing about 50 hours of instruction and drill in basic skills presented within the context of the textile/apparel manufacturing industry. The project was conducted at a Sara Lee knit products plant in North Carolina. During the project, literacy task analyses were…

  18. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report, 1974-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.; Pettibone, Timothy J.

    Project HEED's (Heed Ethnic Education Deplorization) main emphasis in 1974-75 was to develop reading and cultural awareness skills for kindergarten through 4th grades in the 7 project schools on American Indian reservations in Arizona. In its 4th year of operation, the project (funded under Elementary and Secondary Education Title III) involved…

  19. Communication and Recruitment Project. Phase I, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton Community Coll., CA.

    Funded under the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968, this project was conceived to provide occupational counseling on an individual basis in the prospective student's home. The project is planned as a 3-phase, 3-year project. The objectives of Phase I were to develop a unique, individualized approach to the recruitment of students, and to…

  20. Project Avanse. Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Judy

    Project Avanse was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its first year of operation at an intermediate school and a high school in Brooklyn (New York). The project served 266 Haitian-speaking students. Participating students received instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), native language arts (NLA), and…

  1. Project Pride. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantalupo, Denise

    Project PRIDE was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its fourth year of operation at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn (New York). In the 1992-93 school year, the project served 251 students of limited English proficiency. Participating students received instruction in English as a second language (ESL),…

  2. Project Aprendizaje. 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Project Aprendizaje, which served disadvantaged, immigrant, Spanish-speaking high school students at Seward Park High School in Manhattan. The Project enrolled 290 students in grades 9 through 12, 93.1 percent of whom were eligible for the Free Lunch Program. The Project provided students of…

  3. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Encoal project final report, July 1, 1997--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This document is the summative report on the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project. It covers the time period from September 17, 1990, the approval date of the Cooperative Agreement between ENCOAL and the US Department of Energy (DOE), to July 17, 1997, the formal end of DOE participation in the Project. The Cooperative Agreement was the result of an application by ENCOAL to the DOE soliciting joint funding under Round III of the Clean Coal Technology Program. By June 1992, the ENCOAL Plant had been built, commissioned and started up, and in October 1994, ENCOAL was granted a two-year extension, carrying the project through to September 17, 1996. No-cost extensions have moved the Cooperative Agreement end date to July 17, 1997 to allow for completion of final reporting requirements. At its inception, ENCOAL was a subsidiary of Shell Mining Company. In November 1992, Shell Mining Company changed ownership, becoming a subsidiary of Zeigler Coal Holding Company (Zeigler) of Fairview Heights, Illinois. Renamed successively as SMC Mining Company and then Bluegrass Coal Development Company, it remained the parent entity for ENCOAL, which has operated a 1,000-ton/day mild coal gasification demonstration plant near Gillette, Wyoming for nearly 5 years. ENCOAL operates at the Buckskin Mine owned by Triton Coal Company (Triton), another Zeigler subsidiary.

  4. Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction profiles; final project report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Blank, H.R.; Gettings, M.E.; Kohler, W.M.; Lamson, R.J.; Leone, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat-Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used: five on land, with most charges placed below the water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and detonated from a ship. Slightly more than 61 metric tons of explosives were used in 19 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by 100 newly-developed portable seismic stations deployed in approximately 200 km-long arrays for each firing. Each station consisted of a standard 2-Hz vertical component geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. In this final report, we fully document the field and data-processing procedures and present the final seismogram data set as both a digital magnetic tape and as record sections for each shot point. Record sections include a normalized set of seismograms, reduced at 6 km/s, and a true-amplitude set, reduced at 8 km/s, which have been adjusted for amplifier gain, individual shot size, and distance from the shot point. Appendices give recorder station and shot information, digital data set descriptions, computer program listings, arrival times used in the interpretation, and a bibliography of reports published as a result of this project. We used two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques in the data analysis, and our interpretation is based primarily on horizontally layered models. The Arabian Shield is composed, to first-order, of two layers, each about 20 km

  5. Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC`s acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information.

  6. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project Archival Reference, Final Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-13

    This report provides an archival reference to the scientific information and other pertinent documents and materials associated with the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSDP). This archiving process ensures that valuable technical data and information obtained during the life of the project can be retrieved, organized and maintained as a historical record for future reference. This paper describes the background of the project and the process used for archiving the materials. [DJE-2005

  7. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Austad, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  8. 75 FR 7029 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment for Solar Roof Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-16

    ... Geological Survey Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment for Solar Roof Project AGENCY..., the US Geological Survey (USGS) has prepared a Final Environmental Assessment for the Solar Roof... for the Solar Roof Project should immediately contact the USGS S.O. Conte Anadromous Fish...

  9. Nabisco Foods Division--"New Indy" Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivy Tech State Coll., Indianapolis, IN.

    This document contains a final report, evaluation, and curriculum materials from a project conducted at the RJR Nabisco plant in Indianapolis to upgrade the literacy and numeracy skills of the workers to facilitate technological changes to production lines. As the final report explains, although the goal of the project was to recruit and test 150…

  10. Time Management of Final Year Undergraduate English Projects: Supervisees' and the Supervisor's Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Belinda

    2003-01-01

    Explores how the individuality of students affects their time management strategies in doing undergraduate final year projects. Investigates how four students responded differently to the same time management advice given by the supervisor of their final year projects in two different teacher education programs on teaching English as a Second…

  11. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Austad, Stephanie Lee

    2015-09-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  12. Forrest County, MS Geothermal Project--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, Corey

    2014-03-13

    The Forrest County Geothermal Energy Project consists of replacing the existing air cooled chiller with geothermal water to water chillers for energy savings at the Forrest County Multi-Purpose Center. The project will also replace DX/gas rooftop and DX split system heat pump equipment with geothermal units for the Forrest County Jail. Each of the aforementioned projects consists of approximately 400 tons of cooling. The project also includes between 600 and 800 geothermal closed-loop wells. Building controls will be updated as well on both sites.

  13. Multiple Intelligences: Curriculum and Assessment Project. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Aine, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "Multiple Intelligences, Curriculum and Assessment Project" at University College Cork was a collaborative project carried out between 1995 and 1999. The key research question focused on whether Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences could be applied to, and enhance, aspects of curriculum and assessment at primary and second level…

  14. Computer Lessons for Written Harmony. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arenson, Michael A.

    This project was created to help music students in their development of part-writing and harmonization skills, requirements for college-level music study. It was developed and programmed by members of the Instructional Technology Center and Department of Music at the University of Delaware. The software developed during this project provides…

  15. Project for Faculty Development Program Evaluation: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; And Others

    The project of faculty development program evaluation, developed by the Center for the Study of Higher Education of the University of Michigan, is described. Project thrusts were: to develop assessment instruments for judging the success of faculty development programs; to provide formative and summative evaluation for the programs of the 24…

  16. Project Familia. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Candice

    Project Familia was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII funded project that, in the year covered by this evaluation, served 41 special education students of limited English proficiency (LEP) from 5 schools, with the participation of 54 parents and 33 siblings. Participating students received English language enrichment and…

  17. Kentucky Nursing Education Project: Final Report and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The process, activities, and outcomes of a plan for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a statewide coordinated system for nursing education in Kentucky are described. The background and objectives of the 5-year Kentucky Nursing Education Project are discussed, along with the following project components: organizational base,…

  18. Manufacturing Technology Continuation Project--FY 92. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL. Richard J. Daley Coll.

    A project to identify metalworking subsectors (multiple spindle screw machining and gears machining) for inclusion in the Manufacturing Technology Preparation Program is the subject of this report. The project accomplished the following: developed five courses in multiple spindle, secured large donations of equipment and tooling, established a…

  19. Faces of Change Series. Documentary Film Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman N.

    The objectives of the Educational Materials Project were to produce print materials to accompany "The Faces of Change," a series of 26 films and some 60 essays and instructional documents produced for college classes between 1972 and 1975. The scope of the project covered two film production grants, a grant for archiving uncut footage at the…

  20. Tech Prep Intergenerational Curriculum Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock.

    A project was conducted at Texas Tech University to develop a competency-based curriculum to support statewide implementation of tech prep intergenerational programs (careers in providing services to well elderly persons and to children). Project activities included the following: (1) revision and expansion of the Intergenerational Target…

  1. Skill Standards and Certification Project. Final Detailed Report. Year Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Lake Coll., Irving, TX.

    This document reports on the second year of a project conducted to design a seamless training application model for infusing workplace skills into academic and occupational programs at the secondary, postsecondary, and apprenticeship level using the components of SCANS (Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills). For this pilot project,…

  2. Project GROW [Green River Opportunities for Work]: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vikers, Theo; Gibson, Melvin Pat

    Summarizing the progress of Project Green River Opportunities for Work (Project GROW), the document reviews the study's background and the activities resulting from a third party evaluation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Objectives based on the evaluation and recommendations included: (1) development of an articulated and…

  3. Project HEED, Title III, Section 306. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Orval D.

    Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) involves over 1,000 Indian children in grades 1-8 in Arizona. The project target sites are 48 classrooms at Sells, Topowa, San Carlos, Many Farms, Hotevilla, Peach Springs, and Sacaton. Objectives are to increase: (1) reading achievement, (2) affective behavior of teachers, (3) motivation by…

  4. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report, 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.; Pettibone, Timothy

    1973-74 approximately 1,100 Indian students in grades 1 through 8 participated in Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) in Arizona. The project target sites were 59 classrooms at Sacaton, Sells, Peach Springs, San Carlos, Topowa, Many Farms, St. Charles Mission, and Hoteville. Primary objectives were: (1) improvement in reading…

  5. Eldercare Volunteer Corps Demonstration, A "Project Care" Initiative. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. for Social Services, Frankfort.

    The goal for this project was to recognize the volunteers at the beginning of the project and to focus on a program to increase the utilization of volunteers in essential service delivery to at-risk persons in the Big Sandy region of eastern Kentucky. A diverse committee made up of business, education, civil leaders, service providers, and…

  6. Competency-Based Adult Vocational Education Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auburn Univ., AL. Dept. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This applied project recognized the priority to identify, describe, and evaluate existing vocational education programs that are coordinated with the adult performance level (APL) competency based approach. Furthermore, the project supported the value of developing and testing one or more models for APL/vocational education interface. In order to…

  7. Comprehensive Science Evaluation Project: Hudson County Community College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oromaner, Mark

    A summary is provided of the goals, objectives, activities, and findings of Hudson County Community College's (HCCC's) comprehensive science evaluation project. After introductory material outlines the status of science education at HCCC, the project's objectives are presented; i.e., to analyze the college's science courses and their ability to…

  8. Metropolitan Planning Project, 1977-78. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnoff, Steven M.

    This document provides a description of the Metropolitan Planning Project (MPP), its objectives, strategies, and an evaluation of its implementation in the Boston area. In order to encourage the voluntary elimination, reduction, and prevention of minority group isolation in elementary and secondary schools in Boston, the project focuses on two…

  9. Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

  10. NGA/ACT Pilot Project: Increasing Course Rigor. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Increasing Course Rigor Pilot Project, a joint initiative of the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices and ACT, Inc., is one component of Phase Two of the NGA Center for Best Practices Honor States Grant Program. The project, which began in winter 2006 and concluded in summer 2007, was designed to improve the quality…

  11. Rural Workplace Literacy Demonstration Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    In April 1991, Enterprise State Junior College and MacArthur State Technical College established a rural workplace literacy demonstration project in partnership with adult basic education, seven employers, and a labor organization. The project served 615 persons in classes offered at the 2 colleges, 4 partner locations, and 3 additional worksites.…

  12. The Ninos Especiales Outreach Training Project (NEOTP). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth; And Others

    The Ninos Especiales Outreach Training Project was a 3-year federally funded project to provide information, training, and evaluation related to a culturally sensitive, family-focused model of early intervention services for infants with severe disabilities and their families of Puerto Rican heritage. Implementation occurred through three major…

  13. Look into the Future: Displaced Clerical Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Deborah A.

    "Look into the Future" is a program created by a Job Training Partnership Act project and 9to5, Working Women Education Fund, to address the training and retraining needs of office workers in light of the advances in computer and communications systems. This guide describes the model project and suggests steps other organizations can take to…

  14. Automobile Mechanic Training Evaluation Project (AMTEP) Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Charles

    A project was undertaken to identify, develop, and validate those performance, program, and personal standards judged necessary to operate and evaluate a quality automobile mechanic/technician training program. Included among the project activities were the following: (1) a review of existing literature on performance and program standards; (2)…

  15. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  16. Project Open-Out: Adult Basic Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Elva M.

    A project in adult basic education was established in the Model Neighborhood of Wilmington, Delaware. A delivery system of services using paraprofessionals was created to give eligible adults individualized instruction in their home or a nearby center. The results showed that most of the project enrollment and performance objectives were met. Data…

  17. Bilingual Education Project, Santa Clara County, California. Final Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The Spanish Dame Bilingual Education Project, located in Santa Clara County, California, served 190 children who came from homes where the primary language was Spanish and who resided within the target area schools of the Alum Rock School District. The objectives of the preschool project were (1) to demonstrate a home-teaching procedure designed…

  18. Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

  19. Incentives in Education Project, Impact Evaluation Report. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planar Corp., Washington, DC.

    This report describes results of a demonstration project carried out in four cities during 1971-72. The project aimed at exploring the feasibility and impact of two different forms of money incentives payments. In one form -- the "Teacher-Only" model -- the teachers in a school were offered a series of bonuses ranging from $150 to $600 per class…

  20. Project Aprendizaje. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Andrew

    This report provides evaluative information regarding the effectiveness of Project Aprendizaje, a New York City program that served 269 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). The project promoted parent and community involvement by sponsoring cultural events, such as a large Latin American festival. Students developed…

  1. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  2. BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

  3. Austin Children`s Museum ``Go Power`` project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Go Power, was conceived as an interactive exhibit and related set of activities designed to promote in children and families an understanding and appreciation of energy concepts. Planned in 1990, the project culminated its first phase of activities with colorful, interactive exhibit about the pathways and transformations of energy, on display at the Austin Children`s Museum between February 5th and June 6th, 1993. The project was supported by the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Lower Colorado River Authority and various local foundations and businesses. This report describes the process, product and outcomes of this project.

  4. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Weatherization Training Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Denomie, Lawrence J.; LaPointe, Bruce

    2012-03-26

    The objective of the project is to train the appropriate staff, both new and existing from various KBIC Departments in the core competencies needed to develop a comprehensive Tribal community weatherization program. The goal of the project was to build the staff capacity to enable the KBIC to establish a Tribal weatherization program that promotes energy sufficiency throughout the Tribal community. The project addresses the needs identified in the 2008 KBIC Strategic Energy Plan to build the staff capacity and increase the knowledge base within the Tribal Departments and to implement an energy efficiency program through community education and financial assistance incentives.

  5. Final Report for Project FG02-05ER25685

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaosong Ma

    2009-05-07

    In this report, the PI summarizes the results and achievements obtained in the sponsored project. Overall, the project has been very successful and produced both research results in massive data-intensive computing and data management for large scale supercomputers today, and in open-source software products. During the project period, 14 conference/journal publications, as well as two PhD students, have been produced due to exclusive or shared support from this award. In addition, the PI has recently been granted tenure from NC State University.

  6. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    -dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory

  7. SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT PROJECT: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Florida Ecosystem Assessment Project is an innovative, large-scale monitoring and assessment program designed to measure current and changing conditions of ecological resources in South Florida using an integrated holistic approach. Using the United States Environmenta...

  8. Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions.

  9. Final Project Report: A Polyhedral Transformation Framework for Compiler Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy; Rountev, Atanas

    2015-06-15

    The project developed the polyhedral compiler transformation module PolyOpt/Fortran in the ROSE compiler framework. PolyOpt/Fortran performs automated transformation of affine loop nests within FORTRAN programs for enhanced data locality and parallel execution. A FORTAN version of the Polybench library was also developed by the project. A third development was a dynamic analysis approach to gauge vectorization potential within loops of programs; software (DDVec) for automated instrumentation and dynamic analysis of programs was developed.

  10. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  11. 78 FR 13660 - Middle Fork American River Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Middle Fork American River Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Middle Fork American River Hydrolectric Project In accordance with the... Projects has reviewed the application for license for the Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric...

  12. The Indiana Deafblind Services Project: Services for Children with Deafblindness Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Univ., Terre Haute. Blumberg Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Special Education.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Indiana Deaf-Blind Services Project, a 4-year federally funded project to enhance and further develop coordinated direct services to children and youth, birth through 2 and ages 18 through 21. The project also was designed to provide technical assistance to public and private…

  13. Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education (Project SHARE): Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranadive, Jyoti

    Project SHARE (Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education), a project funded by Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was in its third and final year of operation in 1992-93, in eight primary schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan (New York). The project served 141 limited English proficient students from low-income families…

  14. Project PREM: Final Report for Year I. (Preparing Regular Educators for Mainstreaming).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haughton, Donna D.

    The final report on Preparing Regular Educators for Mainstreaming mildly handicapped children (Project PREM) focuses on the first year's activities and outlines proposed objectives for the project's second and third years. Covered in an introductory section are Project PREM's main objective of developing and implementing a competency-based program…

  15. 76 FR 67178 - Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Wells Hydrolectric Project In accordance with the National Environmental... reviewed the application for license for the Wells Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 2149), located on...

  16. Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    US Forest Service; US Bureau of Land Management; US Bonneville Power Administration

    1994-09-01

    BPA has decided to acquire 20 average megawatts (aMW) of electrical power from a privately-owned geothermal power plant on the west flank of Newberry Volcano in Deschutes County, Oregon. The Newberry Project will generate 30 aMW and will be developed, owned, and operated by CE Newberry, Inc. of Portland, Oregon. In addition, BPA has decided to grant billing credits to EWEB for 10 aMW of electrical power and to provide wheeling services to EWEB for the transmission of this power to their system. BPA expects the Newberry Project to be in commercial operation by November 1997. BPA has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. The Newberry Project will be used to meet the electrical power supply obligations of these customers. The Newberry Project will also demonstrate the availability of geothermal power to meet power supply needs in the Pacific Northwest and is expected to be the first commercial geothermal plant in the region. The Newberry Project was selected under the BPA Geothermal Pilot Project Program. The goal of the Program is to initiate development of the Pacific Northwest`s large, but essentially untapped, geothermal resources, and to confirm the availability of this resource to meet the energy needs of the region. The primary underlying objective of this Program is to assure the supply of alternative sources of electrical power to help meet growing regional power demands and needs.

  17. Project on Social Architecture in Education. Final Report. Part II: Research Methods. Chapter 4: Project Overview. Chapter 5: Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Matthew B.

    This document contains chapters 4 and 5 of the final report of the Project on Social Architecture in Education. Chapter 4 provides a brief overview of the activities of the project in order to sketch the context out of which the case studies, conclusions, and learning materials emerged. Chapter 5 discusses and evaluates six major strands of…

  18. LDRD final report on light-powered nanovehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Pereira, Eulalia; Qiu, Yan; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Xu, Huifang; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang; Singh, Anup K.

    2003-11-01

    We have investigated the possibility of constructing nanoscale metallic vehicles powered by biological motors or flagella that are activated and powered by visible light. The vehicle's body is to be composed of the surfactant bilayer of a liposome coated with metallic nanoparticles or nanosheets grown together into a porous single crystal. The diameter of the rigid metal vesicles is from about 50 nm to microns. Illumination with visible light activates a photosynthetic system in the bilayer that can generate a pH gradient across the liposomal membrane. The proton gradient can fuel a molecular motor that is incorporated into the membrane. Some molecular motors require ATP to fuel active transport. The protein ATP synthase, when embedded in the membrane, will use the pH gradient across the membrane to produce ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. The nanoscale vehicle is thus composed of both natural biological components (ATPase, flagellum; actin-myosin, kinesin-microtubules) and biomimetic components (metal vehicle casing, photosynthetic membrane) as functional units. Only light and storable ADP, phosphate, water, and weak electron donor are required fuel components. These nano-vehicles are being constructed by self-assembly and photocatalytic and autocatalytic reactions. The nano-vehicles can potentially respond to chemical gradients and other factors such as light intensity and field gradients, in a manner similar to the way that magnetic bacteria navigate. The delivery package might include decision-making and guidance components, drugs or other biological and chemical agents, explosives, catalytic reactors, and structural materials. We expected in one year to be able only to assess the problems and major issues at each stage of construction of the vehicle and the likely success of fabricating viable nanovehicles with our biomimetic photocatalytic approach. Surprisingly, we have been able to demonstrate that metallized photosynthetic liposomes can indeed be made. We have completed the synthesis of metallized liposomes with photosynthetic function included and studied these structures by electron microscopy. Both platinum and palladium nanosheeting have been used to coat the micelles. The stability of the vehicles to mechanical stress and the solution environment is enhanced by the single-crystalline platinum or palladium coating on the vesicle. With analogous platinized micelles, it is possible to dry the vehicles and re-suspend them with full functionality. However, with the liposomes drying on a TEM grid may cause the platinized liposomes to collapse, although probably stay viable in solution. It remains to be shown whether a proton motive force across the metallized bilayer membrane can be generated and whether we will also be able to incorporate various functional capabilities including ATP synthesis and functional molecular motors. Future tasks to complete the nanovehicles would be the incorporation of ATP synthase into metallized liposomes and the incorporation of a molecular motor into metallized liposomes.

  19. LDRD final report on nanovehicle light-driven propulsion.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; van Swol, Frank B.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang

    2004-12-01

    Having demonstrated the possibility of constructing nanoscale metallic vehicular bodies as described in last year's proposal, our goals have been to make uniform preparations of the metallized lipid assemblies and to determine the feasibility of powering these nanostructures with biological motors that are activated and driven by visible light. We desired that the propulsion system be constructed entirely by self-assembly and powered by a photocatalytic process partially already built into the nanovehicle. The nanovehicle we desire to build is composed of both natural biological components (ATPase, kinesin-microtubules) and biomimetic components (platinized liposomes, photosynthetic membrane) as functional units. The vehicle's body was originally envisioned to be composed of a surfactant liposomal bilayer coated with platinum nanoparticles, but instead of the expected nanoparticles we were able to grow dendritic 2-nm thick platinum sheets on the liposomes. Now, we have shown that it is possible to completely enclose the liposomes with sheeting to form porous platinum spheres, which show good structural stability as evidenced by their ability to survive the stresses of electron-microscopy sample preparation. Our goals were to control the synthesis of the platinized liposomes well enough to make uniform preparations of the coated individual liposomes and to develop the propulsion system for these nanovehicles a hydrogen-evolving artificial photosynthetic system in the liposomal bilayer that generates the pH gradient across the membrane that is necessary to drive the synthesis of ATP by ATP-synthase incorporated in the membrane. ATP produced would fuel the molecular motor (kinesin) attached to the vehicle, needing only light, storable ADP, phosphate, and an electron donor to be produced by ATP-synthase in the membrane. These research goals appear to be attainable, but growing the uniform preparations of the liposomes coated with dendritic platinum sheeting, a necessary accomplishment that would simplify the task of incorporating and verifying the photosynthetic function of the nanovehicle membrane, has proved to be difficult. The detailed understanding of the relative locations of surfactant and Pt in the liposomal bodies has also forced a change in the nanovehicle design strategies. Nevertheless, we have found no insurmountable obstacles to making these nanovehicles given a larger and longer term research effort. These nanovehicles could potentially respond to chemical gradients, light intensity, and field gradients, in the same manner that magnetic bacteria navigate. The cargo might include decision-making and guidance components, drugs and other biological and chemical agents, explosives, catalytic reactors, and structural materials.

  20. LDRD final report on intelligent polymers for nanodevice performance control

    SciTech Connect

    JAMISON,GREGORY M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; WHEELER,DAVID R.; SAUNDERS,RANDALL S.L; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; CARR,MARTIN J.; SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymer systems were prepared and evaluated for their bulk response to optical, thermal and chemical environmental changes. These included modeling studies of polyene-bridged metal porphyrin systems, metal-mediated oligomerization of phosphaalkynes as heteroatomic analogues to polyacetylene monomers, investigations of chemically amplified degradation of acid- and base-sensitive polymers and thermally responsive thermoplastic thermosets based on Diels-Alder cycloaddition chemistry. The latter class of materials was utilized to initiate work to develop a new technique for rapidly building a library of systems with varying depolymerization temperatures.