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Sample records for lead carbonates

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  2. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  3. RESPONSE OF LEAD SOLUBILITY TO DISSOLVED CARBONATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model is presented showing the detailed response of the theoretical solubility curves for lead to changes in dissolved inorganic carbonate concentration (TIC) and pH at 25 C. Aqueous Pb(II) ion, lead carbonate complexes, lead hydroxide monomers and polymers, and the solids lead...

  4. Nucleation and electrolytic deposition of lead on model carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cericola, D.; Spahr, M.

    2016-08-01

    There is a general consensus in the lead acid battery industry for the use of carbon additives as a functional component in the negative paste to boost the battery performance with regards to charge acceptance and cycle life especially for upcoming automotive and energy storage applications. Several mechanisms are discussed in the scientific literature and the affinity of the carbon surfaces to lead species seems to play a key role. With a set of experiments on model carbon electrodes we gave evidence to the fact that some carbon materials promote spontaneous nucleation of lead crystals. We propose a mechanism such that the carbon, as soon as in a lead containing environment, immobilizes some lead on its surface. Such immobilized lead acts as nucleation seed for the deposition of lead when a current is passed through the material. It is therefore possible to differentiate and select the carbon materials based on their ability to form nucleation seeds.

  5. Incorporation of lead into calcium carbonate granules secreted by earthworms living in lead contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, A.; Lambkin, D. C.; Lee, M. R.; Schofield, P. F.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Hodson, M. E.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of soil organisms on metal mobility and bioavailability in soils is not currently fully understood. We conducted experiments to determine whether calcium carbonate granules secreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris could incorporate and immobilise lead in lead- and calcium-amended artificial soils. Soil lead concentrations were up to 2000 mg kg -1 and lead:calcium ratios by mass were 0.5-8. Average granule production rates of 0.39 ± 0.04 mg calcite earthworm -1 day -1 did not vary with soil lead concentration. The lead:calcium ratio in granules increased significantly with that of the soil ( r2 = 0.81, p = 0.015) with lead concentrations in granules reaching 1577 mg kg -1. X-ray diffraction detected calcite and aragonite in the granules with indications that lead was incorporated into the calcite at the surface of the granules. In addition to the presence of calcite and aragonite X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that lead was present in the granules mainly as complexes sorbed to the surface but with traces of lead-bearing calcite and cerussite. The impact that lead-incorporation into earthworm calcite granules has on lead mobility at lead-contaminated sites will depend on the fraction of total soil lead that would be otherwise mobile.

  6. Characterization of nano-lead-doped active carbon and its application in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Jiang, Liangxing; Xue, Haitao; Liu, Fangyang; Jia, Ming; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, nano-lead-doped active carbon (nano-Pb/AC) composite with low hydrogen evolution current for lead-acid battery was prepared by ultrasonic-absorption and chemical-precipitate method. The nano-Pb/AC composite was characterized by SEM, EDS and TEM. The electrochemical characterizations are performed by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a three-electrode system. Since intermediate adsorption is the rate-determining step, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is markedly inhibited as the intermediate adsorption impedance of nano-Pb/AC increased. Meanwhile, the working potential of nano-Pb/AC is widened to the whole potential region of Pb negative plate (from -1.36 V to -0.86 V vs. Hg/HgSO4) in lead-acid battery. In addition, nano-Pb can improve the interfacial compatibility between AC and Pb paste, accordingly relieve the symptoms of carbon floatation. Finally, 2.0 V single-cell flooded lead-acid batteries with 1.0 wt.% nano-Pb/AC or 1.0 wt.% AC addition in negative active materials are assembled. The cell performances test results show that the 3 h rate capacity, quick charging performance, high current discharging performance and cycling performance of nano-Pb/AC modified battery are all improved compared with regular lead-acid battery and AC modified lead-acid battery.

  7. Carbon nanotubes enhanced the lead toxicity on the freshwater fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, D. S. T.; Alves, O. L.; Barbieri, E.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanostructures for many applications in materials industry and biotechnology. However, it is mandatory to evaluate their toxicity and environmental implications. We evaluated nitric acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO3-MWCNT) toxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and also the lead (Pb) toxicity modulation after the nanotube interaction. Industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes [Ctube 100, CNT Co. Ltd] were treated with 9M HNO3 for 12h at 150°C to generate oxygenated groups on the nanotube surface, to improve water dispersion and heavy metal interaction. The HNO3-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were physico-chemically characterized by several techniques [e.g. TEM, FE-SEM, TGA, ζ-potential and Raman spectroscopy]. HNO3-MWCNT did not show toxicity on Nile tilapia when the concentration ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, and the maximum exposure time was 96h. After 24, 48, 72 and 96h the LC50 values of Pb were 1.65, 1.32, 1.10 and 0.99 mg/L, respectively. To evaluate the Pb-nanotube interaction influence on the ecotoxicity, we submitted the Nile tilapia to different concentrations of Pb mixed with a non-toxic concentration of HNO3-MWCNT (1.0 mg/L). After 24, 48, 72, 96 h the LC50 values of Pb plus nanotubes were: 0.32, 0.25, 0.20, 0.18 mg/L, respectively. These values showed a synergistic effect after Pb-nanotube interaction since Pb toxicity increased over five times. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to confirm lead adsorption on the carbon nanotube oxidized surface. The exposure of Nile tilapia to Pb plus HNO3-MWCNT caused both oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion decrease, when compared to the control. Finally, our results show that carbon nanotubes interact with classical pollutants drawing attention to the environmental implications.

  8. Two-dimensional carbon leading to new photoconversion processes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongjie; Hessel, Colin M; Wang, Jiangyan; Yang, Nailiang; Yu, Ranbo; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbon allotropes, which are atomic thick layers made of network carbon atoms with hexagonal structured lattices, have been neglected until the direct investigation of mechanically exfoliated graphene by Novoselov et al. in 2004. Graphene is a 2D carbon allotrope with a unique structure of hexagonally arranged atoms that give it unparalleled electrical conductivity and carrier mobility, in addition to excellent mechanical flexibility and extremely high specific surface area. Graphene and its derivatives have been extensively studied for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications due to their inherent nature to extract and transport charges from photon-absorbing semiconductors and conjugated polymers. Graphyne and graphdiyne, 2D carbon allotropes like graphene but containing not only doubly but also triply bonded carbon atoms, are predicted to possess intrinsic semiconductor bandgap and even more superior electrical properties than graphene. The current theoretical understanding and experimental status of graphyne and graphdiyne will be discussed in contrast of graphene, demonstrating those promising competitors to graphene in further lightening a new photoconversion. This review addresses the recent successes and current challenges of graphene, graphyne and graphdiyne, and provides insightful perspectives for the future applications of 2D carbon materials in photoelectric conversion and photocatalysis. PMID:24654006

  9. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  10. Metallic Concepts for Repair of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Space Shuttle Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Nesbitt, James

    2007-01-01

    The Columbia accident has focused attention on the critical need for on-orbit repair concepts for wing leading edges in the event that potentially catastrophic damage is incurred during Space Shuttle Orbiter flight. The leading edge of the space shuttle wings consists of a series of eleven panels on each side of the orbiter. These panels are fabricated from reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) which is a light weight composite with attractive strength at very high temperatures. The damage that was responsible for the loss of the Colombia space shuttle was deemed due to formation of a large hole in one these RCC leading edge panels produced by the impact of a large piece of foam. However, even small cracks in the RCC are considered as potentially catastrophic because of the high temperature re-entry environment. After the Columbia accident, NASA has explored various means to perform on-orbit repairs in the event that damage is sustained in future shuttle flights. Although large areas of damage, such as that which doomed Columbia, are not anticipated to re-occur due to various improvements to the shuttle, especially the foam attachment, NASA has also explored various options for both small and large area repair. This paper reports one large area repair concept referred to as the "metallic over-wrap." Environmental conditions during re-entry of the orbiter impose extreme requirements on the RCC leading edges as well as on any repair concepts. These requirements include temperatures up to 3000 F (1650 C) for up to 15 minutes in the presence of an extremely oxidizing plasma environment. Figure 1 shows the temperature profile across one panel (#9) which is subject to the highest temperatures during re-entry. Although the RCC possesses adequate mechanical strength at these temperatures, it lacks oxidation resistance. Oxidation protection is afforded by converting the outer layers of the RCC to SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). At high temperatures in an oxidizing

  11. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  12. Enhancing the performance of lead-acid batteries with carbon - In pursuit of an understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Patrick T.; Rand, David A. J.; Peters, Ken

    2015-11-01

    The inherently poor dynamic charge-acceptance of the lead-acid battery can be greatly improved by the incorporation of additional carbon to the negative plate. An analysis is undertaken of the various ways by which the carbon may be introduced, and of the proposed mechanisms whereby its presence proves to be beneficial. It is intended that such an investigation should provide a guide to the selection of the optimum carbon inventory.

  13. Altered soil microbial community at elevated CO2 leads to loss of soil carbon

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Karen M.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Drake, Bert G.; Megonigal, J. Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Increased carbon storage in ecosystems due to elevated CO2 may help stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations and slow global warming. Many field studies have found that elevated CO2 leads to higher carbon assimilation by plants, and others suggest that this can lead to higher carbon storage in soils, the largest and most stable terrestrial carbon pool. Here we show that 6 years of experimental CO2 doubling reduced soil carbon in a scrub-oak ecosystem despite higher plant growth, offsetting ≈52% of the additional carbon that had accumulated at elevated CO2 in aboveground and coarse root biomass. The decline in soil carbon was driven by changes in soil microbial composition and activity. Soils exposed to elevated CO2 had higher relative abundances of fungi and higher activities of a soil carbon-degrading enzyme, which led to more rapid rates of soil organic matter degradation than soils exposed to ambient CO2. The isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids confirmed that elevated CO2 increased microbial utilization of soil organic matter. These results show how elevated CO2, by altering soil microbial communities, can cause a potential carbon sink to become a carbon source. PMID:17360374

  14. Discrete carbon nanotubes increase lead acid battery charge acceptance and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swogger, Steven W.; Everill, Paul; Dubey, D. P.; Sugumaran, Nanjan

    2014-09-01

    Performance demands placed upon lead acid batteries have outgrown the technology's ability to deliver. These demands, typically leading to Negative Active Material (NAM) failure, include: short, high-current surges; prolonged, minimal, overvoltage charging; repeated, Ah deficit charging; and frequent deep discharges. Research shows these failure mechanisms are attenuated by inclusion of carbon allotropes into the NAM. Addition of significant quantities of carbon, however, produces detrimental changes in paste rheology, leading to lowered industrial throughput. Additionally, capacity, cold-cranking performance, and other battery metrics are negatively affected at high carbon loads. Presented here is Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative, a new battery additive comprising discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT) which uniformly disperse within battery pastes during mixing. NS40ZL batteries containing dCNT show enhanced charge acceptance, reserve capacity, and cold-cranking performance, decreased risk of polarization, and no detrimental changes to paste properties, when compared to dCNT-free controls. This work focuses on the dCNT as NAM additives only, but early-stage research is underway to test their functionality as a PAM additive. Batteries infused with Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative address the needs of modern lead acid battery applications, produce none of the detrimental side effects associated with carbon additives, and require no change to existing production lines.

  15. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  16. A novel method for preparation of cobalt(II) and lead(II) carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, M. S.; Teleb, S. M.; Sadeek, S. A.

    2004-10-01

    Cobalt(II) carbonate, CoCO 3·4H 2O and lead(II) carbonate, PbCO 3·2H 2O were synthesis by a new simple method during the reaction of aqueous solutions of CoX 2 (X = Cl -, NO 3- and CH 3COO -) and PbX 2 (X = NO 3- or CH 3COO -), respectively, with urea at ˜85 °C for 2 h. The infrared spectra of the reaction products clearly indicates the absence of the bands due to coordinated urea, but show the characteristic bands of ionic carbonate. A general mechanisms describing the formation of cobalt and lead carbonates are suggested.

  17. Study of the influence of carbon on the negative lead-acid battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bača, Petr; Micka, Karel; Křivík, Petr; Tonar, Karel; Tošer, Pavel

    Experiments were made with negative lead-acid battery electrodes doped with different concentrations of powdered carbon. It turned out that the rate of formation decreased with the rising concentration of carbon added into the active material. During accelerated cycling in the PSoC regime, the cycle life showed a maximum at a concentration of carbon near 1%, whereas at lower or higher concentrations the cycle life was profoundly lower. A marked increase of the active mass resistance with the cycle number was recorded at carbon concentrations above 2%. Orientation experiments showed that compression of the lead-acid laboratory cells caused an increase of the cycle life of the negative electrode in the studied regime.

  18. Removal of Lead (II) Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Murat; Ucar, Suat; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay

    2013-01-01

    The removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II) ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II) ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. PMID:23853528

  19. Lead deposition onto fractured vitreous carbon: influence of electrochemical pretreated electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, E.; Carreño, G.; Ponce-de-León, C.; Oropeza, M. T.; Morales, M.; González, I.; Batina, N.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the electrochemical deposition of Pb(II) onto Fractured Vitreous Carbon (FVC) electrodes from solutions containing very low concentrations of lead in different electrolytes (sulfate or chloride). To examine how the FVC surface state influences the lead deposition efficiency, the electrodes were subjected to different electrochemical pretreatments prior to the actual deposition process. The FVC electrode was used as a representative model of the vitreous carbon (VC) bulk, avoiding the polishing procedure that could change the surface. Electrochemical pretreatment was carried out by cyclic voltammetry in electrolytes containing chloride or nitrate anions and in some cases, ferrocyanide. Before and after the electrochemical pretreatment, the electrode surface morphology was assessed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. The quantity of lead deposited on the FVC electrode surface (lead deposition efficiency) in each experiment was estimated from the charge under the lead anodic, dissolution peak. Electrochemical pretreatment of electrodes in chloride or nitrate electrolytic baths consistently reduced the lead deposition efficiency. A detailed analysis, correlating lead deposition efficiencies to surface roughness and fractal dimension of the freshly prepared and electrochemically pretreated FVC electrodes, indicated that the decrease in efficiency corresponded to the change in electrode surface geometry. The greater efficiency of lead deposition observed in the chloride-containing electrolyte was due to the interaction between chloride and deposited lead rather than a chloride interaction with the FVC substrate.

  20. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption. PMID:25819762

  1. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part I: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, Angel; Kircheva, Nina; Perrin, Marion

    2011-10-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid is proposed as innovative solution for high energy density lead acid battery. The proof of concept is demonstrated, developing grids suitable for the small capacity, scale of valve-regulated lead acid batteries with 2.5-3 Ah plates. The manufacturing of the grids, includes fast, known and simple processes which can be rescaled for mass production with a minimum, investment costs. The most critical process of green composite carbonisation by heating in inert, atmosphere from 200 to 1000 °C takes about 5 h, guaranteeing the low cost of the grids. An AGM-VRLA, cell with prototype positive plate based on the lead-2% tin electroplated carbon honeycomb grid and, conventional negative plates is cycled demonstrating 191 deep cycles. The impedance spectroscopy, measurements indicate the grid performance remains acceptable despite the evolution of the corrosion, processes during the cycling.

  2. Transport across a carbon nanotube quantum dot contacted with ferromagnetic leads: Experiment and nonperturbative modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirnaichner, Alois; Grifoni, Milena; Prüfling, Andreas; Steininger, Daniel; Hüttel, Andreas K.; Strunk, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in single-wall carbon nanotubes attached to ferromagnetic contacts in the Coulomb blockade regime. Strong variations of the TMR with gate voltage over a range of four conductance resonances, including a peculiar double-dip signature, are observed. The data are compared to calculations in the "dressed second order" (DSO) framework. In this nonperturbative theory, conductance peak positions and linewidths are affected by charge fluctuations incorporating the properties of the carbon nanotube quantum dot and the ferromagnetic leads. The theory is able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental data.

  3. Test and Analysis of a Hyper-X Carbon-Carbon Leading Edge Chine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell W.; Sikora, Joseph G.; Lindell, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    During parts production for the X43A Mach 10 hypersonic vehicle nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a leading edge chine detected on imbedded delamination near the lower surface of the part. An ultimate proof test was conducted to verify the ultimate strength of this leading edge chine part. The ultimate proof test setup used a pressure bladder design to impose a uniform distributed pressure field over the bi-planar surface of the chine test article. A detailed description of the chine test article and experimental test setup is presented. Analysis results from a linear status model of the test article are also presented and discussed. Post-test inspection of the specimen revealed no visible failures or areas of delamination.

  4. A novel leady oxide combined with porous carbon skeleton synthesized from lead citrate precursor recovered from spent lead-acid battery paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuchen; Yang, Jiakuan; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yanlin; Wang, Junxiong; Yuan, Xiqing; Vasant Kumar, R.; Liang, Sha; Hu, Jingping; Wu, Xu

    2016-02-01

    A novel nanostructured leady oxides comprising porous carbon skeleton has been synthesized by thermal decomposition of lead citrate precursor, recovered from spent lead-acid battery paste. The influences of O2 percentage in the calcination atmosphere (O2/N2 mixture) and the temperature on leady oxide product characteristics are studied by chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The major crystalline phases of the products are identified as lead oxides, metallic Pb, and carbon. Porous carbon is observed as skeletons within the leady oxide (PbO containing some Pb metal) particles. Mass percentage of Pb metal in the leady oxide increases with increasing the proportion of oxygen in the calcination atmosphere. However, the amount of carbon decreases from approximately 8.0 to 0.3 wt%, and the porous carbon skeleton structure is gradually damaged with oxygen concentration increasing. A model about the thermal decomposition of lead citrate precursor is firstly proposed to elucidate these observations. The nanostructured leady oxides combined with porous carbon can be directly used as precursor of active materials in a new lead acid battery.

  5. Bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrodes, for voltammetric detection of femtomolar leveled lead ions.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qijin; Yu, Fen; Zhu, Lina; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Nianjun

    2010-10-15

    Femtomolar (fM) leveled lead ions were electrochemically detected using a bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrode and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The bucky-gel was composed of dithizone, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The fabrication of the bucky-gel coated electrode was optimized. The modified electrode was characterized with voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry. After the accumulation of lead ions into the bucky-gel modified electrode at -1.2V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 5 min in a pH 4.4 sodium acetate-acetate acid buffer solution, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammograms of the accumulated lead show an anodic wave at -0.58 V. The anodic peak current is detectable for lead ions in the concentration range from 1.0 μM down to 500 fM. The detection limit is calculated to be 100 fM. The proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of lead ions in lake water. PMID:20875583

  6. Electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon current collectors for lead-acid batteries: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, Elod; Jung, Joey; Mahato, Basanta

    Reticulated, open-cell structures based on vitreous carbon substrates electroplated with a Pb-Sn (1 wt.%) alloy were investigated as current collectors for lead-acid batteries. Scanning and backscattered electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, anodic polarization and flooded 2 V single-cell battery testing was employed to characterize the performance of the proposed collectors. A battery equipped with pasted electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) electrodes of 137 cm 2 geometric area, at the time of manuscript submission, completed 500 cycles and over 1500 h of continuous operation. The cycling involved discharges at 63 A kg PAM-1 corresponding to a nominal 0.75 h rate and a positive active mass (PAM) utilization efficiency of 21%. The charging protocol was composed of two voltage limited (i.e. 2.6 V/cell), constant current steps of 35 and 9.5 A kg PAM-1, respectively, with a total duration of about 2 h. The charge factor was 1.05-1.15. The observed cycling behavior in conjunction with the versatility of electrodeposition to produce application-dependent optimized lead alloy coating thickness and composition shows promise for the development of lead-acid batteries using electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon collectors.

  7. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  8. Removal of lead(II) from aqueous solutions using carbonate hydroxyapatite extracted from eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dexiang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Yue, Xiu; Guo, Liang; Zeng, Guangming

    2010-05-15

    Carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHAP) synthesized from eggshell waste was used for removing lead ion from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time and initial concentration were studied in batch experiments. The maximum uptake of lead ion was obtained at pH 6.0. Adsorption equilibrium was established by 60 min. The pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied to study the kinetics of the sorption processes. The pseudo-second order kinetic model provided the best correlation (R(2)>0.9991) of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The adsorption of lead ion by CHAP increased as the initial concentration of lead ion increased in the medium. The maximum lead ion adsorbed was found to be 101 mg g(-1). It was found that the adsorption of Pb(II) on CHAP was correlated well (R(2)=0.9995) with the Langmuir equation as compared to Freundlich isotherm equation under the concentration range studied. This study indicated that CHAP could be used as an efficient adsorbent for removal of lead ion from aqueous solution. PMID:20042291

  9. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  10. Capacitive carbon and electrochemical lead electrode systems at the negative plates of lead-acid batteries and elementary processes on cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Nikolov, P.

    2013-11-01

    Batteries in hybrid electric vehicles operate in High-Rate Partial-State-of-Charge (HRPSoC) cycling duty. To make lead-acid batteries suitable for this duty, carbon is added to the negative active material. As a result of this technological change, two electrical systems form at the negative plates: (a) a capacitive carbon system comprising high-rate charging and discharging of the electric double layer; low Ah capacity, and (b) a lead electrochemical system, comprising oxidation of Pb to PbSO4 during discharge and vice versa during charge; this system is slow to accept charge, but has high Ah capacity. Through cycling lead-acid cells under HRPSoC conditions with short current pulses of various durations we have established that the processes involved in the capacitive system proceed highly reversibly and complete hundreds of thousands HRPSoC cycles. The number of cycles achieved by the electrochemical system is limited to tens of thousands and lead to progressive sulfation. Carbon added to the negative active material changes the latter's structure. The specific surface of NAM increases and the median pore radius decreases. Some carbon additives may reduce the radius of the pores in NAM to membrane sizes, which may change the chemistry of the electrochemical system.

  11. The ionic strength dependence of lead (II) carbonate complexation in perchlorate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easley, Regina A.; Byrne, Robert H.

    2011-10-01

    Lead speciation in many aqueous geochemical systems is dominated by carbonate complexation. However, direct observations of Pb complexation by carbonate ions are few in number. This work represents the first investigation of the equilibrium Pb+CO32-⇌PbCO30 over a range of ionic strength. Through spectrophotometric observations of PbCO30 formation at 25 °C in NaHCO 3-NaClO 4 solutions, PbCO30 formation constants of the form COβ1=[PbCO30]/[Pb][CO32-] were determined between 0.001 and 5.0 molal ionic strength. Formation constant results were well represented by the equation: logCO3β1=(6.789±0.022)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}+(0.244±0.012)I . This result, combined with previous critical assessments of formation constants for the equilibrium PbCO30+CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-, was used to estimate the ionic strength dependence for the equilibrium Pb+2CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-: logCO3β2=(10.41±0.18)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}-(0.31±0.33)I where COβ2=[Pb(CO)22-]/[Pb][CO32-]2. The carbonate complexation constants produced in this study, combined with previous complexation constants for formation of Pb chloride and hydroxide species, were used to predict formation constants for mixed-ligand species Pb(CO)Cl, Pb(OH)Cl, and Pb(CO)OH. Formation constant estimates for the system Pb-HCO3-Cl-H were then used to assess Pb speciation in seawater. In the absence of complexation by organics, approximately 1.9% of the total lead in surface seawater ( S = 35, t = 25 °C, pH ˜8.2 (free H concentration scale)) is present as free hydrated Pb. Carbonate complexes, PbCO30 and Pb(CO)Cl, are predominant forms of Pb in seawater at high pH, and lead chloride complexes are predominant species at low pH. For pH >7.7 the sum concentration of PbCO30, Pb(CO)Cl, PbOH, and Pb(OH)Cl in seawater exceeds the sum concentration of Pb, PbCl, PbCl20, and PbCl3-.

  12. Evaluation of lead/carbon devices for utility applications : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Walmet, Paula S.

    2009-06-01

    This report describes the results of a three-phase project that evaluated lead-based energy storage technologies for utility-scale applications and developed carbon materials to improve the performance of lead-based energy storage technologies. In Phase I, lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were compared to other technologies that used the same or similar materials. At the end of Phase I (in 2005) it was found that lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were not yet fully developed and optimized (cost/performance) to be a viable option for utility-scale applications. It was, however, determined that adding carbon to the negative electrode of a standard lead-acid battery showed promise for performance improvements that could be beneficial for use in utility-scale applications. In Phase II various carbon types were developed and evaluated in lead-acid batteries. Overall it was found that mesoporous activated carbon at low loadings and graphite at high loadings gave the best cycle performance in shallow PSoC cycling. Phase III studied cost/performance benefits for a specific utility application (frequency regulation) and the full details of this analysis are included as an appendix to this report.

  13. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl– with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed inmore » this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.« less

  14. Carbon nanotubes as an efficient hole collector for high voltage methylammonium lead bromide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Boix, Pablo P; Xing, Guichuan; Fu, Kunwu; Kulkarni, Sneha A; Batabyal, Sudip K; Xu, Wenjing; Cao, Anyuan; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-03-28

    A high open circuit voltage (V(OC)) close to 1.4 V under AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2) conditions is achieved when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as a hole conductor in methyl ammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite solar cells. Time-resolved photoluminescence and impedance spectroscopy investigations suggest that the observed high V(OC) is a result of the better charge extraction and lower recombination of the CNT hole conductor. Tandem solar cells with all perovskite absorbers are demonstrated with a MAPbBr3/CNT top cell and a MAPbI3 bottom cell, achieving a V(OC) of 2.24 V in series connection. The semitransparent and high voltage MAPbBr3/CNT solar cells show great potential for applications in solar cell windows, tandem solar cells and solar driven water splitting. PMID:26646241

  15. [Adsorption Behaviors of Lead on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Hydroxyapatite Composites].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-li; Li, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube-hydroxyapatite composites (MWCNT-HAP) were employed as the sorbent to study the sorption characteristic of Pb (II) using batch experiments. Effects of dosage of adsorbent, pH, ionic strength, contact time, initial concentration of lead and temperature were investigated. The results indicated that the removal of lead to MWCNT-HAP composites was strongly dependent on dosage of adsorbent, pH, temperature, and independent of ionic strength. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead was about 716. 13 mg.g-1 at 20°C, with a solid/liquid ratio of 0.08 g.L-1, pH0 = 5.5 and an initial concentration of 100 mg.L-1. The adsorption of Pb(II) on MWCNT-HAP composites was a fast process and could reach the equilibrium within 60 minutes. Ninety percent of the maximum adsorption capacity could be reached in 30 minutes. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-second-order kinetic model reasonably well. The kinetic sorption of Pb(II) on MWCNT-HAP was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative free energy calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms suggested that the sorption of Pb(II) on MWCNT-HAP composites was a spontaneous process, and high temperature favored the adsorption process. The higher correlation coefficient values (R2 = 0. 999 8 - 1. 000 0) of Langmuir isotherm model at different temperatures suggested that Langmuir model could be used to simulate the sorption of Pb(II) on MWCNT-HAP. The adsorption mechanism mainly involves surface complexation between the lead ions and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups of the MWCNT-HAP, dissolution of HAP and precipitation of pyromorphite [Pb10 (PO4)6 (OH) 2], ion exchange reaction between Pb2+ and Ca2+ of hydroxyapatite. PMID:26489325

  16. Carbon nanotubes as an efficient hole collector for high voltage methylammonium lead bromide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Boix, Pablo P.; Xing, Guichuan; Fu, Kunwu; Kulkarni, Sneha A.; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Xu, Wenjing; Cao, Anyuan; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-03-01

    A high open circuit voltage (VOC) close to 1.4 V under AM 1.5, 100 mW cm-2 conditions is achieved when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as a hole conductor in methyl ammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite solar cells. Time-resolved photoluminescence and impedance spectroscopy investigations suggest that the observed high VOC is a result of the better charge extraction and lower recombination of the CNT hole conductor. Tandem solar cells with all perovskite absorbers are demonstrated with a MAPbBr3/CNT top cell and a MAPbI3 bottom cell, achieving a VOC of 2.24 V in series connection. The semitransparent and high voltage MAPbBr3/CNT solar cells show great potential for applications in solar cell windows, tandem solar cells and solar driven water splitting.A high open circuit voltage (VOC) close to 1.4 V under AM 1.5, 100 mW cm-2 conditions is achieved when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as a hole conductor in methyl ammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite solar cells. Time-resolved photoluminescence and impedance spectroscopy investigations suggest that the observed high VOC is a result of the better charge extraction and lower recombination of the CNT hole conductor. Tandem solar cells with all perovskite absorbers are demonstrated with a MAPbBr3/CNT top cell and a MAPbI3 bottom cell, achieving a VOC of 2.24 V in series connection. The semitransparent and high voltage MAPbBr3/CNT solar cells show great potential for applications in solar cell windows, tandem solar cells and solar driven water splitting. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06177f

  17. ACCIDENTAL DROP OF A CARBON STEEL/LEAD SHIPPING CASK AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    B. D. Hawkes; K. R. Durstine

    2007-07-01

    A shielded cask is used to transport radioactive materials between facilities. The cask was fabricated with an outer and inner shell of hot rolled low carbon steel. Lead was poured in the annular space between the shells to provide radiation shielding. Carbon steel is known to be susceptible to lowtemperature brittle fracture under impact loading. This paper will present the analysis results representing postulated transportation accidents during on-site transfers of the cask. The accident scenarios were based on a series of cask drops onto a rigid surface from a height of 6 ft assuming brittle failure of the cask shell at subzero temperatures. Finite element models of the cask and its contents were solved and post processed using ABAQUS software. Each model was examined for failure to contain radioactive materials and/or significant loss of radiation shielding. Results of these analyses show that the body of the cask exhibits considerable ruggedness and will remain largely intact after the impact. There will be deformation of the main cask body with localized brittle failure of the cask outer shell and components and but no complete penetration of the cask shielding. The cask payload outer waste can will experience some permanent plastic deformation in each drop, but will not be deformed to the point where it will rupture, thus maintaining confinement of the can contents.

  18. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part II: Operation of the negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Dumenil, S.; Alias, M.; Christin, R.; de Mascarel, A.; Perrin, M.

    2015-04-01

    The article presents the recent progress in the carbon honeycomb grid technology for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries with absorptive glass-mat separators (AGM-VRLAB). The work is focused on the development of negative current collectors using industrial grade composite honeycomb precursors. The developed model AGM-VRLA cells comprised of one prototype honeycomb negative electrode and two conventional traction positive counter-electrodes show high utilisation of the negative active material and long cycle life both in high-rate partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling mode and in deep cycling mode. The analysis of the results from the cycle-life tests and the tear-down analysis indicate that the benefits delivered by the novel grids can be related to the low mesh size of the grid, low γ-coefficient, as well as the use of milled carbon fibre additive. The combination of the three, results in the reversibility of the negative active material sulfation process when the electrolyte concentration in the cells is lower than the one traditionally used in the AGM-VRLAB technology. The negative plates show no signs of irreversible degradation after more than 900 cycles in deep cycling mode and more than 2000 capacity turnovers (equivalent cycles) in HRPSoC cycling mode.

  19. Accidental Drop of a Carbon Steel/Lead Shipping Cask (HFEF 14) at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Michael E. Nitzel

    2007-08-01

    A shielded cask is used to transport radioactive materials between facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. The cask was fabricated with an outer and inner shell of A36 carbon steel with lead poured in the annular space between the shells to provide radiation shielding. Carbon steel is known to be susceptible to low-temperature brittle fracture under impact loading. This paper will present the analysis results representing postulated transportation accidents during on-site transfers of the cask at subzero temperatures. The accident scenarios were based on a series of cask drops onto a rigid surface from a height of 1.83m (6 ft.) Finite element models of the cask and its contents were solved and post processed using the ABAQUS software. Each model was examined for failure to contain radioactive materials and/or significant loss of radiation shielding. Results of these analyses show that the body of the cask exhibits considerable ruggedness and will remain largely intact after the impact. There will be deformation of the main cask body with localized brittle failure of the cask outer shell and door structure. The cask payload outer waste can remains in the cask but will experience some permanent plastic deformation in each drop. It will not be deformed to the point where it will rupture, thus maintaining confinement of the can contents.

  20. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-11-01

    A new procedure of elimination of Pb2+ from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N2 at -196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb2+ was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb2+ removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO3 on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb2+. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb2+ per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  1. Lead recovery and glass microspheres synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced acid leaching process.

    PubMed

    Mingfei, Xing; Yaping, Wang; Jun, Li; Hua, Xu

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a novel process for detoxification and reutilization of waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass was developed by carbon thermal reduction enhanced acid leaching process. The key to this process is removal of lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of glass microspheres. Carbon powder was used as an isolation agent and a reducing agent. Under the isolation of the carbon powder, the funnel glass powder was sintered into glass microspheres. In thermal reduction, PbO in the funnel glass was first reduced to elemental Pb by carbon monoxide and then located on the surface of glass microspheres which can be removed easily by acid leaching. Experimental results showed that temperature, carbon adding amount and holding time were the major parameters that controlled lead removal rate. The maximum lead removal rate was 94.80% and glass microspheres that measured 0.73-14.74μm were obtained successfully by setting the temperature, carbon adding amount and holding time at 1200°C, 10% and 30min, respectively. The prepared glass microspheres may be used as fillers in polymer materials and abrasive materials, among others. Accordingly, this study proposed a practical and economical process for detoxification and recycling of waste lead-containing glass. PMID:26642446

  2. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed in this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.

  3. Partial carbonized nanoporous resin for uptake of lead from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ghiloufi, I; Al-Hobaib, A S; El Mir, L

    2015-01-01

    Four partial carbonized nanoporous resins (PCNRs), based on organic xerogel compounds, were synthesised by the sol-gel method from pyrogallol and formaldehyde mixtures in water using picric acid as catalyst. The PCNRs were prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures: T(1) = 200 °C (PF-200), T(2) = 300 °C (PF-300), T(3) = 400 °C (PF-400), or T(4) = 500 °C (PF-500). The PCNRs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and nitrogen porosimetry. The obtained results show that PF-200 is more efficient for the removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution than the other adsorbent prepared in this study. The characteristics of lead uptake by PF-200 were explored using well-established and effective parameters including pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. Optimum adsorption of Pb(2+), using PF-200, was observed at pH 4.5. The Langmuir model gave a better fit than the other models, and kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption was well fitted by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and thermodynamic properties, i.e., Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change, showed that adsorption of Pb(2+) onto PF-200 was endothermic, spontaneous and feasible in the temperature range of 298-328 K. PMID:26360758

  4. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Trihalide Perovskite Interface - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-25

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  5. Kinetic research on the sorption of aqueous lead by synthetic carbonate hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Xu, HuanYan; Yang, Lei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Yu; Peng, MingSheng

    2008-01-01

    The sorption of aqueous lead on carbonate-hydroxyapatite (CHAp) is a complicated non-homogeneous solid/water reaction, which from the kinetic point of view has two stages. In the first stage, the reaction rate is so fast and the kinetic pathway so intricate that further research is required. In the second stage, the reaction rate slows down and the reaction process follows that of a first-order kinetic equation. Experimental results show that the relationship between the reaction rate constant k(1) and temperature T agrees with the Arrhenius equation, and that the activation energy of sorption (E(a)) is 11.93 kJ/mol and the frequency factor (A) is 2.51/s. The reaction rate constant k(1) increases with the Pb(2+) initial concentration and decreasing pH, but with increasing CHAp dosage. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion spectrum (SEM-EDS) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests indicate that the main sorption mechanism is dissolution-precipitation, in conjunction with surface sorption. PMID:17360101

  6. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  7. Woody plant encroachment into grasslands leads to accelerated erosion of previously stable organic carbon from dryland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttock, Alan; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.; Macleod, Christopher J. A.; Bol, Roland; Brazier, Richard E.

    2014-12-01

    Drylands worldwide are experiencing rapid and extensive environmental change, concomitant with the encroachment of woody vegetation into grasslands. Woody encroachment leads to changes in both the structure and function of dryland ecosystems and has been shown to result in accelerated soil erosion and loss of soil nutrients. Covering 40% of the terrestrial land surface, dryland environments are of global importance, both as a habitat and a soil carbon store. Relationships between environmental change, soil erosion, and the carbon cycle are uncertain. There is a clear need to further our understanding of dryland vegetation change and impacts on carbon dynamics. Here two grass-to-woody ecotones that occur across large areas of the southwestern United States are investigated. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach, combining ecohydrological monitoring of structure and function and a dual-proxy biogeochemical tracing approach using the unique natural biochemical signatures of the vegetation. Results show that following woody encroachment, not only do these drylands lose significantly more soil and organic carbon via erosion but that this includes significant amounts of legacy organic carbon which would previously have been stable under grass cover. Results suggest that these dryland soils may not act as a stable organic carbon pool, following encroachment and that accelerated erosion of carbon, driven by vegetation change, has important implications for carbon dynamics.

  8. Estimation of snag carbon transfer rates by ecozone and lead species for forests in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hilger, A B; Shaw, C H; Metsaranta, J M; Kurz, W A

    2012-12-01

    Standing dead trees (snags) and downed woody debris contribute substantially to the carbon (C) budget of Canada's forest. Accurate parameterization of the C transfer rates (CTRs) from snags to downed woody debris is important for forest C dynamics models such as the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3), but CTRs are rarely measured or reported in the literature. Therefore, forest C models generally use snag fall rates (FRs) available in the literature, as a proxy for CTRs. However, FRs are based on stem counts while CTRs refer to mass transfers. Stem mass and stem number are not linearly related, with small diameter trees representing disproportionately lower C mass transfers. Therefore this proxy, while convenient, may bias C transfer from standing dead to downed woody material. Here, we combined tree data from 10802 sample plots and previously published species-specific individual-tree relationships between tree diameter (diameter at breast height, dbh) and fall rate to derive stand-level estimates of CTRs for the CBM-CFS3. We estimated CTRs and FRs and used the FR values to validate this approach by comparing them with standardized FR values compiled from the literature. FRs generally differed from CTRs. The overall CTR (4.78% +/- 0.02% per year, mean +/- SE) was significantly smaller than the overall FR (5.40% +/- 0.02% per year; mean +/- SE). Both the difference between FR and CTR (FR - CTR) and the CTR itself varied by ecozone, with ecozone means for CTR ranging from 3.94% per year to 10.02% per year. This variation was explained, in part, by heterogeneity in species composition, size (dbh distribution), structure, and age of the stands. The overall mean CTR estimated for the Snag_Stemwood (4.78% per year) and the Snag_Branches (11.95% per year) pools of the CBM-CFS3 were approximately 50% and 20% higher than the current default rates used in the CBM-CFS3 of 3.2% and 10.0%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that using CTRs to

  9. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program: flux of organic carbon by rivers to the oceans. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    1981-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 15 papers presented in this workshop report. The state of knowledge about the role of rivers in the transport, storage and oxidation of carbon is the subject of this report. (KRM)

  10. Followup to Columbia Investigation: Reinforced Carbon/Carbon From the Breach Location in the Wing Leading Edge Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Tallant, David

    2005-01-01

    Initial estimates on the temperature and conditions of the breach in the Space Shuttle Columbia's wing focused on analyses of the slag deposits. These deposits are complex mixtures of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) constituents, insulation material, and wing structural materials. Identification of melted/solidified Cerachrome insulation (Thermal Ceramics, Inc., Augusta, GA) indicated that the temperatures at the breach had exceeded 1760 C.

  11. Sorption and cosorption of lead and sulfapyridine on carbon nanotube-modified biochars.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Zimmerman, Andrew; Zhou, Yanmei; Cao, Xinde

    2015-02-01

    New, sustainable, and low-cost materials that can simultaneously remove a range of wastewater contaminants, such as heavy metals and pharmaceutical residues, are needed. In this work, modified biochars were produced by dip-coating hickory or bagasse biomass in carbon nanotube (CNT) suspensions with or without sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS)-aided dispersion prior to slow pyrolysis in a N2 environment at 600 °C. The sulfapyridine (SPY) and lead (Pb) sorption ability of pristine hickory (HC) and bagasse (BC) biochars and the modified biochars with (HC-SDBS-CNT and BC-SDBS-CNT, respectively) and without (HC-CNT and BC-CNT) SDBS was assessed in laboratory aqueous batch single- and binary-solute system. The greatest removal of SPY and Pb was observed for HC-SDBS-CNT (86 % SPY and 71 % Pb) and BC-SDBS-CNT (56 % SPY and 53 % Pb), whereas HC-CNT, BC-CNT, and the pristine biochars removed far less. This can be attributed to the fact that surfactant could prevent the aggregation of CNTs and thus promote the distribution and stabilization of individual CNT nanoparticle on the biochar surface to adsorb the contaminants. The observation of no significant change in Pb sorption capacities of the surfactant-dispersed CNT-modified biochars in the presence of SPY, or vice versa, was indicative of site-specific sorption interactions and a lack of significant competition for functional groups by the two sorbates. These results suggest that products of hybrid technologies, such as biochars modified with CNTs, can yield multi-sorbents and may hold excellent promise as a sustainable wastewater treatment alternative. PMID:25212810

  12. Carbon nanotubes leading the way forward in new generation 3D tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hopley, Erin Leigh; Salmasi, Shima; Kalaskar, Deepak M; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Statistics from the NHS Blood and Transplant Annual Review show that total organ transplants have increased to 4213 in 2012, while the number of people waiting to receive an organ rose to 7613 that same year. Human donors as the origin of transplanted organs no longer meet the ever-increasing demand, and so interest has shifted to synthetic organ genesis as a form of supply. This focus has given rise to new generation tissue and organ engineering, in the hope of one day designing 3D organs in vitro. While research in this field has been conducted for several decades, leading to the first synthetic trachea transplant in 2011, scaffold design for optimising complex tissue growth is still underexplored and underdeveloped. This is mostly the result of the complexity required in scaffolds, as they need to mimic the cells' native extracellular matrix. This is an intricate nanostructured environment that provides cells with physical and chemical stimuli for optimum cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Carbon nanotubes are a popular addition to synthetic scaffolds and have already begun to revolutionise regenerative medicine. Discovered in 1991, these are traditionally used in various areas of engineering and technology; however, due to their excellent mechanical, chemical and electrical properties their potential is now being explored in areas of drug delivery, in vivo biosensor application and tissue engineering. The incorporation of CNTs into polymer scaffolds displays a variety of structural and chemical enhancements, some of which include: increased scaffold strength and flexibility, improved biocompatibility, reduction in cancerous cell division, induction of angiogenesis, reduced thrombosis, and manipulation of gene expression in developing cells. Moreover CNTs' tensile properties open doors for dynamic scaffold design, while their thermal and electrical properties provide opportunities for the development of neural, bone and cardiac tissue constructs

  13. Preliminary study of lead isotopes in the carbonate-silica veins of Trench 14, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Zartman, R.E.; Kwak, L.M.

    1993-12-15

    The sub-vertical carbonate-silica veins filling the Bow Ridge Fault, where exposed in Trench 14 on the east side of Yucca Mountain, carry a lead isotopic signature that can be explained in terms of local sources. Two isotopically distinguishable--silicate and carbonate--fractions of lead are recognized within the vein system as well as in overlying surficial calcrete deposits. The acid-insoluble silicate fraction is contributed largely from the decomposing Miocene volcanic tuff, which forms the wall rock of the fault zone and is a ubiquitous component of the overlying soil. Lead contained in the silicate fraction approaches in isotopic composition that of the Miocene volcanic rocks of Yucca Mountain, but diverges from it in some samples by being more enriched in uranogenic isotopes. The carbonate fraction of lead in both vein and calcrete samples resides dominantly in the HCl- and CH{sub 3}COOH-soluble calcite. HCl evidently also attacks and removes lead from silicate phases, but the milder CH{sub 3}COOH dissolution procedure oftentimes identifies a significantly more radiogenic lead in the calcite. Wind-blown particulate matter brought to the area from Paleozoic and Late Proterozoic limestones in surrounding mountains may be the ultimate source of the calcite. Isotopically more uniform samples suggest that locally the basaltic ash and other volcanic rock have contributed most of the lead to both fractions of the vein system. An important finding of this study is that the data does not require the more exotic mechanisms or origins that have been proposed for the veins. Instead, the remarkably similar lead isotopic properties of the veins to those of the soil calcretes support their interpretation as a surficial, pedogenic phenomenon.

  14. An in situ generated carbon as integrated conductive additive for hierarchical negative plate of lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, M.; Ganesan, M.; Ambalavanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we report an in situ generated carbon from sugar as additive in the Negative Active Mass (NAM) which enhances the charge-discharge characteristics of the lead-acid cells. In situ formed sugar derived carbon (SDC) with leady oxide (LO) provides a conductive network and excellent protection against NAM irreversible lead sulfation. The effect of SDC and carbon black (CB) added negative plates are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The results show that subtle changes in the addition of carbon to NAM led to subsequent changes on the performance during partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operations in lead-acid cells. Furthermore, SDC added cells exhibit remarkable improvement in the rate capability, active material utilization, cycle performance and charge acceptance compared to that of the conventional CB added cells. The impact of SDC with LO at various synthesis conditions on the electrochemical performance of the negative plate is studied systematically.

  15. Synthesis of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS)-modified activated carbon from risk husk for waste lead (Pb) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Latief, D. N.; Arnelli, Astuti, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Surfactant-modified active carbon (SMAC) has been successfully synthesized from waste rice husk using a series of treatments i.e. carbonization, activation with H3PO4 and surface modification using sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The synthesized SMAC was characterized using SEM-EDX and FTIR. The adsorption results show that the SMAC synthesized using H3PO4 treatment for 8 hours followed with SLS treatment for 5 hours had efficiency and capacity of the waste lead removal of 99.965% and 0.499825 mg.g-1, respectively.

  16. Carbon Sequestration: is Science Leading Policy or Will Policy Direct Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. K.

    2007-12-01

    Climate-related policy is in its infancy on capital hill, as policy makers only recently started to converge on the acceptance that climate change is a credible, scientific reality. Until recently much of the debate and policy decisions have been related to whether or not climate change, or more specifically global warming, is occurring. The climate debate has shifted from discussing the science behind climate change to addressing how we can reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In the 110th Congress, policy makers have come to realize and accept that we, as a nation, are one of the largest global emitters of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Geologic carbon sequestration has gained significant congressional attention and is considered to be one of the most promising carbon mitigation tools. In the present Congress, scientific experts have testified before numerous committees about the various caveats of geologic carbon sequestration. As a result, policy has been and is currently being drafted to address the challenges facing large-scale commercial demonstration of geologic sequestration facilities. Policy has been passed through both the House and Senate that is aimed at increasing funding for basic and advanced research, development, and demonstration of small- to large-scale carbon dioxide injection projects. This legislation is only the beginning of a series of legislation that is under development. In the next year, policy will be introduced that will likely address issues related to pore space and mineral rights ownership, regulatory framework for carbon dioxide transport and injection, long-term injection site monitoring protocol, personal and environmental safety, and liability issues, to name a few. Policy is not limited to the technical aspects of carbon capture, transport, and storage, but is also being developed to help stimulate a market that will be operating under climate constraints. Financial incentives have been proposed that will assist industrial

  17. Pulsed addition of limiting-carbon during Aspergillus oryzae fermentation leads to improved productivity of a recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Swapnil; Wenger, Kevin S; Marten, Mark R

    2003-04-01

    Fungal morphology in many filamentous fungal fermentations leads to high broth viscosity which limits oxygen mass transfer, and often results in reduced productivity. The objective in this study was to determine if a simple, fed-batch, process strategy-pulsed addition of limiting-carbon source-could be used to reduce fungal broth viscosity, and increase productivity of an industrially relevant recombinant enzyme (glucoamylase). As a control, three Aspergillus oryzae fed-batch fermentations were carried out with continuous addition of limiting-carbon. To determine the effect of pulse-feeding, three additional fermentations were carried out with limiting-carbon added in 90-second pulses, during repeated five-minute cycles. In both cases, overall carbon feed-rate was used to control dissolved oxygen concentration, such that increased oxygen availability led to increased addition of limiting-carbon. Pulse-fed fermentations were found to have smaller fungal mycelia, lower broth viscosity, and improved oxygen mass transfer. As a result, more carbon was added to pulse-fed fermentations that led to increased enzyme productivity by as much as 75%. This finding has significant implications for the bioprocessing industry, as a simple process modification which is likely to cost very little to implement in most production facilities, has the potential to substantially increase productivity. PMID:12569630

  18. Polypyrrole/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite for the solid phase extraction of lead(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Sahmetlioglu, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Erkan; Aktas, Ece; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotubes-polypyrrole conducting polymer nanocomposite has been synthesized, characterized and used for the separation and preconcentration of lead at trace levels in water samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection. The analytical parameters like pH, sample volume, eluent, sample flow rate that were affected the retentions of lead(II) on the new nanocomposite were optimized. Matrix effects were also investigated. Limit of detection and preconcentration factors were 1.1 µg L(-1) and 200, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was 25.0mg lead(II) per gram composite. The validation of the method was checked by using SPS-WW2 Waste water Level 2 certified reference material. The method was applied to the determination of lead in water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24401439

  19. Clusters in strong laser fields: Comparison between carbon, platinum, and lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, M.; Teuber, S.; Köller, L.; Köhn, J.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    Carbon and metal clusters are excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses with up to 1016 W/cm2, yielding ionized clusters and highly charged atomic ions. For small carbon clusters and fullerenes the abundance of charged species correlates with the laser power, while for metal clusters the ionization efficiency is additionally strongly affected by the chosen laser pulse width which may result in an enhanced up-charging of the metal particle. In the case of platinum atomic charge states up to z=20 are detected at a pulse duration of about 600 fs. This observation is in accordance with a model based on a multi-plasmon excitation process.

  20. Lead Adsorption into Activated Carbon: A Critical Review of the Literature

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead has been widely used in many industries due to its desirable chemical and physical properties such as its malleability and resistance to corrosion. However, Lead poisoning is a serious health hazard that causes severe damage to multiple target organs including kidney, liver,...

  1. Lead acid battery performance and cycle life increased through addition of discrete carbon nanotubes to both electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Nanjan; Everill, Paul; Swogger, Steven W.; Dubey, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary applications are changing the failure mechanisms of lead acid batteries. Sulfation at the negative electrode, acid stratification, and dendrite formation now precede positive electrode failures such as grid corrosion and active material shedding. To attenuate these failures, carbon has been explored as a negative electrode additive to increase charge acceptance, eliminate sulfation, and extend cycle life. Frequently, however, carbon incorporation decreases paste density and hinders manufacturability. Discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT), also known as Molecular Rebar®, are lead acid battery additives which can be stably incorporated into either electrode to increase charge acceptance and cycle life with no change to paste density and without impeding the manufacturing process. Here, full-scale automotive batteries containing dCNT in the negative electrode or both negative and positive electrodes are compared to control batteries. dCNT batteries show little change to Reserve Capacity, improved Cold Cranking, increased charge acceptance, and enhanced overall system efficiency. Life cycle tests show >60% increases when dCNT are incorporated into the negative electrode (HRPSoC/SBA) and up to 500% when incorporated into both electrodes (SBA), with water loss per cycle reduced >20%. Failure modes of cycled batteries are discussed and a hypothesis of dCNT action is introduced: the dCNT/Had Overcharge Reaction Mechanism.

  2. Zero-valent iron doped carbons readily developed from sewage sludge for lead removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Sun, Xiaoya; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-10-01

    Low-cost but high-efficiency composites of iron-containing porous carbons were prepared using sewage sludge and ferric salts as raw materials. Unlike previous time- and energy-consuming manufacturing procedures, this study shows that pyrolyzing a mixture of sludge and ferric salt can produce suitable composites for lead adsorption. The specific surface area, the total pore volume and the average pore width of the optimal composite were 321m(2)/g, 0.25cm(3)/g, and 3.17nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that ferric salt favored the formation of metallic iron, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups. The result of batch tests indicated that the adsorption capacity of carbons activated with ferric salt could be as high as 128.9mg/g, while that of carbons without activation was 79.1mg/g. The new manufacturing procedure used in this study could save at least 19.5kJ of energy per gram of activated carbon. PMID:26456600

  3. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  4. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  5. The use of activated carbon and graphite for the development of lead-acid batteries for hybrid vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M.; Valenciano, J.; Trinidad, F.; Muñoz, N.

    Future vehicle applications require the development of reliable and long life batteries operating under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) working conditions. This paper updates work carried out to develop spiral wound valve-regulated batteries for vehicles with different hybridisation degrees, ranging from stop-start to mild hybrid applications. In order to develop a battery that can withstand the hard operating conditions that the work at High Rate Partial-State-of-Charge (HRPSoC) implies, it is necessary to modify the negative AM formulation by using special, additives like carbon and graphite that reduce lead sulphate accumulation during HRPSoC cycling within in the negative plate. Several batches of negative active material (NAM) with the addition of graphites of different types, as well as combinations of graphite and activated carbons, have been made on 6 V 24 Ah Spiral wound modules. Electrical results show a dramatic increase of the charge acceptance at different SoC's that for some combinations approach 200%. On the other hand, on cycle life according to EUCAR Power Assist cycling, values in the range 200,000-220,000 cycles have been obtain in most part of the batch. This represents a capacity turnover of 5000-5500 times the nominal capacity. The paper is divided into three parts. The first part is devoted to identify the cause of failure of the negative plate on Power Assist Cycle Life, that turned to be the development of high amounts of lead sulphate and its accumulation on the surface of the plate. The second part covers the addition of carbon and graphite of low SSA to NAM and finally the third part is dedicated to the test of additions of medium/high SSA carbon to NAM with the specific objective of trying to implement the supercapacitor effect inside the battery.

  6. Saccharin: a Lead Compound for Structure-Based Drug Design of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Brian P.; Hendon, Alex M.; Driscoll, Jenna M.; Rankin, Gregory M.; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition. PMID:25614109

  7. Nonlinear Rayleigh waves to detect initial damage leading to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y..; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Singh, P. M.

    2012-05-01

    This research experimentally investigates second harmonic generation of Rayleigh waves propagating through carbon steel samples damaged in a stress corrosion environment. Damage from stress corrosion cracking is of major concern in nuclear reactor tubes and in gas and fuel transport pipelines. For example, certain types of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) account for more failures in steam generator tubes than most other damage mechanisms, yet these cracks do not initiate until late in the structure's life. Thus, there is a need to be able to measure the damage state prior to crack initiation, and it has been shown that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter - the parameter associated with second harmonic generation - is sensitive to microstructural evolution. In this work, samples are immersed in a sodium carbonate-bicarbonate solution, which typically forms in the soil surrounding buried pipelines affected by SCC, and held at yield stress for 5-15 days to the onset of stress corrosion cracking. Measurements of second harmonic generation with Rayleigh waves are taken intermittently to relate cumulative damage prior to macroscopic cracking to nonlinear wave propagation. Experimental results showing changes in second harmonic generation due to stress corrosion damage are presented.

  8. Modified titanium foil's surface by high temperature carbon sintering method as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Zhu, Junsheng

    2014-12-01

    Titanium foil can be a type of ideal material as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery. However, it can't be directly used because it can be oxidized in the high voltage and strong oxidizing conditions. In this paper, we coat the titanium suboxide on the titanium foil surface by means of the high temperature carbon sintering method for the improvement of corrosion resistance of titanium metal and use it as the substrate to bipolar lead-acid battery to study its effect on the battery performances. Modified titanium foils are characterized by SEM, XRD, corrosion resistance test and electronic conductivity test. The electrochemical properties of the bipolar lead-acid battery are investigated by constant current charge/discharge method. The results demonstrate that the titanium foil carbon-sintered at 800 °C for 2 h has the most excellent chemical stability and electronic conductivity. Initial specific capacities of positive active material of bipolar lead-acid battery with modified titanium as the substrate at 0.25C, 0.5C, 1C and 2C discharge rate are 99.29 mAh g-1, 88.93 mAh g-1, 77.54 mAh g-1, and 65.41 mAh g-1. After 50 cycles, the specific capacity of positive active material at 0.5C is 81.36 mAh g-1 and after 100 cycles, the specific capacity at 1C is 61.92 mAh g-1.

  9. Does Iron Fertilization Lead to Enhanced Carbon Sequestration? A Synthesis of Polar Star Results.

    SciTech Connect

    Buesseler, K.O.

    2002-12-01

    This research synthesized activities related to work conducted as part of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) which investigated the effects of iron fertilization on enhanced carbon sequestration. The primary interest was in the fate of sinking particles which carry carbon to the deep ocean, where it can be sequestered from the atmosphere for >100-1000 year time scales. This was accomplished through direct measurements of thorium-234, a naturally occurring particle reactive radionuclide that traces shallow particle export; SF6 measurements to track the position of the Fe fertilized region; and the collection of ancillary data and samples to augment the study of major C, nutrient and elemental budgets as well as appropriate samples for biological study. Results of this work show a small, but progressively increasing flux of particulate organic C to depth as a consequence of Fe fertilization. This is the first data set to show any effect of Fe fertilization on C sequestration in the Southern Ocean. The changes in particle export during SOFeX are significant, but only possible to detect given what is arguably the largest 234Th data set ever collected as part of an oceanographic experiment. Most prior 234Th studies, simply use a steady-state approximation and ignore advective and diffusive fluxes in the calculation of 234Th fluxes. High resolution time-series of average 0-50m 234Th activities in and out of the Southern patch find a clear steady decrease in 234Th flux that is slightly larger in vs. out of the Fe fertilized patch. This decrease must be included in the full 234Th flux calculation and the deliberate tagging of this water mass with SF6 combined with time-series sampling allowed for a careful evaluation of this non-steady state (NSS) term. Likewise, the addition of SF6 allows for the evaluation of vertical exchange (via the gradient of SF6 below the patch) and dilution effects (after correction for atmospheric losses). In most set tings these physical

  10. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM: 1979 PROFICIENCY SURVEYS FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE, SULFATE, NITRATE, LEAD AND HIGH VOLUME FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Quality Assurance Division of the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, administers semiannual Surveys of Analytical Proficiency for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfate, nitrate and lead. Sample material, s...

  11. Environmental forcing does not lead to variation in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, David; Egan, Jocelyn; Hall, Steven; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted fluctuations in the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by soil respiration. These have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., soil temperature), or with synoptic weather events (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of observations to examine these phenomena over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). Measurements included automated soil respiration chambers and automated measurements of the soil gas profile. We found 1) no diel change in the δ13C of the soil surface flux or the CO2 produced in the soil (despite strong diel change in surface flux rate), 2) no change in δ13C following wetting (despite a significant increase in soil flux rate), and 3) no evidence of pressure-induced ventilation of the soil. Measurements of the δ13C of surface CO2 flux agreed closely with the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production calculated using soil profile measurements. Temporal variation in the δ13C of surface flux was relatively minor and unrelated to measured environmental variables. Deep in the soil profile, results conform to established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation, and suggest that sampling soil gas at a depth of several tens of centimeters is a simple and effective way to assess the mean δ13C of the surface flux.

  12. Processes leading to increased soil organic carbon in a Mojave Desert ecosystem under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Evans, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We observed increased soil organic carbon (SOC) following ten years of elevated atmospheric CO2 treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility in the Mojave Desert. Physical and chemical fractions of surface soils collected under the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata (Larrea), and plant interspace were analyzed for particle size, plant-derived n-alkanes, microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) to explore potential mechanisms causing the observed increase in SOC. SOC concentrations under Larrea in bulk soils, coarse particulate organic matter (POM), fine POM and mineral-bound soil organic matter (SOM) under elevated CO2 were greater than those under ambient CO2 by 34%, 45%, 26% and 20%, respectively. Under Larrea, n-alkane concentrations were 52% greater under elevated compared to ambient CO2. Such increases in coarse POM and n-alkane concentrations suggest litter input from Larrea was at least one source for increased SOC under elevated CO2. While there was no significant difference in PLFA abundance between the CO2 treatments, elevated CO2 significantly increased the fungi to bacterial PLFA ratio. In addition, fungal and bacterial NLFA and NLFA 16:1ω5, a biomarker of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2. These observations plus others suggest that Larrea allocated more photosynthate belowground to increased root exudation rather than increased fine root growth under elevated CO2. Thus, increased root exudates and microbial residues as well as episodic increases in litter input from Larrea are mechanisms behind the increased SOC under elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 did not increase SOC in surface soils in plant interspace despite incorporation of CO2 labeled with 13C under elevated CO2.

  13. Impact of lead and sewage sludge on soil microbial biomass and carbon and nitrogen mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    Sewage sludge disposal on arable land is viewed as a method to reduce waste accumulation and to enrich soil fertility. However, such disposal can degrade soil ecosystems due to the presence of potentially harmful substances, such as heavy metals. Pb has assumed greater significance because currently its dispersal through anthropogenic activities has exceeded the inputs from natural sources by about 17 fold. Several soil variables such as texture, organic matter content, clay, cation exchange capacity, soil pH, and CaCO{sub 3} content influence the toxic effects of heavy metals on sol microbes and their activities. Microbes have an essential function in cycling of nutrients through mineralization activities. However, the addition of 375 and 1500 {mu}g Pb g{sup -1} soil in sandy loam and clay loam has been reported to cause a 15% decrease in soil microbial respiration. Contrarily, in an organic soil microbial respiration and enzyme activities were observed to remain unaltered by the addition of 1000 {mu}g Pb g{sup -1} soil. While the nitrification process in a sandy loam soil has been reported to be significantly inhibited at 100 {mu}g Pb g{sup -1} soil, the addition of similar amount of Pb to alluvial and clay loam had no effect on nitrification and ammonifying and nitrifying bacteria. This study assesses the effects of lead and sewages sludge on microbial biomass and mineralization processes in soils of varied texture and organic matter content. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Lead titanate/cyclic carbonate dependence on ionic conductivity of ferro/acrylate blend polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, R.; Vickraman, P.; Subramanian, N. M. V.; Justin, A. Simon

    2016-05-01

    Impedance, XRD, DSC and FTIR studies had been carried out for PVdF-co-HFP/LIBETI based system for three plasticizer (EC/DMC) - filler (PbTiO3) weight ratios. The enhanced conductivity 4.18 × 10-5 Scm-1 was noted for 57.5 wt% -7.5 wt% plasticizer - filler. while blending PEMA to PVdF-co-HFP respectively 7.5: 22.5 wt % (3/7), 15 wt%: 15 wt % (5/5) and 22.5wt %: 7.5 wt % (7/3), the improved conductivity was noted for 3/7 ratio 1.22 × 10-5 S cm-1 and its temperature dependence abide Arrhenius behavior. The intensity of peaks in XRD diffractogram registered dominance of lead titanate, from 2θ = 10° to 80° and absence of VdF crystallites (α+β phase) was noted. In DSC studies, the presence of the exotherm events, filler effect was distinctively seen exhibiting recrystallization of VdF crystallites. In blending PEMA, however, no trace of exotherms was found suggestive of PEMA better inhibiting recrystallization. FTIR study confirmed molecular interactions of various constituents in the vibrational band 500 - 1000 cm-1 both in pristine PVdF-co-HFP and PEMA blended composites with reference to C-F stretching, C-H stretching and C=O carbonyl bands.

  15. Properties of Lithium-11 and Carbon-22 at leading order in halo effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bijaya; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the 11Li and 22C nuclei at leading order (LO) in halo effective field theory (Halo EFT). Using the value of the 22C rms matter radius deduced in Ref. [1] as an input in a LO calculation, we simultaneously constrain the values of the two-neutron (2n) separation energy of 22C and the virtual-state energy of the 20C-neutron system (hereafter denoted 21C). The 1-σ uncertainty of the input rms matter radius datum, along with the theory error estimated from the anticipated size of the higher-order terms in the Halo EFT expansion, gives an upper bound of about 100 keV for the 2n separation energy. We also study the electric dipole excitation of 2n halo nuclei to a continuum state of two neutrons and the core at LO in Halo EFT. We first compare our results with the 11Li data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment and obtain good agreement within the theoretical uncertainty of a LO calculation. We then obtain the low-energy spectrum of B(E1) of this transition at several different values of the 2n separation energy of 22C and the virtual-state energy of 21C. Our predictions can be compared to the outcome of an ongoing experiment on the Coulomb dissociation of 22C to obtain tighter constraints on the two- and three-body energies in the 22C system.

  16. Tree Death Leading To Ecosystem Renewal? Forecasting Carbon Storage As Eastern Forests Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, P.; Gough, C. M.; Bohrer, G.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The future trajectory of North American carbon (C) stocks remains uncertain as a subset of maturing trees die in mixed deciduous forests of the U.S. Midwest and East transitioning from early to middle and late succession. We are studying disturbance-structure-function relationships of aging forests in northern Michigan using long-term ecological and meteorological C cycling studies, a large-scale disturbance experiment, a 200-year forest chronosequence, and flux comparisons across three tower sites. We find that ecosystem responses to mortality are characterized by several processes that affect structure-function relationships and alter the way ecosystem functioning interacts with meteorological forcing. We subjected 39 ha of forest to moderate experimental disturbance, similar to that of age-related or climatically induced tree mortality. We found that the mortality of a third of all canopy trees minimally altered the balance between forest C uptake and release, as growth-limiting light and nitrogen resources were rapidly reallocated from dead and dying trees to undisturbed trees. Although disturbance-induced mortality increased soil N mineralization rates, nitrification, and denitrification, N exports from soils remained low. Upper canopy gap formation and a rise in structural complexity allowed increased photosynthetic contribution of sub-canopy vegetation to compensate for the death of canopy dominant trees. However, we found large differences between the transpirational response of maples and oaks to VPD and soil moisture, which led to relative declines in maple transpiration post-disturbance. These hydrologic differences may affect a species' ability to compete for resources following such a disturbance. Changes to canopy structure had a relatively small effect on roughness length and the turbulence forcing of fluxes from the canopy. We currently are studying how tree mortality driven changes in canopy structure affects within-canopy resource distribution and

  17. Beneficial effects of activated carbon additives on the performance of negative lead-acid battery electrode for high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Ding, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Xianzhang; Chen, Jian; Yang, Yusheng

    2013-11-01

    Experiments are made with negative electrode of 2 V cell and 12 V lead-acid battery doped with typical activated carbon additives. It turns out that the negative electrode containing tens-of-micron-sized carbon particles in NAM exhibits markedly increased HRPSoC cycle life than the one containing carbon particles with much smaller size of several microns or the one containing no activated carbon. The improved performance is mainly attributed to the optimized NAM microstructure and the enhanced electrode reaction kinetics by introducing appropriate activated carbon. The beneficial effects can be briefly summarized from three aspects. First, activated carbon acts as new porous-skeleton builder to increase the porosity and active surface of NAM, and thus facilitates the electrolyte diffusion from surface to inner and provides more sites for crystallization/dissolution of lead sulfate; second, activated carbon plays the role of electrolyte supplier to provide sufficient H2SO4 in the inner of plate when the diffusion of H2SO4 from plate surface cannot keep pace of the electrode reaction; Third, activated carbon acts as capacitive buffer to absorb excess charge current which would otherwise lead to insufficient NAM conversion and hydrogen evolution.

  18. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  19. Neutron production in collisions between carbon nuclei of energy 2 GeV per nucleon and carbon, aluminum, copper, cadmium, and lead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Yurevich, V. I.; Yakovlev, R. M.; Lyapin, V. G.

    2012-02-15

    Double-differential cross sections for neutron production were measured by the time-of-flight method for the interactions between carbon nuclei of energy 2 GeV per nucleon and carbon, aluminum, copper, cadmium, and lead nuclei. These measurements were performed for angles of 30 Degree-Sign , 53 Degree-Sign , and 90 Degree-Sign in the neutron-energy range fromseveral hundred keVunits to 300MeV. The phenomenologicalmodel of four moving sources was used as a basis in analyzing experimental results and in estimating the contribution to neutron emission from various reaction stages. The temperature parameters determined from the slope of the neutron energy spectra proved to be 22 {+-} 2 MeV for a hot source (fireball) and 4.5 {+-} 0.3 MeV for the stage of thermal fragmentation of highly excited heavy nuclear residues. The relative contribution of these two sources to the total neutron yield is independent of the type of the target nucleus and is about 42%, on average.

  20. Characterization of lead (Ⅱ)-containing activated carbon and its excellent performance of extending lead-acid battery cycle life for high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Pengyang; Zhao, Ruirui; Zhang, Rongbo; Yi, Fenyun; Shi, Guang; Li, Aiju; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-07-01

    In this work, lead (Ⅱ)-containing activated carbon (Pb@C) is prepared as the additive of negative active mass (NAM), aiming to enhance the electrochemical characteristics of the lead-acid battery. The characters of the Pb@C materials and their electrochemical properties are characterized by XRD, SEM, back-scattering electron image (BESI) and electrochemical methods. The lead (Ⅱ) ions disperse well in the carbon bulk of the obtained Pb@C materials as observed, and these materials exhibit remarkable higher specific capacitance and higher hydrogen evolution over-potential compared with original carbons. Many 2 V lead-acid batteries are assembled manually in our lab, and then the batteries are disassembled after formation and high-rate-partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) cycling. Results manifest that the Pb@C additives exhibit high affinity to lead and act as a porous-skeleton in the formation process as well as under HRPSoC cycling conditions, leading to the small and fine formation of PbSO4 particles and accordingly higher active material utilization rate more than 50%, better cycling performance and charging acceptance. Besides, excellent cycle performances of these batteries have great relationship with the dazzling hydrogen evolution performance of Pb@C materials. A possible working mechanism is also proposed based on the testing data in this paper.

  1. Lead sensors development and antimicrobial activities based on graphene oxide/carbon nanotube/poly(O-toluidine) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aftab Aslam Parwaz; Khan, Anish; Rahman, Mohammed M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide/carbon nanotube/poly (O-toluidine) (GO-CNT-POT) nanocomposite was prepared by a situ polymerization method and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The antibacterial activity of the obtained GO-CNT-POT nanocomposite was also evaluated against Gram positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli and antibiotics (Amoxicillin) using the agar plate. The antibacterial study showed that the GO-CNT-POT was found to be most effective against both B. subtilis and E. coli respectively which was significant compared to the amoxicillin and the simultaneously GO-CNT-POT nanocomposite were fabricated onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using conducting coating binders by I-V technique, where the total analytical parameters were measured for the development of sensitive lead sensors (Pb(2+)). The GO-CNT-POT nanocomposite were deposited on flat-GCE (surface area: ∼0.0316cm(2)) to result in a sensor that has a fast response to selective Pb(2+) ions in buffer system. Features including sensitivity, detection limit, reproducibility, linear dynamic range, selectivity, and electrochemical performances were investigated in details with the GO-CNT-POT nanocomposite fabricated GCE electrodes. The calibration plot is linear (r(2): 0.9907) over the large concentration range (0.1nM to 1.0mM). The sensitivity and detection limit is calculated as 8.53164μAcm(-2)μM(-1) and 89.0 pM (at a signal-to-noise-ratio, SNR of 3) respectively. PMID:27112981

  2. Factors Leading to Variability of Emission Factors, Single Scattering Albedo, and Elemental Carbon Fraction from Biofuel Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, C. A.; Bond, T. C.; Conway, S.; Osorto Pinel, B.; Maccarty, N.

    2006-12-01

    In a three-year study of field and laboratory emissions of traditional and improved biofuel cookstoves, we found that field measured particulate emissions of actual cooking events average 2.5 times those of reproduced lab emissions. Emission factors are highly dependent on the care and skill of the operator, and the resulting combustion; these do not appear to be accurately reproduced in the lab. The single scatter albedo (SSA) of the emissions is very low in both lab and field measurements, averaging about 0.3 for lab tests and around 0.5 for field tests, indicating that the primary particles are climate warming. In Honduras, improved stoves generally had lower emission factors than traditional stoves. Over the course of 3 summers we have measured field emissions from traditional cookstoves, relatively-new improved cookstoves, and "broken-in" improved cookstoves. For improved stoves, the presence of a chimney generally resulted in lower emission factors but left the SSA unaffected. Traditional cookstoves had an average PM emission factor of 8.5 g/kg significantly larger than previous studies. Particulate emission factors for improved cookstoves without and with chimneys averaged about 5.7 g/kg and 3.5 g/kg respectively. The elemental carbon (EC) fraction of PM varied significantly between individual tests, but averaged about 25% for each of the categories. Wood type affects on the PM emission factor, the SSA of the emissions and EC fraction. During our 2006 field measurements, we performed multiple emission measurements on the same stove while varying the fuel. Pine wood generally produced more PM than oak per kilogram of fuel. Additionally, Ocote, a resinous pitch pine often used in Central America for lighting fires, produces emissions which have a very low SSA and high EC fraction. We present the elemental carbon fraction and mass emission factors for different type of stoves and testing conditions. We summarize the characteristics of the particles emitted

  3. Metabolic influence of lead on polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production and phosphate uptake in activated sludge fed with glucose or acetic acid as carbon source.

    PubMed

    You, Sheng-Jie; Tsai, Yung-Pin; Cho, Bo-Chuan; Chou, Yi-Hsiu

    2011-09-01

    Sludge in a sequential batch reactor (SBR) system was used to investigate the effect of lead toxicity on metabolisms of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) communities fed with acetic acid or glucose as their sole carbon source, respectively. Results showed that the effect of lead on substrate utilization of both PAOs and GAOs was insignificant. However, lead substantially inhibited both of phosphate release and uptake of PAOs. In high concentration of acetic acid trials, an abnormal aerobic phosphate release was observed instead of phosphate uptake and the release rate increased with increasing lead concentration. Results also showed that PAOs could normally synthesize polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in the anaerobic phase even though lead concentration was 40 mg L(-1). However, they could not aerobically utilize PHB normally in the presence of lead. On the other hand, GAOs could not normally metabolize polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) in both the anaerobic and aerobic phases. PMID:21704513

  4. Enhanced performance of starter lighting ignition type lead-acid batteries with carbon nanotubes as an additive to the active mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Rotem; Ziv, Baruch; Banerjee, Anjan; Cahana, Beni; Luski, Shalom; Aurbach, Doron

    2015-11-01

    Addition of various carbon materials into lead-acid battery electrodes was studied and examined in order to enhance the power density, improve cycle life and stability of both negative and positive electrodes in lead acid batteries. High electrical-conductivity, high-aspect ratio, good mechanical properties and chemical stability of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, unmodified and mofified with carboxylic groups) position them as viable additives to enhance the electrodes' electrical conductivity, to mitigate the well-known sulfation failure mechanism and improve the physical integration of the electrodes. In this study, we investigated the incorporation-effect of carbon nanotubes (CNT) to the positive and the negative active materials in lead-acid battery prototypes in a configuration of flooded cells, as well as gelled cells. The cells were tested at 25% and 30% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The positive effect of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) utilization as additives to both positive and negative electrodes of lead-acid batteries was clearly demonstrated and is explained herein based on microscopic studies.

  5. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  6. Application of Polypyrrole Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Layer for Detection of Mercury, Lead and Iron Ions Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A. S. M.; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H. N.; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd. Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  7. A novel low-temperature dendritic cyclotrimerization of 2,6-diacetyl pyridine leading to mesoporous carbon containing pyridine rings

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Chong M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2009-07-01

    A simple, direct synthesis of a mesoporous carbon containing pyridine rings is described. This synthesis utilizes the SiCl4 induced cyclotrimerization of 2,6-diacetylpyridine to make a dendritic polymer, built of alternating benzene and pyridine rings. The cyclotrimerization allows for a high degree of crosslinking to take place at low temperatures stabilizing the mesostructure and allowing the carbonization to be carried out at only 600°C, the lowest temperature reported to date for an N-doped mesoporous carbon. The functional mesoporous carbon so formed was found to have a surface area of 1275 m2/g, 35Å pores, and contain 6.8% N.

  8. Mechanism of action of electrochemically active carbons on the processes that take place at the negative plates of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Rogachev, T.; Nikolov, P.; Petkova, G.

    It is known that negative plates of lead-acid batteries have low charge acceptance when cycled at high rates and progressively accumulate lead sulphate on high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation in hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) applications. Addition of some carbon or graphite forms to the negative paste mix improves the charge efficiency and slows down sulfation of the negative plates. The present investigation aims to elucidate the contribution of electrochemically active carbon (EAC) additives to the mechanism of the electrochemical reactions of charge of the negative plates. Test cells are assembled with four types of EAC added to the negative paste mix in five different concentrations. Through analysis of the structure of NAM (including specific surface and pore radius measurements) and of the electrochemical parameters of the test cells on HRPSoC cycling, it is established that the electrochemical reaction of charge Pb 2+ + 2e - → Pb proceeds at 300-400 mV lower over-potentials on negative plates doped with EAC additives as compared to the charge potentials of cells with no carbon additives. Hence, electrochemically active carbons have a highly catalytic effect on the charge reaction and are directly involved in it. Consequently, the reversibility of the charge/discharge processes is improved, which eventually leads to longer battery cycle life. Thus, charging of the negative plates proceeds via a parallel mechanism on the surfaces of both Pb and EAC particles, at a higher rate on the EAC phase. Cells with EAC in NAM have the longest cycle life when their NAM specific surface is up to 4 m 2 g -1 against 0.5 m 2 g -1 for the lead surface. The proposed parallel mechanism of charge is verified experimentally on model Pb/EAC/PbSO 4 and Pb/EAC electrodes. During the charge and discharge cycles of the HRPSoC test, the EAC particles are involved in dynamic adsorption/desorption on the lead sulfate and lead surfaces. Another effect of electrochemically

  9. An experimental investigation of lead zirconate titanate--epoxy-multi-walled carbon nanotube bulk and flexible thick film composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sankha

    Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are needed for a wide range of applications from physiological measurement to industrial monitoring systems. Sensors that can be easily integrated with the host, while maintaining high sensitivity and reliability over a wide range of frequencies are not readily feasible and economical with homogenous piezoelectric materials. It is well known that two-phase piezoelectric-epoxy composites offer several benefits over their single phase counterparts, as the properties of the constituent phases combine to improve the range of applicability. However, the piezoelectric properties of these materials suffer from the electrically insulating properties of the epoxy matrix. The electrical properties of the matrix may be enhanced by including electrically conducting inclusions however, less is known about the mechanisms that drive the changes in these properties. Hence, this experimental investigation of sensor materials builds on the previous work in two-phase piezoelectric composites, where the aims are to understand the roles that specific fabrication parameters and inclusion composition play in determining the piezoelectric and dielectric performance the aforementioned composites. The materials under investigation will be comprised of Lead Zirconate Titanate, Epofix Cold-Setting Embedding Resin and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e. the piezoelectric, epoxy and electrical inclusions respectively. Our work suggests that inclusion of MWCNTs enhances the piezoelectric and dielectric properties with increasing volume fraction below the percolation threshold. This work seeks to understand how the processing parameters: poling temperature, poling type and particle distribution influence the contact resistance, space charge double layer at the piezoelectric and conductor interfaces and electric field intensity at the piezoelectric boundary, which all ultimately dictate the piezoelectric and dielectric performance of the composite materials

  10. Carbon sequestration in croplands is mainly driven by management leading to increased net primary production - evidence from long-term field experiments in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kätterer, Thomas; Bolinder, Martin Anders; Börjesson, Gunnar; Kirchmann, Holger; Poeplau, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    carbon stocks not always lead to net sequestration of atmospheric CO2 and that C sequestration not always leads to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. The consequences of different land use and management are discussed, taking into account two critical boundaries - the limited area of agricultural land on Earth and requirements to produce sufficient food, fibres and energy for a growing population.

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Amorphous Carbon Spheres@Graphitic Shells Derived from Pitch: New Structure Leads to Robust Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingtao; Wang, Luxiang; Xia, Wei; Jia, Dianzeng; Zhao, Zongbin

    2016-02-12

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous hollow carbon spheres (NHCS) consisting of hybridized amorphous and graphitic carbon were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition with pitch as raw material. Treatment with HNO3 vapor was performed to incorporate oxygen-containing groups on NHCS, and the resulting NHCS-O showed excellent rate capacity, high reversible capacity, and excellent cycling stability when tested as the anode material in lithium-ion batteries. The NHCS-O electrode maintained a reversible specific capacity of 616 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at a current rate of 500 mA g(-1) , which is an increase of 113 % compared to the pristine hollow carbon spheres. In addition, the NHCS-O electrode exhibited a reversible capacity of 503 mAh g(-1) at a high current density of 1.5 A g(-1) . The superior electrochemical performance of NHCS-O can be attributed to the hybrid structure, high N and O contents, and rich surface defects. PMID:26751009

  12. Development of highly sensitive electrochemical genosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-chitosan-bismuth and lead sulfide nanoparticles for the detection of pathogenic Aeromonas.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, António Maximiano; Abdalhai, Mandour H; Ji, Jian; Xi, Bing-Wen; Xie, Jun; Sun, Jiadi; Noeline, Rasoamandrary; Lee, Byong H; Sun, Xiulan

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we reported the construction of new high sensitive electrochemical genosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-chitosan-bismuth complex (MWCNT-Chi-Bi) and lead sulfide nanoparticles for the detection of pathogenic Aeromonas. Lead sulfide nanoparticles capped with 5'-(NH2) oligonucleotides thought amide bond was used as signalizing probe DNA (sz-DNA) and thiol-modified oligonucleotides sequence was used as fixing probe DNA (fDNA). The two probes hybridize with target Aeromonas DNA (tDNA) sequence (fDNA-tDNA-szDNA). The signal of hybridization is detected by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) after electrodeposition of released lead nanoparticles (PbS) from sz-DNA on the surface of glass carbon electrode decorated with MWCNT-Chi-Bi, which improves the deposition and traducing electrical signal. The optimization of incubation time, hybridization temperature, deposition potential, deposition time and the specificity of the probes were investigated. Our results showed the highest sensibility to detect the target gene when compared with related biosensors and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The detection limit for this biosensor was 1.0×10(-14) M. We could detect lower than 10(2) CFU mL(-1) of Aeromonas in spiked tap water. This method is rapid and sensitive for the detection of pathogenic bacteria and would become a potential application in biomedical diagnosis, food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:25127474

  13. Basanite-nephelinite suite from early Kilauea: Carbonated melts of phlogopite-garnet peridotite at Hawaii's leading magmatic edge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Coombs, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    A basanite-nephelinite glass suite from early submarine Kilauea defines a continuous compositional array marked by increasing concentrations of incompatible components with decreasing SiO2, MgO, and Al2O3. Like peripheral and post-shield strongly alkalic Hawaiian localities (Clague et al. in J Volcanol Geotherm Res 151:279-307, 2006; Dixon et al. in J Pet 38:911-939, 1997), the early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite glasses are interpreted as olivine fractionation products from primary magnesian alkalic liquids. For early Kilauea, these were saturated with a garnet-phlogopite-sulfide peridotite assemblage, with elevated dissolved CO2 contents responsible for the liquids' distinctly low-SiO2 concentrations. Reconstructed primitive liquids for early Kilauea and other Hawaiian strongly alkalic localities are similar to experimental 3 GPa low-degree melts of moderately carbonated garnet lherzolite, and estimated parent magma temperatures of 1,350-1,400??C (olivine-liquid geothermometry) match the ambient upper mantle geotherm shortly beneath the base of the lithosphere. The ???3 GPa source regions were too hot for stable crystalline carbonate and may have consisted of ambient upper mantle peridotite containing interstitial carbonate-silicate or carbonatitic liquid, possibly (Dixon et al. in Geochem Geophys Geosyst 9(9):Q09005, 2008), although not necessarily, from the Hawaiian mantle plume. Carbonate-enriched domains were particularly susceptible to further melting upon modest decompression during upward lithospheric flexure beneath the advancing Hawaiian Arch, or by conductive heating or upward drag by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite suite has a HIMU-influenced isotopic character unlike other Hawaiian magmas (Shimizu et al. in EOS Tran Amer Geophys Union 82(47): abstr V12B-0962, 2001; Shimizu et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 66(15A):710, 2002) but consistent with oceanic carbonatite involvement (Hoernle et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol

  14. Basanite-nephelinite suite from early Kilauea: carbonated melts of phlogopite-garnet peridotite at Hawaii's leading magmatic edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Kimura, J.-I.; Coombs, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    A basanite-nephelinite glass suite from early submarine Kilauea defines a continuous compositional array marked by increasing concentrations of incompatible components with decreasing SiO2, MgO, and Al2O3. Like peripheral and post-shield strongly alkalic Hawaiian localities (Clague et al. in J Volcanol Geotherm Res 151:279-307, 2006; Dixon et al. in J Pet 38:911-939, 1997), the early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite glasses are interpreted as olivine fractionation products from primary magnesian alkalic liquids. For early Kilauea, these were saturated with a garnet-phlogopite-sulfide peridotite assemblage, with elevated dissolved CO2 contents responsible for the liquids’ distinctly low-SiO2 concentrations. Reconstructed primitive liquids for early Kilauea and other Hawaiian strongly alkalic localities are similar to experimental 3 GPa low-degree melts of moderately carbonated garnet lherzolite, and estimated parent magma temperatures of 1,350-1,400°C (olivine-liquid geothermometry) match the ambient upper mantle geotherm shortly beneath the base of the lithosphere. The ~3 GPa source regions were too hot for stable crystalline carbonate and may have consisted of ambient upper mantle peridotite containing interstitial carbonate-silicate or carbonatitic liquid, possibly (Dixon et al. in Geochem Geophys Geosyst 9(9):Q09005, 2008), although not necessarily, from the Hawaiian mantle plume. Carbonate-enriched domains were particularly susceptible to further melting upon modest decompression during upward lithospheric flexure beneath the advancing Hawaiian Arch, or by conductive heating or upward drag by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite suite has a HIMU-influenced isotopic character unlike other Hawaiian magmas (Shimizu et al. in EOS Tran Amer Geophys Union 82(47): abstr V12B-0962, 2001; Shimizu et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 66(15A):710, 2002) but consistent with oceanic carbonatite involvement (Hoernle et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol

  15. Effect of Phosphate Inhibitors on the Formation of Lead Phosphate/Carbonate Nanorods, Microrods and Dendritic Structures

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are several factors which influence the corrosion rate of lead, which in turn morphs into different crystal shapes and sizes. Some of the important factors are: alkalinity, pH, calcium, orthophosphate and silica. Low to moderate alkalinity decreases corrosion rates, while ...

  16. Ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres as a new adsorbent for fast solid phase extraction of trace copper and lead from sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples.

    PubMed

    Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Yavuz, Emre; Şahan, Halil; Çolak, Süleyman Gökhan; Ocakoğlu, Kasım; Kaçer, Mehmet; Patat, Şaban

    2016-10-01

    In this study a new adsorbent, ionic liquid (1,8-naphthalene monoimide bearing imidazolium salt) coated carbon nanospheres, was synthesized for the first time and it was used for the solid phase extraction of copper and lead from various samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The ionic liquid, carbon nanospheres and ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface area and zeta potential measurements. Various parameters for method optimization such as pH, adsorption and elution contact times, eluent volume, type and concentration, centrifuge time, sample volume, adsorption capacity and possible interfering ion effects were tested. The optimum pH was 6. The preconcentration factor, detection limits, adsorption capacity and precision (as RSD%) of the method were found to be 300-fold, 0.30µgL(-1), 60mgg(-1) and 1.1% for copper and 300-fold, 1.76µgL(-1); 50.3mgg(-1) and 2.2%, for lead, respectively. The effect of contact time results showed that copper and lead were adsorbed and desorbed from the adsorbent without vortexing. The equilibrium between analyte and adsorbent is reached very quickly. The method was rather selective for matrix ions in high concentrations. The accuracy of the developed method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference materials (LGC6016 Estuarine Water, Reference Material 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, and BCR-482 Lichen) and by spiking sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples. PMID:27474302

  17. Size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles lead to a variant behavior in the unfolding dynamics of human carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Irem; Lundqvist, Martin; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence revealed that HCAs adsorb to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, however the dynamics of the unfolding at the nanoparticle surfaces drastically vary with the polarity. The size of the nanoparticles has opposite effects depending on the polarity of the nanoparticle surface. The apolar nanoparticles induce seconds timescale structural rearrangements whereas polar nanoparticles induce hours timescale structural rearrangements on the same charged HCA variant. Here, a simple model is proposed where the difference in the timescales of adsorption is correlated with the energy barriers for initial docking and structural rearrangements which are firmly regulated by the surface polarity. Near-UV circular dichorism (CD) further supports that both protein variants undergo structural rearrangements at the nanoparticle surfaces regardless of being "hard" or "soft". However, the conformational changes induced by the apolar surfaces differ for each HCA isoform and diverge from the previously reported effect of silica nanoparticles. PMID:26445221

  18. Allelopathic effects of toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum lead to release of dissolved organic carbon and increase in bacterial biomass.

    PubMed

    Uronen, Pauliina; Kuuppo, Pirjo; Legrand, Catherine; Tamminen, Timo

    2007-07-01

    The haptophyte Prymnesium parvum has lytic properties, and it affects coexisting phytoplankton species through allelopathy. We studied the effect of P. parvum allelochemicals on the lysis of the nontoxic and nonaxenic cryptomonad Rhodomonas salina and the consequent release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Changes in production, cell density, and biomass of associated bacteria were measured over 12 h. Six different combinations of P. parvum and R. salina cultures, their cell- and bacteria-free filtrates, and growth media as controls were used in the experiments. When P. parvum and R. salina cells were mixed, a significant increase in DOC concentration was measured within 30 min. Bacterial biomass increased significantly during the next 6 to 12 h when R. salina was mixed either with the P. parvum culture or the cell-free P. parvum filtrates (allelochemicals only). In contrast, bacterial biomass did not change in the treatments without the allelopathic action (without R. salina cells). Blooms of P. parvum alter the functioning of the planktonic food web by increasing carbon transfer through the microbial loop. In addition, P. parvum may indirectly benefit from the release of DOC as a result of its ability to ingest bacteria, by which it can acquire nutrients during limiting conditions. PMID:17345140

  19. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 2: January through March 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Shane, R.; Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 2 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of the four carbons that have been added to the negative active material of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for the purposes of this study. The four carbons selected for this study were a graphitic carbon, a carbon black, an activated carbon, and acetylene black. The morphology, crystallinity, and impurity contents of each of the four carbons were analyzed; results were consistent with previous data. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown.

  20. Size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles lead to a variant behavior in the unfolding dynamics of human carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Irem; Lundqvist, Martin; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence revealed that HCAs adsorb to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, however the dynamics of the unfolding at the nanoparticle surfaces drastically vary with the polarity. The size of the nanoparticles has opposite effects depending on the polarity of the nanoparticle surface. The apolar nanoparticles induce seconds timescale structural rearrangements whereas polar nanoparticles induce hours timescale structural rearrangements on the same charged HCA variant. Here, a simple model is proposed where the difference in the timescales of adsorption is correlated with the energy barriers for initial docking and structural rearrangements which are firmly regulated by the surface polarity. Near-UV circular dichorism (CD) further supports that both protein variants undergo structural rearrangements at the nanoparticle surfaces regardless of being ``hard'' or ``soft''. However, the conformational changes induced by the apolar surfaces differ for each HCA isoform and diverge from the previously reported effect of silica nanoparticles.The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino

  1. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption-elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L- 1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64-22.9 μg Pb L- 1).

  2. Decreased glycolate oxidase activity leads to altered carbon allocation and leaf senescence after a transfer from high CO2 to ambient air in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dellero, Younès; Jossier, Mathieu; Glab, Nathalie; Oury, Céline; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Hodges, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic and physiological analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana glycolate oxidase (GOX) mutant leaves were performed to understand the development of the photorespiratory phenotype after transfer from high CO2 to air. We show that two Arabidopsis genes, GOX1 and GOX2, share a redundant photorespiratory role. Air-grown single gox1 and gox2 mutants grew normally and no significant differences in leaf metabolic levels and photosynthetic activities were found when compared with wild-type plants. To study the impact of a highly reduced GOX activity on plant metabolism, both GOX1 and GOX2 expression was knocked-down using an artificial miRNA strategy. Air-grown amiRgox1/2 plants with a residual 5% GOX activity exhibited a severe growth phenotype. When high-CO2-grown adult plants were transferred to air, the photosynthetic activity of amiRgox1/2 was rapidly reduced to 50% of control levels, and a high non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching was maintained. (13)C-labeling revealed that daily assimilated carbon accumulated in glycolate, leading to reduced carbon allocation to sugars, organic acids, and amino acids. Such changes were not always mirrored in leaf total metabolite levels, since many soluble amino acids increased after transfer, while total soluble protein, RuBisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), and chlorophyll amounts decreased in amiRgox1/2 plants. The senescence marker, SAG12, was induced only in amiRgox1/2 rosettes after transfer to air. The expression of maize photorespiratory GOX in amiRgox1/2 abolished all observed phenotypes. The results indicate that the inhibition of the photorespiratory cycle negatively impacts photosynthesis, alters carbon allocation, and leads to early senescence in old rosette leaves. PMID:26896850

  3. Morphology-dependent NiO modified glassy carbon electrode surface for lead(II) and cadmium(II) detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Wen, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Dai; Yu, Jingui; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2016-02-01

    Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surfaces have been modified with different NiO morphologies consisting of rods NiO, flakes NiO and balls NiO prepared via the hydrothermal synthesis method for Pb(II) and Cd(II) detection by using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). Meanwhile, the typical cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), BET surface area and adsorption property of the modified electrode surfaces have been investigated to evaluate their electrochemical detection effect. Results show that balls NiO modified GCE can get the optimal detection ability for its highest detection sensitivity to Pb(II) (13.46 A M-1) and Cd(II) (5.10 A M-1), the lowest detection limit (DL) to Pb(II) (0.08 μM) and Cd(II) (0.07 μM) as well as the superior linear relativity. In addition, an enhanced current at redox peaks, lower electron transfer resistance, larger BET surface area and stronger adsorption capacity have been confirmed for the balls NiO modified GCE surface. Finally, excellent stability and reproducibility of balls NiO modified electrodes for Pb(II) and Cd(II) detection have also been proved via the SWASV responses.

  4. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  5. Comparison of biomass and lipid production under ambient carbon dioxide vigorous aeration and 3% carbon dioxide condition among the lead candidate Chlorella strains screened by various photobioreactor scales.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Jensen, Travis; Noel, Eric; Andlay, Gunjan; Rosenberg, Julian N; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Guarnieri, Michael T; Oyler, George A

    2015-12-01

    Chlorella species from the UTEX collection, classified by rDNA-based phylogenetic analysis, were screened based on biomass and lipid production in different scales and modes of culture. The lead candidate strains of C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 and C. vulgaris UTEX 395 and 259 were compared between conditions of vigorous aeration with filtered atmospheric air and 3% CO2 shake-flask cultivation. The biomass of UTEX 1230 produced 2 times higher at 652 mg L(-1) dry weight under both ambient CO2 vigorous aeration and 3% CO2 conditions, while UTEX 395 and 259 under 3% CO2 increased to 3 times higher at 863 mg L(-1) dry weight than ambient CO2 vigorous aeration. The triacylglycerol contents of UTEX 395 and 259 increased more than 30 times to 30% dry weight with 3% CO2, indicating that additional CO2 is essential for both biomass and lipid accumulation in UTEX 395 and 259. PMID:26398668

  6. Comparison of Biomass and Lipid Production under Ambient Carbon Dioxide Vigorous Aeration and 3% Carbon Dioxide Condition Among the Lead Candidate Chlorella Strains Screened by Various Photobioreactor Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Jensen, Travis; Noel, Eric; Andlay, Gunjan; Rosenberg, Julian N.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Oyler, George A.

    2015-09-01

    Chlorella species from the UTEX collection, classified by rDNA-based phylogenetic analysis, were screened based on biomass and lipid production in different scales and modes of culture. Lead candidate strains of C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 and C. vulgaris UTEX 395 and 259 were compared between conditions of vigorous aeration with filtered atmospheric air and 3% CO2 shake-flask cultivation. We found that the biomass of UTEX 1230 produced 2 times higher at 652 mg L-1 dry weight under both ambient CO2 vigorous aeration and 3% CO2 conditions, while UTEX 395 and 259 under 3% CO2 increased to 3 times higher at 863 mg L-1 dry weight than ambient CO2 vigorous aeration. The triacylglycerol contents of UTEX 395 and 259 increased more than 30 times to 30% dry weight with 3% CO2, indicating that additional CO2 is essential for both biomass and lipid accumulation in UTEX 395 and 259.

  7. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 1: October through December 2010).

    SciTech Connect

    Shane, R.; Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails conducting a thorough literature review to establish the current level of understanding of the mechanisms through which carbon additions to the negative active material improve valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Most studies have entailed phenomenological research observing that the carbon additions prevent/reduce sulfation of the negative electrode; however, no understanding is available to provide insight into why certain carbons are successful while others are not. Impurities were implicated in one recent review of the electrochemical behavior of carbon additions. Four carbon samples have been received from East Penn Manufacturing and impurity contents have been analyzed. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the

  8. Conversion from forests to pastures in the Colombian Amazon leads to contrasting soil carbon dynamics depending on land management practices.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Diego; Sitch, Stephen; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Pedroni, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    Strategies to mitigate climate change by reducing deforestation and forest degradation (e.g. REDD+) require country- or region-specific information on temporal changes in forest carbon (C) pools to develop accurate emission factors. The soil C pool is one of the most important C reservoirs, but is rarely included in national forest reference emission levels due to a lack of data. Here, we present the soil organic C (SOC) dynamics along 20 years of forest-to-pasture conversion in two subregions with different management practices during pasture establishment in the Colombian Amazon: high-grazing intensity (HG) and low-grazing intensity (LG) subregions. We determined the pattern of SOC change resulting from the conversion from forest (C3 plants) to pasture (C4 plants) by analysing total SOC stocks and the natural abundance of the stable isotopes (13) C along two 20-year chronosequences identified in each subregion. We also analysed soil N stocks and the natural abundance of (15) N during pasture establishment. In general, total SOC stocks at 30 cm depth in the forest were similar for both subregions, with an average of 47.1 ± 1.8 Mg C ha(-1) in HG and 48.7 ± 3.1 Mg C ha(-1) in LG. However, 20 years after forest-to-pasture conversion SOC in HG decreased by 20%, whereas in LG SOC increased by 41%. This net SOC decrease in HG was due to a larger reduction in C3-derived input and to a comparatively smaller increase in C4-derived C input. In LG both C3- and C4-derived C input increased along the chronosequence. N stocks were generally similar in both subregions and soil N stock changes during pasture establishment were correlated with SOC changes. These results emphasize the importance of management practices involving low-grazing intensity in cattle activities to preserve SOC stocks and to reduce C emissions after land-cover change from forest to pasture in the Colombian Amazon. PMID:26929394

  9. Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Mark A

    2014-08-27

    The project started in September, 2012 with the goal of scaling up from the existing laboratory scale process for producing carbon fiber (CF) from polyolefin (PO) based precursor fiber using a Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization process. The award was used to develop a process that was capable of producing market development quantities of CF from PO precursor fiber at a rate of 4 kg/h of CF. The CF would target properties that met or exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicles Technology [1] standard; i.e., 172 GPa modulus and 1.72 GPa strength at greater than or equal to 1% strain. The Dow proprietary process was capable of meeting and exceeding these targets properties. Project DE-EE0005760 resulted from a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Dow and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and DOE. In the first budget period, the main goal was to design a sulfonation-desulfonation market development plant capable of stabilizing PO precursor fiber at a rate of 5 kg/h using a sulfonation solution. The detailed design, location, and cost estimate were determined as scheduled in the Project Management Plan (PMP). In parallel with this DOE award project was a fundamentals and economic evaluation funded by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). The goal of the Dow sponsored project was to finalize the mass balances, energy balances, and levelized cost to produce CF using the Dow process. A Go-No-Go decision was scheduled in June, 2013 based on the findings of the DOE sponsored scale up project and the Dow sponsored project. In June, 2013, Dow made the No-Go decision to halt and abandon the Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation process for stabilizing PO precursor fibers for the manufacturing of CF. This No-Go decision was identified in the original proposal and at the start of this project, and the decision was made as scheduled. The decision was based

  10. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Cadmium, Copper, and Lead using A Carbon Paste Electrode Modified with Carbamoylphosphonic Acid Self-Assembled Monolayer on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana ); Lin, Yuehe ); Fryxell, Glen E. ); Busche, Brad J. )

    2004-01-30

    A new sensor was developed for simultaneous detection of cadmium (Cd2+), copper (Cu2+), and lead (Pb2+), based on the voltammetric response at a carbon paste electrode modified with carbamoylphosphonic acid (acetamide phosphonic acid) self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous silica (Ac-Phos SAMMS). The adsorptive stripping voltammetry technique involves preconcentration of the metal ions onto Ac-Phos SAMMS under an open circuit, then electrolysis of the preconcentrated species, followed by a square wave potential sweep towards positive values. Factors affecting the preconcentration process were investigated. The voltammetric responses increased linearly with the preconcentration time from 1 to 30 minutes or with metal ion concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ppb. The responses also evolved in the same fashion as adsorption isotherm in the pH range of 2-6. The metal detection limits were 10 ppb after 2 minutes preconcentration and improved to 0.5 ppb after 20 minutes preconcentration.

  12. Using sediment fingerprinting to understand the controls on the fluvial export of sediment associated lead and particulate carbon from eroding peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Rothwell, James

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of carbon as well as a sink of industrial legacy pollutants such as lead (Pb). However, large areas of peatlands are damaged and degraded which have implications for the long-term storage of carbon and Pb in these settings. One concern surrounds the transfer of Pb contaminated sediment to the fluvial system, and previous work has found evidence that substantial concentrations of Pb may be released as an initial 'lead-flush' during the early stages of storm events. However, the underlying controls on sediment production and how these may influence the timing of contaminated sediment export during hydrological events are unclear. This study utilises a sediment source fingerprinting approach to assess the controls of sediment production and mobilisation during storm events in the Peak District National Park, southern Pennines (UK). The blanket peats of the Peak District embody many problems and pressures faced by peatlands globally, and are amongst the most heavily eroded and contaminated in the world. Suspended sediment was collected using time integrated mass samplers (TIMS), deployed for the first time in a vertical stack, to allow the relative changes in the sediment sources during changing discharge conditions in a small headwater stream to be assessed. This study has found evidence of suspended sediment enriched in peat-derived material early in storms, thus confirming accepted models of organic sediment exhaustion during the course of storm events, and that organic sediment transport becomes limited between storms which occur in quick succession. The timing of this organic sediment exhaustion is linked to catchment wetness and rainfall intensity. The contaminated surface layer of the peat is releasing Pb into the fluvial system throughout the year, but a flushing of Pb early in storm events is only evident under certain meteorological and hydrological conditions. The findings of this study pose questions over future sediment

  13. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  14. Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassay of Phosphorylated p53 Using Protein-Cage Templated Lead Phosphate and Carbon Nanospheres for Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Bao, Yuanwu; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Shin, Yongsoon; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-11-20

    Phosphorylated p53 at serin 15 (phospho-p53-15) is a potential biomarker of Gamma-radiation exposure. In this paper, we described a new magnetic particles (MPs)-based electrochemical immunoassay of human phospho-p53-15 using carbon nanospheres (CNS) and protein-cage templated lead phosphate nanoparticles for signal amplification. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by three aspects: 1) The protein-cage nanoparticle (PCN) and p53-15 signal antibody (p53-15 Ab2) are linked to CNS (PCNof each apoferritin; 3) MPs capture a large amount of primary antibodies. Using apoferritin templated metallic phosphate instead of enzyme as label has the advantage of eliminating the addition of mediator or immunoreagents and thus makes the immunoassay system simpler. The subsequent stripping voltammetric analysis of the released lead ions were detected on a disposable screen printed electrode. The response current was proportional to the phospho-p53-15 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 20 ng mL-1 with detection limit of 0.01 ng mL-1. This method shows a good stability, reproducibility and recovery.

  15. Selective dispersive micro solid-phase extraction using oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified with 1,10-phenanthroline for preconcentration of lead ions.

    PubMed

    Feist, Barbara

    2016-10-15

    A dispersive micro solid phase extraction (DMSPE) method for the selective preconcentration of trace lead ions on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs) with complexing reagent 1,10-phenanthroline is presented. Flame and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS, ET-AAS) were used for detection. The influence of several parameters such as pH, amount of sorbent and 1,10-phenanthroline, stirring time, concentration and volume of eluent, sample flow rate and sample volume was examined using batch procedures. Moreover, effects of inorganic matrix on recovery of the determined elements were studied. The experiment shows that foreign ions did not influence on recovery of the determined element. The method characterized by high selectivity toward Pb(II) ions. Lead ions can be quantitatively retained at pH 7 from sample volume up to 400mL and then eluent completely with 2mL of 0.5molL(-1)HNO3. The detection limits of Pb was 0.26μgL(-1) for F-AAS and 6.4ngL(-1) for ET-AAS. The recovery of the method for the determined lead was better than 97% with relative standard deviation lower than 3.0%. The preconcentration factor was 200 for F-AAS and 100 for ET-AAS. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was found to be about 350mgg(-1). The method was applied for determination of Pb in fish samples with good results. Accuracy of the method was verified using certified reference material DOLT-3 and ERM-BB186. PMID:27173531

  16. Windblown Lead Carbonate as the Main Source of Lead in Blood of Children from a Seaside Community: An Example of Local Birds as “Canaries in the Mine”

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, Brian; Korsch, Michael; Matisons, Martin; Douglas, Charles; Gillam, Lindsay; McLaughlin, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Background In late 2006, the seaside community in Esperance, Western Australia, was alerted to thousands of native bird species dying. The source of the lead was thought to derive from the handling of Pb carbonate concentrate from the Magellan mine through the port of Esperance, begun in July 2005. Concern was expressed for the impact of this process on the community. Objective This study was designed to evaluate the source of Pb in blood of a random sample of the community using Pb isotope ratios. Methods The cohort comprised 49 children (48 < 5 years of age) along with 18 adults (> 20 years of age) with a bias toward higher blood lead (PbB) values to facilitate source identification. Results Mean PbB level of the children was 7.5 μg/dL (range, 1.5–25.7 μg/dL; n = 49; geometric mean, 6.6 μg/dL), with four children whose PbB was > 12 μg/dL. The isotopic data for blood samples lay around two distinct arrays. The blood of all children analyzed for Pb isotopes contained a contribution of Pb from the Magellan mine, which for young children ranged from 27% up to 93% (mean, 64%; median, 71%). Subtraction of the ore component gave a mean background PbB of 2.3 μg/dL. Several children whose PbB was > 9 μg/dL and most of the older subjects have complex sources of Pb. Conclusions The death of the birds acted as a sentinel event; otherwise, the exposure of the community, arising from such a toxic form of Pb, could have been tragic. Isotopic data and mineralogic and particle size analyses indicate that, apart from the recognized pathway of Pb exposure by hand-to-mouth activity in children, the inhalation pathway could have been a significant contributor to PbB for some of the very young children and in some parents. PMID:19165402

  17. Sulphur limitation provokes physiological and leaf proteome changes in oilseed rape that lead to perturbation of sulphur, carbon and oxidative metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The decline in industrial emissions of sulphur (S) has led to a sulphate depletion in soil resulting in an alteration of crop performance. In oilseed rape, an S deficiency dramatically reduced the seed yield and/or quality. Paradoxically, little is known about the impact of sulphate limitation on oilseed rape leaf metabolism, despite it being a key determinant of growth. In order to identify the metabolic processes involved in the oilseed rape response to S restriction, an analysis of the young leaf proteome combined with a physiological study was carried out at the vegetative stage. Results S limitation does not significantly reduce the total shoot biomass but inhibits growth and photosynthesis of young leaves. This photosynthesis decline is not due to a decrease in chlorophyll content, which remains similar to Control. The increase in anthocyanins and H2O2 content in young leaves of S-limited plants suggests that S restriction leads to an oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis at 35 d of S limitation also revealed the induction of 12-oxophitodienoate reductase and ACC synthase, respectively involved in jasmonate and ethylene biosynthesis, two phytohormones that could be implicated in oxidative stress. Proteins involved in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism were also modulated by S restriction. In particular, the decrease in plastocyanin and ferredoxin–NADP reductase suggests that H2O2 accumulation is associated with perturbation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The accumulation of chloroplastic Cu-Zn SOD reinforces the idea that an oxidative stress probably occurs in the chloroplast. Proteomic results suggest that the maintenance of chlorophyll in S-limited conditions is related to an accumulation of Water Soluble Chlorophyll binding Proteins, involved in the protection of chlorophyll against ROS. The accumulation of the catalytic α–subunit of chloroplastic ATP synthase suggests that energy production is maintained. Conclusion S

  18. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  19. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  20. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  1. A sensitive, selective and rapid determination of lead(II) ions in real-life samples using an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-graphite reinforced carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Hamsawahini, Kunashegaran; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ahamad, Rahmalan; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a sensitive and cost-effective electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO) on graphite reinforced carbon (GRC) was developed for the detection of lead (Pb(II)) ions present in the real-life samples. A film of graphene oxide (GO) was drop-casted on GRC and their electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), amperometry and square wave voltammetry (SWV). Factors influencing the detection of Pb(II) ions, such as grades of GRC, constant applied cathodic potential (CACP), concentration of hydrochloric acid and drop-casting drying time were optimised. GO is irreversibly reduced in the range of -0.7 V to -1.6 V vs Ag/AgCl (3 M) in acidic condition. The results showed that the reduction behaviour of GO contributed to the high sensitivity of Pb(II) ions detection even at nanomolar level. The ErGO-GRC showed the detection limit of 0.5 nM and linear range of 3-15 nM in HCl (1 M). The developed electrode has potential to be a good candidate for the determination of Pb(II) ions in different aqueous system. The proposed method gives a good recovery rate of Pb(II) ions in real-life water samples such as tap water and river water. PMID:26452915

  2. Applying carbon dioxide, plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium and EDTA can enhance the phytoremediation efficiency of ryegrass in a soil polluted with zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junkang; Feng, Renwei; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Ruigang

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the use of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54 (PGPR) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to enhance the phytoextraction efficiency of ryegrass in response to multiple heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soil containing zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). All of the single or combined CO2, PGPR and EDTA treatments promoted ryegrass growth. The stimulation of ryegrass growth by CO2 and PGPR could primarily be attributed to the regulation of photosynthesis rather than decreased levels of Zn, As and Cd in the shoots. Most treatments seemed to reduce the Zn, As and Cd contents in the shoots, which might be associated with enhanced shoot biomass, thus causing a "dilution effect" regarding their levels. The combined treatments seemed to perform better than single treatments in removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from soil, judging from the larger biomass and relatively higher total amounts (TAs) of Zn, As, Cd and Pb in both the shoots and roots. Therefore, we suggest that the CO2 plus PGPR treatment will be suitable for removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soils using ryegrass as a phytoremediation material. PMID:24762567

  3. Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II) in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Tarigh, Ghazale; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II). The properties of MMWCNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). This adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE) in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. MMWCNT, carrying target metals, was easily separated from the aqueous solutions with the help of an external magnet; so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After extraction and collection of MMWCNT, the adsorbed analytes were eluted and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different sorption/desorption parameters. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits and enhancement factors of the proposed method for Pb and Mn were 1.0 and 0.6 µg L(-1), 390 and 697 respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of Pb(II) and Mn (II) contents in lipstick, rice samples and accuracy was evaluated analyzing a certified reference material Seronorm(™) Urine LOT NO2525. PMID:24054657

  4. Amino-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Lead to Successful Ring-Opening Polymerization of Poly(ε-caprolactone): Enhanced Interfacial Bonding and Optimized Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Roumeli, Eleftheria; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Tsanaktsis, Vasilios; Terzopoulou, Zoe; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the synthesis, structural characteristics, interfacial bonding, and mechanical properties of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with small amounts (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 wt %) of amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) are reported. This method allows the creation of a covalent-bonding zone on the surface of nanotubes, which leads to efficient debundling and therefore satisfactory dispersion and effective load transfer in the nanocomposites. The high covalent grafting extent combined with the higher crystallinity provide the basis for a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties, which was detected in the composites with up to 1 wt % f-MWCNTs. Increasing filler concentration encourages intrinsic aggregation forces, which allow only minor grafting efficiency and poorer dispersion and hence inferior mechanical performance. f-MWCNTs also cause a significant improvement on the polymerization reaction of PCL. Indeed, the in situ polymerization kinetics studies reveal a significant decrease in the reaction temperature, by a factor of 30-40 °C, combined with accelerated the reaction kinetics during initiation and propagation and a drastically reduced effective activation energy. PMID:25950403

  5. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  6. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in the ... a health problem. Lead is everywhere, including dirt, dust, new toys, and old house paint. Unfortunately, you ...

  7. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  8. Amino and thiol modified magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the simultaneous removal of lead, zinc, and phenol from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Li, Shujun; Yu, Haitao; Zou, Zongshu; Hou, Xingang; Shen, Fengman; Li, Chuantong; Yao, Xiayan

    2016-04-01

    The novel functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was synthesized by reacting trimethoxysilylpropanethiol (MPTs), hydrazine, ammonium ferrous sulfate, and ammonium ferric sulfate in sequence as efficient ways to introduce Fe3O4, amino and thiol groups onto the nanotubes sidewalls. The magnetic MWCNTs composite material (N2H4-SH-Fe3O4/o-MWCNTs) was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermo-gravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and magnetization curve. The results revealed that MPTs and hydrazine were coated on the surface of N2H4-SH-Fe3O4/o-MWCNTs. A series of batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study the experimental conditions, such as pH, contact time, initial concentrations and temperatures, which affected the adsorption process. The adsorption experiment results showed that the maximum equilibrium adsorption capacity of N2H4-SH-Fe3O4/o-MWCNTs for lead, zinc and phenol was 195.81 mg/g, 169.89 mg/g and 38.97 mg/g at pH 6, respectively. The adsorption isotherm was better fitted by the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetics was consistent with pseudo-second order kinetics model. Furthermore, thermodynamic data showed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. These results indicated that N2H4-SH-Fe3O4/o-MWCNTs may be promising surface modified materials for removing heavy metal ions and phenol from aqueous solutions.

  9. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  10. Electrochemical sensors for the simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium and lead using a Nafion/ionic liquid/graphene composite modified screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Chaiyo, Sudkate; Mehmeti, Eda; Žagar, Kristina; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon; Kalcher, Kurt

    2016-04-28

    A simple, low cost, and highly sensitive electrochemical sensor, based on a Nafion/ionic liquid/graphene composite modified screen-printed carbon electrode (N/IL/G/SPCE) was developed to determine zinc (Zn(II)), cadmium (Cd(II)), and lead (Pb(II)) simultaneously. This disposable electrode shows excellent conductivity and fast electron transfer kinetics. By in situ plating with a bismuth film (BiF), the developed electrode exhibited well-defined and separate peaks for Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). Analytical characteristics of the BiF/N/IL/G/SPCE were explored with calibration curves which were found to be linear for Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) concentrations over the range from 0.1 to 100.0 ng L(-1). With an accumulation period of 120 s detection limits of 0.09 ng mL(-1), 0.06 ng L(-1) and 0.08 ng L(-1) were obtained for Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively using the BiF/N/IL/G/SPCE sensor, calculated as 3σ value of the blank. In addition, the developed electrode displayed a good repeatability and reproducibility. The interference from other common ions associated with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) detection could be effectively avoided. Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was applied to detect the trace metal ions in drinking water samples with satisfactory results which demonstrates the suitability of the BiF/N/IL/G/SPCE to detect heavy metals in water samples and the results agreed well with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. PMID:27046207

  11. Sulfur- and carbon-isotope composition of the ores and rocks of the lead-zinc deposits of the Sardana ore node (Southeastern Yakutia)

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, L.N.; Zairi, N.M.; Ponomarev, V.G.; Ruchkin, G.V.; Tychinskii, A.A.

    1980-10-01

    Variations in sulfur isotopes from the sulfides of ores and rocks, and also carbon isotopes of the carbonate rocks of the Sardana ore node were examined. The deposition of the ores probably took place from solutions (brines of subsurface waters), heated in the thermal field of dikes and rising along fault zones. During the reduction of the oxidized forms of sulfur and transportation of the ore-forming elements, carbon dioxide gases, associated with petroleum occurrences, played a probable role.

  12. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes ...

  13. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  14. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  15. Determination of lead(II) sorption capacity of hazelnut shell and activated carbon obtained from hazelnut shell activated with ZnCl2.

    PubMed

    Şencan, Aziz; Karaboyacı, Mustafa; Kılıç, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the Pb(+2) adsorption capacities of hazelnut shell and activated carbon obtained from hazelnut shell. It also aimed to determine the effect of ZnCl2 in the activation process. The hazelnut was pyrolyzed at 250 and 700 °C. For determining the capture speed of the adsorbents, the pseudo-first- and second-order kinetic studies were performed. The Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to determine adsorption equilibrium. The surface characterization of hazelnut shell and activated carbon was determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and FTIR spectrum. Pb(+2) adsorption capacity of obtaining activated carbon was determined by ICP-OES analysis. The raw hazelnut shell's BET surface area is 5.92 m(2)/g and the surface area of activated carbons which is pyrolyzed at 250 and 700 °C were determined (270.2 and 686.7 m(2)/g, respectively. The surface area of hazelnut shell, which pyrolyzed at 700 °C after being activated with ZnCl2, was determined to be 736.49 m(2)/g. Results show that physical adsorption process is dominant for the activated carbon pyrolysis at 700 °C but the chemical adsorption is dominant for the activated carbon pyrolysis at lower degrees and for raw hazelnut shell. PMID:24801293

  16. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (FY11 Quarter 4: July through September 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney; Enos, David George

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 4 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails the initiation of high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling of the carbon enhanced batteries. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within the plates after 1k and 10k cycles were documented, illustrating the changes which take place in the early life of the carbon containing batteries, and as the battery approaches failure due to hard sulfation for the control battery. Longer term cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) continues, and will progress into FY12. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO2) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown in a graph. In addition to the aforementioned hybrid device, carbon has also been added directly to

  17. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney; Enos, David George

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

  18. Lead Pencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    A study, undertaken to determine the lead content of paint on various pencils in the Goddard supply system, is reported. The survey found that lead content varied from .04 mg per pencil for carmine colored pencils to approximately 43 mg per pencil for yellow colored pencils. Results also show that yellow pencils had higher lead content than other colors analyzed. More detailed results are given in tabular form.

  19. DABCO-catalyzed ring opening of activated cyclopropanes and recyclization leading to γ-lactams with an all-carbon quaternary center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoxia; Li, Ling; Liang, Fushun; Liu, Qun

    2014-09-18

    A novel and efficient method for the construction of γ-lactams with an all-carbon quaternary center is developed via a DABCO-catalyzed reaction of EWG-activated cyclopropanecarboxamides and electron-deficient alkenes. The process involves sequential ring-opening of activated cyclopropanes, intermolecular Michael addition and intramolecular aza-cyclization. PMID:25068593

  20. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  1. Metal-Free Oxidative Nitration of α-Carbon of Carbonyls Leads to One-Pot Synthesis of Thiohydroximic Acids from Acetophenones.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Shashikant U; Mukhopadhyay, Sushobhan; Priyanka, Kumari; Batra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    A metal-free nitration of the α-C-H to carbonyl in propiophenones was achieved with I2/NaNO2 in the presence of an oxidant in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the medium. Conversely under similar conditions, reaction of acetophenones produced thiohydroximic acids via a radical-based cascade event which involves oxidative nitration of the α-carbon to a carbonyl followed by Michael addition of the thiomethyl group from DMSO and subsequent rearrangement. Besides DMSO, the scope of the reaction encompasses other symmetrical and unsymmetrical dialkylsulfoxides. PMID:27541178

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and metal-organic framework nanocomposites as novel hybrid electrode materials for the determination of nano-molar levels of lead in a lab-on-valve format.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Yichun; Xie, Jing; Ge, Huali; Hu, Xiaoya

    2013-09-01

    Metal-organic frameworks have been the subject of intense research because of their unique physicochemical properties. The presented study investigates the application of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and metal-organic frameworks (MWCNTs@Cu3(BTC)2) nanoparticles-modified electrode for the determination of trace levels of lead. The nanocomposites were prepared by solvothermal synthesis and characterized in detail. The experimental procedure was carried out by accumulating lead on the electrode surface and subsequently measuring with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry in a lab-on-valve format. The main parameters affecting the analytical performance, including the amount of MWCNTs@Cu3(BTC)2 suspension, supporting electrolyte and its pH, stripping mode, and flow rate, have been investigated in detail. Under the optimum conditions, the oxidation peak current displayed a calibration response for lead over a concentration range from 1.0 × 10(-9) to 5.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) with a excellent detection limit of 7.9 × 10(-10) mol L(-1). The relative standard deviation of 7 successive scans was 3.10% for 1.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) lead. The established method showed a great improvement in sensitivity and sample throughput for lead analysis. PMID:23853779

  3. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  4. Determination of the cross section of the proton, pion and neutron inelastic interaction with lead and carbon nuclei at 0.5 - 5.0 TeV energies (PION experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keropian, M. I.; Martirosov, R. M.; Avakian, V. V.; Karagjozian, G. V.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Ovsepian, G. G.; Sokhoyan, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results on the cross section of the single pion, proton and neutron inelastic interaction with carbon and lead nuclei in the 0.5 to 5.0 TeV energy interval obtained on the PION installation (Mount Aragats, Armenia, 3250 m) are presented. For this purpose the (N pi)/(N p) and inelastic (p Fe)/(pi Fe) ratios measured directly on the installation as well as the calculated inelastic (p A)/(pi A) dependence on the target nucleus atomic numbers were used.

  5. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Recovery of lead from lead paste in spent lead acid battery by hydrometallurgical desulfurization and vacuum thermal reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunjian; Qiu, Keqiang

    2015-06-01

    Lead sulfate, lead oxides and lead metal are the main component of lead paste in spent lead acid battery. When lead sulfate was desulfurized and transformed into lead carbonate by sodium carbonate, lead metal and lead oxides remained unchanged. Lead carbonate is easily decomposed to lead oxide and carbon dioxide under high temperature. Namely, vacuum thermal process is the reduction reaction of lead oxides. A compatible environmental process consisted of hydrometallurgical desulfurization and vacuum thermal reduction to recycle lead was investigated in this research. Lead paste was firstly desulfurized with sodium carbonate, by which, the content of sulfur declined from 7.87% to 0.26%. Then, the desulfurized lead paste was reduced by charcoal under vacuum. Under the optimized reaction conditions, i.e., vacuum thermal reduction at temperature 850°C under 20 Pa for 45 min, a 22.11×10(-2) g cm(-2) min(-1) reduction rate, and a 98.13% direct recovery ratio of fine lead (99.77%) had been achieved, respectively. PMID:25818382

  7. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  8. Contribution of lead from calcium supplements to blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, B L; Mizon, K J; Palmer, J M; Korsch, M J; Taylor, A J

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to determine the contribution of lead to blood from consumption of calcium supplements approximating the recommended daily intakes over a 6-month period. Subjects were males and females ages 21 to 47 years (geometric mean 32 years) with a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 2.5 microg/dL. They were subdivided into three groups. One treatment group (n = 8) was administered a complex calcium supplement (carbonate/phosphate/citrate) and the other treatment group (n = 7) calcium carbonate. The control group (n = 6) received no supplement. The lead isotopic compositions of the supplements were completely different from those of the blood of the subjects, allowing us easily to estimate contribution from the supplements. The daily lead dose from the supplements at 100% compliance was about 3 microg Pb. Three blood samples were taken at 2-month intervals before treatment to provide background values, and three were taken during treatment. Subjects in the treatment group were thus their own controls. Lead isotopic compositions for the complex supplement showed minimal change during treatment compared with pretreatment. Lead isotopic compositions in blood for the calcium carbonate supplement showed increases of up to 0.5% in the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratio, and for all isotope ratios there was a statistically significant difference between baseline and treatment (p < 0.005). The change from baseline to treatment for the calcium carbonate supplement differed from that for both the control group and the group administered the complex supplement. Blood lead concentrations, however, showed minimal changes. Variations in blood lead levels over time did not differ significantly between groups. Our results are consistent with earlier investigations using radioactive and stable lead tracers, which showed minimal gastrointestinal absorption of lead in the presence of calcium (+/- phosphorus) in adults. Even though there is no discernible increase in

  9. A sucrose-binding site provides a lead towards an isoform-specific inhibitor of the cancer-associated enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Aggarwal, Mayank; Mahon, Brian P; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) isoform IX (CA IX) is an extracellular zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), thereby playing a role in pH regulation. The majority of normal functioning cells exhibit low-level expression of CA IX. However, in cancer cells CA IX is upregulated as a consequence of a metabolic transition known as the Warburg effect. The upregulation of CA IX for cancer progression has drawn interest in it being a potential therapeutic target. CA IX is a transmembrane protein, and its purification, yield and crystallization have proven challenging to structure-based drug design, whereas the closely related cytosolic soluble isoform CA II can be expressed and crystallized with ease. Therefore, we have utilized structural alignments and site-directed mutagenesis to engineer a CA II that mimics the active site of CA IX. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of this CA IX mimic in complex with sucrose is presented and has been refined to a resolution of 1.5 Å, an Rcryst of 18.0% and an Rfree of 21.2%. The binding of sucrose at the entrance to the active site of the CA IX mimic, and not CA II, in a non-inhibitory mechanism provides a novel carbohydrate moiety binding site that could be further exploited to design isoform-specific inhibitors of CA IX. PMID:26457530

  10. Tuning the structure and solubility of nanojars by peripheral ligand substitution, leading to unprecedented liquid-liquid extraction of the carbonate ion from water into aliphatic solvents.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Basil M; Calco, Brice; Mezei, Gellert

    2016-05-28

    Nanojars, a novel class of neutral anion-incarcerating agents of the general formula [Cu(II)(OH)(pz)]n (Cun; n = 27-31, pz = pyrazolate anion), efficiently sequester various oxoanions with large hydration energies from water. In this work, we explore whether substituents on the pyrazole ligand interfere with nanojar formation, and whether appropriate substituents could be employed to tune the solubility of nanojars in solvents of interest, such as long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons (solvent of choice for large-scale liquid-liquid extraction processes) and water. To this end, we conducted a comprehensive study using 40 different pyrazole ligands, with one, two or three substituents in their 3-, 4- and 5-positions. The corresponding nanojars are characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and/or electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results show that Cun-nanojars with various substituents in the pyrazole 4-position, including long chains, phenyl and CF3 groups, can be obtained. Straight chains are also tolerated at the pyrazole 3-position, and favor the Cu30-nanojar. Homoleptic nanojars, however, could not be obtained with phenyl or CF3 groups. Nevertheless, if used in mixture with the parent non-substituted pyrazole, sterically hindered pyrazoles do form heteroleptic nanojars. With 3,5-disubstituted pyrazoles, only heteroleptic nanojars are accessible. The crystal structure of novel nanojars (Bu4N)2[CO3⊂{Cu30(OH)30(3,5-Me2pz)y(pz)30-y}] (y = 14 and 15) is presented. We find that in contrast to the parent nanojar, which is insoluble in aliphatic solvents and water, nanojars with alkyl substituents are soluble in saturated hydrocarbon solvents, whereas nanojars based on novel pyrazoles, functionalized with oligoether chains, are readily soluble in water. Liquid-liquid extraction of carbonate from water under basic pH is presented for the first time. PMID:27048621

  11. Application of poly 1,8-diaminonaphthalene/multiwalled carbon nanotubes-COOH hybrid material as an efficient sorbent for trace determination of cadmium and lead ions in water samples.

    PubMed

    Nabid, Mohammad Reza; Sedghi, Roya; Behbahani, Mohammad; Arvan, Behnoush; Heravi, Majid M; Oskooie, Hossein Abdi

    2014-07-01

    Poly 1,8-diaminonaphthalene/multiwalled carbon nanotubes-COOH hybrid material as an effective sorbents in solid phase extraction has been developed for the separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at trace levels in environmental water samples. The results indicate that the novel nanocomposite show a high affinity for these heavy metals due to the presence of several good extractive sites, which are introduced to the synthesized nanocomposite The maximum adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for cadmium and lead ions was found to be 101.2 and 175.2 mg g(-1) , respectively. The detection limits of this method were 0.09 and 0.7 ng ml(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. PMID:24895274

  12. Absorption of different lead compounds

    PubMed Central

    Barltrop, D.; Meek, F.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of relative absorption of dietary lead by rats is described. The influence of age, weight and dose rate has been determined and using standard conditions the tissue lead content of blood, kidney and femur are significantly correlated with each other and are a function of ingested lead. Eight lead compounds were evaluated using this technique and the findings related to lead acetate as a reference compound. Of the inorganic preparations studied, lead carbonate (basic) and metallic lead showed a twelve-fold difference in absorption, with the remaining compounds giving intermediate values. The absorption of lead from four organic compounds was determined from diets containing 7·5% corn oil added to the standard diet. Lead tallate was absorbed to the same degree as lead acetate, but lesser absorptions resulted from lead octoate, naphthenate and alsynate. The addition of corn oil to a final concentration of 7·5% of the diet enhanced the absorption of lead acetate. PMID:1208290

  13. Combined processing of lead concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasov, V. L.; Paretskii, V. M.; Sidorin, G. N.; Travkin, V. F.

    2013-06-01

    A combined scheme of processing of lead concentrates with the production of pure metallic lead and the important components containing in these concentrates is considered. This scheme includes sulfating roasting of the lead concentrates and two-stage leaching of the formed cinder with the formation of a sulfate solution and lead sulfate. When transformed into a carbonate form, lead sulfate is used for the production of pure metallic lead. Silver, indium, copper, cadmium, nickel, cobalt, and other important components are separately extracted from a solution. At the last stage, zinc is extracted by either extraction followed by electrolytic extraction of a metal or the return of the forming solution of sulfuric acid to cinder leaching.

  14. Study of electrochemically active carbon, Ga2O3 and Bi2O3 as negative additives for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries working under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Baishuang; Wu, Jinzhu; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemically active carbon (EAC), Gallium (III) oxide (Ga2O3) and Bismuth (III) oxide (Bi2O3) are used as the negative additives of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries to prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) conditions, and their effects on the cycle life of VRLA batteries are investigated. It is found that the addition of EAC in negative active material can restrain the sulfation of the negative plates and prolong the cycle performance of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. It is also observed that the addition of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in EAC can effectively increase the overpotential of hydrogen evolution on EAC electrodes, and decrease the evolution rate of hydrogen. An appropriate addition amount of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in the negative plates of VRLA batteries can decrease the cut-off charging voltage, increase the cut-off discharging voltage, and prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. The battery added with 0.5% EAC and 0.01% Ga2O3 in negative active material shows a lowest cut-off charging voltage and a highest cut-off discharging voltage under HRPSoC conditions, and its' cycle life reaches about 8100 cycles which is at least three times longer than that without Ga2O3.

  15. THE EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ON LEAD SOLUBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Difficulties in predicting and controlling lead corrosion are encountered by hundreds of water systems across the country. Inorganic carbonate, sulfate, silicate, orthophosphate, pH, total organic carbon, temperature and the type/amount of chlorine residual are all known factors ...

  16. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  17. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  18. Where Will LEAD Lead? An Update on My LEAD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    Issues in the future of a federal collaborative program, Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD), are discussed in this paper. Problems attributed to LEAD are its antagonistic posture to educational administration programs in higher education and political conflicts of interest. Methodology involved analysis of successful LEAD…

  19. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  20. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  1. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  2. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children who ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the environment, ...

  3. Novel lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composite materials for possible applications as positive electrode grid in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolshina, L. A.; Yolshina, V. A.; Yolshin, A. N.; Plaksin, S. V.

    2015-03-01

    Novel lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composites which melt at temperature of the melting point of lead were investigated as possible positive current collectors for lead acid batteries in sulfuric acid solution. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, difference scanning calorimetry, cyclic voltammetry and prolonged corrosion tests were employed to characterize the effect of the newly proposed lead-carbon metallic composites on the structure and electrochemical properties of positive grid material. Both lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composite materials show the similar electrochemical characteristics to metallic lead in the voltage range where the positive electrodes of lead acid batteries operate. It has been shown that carbon both as graphene and graphite does not participate in the electrochemical process but improve corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of both metallic composite materials. No products of interaction of lead with sulfuric acid were formed on the surface of graphene and graphite so as it was not found additional peaks of carbon discharge on voltammograms which could be attributed to the carbon. Graphene inclusions in lead prevent formation of leady oxide nanocrystals which deteriorate discharge characteristics of positive electrode of LAB. Both lead-graphene alloy and lead-graphite metallic composite proved excellent electrochemical and corrosion behavior and can be used as positive grids in lead acid batteries of new generation.

  4. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  5. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake and subsequent release. The bulk turnover rates for compact bone are about 2% per year and 8% for spine. Turnover activity varies with age and health. Even though lead approximates calcium, radium, strontium, barium, fluorine, and other bone seekers, the rates for each are different. A simple, two-pool (bone and blood) kinetic model is presented with proposed numerical values for the changes in blood lead levels that occur with changes in turnover rates. Two approaches are offered to further quantify lead turnover. One involves a study of subjects with known past exposure. Changes in the ratio of blood lead to bone lead with time would reflect the course of bone lead availability. Also, stable isotopes and subjects who move from one geographical area to another offer opportunities. Sequential isotope measurements would indicate how much of the lead in blood is from current exposure or bone stores, distinct from changes in absorption or excretion. PMID:2040248

  6. Coronary Sinus Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Edmond M; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2015-12-01

    Expanded indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy and the increasing incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device infection have led to an increased need for coronary sinus (CS) lead extraction. The CS presents unique anatomical obstacles to successful lead extraction. Training and facility requirements for CS lead extraction should mirror those for other leads. Here we review the indications, technique, and results of CS lead extraction. Published success rates and complications are similar to those reported for other leads, although multiple techniques may be required. Re-implantation options may be limited, which should be incorporated into pre-procedural decision making. PMID:26596810

  7. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead soldered cans goes into effect. If imported wine containers have a lead foil wrapper, wipe the ... a towel moistened with lemon juice, vinegar, or wine before using. DO NOT store wine, spirits, or ...

  8. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in some containers and cooking utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially ... leach out into the liquid. Other important recommendations: Paint over old leaded paint if it is in ...

  9. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water and requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports, which include information about lead amounts, are available to consumers. For ...

  10. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  11. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  12. Solving the lead dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the widespread problem of lead poisoning among children. The perils of deleading are addressed and several methods of deleading currently in use are detailed and analyzed. These include the traditional method of burning or sanding off leaded paint, the Baltimore Model involving extensive refabrication of infected dwellings, and encapsulation by which leaded surfaces in the home are covered to prevent the escape of lead dust.

  13. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  14. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  15. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  16. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  17. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  18. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  19. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  20. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the Lead Poisoning Home Checklist (PDF) . Top of page What do I do if I think my child or I have been exposed to lead? Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local ...

  1. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  2. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  3. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  4. Lead Poison Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  5. Lead poisoning: case studies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J N; Taylor, A; Bennett, P N

    2002-05-01

    Early clinical features of lead toxicity are non-specific and an occupational history is particularly valuable. Lead in the body comprises 2% in the blood (t1/2 35 days) and 95% in bone and dentine (t1/2 20-30 years). Blood lead may remain elevated for years after cessation from long exposure, due to redistribution from bone. Blood lead concentration is the most widely used marker for inorganic lead exposure. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration in blood usefully reflects lead exposure over the prior 3 months. Symptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) or in any event >3.8 micromol l-1 (80 microg dl-1) should receive sodium calciumedetate i.v., followed by succimer by mouth for 19 days. Asymptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) may be treated with succimer alone. Sodium calciumedetate should be given with dimercaprol to treat lead encephalopathy. PMID:11994050

  6. Chemisorption effects on colloidal lead nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Henglein, A.

    1999-10-28

    A stable aqueous lead sol (10 nm particles) is formed upon the {gamma}-irradiation of Pb(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} in the presence of (poly)ethyleneimine. Lead nanoparticles have an absorption band at 218 nm with {epsilon} = 3.2 x 10{sup 4} M{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}; the band appears at the wavelength that is expected for a surface plasmon oscillation. The changes in the shape of the absorption band, which occur upon the interaction of the nanoparticles with various solutes, are described and interpreted. Oxygen, nitrous oxide, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform oxidize colloidal lead particles to Pb{sup 2+}. Carbon disulfide oxidizes only surface lead atoms to yield a layer of PbS precursor. The oxidation of lead particles by the ions of noble metals is investigated for Ag{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+}. Silver ions oxidize lead nanoparticles incompletely, which is explained by the formation of mixed Ag-Pb structures. Cu{sup 2+} ions also do not completely oxidize lead particles, although Cu particles with a low Pb content can be obtained.

  7. Leading Education Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Michael D.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on, but is not limited to, reference sources on education found in the library at St. Bonaventure University, New York. The ERIC database leads the list of leading education reference sources. Also mentioned are the "Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors" and the Academic Index (InfoTrak) computer system. Other…

  8. Leading Educational Change Wisely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Gillian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews Christopher Branson's book entitled "Leading Educational Change Wisely". The book provides an alternative and engaging perspective on leading educational change. Branson utilises "wisdom" as its central conceptual device to present a thought-provoking and philosophical account on how leaders are able to build a…

  9. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  10. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  11. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  12. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treated earlier before the damaging effects of lead poisoning occur. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ... exceed 10μg/dL, the threshold used to indicate lead poisoning. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) estimates one ...

  13. Recovering lead from batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Prengaman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to recover lead from scrap batteries. These processes recover lead via hydrometallurgical processing of the paste component of the battery followed by electrowinning. A number of pilot plant operations have been conducted, but thus far none of the processes have become operational.

  14. Lead toxicity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body are devastating. There is almost no function in the human body which is not affected by lead toxicity. Though in countries like US and Canada the use of lead has been controlled up to a certain extent, it is still used vehemently in the developing countries. This is primarily because lead bears unique physical and chemical properties that make it suitable for a large number of applications for which humans have exploited its benefits from historical times and thus it has become a common environmental pollutant. Lead is highly persistent in the environment and because of its continuous use its levels rise in almost every country, posing serious threats. This article reviews the works listed in the literature with recent updates regarding the toxicity of lead. Focus is also on toxic effects of lead on the renal, reproductive and nervous system. Finally the techniques available for treating lead toxicity are presented with some recent updates. PMID:27486361

  15. Lead polluters get punished

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Justice last week cracked down on 36 US companies for polluting the environment with lead. EPA slapped fines totaling more than $10 million on 12 of the offending companies, and Justice filed 24 civil complaints. Hank Habicht, deputy administrator of the EPA, said that his agency's initiative comes after 8 months of intense - and presumably successful - efforts at locating and documenting lead pollution in the soil, air, and water supply. Most feared has been lead's ability to damage the intellectual development of children. This caused the agency, Habicht said, to look beyond the usual suspect - lead in the water supply - to lead-laced dirt in residential areas. Meanwhile, the Department of Justice is using the EPA contamination data as well. Twenty US attorneys have been assigned to pore over the federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Water Act and the Superfund Law, in order to file civil complaints.

  16. Recycling lead to recover refractory precious metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parga, J. R.; Muzquiz, G. G.; Valenzuela, J. L.; Ojebuoboh, F. K.

    2001-12-01

    Lead recycling has many benefits. For example, it provides an alternative to virgin lead, thereby avoiding the environmental impacts of primary lead smelting. In addition, as with other secondary metal operations, it consumes less energy at a lower cost than primary production. An emerging process has been evaluated in which these attributes are leveraged to process refractory precious metals ores. Direct cyanidation of refractory gold and silver ore yields poor gold and silver recoveries. In fact, some ores are simply not amenable to direct cyanidation. The process described in this paper consists of smelting lead-bearing material together with argentopyrite concentrate that contains precious metals. Sodium carbonate is used as a fluxing agent and scrap iron is used as a reductant. The reaction product is molten lead bullion enriched with the precious metals. Smelting recoveries of both silver and gold can be as high as 98%.

  17. Experimental lead poisoning in the baboon

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Anthony

    1970-01-01

    Hopkins, A. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 130-140. Experimental lead poisoning in the baboon. Twelve large and three infant baboons were poisoned by the intratracheal injection of lead carbonate in doses ranging from 50 to 135 mg/kg for 39 to 362 days. Eight baboons had one or more epileptic fits. Weakness of the limbs, believed to be of central origin, was seen in three of them. The effect of single and multiple doses of lead on the blood lead is recorded. Anaemia and punctate basophilia were not found. Measurements of nerve conduction velocity, electromyography and histological examination showed no abnormality of the peripheral nerves. The different effects of lead upon different species are discussed. Images PMID:4987891

  18. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  19. Catalytically active lead(ii)-imidazolium coordination assemblies with diversified lead(ii) coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Naga Babu, Chatla; Suresh, Paladugu; Srinivas, Katam; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Sampath, Natarajan; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-05-10

    Five Pb(ii)-imidazolium carboxylate coordination assemblies with novel structural motifs were derived from the reaction between the corresponding flexible, semi flexible or rigid imidazolium carboxylic acid ligands and lead nitrate. The imidazolium linker present in these molecules likely plays a triple role such as the counter ion to balance the metal charge, the ligand being an integral part of the final product and the catalyst facilitating carbon-carbon bond formation reaction. These lead-imidazolium coordination assemblies exhibit, variable chemical and thermal stabilities, as well as catalytic activity. These newly prepared catalysts are highly active towards benzoin condensation reactions with good functional group tolerance. PMID:27093629

  20. Lead-free piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuyoshi; Takao, Hisaaki; Tani, Toshihiko; Nonoyama, Tatsuhiko; Takatori, Kazumasa; Homma, Takahiko; Nagaya, Toshiatsu; Nakamura, Masaya

    2004-11-01

    Lead has recently been expelled from many commercial applications and materials (for example, from solder, glass and pottery glaze) owing to concerns regarding its toxicity. Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics are high-performance piezoelectric materials, which are widely used in sensors, actuators and other electronic devices; they contain more than 60 weight per cent lead. Although there has been a concerted effort to develop lead-free piezoelectric ceramics, no effective alternative to PZT has yet been found. Here we report a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic with an electric-field-induced strain comparable to typical actuator-grade PZT. We achieved this through the combination of the discovery of a morphotropic phase boundary in an alkaline niobate-based perovskite solid solution, and the development of a processing route leading to highly <001> textured polycrystals. The ceramic exhibits a piezoelectric constant d33 (the induced charge per unit force applied in the same direction) of above 300picocoulombs per newton (pCN-1), and texturing the material leads to a peak d33 of 416pCN-1. The textured material also exhibits temperature-independent field-induced strain characteristics.

  1. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-04-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). PMID:10753088

  2. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  3. Sensors for monitoring the processing of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Yen, C. Eric

    1995-04-01

    Carbon-carbon composite are used in many applications including aircraft disk brakes, space shuttle leading edges, rocket inlet nozzles and exit cones, and are currently being considered for future aircraft structural components, because of their mechanical stability under adverse temperature conditions. Unfortunately, the processing of carbon-carbon composites, especially the first carbonizations, has a relatively low yield, because of in-process interply failure leading to catastrophic delaminations. Considerable amount of man-power, equipment time and material are lost. Here we report on the progress in the development of sensors for monitoring these catastrophic events during the first carbonization. Specifically, acoustic emission sensors and gas sensors are singled out as the most promising ones for monitoring the evolution of micro and macro-structural changes during the first carbonization. Analysis of the high temperature waveguide was undertaken to determine the optimum waveguide geometry so that only a single mode is allowed to propagate in the waveguide.

  4. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  5. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Winter 2012 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  6. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  7. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  8. Multimetallic Electrodeposition on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger-Hiller, F.; Kleiber, J.; Böttger, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lightweight design requires intelligent materials that meet versatile functions. One approach is to extend the range of properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by plating the fiber component. Electroplating leads to metalized layers on carbon fibers. Herein only cyanide-free electrolytes where used. Until now dendrite-free layers were only obtained using current densities below 1.0 A dm-2. In this work, dendrite-free tin and copper coatings were achieved by pre-metalizing the carbon fiber substrates. Furthermore, applying a combination of two metals with different sized thermal expansion coefficient lead to a bimetallic coating on carbon fiber rovings, which show an actuatory effect.

  9. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  10. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Baker, Frederick S.; Armstrong, Beth L.

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  11. L and M-Shell X-Ray Production Cross-Sections of Neodymium, Gadolinium, Holmium, Ytterbium, Gold, and Lead by 25-MEV Carbon and 32-MEV Oxygen Ions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Mike C.(Io), III

    1987-12-01

    L- and M-shell x-ray production cross sections have been measured for thin solid targets of neodymium, gadolinium, holmium, ytterbium, gold, and lead by 25 MeV _sp{6}{12}C ^{rm q+} (q = 4,5,6) and by 32 MeV _sp{8}{16} O^{rm q+} (q = 5,7,8). The cross sections were determined from measurements made with thin targets (<2.5 mu g/cm2). For projectiles with one or two K-shell vacancies, the target x-ray production cross sections were found to be enhanced over those for projectiles without a K-shell vacancy. The sum of direct ionization to the continuum (DI) plus electron capture (EC) to the L, M, Nldots shells and EC to the K-shell of the projectile have been extracted from the data. The results are compared to the predictions of first Born theories, i.e., plane wave Born approximation for DI and Oppenheimer -Brinkman-Kramers formula of Nikolaev for EC and to the ECPSSR approach that accounts for Energy loss and Coulomb deflection of the projectile as well as for Relativistic and Perturbed Stationary States of inner shell electrons.

  12. L- and M-shell x-ray production cross sections of neodymium, gadolinium, holmium, ytterbium, gold, and lead by 25-MeV carbon and 32-MeV oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.C. III

    1987-01-01

    L- and M-shell x-ray production cross sections were measured for thin solid targets of neodymium, gadolinium, holmium, ytterbium, gold, and lead by 25-MeV /sup 12/C/sup q+/ (q = 4,5,6) and by 32-MeV /sup 16/O/sup q+/ (q = 5,7,8). The cross sections were determined from measurements made with thin targets (<2.5 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/). For projectiles with one or two K-shell vacancies, the target x-ray production cross sections were found to be enhanced over those for projectiles without a K-shell vacancy. The sum of direct ionization to the continuum (DI) plus electron capture (EC) to the L, M, N... shells and EC to the K shell of the projectile were extracted from the data. The results are compared to the predictions of first Born theories, i.e., plane-wave Born approximation for DI and Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers formula of Nikolaev for EC and to the ECPSSR approach that accounts for energy loss and Coulomb deflection of the projectile as well as for relativistic and perturbed stationary states of inner-shell electrons.

  13. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  14. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  15. Closure device for lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1983-01-01

    A closure device for lead-acid batteries includes a filter of granulated activated carbon treated to be hydrophobic combined with means for preventing explosion of emitted hydrogen and oxygen gas. The explosion prevention means includes a vertical open-end tube within the closure housing for maintaining a liquid level above side wall openings in an adjacent closed end tube. Gases vent from the battery through a nozzle directed inside the closed end tube against an impingement surface to remove acid droplets. The gases then flow through the side wall openings and the liquid level to quench any possible ignition prior to entering the activated carbon filter. A wick in the activated carbon filter conducts condensed liquid back to the closure housing to replenish the liquid level limited by the open-end tube.

  16. Total contribution of airborne lead to blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Manton, W I

    1985-01-01

    A nine year study of blood lead concentrations and isotope ratios carried out on a married couple shows that pulmonary deposition cannot account for all the airborne lead in blood; that lead from bone may comprise 70% of blood lead; and that during pregnancy blood lead may double due to mobilisation of lead from bone. PMID:3970881

  17. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful in determining therapy. Treatment includes the monitoring and management of cardiac arrhythmias and oxygenation. Hyperbaric oxygenation is beneficial, but there are currently no definite criteria for its use. PMID:4027805

  18. Leading by Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    While the interview remains the most relevant process by which information about an applicant can be obtained, the effective school administrator must recognize that the interview process is much more than exploring an applicant's qualifications, skills, and experiences. The interview must also be utilized as a means of leading. In other words,…

  19. Change, Lead, Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Linda; von Frank, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Redefine leadership in your school, and create capacity through school leadership teams that successfully coordinate professional learning. "Change, Lead, Succeed" shows school leaders and teachers in leadership roles what they need to know to effectively create a culture for change. Find out what distinguishes a school leadership team from other…

  20. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  1. Leading through Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerzon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about leading significant learning opportunities through conflict of ideas in a school system. Catalyzing school change can turn emotional differences of opinion into learning opportunities. Leaders who want to deal effectively with these challenging, often tense situations need to be more than good managers. They need to be…

  2. ALL AGES LEAD MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model for Lead in Children (version 0.99d) was released in March 1994, and has been widely accepted in the risk assessment community as a tool for implementing the site specific risk assessment process when the issue is childhood...

  3. Leading the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slevin, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Claims that the field of rhetoric and composition is leading the way in the increase in attention to the preparation of graduate students as future teachers. Explains how composition programs encourage the development of teacherly attributes. Suggests priorities for further thought and research. (HB)

  4. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  5. Girls Leading Outward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Heather; Reyes, Jazmin; Moceri, Dominic C.; Morana, Laura; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a program implemented in Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey to help at-risk, minority middle school girls realize their leadership potential. The GLO (Girls Leading Outward) program was developed by the Developing Safe and Civil Schools Project at Rutgers University and is facilitated by university students. Selected middle…

  6. Teachers Take the Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Gregory W.; Marshall, Ian; Lineweaver, Lori; McIntyre, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Classroom teachers can serve as instructional leaders to plan, execute, and assess staff development. Such responsibility can lead to successful outcomes, as evidenced by one school's teacher-led technology training. This article illustrates how sharing instructional leadership responsibilities helps develop collegiality among faculty members.

  7. Leading for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    As the dropout problem has grown--and as increasing numbers of students have started to see dropping out as a viable option for expressing their disaffection with school--practitioners, policymakers, and researchers have looked more closely at the factors that lead students to disengage from school and have attempted to find ways to create…

  8. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    Designed as a public information pamphlet, the text discusses the problem of lead poisoning in children. The preventable nature of the problem is stressed as well as needed action on the part of the public, physicians and other health workers, and the legislators. The pamphlet emphasizes that each of these areas is essential in preventing death or…

  9. Machining lead wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schamaun, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Recently, MEC-6 machined some 4-inch-diameter lead wafers to precision tolerances. The tolerance on the wafer thickness was +-0.000080 inch. A diamond tool was used to machine the wafers on a Moore No. 3 lathe. This report discusses the methods used to machine the wafers, the fixtures used to hold the wafers, and the inspection methods and results.

  10. Blood lead--tooth lead relationship among Boston children

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.B.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.C. )

    1989-10-01

    The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. Elevated tooth lead levels have been seen in children who had lead poisoning. Also, on a population wide basis tooth lead levels appear to vary according to housing status and presumably lead exposure. This exposure index has been applied using varying techniques in Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Because of the neurotoxicity of lead, the tooth lead levels of retarded and normal children have been compared. Most recently, in research of lead and child development, tooth lead levels have been used as markers of past lead exposure. Despite the widespread use of tooth lead values, very little is known about the exact time course of lead deposition in tooth from blood. This report compares blood lead levels at different ages to tooth lead levels in a group of Boston children.

  11. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  12. Carbon-Carbon Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon (C-C) Radiator was a success and proved that the technology can work to reduce Spacecraft weight. C-C has a niche, especially for high temperatures. C-C still needs further development: reduction in fabrication time and cost - high conductivity "traditional" composites are more competitive, and CTE interface issues with heat pipes. Redundancy a good idea - we flew the spare panel. CSRP was a success -informal inter-agency partnership. Possible follow-on: C-C foam for low CTE mirrors/optical benches.

  13. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  14. LEAD SEVERING CONTRIVANCE

    DOEpatents

    Widmaier, W.

    1958-04-01

    A means for breaking an electrical circuit within an electronic tube during the process of manufacture is described. Frequently such circuits must be employed for gettering or vapor coating purposes, however, since an external pair of corector pins having no use after manufacture, is undesirable, this invention permits the use of existing leads to form a temporary circuit during manufacture, and severing it thereafter. One portion of the temporary circuit, made from a springy material such as tungsten, is spot welded to a fusable member. To cut the circuit an external radiant heat source melts the fusable member, allowing the tensed tungsten spring to contract and break the circuit. This inexpensive arrangement is particularly useful when the tube has a great many external leads crowded into the tube base.

  15. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  16. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  17. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  18. Carbon nanoscrolls by pyrolysis of a polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Prasad; Warule, Sambhaji; Jog, Jyoti; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2012-12-01

    3D network of carbon nanoscrolls was synthesized starting from pyrolysis of poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt. It is a catalyst-free process where pyrolysis of polymer leads to formation of carbon form and sodium carbonate. Upon water soaking of pyrolysis product, the carbon form undergoes self-assembly to form carbon nanoscrolls. The interlayer distance between the walls of carbon nanoscroll was found to be 0.34 nm and the carbon nanoscrolls exhibited a surface area of 188 m2/g as measured by the BET method.

  19. Leading change: 2--planning.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance. PMID:22439509

  20. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  1. Tissue lead concentrations in Japanese quail ingesting lead Pellets or shot with lead pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, R.J.; Scanlon, P.F.

    1981-05-01

    Data obtained from birds shot by hunters warrant the consideration that shooting with lead pellets may contrbute to the quantity of lead detected in tissues. Information on the effects of shooting avian species with lead shot on tissue concentrations of lead is, therefore, of considerable importance in assessing the value of birds shot by hunters as a source of samples for studying lead contamination. Kendall found that liver and bone lead concentrations of mourning doves were substantially increased after ingestion of a lead shot. Waterfowl shot by hunters and with direct evidence of ingested lead shot had significantly higher liver lead concentrations than did waterfowl without ingested lead shot. As little information on the effects of shooting with lead projectiles on tissue lead concentrations exists, the present study was designed to measure the effects of shooting Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with lead pellets on lead concentrations in livers and in bones).

  2. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  3. Blood Test: Lead (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and when based on a child's risk for lead poisoning. Those who are considered at risk — such as ... How Do I Get My Child Tested for Lead Poisoning? Lead Poisoning Pica Getting a Blood Test (Video) ...

  4. Lead (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have lead in them The good news about lead poisoning is that it’s 100% preventable. That means we ... damage the brain, and may even cause death. Lead poisoning can also cause: Anemia (when your blood doesn’ ...

  5. Thermal and mechanical performance of a carbon-carbon composite spacecraft radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Benner, Steve M.; Butler, C. Dan; Silk, Eric A.

    1999-09-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall cost associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon- carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel.

  6. Carbon monoxide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Kales, S.N. )

    1993-11-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning usually results from inhalation of exhaust fumes from motor vehicles, smoke from fires or fumes from faulty heating systems. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity for hemoglobin, with which it forms carboxyhemoglobin. The resulting decrease in both oxygen-carrying capacity and oxygen release can lead to end-organ hypoxia. The clinical presentation is nonspecific. Headache, dizziness, fatigue and nausea are common in mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning. In more severe cases, tachycardia, tachypnea and central nervous system depression occur. When carbon monoxide intoxication is suspected, empiric treatment with 100 percent oxygen should be initiated immediately. The diagnosis is confirmed by documenting an elevated carboxyhemoglobin level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended in patients with neurologic dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction or a history of unconsciousness. 26 refs.

  7. Leading from the boardroom.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jay W; Clark, Robert C

    2008-04-01

    These days, boards are working overtime to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley and other governance requirements meant to protect shareholders from executive wrongdoing. But as directors have become more hands-on with compliance, they've become more hands-off with long-range planning. That exposes corporations and their shareholders to another--perhaps even greater--risk, say professors Lorsch, of Harvard Business School, and Clark, of Harvard Law School. Boards are giving the long term short shrift for a number of reasons. Despite much heavier workloads, directors haven't rethought their patterns of operating - their meetings, committees, and other interactions. Compliance has changed their relationship with executives, however, turning directors into micromanagers who closely probe executives' actions instead of providing high-level guidance. Meanwhile, the pressure to meet quarterly expectations intensifies. Directors need to do a better job of balancing compliance with forward thinking. Boardroom effectiveness hinges most on the quality of directors and their interactions, the authors' research shows. Directors must apply their wisdom broadly, handling compliance work more efficiently and staying out of the weeds on strategic issues. Using their power with management to evangelize for long-term planning, they must take the lead on discussions about financial infrastructure, talent development, and strategy. Reserving sacrosanct time for such discussions, as Philips Electronics' board does at annual retreats, is an effective practice: After one recent retreat, Philips decided to exit the semiconductor business, where it was losing ground. Individual directors also must not shy away from asking tough questions and acting as catalysts on critical issues, such as grooming a successor to the CEO. In short, directors must learn to lead from the boardroom. PMID:18435010

  8. Exterior surface dust lead, interior house dust lead and childhood lead exposure in an urban environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, R.L.; Succop, P.A.; Krafft, K.M.; Clark, C.S.; Peace, B.; Hammond, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of urban lead exposure is being examined in a prospective study of several hundred children followed from birth to five years of age. A wide range of social, behavioral, biological and environmental factors are being assessed at approximately one year intervals beginning at birth. Previous analyses on this cohort have indicated a strong relationship between hand lead and hand-to-mouth activity and suggests that this is an important mechanism of inadvertent ingestion of lead in infants and young children. The present analyses was undertaken to examine the joint influence of lead in exterior surface dust and interior lead-containing painted surfaces on lead levels in house dust. In addition the joint influence of exterior and interior surface dust lead on children's hand lead content and blood lead concentration was examined. At 18 months of age 38% of the observed variation in blood lead was accounted for by hand lead and dust lead. Interior paint lead and exterior surface dust lead accounted for 52% of the observed variation in interior surface dust lead concentration. Exterior surface dust lead, obtained from exterior surface scrapings, indirectly influenced blood lead through its impact on interior house dust lead and children's hand lead content, but had no observable direct impact on blood lead. 13 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Contacts for organic switches with carbon-nanotube leads.

    PubMed

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata; Rode, Michał F; Sadek, Mikołaj; Sobolewski, Andrzej L

    2015-06-19

    We focus on two classes of organic switches operating due to the photo- or field-induced proton transfer (PT) process. By means of first-principles simulations, we search for the atomic contacts that strengthen diversity of the two swapped current-voltage (I-V) characteristics between two tautomers. We emphasize that the low-resistive contacts do not necessarily possess good switching properties. Very often, the higher-current flow makes it more difficult to distinguish between the logic states. Instead, the more resistive contacts multiply a current gear to a larger extent. The low- and high-bias work regimes set additional conditions, which are fulfilled by different contacts: (i) in the very low-voltage regime, the direct connections to the nanotubes perform better than the popular sulfur contacts, and (ii) in the higher-voltage regime, the best are the peroxide (-O-O-) contacts. Additionally, we find that the switching-bias value is not an inherent property of the conducting molecule, but it strongly depends on the chosen contacts. PMID:26011251

  10. Lead absorption in cows: biological indicators of ambient lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Karacic, V.; Prpic-Majic, D.; Skender, L.

    1984-03-01

    In order to determine actual lead exposure from residual amounts of lead in the environmental soil following the introduction of effective engineering emission controls in a lead smeltery, the absorption of lead in cows grazing in the vicinity was investigated. Four groups of cows were examined: two groups of cows exposed to different ambient lead concentration, compared with two normal groups of cows. In each cow aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) and blood lead (Pb-B) were determined, two years prior to and four years after the technical sanitation of the lead emission source. The results demonstrated normalization of ALAD, EP and Pb-B after the technical sanitation. In spite of normalization, biological indicators ALAD and Pb-B determined four years after the technical sanitation showed increased lead absorption in comparison with the results of the control group. This indirectly indicates lead contamination of the environment from residual amounts of lead in the soil.