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Sample records for ldrd project progress

  1. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchak, Dena

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Annual Report FY 2013 LDRD Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2014-03-01

    The FY 2013 LDRD Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL’s technical capabilities support the current and future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL—it provides a means for the Laboratory to maintain scientific and technical vitality while funding highly innovative, high-risk science and technology research and development (R&D) projects. The program enhances technical capabilities at the Laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities to explore proof-of-principle ideas, advanced studies of innovative concepts, and preliminary technical analyses. Established by Congress in 1991, the LDRD Program proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, national and international awards, and publications.

  3. Advanced polychromator systems for remote chemical sensing (LDRD project 52575).

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Allen, James Joe

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop a programmable diffraction grating fabricated in SUMMiT V{trademark}. Two types of grating elements (vertical and rotational) were designed and demonstrated. The vertical grating element utilized compound leveraged bending and the rotational grating element used vertical comb drive actuation. This work resulted in two technical advances and one patent application. Also a new optical configuration of the Polychromator was demonstrated. The new optical configuration improved the optical efficiency of the system without degrading any other aspect of the system. The new configuration also relaxes some constraint on the programmable diffraction grating.

  4. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  5. THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

  6. Final report for LDRD project learning efficient hypermedia navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang; Laguna, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the work performed under the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}Learning Efficient Hypermedia Navigation.{close_quotes} The bulk of the work is contained in the software developed for the WWW and a copy of the software demonstrating its use has been submitted to the LDRD office.

  7. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.; Al-Ayat, R.; Walter, W. R.

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  8. Validated modeling of distributed energy resources at distribution voltages : LDRD project 38672.

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Mark E.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    2004-03-01

    A significant barrier to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) onto the power grid is uncertainty on the part of utility engineers regarding impacts of DER on their distribution systems. Because of the many possible combinations of DER and local power system characteristics, these impacts can most effectively be studied by computer simulation. The goal of this LDRD project was to develop and experimentally validate models of transient and steady state source behavior for incorporation into utility distribution analysis tools. Development of these models had not been prioritized either by the distributed-generation industry or by the inverter industry. A functioning model of a selected inverter-based DER was developed in collaboration with both the manufacturer and industrial power systems analysts. The model was written in the PSCAD simulation language, a variant of the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), a code that is widely used and accepted by utilities. A stakeholder team was formed and a methodology was established to address the problem. A list of detailed DER/utility interaction concerns was developed and prioritized. The list indicated that the scope of the problem significantly exceeded resources available for this LDRD project. As this work progresses under separate funding, the model will be refined and experimentally validated. It will then be incorporated in utility distribution analysis tools and used to study a variety of DER issues. The key next step will be design of the validation experiments.

  9. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  10. A configuration space toolkit for automated spatial reasoning: Technical results and LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    A robot`s configuration space (c-space) is the space of its kinematic degrees of freedom, e.g., the joint-space of an arm. Sets in c-space can be defined that characterize a variety of spatial relationships, such as contact between the robot and its environment. C-space techniques have been fundamental to research progress in areas such as motion planning and physically-based reasoning. However, practical progress has been slowed by the difficulty of implementing the c-space abstraction inside each application. For this reason, we proposed a Configuration Space Toolkit of high-performance algorithms and data structures meeting these needs. Our intent was to develop this robotics software to provide enabling technology to emerging applications that apply the c-space abstraction, such as advanced motion planning, teleoperation supervision, mechanism functional analysis, and design tools. This final report presents the research results and technical achievements of this LDRD project. Key results and achievements included (1) a hybrid Common LISP/C prototype that implements the basic C-Space abstraction, (2) a new, generic, algorithm for constructing hierarchical geometric representations, and (3) a C++ implementation of an algorithm for fast distance computation, interference detection, and c-space point-classification. Since the project conclusion, motion planning researchers in Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center have been using the CSTk libcstk.so C++ library. The code continues to be used, supported, and improved by projects in the ISRC.

  11. Final report on LDRD project "proliferation-resistant fuel cycles"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N W; Hassberger, J A

    1999-02-25

    This report provides a summary of LDRD work completed during 1997 and 1998 to develop the ideas and concepts that lead to the Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) program proposals to the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI). The STAR program consists of a team of three national laboratories (LLNL, ANL, and LANL), three universities, (UC Berkeley, TAMU, and MIT) and the Westinghouse Research Center. Based on the LLNL work and their own efforts on related work this team prepared and integrated a package of twelve proposals that will carry the LDRD work outlined here into the next phase of development. We are proposing to develop a new nuclear system that meets stringent requirements for a high degree of safety and proliferation resistance, and also deals directly with the related nuclear waste and spent fuel management issues.

  12. Development of a cryogenic EOS capability for the Z Pulsed Radiation Source: Goals and accomplishments of FY97 LDRD project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Johnston, R.R.; Asay, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Experimental cryogenic capabilities are essential for the study of ICF high-gain target and weapons effects issues involving dynamic materials response at low temperatures. This report describes progress during the period 2/97-11/97 on the FY97 LDRD project ``Cryogenic EOS Capabilities on Pulsed Radiation Sources (Z Pinch)``. The goal of this project is the development of a general purpose cryogenic target system for precision EOS and shock physics measurements at liquid helium temperatures on the Z accelerator Z-pinch pulsed radiation source. Activity during the FY97 LDRD phase of this project has focused on development of a conceptual design for the cryogenic target system based on consideration of physics, operational, and safety issues, design and fabrication of principal system components, construction and instrumentation of a cryogenic test facility for off-line thermal and optical testing at liquid helium temperatures, initial thermal testing of a cryogenic target assembly, and the design of a cryogenic system interface to the Z pulsed radiation source facility. The authors discuss these accomplishments as well as elements of the project that require further work.

  13. Overview of Stellarator Divertor Studies: Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-069

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Rognlien, T D; Koniges, A; Unmansky, M; Hill, D N

    2003-01-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 01-ERD-069 entitled Stellarator Divertor Studies. This project has contributed to the development of a three-dimensional edge-plasma modeling and divertor diagnostic design capabilities at LLNL. Results are demonstrated by sample calculations and diagnostic possibilities for the edge plasma of the proposed U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment device. Details of the work are contained in accompanying LLNL reports that have been accepted for publication.

  14. FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Radiation Biodosimetry LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-ERD-076

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; A.Coleman, M; Lehmann, J; Manohar, C F; Marchetti, F; Mariella, R; Miles, R; Nelson, D O; Wyrobek, A J

    2006-02-03

    been, these methods are not suitable. The best current option for triage radiation biodosimetry is self-report of time to onset of emesis after the event, a biomarker that is subject to many false positives. The premise of this project is that greatly improved radiation dosimetry can be achieved by research and development directed toward detection of molecular changes induced by radiation in cells or other biological materials. Basic research on the responses of cells to radiation at the molecular level, particularly of message RNA and proteins, has identified biomolecules whose levels increase (or decrease) as part of cellular responses to radiation. Concerted efforts to identify markers useful for triage and clinical applications have not been reported as yet. Such studies would scan responses over a broad range of doses, below, at and above the threshold of clinical significance in the first weeks after exposure, and would collect global proteome and/or transcriptome information on all tissue samples accessible to either first responders or clinicians. For triage, the goal is to identify those needing medical treatment. Treatment will be guided by refined dosimetry. Achieving this goal entails determining whether radiation exposure was below or above the threshold of concern, using one sample collected within days of an event, with simple devices that first responders either use or distribute for self-testing. For the clinic, better resolution of dose and tissue damage is needed to determine the nature and time sensitivity of therapy, but multiple sampling times may be acceptable and clinical staff and equipment can be utilized. Two complementary areas of research and development are needed once candidate biomarkers are identified, validation of the biomarker responses and validation of devices/instrumentation for detection of responses. Validation of biomarkers per se is confirmation that the dose, time, and tissue specific responses meet the reporting

  15. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  16. Final report of LDRD project: Electromagnetic impulse radar for detection of underground structures

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.; Aurand, J.; Buttram, M.; Zutavern, F.; Brown, D.; Helgeson, W.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the LDRD project titled: Electromagnetic impulse radar for the detection of underground structures. The project met all its milestones even with a tight two year schedule and total funding of $400 k. The goal of the LDRD was to develop and demonstrate a ground penetrating radar (GPR) that is based on high peak power, high repetition rate, and low center frequency impulses. The idea of this LDRD is that a high peak power, high average power radar based on the transmission of short impulses can be utilized effect can be utilized for ground penetrating radar. This direct time-domain system the authors are building seeks to increase penetration depth over conventional systems by using: (1) high peak power, high repetition rate operation that gives high average power, (2) low center frequencies that better penetrate the ground, and (3) short duration impulses that allow for the use of downward looking, low flying platforms that increase the power on target relative to a high flying platform. Specifically, chirped pulses that are a microsecond in duration require (because it is difficult to receive during transmit) platforms above 150 m (and typically 1 km) while this system, theoretically could be at 10 m above the ground. The power on target decays with distance squared so the ability to use low flying platforms is crucial to high penetration. Clutter is minimized by time gating the surface clutter return. Short impulses also allow gating (out) the coupling of the transmit and receive antennas.

  17. Final report on LDRD project :leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas; Ongstand, Andrea; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Montano, Victoria A.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''Leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits''. Leaky-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer new possibilities for integration of microcavity lasers to create optical microsystems. A leaky-mode VCSEL output-couples light laterally, in the plane of the semiconductor wafer, which allows the light to interact with adjacent lasers, modulators, and detectors on the same wafer. The fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs based on effective index modification was proposed and demonstrated at Sandia in 1999 but was not adequately developed for use in applications. The aim of this LDRD has been to advance the design and fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs to the point where initial applications can be attempted. In the first and second years of this LDRD we concentrated on overcoming previous difficulties in the epitaxial growth and fabrication of these advanced VCSELs. In the third year, we focused on applications of leaky-mode VCSELs, such as all-optical processing circuits based on gain quenching.

  18. Final Report on LDRD Project: High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SERKLAND, DARWIN K.; GEIB, KENT M.; BLANSETT, ETHAN L.; KARPEN, GARY D.; PEAKE, GREGORY M.; HARGETT, TERRY; MONTANO, VICTORIA; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; ALLERMAN, ANDREW A.; RIENSTRA, JEFFREY L.

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications.'' The goal of this LDRD has been to address the future needs of focal-plane-array (FPA) sensors by exploring the use of high-bandwidth fiber-optic interconnects to transmit FPA signals within a satellite. We have focused primarily on vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) based transmitters, due to the previously demonstrated immunity of VCSELs to total radiation doses up to 1 Mrad. In addition, VCSELs offer high modulation bandwidth (roughly 10 GHz), low power consumption (roughly 5 mW), and high coupling efficiency (greater than -3dB) to optical fibers. In the first year of this LDRD, we concentrated on the task of transmitting analog signals from a cryogenic FPA to a remote analog-to-digital converter. In the second year, we considered the transmission of digital signals produced by the analog-to-digital converter to a remote computer on the satellite. Specifically, we considered the situation in which the FPA, analog-to-digital converter, and VCSEL-based transmitter were all cooled to cryogenic temperatures. This situation requires VCSELs that operate at cryogenic temperature, dissipate minimal heat, and meet the electrical drive requirements in terms of voltage, current, and bandwidth.

  19. FY2003 LDRD Final Annual Report Article: Pathogen Pathway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2003-11-10

    Understanding virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens is vital to anticipating biological threats and to improving detectors, vaccines, and treatments. This project will characterize factors responsible for virulence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague and a biothreat agent, which has an inducible Type III secretion virulence mechanism also found in other animal, plant, and human pathogens. Our approach relies on genomic and proteomic characterization of Y. pestis in addition to a bioinformatic infrastructure. Scientific and technical capabilities developed in this project can be applied to other microbes of interest. This work will establish a significant new direction for biodefense at LLNL and expand our national and international scientific collaborations.

  20. Fabrications of PVDF gratings :final report for LDRD project 79884.

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. A. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Carr, Dustin Wade; Bogart, Gregory R.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to do some preliminary studies and process development on electroactive polymers to be used for tunable optical elements and MEMS actuators. Working in collaboration between Sandia National Labs and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, we have successfully developed a process for applying thin films of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) onto glass substrates and patterning these using a novel stamping technique. We observed actuation in these structures in static and dynamic measurements. Further work is needed to characterize the impact that this approach could have on the field of tunable optical devices for sensing and communication.

  1. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  2. FPGAs in High Perfomance Computing: Results from Two LDRD Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith D; Ulmer, Craig D.; Thompson, David; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2006-11-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been used as alternative computational de-vices for over a decade; however, they have not been used for traditional scientific com-puting due to their perceived lack of floating-point performance. In recent years, there hasbeen a surge of interest in alternatives to traditional microprocessors for high performancecomputing. Sandia National Labs began two projects to determine whether FPGAs wouldbe a suitable alternative to microprocessors for high performance scientific computing and,if so, how they should be integrated into the system. We present results that indicate thatFPGAs could have a significant impact on future systems. FPGAs have thepotentialtohave order of magnitude levels of performance wins on several key algorithms; however,there are serious questions as to whether the system integration challenge can be met. Fur-thermore, there remain challenges in FPGA programming and system level reliability whenusing FPGA devices.4 AcknowledgmentArun Rodrigues provided valuable support and assistance in the use of the Structural Sim-ulation Toolkit within an FPGA context. Curtis Janssen and Steve Plimpton provided valu-able insights into the workings of two Sandia applications (MPQC and LAMMPS, respec-tively).5

  3. Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

    2005-11-01

    LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

  4. LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Liu, Kaijun; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2012-07-17

    We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

  5. FY08 LDRD Final Report A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media LDRD Project Tracking Code: 05-ERD-079

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, A

    2009-01-29

    The LDRD project 'A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media' developed several improvements to the traditional finite difference technique for seismic wave propagation, including a summation-by-parts discretization which is provably stable for arbitrary heterogeneous materials, an accurate treatment of non-planar topography, local mesh refinement, and stable outflow boundary conditions. This project also implemented these techniques in a parallel open source computer code called WPP, and participated in several seismic modeling efforts to simulate ground motion due to earthquakes in Northern California. This research has been documented in six individual publications which are summarized in this report. Of these publications, four are published refereed journal articles, one is an accepted refereed journal article which has not yet been published, and one is a non-refereed software manual. The report concludes with a discussion of future research directions and exit plan.

  6. Final report on LDRD project: Simulation/optimization tools for system variability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Bierbaum; R. F. Billau; J. E. Campbell; K. D. Marx; R. J. Sikorski; B. M. Thompson; S. D. Wix

    1999-10-01

    >This work was conducted during FY98 (Proposal Number 98-0036) and FY99 (Proposal Number 99-0818) under the auspices of the Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Electrical simulation typically treats a single data point in the very large input space of component properties. For electrical simulation to reach its full potential as a design tool, it must be able to address the unavoidable variability and uncertainty in component properties. Component viability is strongly related to the design margin (and reliability) of the end product. During the course of this project, both tools and methodologies were developed to enable analysis of variability in the context of electrical simulation tools. Two avenues to link relevant tools were also developed, and the resultant toolset was applied to a major component.

  7. Final LDRD Report for Projects %23 52797 and %23 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects %23 52797 and %23 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  8. Final Report for LDRD Project on Rapid Problem Setup for Mesh-Based Simulation (Rapsodi)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L; Henshaw, W; Petersson, N A; Fast, P; Chand, K

    2003-02-07

    Under LLNL Exploratory Research LDRD funding, the Rapsodi project developed rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that require computational representations of complex geometry. Many simulation projects at LLNL involve the solution of partial differential equations in complex 3-D geometries. A significant bottleneck in carrying out these simulations arises in converting some specification of a geometry, such as a computer-aided design (CAD) drawing to a computationally appropriate 3-D mesh that can be used for simulation and analysis. Even using state-of-the-art mesh generation software, this problem setup step typically has required weeks or months, which is often much longer than required to carry out the computational simulation itself. The Rapsodi project built computational tools and designed algorithms that help to significantly reduce this setup time to less than a day for many realistic problems. The project targeted rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that use mixed-element unstructured meshes, overset meshes or Cartesian-embedded boundary (EB) meshes to represent complex geometry. It also built tools that aid in constructing computational representations of geometry for problems that do not require a mesh. While completely automatic mesh generation is extremely difficult, the amount of manual labor required can be significantly reduced. By developing novel, automated, component-based mesh construction procedures and automated CAD geometry repair and cleanup tools, Rapsodi has significantly reduced the amount of hand crafting required to generate geometry and meshes for scientific simulation codes.

  9. Final report on LDRD Project: The double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Moon, J.S.; Blount, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ``Double Electron Layer Tunneling Transistor.`` The main goal of this project was to investigate whether the recently discovered phenomenon of 2D-2D tunneling in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells (DQWs), investigated in a previous LDRD, could be harnessed and implemented as the operating principle for a new type of tunneling device the authors proposed, the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT). In parallel with this main thrust of the project, they also continued a modest basic research effort on DQW physics issues, with significant theoretical support. The project was a considerable success, with the main goal of demonstrating a working prototype of the DELTT having been achieved. Additional DELTT advances included demonstrating good electrical characteristics at 77 K, demonstrating both NMOS and CMOS-like bi-stable memories at 77 K using the DELTT, demonstrating digital logic gates at 77 K, and demonstrating voltage-controlled oscillators at 77 K. In order to successfully fabricate the DELTT, the authors had to develop a novel flip-chip processing scheme, the epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) technique. This technique was latter improved so as to be amenable to electron-beam lithography, allowing the fabrication of DELTTs with sub-micron features, which are expected to be extremely high speed. In the basic physics area they also made several advances, including a measurement of the effective mass of electrons in the hour-glass orbit of a DQW subject to in-plane magnetic fields, and both measurements and theoretical calculations of the full Landau level spectra of DQWs in both perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields. This last result included the unambiguous demonstration of magnetic breakdown of the Fermi surface. Finally, they also investigated the concept of a far-infrared photodetector based on photon assisted tunneling in a DQW. Absorption calculations showed a

  10. RF/microwave properties of nanotubes and nanowires : LDRD Project 105876 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Lee, Mark; Hsu, Julia W. P.; Highstrete, Clark

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 105876 was a research project whose primary goal was to discover the currently unknown science underlying the basic linear and nonlinear electrodynamic response of nanotubes and nanowires in a manner that will support future efforts aimed at converting forefront nanoscience into innovative new high-frequency nanodevices. The project involved experimental and theoretical efforts to discover and understand high frequency (MHz through tens of GHz) electrodynamic response properties of nanomaterials, emphasizing nanowires of silicon, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes. While there is much research on DC electrical properties of nanowires, electrodynamic characteristics still represent a major new frontier in nanotechnology. We generated world-leading insight into how the low dimensionality of these nanomaterials yields sometimes desirable and sometimes problematic high-frequency properties that are outside standard model electron dynamics. In the cases of silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes, evidence of strong disorder or glass-like charge dynamics was measured, indicating that these materials still suffer from serious inhomogeneities that limit there high frequency performance. Zinc oxide nanowires were found to obey conventional Drude dynamics. In all cases, a significant practical problem involving large impedance mismatch between the high intrinsic impedance of all nanowires and nanotubes and high-frequency test equipment had to be overcome.

  11. Millimeter- and submillimeter-wave nanoscience : LDRD project 122359 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Mark

    2008-09-01

    LDRD Project 122359 was a nine-month, late-start effort that pursued initial experiments studying the fundamental electrodynamic response properties of various nanomaterials from millimeter-wave (above roughly 30 GHz) up to submillimeter-wave (above roughly 0.1 THz) frequencies. The nine months of this project's duration produced two main empirical findings. First, Fourier transform reflectance spectroscopy on SrTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals from 0.2 to 10 THz frequency showed signatures of two optical phonons that correspond to known optical modes in bulk crystal SrTiO{sub 3}. However, quantitative differences between the nanoparticle and bulk spectra suggest that one or both of these phonons may shift frequency and weaken in nanoparticles relative to bulk crystal. Second, heavily doped n-type GaAs nanowires were synthesized for the purpose of creating high frequency diodes to study non-linear frequency conversion properties of compound semiconductor nanowires. It was found that incorporation of a heavy concentration of dopants interferes with the growth of these nanowires. While DC measurements showed reasonable diode-like current-voltage properties, the current state-of-the-art material properties of these nanowires are still unsuitable for millimeter-wave testing and applications.

  12. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E. Eric; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  13. LDRD LW Project Final Report:Resolving the Earthquake Source Scaling Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Felker, S; Gok, R; O'Boyle, J; Walter, W R; Ruppert, S

    2004-02-10

    The scaling behavior of basic earthquake source parameters such as the energy release per unit area of fault slip, quantitatively measured as the apparent stress, is currently in dispute. There are compelling studies that show apparent stress is constant over a wide range of moments (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001, Ide et al. 2003). Other equally compelling studies find the apparent stress increases with moment (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993; Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001; Richardson and Jordan, 2002). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for attenuation, radiation inhomogeneities, bandwidth and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. As one part of our LDRD project we convened a one-day workshop on July 24, 2003 in Livermore to review the current state of knowledge on this topic and discuss possible methods of resolution with many of the world's foremost experts.

  14. RF/Microwave properties and applications of directly assembled nanotubes and nanowires: LDRD project 102662 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Theresa (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Vallett, Aaron (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Jones, Frank E.; Talin, Albert Alec; Highstrete, Clark

    2006-11-01

    LDRD Project 102662 provided support to pursue experiments aimed at measuring the basic electrodynamic response and possible applications of carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires at radiofrequency to microwave frequencies, approximately 0.01 to 50 GHz. Under this project, a method was developed to integrate these nanomaterials onto high-frequency compatible co-planar waveguides. The complex reflection and transmission coefficients of the nanomaterials was studied as a function of frequency. From these data, the high-frequency loss characteristics of the nanomaterials were deduced. These data are useful to predict frequency dependence and power dissipation characteristics in new rf/microwave devices incorporating new nanomaterials.

  15. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  16. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-FS-009 Gigapixel Surveillance Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Bennett, C L

    2010-04-20

    The threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction add urgency to the development of new techniques for surveillance and intelligence collection. For example, the United States faces a serious and growing threat from adversaries who locate key facilities underground, hide them within other facilities, or otherwise conceal their location and function. Reconnaissance photographs are one of the most important tools for uncovering the capabilities of adversaries. However, current imaging technology provides only infrequent static images of a large area, or occasional video of a small area. We are attempting to add a new dimension to reconnaissance by introducing a capability for large area video surveillance. This capability would enable tracking of all vehicle movements within a very large area. The goal of our project is the development of a gigapixel video surveillance camera for high altitude aircraft or balloon platforms. From very high altitude platforms (20-40 km altitude) it would be possible to track every moving vehicle within an area of roughly 100 km x 100 km, about the size of the San Francisco Bay region, with a gigapixel camera. Reliable tracking of vehicles requires a ground sampling distance (GSD) of 0.5 to 1 m and a framing rate of approximately two frames per second (fps). For a 100 km x 100 km area the corresponding pixel count is 10 gigapixels for a 1-m GSD and 40 gigapixels for a 0.5-m GSD. This is an order of magnitude beyond the 1 gigapixel camera envisioned in our LDRD proposal. We have determined that an instrument of this capacity is feasible.

  17. Scrape-Off-Layer Flow Studies in Tokamaks: Final Report of LDRD Project 09-ERD-025

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Allen, S L; Ellis, R M; Porter, G D; Nam, S K; Weber, T R; Umansky, M V; Howard, J

    2011-11-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 09-ERD-025 entitled Scrape-Off-Layer Flow Studies in Tokamaks. This project has lead to implementation of the new prototype Fourier Transform Spectrometer edge plasma flow diagnostic on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General Atomics, acquisition of carbon impurity concentration and flow data, and demonstration that the resulting data compare reasonably well with LLNL's edge plasma transport code UEDGE. Details of the work are contained in attached published papers, while the most recent results that are being written-up for publication are summarized in the report. Boundary plasma flows in tokamak fusion devices are key in determining the distribution of fuel and impurity ions, with tritium build-up in the walls an especially critical operational issue. The intrusion of impurity ions to the hot plasma core region can result in serious energy-loss owing to line radiation. However, flow diagnostic capability has been severely limited in fusion-relevant hot edge plasmas where Langmuir-type probes cannot withstand the high heat flux and traditional Doppler spectroscopy has limited resolution and signal strength. Thus, new edge plasma flow diagnostic capabilities need to be developed that can be used in existing and future devices such as ITER. The understanding of such flows requires simulation with 2-dimensional transport codes owing to the geometrical complexity of the edge region in contact with material surfaces and the large number of interaction physical processes including plasma flow along and across the magnetic field, and coupling between impurity and neutral species. The characteristics of edge plasma flows are substantially affected by cross-magnetic-field drifts (ExB/B{sup 2} and BxVB/B{sup 2}), which are known to introduce substantial convergence difficulty for some cases. It is important that these difficulties be overcome so that drifts can be included in transport models, both

  18. Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is

  19. Final report on LDRD project : coupling strategies for multi-physics applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Moffat, Harry K.; Carnes, Brian; Hooper, Russell Warren; Pawlowski, Roger P.

    2007-11-01

    Many current and future modeling applications at Sandia including ASC milestones will critically depend on the simultaneous solution of vastly different physical phenomena. Issues due to code coupling are often not addressed, understood, or even recognized. The objectives of the LDRD has been both in theory and in code development. We will show that we have provided a fundamental analysis of coupling, i.e., when strong coupling vs. a successive substitution strategy is needed. We have enabled the implementation of tighter coupling strategies through additions to the NOX and Sierra code suites to make coupling strategies available now. We have leveraged existing functionality to do this. Specifically, we have built into NOX the capability to handle fully coupled simulations from multiple codes, and we have also built into NOX the capability to handle Jacobi Free Newton Krylov simulations that link multiple applications. We show how this capability may be accessed from within the Sierra Framework as well as from outside of Sierra. The critical impact from this LDRD is that we have shown how and have delivered strategies for enabling strong Newton-based coupling while respecting the modularity of existing codes. This will facilitate the use of these codes in a coupled manner to solve multi-physic applications.

  20. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.; Tovesson, Fredrik K.; Sierk, Arnold John

    2014-02-06

    The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents the progress made against the goals agreed to as part of the 2013 review.

  1. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest

  2. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  3. LDRD Progress Report: Radioimmunotherapy using oxide nanoparticles: Radionuclide contaiment and mitigation of normal tissue toxicity.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinone, Adam Justin; Dai, Sheng; Mirzadeh, Saed; Kennel, Steve J

    2005-10-01

    Radionuclides with specific emission properties can be incorporated into metal-chalcogenide and metal-oxide nanoparticles. Coupled to antibodies, these conjugates could be injected into the bloodstream to target and destroy non-solid tumors or target organs for radioimaging. In the first year of this project, two types of radioactive nanoparticles, CdTe: {sup 125m}Te and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}: {sup 170}Tm were synthesized and coupled to antibodies specific to murine epithelial lung tissue. The nanoparticles successfully target the lung tissue in vivo. Some leaching of the radioisotope was observed. The coming year will explore other types of nanoparticles (other crystal chemistries) in order to minimize leaching.

  4. LDRD project final report : hybrid AI/cognitive tactical behavior framework for LVC.

    SciTech Connect

    Djordjevich, Donna D.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Brannon, Nathan Gregory; Hart, Brian E.; Hart, Derek H.; Little, Charles Quentin; Oppel, Fred John III; Linebarger, John Michael; Parker, Eric Paul

    2012-01-01

    This Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) sought to develop technology that enhances scenario construction speed, entity behavior robustness, and scalability in Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) simulation. We investigated issues in both simulation architecture and behavior modeling. We developed path-planning technology that improves the ability to express intent in the planning task while still permitting an efficient search algorithm. An LVC simulation demonstrated how this enables 'one-click' layout of squad tactical paths, as well as dynamic re-planning for simulated squads and for real and simulated mobile robots. We identified human response latencies that can be exploited in parallel/distributed architectures. We did an experimental study to determine where parallelization would be productive in Umbra-based force-on-force (FOF) simulations. We developed and implemented a data-driven simulation composition approach that solves entity class hierarchy issues and supports assurance of simulation fairness. Finally, we proposed a flexible framework to enable integration of multiple behavior modeling components that model working memory phenomena with different degrees of sophistication.

  5. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  6. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  7. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  8. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  9. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  10. Characterizing the emissivity of materials under dynamic compression (final report for LDRD project 79877).

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2007-10-01

    Temperature measurements are crucial to equation of state development, but difficult to perform reliably. In the case of infrared pyrometry, a large uncertainty comes from the fact that sample emissivity (the deviation from a blackbody) is unknown. In this project, a method for characterizing the emissivity of shocked materials was developed. By coupling infrared radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source to a gas gun system, broad spectrum emissivity changes were studied to a peak stress of 8 GPa. Emissivity measurements were performed on standard metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Pt) as well as a high emissivity coating developed at Sandia.

  11. Intelligent tools and process development for robotic edge finishing: LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a project undertaken to develop an agile automated, high-precision edge finishing system, for fabricating precision parts. The project involved re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing work-cell. The resulting work-cell may serve as prototype for production systems to be integrated in highly flexible automated production lines. The system removes burrs formed in the machining process and produces precision chamfers. The system uses an expert system to predict the burr size from the machining history. Within the CAD system, tool paths are generated for burr removal and chamfer formation. Then, the optimal grinding process is automatically selected from a database of processes. The tool trajectory and the selected process definition is then downloaded to a robotic control system to execute the operation. The robotic control system implements a hybrid fuzzy logic-classical control scheme to achieve the desired performance goals regardless of tolerance and fixturing errors. This report describes the system architecture and the system`s performance.

  12. Final report on LDRD project : outstanding challenges for AlGaInN MOCVD.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Russell, Michael J.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2005-03-01

    The AlGaInN material system is used for virtually all advanced solid state lighting and short wavelength optoelectronic devices. Although metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has proven to be the workhorse deposition technique, several outstanding scientific and technical challenges remain, which hinder progress and keep RD&A costs high. The three most significant MOCVD challenges are: (1) Accurate temperature measurement; (2) Reliable and reproducible p-doping (Mg); and (3) Low dislocation density GaN material. To address challenge (1) we designed and tested (on reactor mockup) a multiwafer, dual wavelength, emissivity-correcting pyrometer (ECP) for AlGaInN MOCVD. This system simultaneously measures the reflectance (at 405 and 550 nm) and emissivity-corrected temperature for each individual wafer, with the platen signal entirely rejected. To address challenge (2) we measured the MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation phase diagram from 65-115 C, at typical MOCVD concentrations. Results indicate that it requires temperatures of 80-100 C in order to prevent MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation. Modification and testing of our research reactor will not be complete until FY2005. A new commercial Veeco reactor was installed in early FY2004, and after qualification growth experiments were conducted to improve the GaN quality using a delayed recovery technique, which addresses challenge (3). Using a delayed recovery technique, the dislocation densities determined from x-ray diffraction were reduced from 2 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} to 4 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. We have also developed a model to simulate reflectance waveforms for GaN growth on sapphire.

  13. LDRD final report : autotuning for scalable linear algebra.

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Marker, Bryan

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress made as part of a one year lab-directed research and development (LDRD) project to fund the research efforts of Bryan Marker at the University of Texas at Austin. The goal of the project was to develop new techniques for automatically tuning the performance of dense linear algebra kernels. These kernels often represent the majority of computational time in an application. The primary outcome from this work is a demonstration of the value of model driven engineering as an approach to accurately predict and study performance trade-offs for dense linear algebra computations.

  14. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  15. Climate system modeling on massively parallel systems: LDRD Project 95-ERP-47 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.; Dannevik, W.P.; Chan, B.; Duffy, P.B.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Wehner, M.F.

    1996-12-01

    Global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss are some of the major climate-related issues presently being addressed by climate and environmental scientists. Because unexpected changes in the climate could have significant effect on our economy, it is vitally important to improve the scientific basis for understanding and predicting the earth`s climate. The impracticality of modeling the earth experimentally in the laboratory together with the fact that the model equations are highly nonlinear has created a unique and vital role for computer-based climate experiments. However, today`s computer models, when run at desired spatial and temporal resolution and physical complexity, severely overtax the capabilities of our most powerful computers. Parallel processing offers significant potential for attaining increased performance and making tractable simulations that cannot be performed today. The principal goals of this project have been to develop and demonstrate the capability to perform large-scale climate simulations on high-performance computing systems (using methodology that scales to the systems of tomorrow), and to carry out leading-edge scientific calculations using parallelized models. The demonstration platform for these studies has been the 256-processor Cray-T3D located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our plan was to undertake an ambitious program in optimization, proof-of-principle and scientific study. These goals have been met. We are now regularly using massively parallel processors for scientific study of the ocean and atmosphere, and preliminary parallel coupled ocean/atmosphere calculations are being carried out as well. Furthermore, our work suggests that it should be possible to develop an advanced comprehensive climate system model with performance scalable to the teraflops range. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Darren

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  17. Final report for LDRD project {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the research performed under the laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}, funded FY94-6. We describe the goals of the research, motivate and list our improvements to the state of the art in multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny (evolutionary tree) construction, but leave technical details to the six publications resulting from this work. At least three algorithms for phylogeny construction or tree consensus have been implemented and used by researchers outside of Sandia.

  18. Tiger LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  19. Final report on LDRD project 105967 : exploring the increase in GaAs photodiode responsivity with increased neutron fluence.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Cich, Michael Joseph; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Fleming, Robert M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Wrobel, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    A previous LDRD studying radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications led to the result that increased neutron irradiation from a fast-burst reactor caused increased responsivity in GaAs photodiodes up to a total fluence of 4.4 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (1 MeV Eq., Si). The silicon photodiodes experienced significant degradation. Scientific literature shows that neutrons can both cause defects as well as potentially remove defects in an annealing-like process in GaAs. Though there has been some modeling that suggests how fabrication and radiation-induced defects can migrate to surfaces and interfaces in GaAs and lead to an ordering effect, it is important to consider how these processes affect the performance of devices, such as the basic GaAs p-i-n photodiode. In this LDRD, we manufactured GaAs photodiodes at the MESA facility, irradiated them with electrons and neutrons at the White Sands Missile Range Linac and Fast Burst Reactor, and performed measurements to show the effect of irradiation on dark current, responsivity and high-speed bandwidth.

  20. Final report for LDRD project 11-0029 : high-interest event detection in large-scale multi-modal data sets : proof of concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson

    2011-09-01

    Events of interest to data analysts are sometimes difficult to characterize in detail. Rather, they consist of anomalies, events that are unpredicted, unusual, or otherwise incongruent. The purpose of this LDRD was to test the hypothesis that a biologically-inspired anomaly detection algorithm could be used to detect contextual, multi-modal anomalies. There currently is no other solution to this problem, but the existence of a solution would have a great national security impact. The technical focus of this research was the application of a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) to the problem of anomaly detection. One aspect of BECCA in particular was discovered to be critical to improved anomaly detection capabilities: it's feature creator. During the course of this project the feature creator was developed and tested against multiple data types. Development direction was drawn from psychological and neurophysiological measurements. Major technical achievements include the creation of hierarchical feature sets created from both audio and imagery data.

  1. Progress on the DPASS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Svidzinski, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    A novel project to develop Disruption Prediction And Simulation Suite (DPASS) of comprehensive computational tools to predict, model, and analyze disruption events in tokamaks has been recently started at FAR-TECH Inc. DPASS will eventually address the following aspects of the disruption problem: MHD, plasma edge dynamics, plasma-wall interaction, generation and losses of runaway electrons. DPASS uses the 3-D Disruption Simulation Code (DSC-3D) as a core tool and will have a modular structure. DSC is a one fluid non-linear, time-dependent 3D MHD code to simulate dynamics of tokamak plasma surrounded by pure vacuum B-field in the real geometry of a conducting tokamak vessel. DSC utilizes the adaptive meshless technique with adaptation to the moving plasma boundary, with accurate magnetic flux conservation and resolution of the plasma surface current. DSC has also an option to neglect the plasma inertia to eliminate fast magnetosonic scale. This option can be turned on/off as needed. During Phase I of the project, two modules will be developed: the computational module for modeling the massive gas injection and main plasma respond; and the module for nanoparticle plasma jet injection as an innovative disruption mitigation scheme. We will report on this development progress. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR grant # DE-SC0013727.

  2. LDRD final report : robust analysis of large-scale combinatorial applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Robert D.; Morrison, Todd; Hart, William Eugene; Benavides, Nicolas L.; Greenberg, Harvey J.; Watson, Jean-Paul; Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2007-09-01

    Discrete models of large, complex systems like national infrastructures and complex logistics frameworks naturally incorporate many modeling uncertainties. Consequently, there is a clear need for optimization techniques that can robustly account for risks associated with modeling uncertainties. This report summarizes the progress of the Late-Start LDRD 'Robust Analysis of Largescale Combinatorial Applications'. This project developed new heuristics for solving robust optimization models, and developed new robust optimization models for describing uncertainty scenarios.

  3. Hardness Assurance for Low-Energy Proton-Induced Single-Event Effects: Final report for LDRD Project 173134

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson

    2015-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes three publications that resulted from a two-year LDRD. The three publications address a recently emerging reliability issue: namely, that low-energy protons (LEPs) can cause single-event effects (SEEs) in highly scaled microelectronics. These publications span from low to high technology readiness levels. In the first, novel experiments were used to prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for LEP-induced SEEs. In the second, a simple method was developed to calculate expected on-orbit error rates for LEP effects. This simplification was enabled by creating (and characterizing) an accelerated space-like LEP environment in the laboratory. In the third publication, this new method was applied to many memory circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to study the general importance of LEP effects, in terms of their contribution to the total on-orbit SEE rate.

  4. Shock compression of liquid helium and helium-hydrogen mixtures : development of a cryogenic capability for shock compression of liquid helium on Z, final report for LDRD Project 141536.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Andrew J.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Shelton, Keegan P.; Hanson, David Lester

    2010-10-01

    This final report on SNL/NM LDRD Project 141536 summarizes progress made toward the development of a cryogenic capability to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples for high accuracy equation-of-state (EOS) measurements on the Z current drive. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations, but it is difficult to condense LHe samples at very low temperatures (<3.5 K) for experimental studies on gas guns, magnetic and explosive compression devices, and lasers. We have developed a conceptual design for a cryogenic LHe sample system to generate quiescent superfluid LHe samples at 1.5-1.8 K. This cryogenic system adapts the basic elements of a continuously operating, self-regulating {sup 4}He evaporation refrigerator to the constraints of shock compression experiments on Z. To minimize heat load, the sample holder is surrounded by a double layer of thermal radiation shields cooled with LHe to 5 K. Delivery of LHe to the pumped-He evaporator bath is controlled by a flow impedance. The LHe sample holder assembly features modular components and simplified fabrication techniques to reduce cost and complexity to levels required of an expendable device. Prototypes have been fabricated, assembled, and instrumented for initial testing.

  5. Microwave to millimeter-wave electrodynamic response and applications of semiconductor nanostructures: LDRD project 67025 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric Arthur; Lee, Mark; Averitt, R. D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Highstrete, Clark; Taylor, A. J.; Padilla, W. J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, S. James (University of California Santa Barbara)

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  6. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  7. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  8. Nanoporous Silica Templated HeteroEpitaxy: Final LDRD Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce; Koleske, Daniel; Rowen, Adam M.; Williams, John Dalton; Fan, Hongyou; Arrington, Christian L.

    2006-11-01

    This one-year out-of-the-box LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, and the UV curable epoxy, SU-8. Use of SU-8 as a growth mask represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist patterns and pilot work on using SU-8 as a DUV negative resist, another significant potential result. While the late start nature of this project pushed some of the initial research goals out of the time table, significant progress was made. 3 Acknowledgements This work was performed in part at the Nanoscience %40 UNM facility, a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant ECS 03-35765). Sandia is multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United Stated Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported under the Sandia LDRD program (Project 99405). 4

  9. 2013 SRNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, S.

    2014-03-07

    This report demonstrates the execution of our LDRD program within the objectives and guidelines outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the DOE Order 413.2b. The projects described within the report align purposefully with SRNL’s strategic vision and provide great value to the DOE. The diversity exhibited in the research and development projects underscores the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) mission and enhances that mission by developing the technical capabilities and human capital necessary to support future DOE-EM national needs. As a multiprogram national laboratory, SRNL is applying those capabilities to achieve tangible results for the nation in National Security, Environmental Stewardship, Clean Energy and Nuclear Materials Management.

  10. Multi-attribute criteria applied to electric generation energy system analysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Drennen, Thomas E.; Zuffranieri, Jason V.; Paananen, Orman Henrie; Jones, Scott A.; Ortner, Juergen G.; Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Valdez, Maximo M.

    2005-10-01

    This report began with a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve Sandia National Laboratories multidisciplinary capabilities in energy systems analysis. The aim is to understand how various electricity generating options can best serve needs in the United States. The initial product is documented in a series of white papers that span a broad range of topics, including the successes and failures of past modeling studies, sustainability, oil dependence, energy security, and nuclear power. Summaries of these projects are included here. These projects have provided a background and discussion framework for the Energy Systems Analysis LDRD team to carry out an inter-comparison of many of the commonly available electric power sources in present use, comparisons of those options, and efforts needed to realize progress towards those options. A computer aid has been developed to compare various options based on cost and other attributes such as technological, social, and policy constraints. The Energy Systems Analysis team has developed a multi-criteria framework that will allow comparison of energy options with a set of metrics that can be used across all technologies. This report discusses several evaluation techniques and introduces the set of criteria developed for this LDRD.

  11. The International Project. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutimann, Hans

    The International Project of the Commission on Preservation and Access was begun in June 1988 to explore the feasibility of creating an international database of preserved materials. Its main goals are to: (1) determine the extent to which preservation records exist in other countries; (2) identify the difficulties in converting records to…

  12. Decomposable Mandrel Project. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Fearon, E.; Allison, L.; Buckley, S.; Saculla, M.; Cook, R.

    1995-05-08

    We report on our progress in developing a new technology to produce both Nova and NIF scale capsules using a depolymerizable mandrel. In this technique we use poly({alpha}-methylstyrene) (PAMS) beads or shells as mandrels which are overcoated with plasma polymer. The poly({alpha}-methylstyrene) mandrel is then thermally depolymerized to gas phase monomer which diffuses away through the more thermally stable plasma polymer coating, leaving a hollow shell. Since our last report we have concentrated on characterization of the final shell. Starting with PAMS bead mandrels leads to distorted pyrolyzed shells because of thermally induced creep of the CH coating. We found that plasma polymer coatings on hollow shell mandrels shrink isotropically during pyrolysis and maintain sphericity. We are now concentrating our efforts on the use of microencapsulated shells to prepare targets with buried diagnostic layers or inner wall surface texture.

  13. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 2: LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-05-19

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2002, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''To make programs succeed today and to ensure the vitality of the Laboratory tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in new technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program (Volume I) and the LDRD program (Volume II). This report summarizes the LDRD portion of Engineering's Technology Program. LDRD is the vehicle for researching and developing those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2002, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology for national security applications.

  14. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation.

  15. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  16. The Ares Projects: Progress Toward Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, Phil

    2008-01-01

    Ares Projects are making great strides toward building a new generation of launch vehicles. Support ISS operations and human exploration of Moon and other destinations. Ares I-X flight test in 2009. Additional testing and development work is in progress. Ares launch vehicles continue on schedule to fulfill this strategic capability for the future. Capabilities will develop in environment of increasing challenges. NASA transitioning from performing space operations to expanding the Nation's frontiers.

  17. Olympic Fisher Reintroduction Project: 2010 Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Happe, Patti J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Manson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 progress report is a summary of the reintroduction, monitoring, and research efforts undertaken during the third year of the Olympic fisher reintroduction project. Jeffrey C. Lewis of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Patti J. Happe of Olympic National Park, and Kurt J. Jenkins of U. S. Geological Survey are the principal investigators of the monitoring and research program associated with the reintroduction. David J. Manson of Olympic National Park is the lead biological technician.

  18. Olympic Fisher Reintroduction Project- 2009 Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Happe, Patti J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Manson, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 progress report is a summary of the reintroduction, monitoring, and research efforts undertaken during the first two years of the Olympic fisher reintroduction project. Jeffrey C. Lewis of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Patti J. Happe of Olympic National Park, and Kurt J. Jenkins of U. S. Geological Survey are the principal investigators of the monitoring and research program associated with the reintroduction. David J. Manson of Olympic National Park is the lead biological

  19. Final report on grand challenge LDRD project : a revolution in lighting : building the science and technology base for ultra-efficient solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Robert Guild; Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Thoma, Steven George; Gee, James Martin; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Burdick, Brent A.; Salamone, Angelo, L., Jr.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Elliott, Russell D.; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Abrams, Billie Lynn; Wendt, Joel Robert; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Kurtz, Steven Ross; Cole, Phillip James; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm; Kerley, Thomas M.; Norman, Adam K.; Tallant, David Robert; Woessner, Stephen Matthew; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Moffat, Harry K.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Emerson, John Allen; Kaplar, Robert James; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wright, Alan Francis; Gonzales, Rene Marie; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Garcia, Marie L.; Allen, Mark S.; Southwell, Edwin T.; Bauer, Tom M.; Monson, Mary Ann; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Simmons, Jerry A.; Boyack, Kevin W.; Jones, Eric Daniel; Moran, Michael P.; Pinzon, Marcia J.; Pinson, Ariane O.; Miksovic, Ann E.; Wang, George T.; Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Missert, Nancy A.; Koleske, Daniel David; Rahal, Nabeel M.

    2004-06-01

    This SAND report is the final report on Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD Project 27328, 'A Revolution in Lighting -- Building the Science and Technology Base for Ultra-Efficient Solid-state Lighting.' This project, which for brevity we refer to as the SSL GCLDRD, is considered one of Sandia's most successful GCLDRDs. As a result, this report reviews not only technical highlights, but also the genesis of the idea for Solid-state Lighting (SSL), the initiation of the SSL GCLDRD, and the goals, scope, success metrics, and evolution of the SSL GCLDRD over the course of its life. One way in which the SSL GCLDRD was different from other GCLDRDs was that it coincided with a larger effort by the SSL community - primarily industrial companies investing in SSL, but also universities, trade organizations, and other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories - to support a national initiative in SSL R&D. Sandia was a major player in publicizing the tremendous energy savings potential of SSL, and in helping to develop, unify and support community consensus for such an initiative. Hence, our activities in this area, discussed in Chapter 6, were substantial: white papers; SSL technology workshops and roadmaps; support for the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), DOE and Senator Bingaman's office; extensive public relations and media activities; and a worldwide SSL community website. Many science and technology advances and breakthroughs were also enabled under this GCLDRD, resulting in: 55 publications; 124 presentations; 10 book chapters and reports; 5 U.S. patent applications including 1 already issued; and 14 patent disclosures not yet applied for. Twenty-six invited talks were given, at prestigious venues such as the American Physical Society Meeting, the Materials Research Society Meeting, the AVS International Symposium, and the Electrochemical Society Meeting. This report contains a summary of these science and technology advances and breakthroughs

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  1. FY 2007 LDRD Director's R&D Progress SummaryProposal Title: Developing a Science Base for Fuel Reprocessing Separations in the Global Nuclear Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Tsouris, Costas; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; D'Azevedo, Ed F; Jubin, Robert Thomas; DePaoli, David W; Moyer, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    This work is aimed at developing an experimentally validated computational capability for understanding the complex processes governing the performance of solvent extraction devices used for separations in nuclear fuel reprocessing. These applications pose a grand challenge due to the combination of complicating factors in a three-dimensional, turbulent, reactive, multicomponent, multiphase/interface fluid flow system. The currently limited process simulation and scale-up capabilities provides uncertainty in the ability to select and design the separations technology for the demonstration plan of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. We anticipate the development of science-based models for technology development and design. This project will position ORNL to address the emerging opportunity by creating an expandable process model validated experimentally. This project has three major thrusts, namely, a prototype experimental station, a continuum modeling and simulation effort, and molecular modeling and kinetics support. Excellent progress has been made in corresponding activities in this first year in: (1) defining, assembling, and operating a relevant prototype system for model validation; (2) establishing a mathematical model for fluid flow and transport; (3) deploying sub-scale molecular modeling.

  2. Progress in two major CCPI projects

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    Two projects under the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Clean Coal Power initiative have made significant progress in demonstrating new technologies to remove mercury from coal and enhance use of low-Btu lignite coals while increasing energy efficiency. The Wisconsin Electricity Power Company is demonstrating the TOXECON{trademark} mercury control process at its Presque Isle Power Plant near Marquette, Michigan, while Great River Energy (GRE) is showing the viability of lignite fuel enhancement at its Coal Creek Station in Underwood, North Dakota. Both projects were awarded in 2004 under Round I of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. Elsewhere in the program, six projects are in various phases of planning or operation. Plans for a third round under the CCPI were announced on May 23, 2007. 2 figs.

  3. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  4. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  6. Computational Biology: A Strategic Initiative LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Barksy, D; Colvin, M

    2002-02-07

    The goal of this Strategic Initiative LDRD project was to establish at LLNL a new core capability in computational biology, combining laboratory strengths in high performance computing, molecular biology, and computational chemistry and physics. As described in this report, this project has been very successful in achieving this goal. This success is demonstrated by the large number of referred publications, invited talks, and follow-on research grants that have resulted from this project. Additionally, this project has helped build connections to internal and external collaborators and funding agencies that will be critical to the long-term vitality of LLNL programs in computational biology. Most importantly, this project has helped establish on-going research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, the Physics and Applied Technology Directorate, and the Computation Directorate. These groups include three laboratory staff members originally hired as post-doctoral researchers for this strategic initiative.

  7. The OOPIC simulation project: Progress and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Gladd, N.T.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.; Cartwright, K.; Mardahl, P.; Peter, W.

    1994-12-31

    The OOPIC (Object-Oriented Particle-In-Cell) project is a three year, multi-institutional effort centering on the use of advanced computational methods to develop a 2{1/2}-D, relativistic, electromagnetic PIC code for application to vacuum electronic design. OOPIC is formulated with object-oriented concepts, implemented in C++, has a sophisticated graphical user interface, and operates on PCs as well as workstations. Specific software engineered protocols are being followed to insure that OOPIC is easy to modify and that its components will be reusable within other PIC projects. OOPIC is also interesting in its use of Langdon`s integral formulation of Maxwell`s equations for general quadrilateral grids. The authors report on the progress of the OOPIC project and, in particular, discuss the various tests developed to validate the code. Since OOPIC is intended for the public domain as a general tool for vacuum electronic design, are developing an extensive suite of tests against analytical and numerical theory.

  8. SRNL LDRD ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-29

    The Laboratory Director is pleased to have the opportunity to present the 2008 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This is my first opportunity to do so, and only the second such report that has been issued. As will be obvious, SRNL has built upon the excellent start that was made with the LDRD program last year, and researchers have broken new ground in some important areas. In reviewing the output of this program this year, it is clear that the researchers implemented their ideas with creativity, skill and enthusiasm. It is gratifying to see this level of participation, because the LDRD program remains a key part of meeting SRNL's and DOE's strategic goals, and helps lay a solid scientific foundation for SRNL as the premier applied science laboratory. I also believe that the LDRD program's results this year have demonstrated SRNL's value as the EM Corporate Laboratory, having advanced knowledge in a spectrum of areas, including reduction of the technical risks of cleanup, separations science, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials, and many others. The research in support of Energy Security and National and Homeland Security has been no less notable. SRNL' s researchers have shown again that the nascent LDRD program is a sound investment for DOE that will pay off handsomely for the nation as time goes on.

  9. Tactical Deployment and Management of Autonomous Agents, LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.

    2007-11-16

    This is the final report for FY07 for this ongoing LDRD. The project involves deriving a behavioral framework, algorithms, and science underlying a complex-adaptive network of cooperating sensors that secures the computational infrastructure of a multi-enterprise cooperative organization.

  10. Progress in the AGS upgrade projects

    SciTech Connect

    Sluyters, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the AGS Upgrade Project are to prepare the AGS for Booster injection with an increase in the proton intensity to 6 {times} 10{sup 13} particles per pulse for a new generation of experiments on rare K decay, neutrino physics, the (g-2) value of the muon, and many other areas; to increase polarized proton intensity to 10{sup 12} particles per pulse for multi-target spin physics; to accelerate heavy ions up to Au for heavy ion physics; and, of course, to improve the flexibility and reliability of the AGS. High priority has been given to those projects which will reduce, at an early stage, beam losses during injection and acceleration, such as a fast electrostatic beam chopper and a high frequency dilution cavity. Other upgrade programs in progress are: a vacuum overhaul to reduce the AGS operating pressure by a factor of 100; an upgrade of the low and high field magnet correction system; automation of the Siemens main magnet power supply, etc. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Final LDRD report :

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Ermanoski, Ivan; Hogan, Roy E.,; McDaniel, Anthony H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid progress, solar thermochemistry remains high risk; improvements in both active materials and reactor systems are needed. This claim is supported by studies conducted both prior to and as part of this project. Materials offer a particular large opportunity space as, until recently, very little effort apart from basic thermodynamic analysis was extended towards understanding this most fundamental component of a metal oxide thermochemical cycle. Without this knowledge, system design was hampered, but more importantly, advances in these crucial materials were rare and resulted more from intuition rather than detailed insight. As a result, only two basic families of potentially viable solid materials have been widely considered, each of which has significant challenges. Recent efforts towards applying an increased level of scientific rigor to the study of thermochemical materials have provided a much needed framework and insights toward developing the next generation of highly improved thermochemically active materials. The primary goal of this project was to apply this hard-won knowledge to rapidly advance the field of thermochemistry to produce a material within 2 years that is capable of yielding CO from CO2 at a 12.5 % reactor efficiency. Three principal approaches spanning a range of risk and potential rewards were pursued: modification of known materials, structuring known materials, and identifying/developing new materials for the application. A newly developed best-of-class material produces more fuel (9x more H2, 6x more CO) under milder conditions than the previous state of the art. Analyses of thermochemical reactor and system efficiencies and economics were performed and a new hybrid concept was reported. The larger case for solar fuels was also further refined and documented.

  12. The Astronomy Genealogy Project: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is not yet visible, much progress has been made on the Astronomy Genealogy Project (AstroGen) since it was accepted as a project of the Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) three years ago. AstroGen will list the world's astronomers with information about their highest degrees and advisors. (In academic genealogy, your thesis advisor is your parent.) A small group (the AstroGen Team) has compiled a database of approximately 12,000 individuals who have earned doctorates with theses (dissertations) on topics in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, or planetary science. These include nearly all those submitted in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, and most of those in the United States (all through 2014 for most universities and all through 1990 for all). We are compiling more information than is maintained by the Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP). In addition to name, degree, university, year of degree, and thesis advisor(s), all provided by MGP as well, we are including years of birth and death when available, mentors in addition to advisors, and links to the thesis when it is online and to the person's web page or obituary, when we can find it. We are still struggling with some questions, such as the boundaries of inclusion and whether or not to include subfields of astronomy. We believe that AstroGen will be a valuable resource for historians of science as well as a source of entertainment for those who like to look up their academic family trees. A dedicated researcher following links from AstroGen will be able to learn quite a lot about the careers of astronomy graduates of a particular university, country, or era. We are still seeking volunteers to enter the graduates of one or more universities.

  13. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  14. Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    HANSON, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL).

  15. Progress of the Sarlux IGCC project

    SciTech Connect

    Collodi, G.; Zaccolo, G.

    1998-07-01

    SARLUX, a joint venture between SARAS and ENRON, is developing a new 551 MW IGCC plant in the SARAS Refinery located in Sarroch, Sardinia, Italy. The plant will be built by the Raggruppamento Temporaneo d'Imprese (Consortium) formed by SNAMPROGETTI - GENERAL ELECTRIC - TURBOTECNICA under a lump-sum, turn-key construction contract. The process configuration includes three parallel Texaco low pressure quench gasifiers (TAR feedstock) followed by two trains of gas cooling, COS hydrolysis, Selexol (UOP) sulphur removal and syngas moisturization. The combined cycle unit (CCU) consists of three parallel single shaft units General Electric STAG 109E producing 551 MW net power to ENEL national grid. Facilities for pure hydrogen and liquid sulphur production are included, as well as all necessary utilities required to support the IGCC operation. The contract, started on January 1997, is at present under the construction phase. After 14 months, the overall progress of the project is 47% with the engineering and procurement activities almost concluded. The commissioning of the utility units is expected from September 1998, the first CCU train on March 1999 (on gasoil) and the first gasifier will be ignited on August 1999. At present an intensive and complete training program is under-way for the Sarlux personnel involved in the management and conduction of the new IGCC.

  16. Neurons to algorithms LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Aimone, James Bradley; Warrender, Christina E.; Trumbo, Derek

    2013-09-01

    Over the last three years the Neurons to Algorithms (N2A) LDRD project teams has built infrastructure to discover computational structures in the brain. This consists of a modeling language, a tool that enables model development and simulation in that language, and initial connections with the Neuroinformatics community, a group working toward similar goals. The approach of N2A is to express large complex systems like the brain as populations of a discrete part types that have specific structural relationships with each other, along with internal and structural dynamics. Such an evolving mathematical system may be able to capture the essence of neural processing, and ultimately of thought itself. This final report is a cover for the actual products of the project: the N2A Language Specification, the N2A Application, and a journal paper summarizing our methods.

  17. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  18. Introduction and Progress of APOSOS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, You; Gao, P. Q.; Shen, Ming; Chaudhry, Maqbool A.; Guo, Xiaozhong; Teng, D. P.; Yang, Datao; Yu, Huanhuan; Zhao, Zhe

    Asia-Pacific Ground-Based Optical Satellite Observation System (APOSOS) project is based on members of Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organization (APSCO). Its aim is to develop a regional or even global satellite tracking network basically composed of optical trackers. The system will be used to track objects of interest or space-debris for the safety of spacecraft launch mission or the intactness of operational satellites. The system will benefit from the distribution of APSCO members and multi-national fund support or technical cooperation. Thus APOSOS will have a potential capability to observe all the satellites orbiting earth with high precision but relatively low cost. This paper will present the introduction, progress and current status of APOSOS project, including: System Requirements Definition, System Main Mission, System Goal, System design, Services and Clients, Organization Framework of Observation Center, Major Function of Observation Center, Establishment of Observation Plan, Format Standard for Exchanging Data, Data Policy, Implementation Schedule, etc.. APOSOS will build a unified surveillance network from observational facilities of member states involved, to utilize the wide geographical distribution advantage of multi-country. It will be operated under the coordination of APSCO observation mission management department. (1)APOSOS should conduct observation missions of specific satellites, space-debris or other space objects of interest, based on requirements of member states. APOSOS should fulfill the basic requirement for satellites observation and tracking missions. And it should also have the potential ability of small debris detection to support collision avoidance planning, which can protect the members high valued space assets. (2)In some particular application, APOSOS would be able to be used for long-term tracking of specific space object of interest, and have the ability of data processing and analysis, so as to provide conjunction

  19. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... project and grant management opportunities for collaborative efforts, future directions for education... agricultural sciences higher education system; and data on project personnel and beneficiaries. The Final... PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.19 Monitoring progress of funded projects. (a) During the...

  20. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  1. Nanoporous films for epitaxial growth of single crystal semiconductor materials : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, Adam M.; Koleske, Daniel David; Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Burckel, David Bruce; Williams, John Dalton; Arrington, Christian L.; Steen, William Arthur

    2007-10-01

    This senior council Tier 1 LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, photolithographically patterned SU-8 and carbonized SU-8 structures. Use of photolithographically defined growth templates represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  2. LDRD Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Price, D.; Shepherd, R.; White, W.; Walling, R.; More, R.

    1995-03-16

    The goal of this project is to develop a 100-fs pulse length laser capable of heating solid density plasmas to near-kilovolt temperatures before hydrodynamic decompression of the target can take place, and to experimentally determine the properties of these plasmas with it. The authors have successfully developed the laser for this work and measured plasma production and laser absorption with it. This work has demonstrated the capacity to produce solid-density plasmas. Future experiments are described.

  3. 105. View of tracking radome replacement project, progress photograph, official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. View of tracking radome replacement project, progress photograph, official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 August 1981, clear as negative no. A-18562. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Project TAPS. Progress Report Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desch, S. H.; Stolurow, L. M.

    TRIGEM, a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) course developed as a part of Project TAPS (Teaching Anatomy with Programed Schematics) is designed to teach the anatomy of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. This course is currently operational on the Harvard CAI System which uses an IBM S 360/Model 65 as the central processor, either…

  5. Transportation Energy Pathways LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, Garrett; Reichmuth, David; Westbrook, Jessica; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Yoshimura, Ann S.; Peterson, Meghan; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Guzman, Katherine Dunphy; Edwards, Donna M.; Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions between the USlight-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources through the year2050. An important capability of our model is the ability to conduct parametric analyses. Others have reliedupon scenario-based analysis, where one discrete set of values is assigned to the input variables and used togenerate one possible realization of the future. While these scenarios can be illustrative of dominant trendsand tradeoffs under certain circumstances, changes in input values or assumptions can have a significantimpact on results, especially when output metrics are associated with projections far into the future. Thistype of uncertainty can be addressed by using a parametric study to examine a range of values for the inputvariables, offering a richer source of data to an analyst.The parametric analysis featured here focuses on a trade space exploration, with emphasis on factors thatinfluence the adoption rates of electric vehicles (EVs), the reduction of GHG emissions, and the reduction ofpetroleum consumption within the US LDV fleet. The underlying model emphasizes competition between13 different types of powertrains, including conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs), conventional hybrids(HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles(BEVs).We find that many factors contribute to the adoption rates of EVs. These include the pace of technologicaldevelopment for the electric powertrain, battery performance, as well as the efficiency improvements inconventional vehicles. Policy initiatives can also have a dramatic impact on the degree of EV adoption. Theconsumer effective payback period, in particular, can significantly increase the market penetration rates ifextended towards the vehicle lifetime.Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas

  6. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark David; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesota's Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  7. Progress of the MAGDAS Project During 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, G.; Yoshikawa, A.; Abe, S.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetometer array of the MAGDAS Project is perhaps the largest magnetometer array in the world -- with 71 real time magnetometers deployed around the world. In this presentation we explain the latest status of this array and the latest data release policy. In addition, we describe various MAGDAS activities of this year, such as: (1) the ISWI and MAGDAS School in Africa, (2) the ISWI/MAGDAS presentation by the MAGDAS PI at Graz, Austria, and (3) the maintenance work done in the field for magnetometers.

  8. Progress on Suffa Large Radiotelescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanin, G. I.; Hojaev, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    The large-scale radio astronomy facility complex (analogous to the GBT at NRAO) is being created not far from Samarkand (Uzbekistan) on Suffa plateau at 2300 m (Trimble,2001). Originally it was designed as a basic part of the Earth-Space VLBI system (Kardashev et al,1995; URL http://www.asc.rssi.ru/suffa/) and contains the radio telescope for 0.8-60 mm band with 70 [Author ID2: at Fri Jul 14 10:39:00 2006 ]m main reflector, two removable subreflectors; satellite communication station; data receiving and processing system and other necessary infrastructure. The adaptive optics principle will be used for control the surface of the main mirror consisted of 1200 trapezoid panels. The site location provides good seeing conditions for cm-mm range. Averaged annual atmospheric transmission coefficients at zenith were derived as 0.90-0.98 for 3.1 mm and 5.8 mm wavelengths and about 0.60 for 1.36 (Hojaev & Shanin, 1996). The project started as far back as the period of the Soviet Union was stalled since its disintegration. Quite recently the firm decision on completing the project has been endorsed by our Governments, and Russia will invest for these; therefore the project's layouts have been considerably modernizated and updated in order to build up the state-of-art instrument. It should be operational in 2009. Now we are arranging the scientific consortium to further explore the Suffa site more deep and to learn the main 'radio astro climate' parameters by means of a new technology ('radioseeing', radio transparency in different submm, mm and cm bands, PWV, their intercorrelation and correlation with meteoparameters) for the atmosphere modelling at the site and try to forecast the "radio-weather" for reliably planning the scientific schedule of the future telescope. References: Kardashev N.S., Andreyanov V.V., Gvamichava A.S., Likhachev S.F., and Slysh V.I., 1995, , Acta Astronautica, vol.37, p.271 Hojaev A.S., Shanin G.I., 1996, JKAS, v.29 , p.S411 Trimble, V., 2001, A

  9. Progress on Suffa Large Radiotelescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanin, G. I.; Hojaev, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    The large-scale radio astronomy facility complex (analogous to the GBT at NRAO) is being created not far from Samarkand (Uzbekistan) on Suffa plateau at 2300 m (Trimble,2001). Originally it was designed as a basic part of the Earth-Space VLBI system (Kardashev et al,1995; URL http://www.asc.rssi.ru/suffa/) and contains the radio telescope for 0.8-60 mm band with 70m main reflector, two removable subreflectors; satellite communication station; data receiving and processing system and other necessary infrastructure. The adaptive optics principle will be used for control the surface of the main mirror consisted of 1200 trapezoid panels. The site location provides good seeing conditions for cm-mm range. Averaged annual atmospheric transmission coefficients at zenith were derived as 0.90-0.98 for 3.1 mm and 5.8 mm wavelengths and about 0.60 for 1.36 (Hojaev & Shanin, 1996). The project started as far back as the period of the Soviet Union was stalled since its disintegration. Quite recently the firm decision on completing the project has been endorsed by our Governments, and Russia will invest for these; therefore the project's layouts have been considerably modernizated and updated in order to build up the state-of-art instrument. It should be operational in 2009. Now we are arranging the scientific consortium to further explore the Suffa site more deep and to learn the main 'radio astro climate' parameters by means of a new technology ('radioseeing', radio transparency in different submm, mm and cm bands, PWV , their intercorrelation and correlation with meteoparameters) for the atmosphere modelling at the site and try to forecast the "radio-weather" for reliably planning the scientific schedule of the future telescope. References: Kardashev N.S., Andreyanov V.V., Gvamichava A.S., Likhachev S.F., and Slysh V.I., 1995, , Acta Astronautica, vol.37, p.271 Hojaev A.S., Shanin G.I., 1996, JKAS, v.29 , p.S411 Trimble, V., 2001, A Year of Discovery: Astronomy Highlights of

  10. Progress in PV:BONUS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, James J.; Pierce, Lizana K.

    1996-01-01

    The PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) program, to develop photovoltaic products and the associated infrastructure for a sustainable photovoltaic market in the building sector, has attracted a variety of promising projects ranging from integrated modular homes, rooftop integrated photovoltaic systems, dispatchable peak shaving systems, alternating-current module, photovoltaic glazing systems, and curtain wall systems. The mutual commitment by the Department of Energy and the program recipients has inspired diverse partnerships among manufacturers, utilities, construction companies, and universities for the development of niche markets for building-integrated photovoltaics. Many of the photovoltaic systems are currently being demonstrated with market campaigns underway to commercialize these innovative renewable energy, building-integrated products.

  11. Progress on LAMOST High Resolution Spectrograph Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, KaI

    2015-08-01

    To explore more science case, LAMOST doesn't only has strong power on celestial spectral survey but also reserves an access to high resolution spectrograph with a few optional fibers. This commissioned spectrograph gets high resolution of R=30,000 - 60,000 at a broad visible band from 370nm to 760nm. With the consideration about site seeing variation in future, single science fiber covers wider field on sky of 4.5arcsec instead of the present 3.3arcsec. An oversize Echelle R4 grating and a pre-slit image slicer are adopted to relieve the spectrograph resolution pressure. High resolution observation will parallel to the low resolution spectral survey at a small cost of losing a few fibers (10 - 20) on telescope focal plane. These science fibers will locate at the different sky areas for more approciate choice. The presentation will give the detailed design introduction and the current project status.

  12. Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes - FY-98 Final Report for LDRD 2349

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, Glen Frank; Nelson, Lee Orville; Grandy, Jon Drue; Zuck, Larry Douglas; Kong, Peter Chuen Sun; Anderson, Gail

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of LDRD #2349, Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes, was to develop a set of tools that would allow the user to, based on the chemical composition of a waste stream to be immobilized, predict the durability (leach behavior) of the final waste form and the phase assemblages present in the final waste form. The objectives of the project were: • investigation, testing and selection of thermochemical code • development of auxiliary thermochemical database • synthesis of materials for leach testing • collection of leach data • using leach data for leach model development • thermochemical modeling The progress toward completion of these objectives and a discussion of work that needs to be completed to arrive at a logical finishing point for this project will be presented.

  13. Self organizing software research : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-01-01

    We have made progress in developing a new statistical mechanics approach to designing self organizing systems that is unique to SNL. The primary application target for this ongoing research has been the development of new kinds of nanoscale components and hardware systems. However, this research also enables an out of the box connection to the field of software development. With appropriate modification, the collective behavior physics ideas for enabling simple hardware components to self organize may also provide design methods for a new class of software modules. Our current physics simulations suggest that populations of these special software components would be able to self assemble into a variety of much larger and more complex software systems. If successful, this would provide a radical (disruptive technology) path to developing complex, high reliability software unlike any known today. This high risk, high payoff opportunity does not fit well into existing SNL funding categories, as it is well outside of the mainstreams of both conventional software development practices and the nanoscience research area that spawned it. This LDRD effort was aimed at developing and extending the capabilities of self organizing/assembling software systems, and to demonstrate the unique capabilities and advantages of this radical new approach for software development.

  14. LDRD 102610 final report new processes for innovative microsystems engineering with predictive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Mitchell, Scott A.; Thomas, Stephen W.

    2007-08-01

    This LDRD Final report describes work that Stephen W. Thomas performed in 2006. The initial problem was to develop a modeling, simulation, and optimization strategy for the design of a high speed microsystem switch. The challenge was to model the right phenomena at the right level of fidelity, and capture the right design parameters. This effort focused on the design context, in contrast to other Sandia efforts focus on high-fidelity assessment. This report contains the initial proposal and the annual progress report. This report also describes exploratory work on micromaching using femtosecond lasers. Steve's time developing a proposal and collaboration on this topic was partly funded by this LDRD.

  15. Progress in Aging Epidemiology in Japan: The JAGES Project

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a prominent topic in global health. The purpose of this report is to document progress in two of our research projects in Japan, which currently is the most aged society in the world. The Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) is one of the largest nation-wide research projects on aging, with more than 100 000 participants in 2010 and 2013. One of the notable findings is that community participation is a significant determinant of older people’s health. We have also made progress in the development of the JAGES Health Equity Assessment and Response Tools (HEART), which is a management tool for developing age-friendly cities. This progress suggests that community perspective and management of health promotion in the communities are valuable and require further research. PMID:27349200

  16. Progress in Aging Epidemiology in Japan: The JAGES Project.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Katsunori

    2016-07-01

    Aging is a prominent topic in global health. The purpose of this report is to document progress in two of our research projects in Japan, which currently is the most aged society in the world. The Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) is one of the largest nation-wide research projects on aging, with more than 100 000 participants in 2010 and 2013. One of the notable findings is that community participation is a significant determinant of older people's health. We have also made progress in the development of the JAGES Health Equity Assessment and Response Tools (HEART), which is a management tool for developing age-friendly cities. This progress suggests that community perspective and management of health promotion in the communities are valuable and require further research. PMID:27349200

  17. Milliwatt Generator Project: April 1988--September 1996. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, T.W.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator (MWG) Project from April 1988 to September 1996. Manufacturing of heat sources for the project ended by September 1990. Beginning in October 1990, the major activities of the project have been surveillance and testing of MWGs, disposal of excess MWGs, and reclamation of the PuO{sub 2} from excess MWG heat sources. Reported activities include fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, compatibility studies, impact testing, examination and electrical testing of surveillance units, and recovery of PuO{sub 2} from heat sources.

  18. Final Report: CNC Micromachines LDRD No.10793

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR., BERNHARD; BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; BIEG, LOTHAR F.; ALLEN, JAMES J.

    2003-04-01

    The three-year LDRD ''CNC Micromachines'' was successfully completed at the end of FY02. The project had four major breakthroughs in spatial motion control in MEMS: (1) A unified method for designing scalable planar and spatial on-chip motion control systems was developed. The method relies on the use of parallel kinematic mechanisms (PKMs) that when properly designed provide different types of motion on-chip without the need for post-fabrication assembly, (2) A new type of actuator was developed--the linear stepping track drive (LSTD) that provides open loop linear position control that is scalable in displacement, output force and step size. Several versions of this actuator were designed, fabricated and successfully tested. (3) Different versions of XYZ translation only and PTT motion stages were designed, successfully fabricated and successfully tested demonstrating absolutely that on-chip spatial motion control systems are not only possible, but are a reality. (4) Control algorithms, software and infrastructure based on MATLAB were created and successfully implemented to drive the XYZ and PTT motion platforms in a controlled manner. The control software is capable of reading an M/G code machine tool language file, decode the instructions and correctly calculate and apply position and velocity trajectories to the motion devices linear drive inputs to position the device platform along the trajectory as specified by the input file. A full and detailed account of design methodology, theory and experimental results (failures and successes) is provided.

  19. The final LDRD report for the project entitled: {open_quotes}Enhanced analysis of complex gas mixtures by pattern recognition of microsensor array signals{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1996-09-01

    Microsensors do not have the selectivity to chemical species available in large laboratory instruments. This project employed arrays of catalytically gated silicon microsensors with different catalysts to create data streams which can be analyzed by pattern recognition programs. One of the most significant accomplishments of the program was the demonstration of that mixtures of H{sub 2} with the oxidants NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} could distinguished from one another by the use of different catalytic metals on the Sandia Robust Hydrogen (SRH) sensors and the newly developed pattern recognition algorithm. This sensor system could be used to identify explosive gas mixtures and analyze exhaust streams for pollution control.

  20. Making Progress: The Use of Multiple Progress Reports to Enhance Advertising Students' Media Plan Term Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritz, Gary H.; Lozada, Hector R.; Long, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the AACSB mandates that students demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills, it is imperative that business professors do what is necessary to improve such skills. The authors investigate whether the use of using multiple progress reports in an Advertising class project improves the final product. The data results show that…

  1. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  2. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-ERD-069: Discovering the Unknown Mechanism(s) of Virulence in a BW, Class A Select Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E

    2003-02-06

    The goal of this proposed effort was to assess the difficulty in identifying and characterizing virulence candidate genes in an organism for which very limited data exists. This was accomplished by first addressing the finishing phase of draft-sequenced F. tularensis genomes and conducting comparative analyses to determine the coding potential of each genome; to discover the differences in genome structure and content, and to identify potential genes whose products may be involved in the F. tularensis virulence process. The project was divided into three parts: (1) Genome finishing: This part involves determining the order and orientation of the consensus sequences of contigs obtained from Phrap assemblies of random draft genomic sequences. This tedious process consists of linking contig ends using information embedded in each sequence file that relates the sequence to the original cloned insert. Since inserts are sequenced from both ends, we can establish a link between these paired-ends in different contigs and thus order and orient contigs. Since these genomes carry numerous copies of insertion sequences, these repeated elements ''confuse'' the Phrap assembly program. It is thus necessary to break these contigs apart at the repeated sequences and individually join the proper flanking regions using paired-end information, or using results of comparisons against a similar genome. Larger repeated elements such as the small subunit ribosomal RNA operon require verification with PCR. Tandem repeats require manual intervention and typically rely on single nucleotide polymorphisms to be resolved. Remaining gaps require PCR reactions and sequencing. Once the genomes have been ''closed'', low quality regions are addressed by resequencing reactions. (2) Genome analysis: The final consensus sequences are processed by combining the results of three gene modelers: Glimmer, Critica and Generation. The final gene models are submitted to a battery of homology searches and

  3. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  4. FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N; Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Sharpe, R; Jandhyala, V; Champagne, N; Rockway, J D; Pingenot, J

    2007-03-08

    This is the final report for LDRD 01-ERD-005. The Principle Investigator was Robert Sharpe. Collaborators included Niel Madsen, Benjamin Fasenfest, John D. Rockway, of the Defense Sciences Engineering Division (DSED), Vikram Jandhyala and James Pingenot from the University of Washington, and Mark Stowell of the Center for Applications Development and Software Engineering (CADSE). It should be noted that Benjamin Fasenfest and Mark Stowell were partially supported under other funding. The purpose of this LDRD effort was to enhance LLNL's computational electromagnetics capability in the area of broadband radiation and scattering. For radiation and scattering problems our transient EM codes are limited by the approximate Radiation Boundary Conditions (RBC's) used to model the radiation into an infinite space. Improved RBC's were researched, developed, and incorporated into the existing EMSolve finite-element code to provide a 10-100x improvement in the accuracy of the boundary conditions. Section I provides an introduction to the project and the project goals. Section II provides a summary of the project's research and accomplishments as presented in the attached papers.

  5. Hydrodynamics of maneuvering bodies: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ``Hydrodynamics of Maneuvering Bodies`` LDRD project was to develop a Lagrangian, vorticity-based numerical simulation of the fluid dynamics associated with a maneuvering submarine. Three major tasks were completed. First, a vortex model to simulate the wake behind a maneuvering submarine was completed, assuming the flow to be inviscid and of constant density. Several simulations were performed for a dive maneuver, each requiring less than 20 cpu seconds on a workstation. The technical details of the model and the simulations are described in a separate document, but are reviewed herein. Second, a gridless method to simulate diffusion processes was developed that has significant advantages over previous Lagrangian diffusion models. In this model, viscous diffusion of vorticity is represented by moving vortices at a diffusion velocity, and expanding the vortices as specified by the kinematics for a compressible velocity field. This work has also been documented previously, and is only reviewed herein. The third major task completed was the development of a vortex model to describe inviscid internal wave phenomena, and is the focus of this document. Internal wave phenomena in the stratified ocean can affect an evolving wake, and thus must be considered for naval applications. The vortex model for internal wave phenomena includes a new formulation for the generation of vorticity due to fluid density variations, and a vortex adoption algorithm that allows solutions to be carried to much longer times than previous investigations. Since many practical problems require long-time solutions, this new adoption algorithm is a significant step toward making vortex methods applicable to practical problems. Several simulations are described and compared with previous results to validate and show the advantages of the new model. An overview of this project is also included.

  6. Progress on the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-12-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide.

  7. Progress on the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-12-23

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercialmore » cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide« less

  8. Progress on the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    SciTech Connect

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-12-23

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. The progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide

  9. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report briefly describes recent progress in eight projects. The projects are entitled Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Spray Casting Project; and Watervliet Arsenal Project.

  10. Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry LDRD 13-0144 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.; Ebeida, Mohamed Salah; Romero, Vicente J.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Abdelkader, Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    This SAND report summarizes our work on the Sandia National Laboratory LDRD project titled "Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry" which was project #165617 and proposal #13-0144. This report merely summarizes our work. Those interested in the technical details are encouraged to read the full published results, and contact the report authors for the status of the software and follow-on projects.

  11. TPS In-Flight Health Monitoring Project Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Chris; Richards, Lance; Hudston, Larry; Prosser, William

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the development of new thermal protection systems (TPS) is reported. New approaches use embedded lightweight, sensitive, fiber optic strain and temperature sensors within the TPS. Goals of the program are to develop and demonstrate a prototype TPS health monitoring system, develop a thermal-based damage detection algorithm, characterize limits of sensor/system performance, and develop ea methodology transferable to new designs of TPS health monitoring systems. Tasks completed during the project helped establish confidence in understanding of both test setup and the model and validated system/sensor performance in a simple TPS structure. Other progress included complete initial system testing, commencement of the algorithm development effort, generation of a damaged thermal response characteristics database, initial development of a test plan for integration testing of proven FBG sensors in simple TPS structure, and development of partnerships to apply the technology.

  12. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  14. Cedar project: Original goals and progress to date

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project, was to demonstrate that supercomputers of the future can exhibit general-purpose behavior and be easy to use. The Cedar Project was based on five key developments which taken together offered a comprehensive solution to achieving high performance computation: the development of VLSI components made large memories and small, fast processors available at low cost; based on many years of work at Illinois and elsewhere, we had designed a shared memory and switch which provide high bandwidth over a wide range of computations and applications areas; the Parafrase project at Illinois had for more than 10 years been aimed at developing software for restructuring ordinary programs to effectively exploit supercomputer architectures; by using a hierarchy of control, we believed that dataflow principles could be used at a high level (macro-dataflow), thus avoiding some of the problems with traditional dataflow methods; and work in numerical algorithms indicated great promise in exploiting multiprocessors without the penalty of high synchronization overhead, which had proved fatal in some earlier studies. In this section we will outline our progress since the beginning of the Cedar Project and briefly describe specific Cedar work that remains to be done.

  15. Progress update on the US photovoltaic manufacturing technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Thomas, H.P.

    1997-10-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is helping the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and stimulate the commercial development of PV modules and systems. Initiated in 1990, PVMaT is being carried out in several directed and staggered phases to support industry`s continued progress. Thirteen subcontracts awarded in FY 1996 under Phase 4A emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. Areas of work in Phase 4A included, but were not limited to, issues such as improving module-manufacturing processes; system and system-component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements. These Phase 4A, product-driven manufacturing research and development (R&D) activities are now completing their second phase. Progress under these Phase 4A and remaining Phase 2B subcontracts from the earlier PVMaT solicitation are summarized in this paper. Evaluations of the success of this project have been carried out in FY 1995 and late FY 1996. This paper examines the 1997 cost/capacity data that have been collected from active PVMaT manufacturers.

  16. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  17. Retrospective on the Seniors' Council Tier 1 LDRD portfolio.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, William Parker

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the Tier 1 LDRD portfolio, administered by the Seniors Council between 2003 and 2011. 73 projects were sponsored over the 9 years of the portfolio at a cost of $10.5 million which includes $1.9M of a special effort in directed innovation targeted at climate change and cyber security. Two of these Tier 1 efforts were the seeds for the Grand Challenge LDRDs in Quantum Computing and Next Generation Photovoltaic conversion. A few LDRDs were terminated early when it appeared clear that the research was not going to succeed. A great many more were successful and led to full Tier 2 LDRDs or direct customer sponsorship. Over a dozen patents are in various stages of prosecution from this work, and one project is being submitted for an R and D 100 award.

  18. Progress and status of cryogenic refrigeration system for project Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Catseman, F.; Tilleman, H.; Henderson, N.

    2015-12-01

    In the last two decades, HTS cables have been successfully demonstrated around the world, preparing HTS power cables for a full commercial introduction. Among the demonstration projects, circulating subcooled liquid nitrogen to maintain the HTS cable at operating temperature is a widely adopted approach. In this approach, the cooling systems are absolutely critical to the successful operation of the HTS cables. This paper describes the progress and status of the cryogenic refrigeration system designed and manufactured for project Hydra, which is a project jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, American Superconductor and Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. American Superconductor is leading the team supported by Con Edison, Ultera, Altran Solutions, and DH Industries. The cable is an inherently fault current limiting HTS cable, approximately 200 m long and designed to carry 96 MVA at a distribution level voltage of 13.8 kV. The cable will be installed and energized near New York City. The refrigeration system was designed and manufactured by DH Industries. This paper provides details on the successful factory acceptance testing completed in November 2014.

  19. A progress report on the LDRD project entitled {open_quotes}Microelectronic silicon-based chemical sensors: Ultradetection of high value molecules{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    This work addresses a new kind of silicon based chemical sensor that combines the reliability and stability of silicon microelectronic field effect devices with the highly selective and sensitive immunoassay. The sensor works on the principle that thin SiN layers on lightly doped Si can detect pH changes rapidly and reversibly. The pH changes affect the surface potential, and that can be quickly determined by pulsed photovoltage measurements. To detect other species, chemically sensitive films were deposited on the SiN where the presence of the chosen analyte results in pH changes through chemical reactions. A invention of a cell sorting device based on these principles is also described. A new method of immobilizing enzymes using Sandia`s sol-gel glasses is documented and biosensors based on the silicon wafer and an amperometric technique are detailed.

  20. Progress of the NASA/USGS Lunar Regolith Simulant Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; MLemore, Carole; Wilson, Steve; Stoeser, Doug; Schrader, Christian; Fikes, John; Street, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in 2004 personnel at MSFC began serious efforts to develop a new generation of lunar simulants. The first two products were a replication of the previous JSC-1 simulant under a contract to Orbitec and a major workshop in 2005 on future simulant development. Beginning in 2006 the project refocused its efforts and approached simulant development in a new and more comprehensive manner, examining new approaches in simulant development and ways to more accurately compare simulants to actual lunar materials. This led to a multi-year effort with five major tasks running in parallel. The five tasks are Requirements, Lunar Analysis, Process Development, Feed Stocks, and Standards. Major progress has been made in all five areas. A substantial draft of a formal requirements document now exists and has been largely stable since 2007. It does evolve as specific details of the standards and Lunar Analysis efforts proceed. Lunar Analysis has turned out to be vastly more difficult than anticipated. After great effort to mine existing published and gray literature, the team has realized the necessity of making new measurements of the Apollo samples, an effort that is currently in progress. Process development is substantially ahead of expectations in 2006. It is now practical to synthesize glasses of appropriate composition and purity. It is also possible to make agglutinate particles in significant quantities. A series of minerals commonly found on the Moon has been synthesized. Separation of mineral constituents from starting rock material is also proceeding. Customized grinding and mixing processes have been developed and tested are now being documented. Identification and development of appropriate feedstocks has been both easier and more difficult than anticipated. The Stillwater Mining Company, operating in the Stillwater layered mafic intrusive complex of Montana, has been an amazing resource for the project, but finding adequate sources for some of the components

  1. Lincoln County nuclear waste project. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document included the following three progress reports to the Yucca Mountain Project Office on radioactive waste storage in Lincoln County, Nevada: financial status report; federal cash transactions report; and technical progress report.

  2. Integrated multidisciplinary fault observation in Marmara Through MARSite - Project Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal; Oguz Ozel, Asım; Ergintav, Semih; Geli, Louis Louis; Favali, Paolo; Guralp, Cansun; Douglas, John; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Tan, Onur; Gürbüz, Cemil; Erdik, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    This presentation provides a progress overview of the EC/FP-7 MARSite Project started in November 2012, which aims to coordinate research groups ranging from seismology to gas geochemistry in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed both in the Marmara Region based on collection of multidisciplinary data to be shared, interpreted and merged in consistent theoretical and practical models suitable for the implementation of good practices to move the necessary information to the end users in charge of seismic risk management of the region. In addition, processes involved in earthquake generation and the physics of short-term seismic transients, 4D deformations to understand earthquake cycle processes, fluid activity monitoring and seismicity under the sea floor using existing autonomous instrumentation, early warning and development of real-time shake and loss information, real- and quasi-real-time earthquake and tsunami hazard monitoring and earthquake-induced landslide hazard topics are also covered within MARSite. This presentation would provide a report on the progress achieved during the half-life of the project. In this respect, the main data server for the integration of real time network data has been finalized. Daily evaluation of online spring water and soil radon gas data in relation to seismic activity is in place, together with the continuous GPS data processing. A significant combination of postseismic (viscoelastic) deformation and afterslip was detected in the western segment of the 1999 Izmit rupture plane based on InSAR modeling. The optimum borehole depths have been identified based on seismic reflection studies and GURALP Systems is continuing its work on the manufacturing the borehole system. Seismic risk study for IGDAS Natural Gas Network including pipelines and its components has been carried out with several earthquake scenarios in Marmara Sea and an automatic shut-off algorithm has been developed for the automatic shut-off of the gas

  3. Methane recovery from coalbeds project. Monthly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Progress made on the Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project (MRCP) is reported in the Raton Mesa Coal Region. The Uinta and Warrior basin reports have been reviewed and will be published and delivered in early December. A cooperative core test with R and P Coal Company on a well in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was negotiated. In a cooperative effort with the USGS Coal Branch on three wells in the Wind River Basin, desorption of coal samples showed little or no gas. Completed field testing at the Dugan Petroleum well in the San Juan Basin. Coal samples showed minimal gas. Initial desorption of coal samples suggests that at least a moderate amount of gas was obtained from the Coors well test in the Piceance Basin. Field work for the Piceance Basin Detailed Site Investigation was completed. In the Occidental Research Corporation (ORC) project, a higher capacity vacuum pump to increase CH/sub 4/ venting operations has been installed. Drilling of Oxy No. 12 experienced delays caused by mine gas-offs and was eventually terminated at 460 ft after an attempt to drill through a roll which produced a severe dog leg and severely damaged the drill pipe. ORC moved the second drill rig and equipment to a new location in the same panel as Oxy No. 12 and set the stand pipe for Oxy No. 13. Drill rig No. 1 has been moved east of the longwall mining area in anticipation of drilling cross-panel on 500 foot intervals. Waynesburg College project, Equitable Gas Company has received the contract from Waynesburg College and has applied to the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission for a new tariff rate. Waynesburg College has identified a contractor to make the piping connections to the gas line after Equitable establishes their meter and valve requirements.

  4. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

  5. 7 CFR 3406.26 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... project and grant management, opportunities for collaborative efforts, future directions for education reform, research project management, advancing a field of science, and opportunities to enhance.../project directors must attend at least one national principal investigators/project directors meeting,...

  6. 7 CFR 3406.26 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... project and grant management, opportunities for collaborative efforts, future directions for education reform, research project management, advancing a field of science, and opportunities to enhance.../project directors must attend at least one national principal investigators/project directors meeting,...

  7. 7 CFR 3406.26 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... project and grant management, opportunities for collaborative efforts, future directions for education reform, research project management, advancing a field of science, and opportunities to enhance.../project directors must attend at least one national principal investigators/project directors meeting,...

  8. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  9. Progress in Coastal Altimetry: the experience of the COASTALT Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Gommenginger, C.; Coelho, H.; Fernandes, J.; Gomez-Enri, J.; Martin-Puig, C.; Vignudelli, S.; Woodworth, P.; Dinardo, S.; Benveniste, J.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite altimetry over the open ocean is a mature discipline, and data are routinely assimilated for operational applications. In contrast, global altimetry data collected over the coastal ocean remain largely unexploited in the data archives, simply because intrinsic difficulties in the corrections (especially the wet tropospheric component, the high-frequency atmospheric signal and the tides) and issues of land contamination in the footprint have so far resulted in systematic flagging and rejection of these data. In the last couple of years, significant research has been carried out into overcoming these problems and extending the capabilities of current and future altimeters to the coastal zone, with the aim to integrate the altimeter-derived measurements of sea level, wind speed and significant wave height into coastal ocean observing systems. At the same time the major Space Agencies have recognized the importance of the topic and are sustaining coastal altimetry research through projects such as COASTALT (ESA), PISTACH (CNES) and some OSTST (NASA/CNES) initiatives. A number of crucial improvements to the processing of the altimetric waveforms in the coastal zone and to the correction of the measurements for path delay and geophysical effects (tides and atmospheric) are being implemented and tested. The first custom-processed coastal altimetry data are now available, and many more data from Jason-1, Jason-2 and Envisat will become available during 2009. This new "coastal altimetry" community, inherently interdisciplinary, has already had two well-attended international workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/pisaworkshop08/). In this paper we will report on the progress of the COASTALT Project, funded by the European Space Agency, which aims at defining, developing and testing a prototype software processor to generate new Envisat radar altimeter products in the coastal zone. Ultimately, the plans are for ESA to routinely generate and distribute these new

  10. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  11. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy (DOE) test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD proof-of-concept project; mine waste pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  12. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept project; mine waste technology pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  13. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  14. 42 CFR 137.352 - What is contained in a construction project progress report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is contained in a construction project... Construction Roles of Self-Governance Tribe in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.352 What is contained in a construction project progress report? Construction project...

  15. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report: First quarter (January--August 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Project goals, project tasks, progress on tasks, and problems encountered are described and discussed for each of the studies that make up the Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project for Yucca Mountain. These studies are: Paleobotany, Paleofauna, Geomorphology, and Transportation. Budget summaries are also given for each of the studies and for the overall project.

  16. 7 CFR 3406.26 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the food and agricultural sciences higher education system; and data on project personnel and... efforts, future directions for education reform, research project management, advancing a field of...

  17. Laser Spray Fabrication for Net-Shape Rapid Product Realization LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Jeantette, F.P.; Keicher, D.M.; Oliver, M.S.; Reckaway, D.E.; Romero, J.A.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.D.

    1999-04-01

    The primary purpose of this LDRD project was to characterize the laser deposition process and determine the feasibility of fabricating complex near-net shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Process characterization provided direction in developing a system to fabricate complex shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Our goal for this LDRD was to develop a system that is robust and provides a significant advancement to existing technologies (e.g., polymeric-based rapid prototyping, laser welding). Development of the process will allow design engineers to produce functional models of their designs directly from CAD files. The turnaround time for complex geometrical shaped parts will be hours instead of days and days instead of months. With reduced turnaround time, more time can be spent on the product-design phase to ensure that the best component design is achieved. Maturation of this technology will revolutionize the way the world produces structural components.

  18. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  19. Evansville Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (EAEHMP) - Progress Report, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver S.; Haase, Jennifer L.; Moore, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Maps of surficial geology, deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard, and liquefaction potential index have been prepared by various members of the Evansville Area Earthquake Hazard Mapping Project for seven quadrangles in the Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson, Kentucky, metropolitan areas. The surficial geologic maps feature 23 types of surficial geologic deposits, artificial fill, and undifferentiated bedrock outcrop and include alluvial and lake deposits of the Ohio River valley. Probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard and liquefaction hazard mapping is made possible by drawing on a wealth of information including surficial geologic maps, water well logs, and in-situ testing profiles using the cone penetration test, standard penetration test, down-hole shear wave velocity tests, and seismic refraction tests. These data were compiled and collected with contributions from the Indiana Geological Survey, Kentucky Geological Survey, Illinois State Geological Survey, United States Geological Survey, and Purdue University. Hazard map products are in progress and are expected to be completed by the end of 2009, with a public roll out in early 2010. Preliminary results suggest that there is a 2 percent probability that peak ground accelerations of about 0.3 g will be exceeded in much of the study area within 50 years, which is similar to the 2002 USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps for a firm rock site value. Accelerations as high as 0.4-0.5 g may be exceeded along the edge of the Ohio River basin. Most of the region outside of the river basin has a low liquefaction potential index (LPI), where the probability that LPI is greater than 5 (that is, there is a high potential for liquefaction) for a M7.7 New Madrid type event is only 20-30 percent. Within the river basin, most of the region has high LPI, where the probability that LPI is greater than 5 for a New Madrid type event is 80-100 percent.

  20. CAP 5: Progress Report on the Center Accreditation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the progress of development of a nationwide voluntary accreditation system for early childhood centers and schools, reviewing the accreditation process and providing a draft describing criteria for high quality programs. (BJD)

  1. LNG projects make progress in Oman and Yemen

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-24

    Two LNG projects in the Middle East, one in Oman and the other in Yemen, are due on stream at the turn of the century--each the largest single project ever put together in its country. Officials described their projects at a yearend 1996 conference in Paris by Institut Francais du Petrole and Petrostrategies. The Oman project develops gas reserves, does gas processing, and transports the gas 360 km to a liquefaction plant to be built on the coast. The Yemen project involves a liquefaction plant and an export terminal.

  2. 42 CFR 137.351 - Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit construction project progress and financial reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... construction project progress and financial reports for construction project agreements? 137.351 Section 137... Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.351 Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit construction project progress and financial reports for construction project agreements? Yes,......

  3. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  4. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  5. The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Fifth Progress Report, May 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grannis, Joseph C.

    This report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter One, an Introduction by Joseph C. Grannis, includes the most relevant sections of the proposal made by the Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) to Project Follow Through in August 1970. Chapter Two is an Analysis of the Child Behavior Stream Observations from the Spring 1971 Study of…

  6. 7 CFR 3406.26 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... principal investigator(s)/project director(s), the institution, and the food and agricultural sciences... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406... reform, research project management, advancing a field of science, and opportunities to...

  7. Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Cerveny; Tor Kragas; Travis Gillham

    1997-07-10

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.

  8. Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

  9. The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Second Progress Report, February 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grannis, Joseph C.

    This report discusses the Columbia Classroom Environments Project Autonomy in Learning An Exploration of Pupils' and Teachers Roles in Different Classroom Environments to develop Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation in Project Follow Through. The report begins with a discussion of a set of matrices which combine all of the behavior code…

  10. LDRD Final Report: Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.

    1999-12-01

    For a wide variety of scientific and engineering problems the desired solution corresponds to an optimal set of objective function parameters, where the objective function measures a solution's quality. The main goal of the LDRD ''Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems'' was the development of new robust and efficient optimization algorithms that can be used to find globally optimal solutions to complex optimization problems. This SAND report summarizes the technical accomplishments of this LDRD, discusses lessons learned and describes open research issues.

  11. Cooperative General Science Project; Progress Report 1966-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative General Science Project, Atlanta, GA.

    Reported is progress on an experimental curriculum development program by four liberal arts colleges (Clark, Morehouse, Morris Brown and Spelman) directed at the development of a one-year course in general science for non-science majors. The current version of the course and laboratory materials has been tried out with 2,000 students on a…

  12. Canadian Environmental Concerns: Winnipeg, Manitoba. Progress Report. Project Canada West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Curriculum Project on Canada Studies, Edmonton (Alberta).

    Part I of this progress report places emphasis on curriculum development from the standpoint of the teacher-developer. The role is defined and factors such as teacher selection, release time, administrative cooperation, work schedules, assigned work space, and benefits to the school division and to the teacher are discussed. Recommendations deal…

  13. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by HEP, Project Directors awarded Graduate Fellowship (excluding supplemental international and... reports may be needed to assess continuing progress of Fellows supported by any special international...) All grantees (supplemental international, graduate, and postdoctoral) shall submit initial...

  14. Pataha [Creek] Model Watershed : 1997 Habitat Projects : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Duane

    1998-10-28

    The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until this year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream.

  15. Magma Energy Research Project, FY80 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Colp, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    The technical feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies is explored. Five aspects of the project are studied: resource location and definition, source tapping, magma characterization, magma/material compatibility, and energy extraction.

  16. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.19... location. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss project and grant management opportunities...

  17. Magma energy research project, FY80 annual progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colp, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    The technical feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies is explored. Five aspects of the project are studied: resource location and definition, source tapping, magma characterization, magma/material compatibility, and energy extraction.

  18. Milliwatt-Generator Project. Progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    Los Alamos will fabricate the MC 3599 heat source (4.5 W) for the MC 3500 radioisotopic thermoelectric generator (RTG) in addition to the MC 2893A heat source (4.0 W) for the MC 2730A RTG. Progress on the following tasks is described in detail: /sup 238/Pu fuel processing and characterization, fabrication of test units, destructive testing, and quality assurance. (WHK)

  19. Progress, status, and plans for the HRIBF project

    SciTech Connect

    Auble, R.L.; Alton, G.D.; Bailey, J.D

    1995-12-31

    Over the last three years, the Holifield accelerator system has been reconfigured into a first-generation radioactive ion beam facility, the HRIBF, a national user facility for RIB research. The construction and reconfiguration have been completed and the equipment commissioning and beam development phases have started. The progress to date, the present status, and future plans will be given. The special problems connected with the production and acceleration of RIBs will be discussed.

  20. The Second Year of the Brookline Early Education Project: Progress Report and Plans for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookline Public Schools, MA.

    This is the second in a series of progress reports on the Brookline Early Education Project (BEEP), a program which provides diagnostic and educational services for very young children and their families. The 1972-74 programs are described, and plans for the following 3-year period are reviewed. The purpose of this pilot project of the Brookline…

  1. Rationale and Activities of Project on Television in Early Education: Progress Report, July - December 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Margaret E.; Williams, Frederick

    This progress report discusses the rationale and activities of the Project on Television in Early Childhood Education at the University of Southern California. Since January 1975, the Annenberg School and the School for Early Childhood Education have cooperated in a program of faculty and student interaction and informal research projects aimed at…

  2. Doctoral Projects in Progress in Theatre Arts, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Philip G.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-first annual listing of dissertations arranged by subject according to geographical divisions. Entries include researchers's name, title of project, institution, academic department, faculty supervisor, and expected date of completion. Available from American Theatre Assoc. 1010 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Suite 630, Washington, D.C. 20007; sc…

  3. Doctoral Projects in Progress in Theatre Arts, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Philip G.

    1982-01-01

    Thirtieth annual listing of dissertations, arranged, for the most part, by subject according to geographical divisions. Entries include researcher's name, title of project, institution, academic department, faculty supervisor, and expected date of completion. Available from American Theatre Assn., 1000 Vermont Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20005, sc…

  4. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.19... director(s), the institution, and the food and agricultural sciences higher education system; and data on... location. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss project and grant management opportunities...

  5. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.19... director(s), the institution, and the food and agricultural sciences higher education system; and data on... location. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss project and grant management opportunities...

  6. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.19... director(s), the institution, and the food and agricultural sciences higher education system; and data on... location. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss project and grant management opportunities...

  7. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Expressed Sequence Tag Project: Progress and Application

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Suping; Wang, Xingjun; Zhang, Xinyou; Dang, Phat M.; Holbrook, C. Corley; Culbreath, Albert K.; Wu, Yaoting; Guo, Baozhu

    2012-01-01

    Many plant ESTs have been sequenced as an alternative to whole genome sequences, including peanut because of the genome size and complexity. The US peanut research community had the historic 2004 Atlanta Genomics Workshop and named the EST project as a main priority. As of August 2011, the peanut research community had deposited 252,832 ESTs in the public NCBI EST database, and this resource has been providing the community valuable tools and core foundations for various genome-scale experiments before the whole genome sequencing project. These EST resources have been used for marker development, gene cloning, microarray gene expression and genetic map construction. Certainly, the peanut EST sequence resources have been shown to have a wide range of applications and accomplished its essential role at the time of need. Then the EST project contributes to the second historic event, the Peanut Genome Project 2010 Inaugural Meeting also held in Atlanta where it was decided to sequence the entire peanut genome. After the completion of peanut whole genome sequencing, ESTs or transcriptome will continue to play an important role to fill in knowledge gaps, to identify particular genes and to explore gene function. PMID:22745594

  8. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  9. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on several different projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Furnace Projects for waste destruction; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project for removal of radioactive materials; and Spray Casting Project.

  10. Parallel Computation Chemistry Using Constraints: Final Report, LDRD 97-0301, Case 3504140000

    SciTech Connect

    Todd D. Plantenga

    1998-11-01

    Computer modeling to estimate material properties, design chem/bio sensors, and evaluate protein-protein interactions all require solving force field equations for molecular structures that contain tens of thousands of covalently connected atoms. Potential energy minimization is a key step in the calculation, but stiff covalent bonding forces make optimization difficult and expensive. This two-year LDRD developed two classes of advanced minimization algorithms that were specialized for chemistry applications and distributed computing machines. The project led to two successful algorithms that were implemented in three Sandia computational chemistry codes to support various users.

  11. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  12. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. ); Thompson, P.B. . Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  13. Milliwatt generator project. Progress report, April-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1981-12-01

    This formal biannual report covers the effort related to the Milliwatt Generator Project (MWG) carried out for the Department of Energy, Office of Military Applications, by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

  14. Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, October 1980-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1981-06-01

    This formal biannual report covers the effort related to the Milliwatt Generator Project (MWG) carried out for the Department of Energy, Office of Military Application by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

  15. Progress Report 15, December 1979-April 1980, and proceedings of the fifteenth Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period December 1979 to April 1980 is reported. Reports on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering; and operations are included. Also, a report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held April 2 and 3, 1980, are included.

  16. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  17. CDC Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project: background, objectives, and progress report.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Genco, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    This supplement contains papers presented at the 2006 International Association of Dental Research (IADR) symposium entitled "Development of Self-Reported Measures for Population-Based Surveillance of Periodontitis." These papers highlight activities of an independent periodontal disease surveillance workgroup convened by the Division of Oral Health (DOH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the American Academy of Periodontology, to examine the feasibility of using self-reported measures for population-based surveillance of periodontal disease in the United States. This workgroup was convened in 2003 as part of a CDC periodontal disease surveillance project. PMID:17610396

  18. Progress report on HGP-A wellhead generator feasibility project

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; Kuwada, J.T.; Farrington, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    The HGP-A Well underwent a substantial workover last fall. A new tie-back 7'' casing was installed from surface to 3000 ft. A two-week test was conducted in January, 1980, with full hydrogen sulfide and noise abatement. Preliminary test results showed a slight increase in total mass flow. Both noise and odor abatement were shown to be very effective. As a result of the two week test, some changes have been made to the final design, and the projected plant on-line date has been extended to March 31, 1980.

  19. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  20. Project 3000 by 2000. Progress to Date. Year Four Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The Association of American Medical Colleges launched Project 3000 by 2000 in November 1991 to address the under-representation of Blacks, American Indians, Mexican Americans, and Mainland Puerto Ricans in medical schools. Its aim is to increase the number of under-represented minorities to entering medical schools to 3,000 by the year 2000. Since…

  1. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Rogers, D.J.; Wightman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US`s effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

  3. Recent Progress of the Series-Connected Hybrid Magnet Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Todd; Bole, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida has designed and is now constructing two Series Connected Hybrid (SCH) magnets, each connecting a superconducting outsert coil and a resistive Florida Bitter insert coil electrically in series. The SCH to be installed at the NHMFL will produce 36 T and provide 1 ppm maximum field inhomogeneity over a 1 cm diameter spherical volume. The SCH to be installed at the Helmholtz Center Berlin (HZB) in combination with a neutron source will produce 25 T to 30 T depending on the resistive insert. The two magnets have a common design for their cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and superconducting outsert coils. The CICC outsert coil winding packs have an inner diameter of 0.6 m and contribute 13.1 T to the central field using three grades of CICC conductors. Each conductor grade carries 20 kA and employs the same type of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wire, but each grade contains different quantities of superconducting wires, different cabling patterns and different aspect ratios. The cryostats and resistive insert coils for the two magnets are different. This paper discusses the progress in CIC conductor and coil fabrication over the last year including specification, qualification and production activities for wire, cable, conductor and coil processing.

  4. Progress of the LASL dry hot rock geothermal energy project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The possibilities and problems of extracting energy from geothermal reservoirs which do not spontaneously yield useful amounts of steam or hot water are discussed. The system for accomplishing this which is being developed first is a pressurized-water circulation loop intended for use in relatively impermeable hot rock. It will consist of two holes connected through the hot rock by a very large hydraulic fracture and connected at the surface through the primary heat exchanger of an energy utilization system. Preliminary experiments in a hole 2576 ft (0.7852 km) deep, extending about 470 ft (143 m) into the Precambrian basement rock underlying the Jemez Plateau of north-central New Mexico, revealed no unexpected difficulties in drilling or hydraulically fracturing such rock at a temperature of approximately 100 C, and demonstrated a permeability low enough so that it appeared probable that pressurized water could be contained by the basement rock. Similar experiments are in progress in a second hole, now 6701 ft (2.043 km) deep, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south of the first one.

  5. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project: Progress and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Garrel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 λ/D. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss two exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks.

  6. Manchester Spring Chinook Broodstock Project : Progress Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, W. Carlin; Wastel, Michael R.; Flagg, Thomas A.

    2000-11-01

    In spring 1995 the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) initiated captive broodstocks as part of conservation efforts for ESA-listed stocks of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). The need for this captive broodstock strategy was identified as critical in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Proposed Recovery Plan for Snake River Salmon. These captive broodstock programs are being coordinated by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Chinook Salmon Captive Propagation Technical Oversight Committee (CSCPTOC). Oregon's Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon captive broodstock program currently focuses on three stocks captured as juveniles from the Grande Ronde River Basin: the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek, and the Lostine River. Idaho's Snake River program includes three stocks captured as eggs and juveniles from the Salmon River Basin: the Lemhi River, East Fork Salmon River, and West Fork Yankee Fork. The majority of captive fish from each stock of the Grande Ronde Basin will be grown to maturity in freshwater at the ODFW Bonneville Hatchery. A minority of the Salmon River Basin stocks will be grown to maturity in freshwater at the IDFG Eagle Hatchery. However, the IDFG and ODFW requested that a portion of each group also be reared in protective culture in seawater. In August 1996, NMFS began a BPA funded project (Project 96-067-00) to rear Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon captive broodstocks in seawater at the NMFS Manchester Research Station. During 1997-1999, facilities modifications were undertaken at Manchester to provide secure facilities for rearing of these ESA-listed fish. This included construction of a building housing a total of twenty 6.1-m diameter fiberglass rearing tanks, upgrade of the Manchester salt water pumping and filtration/sterilization systems to a total capacity of 5,670 L/min (1,500 gpm), and installation

  7. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1993-06-01

    Technical assistance was provided to 60 requests from 19 states. R&D progress is reported on: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Two presentations and one tour were conducted, and three technical papers were prepared. The Geothermal Progress Monitor reported: USGS Forum on Mineral Resources, Renewable Energy Tax Credits Not Working as Congress Intended, Geothermal Industry Tells House Panel, Newberry Pilot Project, and Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Nevada.

  8. The New Progress of the Starry Sky Project of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-08-01

    Since the 28th General Assembly of IAU, the SSPC team made new progress:1. Enhanced the function of the SSPC team-- Established the contact with IAU C50, IUCN Dark Skies Advisory Group, AWB and IDA,and undertakes the work of the IDA Beijing Chapter.-- Got supports from China’s National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing Planetarium, and Shanghai Science and Technology Museum.-- Signed cooperation agreements with Lighting Research Center, English Education Group and law Firm; formed the team force.2. Put forward a proposal to national top institutionThe SSPC submitted the first proposal about dark sky protection to the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.3. Introduced the Criteria and Guideline of dark sky protectionThe SSPC team translated 8 documents of IDA, and provided a reference basis for Chinese dark sky protection.4. Actively establish dark sky places-- Plan a Dark Sky Reserve around Ali astronomical observatory (5,100m elevation) in Tibet. China’s Xinhua News Agency released the news.-- Combining with Hangcuo Lake, a National Natural Reserve and Scenic in Tibet, to plan and establish the Dark Sky Park.-- Cooperated with Shandong Longgang Tourism Group to construct the Dream Sky Theme Park in the suburbs of Jinan city.In the IYL 2015, the SSPC is getting further development:First, make dark sky protection enter National Ecological Strategy of “Beautiful China”. We call on: “Beautiful China” needs “Beautiful Night Sky” China should care the shared starry sky, and left this resource and heritage for children.Second, hold “Cosmic Light” exhibition in Shanghai Science and Technology Museum on August.Third, continue to establish Dark Sky Reserve, Park and Theme Park. We want to make these places become the bases of dark sky protection, astronomical education and ecological tourism, and develop into new cultural industry.Fourth, actively join international cooperation.Now, “Blue Sky, White Cloud and Starry Sky “have become

  9. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  10. Progress of the NASAUSGS Lunar Regolith Simulant Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas; McLemore, C.; Stoeser, D.; Schrader, C.; Fikes, J.; Street, K.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in 2004 personnel at MSFC began serious efforts to develop a new generation of lunar simulants. The first two products were a replication of the previous JSC-1 simulant under a contract to Orbitec and a major workshop in 2005 on future simulant development. It was recognized in early 2006 there were serious limitations with the standard approach of simply taking a single terrestrial rock and grinding it. To a geologist, even a cursory examination of the Lunar Sourcebook shows that matching lunar heterogeneity, crystal size, relative mineral abundances, lack of H2O, plagioclase chemistry and glass abundance simply can not be done with any simple combination of terrestrial rocks. Thus the project refocused its efforts and approached simulant development in a new and more comprehensive manner, examining new approaches in simulant development and ways to more accurately compare simulants to actual lunar materials. This led to a multi-year effort with five major tasks running in parallel. The five tasks are Requirements, Lunar Analysis, Process Development, Feed Stocks, and Standards.

  11. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

  12. Healy Clean Coal Project 1993 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The primary objective of the HCCP is to demonstrate a new power plant design integrating an advanced combustor and heat recovery system coupled with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The parties anticipate that, if the demonstration project is successful, the technology will be commercialized in the late 1990s and be capable of (1) achieving significant reductions in the emissions of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen from existing facilities, (2) providing for future energy needs in an environmentally acceptable manner. Alaskan bituminous and subbituminous coals will be the fuels. Emissions of SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}, from the plant will be controlled using TRW`s slagging coal combustor with limestone injection, in conjunction with a boiler supplied by Foster Wheeler. Further SO{sub 2}, and particulate removal will be accomplished using Joy Technologies, Inc.`s (Joy) Activated Recycle Spray Absorber System. Successful demonstration of these technologies is expected to result in NO{sub x}, emissions of less than 0.2 lb/MMBtu and SO{sub 2}, removal efficiencies greater than 90 percent. The heart of the system being demonstrated is a combustion system. Each combustor consists of two cylindrical sections followed by a short duct that connects the combustor to the boiler. A precombustor burns about 35 percent of the coal to preheat the main combustor secondary air. The preheated air enters the main combustor section tangentially to impart a swirling motion to the coal and air. The balance of the coal is injected axially through multiple injection ports at the front end of this cylindrical section.

  13. The WPI Autonomous Mobile Robot Project: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Peter E.; Hall, Kyle S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a report on the WPI autonomous mobile robot (WAMR). This robot is currently under development by the Intelligent Machines Project at WPI. Its purpose is to serve as a testbed for real-time artificial intelligence. WAMR is expected to find its way from one place in a building to another, avoiding people and obstacles enroute. It is given no a priori knowledge of the building, but must learn about its environment by goal-directed exploration. Design concepts and descriptions of the major items completed thus far are presented. WAMR is a self-contained, wheeled robot that uses evidence based techniques to reason about actions. The robot builds and continually updates a world model of its environment. This is done using a combination of ultrasonic and visual data. This world model is interpreted and movement plans are generated by a planner utilizing uses real-time incremental evidence techniques. These movement plans are then carried out by a hierarchical evidence-based adaptive controller. Two interesting features of the robot are the line imaging ultrasonic sensor and the video subsystem. The former uses frequency variation to form a line image of obstacles between one and twenty feet in front of the robot. The latter attempts to mimic the human eye using neural network pattern recognition techniques. Several items have been completed thus far. The paper describes some of these, including the multiprocessor navigator and non-skid motion control system, the ultrasonic line imager, the concepts of the vision system, and the computer hardware and software environment.

  14. Building more powerful less expensive supercomputers using Processing-In-Memory (PIM) LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Richard C.

    2009-09-01

    This report details the accomplishments of the 'Building More Powerful Less Expensive Supercomputers Using Processing-In-Memory (PIM)' LDRD ('PIM LDRD', number 105809) for FY07-FY09. Latency dominates all levels of supercomputer design. Within a node, increasing memory latency, relative to processor cycle time, limits CPU performance. Between nodes, the same increase in relative latency impacts scalability. Processing-In-Memory (PIM) is an architecture that directly addresses this problem using enhanced chip fabrication technology and machine organization. PIMs combine high-speed logic and dense, low-latency, high-bandwidth DRAM, and lightweight threads that tolerate latency by performing useful work during memory transactions. This work examines the potential of PIM-based architectures to support mission critical Sandia applications and an emerging class of more data intensive informatics applications. This work has resulted in a stronger architecture/implementation collaboration between 1400 and 1700. Additionally, key technology components have impacted vendor roadmaps, and we are in the process of pursuing these new collaborations. This work has the potential to impact future supercomputer design and construction, reducing power and increasing performance. This final report is organized as follow: this summary chapter discusses the impact of the project (Section 1), provides an enumeration of publications and other public discussion of the work (Section 1), and concludes with a discussion of future work and impact from the project (Section 1). The appendix contains reprints of the refereed publications resulting from this work.

  15. Linear scaling algorithms: Progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, E.B.

    1996-08-01

    The goal of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop a new and efficient electronic structure algorithm that would scale linearly with system size. Since the start of the program this field has received much attention in the literature as well as in terms of focused symposia and at least one dedicated international workshop. The major success of this program is the development of a unique algorithm for minimization of the density functional energy which replaces the diagonalization of the Kohn-Sham hamiltonian with block diagonalization into explicit occupied and partially occupied (in metals) subspaces and an implicit unoccupied subspace. The progress reported here represents an important step toward the simultaneous goals of linear scaling, controlled accuracy, efficiency and transferability. The method is specifically designed to deal with localized, non-orthogonal basis sets to maximize transferability and state by state iteration to minimize any charge-sloshing instabilities and accelerate convergence. The computational demands of the algorithm do scale as the particle number, permitting applications to problems involving many inequivalent atoms. Our targeted goal is at least 10,000 inequivalent atoms on a teraflop computer. This report describes our algorithm, some proof-of-principle examples and a state of the field at the conclusion of this LDRD.

  16. Interface physics in microporous media : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Knutson, Chad E.; Noble, David R.; Aragon, Alicia R.; Chen, Ken Shuang; Giordano, Nicholas J.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Liu, Yihong

    2008-09-01

    This document contains a summary of the work performed under the LDRD project entitled 'Interface Physics in Microporous Media'. The presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, which can carry non-zero stresses, distinguishes multiphase flows from more readily understood single-phase flows. In this work the physics active at these interfaces has been examined via a combined experimental and computational approach. One of the major difficulties of examining true microporous systems of the type found in filters, membranes, geologic media, etc. is the geometric uncertainty. To help facilitate the examination of transport at the pore-scale without this complication, a significant effort has been made in the area of fabrication of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional micromodels. Using these micromodels, multiphase flow experiments have been performed for liquid-liquid and liquid-gas systems. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has been utilized to provide high resolution, three-dimensional reconstructions as well as time resolved, two-dimensional reconstructions. Computational work has focused on extending lattice Boltzmann (LB) and finite element methods for probing the interface physics at the pore scale. A new LB technique has been developed that provides over 100x speed up for steady flows in complex geometries. A new LB model has been developed that allows for arbitrary density ratios, which has been a significant obstacle in applying LB to air-water flows. A new reduced order model has been developed and implemented in finite element code for examining non-equilibrium wetting in microchannel systems. These advances will enhance Sandia's ability to quantitatively probe the rich interfacial physics present in microporous systems.

  17. Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hanenburg, W.H.; Lacy, R.G.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1981-06-01

    Work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of September 15, 1980, through March 31, 1981 is documented. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluids Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  18. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Documentation of progress on funded projects. 3402.23 Section 3402.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM...

  19. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Documentation of progress on funded projects. 3402.23 Section 3402.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  20. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  1. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Documentation of progress on funded projects. 3402.23 Section 3402.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND...

  2. Colorado Preschool Project. Progress Report: Year 1. A Report to the Colorado General Assembly. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmiaston, Rebecca; And Others

    By creating the Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) in 1988, the Colorado General Assembly responded to the needs of 4- and 5-year-old children who are at risk of educational failure in Colorado. This paper is an executive summary of a report to the state's general assembly on the project's first 6 months of progress. The CPP addresses two critical…

  3. LDRD final report: Physical simulation of nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project whose objective was to initiate a research program for developing a fundamental understanding of multiphase multicomponent subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media and to develop parallel processing computational tools for numerical simulation of such problems. The main achievement of this project was the successful development of a general-purpose, unstructured grid, multiphase thermal simulator for subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media implemented for use on massively parallel (MP) computers via message-passing and domain decomposition techniques. The numerical platform provides an excellent base for new and continuing project development in areas of current interest to SNL and the DOE complex including, subsurface nuclear waste disposal and cleanup, groundwater availability and contamination studies, fuel-spill transport for accident analysis, and DNAPL transport and remediation.

  4. Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Fernald, Ohio, conducted from October 15 through October 25, 1991. The Secretary of Energy directed that small, focused, ES&H Progress Assessments be performed as part of the continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process in the areas of ES&H. The FEMP assessment is the pilot assessment for this new program. The objectives for the FEMP ES&H Progress Assessment were to assess: (1) how the FEMP has progressed since the 1989 Tiger Assessment; (2) how effectively the FEMP has corrected specific deficiencies and associated root causes identified by that team; and (3) whether the current organization, resources, and systems are sufficient to proactively manage ES&H issues.

  5. St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project - December 2008-June 2009 Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Bauer, R.A.; Boyd, O.S.; Chung, J.; Cramer, C.H.; Gaunt, D.A.; Hempen, G.L.; Hoffman, D.; McCallister, N.S.; Prewett, J.L.; Rogers, J.D.; Steckel, P.J.; Watkins, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the mission, the project background, the participants, and the progress of the St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (SLAEHMP) for the period from December 2008 through June 2009. During this period, the SLAEHMP held five conference calls and two face-to-face meetings in St. Louis, participated in several earthquake awareness public meetings, held one outreach field trip for the business and government community, collected and compiled new borehole and digital elevation data from partners, and published a project summary.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory LDRD Annual Report FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2013-03-01

    This report provides a glimpse into our diverse research and development portfolio, wwhich encompasses both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies. IN keeping with the mission, INL's LDRD program fosters technical capabilities necessary to support current and future DOE-Office of Nuclear Energy research and development needs.

  7. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This detailed report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project demonstrates an advanced thermal coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to high-quality, low-sulfur fuel. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the project was to expand market awareness and acceptability for the products and the technology. The use of covered hopper cars has been successful and marketing efforts have focused on this technique. Operational improvements are currently aimed at developing fines marketing systems, increasing throughput capacity, decreasing operation costs, and developing standardized continuous operator training. Testburns at industrial user sites were also conducted. A detailed process description; technical progress report including facility operations/plant production, facility testing, product testing, and testburn product; and process stability report are included. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Project Progress

    SciTech Connect

    William F. Morgan, Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-09-11

    The proposed study investigates the effect of low dose and low dose rate radiation exposure (X-rays) on induced genomic instability and the adaptive response, including the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena. The proposed studies will utilize human cell lines containing a stably integrated plasmid that can be caused by certain kinds of mutational insults to recombine to express the green fluorescent proteins, GFP. The study will use this cell line with the fluorescent plasmid recombination reporter system in a direct study of the effects of 1, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 100 and 500 rads acute X-irradiation and the same doses delivered by protraction at 1 rad or 0.01 rad per minute. This system will be used to provide a quantitative measure of the kinetics of genomic instability in colonies of cells exposed to low dose/dose rate, as well as to examine the adaptive response. The study will also apply micro array technology to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying induced instability and adaptive effects.

  9. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldnt lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  10. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldnt lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  11. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Eighteenth quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  12. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 14, August 1979-December 1979 and proceedings of the 14th Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period August through November 1979, is described. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations, and the steps taken to integrate these efforts are detailed. A report on the Project Integration Meeting held December 5-6, 1979, including copies of the visual materials used, is presented.

  13. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D, and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center. It describes 95 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with goethermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics, and resources. Research activities are summarized on geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, goethermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  14. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2006 Progress Update

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

    2006-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project through a competitive solicitation process in 2003. The purpose of this project is to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examines the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure. Four industry teams have signed cooperative agreements with DOE and are supporting plans for more than 130 fuel cell vehicles and 20 hydrogen refueling stations over the 5-year project duration. This paper provides a status update covering the progress accomplished by the demonstration and validation project over the last six months; the first composite data products from the project were published in March 2006. The composite data products aggregate individual performance into a range that protects the intellectual property of the companies involved, while publicizing the progress the hydrogen and fuel cell industry is making as a whole relative to the program objectives and timeline. Updates to previously published composite data products, such as on-road fuel economy and vehicle/infrastructure safety, will be presented along with new composite data products, such as fuel cell stack efficiency and refueling behavior.

  15. Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

  16. LDRD final report on new homogeneous catalysts for direct olefin epoxidation (LDRD 52591).

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Karen; Smythe, Nicole A.; Moore, Joshua T.; Stewart, Constantine A.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Miller, James Edward; Kornienko, Alexander (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology); Denney, Melanie C. (University of Washington); Cetto, Kara L.

    2006-02-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel homogeneous epoxidation catalyst system that uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant, a ''Holy Grail'' in catalysis. While olefins (alkenes) that do not contain allylic hydrogens can be epoxidized directly using heterogeneous catalysts, most olefins cannot, and so a general, atom-efficient route is desired. While most of the work performed on this LDRD has been on pincer complexes of late transition metals, we also scouted out metal/ligand combinations that were significantly different, and unfortunately, less successful. Most of the work reported here deals with phosphorus-ligated Pd hydrides [(PCP)Pd-H]. We have demonstrated that molecular oxygen gas can insert into the Pd-H bond, giving a structurally characterized Pd-OOH species. This species reacts with oxygen acceptors such as olefins to donate an oxygen atom, although in various levels of selectivity, and to generate a [(PCP)Pd-OH] molecule. We discovered that the active [(PCP)Pd-H] active catalyst can be regenerated by addition of either CO or hydrogen. The demonstration of each step of the catalytic cycle is quite significant. Extensions to the pincer-Pd chemistry by attaching a fluorinated tail to the pincer designed to be used in solvents with higher oxygen solubilities are also presented.

  17. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  18. Final report for the mobile node authentication LDRD project.

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, John T.; Lanzone, Andrew J.

    2005-09-01

    In hostile ad hoc wireless communication environments, such as battlefield networks, end-node authentication is critical. In a wired infrastructure, this authentication service is typically facilitated by a centrally-located ''authentication certificate generator'' such as a Certificate Authority (CA) server. This centralized approach is ill-suited to meet the needs of mobile ad hoc networks, such as those required by military systems, because of the unpredictable connectivity and dynamic routing. There is a need for a secure and robust approach to mobile node authentication. Current mechanisms either assign a pre-shared key (shared by all participating parties) or require that each node retain a collection of individual keys that are used to communicate with other individual nodes. Both of these approaches have scalability issues and allow a single compromised node to jeopardize the entire mobile node community. In this report, we propose replacing the centralized CA with a distributed CA whose responsibilities are shared between a set of select network nodes. To that end, we develop a protocol that relies on threshold cryptography to perform the fundamental CA duties in a distributed fashion. The protocol is meticulously defined and is implemented it in a series of detailed models. Using these models, mobile wireless scenarios were created on a communication simulator to test the protocol in an operational environment and to gather statistics on its scalability and performance.

  19. Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) was formally established by Executive Policy in 1983 following passage of the federal Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act). That Act provides for the systematic siting, construction, operation, and closure of high-level radioactive defense and research by-products and other forms of high-level radioactive waste from around the country which will be stored at such repositories. In 1985 the Nevada legislature formally established the NWPO as a distinct and statutorily authorized agency to provide support to the Governor and State Legislature on matters concerning the high-level nuclear waste programs. The NWPO utilized a small, central staff supplemented by contractual services for needed technical and specialized expertise in order to provide high quality oversight and monitoring of federal activities, to conduct necessary independent studies, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing program to ensure that risks to the environment and to human safety are minimized. It includes findings in the areas of hydrogeology, geology, quality assurance activities, repository engineering, legislature participation, socioeconomic affects, risk assessments, monitoring programs, public information dissemination, and transportation activities. The bulk of the reporting deals with the Yucca Mountain facility.

  20. Progress on the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments project at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercialmore » cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. Hence, the progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide« less

  1. Progress on the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments project at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercial cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. Hence, the progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide

  2. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-12-18

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  3. Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream

  4. Great basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report first quarter (year 2), June--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal Progress reports are presented for: Paleobotenical studies in the Great Basin; Paleofaunas studies in the Great Basin; Geomorphology studies in the Great Basin; and Transportation. The goal of the transportation project is to compare the results from three models (FESWMS-2DH, DAMBRK, and FLO-2D) that have been suggested as appropriate for evaluating flood flows on alluvial fans with the results obtained from the traditional one-dimensional, stochastic model used in previous research performed by DRI for the Yucca Mountain Project.

  5. Research Progress in the DOE/SERI Amorphous Silicon Research Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sabisky, E.; Wallace, W.; Stafford, B.; Sadlon, K.; Luft, W.

    1985-04-01

    The Amorphous Silicon Research Project (ASRP), established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in 1983, is responsible for all U.S. DOE government-supported research activities in the field of amorphous silicon photovoltaics. The objectives and research directions of the project have been established by a Five-Year Research Plan developed at SERI in cooperation with the Department of Energy in 1984. In order to accomplish project goals, research is performed by a combination of i) multi-year programs consisting of multi-disciplinary research teams based on strong government/industry partnerships and ii) basic research performed in university, government, and industrial laboratories. A summary of recent research progress in the ASRP program is presented.

  6. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  7. Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

    2005-11-01

    We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

  8. The Progress of Research Project for Magnetized Target Fusion in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of magnetized plasma called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a hot research area recently. It may significantly reduce the cost and size. Great progress has been achieved in past decades around the world. Five years ago, China initiated the MTF project and has gotten some progress as follows: 1. Verifying the feasibility of ignition of MTF by means of first principle and MHD simulation; 2. Generating the magnetic field over 1400 Tesla, which can be suppress the heat conduction from charged particles, deposit the energy of alpha particle to promote the ignition process, and produce the stable magnetized plasma for the target of ignition; 3. The imploding facility of FP-1 can put several Mega Joule energy to the solid liner of about ten gram in the range of microsecond risen time, while the simulating tool has been developed for design and analysis of the process; 4. The target of FRC can be generated by ``YG 1 facility'' while some simulating tools have be developed. Next five years, the above theoretical work and the experiments of MTF may be integrated to step up as the National project, which may make my term play an important lead role and be supposed to achieve farther progress in China. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11175028.

  9. Personal genomes in progress: from the Human Genome Project to the Personal Genome Project

    PubMed Central

    Lunshof (Co-first author), Jeantine E.; Bobe (Co-first author), Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; V. Thakuria, Joseph; Vorhaus, Daniel B.; R. Hoehe (Co-last author), Margret; Church (Co-last author), George M.

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007- even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics. PMID:20373666

  10. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    SciTech Connect

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer chains.