Science.gov

Sample records for lead-alloy coolant technology

  1. Surface Treatment to Improve Corrosion Resistance in Lead-Alloy Coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Kumar Sridharan; McLean T. Machut; Lizhen Tan

    2007-08-29

    One of the six proposed advanced reactor designs of the Generation IV Initiative, the Leadcooled Fast Reactor (LFR) possesses many characteristics that make it a desirable candidate for future nuclear energy production and responsible actinide management. These characteristics include favorable heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and neutronic performance compared to other candidate coolants. However, the use of a heavy liquid metal coolant presents a challenge for reactor designers in regards to reliable structural and fuel cladding materials in both a highly corrosive high temperature liquid metal and an intense radiation fieldi. Flow corrosion studies at the University of Wisconsin have examined the corrosion performance of candidate materials for application in the LFR concept as well as the viability of various surface treatments to improve the materials’ compatibility. To date this research has included several focus areas, which include the formulation of an understanding of corrosion mechanisms and the examination of the effects of chemical and mechanical surface modifications on the materials’ performance in liquid lead-bismuth by experimental testing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s DELTA Loop, as well as comparison of experimental findings to numerical and physical models for long term corrosion prediction. This report will first review the literature and introduce the experiments and data that will be used to benchmark theoretical calculations. The experimental results will be followed by a brief review of the underlying theory and methodology for the physical and theoretical models. Finally, the results of theoretical calculations as well as experimentally obtained benchmarks and comparisons to the literature are presented.

  2. Long life coolant pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts were investigated to improve space system coolant pump technology to be suitable for mission durations of two years and greater. These design concepts included an improved bearing system for the pump rotating elements, consisting of pressurized conical bearings. This design was satisfactorily endurance tested as was a new prototype pump built using various other improved design concepts. Based upon an overall assessment of the results of the program it is concluded that reliable coolant pumps can be designed for three year space missions.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF CLEANER TECHNOLOGIES TO MINIMIZE AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. These evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction and econo...

  4. Investigation of cleaner technologies to minimize automotive coolant wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. These evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues. In addition, the authors examined the potential for substituting propylene glycol for ethylene glycol based engine coolant formulations. (Copyright (c) 1993 Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd.)

  5. INVESTIGATION OF CLEANER TECHNOLOGIES TO MINIMIZE AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. hese evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction, and eco...

  6. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  7. Development of mobile, on-site engine coolant recycling utilizing reverse-osmosis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kughn, W.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the history of the development of self-contained, mobile, high-volume, engine coolant recycling by reverse osmosis (R/O). It explains the motivations, created by government regulatory agencies, to minimize the liability of waste generators who produce waste engine coolant by providing an engine coolant recycling service at the customer`s location. Recycling the used engine coolant at the point of origin minimizes the generators` exposure to documentation requirements, liability, and financial burdens by greatly reducing the volume of used coolant that must be hauled from the generator`s property. It describes the inherent difficulties of recycling such a highly contaminated, inconsistent input stream, such as used engine coolant, by reverse osmosis. The paper reports how the difficulties were addressed, and documents the state of the art in mobile R/O technology. Reverse osmosis provides a purified intermediate fluid that is reinhibited for use in automotive cooling systems. The paper offers a review of experiences in various automotive applications, including light-duty, medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles operating on many types of fuel. The authors conclude that mobile embodiments of R/O coolant recycling technology provide finished coolants that perform equivalently to new coolants as demonstrated by their ability to protect vehicles from freezing, corrosion damage, and other cooling system related problems.

  8. Low-antimony—lead alloy strip production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolisnyk, P. S.; Vincze, A. M.

    Cominco is developing a new casting process for the continuous production of low-antimony—lead alloy strip that is expanded to make positive plates for hybrid-design, maintenance-free batteries. The stages of development from initial trials to pilot production plant are reviewed. The advantages of the process and the product are also discussed.

  9. Medium Power Lead Alloy Fast Reactor Balance of Plant Options

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav Dosta; Pavel Hejzlar; Neil E. Todreas; Jacopo Buongiorno

    2004-09-01

    Proper selection of the power conversion cycle is a very important step in the design of a nuclear reactor. Due to the higher core outlet temperature (~550°C) compared to that of light water reactors (~300°C), a wide portfolio of power cycles is available for the lead alloy fast reactor (LFR). Comparison of the following cycles for the LFR was performed: superheated steam (direct and indirect), supercritical steam, helium Brayton, and supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) recompression. Heat transfer from primary to secondary coolant was first analyzed and then the steam generators or heat exchangers were designed. The direct generation of steam in the lead alloy coolant was also evaluated. The resulting temperatures of the secondary fluids are in the range of 530-545°C, dictated by the fixed space available for the heat exchangers in the reactor vessel. For the direct steam generation situation, the temperature is 312°C. Optimization of each power cycle was carried out, yielding net plant efficiency of around 40% for the superheated steam cycle while the supercritical steam and S-CO2 cycles achieved net plant efficiency of 41%. The cycles were then compared based on their net plant efficiency and potential for low capital cost. The superheated steam cycle is a very good candidate cycle given its reasonably high net plant efficiency and ease of implementation based on the extensive knowledge and operating experience with this cycle. Although the supercritical steam cycle net plant efficiency is slightly better than that of the superheated steam cycle, its high complexity and high pressure result in higher capital cost, negatively affecting plant economics. The helium Brayton cycle achieves low net plant efficiency due to the low lead alloy core outlet temperature, and therefore, even though it is a simpler cycle than the steam cycles, its performance is mediocre in this application. The prime candidate, however, appears to be the S-CO2 recompression cycle, because it

  10. Fleet test evaluation of fully formulated heavy-duty coolant technology maintained with a delayed-release filter compared with coolant inhibited with a nitrited organic acid technology: An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Aroyan, S.S.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is a controlled extended service interval (ESI) study of the comparative behaviors of a nitrite/borate/low-silicate, low total dissolved solids (TDS) coolant maintained with delayed-release filters, and an organic acid inhibited coolant technology in heavy-duty engines. It reports both laboratory and fleet test data from 66 trucks, powered with different makes of heavy-duty diesel engines. The engines were cooled with three different types of inhibitors and two different glycol base (ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) coolants for an initial period exceeding two years and 500,000 km (300,000 miles). The data reported include chemical depletion rates, periodic coolant chemical analyses, and engine/cooling system reliability experience. The ongoing test will continue for approximately five years and a 1.6 million km (1 million miles) duration. Thirteen trucks were retained as controls, operating with ASTM D 4985 specification (GM-6038 type) coolant maintained with a standard ASTM D 57542 supplemental coolant additive (SCA). Engines produced by Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corp., Cummins Engine Co., and Mack Trucks are included in the test mix.

  11. Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Fast Reactor Balance-of-Plant Options

    SciTech Connect

    Dostal, Vaclav; Hejzlar, Pavel; Todreas, Neil E.; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2004-09-15

    Proper selection of the power conversion cycle is a very important step in the design of a nuclear reactor. Due to the higher core outlet temperature ({approx}550 deg. C) compared to that of light water reactors ({approx}300 deg. C), a wide portfolio of power cycles is available for the lead alloy fast reactor (LFR). Comparison of the following cycles for the LFR was performed: superheated steam (direct and indirect), supercritical steam, helium Brayton, and supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) recompression. Heat transfer from primary to secondary coolant was first analyzed and then the steam generators or heat exchangers were designed. The direct generation of steam in the lead alloy coolant was also evaluated. The resulting temperatures of the secondary fluids are in the range of 530-545 deg. C, dictated by the fixed space available for the heat exchangers in the reactor vessel. For the direct steam generation situation, the temperature is 312 deg. C. Optimization of each power cycle was carried out, yielding net plant efficiency of around 40% for the superheated steam cycle while the supercritical steam and S-CO{sub 2} cycles achieved net plant efficiency of 41%. The cycles were then compared based on their net plant efficiency and potential for low capital cost. The superheated steam cycle is a very good candidate cycle given its reasonably high net plant efficiency and ease of implementation based on the extensive knowledge and operating experience with this cycle. Although the supercritical steam cycle net plant efficiency is slightly better than that of the superheated steam cycle, its high complexity and high pressure result in higher capital cost, negatively affecting plant economics. The helium Brayton cycle achieves low net plant efficiency due to the low lead alloy core outlet temperature, and therefore, even though it is a simpler cycle than the steam cycles, its performance is mediocre in this application. The prime candidate, however, appears to be

  12. Predicting the properties of the lead alloys from DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buimaga-Iarinca, L.; Calborean, A.

    2015-12-01

    We provide qualitative results for the physical properties of the lead alloys at atomic scale by using DFT calculations. Our approach is based on the two assumptions: (i) the geometric structure of lead atoms provides a matrix where the alloying elements can take their positions in the structure as substitutions and (ii) there is a small probability of a direct interaction between the alloying elements, thus the interactions of each alloying element may be approximated by the interactions to the lead matrix. DFT calculations are used to investigate the interaction between several types of impurities and the lead matrix for low concentrations of the alloying element. We report results such as the enthalpy of formation, charge transfer and mechanical stress induced by the impurities in the lead matrix; these results can be used as qualitative guide in tuning the physico-chemical properties of the lead alloys.

  13. Predicting the properties of the lead alloys from DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Buimaga-Iarinca, L. Calborean, A.

    2015-12-23

    We provide qualitative results for the physical properties of the lead alloys at atomic scale by using DFT calculations. Our approach is based on the two assumptions: (i) the geometric structure of lead atoms provides a matrix where the alloying elements can take their positions in the structure as substitutions and (ii) there is a small probability of a direct interaction between the alloying elements, thus the interactions of each alloying element may be approximated by the interactions to the lead matrix. DFT calculations are used to investigate the interaction between several types of impurities and the lead matrix for low concentrations of the alloying element. We report results such as the enthalpy of formation, charge transfer and mechanical stress induced by the impurities in the lead matrix; these results can be used as qualitative guide in tuning the physico-chemical properties of the lead alloys.

  14. The high-temperature sodium coolant technology in nuclear power installations for hydrogen power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Alekseev, V. V.; Konovalov, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of using high-temperature sodium-cooled nuclear power installations for obtaining hydrogen and for other innovative applications (gasification and fluidization of coal, deep petroleum refining, conversion of biomass into liquid fuel, in the chemical industry, metallurgy, food industry, etc.), the sources of hydrogen that enters from the reactor plant tertiary coolant circuit into its secondary coolant circuit have intensity two or three orders of magnitude higher than that of hydrogen sources at a nuclear power plant (NPP) equipped with a BN-600 reactor. Fundamentally new process solutions are proposed for such conditions. The main prerequisite for implementing them is that the hydrogen concentration in sodium coolant is a factor of 100-1000 higher than it is in modern NPPs taken in combination with removal of hydrogen from sodium by subjecting it to vacuum through membranes made of vanadium or niobium. Numerical investigations carried out using a diffusion model showed that, by varying such parameters as fuel rod cladding material, its thickness, and time of operation in developing the fuel rods for high-temperature nuclear power installations (HT NPIs) it is possible to exclude ingress of cesium into sodium through the sealed fuel rod cladding. However, if the fuel rod cladding loses its tightness, operation of the HT NPI with cesium in the sodium will be unavoidable. Under such conditions, measures must be taken for deeply purifying sodium from cesium in order to minimize the diffusion of cesium into the structural materials.

  15. Improvised source of water coolant for ultrasonic scaler: an appropriate technology in underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Ibiyemi, Olushola; Taiwo, Juliana O; Oke, Gbemisola A

    2012-10-01

    Traditionally dental plaque, calculus and stains have been removed by scaling and polishing manually with hand instruments such as curettes, chisels, hoes and scalers. However, ultrasonic scaling is becoming the preferred method of initial periodontal treatment and maintenance, due to improved patient and operator comfort. Ultrasonic scaling can be performed effectively using pipe-borne water as coolant. However, such a water supply is unavailable in many rural dental clinics, especially in underserved communities in Nigeria. This article reports on an improvised source of water coolant, designed and fabricated to make modern, easy and effective plaque control available to people in communities where there is no pipe-borne water. The device will improve operator efficiency in tooth cleaning and patient compliance with treatment. Due to its simple design but effective function, the device is ideal for use in Nigeria's primary healthcare delivery program, offering enhanced preventive and curative services to remote, rural and semi-urban populations. In doing so oral health can be improved with a reduction in the incidence of oral diseases. PMID:23276120

  16. Coolant line hydrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, M.D.; Kipp, W.G.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes a hydrometer unit for connection in an automobile coolant flow line comprising: a tubular fitting adapted to be connected to the coolant flow line; a coolant receiving chamber means connected to the tubular fitting for receiving coolant from the tubular fitting; and indicating float elements contained within the coolant receiving chamber means and adapted to rise therein individually as a function of the specific gravity of the coolant. The coolant receiving chamber means includes a closure cap which when connected to the tubular fitting forms a coolant receiving chamber, retaining means for retaining the indicating float elements within the coolant receiving chamber, a viewing window member of a substantially clear material through which the float elements can be visually observed within the coolant receiving chamber means, and air venturi means located within the coolant receiving chamber means for automatically removing air which may collect within the coolant chamber means.

  17. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meetings the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal REstriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered {open_quotes}Best Demonstrated Available Technologies,{close_quotes} or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a mutiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  18. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meeting the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal Restriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered Best Demonstrated Available Technologies, or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a multiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  19. Studies of Polonium Removal from Molten Lead-Bismuth for Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jacopo Buongiorno; Ken Czerwinski; Eric Loewen; Chris Larson

    2004-09-01

    The isotope 210Po is the main product of neutron activation in fast reactors cooled by molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The isotope 210Po is a pure alpha emitter with a half-life of 138.38 days. For typical values of the neutron flux the 210Po concentration in the coolant can reach 1-10 Ci/kg. While exposure of plant personnel to Po is prevented under normal operating conditions because the primary system is sealed, Po does pose a radiological hazard during maintenance activities for which access to submerged structures is required as well as during accidents resulting in breach of the primary-system barrier. Obviously, continuous removal of Po from the LBE reduces this hazard. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which Po is formed in and released from the LBE. We summarize research performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the basic chemistry of four mechanisms of Po release, which could serve as the basis for a coolant cleanup system in LBE-cooled reactors. The mechanisms explored are lead polonide evaporation, formation of polonium hydride, rare-earth filtering, and alkaline extraction. For the key chemical species involved expressions are given for useful quantities such as formation energy, release, and deposition rates. It is concluded that the most promising removal mechanism is alkaline extraction, although a more systematic investigation of this mechanism is needed.

  20. Studies of Polonium Removal from Molten Lead-Bismuth for Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buongiorno, Jacopo; Loewen, Eric P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth; Larson, Christopher

    2004-09-15

    The isotope {sup 210}Po is the main product of neutron activation in fast reactors cooled by molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The isotope {sup 210}Po is a pure alpha emitter with a half-life of 138.38 days. For typical values of the neutron flux the {sup 210}Po concentration in the coolant can reach 1-10 Ci/kg. While exposure of plant personnel to Po is prevented under normal operating conditions because the primary system is sealed, Po does pose a radiological hazard during maintenance activities for which access to submerged structures is required as well as during accidents resulting in breach of the primary-system barrier. Obviously, continuous removal of Po from the LBE reduces this hazard. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which Po is formed in and released from the LBE. We summarize research performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the basic chemistry of four mechanisms of Po release, which could serve as the basis for a coolant cleanup system in LBE-cooled reactors. The mechanisms explored are lead polonide evaporation, formation of polonium hydride, rare-earth filtering, and alkaline extraction. For the key chemical species involved expressions are given for useful quantities such as formation energy, release, and deposition rates. It is concluded that the most promising removal mechanism is alkaline extraction, although a more systematic investigation of this mechanism is needed.

  1. Overview of recent studies related to lead-alloy-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sa, Rongyuan; Pramutadi, Asril; Yamaki-Irisawa, Eriko

    2012-06-01

    The recent progress of the studies related to lead alloy-cooled reactors (LFR) and the accelerator driven system (ADS) is summarized. The compatibility of materials with lead alloys has been clarified under steady and transient temperature conditions. Higher Cr content, Si and Al addition and Al-Fe alloy-coating improved the corrosion resistance of steels. The Al-Fe alloy-coated steel was not corroded even under high temperature transient conditions. The ceramics of SiC and Si3N4 are expected to be used as cladding material for high temperature LFR. For the analytical consideration of mass transport in lead alloy circuit, the diffusion coefficient of Ni was measured using the capillary methods. A new bubble visualization method in LBE using gamma-ray radiography was developed. The thermal interaction of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and lead droplets with sub-cooled water, and the behaviors of droplet fragmentation were investigated, and the visualization of volatile liquids in high temperature liquids was achieved.

  2. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  3. Machine coolant waste reduction by optimizing coolant life. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pallansch, J.

    1995-08-01

    The project was designed to study the following: A specific water-soluble coolant (Blasocut 2000 Universal) in use with a variety of machines, tools, and materials; Coolant maintenance practices associated with three types of machines; Health effects of use and handling of recycled coolant; Handling practices for chips and waste coolant; Chip/coolant separation; and Oil/water separation.

  4. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.H.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  5. Surface characterization of a corroded bronze-leaded alloy in a salt spray cabinet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo Junior, João Cura D.'Ars; de Freitas Cunha Lins, Vanessa; De Bellis, Vito Modesto

    2007-06-01

    The corrosion products of a TM 23 bronze-leaded alloy (Cu 72%, Pb 15%, Zn 8% and Sn 5%) were obtained in a salt spray cabinet after exposition during 120 h and 1000 h. The products obtained were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The major products of bronze-leaded corrosion were oxides and basic salts of Cu, CuCl 2·3Cu(OH) 2, and Pb, Pb(OH)Cl. The results can be attributed to a kinetic control of the corrosion reactions.

  6. Microstructural changes in eutectic tin-lead alloy due to severe bending

    SciTech Connect

    SHEN,Y.-L.; ABEYTA,M.C.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT

    2000-02-29

    Severe plastic deformation in an eutectic tin-lead alloy is studied by imposing fast bending at room temperature, in an attempt to examine the microstructural response in the absence of thermally activated diffusion processes. A change in microstructure due to this purely mechanically imposed load is observed: the tin-rich matrix phase appears to be extruded out of the narrow region between neighboring layers of the lead-rich phase and alterations in the colony structure occur. A micromechanism is proposed to rationalize the experimental observations.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolytic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 5% of beryllium or magnesium dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolitic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 10% of an alkall metal dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  9. Evaluation of lead anode reactions in acid sulfate electrolytes. 1: Lead alloys with cobalt additives

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.; O`Keefe, T.J.

    1999-04-01

    Lead alloys, such as lead-calcium-tin and lead-silver, are the primary insoluble anodes used in the electrowinning of metals. While some difficulties are encountered in their use, there is no obvious replacement that is economically and technically competitive. Two of the specific problems with lead include decreased cathode purity due to incorporation from corrosion products and the relatively high overpotential which increases cell voltage. To gain an improved understanding of the fundamental behavior of lead anodes, the polarization behavior of six different alloys in sulfuric acid was evaluated. Some tests were also made with Co(II) in the acid sulfate electrolyte. Notable differences were found in the multiple activation-passivation cycles, stability, and relative activity for oxygen evolution for the alloys, and the relative trends in behavior were established. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies were also conducted at selected potentials. Overall, the data show that the electrochemical response, particularly the degree of polarization for the oxygen evolution reaction, of the lead alloy anodes are dependent on the surface phases and structures present. The ability to depolarize the anode reaction using Co(II) was particularly sensitive to the lead composition.

  10. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  11. Structure of liquid equiatomic potassium--lead alloy: A neutron diffraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, M.; Blomquist, R.; Volin, K.J.; Price, D.L.

    1987-08-15

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been performed on liquid equiatomic potassium--lead alloy at T = 870, 900, and 930 K to determine the influence of temperature on the structure. A well-defined first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) at Q = 0.96 A/sup -1/, similar to that found in glassy materials, was obtained in the total structure factors S(Q) at the three temperatures. While the position of the peak remained unaffected by temperature changes, its magnitude decreased with increasing temperature. The other features of S(Q) were almost unaltered by temperature, as expected. The FSDP can be related to the presence of chemical bonds or clusters whose stability decreases with increasing temperature. A molecular model based on the random packing of K/sub 4/Pb/sub 4/ structural units is shown to give a remarkable correspondence with the measured structure factors.

  12. MACHINE COOLANT WASTE REDUCTION BY OPTIMIZING COOLANT LIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Machine shops use coolants to improve the life and function of machine tools. hese coolants become contaminated with oils with use, and this contamination can lead to growth of anaerobic bacteria and shortened coolant life. his project investigated methods to extend coolant life ...

  13. Phase Structure and Cyclic Deformation in Eutectic Tin-Lead Alloy: A Numerical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    FANG,HUEI ELIOT; Li,W; SHEN,Y.-L

    1999-09-09

    This study is devoted to providing a mechanistic rationale of coarsening induced failure in solder alloys during thermomechanical fatigue. Micromechanical modeling of cyclic deformation of eutectic tin-lead alloy was undertaken using the finite element method. The models consist of regularly arranged tin-rich and lead-rich phases, simulating the lamellar array and colony structure in a typical eutectic system. A fine structure and a coarse structure, bearing the same phase fraction but different in the aspect ratio of each lead-rich layer and in the number of lead-rich layers in each colony, are utilized for representing the microstructure before and after coarsening, respectively. Both phases are treated as elastic-plastic solids with their respective properties. For simplicity the creep effect is ignored without compromising the main objective of this study. Cyclic loading under pure shear and uniaxial conditions is modeled. It is found that both the fine and coarse structures exhibit essentially the same macroscopic stress-strain response. The coarse structure, however, shows a greater maximum effective plastic strain on a local scale throughout the deformation. The numerical result implies that, in a solder joint, a locally coarsened region may not be mechanically weaker than its surrounding, but it is subject to early damage initiation due to accumulated plasticity. Other implications regarding solder alloy failure and micromechanical modeling of two-phase materials are discussed.

  14. Environmentally Friendly Coolant System

    SciTech Connect

    David Jackson Principal Investigator

    2011-11-08

    Energy reduction through the use of the EFCS is most improved by increasing machining productivity. Throughout testing, nearly all machining operations demonstrated less land wear on the tooling when using the EFCS which results in increased tool life. These increases in tool life advance into increased productivity. Increasing productivity reduces cycle times and therefore reduces energy consumption. The average energy savings by using the EFCS in these machining operations with these materials is 9%. The advantage for end milling stays with flood coolant by about 6.6% due to its use of a low pressure pump. Face milling and drilling are both about 17.5% less energy consumption with the EFCS than flood coolant. One additional result of using the EFCS is improved surface finish. Certain machining operations using the EFCS result in a smoother surface finish. Applications where finishing operations are required will be able to take advantage of the improved finish by reducing the time or possibly eliminating completely one or more finishing steps and thereby reduce their energy consumption. Some machining operations on specific materials do not show advantages for the EFCS when compared to flood coolants. More information about these processes will be presented later in the report. A key point to remember though, is that even with equivalent results, the EFCS is replacing petroleum based coolants whose production produces GHG emissions and create unsafe work environments.

  15. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. he specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtration and distilla...

  16. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    SciTech Connect

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  17. Proposed reactor coolant density monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Until now there has been no feasible method of monitoring coolant density in the environment of an operating reactor core. By analysis of output from self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) in the core of the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) Reactor, the author has successfully estimated local coolant densities under post-scram conditions during a large break loss of coolant transient. The model used for estimation is not fully explained by published principles on the interaction of gamma rays with SPNDs. However, based on the success of the model, the author proposes employing self powered gamma detectors (SPGDs) to monitor reactor coolant density and discusses areas of experimental work to establish the best conditions for this application. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  18. A new lead alloy for automotive batteries operating under high-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Goguelin, A.; Jullian, E.

    The operating conditions of automotive and some industrial batteries are involving increasingly higher temperatures and heavier duty cycles. These place stress on the positive-grid materials which are presently not sufficiently resistant to corrosion and to creep. Conventional lead-calcium-tin-aluminium alloys can usually be optimized by a proper choice of calcium and tin contents for each specific manufacturing technology. With the new requirements of customers and the typical behaviour of these conventional alloys, however, there is no more room for improvement without searching for additional alloying elements. The work reported here shows how the doping of conventional lead-calcium-tin-aluminium alloys with barium improves mechanical properties (tensile strength and creep resistance) and increases corrosion resistance at temperatures between 50 and 75°C. Grid materials prepared by two manufacturing technologies (gravity cast; continuous cast followed by expansion) are investigated. Both the mechanical properties and the corrosion behaviour of the resulting grids are evaluated.

  19. Performance of high speed ball bearings with lead and lead alloy plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Scibbe, H. W.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 400 lb. Bearing lives were compared using different: (1) lead- and lead-alloy coatings, (2) coating thicknesses, (3) substrate materials, (4) retainer locating surfaces, and (5) plating techniques. Longer bearing run times were achieved using retainers with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating electroplated onto a leaded-bronze material and an aluminum-bronze alloy. Thirty percent of the bearings tested achieved the desired objective of 10 hours. All of the lead-alloy coated retainers exceeded this objective. A coating thickness of at least 0.0014 in. was used for all bearings exceeding the 10-hour goal.

  20. 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The following compilation of documents includes a list of the 66 attendees, a copy of the viewgraphs presented, and a summary of the discussions held after each session at the 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, adjacent to the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio on December 12-13, 1996. The workshop was organized by H. Joseph Gladden and Steven A. Hippensteele of NASA Lewis Research Center. Participants in this workshop included Coolant Flow Management team members from NASA Lewis, their support service contractors, the turbine engine companies, and the universities. The participants were involved with research projects, contracts and grants relating to: (1) details of turbine internal passages, (2) computational film cooling capabilities, and (3) the effects of heat transfer on both sides. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble the team members, along with others who work in gas turbine cooling research, to discuss needed research and recommend approaches that can be incorporated into the Center's Coolant Flow Management program. The workshop was divided into three sessions: (1) Internal Coolant Passage Presentations, (2) Film Cooling Presentations, and (3) Coolant Flow Integration and Optimization. Following each session there was a group discussion period.

  1. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ≥6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (≤4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially funded

  2. Observing Tin-Lead Alloys by Scanning Electron Microscopy: A Physical Chemistry Experiment Investigating Macro-Level Behaviors and Micro-Level Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Meifen; Hu, Huikang; Wang, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced into undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum to help students observe the phase composition and morphology characteristics of tin-lead alloys and thus further their understanding of binary alloy phase diagrams. The students were captivated by this visual analysis method, which…

  3. Preliminary neutronics design of china lead-alloy cooled demonstration reactor (CLEAR-III) for nuclear waste transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wang, W.; Chen, Z.; Hu, L.; Long, P.

    2012-07-01

    China Lead-Alloy cooled Demonstration Reactor (CLEAR-III), which is the concept of lead-bismuth cooled accelerator driven sub-critical reactor for nuclear waste transmutation, was proposed and designed by FDS team in China. In this study, preliminary neutronics design studies have primarily focused on three important performance parameters including Transmutation Support Ratio (TSR), effective multiplication factor and blanket thermal power. The constraint parameters, such as power peaking factor and initial TRU loading, were also considered. In the specific design, uranium-free metallic dispersion fuel of (TRU-Zr)-Zr was used as one of the CLEAR-III fuel types and the ratio between MA and Pu was adjusted to maximize transmutation ratio. In addition, three different fuel zones differing in the TRU fraction of the fuel were respectively employed for this subcritical reactor, and the zone sizes and TRU fractions were determined such that the linear powers of these zones were close to each other. The neutronics calculations and analyses were performed by using Multi-Functional 4D Neutronics Simulation System named VisualBUS and nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library). In the preliminary design, the maximum TSRLLMA was {approx}11 and the blanket thermal power was {approx}1000 MW when the effective multiplication factor was 0.98. The results showed that good performance of transmutation could be achieved based on the subcritical reactor loaded with uranium-free fuel. (authors)

  4. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corrective measures taken are also described.

  5. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. The specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtrat...

  6. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. he specific recycling units evaluated are a fleet-size unit and a portable unit, both based on the technology of chemical filtration...

  7. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K. ); Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M. ); Gierszewski, P. ); Hollies, R. ); Sharafat, S. ); Herring, S. )

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He{sub 3} reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He{sub 3} reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He{sub 3} reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. INHIBITING THE POLYMERIZATION OF NUCLEAR COOLANTS

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    >The formation of new reactor coolants which contain an additive tbat suppresses polymerization of the primary dissoclation free radical products of the pyrolytic and radiation decomposition of the organic coolants is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to 5% of a powdered metal hydride chosen from the group consisting of the group IIA and IVA dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  9. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  10. Cleaning of uranium vs machine coolant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Byrd, V.R.; Simandl, R.F.

    1984-10-01

    This study compares methods for cleaning uranium chips and the residues left on chips from alternate machine coolants based on propylene glycol-water mixtures with either borax, ammonium tetraborate, or triethanolamine tetraborate added as a nuclear poison. Residues left on uranium surfaces machined with perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolant and on surfaces machined with the borax-containing alternate coolant were also compared. In comparing machined surfaces, greater chlorine contamination was found on the surface of the perchloroethylene-mineral oil machined surfaces, but slightly greater oxidation was found on the surfaces machined with the alternate borax-containing coolant. Overall, the differences were small and a change to the alternate coolant does not appear to constitute a significant threat to the integrity of machined uranium parts.

  11. Computing Flows Of Coolants In Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant Passage Flow (CPF) computer code developed to predict accurately coolant flow and heat transfer inside turbomachinery cooling passages (either radial or axial blading). Computes flow in one-inlet/one-outlet passage of any shape. Calculates rate of flow of coolant, temperature, pressure, velocity, and heat-transfer coefficients along passage. Integrates one-dimensional momentum and energy equations along defined flow path, taking into account change in area, addition or subtraction of mass, pumping, friction, and transfer of heat. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  12. Bi-coolant flat plate solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, W. Y.; Green, L. L.

    The feasibility study of a flat plate solar collector which heats air and water concurrently or separately was carried out. Air flows above the collector absorber plate, while water flows in tubes soldered or brazed beneath the plate. The collector efficiencies computed for the flow of both air and water are compared with those for the flow of a single coolant. The results show that the bi-coolant collector efficiency computed for the entire year in Buffalo, New York is higher than the single-coolant collector efficiency, although the efficiency of the water collector is higher during the warmer months.

  13. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  14. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  15. Coolant passage heat transfer with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Higgins, A. W.

    1985-10-01

    The objective is to develop a heat transfer and pressure drop data base, computational fluid dynamic techniques, and correlations for multi-pass rotating coolant passages with and without flow turbulators. The experimental effort is focused on the simulation of configurations and conditions expected in the blades of advanced aircraft high pressure turbines. With the use of this data base, the effects of Coriolis and buoyancy forces on the coolant side flow can be included in the design of turbine blades.

  16. Mechanism of formation of dense anodic films of PbO on lead and lead alloys in sulfuric acid: Use of an {sup 18}O tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, E.; Steinmetz, J.; Weber, S.

    1999-01-01

    In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of the passive {alpha}-PbO at the interface grid/positive active material of the lead-acid batteries, a sequential electrochemical method using {sup 18}O was set up. It was established that the formation of a thick, dense PbO layer on pure lead and lead alloys (Pb-Sb, Pb-Ca-Sn), in potential conditions simulating deep discharged batteries for electric vehicles, is the consequence of a solid-state process, with O{sup 2{minus}} as the predominant diffusing species. Diffusion of O{sup 2{minus}} anions occurs along the grain boundaries of PbO, as well as in the grain bulk, probably between the two neighboring planes of Pb{sup 2+} cations of the PbO tetragonal structure.

  17. Performance of 40-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Wisander, D. W.; Scribbe, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Forty-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 1780 N (400 lb.) Four different substrate materials were used for the retainer. Longer bearing run times were achieved with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating plated onto a leaded-bronze material (22.5 hr) and an aluminum-bronze alloy (19.3 hr). One bearing with a pure lead coating achieved the desired objective of 10 hr. This bearing had an aluminum - bronze substrate retainer and ran successfully for 12.4 hr. Additions of antimony to the lead provided an alloy coating with better wear resistance than pure lead; however, this coating was abrasive to the outer-race lands.

  18. Nuclear reactor loss of coolant protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Loose, R.A.

    1986-03-18

    A pressurized water reactor system is described of a nuclear power plant having a water storage tank for providing emergency coolant water and means provided external to the containment vessel, for use in the event of a primary loss of coolant situation, to circulate emergency water as a coolant by withdrawal through a wall of the containment vessel and return the same back through the wall of the containment vessel and passing the water through a heat exchange means prior to use as a coolant for the reactor core. The improvement described here consists of: an enslosure, the interior of which is sealed to the atmosphere, positioned adjacent to and exterior of a wall of the containment vessel; an inlet conduit, enclosed within a sealed outer casing, communicating between the interior of the containment vessel and the interior of the enclosure; an exhaust conduit, enclosed within a sealed outer casing, communicating between the interior of the enclosure and the interior of the containment vessel; a rupture disc on the inlet conduit within the enclosure, such that failure of the exhaust conduit within the enclosure will produce an increase of the pressure within the enclosure and above a predetermined pressure will fracture the rupture disc, and will circulate the coolant within the enclosure; and means within the interior of the enclosure for pumping coolant from the interior of the containment vessel through the inlet conduit, and back to the interior of the containment vessel through the exhaust conduit; whereby if either of the conduits should fail, coolant will be collected within the enclosure and sealed to the atmosphere.

  19. Molecular Design for Cryogenic Magnetic Coolants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The area of molecular magnetic coolants has developed rapidly in recent years. A large number of competitive candidates have been reported, with the cooling performances chasing each other. In this account, four explicit strategies, namely, increasing ground-state spin, reducing magnetic anisotropy, weakening magnetic interactions, and lowering the molecular weight, are proposed from the theoretical viewpoint towards improving the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). According to this guidance, these successful strategies are discussed to pursue excellent magnetic coolants. This is accompanied by a discussion of the representative examples reported by our group. The magnetic entropy change increases from one compound to another, which in the most pronounced cases is suggestive of being the largest MCE in magnetic coolants. PMID:26929130

  20. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LM Bachman

    2006-07-19

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level.

  1. Coolant monitoring apparatus for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system for monitoring coolant conditions within a pressurized vessel. A length of tubing extends outward from the vessel from an open end containing a first line restriction at the location to be monitored. The flowing fluid is cooled and condensed before passing through a second line restriction. Measurement of pressure drop at the second line restriction gives an indication of fluid condition at the first line restriction. Multiple lengths of tubing with open ends at incremental elevations can measure coolant level within the vessel.

  2. NGNP Reactor Coolant Chemistry Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Castle

    2010-11-01

    The main focus of this paper is to identify the most desirable ranges of impurity levels in the primary coolant to optimize component life in the primary circuit of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which will either be a prismatic block or pebble bed reactor.

  3. Design criteria for Waste Coolant Processing Facility and preliminary proposal 722 for Waste Coolant Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-27

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A-E) in the performance of Titles 1 and 2 design for the construction of a facility to treat the biodegradable, water soluble, waste machine coolant generated at the Y-12 plant. The purpose of this facility is to reduce the organic loading of coolants prior to final treatment at the proposed West Tank Farm Treatment Facility.

  4. Lead alloys past present future

    SciTech Connect

    Bagshaw, N.E.

    1995-03-01

    The most critical non-active component in the lead acid battery is the grid of substrate. A review of the work on and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by by the Advanced Lead-Acid Consortium, (ALABC), and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended in different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions have received the greatest attention in the past.

  5. Coolant passage heat transfer with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J.; Johnson, B. V.

    1986-10-01

    In current and advanced gas turbine engines, increased speeds, pressures and temperatures are used to reduce specific fuel consumption and increase thrust/weight ratios. Hence, the turbine airfoils are subjected to increased heat loads escalating the cooling requirements to satisfy life goals. The efficient use of cooling air requires that the details of local geometry and flow conditions be adequately modeled to predict local heat loads and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients. The objective of this program is to develop a heat transfer and pressure drop data base, computational fluid dynamic techniques and correlations for multi-pass rotating coolant passages with and without flow turbulators. The experimental effort is focused on the simulation of configurations and conditions expected in the blades of advanced aircraft high pressure turbines. With the use of this data base, the effects of Coriolis and buoyancy forces on the coolant side flow can be included in the design of turbine blades.

  6. Secondary coolant circuit for nuclear-reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, A.

    1981-10-06

    A secondary coolant circuit for a nuclear-reactor of the liquid metal cooled type is described. The circuit comprises at least one intermediate exchanger mounted in the vessel of said reactor, Also included is a steam-generator for the exchange of calories between the secondary liquid-metal flowing through said secondary circuit and water-steam, at least one pump for circulating said secondary sodium and one tank for storing said secondary liquid-metal andrecovering those products generated by a possible liquid-metal-water reaction in said steam-generator.

  7. Cryogenic-coolant He-4-superconductor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermal interaction between a type 2 composite alloy and cryo-coolant He4 was studied with emphasis on post quench phenomena of formvar coated conductors. The latter were investigated using a heater simulation technique. Overall heat transfer coefficients were evaluated for the quench onset point. Heat flux densities were determined for phenomena of thermal switching between a peak and a recovery value. The study covered near saturated liquid, pressurized He4, both above and below the lambda transition, and above and below the thermodynamic critical pressure. In addition, friction coefficients for relative motion between formvar insulated conductors were determined.

  8. Nuclear fuel assembly with coolant conducting tube

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, T. G.; Cearley, J. E.; Jameson, W. G. Jr.; Mefford, C. R.; Nelson, H. L.

    1983-12-13

    In a nuclear fuel assembly having a coolant conducting or water tube which also retains the spacers in axial position, the fuel rods experience greater axial growth with exposure than the water tube creating a risk that the water tube might become disengaged from the supporting tie plates. An arrangement for preventing such disengagement is described including lengthened end plug shanks for the water tube, a protective boss surrounding the lower end plug shank to protect it from flow induced vibration, a conical seat for the lower end plug and an arrangement for limiting upward movement of the water tube.

  9. A Heated Tube Facility for Rocket Coolant Channel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Pease, Gary M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The capabilities of a heated tube facility used for testing rocket engine coolant channels at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The facility uses high current, low voltage power supplies to resistively heat a test section to outer wall temperatures as high as 730 C (1350 F). Liquid or gaseous nitrogen, gaseous helium, or combustible liquids can be used as the test section coolant. The test section is enclosed in a vacuum chamber to minimize heat loss to the surrounding system. Test section geometry, size, and material; coolant properties; and heating levels can be varied to generate heat transfer and coolant performance data bases.

  10. Transpiration cooling using air as a coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kikkawa, Shinzo; Senda, Mamoru; Sakagushi, Katsuji; Shibutani, Hideki )

    1993-02-01

    Transpiration cooling is one of the most effective techniques for protecting a surface exposed to a high-temperature gas stream. In the present paper, the transpiration cooling effectiveness was measured under steady state. Air as a coolant was transpired from the surface of a porous plate exposed to hot gas stream, and the transpiration rate was varied in the range of 0.001 [approximately] 0.006. The transpiration cooling effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the temperature of the upper surface of the plate. Also, a theoretical study was performed and it was clarified that the effectiveness increases with increasing transpiration rate and heat-transfer coefficient of the upper surface. Further, the effectiveness was expressed as a function of the blowing parameter only. The agreement between the experimental results and theoretical ones was satisfactory.

  11. Testing of organic acids in engine coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, T.W.

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of 30 organic acids as inhibitors in engine coolants is reported. Tests include glassware corrosion of coupled and uncoupled metals. FORD galvanostatic and cyclic polarization electrochemistry for aluminum pitting, and reserve alkalinity (RA) measurements. Details of each test are discussed as well as some general conclusions. For example, benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In general, the organic acids provide little RA when titrated to a pH of 5.5, titration to a pH of 4.5 can result in precipitation of the acid. Trends with respect to acid chain length are reported also.

  12. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  13. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  14. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Effects of rotation on coolant passage heat transfer. Volume 1: Coolant passages with smooth walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Higgins, A. W.; Steuber, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of rotating multipass passages, for configurations and dimensions typical of modern turbine blades. The immediate objective was the generation of a data base of heat transfer and pressure loss data required to develop heat transfer correlations and to assess computational fluid dynamic techniques for rotating coolant passages. Experiments were conducted in a smooth wall large scale heat transfer model.

  16. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  17. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  18. Investigating Liquid CO2 as a Coolant for a MTSA Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Padilla, Sebastian; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO 2) control for a future Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. CO 2 removal and rejection is accomplished by driving a sorbent through a temperature swing of approximately 210 K to 280 K . The sorbent is cooled to these sub-freezing temperatures by a Sublimating Heat Exchanger (SHX) with liquid coolant expanded to sublimation temperatures. Water is the baseline coolant available on the moon, and if used, provides a competitive solution to the current baseline PLSS schematic. Liquid CO2 (LCO2) is another non-cryogenic coolant readily available from Martian resources which can be produced and stored using relatively low power and minimal infrastructure. LCO 2 expands from high pressure liquid (5800 kPa) to Mars ambient (0.8 kPa) to produce a gas / solid mixture at temperatures as low as 156 K. Analysis and experimental work are presented to investigate factors that drive the design of a heat exchanger to effectively use this sink. Emphasis is given to enabling efficient use of the CO 2 cooling potential and mitigation of heat exchanger clogging due to solid formation. Minimizing mass and size as well as coolant delivery are also considered. The analysis and experimental work is specifically performed in an MTSA-like application to enable higher fidelity modeling for future optimization of a SHX design. In doing so, the work also demonstrates principles and concepts so that the design can be further optimized later in integrated applications (including Lunar application where water might be a choice of coolant).

  19. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel, G.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  20. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

    2006-09-30

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  1. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, Robert H; Hsu, John S; Starke, Michael R

    2006-09-01

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  2. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  3. Reclamation and disposal of water-based machining coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which is operated by the Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division for the Department of Energy under US government contract W-7405-eng-26, currently uses about 10{sup 6} L/yr (260,000 gal/yr) of water-based coolants in its machining operations. These coolants are disposed of in a 110,000-L (29,000-gal) activated sludge reactor. The reactor has oxidized an average of 38.6 kg of total organic carbon (TOC) per day with an overall efficiency of 90%. The predominant bacteria in the reactor have been identified once each year for the past three years. Six primary types of water-based coolants are currently used in the machine shops. In order to reduce the coolant usage rate, efforts are being made to introduce one universal coolant into the shops. By using a biocide to limit bacterial deterioration and using a filter and centrifuge system to remove dirt and tramp oils from the coolant, the coolant discard rate can be greatly reduced. 1 tab.

  4. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M. ); Humenik, K.E. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium

  7. Modeling Reactor Coolant Systems Thermal-Hydraulic Transients

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-05

    RELAP5/MOD3.2* is used to model reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transients without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal-hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to allow modeling of themore » plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  8. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  9. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang

    2012-02-14

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  10. Longer life for glyco-based stationary engine coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlfeld, R.

    1996-07-01

    Large, stationary diesel engines used to compress natural gas that is to be transported down pipelines generate a great deal of heat. Unless this heat is dissipated efficiently, it will eventually cause an expensive breakdown. Whether the coolant uses ethylene glycol or propylene glycol, the two major causes of glycol degradation are heat and oxidation. The paper discusses inhibitors that enhance coolant service life and presents a comprehensive list of do`s and don`ts for users to gain a 20-year coolant life.

  11. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  12. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed.

  13. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  18. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  19. Hydrodynamics of large-scale fuel-coolant interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, M.; Board, S.J.; Buttery, N.E.

    1980-06-01

    The analogy between thermal reactive and chemical reactive flows suggests that all propagating thermal explosions have a detonation-like (i.e., shock) structure. A vapor detonation model, which allows for thermal disequilibrium in the coolant, is developed. It is suggested that similar nonequilibrium effects may limit the efficiency of UO/sub 2/-sodium system, however, because of high conductivity of the coolant. 34 refs.

  20. Effects of rotation on coolant passage heat transfer. Volume 2: Coolant passages with trips normal and skewed to the flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of rotating multipass passages, for configurations and dimensions typical of modem turbine blades. This experimental program is one part of the NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) Initiative, which has as its overall objective the development and verification of improved analysis methods that will form the basis for a design system that will produce turbine components with improved durability. The objective of this program was the generation of a data base of heat transfer and pressure loss data required to develop heat transfer correlations and to assess computational fluid dynamic techniques for rotating coolant passages. The experimental work was broken down into two phases. Phase 1 consists of experiments conducted in a smooth wall large scale heat transfer model. A detailed discussion of these results was presented in volume 1 of a NASA Report. In Phase 2 the large scale model was modified to investigate the effects of skewed and normal passage turbulators. The results of Phase 2 along with comparison to Phase 1 is the subject of this Volume 2 NASA Report.

  1. Sealing of a shrouded rotor-stator system with pre-swirl coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Oun, Z. B.; Neller, P. H.; Turner, A. B.

    1987-05-01

    Experimental results for a modeled gas turbine rotor-stator system using both preswirled blade coolant and radially outward flowing disc coolant are presented. Although the preswirled coolant flow is found to have little effect on the pressure distribution below the preswirl nozzles, it is shown that considerable contamination of the preswirled coolant by the frictionally heated disc coolant can occur. A clear pressure inversion effect was found when coolant was provided by the preswirl nozzles alone, while the pressure under the rim seal increased with increasing rotational speed. Blade coolant flow increases the sealing flow requirement, except at the lowest flow rates.

  2. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  3. CFD modeling of turbulent duct flows for coolant channel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Chan, Daniel C.

    1993-07-01

    The design of modern liquid rocket engines requires the analysis of chamber coolant channels to maximize the heat transfer while minimizing the coolant flow. Coolant channels often do not remain at a constant cross section or at uniform curvature. New designs require higher aspect ratio coolant channels than previously used. To broaden the analysis capability and to complement standard analysis tools an investigation on the accuracy of CFD predictions for coolant channel flow has been initiated. Validation of CFD capabilities for coolant channel analysis will enhance the capabilities for optimizing design parameters without resorting to extensive experimental testing. The eventual goal is to use CFD to determine the flow fields of unique coolant channel designs and therefore determine critical heat transfer coefficients. In this presentation the accuracy of a particular CFD code is evaluated for turbulent flows. The first part of the presentation is a comparison of numerical results to existing cold flow data for square curved ducts (NASA CR-3367, 'Measurements of Laminar and Turbulent Flow in a Curved Duct with Thin Inlet Boundary Layers'). The results of this comparison show good agreement with the relatively coarse experimental data. The second part of the presentation compares two cases of higher aspect ratio channels (AR=2.5,10) to show changes in axial and secondary flow strength. These cases match experimental work presently in progress and will be used for future validation. The comparison shows increased secondary flow strength of the higher aspect ratio case due to the change in radius of curvature. The presentation includes a test case with a heated wall to demonstrate the program's capability. The presentation concludes with an outline of the procedure used to validate the CFD code for future design analysis.

  4. Coolant mixing and distribution in a transparent reactor model

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, M.W.; Haury, G.; Pflug, L.; Rothe, P.H.

    1983-11-01

    Following a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, coolant water may be injected at high pressure to help cool the core. This paper reports the results of tests which determined the mixing and distribution of the coolant in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the reactor. The model components included the reactor vessel, cold leg pipe, pump, and loop seal with steam generator and hot leg simulators completing the flow loop. Tests were conducted for a no-refill condition with constant liquid inventory in the facility and zero flow of the primary water. Salt water, dyed red was used for the coolant water to create prototypical density differences in this atmospheric facility. Steady state fluid distribution was determined from flow and density measurements and complete mass balances. Interpretation of the quantitative results was aided by extensive flow visualization studies which include still photographs and motion picture films for all tests. The test parameters included the fluid density ratio, the flow rate of coolant water, and the flow rate of primary water injected in the vessel downcomer to simulate a natural circulation flow through vent valves between the reactor core and the downcomer. Four locations of the small break were tested.

  5. Reactor coolant seal testing under station blackout conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Failures of reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals that could result in a significant loss-of-coolant inventory are of current concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Particular attention is being focused on seal behavior during station blackout conditions, when failure of on-site emergency diesel generators occurs simultaneously with loss of all off-site alternating current power. Under these conditions, both seal injection flow and component cooling water flow are lost, and the RCP seals are exposed to full reactor coolant temperature. Overheating of elastomeric components and flashing of coolant across the sealing faces can cause unacceptably high leakage rates, with potential catastrophic consequences. A test program has been conducted that subjects full-scale seal cartridges to typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant system steady-state and transient operation conditions including associated dynamic shaft motions. A special test segment was developed to evaluate seal operation under station blackout conditions. The test program successfully mirrored the severity of an actual loss-of-seal cooling water event under station blackout conditions, and the Byron Jackson{reg sign} N-9000 seal cartridge maintained its integrity.

  6. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the proposed CFC replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Dyer, H.R.

    1993-12-01

    The neutron multiplication characteristics of refrigerant-114 (R-114) and proposed replacement coolants perfluorobutane (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}) and cycloperfluorobutane C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) have been compared by evaluating the infinite media multiplication factors of UF{sub 6}/H/coolant systems and by replacement calculations considering a 10-MW freezer/sublimer. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that R-114 is a neutron absorber, due to its chlorine content, and that the alternative fluorocarbon coolants are neutron moderators. Estimates of critical spherical geometries considering mixtures of UF{sub 6}/HF/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} indicate that the flourocarbon-moderated systems are large compared with water-moderated systems. The freezer/sublimer calculations indicate that the alternative coolants are more reactive than R-114, but that the reactivity remains significantly below the condition of water in the tubes, which was a limiting condition. Based on these results, the alternative coolants appear to be acceptable; however, several follow-up tasks have been recommended, and additional evaluation will be required on an individual equipment basis.

  7. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  8. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Lukas, M.; Lynch, B.K.

    1998-09-01

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are used in many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long, that most practitioners have probably forgotten that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were also routinely used for aqueous samples. This paper describes recent work to calibrate and modify RDE arc emission spectrometers for the analysis of engine coolant samples; a mixture of approximately 50% water and 50% glycol. The technique has been shown to be effective for the analysis of wear metals, contamination and supplemental coolant additives in ethylene and propylene glycol. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and RDE spectrometers will be presented. The data correlates extremely well on new and relatively clean coolants. However, not surprisingly, RDE results are sometimes higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. This paper suggests that RDE spectrometers are appropriate, and sometimes preferred, for most types of coolants and certain types of aqueous samples. Actual field data is be presented to support the arguments.

  9. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, R.P.

    1983-08-10

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium inventory thereof further into the carbon matrix while simultaneously redispersing a portion into the regeneration system for absorption at a reduced temperature by the secondary trap.

  10. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  11. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  12. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report ofmore » the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.« less

  13. Spectrophotometric Procedure for Fast Reactor Advanced Coolant Manufacture Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, O. S.; Egorov, N. B.; Zherin, I. I.; Indyk, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a spectrophotometric procedure for fast reactor advanced coolant manufacture control. The molar absorption coefficient of dimethyllead dibromide with dithizone was defined as equal to 68864 ± 795 l·mole-1·cm-1, limit of detection as equal to 0.583 · 10-6 g/ml. The spectrophotometric procedure application range was found to be equal to 37.88 - 196.3 g. of dimethyllead dibromide in the sample. The procedure was used within the framework of the development of the method of synthesis of the advanced coolant for fast reactors.

  14. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Pat

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report of the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.

  15. Evaluation of engine coolants under flow boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Stinson, C.; Gollin, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine coolant mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. In each mixture, the concentration was 50-50 by volume. Performance in this situation is defined as the ability to maintain a lower surface temperature for a given flux. The heat transfer regimes considered covered the range from single phase forced convection through saturated flow boiling. Results show that both coolants perform satisfactorily. However, in single phase convection, ethylene-glycol/water is slightly more effective. Conversely, for sub-cooled nucleate boiling and saturated boiling, propylene-glycol/water results in slightly lower metal temperatures.

  16. Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this

  17. Coolants with selective optical filtering characteristics for ruby laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Devitt, F. R.; Rasquin, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Coolant-filtering medium developed consists of a solution of copper sulfate in a 4-1 volumetric mixture of ethanol and methanol. This solution should be a useful addition to ruby laser systems, particularily in large pulse or Q switching applications.

  18. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  19. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  20. Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on fuels, lubricants, and coolants is one of a series of power mechanics tests and visual aids on automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials present basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Focusing on fuels, the first of…

  1. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY DISTILLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants for a facility such as the New Jersey Department of Transportation garage in Ewing, New Jersey. he specific recycling evaluated is b...

  2. 37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile guidance section, retractor cables for lock pin in front of ladder at left - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR TO EMBEDMENT IN CONCRETE. HIGHER PIPE IS INLET; THE OTHER, THE OUTLET LOOP. INLET PIPE WILL CONNECT TO TOP SECTION OF REACTOR VESSEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1287. Unknown Photographer, 1/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Coolant Characteristics and Control in Direct Chill Casting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This project focuses on understanding the fundamentals of coolant behavior and developing strategies to control the cooling rate of DC casting of aluminum ingots. Project partners will conduct a fundamental study to identify various parameters affecting critical heat flux and boiling transition and evaluate the effects of various additives (impurity particulates, sodium and calcium salts, carbonates, bicarbonates, surfactants, etc.).

  5. Thermal explosions resulting from fuel-coolant interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bartusiak, R.D.; Caram, H.S.

    1988-08-01

    High-speed photographic data and pressure traces of thermal explosions from the contact of single drops of ion oxide with water were analyzed according to models describing underwater chemical explosion and cavitation bubbles. The objective was to develop a simple method for analyzing the microscale hydrodynamics of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI). For a given external pressure and liquid density essentially all the features of the radial motion of the explosion bubble, including the total energy release, are uniquely determined by a single parameter - the bubble period. Nearly all of the heat transfer from fuel to coolant occurs during the 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -4/ sec timespan of coolant vapor film collapse during which the fuel fragments. The features of the resulting explosion bubble are not significantly affected by the degree of heat transfer from vapor to coolant liquid and the bubble can be modeled as an empty cavity. The method developed during this study should facilitate investigations on FCI by simplifying the analyses of thermal explosion data. Further attention can be given to experiments on the effects of fuel parameters, e.g., surface tension and viscosity, on fragmentation, heat transfer, and explosive yield.

  6. Antimony tartrate corrosion inhibitive composition for coolant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Payerle, N.E.

    1987-08-11

    An automobile coolant concentrate is described comprising (a) a liquid polyhydric alcohol chosen from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol and mixtures thereof, and (b) corrosion inhibitors in a corrosion inhibitory amount with respect to corrosion of lead-containing solders, the corrosion inhibitors comprising (i) an alkali metal antimony tartrate, and (ii) an azole compound.

  7. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  8. Experimental interaction of magma and “dirty” coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. Ian; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf; Sonder, Ingo; Schmid, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The presence of water at volcanic vents can have dramatic effects on fragmentation and eruption dynamics, but little is known about how the presence of particulate matter in external water will further alter eruptions. Volcanic edifices are inherently “dirty” places, where particulate matter of multiple origins and grainsizes typically abounds. We present the results of experiments designed to simulate non-explosive interactions between molten basalt and various “coolants,” ranging from homogeneous suspensions of 0 to 30 mass% bentonite clay in pure water, to heterogeneous and/or stratified suspensions including bentonite, sand, synthetic glass beads and/or naturally-sorted pumice. Four types of data are used to characterise the interactions: (1) visual/video observations; (2) grainsize and morphology of resulting particles; (3) heat-transfer data from a network of eight thermocouples; and (4) acoustic data from three force sensors. In homogeneous coolants with <~10% bentonite, heat transfer is by convection, and the melt is efficiently fragmented into blocky particles through multiple thermal granulation events which produce associated acoustic signals. For all coolants with >~20% sediment, heat transfer is by forced convection and conduction, and thermal granulation is less efficient, resulting in fewer blocky particles, larger grainsizes, and weaker acoustic signals. Many particles are droplet-shaped or/and “vesicular,” containing bubbles filled with coolant. Both of these particle types indicate significant hydrodynamic magma-coolant mingling, and many of them are rewelded into compound particles. The addition of coarse material to heterogeneous suspensions further slows heat transfer thus reducing thermal granulation, and variable interlocking of large particles prevents efficient hydrodynamic mingling. This results primarily in rewelded melt piles and inefficient distribution of melt and heat throughout the coolant volume. Our results indicate

  9. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  10. Numerical simulation of PWR response to a small break LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) with reactor coolant pumps operating

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Dobbe, C.A.; Bayless, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations have been made of the response of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) during a small-break, loss-of-coolant accident with the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) operating. This study was conducted, as part of a comprehensive project, to assess the relationship between measurable RCP parameters, such as motor power or current, and fluid density, both local (at the RCP inlet) and global (average reactor coolant system). Additionally, the efficacy of using these RCP parameters, together with fluid temperature, to identify an off-nominal transient as either a LOCA, a heatup transient, or a cooldown transient and to follow recovery from the transient was assessed. The RELAP4 and RELAP5 computer codes were used with three independent sets of RCP, two-phase degradation multipliers. These multipliers were based on data obtained in two-phase flow conditions for the Semiscale, LOFT, and Creare/Combustion Engineering (CE)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pumps, respectively. Two reference PWRs were used in this study: Zion, a four-loop, 1100-MWe, Westinghouse plant operated by Commonwealth Edison Co. in Zion, Illinois and Bellefonte, a two-by-four loop, 1213 MWe, Babcock and Wilcox designed plant being built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in Scottsboro, Alabama. The results from this study showed that RCP operation resulted in an approximately homogeneous reactor coolant system and that this result was independent of reference plant, computer code, or two-phase RCP head degradation multiplier used in the calculation.

  11. Lead alloys: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagshaw, N. E.

    The most critical non-active component in the lead/acid battery is the grid or substrate. A review of the work on grids and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended on different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions, have received the greatest attention in the past. Proposals are made for future studies. Possible evolutionary developments include the addition of silver and higher amounts of tin to lead-calcium alloys, more detailed investigations of lead-strontium and lead-lithium alloys containing tin and/or silver, and further work on very-low-antimony alloys. More speculative projects are very rapidly cooled alloys, the use of aluminium as grids or spines, plastic/lead-coated copper negative grids, corrosion-resistant coatings of lead compounds on the grids and, finally, a substrate for a bipolar plate that is based on conductive inorganic compounds.

  12. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  13. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  14. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  15. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  16. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed.

  17. Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P.

    1999-08-01

    To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

  18. Glycol coolants improve heat transfer and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Holfield, R.

    1995-03-01

    Various liquids from plain water to exotic fluids have been used as coolants in large stationary diesel engines that drive compressors on natural gas pipeline distribution systems. Although water is an efficient heat transfer medium, its drawbacks of freezing at {minus}32 F and boiling at 212 F seriously limit its usefulness. Special glycol-based heat transfer fluids are available and refined specifically for long-term needs of gas compressor engines. Appropriate corrosion inhibitors have been formulated for metallurgy and operating conditions encountered with these engines. Propylene glycol was developed as an alternative for use in environmentally sensitive areas. Glycol-based fluids must be specifically inhibited for industrial applications because uninhibited or improperly inhibited coolants can seriously damage reciprocating engines.

  19. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  20. 92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant process water tanks (sodium bisulfate solution), stainless steel, for electronic systems cooling in transmitter and MIP rooms. RCA Services Company 29 September, 1960, official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photograph, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-1226 - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Experimental investigations of thermal interaction between corium and coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorul'ko, Yu. I.; Zhmurin, V. G.; Volov, A. N.; Kovalev, Yu. P.

    2008-03-01

    We present a generalized analysis of the experimental results from investigations of thermal interaction in corium simulators (melts of thermite mixtures U + Mo3 and Zr + Fe2O3)-coolant (Na and H2O) systems. We also present the results from experimental assessments of the kinematic characteristics pertinent to the displacement of materials during the thermal interaction process and the coefficients for conversion of the corium thermal energy into mechanical work.

  2. Circulation within the primary system at TMI-2 with lowered coolant level and at atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Baston, V.F.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1985-06-01

    Experiments were performed with the Three Mile Island reactor coolant system open to the atmosphere and the coolant lowered to a level above the fuel (a condition required for defueling) to ascertain the extent of coolant mixing. A principal concern for coolant decontamination during defueling is the radionuclides released and their distribution within the primary system. Analyses of radionuclide, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data taken during these experiments confirm mixing in the primary system under forced coolant flow conditions with only minimal mixing occurring during static periods.

  3. Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapa, Sayuri; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2012-11-01

    Gas turbine engines operate at peak temperatures in excess of the material limits because the high pressure turbine nozzles and buckets are film cooled. The nozzle vanes of the first stage turbine use the most cooling air because they are exposed directly to the high temperature combustor exhaust. Existing turbine analysis assumes a uniform temperature at the rotor inlet. However, the coolant does not mix completely with the mainstream flow before impinging on the turbine rotor, and the coolant streaks create variations in temperature along the leading edge of the downstream turbine blades. 3D velocity and concentration measurements are made using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques to study turbulent mixing in a realistic film-cooled nozzle vane cascade. A scalar mixing analogy for thermal diffusion is used in which a chemical contaminant plays the role of temperature. In a typical experiment, the mainstream flow is water and the film coolant is a copper sulfate solution. The concentration of copper sulfate measured anywhere in the flow is a surrogate for normalized temperature. The turbulent scalar diffusivity in the scalar transport equation can be estimated from the MR data and used to improve computational fluid dynamics models. Army Research Office.

  4. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  5. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Miller, R.F.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.

  6. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  7. Turbine vane coolant flow variations and calculated effects on metal temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, F. C.; Meitner, P. L.; Russell, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Seventy-two air-cooled turbine vanes were tested to determine coolant flow variations among the vanes. Calculations were made to estimate the effect of measured coolant flow variations on local vane metal temperatures. The calculations were based on the following assumed operating conditions: turbine inlet temperature, 1700 K (2600 F); turbine inlet pressure, 31 N/sq cm (45 psia); coolant inlet temperature, 811 K (1000 F); and total coolant to gas flow ratio, 0.065. Variations of total coolant flow were not large (about 10 percent from the arithmetic mean) for all 72 vanes, but variations in local coolant flows were large. The local coolant flow variations ranged from 8 to 75 percent, and calculated metal temperature variations ranged from 8 to 60 K (15 to 180 F).

  8. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  9. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  10. Nonintrusive Flow Rate Determination Through Space Shuttle Water Coolant Loop Floodlight Coldplate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph; Johnson, Harry; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1997-01-01

    Using a Nonintrusive Flow Measurement System (NFMS), the flow rates through the Space Shuttle water coolant coldplate were determined. The objective of this in situ flow measurement was to prove or disprove a potential block inside the affected coldplate had contributed to a reduced flow rate and the subsequent ice formation on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Flow through the coldplate was originally calculated to be 35 to 38 pounds per hour. This application of ultrasonic technology advanced the envelope of flow measurements through use of 1/4-inch-diameter tubing, which resulted in extremely low flow velocities (5 to 30 pounds per hour). In situ measurements on the orbiters Discovery and Atlantis indicated both vehicles, on the average, experienced similar flow rates through the coldplate (around 25 pounds per hour), but lower rates than the designed flow. Based on the noninvasive checks, further invasive troubleshooting was eliminated. Permanent monitoring using the NFMS was recommended.

  11. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Heames, T.J. ); Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Chown, N.M. ); Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J. ); Wheatley, C.J. )

    1990-10-01

    This document provides a description of a model of the radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident. This document serves as the user's manual for the computer code called VICTORIA, based upon the model. The VICTORIA code predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions between fission products and structural materials, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. This document provides a detailed description of each part of the implementation of the model into VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided. The VICTORIA code was developed upon a CRAY-XMP at Sandia National Laboratories in the USA and a CRAY-2 and various SUN workstations at the Winfrith Technology Centre in England. 60 refs.

  12. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  13. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  14. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  15. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  16. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  17. Cryogenic-coolant He4-superconductor dynamic and static interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Chuang, C.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. E.

    1980-01-01

    A composite superconducting material (NbTi-Cu) was evaluated with emphasis on post quench solid cooling interaction regimes. The quasi-steady runs confirm the existence of a thermodynamic limiting thickness for insulating coatings. Two distinctly different post quench regimes of coated composites are shown to relate to the limiting thickness. Only one regime,, from quench onset to the peak value, revealed favorable coolant states, in particular in He2. Transient recovery shows favorable recovery times from this post quench regime (not drastically different from bare conductors) for both single coated specimens and a coated conductor bundle.

  18. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  19. Aerodynamic effect of coolant ejection in the rear part of transonic rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, F. H.; Holmes, A. T.

    1985-09-01

    An investigation of transonic turbine blades designed by Rolls-Royce/Bristol concerning the aerodynamic penalties of coolant flow for two alternative cooling configurations is discussed. Rolls-Royce designed a blade with a thick trailing edge where the coolant is ejected through slots in the trailing edge and a second blade with a thin trailing edge where coolant is ejected through a row of holes on the pressure side and a row of holes on the suction side. Tests were performed in a plane cascade wind tunnel. The results indicate the sensitivity of the blade performance to cooling configuration and coolant flow rate. By combining measured data from blade surface and wake traverses it was possible to separate the various loss mechanisms. Therefore, the separate losses due to the momentum of the coolant, change of base pressure, and change of blade friction could be determined quantitatively as a function of coolant flow rate.

  20. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-06

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  1. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and 208Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  2. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  3. Analysis of automobile radiator performance with ethylene glycol/water and propylene glycol/water coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Gollin, M.; Bjork, D.

    1996-12-31

    The heat transfer and hydraulic performance of the following coolants was examined in five automobile radiators in a wind tunnel: 100% water; 100% propylene glycol; 70/30 propylene glycol/water (volume); 50/50 propylene glycol/water (volume); 70/30 ethylene glycol/water (volume); 50/50 ethylene glycol water (volume). The results of these studies are presented to demonstrate the relative performance of these coolant mixtures in terms of heat transfer, coolant pressure drop and radiator effectiveness for a range of coolant and air flowrates. It is concluded that the most effective of the coolants in transferring heat in the test radiators was water, followed by 50/50 ethylene glycol/water, 50/50 propylene glycol/water, 70/30 ethylene glycol/water, 70/30 propylene glycol and, finally, 100% propylene glycol. There will be a negligible differences between the performance of a radiator using a 50/50 propylene glycol/water coolant and a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water coolant. It is estimated that, with 50/50 propylene glycol coolant replacing 50/50 ethylene glycol/water, the temperature of the coolant throughout the cooling loop will increase by approximately 5%. The effect that the flow regime (fully turbulent/transition/laminar) has upon the performance of a given radiator/coolant combination was found to be significant. The design of the coolant passages in radiators can affect the onset of fully turbulent flow in the coolant passages in a radiator.

  4. Emergency cooling analysis for the loss of coolant malfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    This report examines the dynamic response of a conceptual space power fast-spectrum lithium cooled reactor to the loss of coolant malfunction and several emergency cooling concepts. The results show that, following the loss of primary coolant, the peak temperatures of the center most 73 fuel elements can range from 2556 K to the region of the fuel melting point of 3122 K within 3600 seconds after the start of the accident. Two types of emergency aftercooling concepts were examined: (1) full core open loop cooling and (2) partial core closed loop cooling. The full core open loop concept is a one pass method of supplying lithium to the 247 fuel pins. This method can maintain fuel temperature below the 1611 K transient damage limit but requires a sizable 22,680-kilogram auxiliary lithium supply. The second concept utilizes a redundant internal closed loop to supply lithium to only the central area of each hexagonal fuel array. By using this method and supplying lithium to only the triflute region, fuel temperatures can be held well below the transient damage limit.

  5. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  6. Zero waste machine coolant management strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-12-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extend ed coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98.

  7. Zero Waste Machine Coolant Management Strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-06-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extend ed coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98.

  8. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  9. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Robotic inspection of PWR coolant pump casing welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, W.R.; Alford, J.W.; Davis, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    As of January 1, 1995, the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate began requiring more thorough inspections of cast stainless-steel components in nuclear power plants, including pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor coolant pump (RCP) casings. The examination requirements are established by fracture mechanics analyses of component weldments and demonstrated test system detection capabilities. This may include full volumetric inspection or some portion thereof. Ringhals station is a four-unit nuclear power plant, owned and operated by the Swedish State Power Board, Vattenfall. Unit 1 is a boiling water reactor. Units 2, 3, and 4 are Westinghouse-designed PWRs, ranging in size from 795 to 925 MW. The RCP casings at the PWR units are made of cast stainless steel and contain four circumferential welds that require inspection. Due to the thickness of the casings at the weld locations and configuration and surface conditions on the outside diameter of the casings, remote inspection from the inside diameter of the pump casing was mandated.

  12. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  13. Electrochemical pitting evaluation of aluminium alloy 7075 in machining coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanaland, V.A.; Dillon, J.J.

    1984-08-24

    The corrosion rate of aluminum alloy 7075 in Trim Sol with a Tris-Nitro biocide addition is satisfactory. Both deaeration and increasing the nitrite addition decreased the stability of the passive film. Chloride contamination below 500 ppM does not cause pitting corrosion of aluminum alloy 7075 in the Trim Sol environment. The limit for chloride contamination is between 500 and 1000 ppM. The potentiodynamic, fast-scan-rate technique is satisfactory for evaluating the pitting tendency of the aluminum alloy 7075 in a Trim Sol environment. Consequently, the potentiodynamic, fast-scan-rate technique is recommended for use in conjunction with reverse scans to evaluate the quality of in-use machining coolants, that are suspected of causing contamination.

  14. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, J. A.; Meier, W. R.; Jolodosky, A.; Frantoni, M.; Reyes, S.

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  15. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  16. Investigation of an anion exchange resin for cleanup of a coolant used to machine nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, E.R. Jr.; Tucker, H.L.; Asbury, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes the interaction of Dowex SBR-P, which is a strongly basic anion exchange resin, with ions found in a used machining coolant. The coolant is used in machining enriched uranium and contains uranium, chloride, nitrite, borate ions, water, and propylene glycol.

  17. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.46a Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant...

  18. A method for measuring cooling air flow in base coolant passages of rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method accurately determines actual coolant mass flow rate in cooling passages of rotating turbine blades. Total and static pressures are measured in blade base coolant passages. Mass flow rates are calculated from these measurements of pressure, measured temperature and known area.

  19. Coolant flows in prismatic fuel and particle bed nuclear reactors for rocket applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1993-01-01

    Semiempirical expressions for pressure losses in prismatic and particle bed reactors for nuclear propulsion are combined with the geometric characteristics of core configurations and coolant flow patterns. The results are used to illustrate a limitation on the coolant velocity and to develop a unified approach to a quantitative comparison of merits and demerits of different reactor core concepts intended for space applications.

  20. Some peculiarities of checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    This paper contains the analysis of validity of methods used for checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality by a metering tank according to the mathematical model developed. A number of criteria is proposed for detecting occluded gas in the coolant loop. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Engine coolant compatibility with the nonmetals found in automotive cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greaney, J.P.; Smith, R.A.

    1999-08-01

    High temperature, short term immersion testing was used to determine the impact of propylene and ethylene glycol base coolants on the physical properties of a variety of elastomeric and thermoplastic materials found in automotive cooling systems. The materials tested are typically used in cooling system hoses, radiator end tanks, and water pump seals. Traditional phosphate or borate-buffered silicated coolants as well as extended-life organic acid formulations were included. A modified ASTM protocol was used to carry out the testing both in the laboratory and at an independent testing facility. Post-test fluid chemistry including an analysis of any solids which may have formed is also reported. Coolant impact on elastomer integrity as well as elastomer-induced changes in fluid chemistry were found to be independent of the coolant`s glycol base.

  2. Investigations of ice formation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209 main injector coolant cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Charklwick, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Severe main combustion chamber wall and main injector baffle element deterioration occurred during tests of Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209. One of the possible causes considered is ice formation and blockage of coolant to these components, resulting from the mixing of leaking hot turbine exhaust gas (hydrogen rich steam) and hydrogen coolant in the injector coolant cavity. The plausibility of ice blockage is investigated through simple mixing calculations for hot gas and hydrogen, investigation of condensation and water droplet formation, calculation of the freezing times for droplets, and the prediction of ice layer thicknesses. It is concluded that condensation and droplet formation can occur, and small water droplets that form can freeze very quickly when in contact with the cold coolant cavity surfaces. Copnservative analysis predicts, however, that the maximum thickness of the ice layers formed is too small to result in significant blockage of the coolant flow.

  3. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, L.E.

    1980-11-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preventing a solar receiver utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver by a plurality of reflectors which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver. The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank through the solar receiver and into the second storage tank. Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors become defocused with respect to the solar receiver due to the earth's rotation.

  4. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preventing a solar receiver (12) utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver (12) by a plurality of reflectors (16) which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver (12) as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank (30) for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank (30) includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank (34) for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank (34) having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver (12). The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank (30) through the solar receiver (12) and into the second storage tank (34). Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors (16) stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver (12) below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors (16) become defocused with respect to the solar receiver (12) due to the earth's rotation.

  5. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  6. Flow in serpentine coolant passages with trip strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G.-N.

    1995-01-01

    Under the subject contract, an effort is being conducted at Scientific Research Associates, Inc. (SRA) to obtain flow field measurements in the coolant passage of a rotating turbine blade with ribbed walls, both in the stationary and rotating frames. The data obtained will be used for validation of computational tools and assessment of turbine blade cooling strategies. The configuration of the turbine blade passage model is given, and the measuring plane locations are given. The model has a four-pass passage with three 180 turns. This geometry was chosen to allow analyses of the velocity measurements corresponding to the heat transfer results obtained by Wagner. Two passes of the passage have a rectangular cross-section of 1.0 in x 0.5 in. Another two passes have a square cross-section of 0.5 in x 0.5 in. Trips with a streamwise pitch to trip height (P/e) = 5 and trip height to coolant passage width (e/Z) = 0.1, were machined along the leading and trailing walls. These dimensions are typical of those used in turbine blade coolant passages. The trips on these walls are staggered by the half-pitch. The trips are skewed at +/- 45 deg, and this allows the effect of trip orientation to be examined. Experiments will be conducted with flow entering the model through the 1.0 in x 0.5 in rectangular passage (Configuration C) and the 0.5 in x 0. 5 in square passage (Configuration D) to examine the effect of passage aspect ratio. Velocity measurements were obtained with a Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000, based on the hydraulic diameter of and bulk mean velocity in the half inch square passage. The coordinate system used in presenting the results for configurations C and D, respectively, is shown. The first, second and third passes of the passage will be referred to as the first, second and third passages, respectively, in later discussion. Streamwise distance (x) from the entrance is normalized by the hydraulic diameter (D). Vertical (y) and tangential (z) distances are

  7. Purification of liquid metal systems with sodium coolant from oxygen using getters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Konovalov, M. A.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    For increasing the safety and economic parameters of nuclear power stations (NPSs) with sodium coolant, it was decided to install all systems contacting radioactive sodium, including purification systems of circuit I, in the reactor vessel. The performance and capacity of cold traps (CTs) (conventional element of coolant purification systems) in these conditions are limited by their volume. It was proposed to use hot traps (HTs) in circuit I for coolant purification from oxygen. It was demonstrated that, at rated parameters of the installation when the temperature of the coolant streamlining the getter (gas absorber) is equal to 550°C, the hot trap can provide the required coolant purity. In shutdown modes at 250-300°C, the performance of the hot trap is reduced by four orders of magnitude. Possible HT operation regimes for shutdown modes and while reaching rated parameters were proposed and analyzed. Basic attention was paid to purification modes at power rise after commissioning and accidental contamination of the coolant when the initial oxygen concentration in it reached 25 mln-1. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of purification systems can be increased using HTs with the getter in the form of a foil or granules. The possibility of implementing the "fast purification" mode in which the coolant is purified simultaneously with passing over from the shutdown mode to the rated parameters was substantiated.

  8. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell performance degradation by coolant leakage and recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ju Hae; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Seung Hyun; Joo, Sang Hoon; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Junbom

    2013-03-01

    Coolant leakage leads to decrease in performance during the operation of electric vehicles which make use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). This study examines the effects of various coolant leak conditions in 3-cell stack and single cell. The experimental results show that an irreversible reduction in performance occurs after coolant injection into the anode side of the stack. Poisoning of carbon monoxide (CO) on the platinum (Pt) catalyst is caused by electro-oxidation reaction of EG. Water cleaning is selected because CO poisoning is desorbed to reaction with water molecules. Performance is quickly reduced when the interval between coolant injections is short. Performance reduction is indicated by the experimental results for the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). It shows that performance of the MEA with the GDL exposed to coolant decreased, but it is recovered after water cleaning. In contrast, results for performance of the MEA exposed to coolant for long time could not be reversed after water cleaning. Therefore, we propose that performance degradation of coolant leak on the Pt catalyst surface and GDL can be recovered by the water cleaning simply without disassembly of stack.

  9. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  10. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  11. Cracked shaft detection on large vertical nuclear reactor coolant pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    Due to difficulty and radiation exposure associated with examination of the internals of large commercial nuclear reactor coolant pumps, it is necessary to be able to diagnose the cause of an excessive vibration problem quickly without resorting to extensive trial and error efforts. Consequently, it is necessary to make maximum use of all available data to develop a consistent theory which locates the problem area in the machine. This type of approach was taken at Three Mile Island, Unit #1, in February 1984 to identify and locate the cause of a continuously climbing vibration level of the pump shaft. The data gathered necessitated some in-depth knowledge of the pump internals to provide proper interpretation and avoid misleading conclusions. Therefore, the raw data included more than just the vibration characteristics. Pertinent details of the data gathered is shown and is necessary and sufficient to show that the cause of the observed vibration problem could logically only be a cracked pump shaft in the shaft overhang below the pump bearing.

  12. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: ``Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10{sup 8} Pa``, Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923--1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: ``Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres``, Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  13. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant

    SciTech Connect

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10{sup 8} Pa'', Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923--1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres'', Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  14. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant, revision A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: 'Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10(exp 8) Pa', Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923-1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: 'Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres', Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  15. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani,; Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-06

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  16. Review of Failure Probability Calculations for HFIR Primary Coolant System Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.

    2001-10-31

    During July 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Facilities Management, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, Germantown, Maryland, to review calculations of piping failure probabilities for the High Flux Test Reactor (HFIR) located at and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the failure probability calculations was to estimate the probabilities of large leaks (>1500 gpm) that are of sufficient size to disable the primary coolant system of HFIR to the extent that there is a potential for core damage. PNNL reviewed the computational methods and the inputs to the calculations along with an evaluation of potential failure mechanisms not explicitly addressed by the ORNL calculations. The review concluded that the calculated failure probabilities even with consideration of uncertainties in the calculations and of other potential failure mechanisms provide a high level of confidence that failure frequencies are less than the stated goal of 10-6 piping failures per year.

  17. Simulating experimental investigation on the safety of nuclear heating reactor in loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhanjie

    1996-12-01

    The 5MW low temperature nuclear heating reactor (NHR-5) is a new and advanced type of nuclear reactor developed by Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University of China in 1989. Its main loop is a thermal-hydraulic system with natural circulation. This paper studies the safety of NHR under the condition of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) by means of simulant experiments. First, the background and necessity of the experiments are presented, then the experimental system, including the thermal-hydraulic system and the data collection system, and similarity criteria are introduced. Up to now, the discharge experiments with the residual heating power (20% rated heating power) have been carried out on the experimental system. The system parameters including circulation flow rate, system pressure, system temperature, void fraction, discharge mass and so on have been recorded and analyzed. Based on the results of the experiments, the conclusions are shown as follos: on the whole, the reactor is safe under the condition of LOCAs, but the thermal vacillations resulting from the vibration of the circulation flow rate are disadvantageous to the internal parts of the reactor core.

  18. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-08-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  19. The experience in handling of lead-bismuth coolant contaminated by Polonium-210

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, D.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Solodjankin, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    During exploitation of lead-bismuth cooled reactors a wide experience in handling of radioactive coolant containing polonium has been gained. By 1990 total time of this reactor operation has reached approximately 60 reactor years.

  20. 120. COOLANT LINES TO SIS HEAT EXCHANGER No.1 IN AUXILIARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. COOLANT LINES TO SIS HEAT EXCHANGER No.1 IN AUXILIARY CHAMBER, NOVEMBER 1, 1976 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. Hot-Gas-Slide and Coolant-Side Heat Transfer in Liquid Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to develop a multidisciplinary, computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in film cooling assisted, regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors, and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a developmental combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40-k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the advanced main combustion chamber to find a strategy for a proposed coolant channel design.

  2. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  3. Sodium coolant purification systems for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Kovalev, Yu. P.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Kumaev, V. Ya.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.; Matyukhin, V. V.; Pirogov, E. P.; Sergeev, G. P.; Sorokin, A. P.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Both traditional coolant purification methods (by means of traps and sorbents for removing cesium), the use of which supported successful operation of nuclear power installations equipped with fast-neutron reactors with a sodium coolant, and the possibility of removing oxygen from sodium through the use of hot traps are analyzed in substantiating the purification system for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor. It is shown that a cold trap built into the reactor vessel must be a mandatory component of the reactor plant primary coolant circuit's purification system. The use of hot traps allows oxygen to be removed from the sodium coolant down to permissible concentrations when the nuclear power station operates in its rated mode. The main lines of works aimed at improving the performance characteristics of cold traps are suggested based on the results of performed investigations.

  4. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  5. Correct numerical simulation of a two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroshilin, A. E.; Kroshilin, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Different models used in calculating flows of a two-phase coolant are analyzed. A system of differential equations describing the flow is presented; the hyperbolicity and stability of stationary solutions of the system is studied. The correctness of the Cauchy problem is considered. The models' ability to describe the following flows is analyzed: stable bubble and gas-droplet flows; stable flow with a level such that the bubble and gas-droplet flows are observed under and above it, respectively; and propagation of a perturbation of the phase concentration for the bubble and gas-droplet media. The solution of the problem about the breakdown of an arbitrary discontinuity has been constructed. Characteristic times of the development of an instability at different parameters of the flow are presented. Conditions at which the instability does not make it possible to perform the calculation are determined. The Riemann invariants for the nonlinear problem under consideration have been constructed. Numerical calculations have been performed for different conditions. The influence of viscosity on the structure of the discontinuity front is studied. Advantages of divergent equations are demonstrated. It is proven that a model used in almost all known investigating thermohydraulic programs, both in Russia and abroad, has significant disadvantages; in particular, it can lead to unstable solutions, which makes it necessary to introduce smoothing mechanisms and a very small step for describing regimes with a level. This does not allow one to use efficient numerical schemes for calculating the flow of two-phase currents. A possible model free from the abovementioned disadvantages is proposed.

  6. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

    2014-05-23

    This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

  7. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  8. Measurement of the Coolant Channel Temperatures and Pressures of a Cooled Radial-Inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation has been installed on the surface of a cooled radial-inflow turbine. Thermocouples and miniature integrated sensor pressure transducers were installed to measure steady state coolant temperatures, blade wall temperatures, and coolant pressures. These measurements will eventually be used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of the rotor. This paper will describe the procedures used to install and calibrate the instrumentation and the testing methods followed. A limited amount of data will compare the measured values to the predicted values.

  9. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L. ); Wendel, M.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Influence of coolant tube curvature on film cooling effectiveness as detected by infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Graham, R. W.; Cageao, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal film cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery from straight, curved, and looped coolant tube geometries are compared. It was hypothesized that the differences in secondary flow and in the turbulence structure of flow through these three tubes should influence the mixing properties between the coolant and the main stream. A flow visualization tunnel, an infrared camera and detector, and a Hilsch tube were employed to test the hypothesis.

  11. Impact of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant on material recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Taylor, P.A.

    1983-05-01

    The reaction of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant with nitric acid has now been studied in some detail. This document is intended to provide a summary of the results. Findings are summarized under nine headings. Tests have also been conducted to determine if the new coolant would have any adverse effects on the uranium recycle systems. Experiments were scientifically designed after observation of the production operations so that accurate response to the immediate production concerns could be provided. Conclusions from these studies are: formation of glycol nitrates is very improbable; the reaction of concentrated (70%) nitric acid with pure propylene glycol is very violent and hazardous; dilution of the nitric acid-glycol mixture causes a drastic decrease in the rate and intensity of the reaction; the mechanism of the nitric acid propylene glycol reaction is autocatalytic in nitrous acid; no reaction is observed between coolant and 30% nitric acid unless the solution is heated; the coolant reacts fairly vigorously with 55% nitric acid after a concentration-dependent induction time; experiments showed that the dissolution of uranium chips that had been soaked in coolant proceeded at about the same rate as if the chips had not previously contacted glycol; thermodynamic calculations show that the enthalpy change (heat liberated) by the reaction of nitric acid (30%) with propylene glycol is smaller than if the same amount of nitric acid reacted with uranium. Each of these conclusions is briefly discussed. The effect of new coolant on uranium recycle operations is then briefly discussed.

  12. Modeling electrodeposition of charged nanoparticles onto fuel cell coolant flow channel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.-T.

    2008-10-01

    To cool down the stack system in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), a coolant is needed that must be electrically nonconductive. In the specialized coolant that is modeled by us, charged nanoparticles are added into the flow to neutralize the ion contamination that otherwise gradually degrades the coolant until shunt currents become significant. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) physicochemical model of the multiphase coolant flow with charged nanoparticles has been formulated and coded using COMSOL Multiphysics and MEMS. Electrochemistry, fluid mechanics, steric stabilization, and heat transfer are coupled in this model. For nanoparticles in the fluid, electrokinetic force, electrical double layer (EDL) force, hydrodynamic force, and buoyancy force have been taken into account for the prediction of the electrodeposition rate onto channel walls. The overall goal of the model is to provide a fundamental first principles-based design tool for a specialized coolant to enable operations in a fuel cell stack for 2-3 years without the need for frequent replacement or filtering of the coolant.

  13. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  14. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-06-11

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed.

  15. Survey of tracking systems and rotary joints for coolant piping. Final report, August 15, 1978-August 14, 1978. [Includes patents

    SciTech Connect

    Furaus, J P; Gruchalla, M E; Sower, G D

    1980-01-01

    Problems were surveyed and evaluated with respect to solar tracking mechanisms and rotary joints for coolant piping. An analytical development of celestial mechanics, one- and two-axis tracking configurations and the effect of tracking accuracy versus collector efficiency are reported. Daily operational requirements and tracking modes were defined and evaluated. A literature and patent search on solar tracking technology was performed. Tracking system and control system performance specifications were determined. Alternative conceptual tracking approaches were defined and a cost and performance evaluation of a mechanical tracking concept was performed. Fluid coupling service specifications were determined. The cost and performance of several types of actuators and error detectors were evaluated with respect to solar tracking mechanisms.

  16. Thermal criteria to compare fast reactors coolants for the intermediate loop

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, Manuel; Rodriguez, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) are typically using a liquid metal as the primary coolant. Up to now, sodium is the referenced coolant for all large-scale FBR, but lead and sodium-potassium alloy have both also been used successfully for smaller rigs. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has an extensive experience and significant expertise in Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) over the past 40 years of R and D and feedback experiments. Some improvements are needed on the SFR to meet the Generation IV goals, and in particular the safety and the reliability through the intermediate loop coolant. As sodium reacts exo-thermically with air and water and to eliminate the drawback of the water-sodium interaction when a steam generator tube is ruptured, CEA is involved in a substantial effort in order to investigate the interest to use an alternative coolant than sodium in the intermediate loop. This paper presents the main thermal criteria to compare Fast Reactors coolants for the intermediate loop under natural and forced convection. Neutronics considerations are not taken into account for the intermediate loop coolant. Transport, transfer and energetic criteria are analysed in the field of turbulent flows. Criteria are applied to the following potential coolant candidates: sodium, lithium, tin, bismuth, lead, lead-bismuth alloy, lead-lithium alloy, gallium, indium, potassium and sodium-potassium alloy. According to this thermal analysis, the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop is considered as a promising candidate. For the discussion of the applicability of the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop, a limited thermal hydraulic pre-sizing of a steam generator is undertaken using simple engineering methods implemented in COPERNIC code, a CEA tool dedicated to reactor systems pre-sizing. (authors)

  17. Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at US operating plants during the 1970`s and early 1980`s raised concerns from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants.

  18. Comparison of Lead-Bismuth and Lead as Coolants for Accelerator Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, F.; Mattioda, F.; Meloni, P.

    2002-07-01

    In the framework of the Italian research program TRASCO (TRAsmutazione SCOrie, namely transmutation of radioactive wastes) and of the European research program PDS-XADS (Preliminary Design Study on an eXperimental Accelerator Driven System) the feasibility and operability of gas or liquid metal cooled accelerator driven system prototypes are currently under investigation. Initially the attention of the thermal-hydraulics group of ENEA research centre in Bologna has been focussed toward a lead-bismuth cooled subcritical system under natural or enhanced natural circulation according to the prototype design proposed. The interest in using lead as a coolant, which is characterized by a higher melting point, is explained by the need to increase the plant efficiency for the economic competitiveness, though the higher temperatures pose some technological problems. Moreover, the amount of activation products should result significantly lower. Of course the results obtained and the experience gained analysing the dynamical behaviour of the lead-bismuth cooled system cannot be directly transferred to lead cooled systems. This paper aims at presenting a preliminary comparison of lead-bismuth and lead in a simplified liquid metal cooled subcritical system, mainly from the thermal-hydraulics and system dynamics points of view. By means of the modified RELAP5 version, the dynamical behavior of a lead-bismuth or lead cooled system, which is intended to be a quite accurate representation of the Italian accelerator driven prototype XADS, has been studied. Although a more exhaustive comparison should take into account the necessarily different structural characteristics of lead-bismuth and lead cooled systems, the neutronic feedback on reactor power and also the slightly different neutronic properties of lead-bismuth and lead, the purely thermal-hydraulic analysis presented in this paper has shown that the dynamical behaviour of the XADS does not differ noticeable when lead is used

  19. Influence of coolant on ductile mode processing of binderless nanocrystalline tungsten carbide through ultraprecision diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetz, Marius; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz; Fähnle, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Molds made of tungsten carbide are typically used for the replicative mass production of glass lenses by precision glass molding. Consequently an ultra-precision grinding process with a subsequent fresh-feed polishing operation is conventionally applied. These processes are time consuming and have a relatively low reproducibility. An alternative manufacturing technology, with a high predictability and efficiency, which additionally allows a higher geometrical flexibility, is the single point diamond turning technique (SPDT). However, the extreme hardness and the chemical properties of tungsten carbide lead to significant tool wear and therefore the impossibility of machining the work pieces in an economical way. One approach to enlarge the tool life is to affect the contact zone between tool and work piece by the use of special cutting fluids. This publication emphasizes on the most recent investigations and results in direct machining of nano-grained tungsten carbide with mono crystal diamonds under the influence of various kinds of cutting fluids. Therefore basic ruling experiments on binderless nano grained tungsten carbide were performed, where the tool performed a linear movement with a steadily increasing depth of cut. As the ductile cutting mechanism is a prerequisite for the optical manufacturing of tungsten carbide these experiments serve the purpose for establish the influence of different cutting fluid characteristics on the cutting performance of mono crystal diamonds. Eventually it is shown that by adjusting the coolant fluid it is possible to significantly shift the transition point from ductile to brittle removal to larger depths of cut eventually enabling a SPDT of binderless tungsten carbide molds.

  20. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  1. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Luong, V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop computational methods to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer, and to use these methods in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the coolant channels, was developed. The mode was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods. Parametric studies were performed to find a strategy for optimized combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  2. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The three-dimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved using the finite-volume method for a wide range of pressure drop laminar flows along the heat sink. The temperature and the mass flow rate distribution in the heat sink are discussed. The results, which are in good agreement with previous computational studies, show that using suggested heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system.

  3. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  4. Measurement of Coolant in a Flat Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Kei; Saito, Yasushi; Goshima, Takashi; Tsutsui, Toshio

    A newly developed flat heat pipe FGHPTM (Morex Kiire Co.) was experimentally investigated by using neutron radiography. The test sample of the FGHP heat spreader was 65 × 65 × 2 mm3 composed of several etched copper plates and pure water was used as the coolant. Neutron radiography was performed at the E-2 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The coolant distributions in the wick area of the FGHP and its heat transfer characteristics were measured at heating conditions. Experimental results show that the coolant distributions depend slightly on its installation posture and that the liquid thickness in the wick region remains constant with increasing heat input to the FGHP. In addition, it is found that the wick surface does not dry out even in the vertical posture at present experimental conditions.

  5. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  6. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants. PMID:18019146

  7. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-01

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  8. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-06

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  9. Polonium release from an ATW burner system with liquid lead-bismuth coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Yefimov, E.; Pankratov, D.

    1998-04-01

    The authors analyzed polonium release hazards in a conceptual pool-type ATW burner with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Simplified quantitative models are used based on experiments and real NPP experience. They found little Po contamination outside the burner under normal operating conditions with nominal leakage from the gas system. In sudden gas leak and/or coolant spill accidents, the P contamination level can reach above the regulation limit but short exposure would not lead to severe health consequences. They are evaluating and developing mitigation methods.

  10. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor) gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Loss of coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into modular gas-cooled reactor designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests were conducted with the 15-MW(electric), 46-MW(thermal), pebble-bed, high-temperature Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCa conditions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory participation in the preparation and conduct of the tests was carried out within the U.S./FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development.

  11. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  12. Development of a cleaning process for uranium chips machined with a glycol-water-borax coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    A chip-cleaning process has been developed to remove the new glycol-water-borax coolant from oralloy chips. The process involves storing the freshly cut chips in Freon-TDF until they are cleaned, washing with water, and displacing the water with Freon-TDF. The wash water can be reused many times and still yield clean chips and then be added to the coolant to make up for evaporative losses. The Freon-TDF will be cycled by evaporation. The cleaning facility is currently being designed and should be operational by April 1985.

  13. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  14. TRAC loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Savannah River production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lime, J.F.; Motley, F.E. )

    1990-06-01

    TRAC loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses were performed as part of the independent safety review of the US Department of Energy's Savannah River (SR) production reactors. The double-ended guillotine break in a coolant loop is a design-basis LOCA for the SR reactors. Three break locations were analyzed to determine the worst break location: (1) at the pump-suction flange; (2) at the pump discharge flange; or (3) at the plenum inlet. The plenum-inlet break was shown to be the most severe in terms of minimum flow delivered to each fuel assembly in the reactor core.

  15. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping. [Double-ended guillotine break

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-07-20

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB).

  16. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-05-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks.

  17. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User`s Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks.

  18. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  19. Effect of glycol-based coolants on the suppression and recovery of platinum fuel cell electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garsany, Yannick; Dutta, Sreya; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.

    2012-10-01

    We use cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry to study glycol-based coolant formulations to show that individual constituents have either negligible or significant poisoning effects on the nanoscale Pt/carbon catalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The base fluid in all these coolants is glycol (1, 3 propanediol), commercially available in a BioGlycol coolant formulation with an ethoxylated nonylphenol surfactant, and azole- and polyol-based non-ionic corrosion inhibitors. Exposure of a Pt/Vulcan carbon electrode to glycol-water or glycol-water-surfactant mixtures causes the loss of Pt electrochemical surface area (ECSA), but the Pt ECSA is fully recovered in clean electrolyte. Only mixtures with the azole corrosion inhibitor cause irreversible losses to the Pt ECSA and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. The Pt ECSA and ORR activity can only be recovered to within 70% of its initial values after aggressive voltammetric cycling to 1.50 V after azole poisoning. When poisoned with a glycol mixture containing the polyol corrosion inhibitor instead, the Pt ECSA and ORR activity is completely recovered by exposure to a clean electrolyte. The results suggest that prior to incorporation in a fuel cell, voltammetric evaluation of the constituents of coolant formulations is worthwhile.

  20. ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA644. A PRIMARY COOLANT PUMP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644. A PRIMARY COOLANT PUMP AND 24-INCH CHECK VALVE ARE MOUNTED IN A SHIELDED CUBICLE. NOTE CONNECTION AT RIGHT THROUGH SHIELD WALL TO PUMP MOTOR ON OTHER SIDE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4177. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ARE ARRANGED IN A ROW. IN REAR ARE THREE SHUTDOWN EMERGENCY PUMPS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4176. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Inverse design of coolant flow passage shapes with partially fixed internal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennon, S. R.; Dulikravich, G. S.

    1985-03-01

    A method has been developed for the design and analysis of complex coolant flow passage shapes in internally cooled turbine engines. The method is particularly applicable to turbine airfoil cascade inverse design but may also be applied to the design of other nonadiabatic boundaries such as missile cone tips and internal combustion engine cylinder. The method makes it possible to specify and fix the temperature or the heat flux at the turbine airfoil outer surface, together with the desired temperature at the coolant/blade interfaces. Coupled with an appropriate flow solver and stress analysis code, the method provides accurate estimates of the blade surface temperature and heat flux distribution in the coolant passage. A first order panel method is used to solve the Laplace equations for steady heat conduction within the solid portions of the hollow blade. In order to illustrate the efficiency of the method, numerical results are presented for the case of a turbine airfoil having three coolant holes. The discretized temperature contours for the inner and outer parts of the blade are illustrated in graphic form.

  3. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.; Krueger, K.; Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. . Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor)

    1989-01-01

    Loss-of-coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into small High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests have been conducted with the German pebble-bed High-Temperature Reactor AVR. The AVR is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCA conditions. The LOCA test was planned to create conditions that would exist if a rapid LOCA occurred with the reactor operating at full power. The tests demonstrated this reactor's safe response to an accident in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system is available to provide coolant flow to the core. The test is of special interest because it demonstrates the inherent safety features incorporated into modular HTGR designs. The main LOCA test lasted for 5 d. After the test began, core temperatures increased for {approximately}13 h and then gradually and continually decreased as the rate of heat dissipation from the core exceeded accident levels of decay power. Throughout the test, temperatures remained below limiting values for the core and other reactor components. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1990-01-01

    A landmark safety test has been conducted at the AVR-reactor, a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the Federal Republic of Germany owned by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor, AVR in Juelich. The 46-MW(t), 15-MW(e) AVR reactor was subjected to a simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), a very severe occurrence in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system provides coolant flow to the core. The test, which demonstrated the inherently safe response of this reactor to a LOCA, marked the first time ever that a reactor has been intentionally subjected to loss-of-coolant conditions without emergency cooling. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Atomics participated in the test by working with AVR staff by jointly performing the analyses needed to obtain the license to conduct the test and by performing post test analyses. This participation was carried out under the cooperative AVR Subprogram which is conducted within the US/FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development. 7 figs.

  5. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  6. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-05-05

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  7. In-core coolant flow monitoring of pressurized water reactors using temperature and neutron noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Shieh, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Noise measurements were performed at the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) and Sequoyah-1 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in order to investigate the possibility of inferring in-core coolant velocities from cross-power spectral density (CPSD) phases of core-exit thermocouple and in-core neutron detector signals. These noise measurements were used to investigate the effects of inlet coolant temperature, core flow, reactor power, and random heat transfer fluctuations on the noise-inferred coolant velocities. The effect on the inferred velocities of varying in-core neutron detector and core-exit thermocouple locations was also investigated. Theoretical models of temperature noise were developed, and the results were used to interpret the experimental measurements. Results of these studies indicate that the neutron detector/thermocouple phase is useful for monitoring core flow in PWRs. Results show that the interpretation of the phase between these signals depends on the source of temperature noise, the response times and locations of the sensors, and the neutron dynamics of the reactor. At Sequoyah-1 we found that the in-core neutron detector/core-exit thermocouple phase can be used to infer in-core coolant velocities, provided that the measurements are corrected for the thermocouple response time.

  8. MTR, TRA603. SUBBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER (NORTH SIDE) AND AIR (SOUTH SIDE). RABBIT CANAL AND BULKHEADS. SUMPS AND DRAINS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-3-7, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100006, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Method and apparatus for removing iodine from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing iodine-131 and iodine-125 from a liquid sodium reactor coolant. Non-radioactive iodine is dissolved in hot liquid sodium to increase the total iodine concentration. Subsequent precipitation of the iodine in a cold trap removes both the radioactive iodine isotopes as well as the non-radioactive iodine.

  10. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operated from the control room. (b) The design of the vents and associated controls, instruments and power sources must conform to appendix A and appendix B of this part. (c) The vent system must be designed to... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with...