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Sample records for leaf peroxidase isozyme

  1. Peroxidase Isozymes from Meloidogyne spp. and Their Origin

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Two peroxidase isozymes (Ef 0.43 and 0.53) were detected by electrophoretic analysis in homogenates of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. hapla, M. javanica, and M. incognita females reared on tomato. No peroxidase isozymes were detected electrophoretically in homogenates of adult males, preparasitic larvae, or eggs. Peroxidase isozymes from females reared on bean, eggplant, or tobacco differed from those from females reared on tomato. Bean and eggplant populations had a single peroxidase isozyme each, respectively Ef 0.21 and 0.28. No peroxidase isozymes were detected in tobacco populations under the conditions used, although total activity assays did reveal low levels of peroxidase activity in homogenates of tobacco populations. The peroxidase isozymes detected in females reared on tomato or bean appear similar to the peroxidase isozymes present in root-knot galls, adjacent ungalled roots, and roots from uninoculated plants of the corresponding hosts. The probability is discussed that most of the peroxittase activity associated with Meloidogyne spp. females is of host origin. PMID:19305520

  2. Studies on Polyphenol Content, Activities and Isozymes of Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase During Air-Curing in Three Tobacco Types 1

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, S. J.; Calvert, J.

    1969-01-01

    The change in polyphenol content in the primed leaves of burley, flue-cured, and Turkish tobaccos during air-curing was related to the activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The quantity of chlorogenic acid was rapidly reduced during the first week of curing. The decrease in rutin content during curing was less significant, especially when the concentration of chlorogenic acid was high in leaf tissues. This result was further confirmed by in vitro assays with partially purified tobacco polyphenol oxidase. The polyphenol oxidase activity did not differ at any stage of curing in the 3 tobaccos. When the activity was measured by the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine it rose rapidly during the first day of curing and then decreased sharply so that in the fully cured leaf only 15% activity remained. The increase in activity was not observed when chlorogenic acid was used as the substrate. A similar level of peroxidase activity was found in the 3 tobaccos before curing. Peroxidase activities increased rapidly during the first 24 hr of curing, declined thereafter, and remained highest in the flue-cured tobacco, less in the Turkish line, and least in the burley at the end of curing process. By polyacrylamide gel block electrophoresis, 10 peroxidase isozyme bands, 2 cationic and 8 anionic, appeared identical in all 3 tobaccos. When catechol replaced benzidine-2 HCl as the electron donor, 1 cationic and 2 anionic peroxidase isozymes did not form. Of interest is that the same 10 peroxidase isozyme bands also exhibited polyphenol oxidase activities when treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or chlorogenic acid. Results suggest that in the crude tobacco leaf extract the peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase may associate as protein complexes, and peroxidase isozymes may differ in electron-donor requirements. Isozyme patterns for both oxidases at various curing intervals differed only quantitatively. Images PMID:16657046

  3. Identification of IAA-oxidase in peroxidase isozymes from cotton plant leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the functions of plant peroxidase is to regulate the indole acetic acid (IAA) hormonal level by oxidizing it to inactive 3-methyleneoxyindole. IAA-binding proteins and plant peroxidase revealed five structurally similar fragments. We have isolated peroxidase isozymes with IAA-oxidase activit...

  4. Production and characterization of recombinant lignin peroxidase isozyme H2 from Phanerochaete chrysosporium using recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T M; Pease, E A; Li, J K; Tien, M

    1992-08-01

    Recombinant Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase isozyme H2 (pI 4.4) was produced in insect cells infected with a genetically engineered baculovirus containing a copy of the cDNA clone lambda ML-6. The recombinant enzyme was purified to near homogeneity and is capable of oxidizing veratryl alcohol, iodide, and, to a lesser extent, guaiacol. The Km of the recombinant enzyme for veratryl alcohol and H2O2 is similar to that of the fungal enzyme. The guaiacol oxidation activity or any other activity is not dependent upon Mn2+. The purified recombinant peroxidase is glycosylated with N-linked carbohydrate(s). The recombinant lignin peroxidase eluted from an anion exchange resin similar to that of native isozyme H1 rather than H2. However, the pI of the recombinant enzymes is different from both H1 and H2 isozymes. Further characterization of native isozymes H1 and H2 from the fungal cultures revealed identical N-terminus residues. This indicates that isozymes H1 and H2 differ in post-translational modification. PMID:1632652

  5. Chloroplasts and mitochondria have multiple heat tolerant isozymes of SOD and APX in leaf and inflorescence in Chenopodium album.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu; Jajoo, Anjana; Semwal, Vimal Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Thermal stability of antioxidant defense enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) was studied in chloroplasts and mitochondria of leaf and inflorescence in heat adaptive weed Chenopodium album. Leaf samples were taken in March (31°C/14°C) and young inflorescence (INF) was sampled at flowering in April (40°C/21°C). Leaf and INF chloroplast and mitochondrial fractions were subjected to elevated temperatures in vitro (5-100°C) for 30'. SOD and APX showed activity even after boiling treatment in both chloroplast and mitochondria of leaf and INF. SOD was more heat stable than APX in both chloroplasts and mitochondria in both the tissues. Chloroplast contained more heat stable SOD and APX isozymes than mitochondria in both leaf and INF. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing presence of thermostable APX isozymes (100°C for 30') in chloroplasts and mitochondria in C. album. Heat stable isozymes of SOD and APX in chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves and inflorescence may contribute to heat tolerance in C. album. PMID:21763282

  6. Involvement of Peroxidase and Indole-3-acetic Acid Oxidase Isozymes from Pear, Tomato, and Blueberry Fruit in Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Chaim

    1972-01-01

    Protein extracts were obtained from climacteric fruits (pear, tomato) and nonclimacteric fruits (blueberry) during various stages of ripening. The use of a gel electrophoresis technique revealed a consistent reinforcement in indoleacetic acid oxidase but not in peroxidase isozymes during ripening. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to the resistance of fruits to ripening and ethylene action. Images PMID:16658043

  7. Morphology and isozyme band-profile as sexual determinant of nutmeg plant (Myristica fragrants Houttj).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanah; Maslahat, M.; Nurhayati, dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex information in nutmeg plant is important to distinguish between male and female species. The recommendation of optimum sex-ratio for a nutmeg plantation is 1:10. This research is aimed to discover the morphological characteristic of nutmeg plant and the difference of leaf pattern as sexual determinant between male and female plant with the comparison of isozyme analysis. The result of morphological identification provided from 3 research farm location indicated that female nutmeg was higher, with longer and wider leaf, more vein, bigger diameter of stem and branching angle as compared to male nutmeg. Two parameters which were widht of leaf and branching angle showed significant differences, where female nutmeg plants have wider leaves and branching angle. Isozyme analysis suggested that the analysis of peroxidase enzyme (PER) was better and able to provide more information than aspartarte amino transferase (AAT) and acid phospatase (ACP) Enzymes.

  8. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Rabdosia serra (Maxim.) Hara leaf peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase and comparative evaluation of drying methods on leaf phenolic profile and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lianzhu; Lei, Fenfen; Sun, Da-Wen; Dong, Yi; Yang, Bao; Zhao, Mouming

    2012-10-15

    Inactivation kinetics of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase in fresh Rabdosia serra leaf were determined by hot water and steam blanching. Activation energy (52.30 kJ mol(-1)) of polyphenol oxidase inactivation was higher than that (20.15 kJ mol(-1)) of peroxidase. Water blanching at 90 °C or steam blanching at 100 °C for 90 s was recommended as the preliminary treatment for the retention of phenolics. Moreover, comparative evaluation of drying methods on the phenolics profiles and bioactivities of R. serra leaf were conducted. The results indicated that only intact leaf after freeze drying retained the initial quality. The sun- and air-dried leaves possessed identical phenolic profiles. The homogenised leaf (after freeze-drying) possessed a lower level of phenolics due to enzymatic degradation. Good antioxidant activities were detected for the sun- and air-dried leaves. There was insignificant difference in anti-tyrosinase and anti-α-glucosidase activities among sun-, air-, and freeze-dried leaves. PMID:23442652

  9. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  10. Characterization of leaf apoplastic peroxidases and metabolites in Vigna unguiculata in response to toxic manganese supply and silicon.

    PubMed

    Führs, Hendrik; Götze, Stefanie; Specht, André; Erban, Alexander; Gallien, Sébastien; Heintz, Dimitri; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Kopka, Joachim; Braun, Hans-Peter; Horst, Walter J

    2009-01-01

    Previous work suggested that the apoplastic phenol composition and its interaction with apoplastic class III peroxidases (PODs) are decisive in the development or avoidance of manganese (Mn) toxicity in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.). This study characterizes apoplastic PODs with particular emphasis on the activities of specific isoenzymes and their modulation by phenols in the Mn-sensitive cowpea cultivar TVu 91 as affected by Mn and silicon (Si) supply. Si reduced Mn-induced toxicity symptoms without affecting the Mn uptake. Blue Native-PAGE combined with Nano-LC-MS/MS allowed identification of a range of POD isoenzymes in the apoplastic washing fluid (AWF). In Si-treated plants Mn-mediated induction of POD activity was delayed. Four POD isoenzymes eluted from the BN gels catalysed both H(2)O(2)-consuming and H(2)O(2)-producing activity with pH optima at 6.5 and 5.5, respectively. Four phenols enhanced NADH-peroxidase activity of these isoenzymes in the presence of Mn(2+) (p-coumaric=vanillic>benzoic>ferulic acid). p-Coumaric acid-enhanced NADH-peroxidase activity was inhibited by ferulic acid (50%) and five other phenols (50-90%). An independent component analysis (ICA) of the total and apoplastic GC-MS-based metabolome profile showed that Mn, Si supply, and the AWF fraction (AWF(H(2)O), AWF(NaCl)) significantly changed the metabolite composition. Extracting non-polar metabolites from the AWF allowed the identification of phenols. Predominantly NADH-peroxidase activity-inhibiting ferulic acid appeared to be down-regulated in Mn-sensitive (+Mn, -Si) and up-regulated in Mn-tolerant (+Si) leaf tissue. The results presented here support the previously hypothesized role of apoplastic NADH-peroxidase and its activity-modulating phenols in Mn toxicity and Si-enhanced Mn tolerance. PMID:19286915

  11. Heterogeneity and regulation of manganese peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, E A; Tien, M

    1992-01-01

    Lignin and Mn peroxidases are two families of isozymes produced by the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium under nutrient nitrogen or carbon limitation. We purified to homogeneity the three major Mn peroxidase isozymes, H3 (pI = 4.9), H4 (pI = 4.5), and H5 (pI = 4.2). Amino-terminal sequencing of these isozymes demonstrates that they are encoded by different genes. We also analyzed the regulation of these isozymes in carbon- and nitrogen-limited cultures and found not only that the lignin and Mn peroxidases are differentially regulated but also that differential regulation occurs within the Mn peroxidase isozyme family. The isozyme profile and the time at which each isozyme appears in secondary metabolism differ in both nitrogen- and carbon-limited cultures. Each isozyme also responded differently to the addition of a putative inducer, divalent Mn. The stability of the Mn peroxidases in carbon- and nitrogen-limited cultures was also characterized after cycloheximide addition. The Mn peroxidases are more stable in carbon-limited cultures than in nitrogen-limited cultures. They are also more stable than the lignin peroxidases. These data collectively suggest that the Mn peroxidase isozymes serve different functions in lignin biodegradation. Images PMID:1592808

  12. The role of hydrogen peroxide-producing and hydrogen peroxide-consuming peroxidases in the leaf apoplast of cowpea in manganese tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fecht-Christoffers, Marion Maria; Führs, Hendrik; Braun, Hans-Peter; Horst, Walter Johannes

    2006-04-01

    The apoplast is considered the leaf compartment decisive for manganese (Mn) toxicity and tolerance in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). Particularly apoplastic peroxidases (PODs) were proposed to be key enzymes in Mn toxicity-induced processes. The presented work focuses on the characterization of the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing (NADH peroxidase) and H2O2-consuming peroxidase (guaiacol POD) in the apoplastic washing fluid (AWF) of leaves for early stages of Mn toxicity and genotypic differences in Mn tolerance of cowpea. Leaf AWF of the Mn-sensitive cultivar (cv) TVu 91 but not of the Mn-tolerant cv 1987 showed an increase of guaiacol-POD and NADH-peroxidase activities at elevated AWF Mn concentrations. two-dimensional resolutions of AWF proteins revealed that cv TVu 91 expressed more and additional proteins at high Mn treatment, whereas Mn-tolerant cv TVu 1987 remained nearly unaffected. In both cultivars, NADH-peroxidase activity and accompanied H2O2 formation rate in vitro were significantly affected by Mn2+, p-coumaric acid, and metabolites occurring in the AWF. The total phenol concentration in the AWF was indicative of advanced stages of Mn toxicity but was rather unrelated to early stages of Mn toxicity and genotypic differences in Mn tolerance. The NADH oxidation by AWF PODs was significantly delayed or enhanced in the presence of the protein-free AWF from cv TVu 1987 or cv TVu 91, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of AWF indicates the presence of phenols in cv TVu 1987 not observed in cv TVu 91. We conclude from our studies that the H2O2-producing NADH peroxidase and its modulation by stimulating or inhibiting phenolic compounds in the leaf apoplast play a major role for Mn toxicity and Mn tolerance in cowpea. PMID:16489137

  13. Superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase are constitutively more thermotolerant than other antioxidant enzymes in Chenopodium album.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu; Semwal, Vimal Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Thermal stability of antioxidant defense enzymes was investigated in leaf and inflorescence of heat adaptive weed Chenopodium album. Leaf samples were taken at early and late seedling stage in December (LD, 20 °C/4 °C) and March (LM, 31 °C/14 °C). Young inflorescence (INF) was sampled at flowering in April (40 °C/21 °C). LD, LM and INF crude protein extracts were subjected to elevated temperatures (5 to 100 °C) for 30'. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was the most heat stable enzyme followed by Ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Two heat stable SOD isozymes were visible on native-PAGE at 100 °C in both leaf and INF. Some heat stable APX isozymes were more abundant in INF than leaf. Thermostability of catalase (CAT) increased with age and increasing ambient temperatures in leaves. CAT activity was observed up to 60 °C in leaves and INF while peroxidase (POX) retained activity up to 100 °C in INF due to one thermostable isozyme. Glutathione reductase (GR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) showed activity up to 70 °C in both leaves and INF. DHAR activity was stable up to 60 °C while GR and MDHAR declined sharply after 40 °C. Constitutive heat stable isozymes of SOD and APX in leaves and INF may contribute towards heat tolerance in C. album. PMID:23573027

  14. Gel Separation of Isozymes To Study Relatedness of Common Bean Cultivars from ARound the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Paul; Oxley, Mary; Ealing, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Explains a three week laboratory experiment on the gel separation of peroxidase, which is the most well-known isozyme, from beans. Includes suggestions on the laboratory management. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  15. Preventive (myoglobin, transferrin) and scavenging (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) anti-oxidative properties of raw liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Mathew Folaranmi; Babatunde, Elizabeth Moyinoluwa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf has been demonstrated to have antiplasmodial activities. Some phytochemicals act as preventive and or scavenging antioxidants. This study aimed to investigate the preventative and scavenging properties of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf using plasma myoglobin, transferrin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight Plasmodium-infected patients aged 29-47 years that have not been treated with any antimalaria medication but have decided to be treated traditionally using M. lucida leaf extract were recruited from 15 traditional homes in ATISBO, Saki-East, and Saki-West local government areas of Oke-Ogun — the Northern part of Oyo State-Nigeria. Identification of Plasmodium in the blood of the test and normal control subjects were carried out by Giemsha thick film technique. Packed cell volume, total bile acids, blood glucose, blood pressure, plasma myoglobin, transferrin, SOD, and GSH peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in the normal control subjects and in the Plasmodium-infected patients before and after the treatment with raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Results: A significant (P < 0.05) biochemical alterations were observed in the plasma values of transferrin, SOD, and GPx in the Plasmodium-infected patients when compared with the normal control subjects and after treatment with the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Conclusion: Our study supports the possible preventative and scavenging antioxidative effect of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection. PMID:27003969

  16. Distinguishing clonal apple rootstocks by isozymes banding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, K; Modgil, M; Sharma, D R

    2001-11-01

    Molecular characterisation of clonal apple rootstocks using isozymes was carried out to identify isozyme polymorphism in seven clonal apple rootstocks and to identify the most characteristic and stable enzyme markers for each individual rootstock. Five enzyme systems were studied out of which polyphenol oxidase, malate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase and peroxidase were useful in discriminating among the rootstocks. The peroxidase enzyme system showed maximum variation and esterase showed the least variation among the rootstocks. Out of seven rootstocks, three were distinguished on the basis of one enzyme system only (M.3 with MDH or PER, M.7 with PPO or PER and MM. 111 with MDH). Out of the sixteen loci studied seven were found to be polymorphic. Genetic variation among the rootstocks was explained on the basis of various parameters. The percentage of polymorphic loci varied from 13.33 to 35.71 per cent. PMID:11906109

  17. Phenol-Oxidizing Peroxidases Contribute to the Protection of Plants from Ultraviolet Radiation Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marcel A.K.; van den Noort, Ria E.; Tan, M.Y. Adillah; Prinsen, Els; Lagrimini, L. Mark; Thorneley, Roger N.F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of UV protection in two duckweed species (Lemnaceae) by exploiting the UV sensitivity of photosystem II as an in situ sensor for radiation stress. A UV-tolerant Spirodela punctata G.F.W. Meyer ecotype had significantly higher indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels than a UV-sensitive ecotype. Parallel work on Lemna gibba mutants suggested that UV tolerance is linked to IAA degradation rather than to levels of free or conjugated IAA. This linkage is consistent with a role for class III phenolic peroxidases, which have been implicated both in the degradation of IAA and the cross-linking of various UV-absorbing phenolics. Biochemical analysis revealed increased activity of a specific peroxidase isozyme in both UV-tolerant duckweed lines. The hypothesis that peroxidases play a role in UV protection was tested in a direct manner using genetically modified tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris). It was found that increased activity of the anionic peroxidase correlated with increased tolerance to UV radiation as well as decreased levels of free auxin. We conclude that phenol-oxidizing peroxidases concurrently contribute to UV protection as well as the control of leaf and plant architecture. PMID:11457952

  18. Consequences of antisense down-regulation of a lignification-specific peroxidase on leaf and vascular tissue in tobacco lines demonstrating enhanced enzymic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Bahram; Daudi, Arsalan; Cook, Charis M; Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Ruel, Katia; Devoto, Alessandra; Bolwell, G Paul; Blee, Kristopher A

    2010-04-01

    Tobacco plants expressing an antisense construct for a cationic peroxidase, which down-regulated lignin content at the presumed level of polymerisation, have been further analysed. T(1) plants were derived from a large-scale screen of T(0) mutant lines, previously published, which identified lines demonstrating consistent lignin down-regulation. Of these, line 1074 which had the most robust changes in lignin distribution through several generations was shown to have accompanying down-regulation of transcription of most lignin biosynthesis genes, except cinnamoyl-CoA reductase. The consistent 20% reduction in lignin was not accompanied by significant gross changes in vascular polysaccharide content and composition, despite a modest up-regulation of transcripts of genes involved in cellulose and hemicellulose synthesis. Morphologically, 1074 plants have under-developed xylem with both fibers and vessels having thin cell walls and limited secondary wall thickening with an abnormal S2 layer. However, they were not compromised in overall growth. Nevertheless, these and other lines showed improved potential industrial utility through a threefold increase in enzymic saccharification efficiency compared with wild-type (wt). Therefore, they were profiled for further un-intended effects of transgenesis that might compromise their value for industrial or biofuel processes. Other phenotypic changes included increased leaf thickness and bifurcation at the tip of the leaf. wt-Plants had smaller chloroplasts and higher stomatal numbers than mutants. Transgenic lines also showed a variable leaf pigment distribution with light-green areas that contained measurably less chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids. Changes in epidermal pavement cells of mutant lines were also observed after exposure to various chemicals, while wt leaves retained their structural integrity. Despite these changes, the mutant plants grew and were viable indicating that lignification patterns can be manipulated

  19. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide. PMID:25046753

  20. Isozymes of antioxidative enzymes during ripening and storage of ber ( Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Yadav, Praduman; Jain, Veena; Malhotra, Sarla P

    2014-02-01

    Isozyme profile of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was studied during ripening and storage of two cultivars of ber fruit (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.) differing in their shelf-lives viz. Umran (shelf-life, 8-9 d) and Kaithali (shelf-life, 4-5 d). The profile revealed that Umran variety exhibited three bands each of SOD and POX while in Kaithali, these enzymes had two isoenzymes throughout ripening. CAT and APX, however, showed two isozymes each during ripening of both the varieties and the pattern remained the same at all the stages of ripening except at the initial stage i.e immature green stage where single CAT isozyme was visible. During storage, one extra band each of SOD and POX present only in Umran got disappeared at later stages of storage, whereas in Kaithali, the pattern remained unchanged. Also, there was no change in the pattern of CAT and APX isozymes during storage of both the varieties. One isozyme of CAT could be considered as ripening related while one isozyme each of SOD and POX could be related to higher shelf life of fruits. PMID:24493891

  1. Intracellular compartmentation of isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism in green leaves.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Herbert, M; Krüger, I

    1983-01-01

    The present paper has summarized evidence for the presence of two isozymes for many enzyme activities of sugar phosphate metabolism in plant leaves. These two isozymes are clearly compartmentalized in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol of plant leaf cells. In C4 plants there exists an additional isozyme in the mesophyll cells of these leaves in addition to the two isozymes in the bundle sheath cells. Such cell-compartment-specific and cell-specific isozymes provide duplicate (and possibly triplicate) enzyme systems for complete or almost complete pathways (ie, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway). They provide a basis for the understanding as to how many isozymes one may expect in plants. They also provide a challenge to determine what their function is particularly in the differential regulation of metabolic pathways in different cell compartments. Based on his genetic analyses Weeden [1981] has recently proposed a model for the evolution of chloroplast-specific isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism. This model rests on the endosymbiotic theory for the origin of chloroplasts. It still is highly speculative. However, cell-compartment specific isozymes may eventually provide a means of studying plant evolution, especially if we succeed in analyzing their primary structure. PMID:6629713

  2. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  3. Oxidation-reduction potentials and ionization states of extracellular peroxidases from the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Millis, C D; Cai, D Y; Stankovich, M T; Tien, M

    1989-10-17

    The oxidation-reduction potentials of lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8, and H10 as well as the Mn-dependent peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are reported. The potentiometric titrations involving the ferrous and ferric states of the enzyme had Nernst plots indicating single-electron transfer. The Em7 values of lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8, and H10 are -142, -135, -137, and -127 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode, respectively. The Em7 values for the Mn-dependent peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are -88 and -93 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode, respectively. The midpoint potential of H1, H8, and H4 remained unchanged in the presence of their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn(II). The midpoint potential between the ferric and ferrous forms of isozymes H1 and H4 exhibited a pH-dependent change between pH 3.5 and pH 6.5. These results indicate that the reductive half-reaction of the enzymes is the following: ferric peroxidase + le- + H+----ferrous peroxidase. Above pH 6.5, the effect of pH on the midpoint potential is diminished and indicates that an ionization with an apparent pKa equal to approximately 6.6-6.7 occurs in the reduced form of the enzymes. A heme-linked ionization group in the ferrous form of the enzymes was confirmed by studying the effect of pH on the absorption spectra of isozymes H1 and H4. These spectrophotometric pH titration experiments confirmed the electrochemical results indicating pKa values of 6.59 and 6.69 for reduced isozymes H1 and H4, respectively. These results indicate the presence of a heme-linked ionization of an amino acid in the reduced form of the lignin peroxidase isozymes similar to that of other plant peroxidases. PMID:2605198

  4. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  5. Widespread Occurrence of Expressed Fungal Secretory Peroxidases in Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J.; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R.; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  6. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized [veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)], we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  7. Isozyme variation in wild and cultivated pineapple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isozyme variation was studied in 161 accessions of pineapple including four species of Ananas and one of Pseudananas. Six enzyme systems (ADH, GPI, PGM, SKDH, TPI, UGPP) involving seven putative loci revealed 35 electromorphs . Considerable variation exists within and between species of Ananas. Sixt...

  8. Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16 Produces a Second Set of Plant-Inducible Pectate Lyase Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Kelemu, Segenet; Collmer, Alan

    1993-01-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi causes soft-rot diseases involving extensive tissue maceration in a wide variety of plants and secretes multiple pectic enzymes that degrade plant cell walls and middle lamellae. An E. chrysanthemi mutant with directed deletions or insertions in genes pehX, pelX, pelA, pelB, pelC, and pelE, which encode exo-poly-α-d-galacturonosidase, exopolygalacturonate lyase, and four isozymes of pectate lyase, respectively, was constructed by the marker exchange of a cloned pehX::TnphoA fragment into E. chrysanthemi CUCPB5010, a Δ(pelA pelE) Δ(pelB pelC)::28bp Δ(pelX)Δ4bp derivative of strain EC16. This mutant, E. chrysanthemi CUCPB5012, no longer caused pitting in a standard pectate semisolid agar medium used to detect pectolytic activity in bacteria. Nevertheless, the mutant still macerated leaves of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium), although with reduced virulence. The mutant was found to produce significant pectate lyase activity in rotting chrysanthemum tissue and in minimal media containing chrysanthemum extracts or cell walls as the sole carbon source. Activity-stained, ultra-thin-layer isoelectric focusing gels revealed the presence in these preparations of several pectate lyase isozymes with pIs ranging from highly acidic to highly alkaline. Sterile culture fluids containing these isozymes were able to macerate chrysanthemum leaf tissue. Unlike the products of the pelA, pelB, pelC, and pelE genes in E. chrysanthemi EC16, these plant-inducible pectate lyase isozymes were not produced in minimal medium containing pectate. The results suggest that E. chrysanthemi produces two sets of independently regulated pectate lyase isozymes that are capable of macerating plant tissues. Images PMID:16348952

  9. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S.; Church, W. Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1–4) are members of the pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70%) in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies. PMID:27314340

  10. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S; Church, W Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1-4) are members of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70%) in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies. PMID:27314340

  11. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  12. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an atypical manganese peroxidase of the litter-decomposing fungus Agrocybe praecox.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Archer, David B; Lundell, Taina K

    2014-11-01

    Agrocybe praecox is a litter-decomposing Basidiomycota species of the order Agaricales, and is frequently found in forests and open woodlands. A. praecox grows in leaf-litter and the upper soil and is able to colonize bark mulch and wood chips. It produces extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities and mineralizes synthetic lignin. In this study, the A. praecox MnP1 isozyme was purified, cloned and enzymatically characterized. The enzyme catalysed the oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), which is the specific reaction for manganese-dependent class II heme-peroxidases, in the presence of malonate as chelator with an activity maximum at pH 4.5; detectable activity was observed even at pH 7.0. The coding sequence of the mnp1 gene demonstrates a short-type of MnP protein with a slightly modified Mn(2+) binding site. Thus, A. praecox MnP1 may represent a novel group of atypical short-MnP enzymes. In lignocellulose-containing cultures composed of cereal bran or forest litter, transcription of mnp1 gene was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. On spruce needle litter, mnp1 expression was more abundant than on leaf litter after three weeks cultivation. However, the expression was constitutive in wheat and rye bran cultures. Our data show that the atypical MnP of A. praecox is able to catalyse Mn(2+) oxidation, which suggests its involvement in lignocellulose decay by this litter-decomposer. PMID:24657475

  13. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weert, Sandra; Lokman, B. Christien

    The industrial importance of peroxidases has led to much research in the past two decades on the development of a cost effective and efficient production process for peroxidases. Unfortunately, even today, no clear answers can be given to questions such as (1) should the peroxidase be expressed in bacteria, yeast, or fungi? (2) which is the optimal production strain (e.g., protease deficient, heme overproducing)? (3) which expression vector should be chosen? and (4) what purification method should be used? Strategies that have proven successful for one peroxidase can fail for another one; for each individual peroxidase, a new strategy has to be developed. This chapter gives an overview of the heterologous production of heme containing peroxidases in various systems. It focuses on the heterologous production of fungal peroxidases as they have been subject of considerable research for their industrial and environmental applications. An earlier study has also been performed by Conesa et al. [1] and is extended with recent proceedings.

  14. Redox Potential of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Marcela

    Redox potential of peroxidases greatly influences the range of oxidizable substrates: in principle, peroxidases may only catalyze the oxidation of substrates with lower redox potential. There is substantial information on the factors that modulate the redox potential of heme proteins. Both theoretical and experimental evidence highlight the most significant contributions arising from the interaction of heme iron with the axial ligands, as well as the electrostatic interactions surrounding the heme group. However, for different proteins, the factors contribute to different extents. Understanding the electrochemistry of heme peroxidases is fundamental in order to design enhanced biocatalysts. In this chapter, current knowledge of the forces influencing redox potential of heme peroxidases is reviewed.

  15. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  16. Nanostructures for peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  17. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  18. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  19. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  20. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  1. General and Versatile Autoinhibition of PLC Isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Stephanie N.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Gershburg, Svetlana; Seifert, Jason P.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John

    2008-10-31

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are directly activated by heterotrimeric G proteins and Ras-like GTPases to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate into the second messengers diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Although PLCs play central roles in myriad signaling cascades, the molecular details of their activation remain poorly understood. As described here, the crystal structure of PLC-{beta}2 illustrates occlusion of the active site by a loop separating the two halves of the catalytic TIM barrel. Removal of this insertion constitutively activates PLC-{beta}2 without ablating its capacity to be further stimulated by classical G protein modulators. Similar regulation occurs in other PLC members, and a general mechanism of interfacial activation at membranes is presented that provides a unifying framework for PLC activation by diverse stimuli.

  2. Structural diversity and transcription of class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Karen G; Justesen, Annemarie F; Kjaersgård, Inger V H; Jensen, Rikke B; Rasmussen, Søren K; Jespersen, Hans M; Duroux, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Understanding peroxidase function in plants is complicated by the lack of substrate specificity, the high number of genes, their diversity in structure and our limited knowledge of peroxidase gene transcription and translation. In the present study we sequenced expressed sequence tags (ESTs) encoding novel heme-containing class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana and annotated 73 full-length genes identified in the genome. In total, transcripts of 58 of these genes have now been observed. The expression of individual peroxidase genes was assessed in organ-specific EST libraries and compared to the expression of 33 peroxidase genes which we analyzed in whole plants 3, 6, 15, 35 and 59 days after sowing. Expression was assessed in root, rosette leaf, stem, cauline leaf, flower bud and cell culture tissues using the gene-specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We predicted that 71 genes could yield stable proteins folded similarly to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The putative mature peroxidases derived from these genes showed 28-94% amino acid sequence identity and were all targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum by N-terminal signal peptides. In 20 peroxidases these signal peptides were followed by various N-terminal extensions of unknown function which are not present in HRP. Ten peroxidases showed a C-terminal extension indicating vacuolar targeting. We found that the majority of peroxidase genes were expressed in root. In total, class III peroxidases accounted for an impressive 2.2% of root ESTs. Rather few peroxidases showed organ specificity. Most importantly, genes expressed constitutively in all organs and genes with a preference for root represented structurally diverse peroxidases (< 70% sequence identity). Furthermore, genes appearing in tandem showed distinct expression profiles. The alignment of 73 Arabidopsis peroxidase sequences provides an easy access to the identification of orthologous peroxidases

  3. Phylogeny congruence analysis and isozyme classification: the pyruvate kinase system.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Fournier, P; Auclair, J C

    1989-09-22

    As the isozymes of pyruvate kinase (PK) are best known in rats, the characteristics of the rat isozymes are generally used to classify the PK isozymes in other species. Given the discrepancies generated by this classification by analogy, we evaluated a classification using a phylogeny congruence analysis of the compositional relatedness of vertebrate PK's. While our phylogenetic analysis confirmed the well established separation of the L and R isozymes from the K and M isozymes, its power became most evident in the identification of non-orthologous (or variant) forms of PK. Our analysis emphasized the uniqueness of chicken liver PK which cannot be classified either as a K or an L isozyme, confirmed that tumors express a variety of forms of PK, and indicated that lungs systematically express PK's which are not orthologous with PK's from other tissues. The determination of orthology by the phylogeny congruence analysis assumes that the structural data from different sources are subject to similar methodological error. However, we cannot reject the possibility that an apparent lack of orthology be due to artifacts during purification and analysis. PMID:2615396

  4. Soybean roots retain the seed urease isozyme synthesized during embryo development. [Glycine max (L. ) Merr

    SciTech Connect

    Torisky, R.S.; Polacco, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    Roots of young soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants (up to 25 days old) contain two distinct urease isozymes, which are separable by hydroxyapatite chromatography. These two urease species (URE1 and URE2) differ in: (a) electrophoretic mobility in native gels, (b) pH dependence, and (c) recognition by a monoclonal antibody specific for the seed (embryo-specific) urease. By these parameters root URE1 urease is similar to the abundant embryo-specific urease isozyme, while root URE2 resembles the ubiquitous urease which has previously been found in all soybean tissues examined (leaf, embryo, seed coat, and cultured cells). The embryo-specific and ubiquitous urease isozymes are products of the Eu1 and Eu4 structural genes, respectively. Roots of the eu1-sun/eu1-sun genotype, which lacks the embryo-specific urease (i.e. seed urease-null), contain no URE1 urease activity. Roots of eu4/eu4, which lacks ubiquitous urease, lack the URE2 (leaflike) urease activity. From these genetic and biochemical criteria, then, we conclude that URE1 and URE2 are the embryo-specific and ubiquitous ureases, respectively. Adventitious roots generated from cuttings of any urease genotype lack URE1 activity. In seedling roots the seedlike (URE1) activity declines during development. Roots of 3-week-old plants contain 5% of the total URE1 activity of the radicle of 4-day-old seedlings, which, in turn, has approximately the same urease activity level as the dormant embryonic axis. The embryo-specific urease incorporates label from ({sup 35}S)methionine during embryo development but not during germination, indicating that there is no de novo synthesis of the embryo-specific (URE1) urease in the germinating root.

  5. Broccoli processing wastes as a source of peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Vázquez, Miguel A; García-Padilla, Sandra; García-Almendárez, Blanca E; Whitaker, John R; Regalado, Carlos

    2007-12-12

    A peroxidase isozyme (BP) was purified to homogeneity from broccoli stems ( Brassica oleraceae var. maraton) discarded from industrial processing wastes. BP specific activity was 1216 ABTS [2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] units/mg, representing 466-fold that of crude extract. BP is a monomeric glycoprotein containing 16% carbohydrates, with a molecular mass of 49 kDa and an isoelectric point close to 4.2. From kinetic data it showed a two-substrate ping-pong mechanism, and the catalytic efficiency measured as the rate-limiting step of free BP regeneration was 3.4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The ABTS K m value was 0.2 mM, which was about 20 times lower than that reported for acidic commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Assessment of BP secondary structure showed 30% helical character, similar to HRP and cytochrome c peroxidase. BP lost only 25% activity after 10 min of heating at 55 degrees C and pH 6; it was stable in the pH range from 4 to 9 and showed an optimum pH of 4.6 using ABTS as substrate. BP was active on substrates normally involved in lignin biosynthesis, such as caffeic and ferulic acids, and also displayed good catechol oxidation activity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Reverse micellar extraction was successfully used as potential large-scale prepurification of broccoli peroxidase, achieving a purification factor of 7, with 60% activity yield. Stems from the broccoli processing industry have a high potential as an alternative for peroxidase purification. PMID:17997521

  6. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  7. Peroxidase activity in Aloe barbadensis commercial gel: probable role in skin protection.

    PubMed

    Esteban, A; Zapata, J M; Casano, L; Martín, M; Sabater, B

    2000-12-01

    A basic peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) (pl around 9.0) has been identified in commercial gel of Aloe barbadensis. In vivo, the activity is localised in the vascular system of inner aqueous leaf parenchyma. Some relevant properties of this basic peroxidase of Aloe have been investigated in leaf extract and in commercial gel where it is notably stable. The acid optimum pH (5.0) for activity and the low KM for H2O2 (0.14 mM) suggest that, when topically applied, Aloe peroxidase may scavenge H2O2 in skin surface. PMID:11199129

  8. Characterization of manganese peroxidases from the hyperlignolytic fungus IZU-154.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, M; Suzuki, J; Deguchi, T; Miura, M; Kitaoka, Y

    1996-01-01

    Four isozymes of manganese peroxidase (MnP) were identified in the culture fluid of the hyperlignolytic fungus IZU-154 under nitrogen starvation conditions. One of them was purified and characterized kinetically. The specific activity and Kcat/K(m) value of the MnP from IZU-154 were 1.6 times higher than those of the MnP from a typical lignin-degrading fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Two cDNAs encoding MnP isozymes from IZU-154 were isolated. The coding sequence of the two cDNAs, IZ-MnP1 cDNA and IZ-MnP2 cDNA, were 1,152 (384 amino acids) and 1,155 (385 amino acids) bp in length, respectively. They exhibit 96.2% identity at the nucleotide level and 95.1% identity at the amino acid level. Southern blot analysis indicated that two MnP isozyme genes exist in IZU-154 genomic DNA. The primary structures of two MnPs from IZU-154 were similar to those of MnPs from P. chrysosporium. The amino acid sequences including the important residues identified in MnPs from P. chrysosporium, such as the manganese-binding residues, the calcium-binding residues, the disulfide bonds, and the N-glycosylation site, were conserved in the two deduced IZ-MnPs. However, several discrepancies were found in the context around the distal histidine residue between MnP from IZU-154 and MnP from P. chrysosporium, which likely led to the difference in the kinetic parameters for MnP function. PMID:8899997

  9. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase Isozyme Expression in Cotton Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, RN

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that expression of the five tetrameric catalase isozymes during postgerminative growth of cotton seedings was a consequence of interactions between two subunits (SU 1 and SU 2) temporally synthesized from two distinct catalase genes. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of these two catalase subunits during the changeover from glyoxysomal to leaf-type peroxisomal metabolism. The steady-state level of glyoxysomal SU 1 protein (present in 12-hour-old seeds) increased through day 3 and then declined linearly through day 6, whereas SU 2 protein (first detected in 24-hour-old seeds) increased continuously through day 6. The time courses for steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding these two subunits revealed two clearly separated peaks: the first at day 1 (SU 1) and the other at day 4 (SU 2). Accumulation of these mRNAs preceded the accumulation of their corresponding proteins by at least 24 hours, suggesting temporal, pretranslational regulation of synthesis of both subunits. Results from run-on transcriptional assays with isolated nuclei, however, revealed that transcripts encoding both subunits were synthesized together on days 1 through 5. Hence, it appears that the accumulations of SU 1 and SU 2 mRNAs are controlled primarily at the post-transcriptional level, which has not been reported for catalase or any other eukaryotic peroxisomal enzymes. The accumulation of SU 1 mRNA is not light dependent, whereas the accumulation of SU 2 mRNA, which directs synthesis of the predominant subunit comprising the leaf-type peroxisomal isozyme, occurs only after exposure of seedlings to light. PMID:12324611

  10. Differential Contribution of Lipoxygenase Isozymes to Nigrostriatal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Vivian P.; Holman, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    The 5- and 12/15- lipoxygenase (LOX) isozymes have been implicated to contribute to disease development in CNS disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These LOX isozymes are distinct in function, with differential effects on neuroinflammation, and the impact of the distinct isozymes in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not as yet been evaluated. To determine whether the isozymes contribute differently to nigrostriatal vulnerability, the effects of 5- and 12/15-LOX deficiency on dopaminergic tone under na ve and toxicant-challenged conditions were tested. In na ve mice deficient in 5-LOX expression, a modest but significant reduction (18.0% reduction vs. wildtype (WT)) in striatal dopamine (DA) was detected (n=6-8 per genotype). A concomitant decline in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme was also revealed in null 5-LOX vs. WT mice (26.2%); however, no changes in levels of DA or TH immunoreactivity were observed in null 12/15-LOX vs. WT mice. When challenged with the selective dopaminergic toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), WT mice showed marked reduction in DA (31.9%) and robust astrocytic and microglial activation as compared to saline-treated animals. In contrast, null 5-LOX littermates demonstrated no significant striatal DA depletion or astrogliosis (as noted by Western blot analyses for GFAP immunoreactivity). In na ve null 12/15-LOX mice, no significant change in striatal DA values was observed compared to WT, and following MPTP treatment, the transgenics revealed striatal DA reduction similar to the challenged WT mice. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that: (i) LOX isozymes are involved in the maintenance of normal dopaminergic function in the striatum, and (ii) the 5- and 12/15-LOX isozymes contribute differentially to striatal vulnerability in response to neurotoxicant challenge. PMID:23079635

  11. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h. PMID:12396133

  12. Developmental changes in the pyruvate kinase isozymes of coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H E; Cardenas, J M

    1979-04-01

    Pyruvate kinase exists as two major isozymes in coho salmon. As in mammals and birds, one form is present in the early embryo and maintains a wide tissue distribution in adults. This salmonid type K shows anodal migration during electrophoresis at pH 7.5. The appearence of functional musculature in the developing embryos. In adult animals this second form is the only pyruvate kinase in muscle. Brain, kidney, liver and gill contain primarily the type K pyruvate kinase while heart contains both major forms along with three intermediate forms which presumably constitute a hybrid set. Since there is no additional isozyme restricted to gluconeogenic tissues, we conclude that a type L isozyme has not developed in these animals. The two major isozymes are immunologically distincy. Both forms are dubject to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation of phosphoenolpyruvate binding, but the magnitude of the effect is small. The affinities for phosphoenolpyruvate are similar, but salmon type K has hyperbolic saturation curves with this substrate and type M has sigmoidal saturation curves. While the immunological data indicates considerable divergence in structure, the kinetic parameters of the two forms have remained relatively similar. PMID:469475

  13. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase in Tectona grandis: kinetics, stability, isozyme analysis and relationship with photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anita; Kumar, Pramod; Chawhaan, Pravin H; Singh, Sanjay; Ansari, S A

    2006-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC: 4.2.1.1) activity in teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) was studied to determine its characteristics, kinetics and isozyme patterns. We also investigated effects of leaf age, plant age and genotype on CA activity and gas exchange parameters. Carbonic anhydrase extracted from leaves in 12 mM veronal buffer, pH 7.8, had a K(m) for CO(2) of 15.20 mM and a V(max) of 35,448 U mg(-1) chlorophyll min(-1), which values declined by 50 and 70%, respectively, after 1 week of storage at 4 degrees C. A 15% native polyacrylamide gel revealed the absence of CA isozymes in teak, with only a single CA band of 45 kD molecular mass observed across 10 segregating half-sib families and groups of trees ranging in age from 10 to 25 years. Activity remained stable during the first month in storage at 0 degrees C, but gradually declined to 25% of the initial value after 1 year in storage. During the period of active growth (February-May), maximal CA activity was observed in fully expanded and illuminated leaves. Significant variation was observed in CA activity across 10 1-year-old half-sib families and 21 5-year-old half-sib families. There was a positive correlation between CA activity and photosynthetic rate in a population of 10-year-old trees (P < 0.005). Positive correlations between CA activity and photosynthetic rate were found in 10 of 21 5-year-old half-sib families (P < 0.005 to P < 0.05), which showed greater diversity in CA activity than in photosynthetic characteristics. Thus, CA may serve as a biochemical marker for photosynthetic capacity in teak genotypes. PMID:16651256

  15. Homologous expression of recombinant lignin peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Sollewijn Gelpke, M.D.; Mayfield-Gambill, M.; Lin Cereghino, G.P.; Gold, M.H.

    1999-04-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) promoter was used to drive expression of lip2, the gene encoding lignin peroxidase (LiP) isozyme H8, in primary metabolic cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression vector, pUGL, also contained the Schizophyllum commune ura1 gene as a selectable marker. pUGL was used to transform a P. chrysosporium Ura11 auxotroph to prototrophy. Ura{sup +} transformants were screened for peroxidase activity in liquid cultures containing high-carbon and high-nitrogen medium. Recombinant LiP (rLiP) was secreted in active form by the transformants after 4 days of growth, whereas endogenous lip genes were not expressed under these conditions. Approximately 2 mg of homogeneous rLiP/liter was obtained after purification. The molecular mass, pI, and optical absorption spectrum of rLiPH8 were essentially identical to those of the wild-type LiPH8 (wt LiPH8), indicating that heme insertion, folding, and secretion functioned normally in the transformant. Steady-state and transient-state kinetic properties for the oxidation of veratryl alcohol between wtLiPH8 and rLiPH8 were also identical.

  16. Different Functions of Phylogenetically Distinct Bacterial Complex I Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Brickner, Joshua R.; Mollet, Jordan T.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a bioenergetic enzyme that transfers electrons from NADH to quinone, conserving the energy of this reaction by contributing to the proton motive force. While the importance of NADH oxidation to mitochondrial aerobic respiration is well documented, the contribution of complex I to bacterial electron transport chains has been tested in only a few species. Here, we analyze the function of two phylogenetically distinct complex I isozymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an alphaproteobacterium that contains well-characterized electron transport chains. We found that R. sphaeroides complex I activity is important for aerobic respiration and required for anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respiration (in the absence of light), photoautotrophic growth, and photoheterotrophic growth (in the absence of an external electron acceptor). Our data also provide insight into the functions of the phylogenetically distinct R. sphaeroides complex I enzymes (complex IA and complex IE) in maintaining a cellular redox state during photoheterotrophic growth. We propose that the function of each isozyme during photoheterotrophic growth is either NADH synthesis (complex IA) or NADH oxidation (complex IE). The canonical alphaproteobacterial complex I isozyme (complex IA) was also shown to be important for routing electrons to nitrogenase-mediated H2 production, while the horizontally acquired enzyme (complex IE) was dispensable in this process. Unlike the singular role of complex I in mitochondria, we predict that the phylogenetically distinct complex I enzymes found across bacterial species have evolved to enhance the functions of their respective electron transport chains. IMPORTANCE Cells use a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP to support numerous processes. In mitochondria, complex I uses NADH oxidation to generate a PMF, which can drive ATP synthesis. This study analyzed the function of complex I in bacteria, which contain more

  17. Pyruvate kinases of salmon: purification and comparison with the isozymes from birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Cardenas, J M

    1980-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase occurs as two major forms in coho salmon; the type M isozyme occurs primarily in muscle and heart, but type K has a more generalized tissue distribution, in parallel with the type K isozyme in other vertebrate systems. In order to assess the evolutionary relationships among the fish, avian, and mammalian isozymes of pyruvate kinase, we have purified the two isozymes from fish, have examined some of their physical properties, and have studied their immunological relationships to the avian and mammalian isozymes. Salmon type K is at least partially inactivated by antibody to bivine type L pyruvate kinase as well as by antibodies produced against chicken, bovine, and salmon type M isozymes. Salmon type M pyruvate kinase, on the other hand, is not significantly corss-reactive with the bovine type L isozyme, but is at least partially inactivated by antibodies produced against bovine or chicken type M isozymes. Mammalian type L pyruvate kinase is immunologically distinct from either mammalian type K or type M, but salmon type K has some structural features in common with all three mammalian isozymes. Thus, salmon fish type K pyruvate kinase could be similar to a primordial form that was antecedent to the three major differentiated isozymes of higher vertebrates. PMID:7373271

  18. Changes in chalazal cell walls and in the peroxidase enzymes of the crease region during grain development in barley.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, M P; Paterson, L; Gould, E

    2000-03-01

    In an investigation of the role of peroxidase enzymes in the differentiation of the tissues of the crease region of barley, plants of winter barley cv. Halcyon were grown from anthesis onwards in controlled conditions at a constant temperature of 16 degrees C. Four ears were harvested at 2-d intervals from 6 d after anthesis (daa) until 50 daa. Grains from mid-ear were used for (i) fresh and dry weight determinations, (ii) extraction of crease tissue for the determination of peroxidase activity and for the separation of isozymes of peroxidase by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and (iii) detection of lignin and suberin in the tissues of the crease using autofluorescence and cytochemistry. Peroxidase activity was located histochemically in the crease tissue of cv. Chariot. Scanning electron microscopy studies were carried out on developing grains of cv. Blenheim. Maximum grain water content was achieved at 14 daa. Lignin and suberin were detected in the walls of the chalazal cells from 18 daa onwards. No changes in the staining of chalazal cell walls were detected at the end of grain filling (32 daa), but loss of autofluorescence and staining were observed at 42 daa, just prior to the final, rapid phase of grain dehydration. Peroxidase activity per fresh weight of crease tissue was high at 6 daa and low at 22 daa. It was also low between 32 and 40 daa, but it rose again from 42 daa onwards. IEF demonstrated that both anionic and cationic isozymes of peroxidase were present in crease tissue, the pattern of bands showing some marked changes during the course of grain development. PMID:10938807

  19. Crystal structure and statistical coupling analysis of highly glycosylated peroxidase from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandra; de Moura, Patricia Ribeiro; Bleicher, Lucas; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Zamorano, Laura S; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Pérez, Alicia; Bursakov, Sergey; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP) is a very stable enzyme in regards to acidity, temperature, H(2)O(2), and organic solvents. Thus, RPTP is a promising candidate for developing H(2)O(2)-sensitive biosensors for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry. RPTP belongs to the family of class III secretory plant peroxidases, which include horseradish peroxidase isozyme C, soybean and peanut peroxidases. Here we report the X-ray structure of native RPTP isolated from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) refined to a resolution of 1.85A. RPTP has the same overall folding pattern of the plant peroxidase superfamily, and it contains one heme group and two calcium-binding sites in similar locations. The three-dimensional structure of RPTP was solved for a hydroperoxide complex state, and it revealed a bound 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid molecule (MES) positioned at a putative substrate-binding secondary site. Nine N-glycosylation sites are clearly defined in the RPTP electron-density maps, revealing for the first time conformations of the glycan chains of this highly glycosylated enzyme. Furthermore, statistical coupling analysis (SCA) of the plant peroxidase superfamily was performed. This sequence-based method identified a set of evolutionarily conserved sites that mapped to regions surrounding the heme prosthetic group. The SCA matrix also predicted a set of energetically coupled residues that are involved in the maintenance of the structural folding of plant peroxidases. The combination of crystallographic data and SCA analysis provides information about the key structural elements that could contribute to explaining the unique stability of RPTP. PMID:19854274

  20. Isozyme gene expression in potato tumors incited by Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J L

    1986-06-01

    Two plant tumors (crown galls and hairy roots) were experimentally provoked on potato cv. 'Désirée' by oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes. A marked shift in the expression of some organ-specific genes occurred in crown galls derived from the central zone of tubers: two novel isozyme genes (Est-B and Pox-E) were expressed, two others (Est-C and Pox-F) were suppressed and the remaining ones were maintained in the original state. When the starting tissue was the stem segment, a smaller shift occurred, namely the activation of Adh-A and the suppression of Pox-F. In all cases, the isozyme profiles characterizing all crown galls, whatever their origin, were identical. Under normal aeration conditions, Adh-A was not expressed in either tumoral or non-tumoral roots. However, under the relative anaerobic conditions of in vitro cultures, a difference existed between both types of roots: Adh-A was expressed in normal but not in tumoral roots. This means that hairy roots can tolerate higher levels of anaerobiosis without giving rise to an anaerobic response. For the remaining isozymes, no alteration occurred in either organized (hairy root) or unorganized (crown gall) tumors, as compared to the corresponding non-tumoral tissues (normal root and callus, respectively). PMID:24247945

  1. Isozymes of Ipomoea batatas catechol oxidase differ in catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, C; Eicken, C; Magrini, A; Meyer, H E; Rompel, A; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    2001-07-01

    The amino acid sequences of two isozymes of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) were determined by Edman degradation of BrCN cleavage fragments of the native protein and by sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of plant catechol oxidases revealed about 80% equidistance between the two I. batatas catechol oxidases and approximately 40--60% to catechol oxidases of other plants. When H(2)O(2) was applied as substrate the 39 kDa isozyme, but not the 40 kDa isozyme, showed catalase-like activity. The structure of the 40 kDa isozyme was modeled on the basis of the published crystal structure of the 39 kDa isozyme [T. Klabunde et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084]. The active site model closely resembled that of the 39 kDa isozyme determined by crystallography, except for a mutation of Thr243 (40 kDa isozyme) to Ile241 (39 kDa isozyme) close to the dimetal center. This residue difference affects the orientation of the Glu238/236 residue, which is thought to be responsible for the catalase-like activity of the 39 kDa isozyme for which a catalytic mechanism is proposed. PMID:11451442

  2. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  3. ISOZYME PROFILES OF LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE AND CREATINE PHOSPHOKINASE IN NEONATAL MOUSE HEARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isozyme profiles of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were determined in cardiac tissue of mice during postnatal development. LDH isozymes 1 and 5 showed a definite developmental change, achieving the adult values by 20 days of age, while the other three...

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF THE GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE ISOZYME GSP1 IN MAIZE (ZEA MAYS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher plants contain families of glutamine synthetase (GS) isozymes. In maize (Zea mays L.), GSp1, the predominant GS isozyme of the developing kernel, is abundant in the pedicel and pericarp, but absent from the endosperm and embryo. Determination of GSp1 tissue distribution in vegetative tissue...

  5. A protein kinase C isozyme is translocated to cytoskeletal elements on activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Henrich, C J; Cheever, L; Khaner, H; Simpson, P C

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)1 isozymes comprise a family of related cytosolic kinases that translocate to the cell particulate fraction on stimulation. The activated enzyme is thought to be on the plasma membrane. However, phosphorylation of protein substrates occurs throughout the cell and is inconsistent with plasma membrane localization. Using an isozyme-specific monoclonal antibody we found that, on activation, this PKC isozyme translocates to myofibrils in cardiac myocytes and to microfilaments in fibroblasts. Translocation of this activated PKC isozyme to cytoskeletal elements may explain some of the effects of PKC on cell contractility and morphology. In addition, differences in the translocation site of individual isozymes--and, therefore, phosphorylation of different substrates localized at these sites--may explain the diverse biological effects of PKC. Images PMID:2078573

  6. Comprehensive Characterization of Cytochrome P450 Isozyme Selectivity across Chemical Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; James, Tim; Fayne, Darren; Artemenko, Natalia; Shen, Min; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Lloyd, David G.; Auld, Douglas S.

    2009-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene family strongly influences drug development. We determined potency values for 17,143 compounds against recombinant CYP 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 enzymes through an in vitro bioluminescent assay. The compound collections included substances from typical libraries and FDA-approved drugs. Cross-library isozyme inhibition (30–78%) was observed with important differences between collections. While only 7% of the typical screening library was inactive against all five isozymes, 33% of FDA-approved drugs were inactive, reflecting the optimized pharmacological properties of the latter. Unexpectedly, drugs exhibited less activity towards the CYP 2C9 and 2C19 isozymes compared to un-optimized collections. We then identified substructures that differentiated between the five isozymes as well as substructures trending towards active or inactive categories. We describe here a pharmacological compendium to further the understanding of CYP isozymes. PMID:19855396

  7. Oxidative stress response of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease in banana plants, to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Manzo-Sanchez, Gilberto; Guzmán-González, Salvador; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Avila-Miranda, Martin; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2009-07-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis causes black leaf streak disease in banana and plantain. This fungus is usually attacked by reactive oxygen species secreted by the plant or during exposure to fungicide, however, little is known about the antioxidant response of the fungus. In this study, mycelia were observed to totally decompose 30 mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) within 120 min, liberating oxygen bubbles, and also to survive in concentrations as high as 100 mmol/L H2O2. The oxidative stress responses to H2O2, paraquat, and hydroquinone were characterized in terms of the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Two active catalase bands were seen in native PAGE induced by H2O2. Band I had monofunctional activity and band II had bifunctional catalase-peroxidase activity. Two isozymes of SOD, distinguishable by their cyanide sensitivity, were found; CuZnSOD was the main one. The combination of H2O2 and 3-aminotriazole reduced the accumulation of biomass up to 40% compared with exposure to H2O2 alone, suggesting that catalase is important for the rapid decomposition of H2O2 and has a direct bearing on cell viability. The results also suggest that the superoxide anion formed through the redox of paraquat and hydroquinone has a greater effect than H2O2 on the cellular viability of M. fijiensis. PMID:19767862

  8. High-yield production of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Guzmán-Ortiz, Doralinda A; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium secretes extracellular oxidative enzymes during secondary metabolism, but lacks versatile peroxidase, an enzyme important in ligninolysis and diverse biotechnology processes. In this study, we report the genetic modification of a P. chrysosporium strain capable of co-expressing two endogenous genes constitutively, manganese peroxidase (mnp1) and lignin peroxidase (lipH8), and the codon-optimized vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii. For this purpose, we employed a highly efficient transformation method based on the use of shock waves developed by our group. The expression of recombinant genes was verified by PCR, Southern blot, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and assays of enzymatic activity. The production yield of ligninolytic enzymes was up to four times higher in comparison to previously published reports. These results may represent significant progress toward the stable production of ligninolytic enzymes and the development of an effective fungal strain with promising biotechnological applications. PMID:25269601

  9. Antifungal Properties of Haem Peroxidase from Acorus calamus

    PubMed Central

    GHOSH, MODHUMITA

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants have evolved a number of inducible defence mechanisms against pathogen attack, including synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins. The aim of the study was to purify and characterize antifungal protein from leaves of Acorus calamus. • Methods Leaf proteins from A. calamus were fractionated by cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration and the fraction inhibiting the hyphal extension of phytopathogens was characterized. The temperature stability and pH optima of the protein were determined and its presence was localized in the leaf tissues. • Key Results The purified protein was identified as a class III haem peroxidase with a molecular weight of approx. 32 kDa and pI of 7·93. The temperature stability of the enzyme was observed from 5 °C to 60 °C with a temperature optimum of 36 °C. Maximum enzyme activity was registered at pH 5·5. The pH and temperature optima were corroborated with the antifungal activity of the enzyme. The enzyme was localized in the leaf epidermal cells and lumen tissues of xylem, characteristic of class III peroxidases. The toxic nature of the enzyme which inhibited hyphal growth was demonstrated against phytopathogens such as Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Trichosporium vesiculosum. Microscopic observations revealed distortion in the hyphal structure with stunted growth, increased volume and extensive hyphal branching. • Conclusions This study indicates that peroxidases may have a role to play in host defence by inhibiting the hyphal extension of invading pathogens. PMID:17056613

  10. Comparative Diversity Analysis of Rflps and Isozymes within and among Populations of Hordeum Vulgare Ssp. Spontaneum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q.; Maroof, MAS.; Kleinhofs, A.

    1993-01-01

    DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and isozyme variation were surveyed in 268 accessions of a wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) sampled from diverse ecogeographical areas in Israel and Iran. A total of 24 markers was used: 7 well characterized isozyme loci and 15 DNA probes which detected 17 putative loci and included three classes of DNA sequences (single copy, low copy and repetitive) representing all 7 barley chromosomes. Survey results indicated that both RFLPs and isozymes are highly polymorphic both within and among populations of this wild barley. The number of alleles per locus and average level of diversity do not differ between isozymes and RFLPs. However, the relative amounts of within vs. between population components vary greatly between these two sets of molecular markers. Isozymes demonstrated a larger amount of within population diversity, whereas RFLPs resolved a higher proportion of between population differentiation. Furthermore, RFLPs detected more heterozygosity than did isozymes. Both classes of markers resolved large numbers of multilocus combinations, the majority of which were represented by only one individual in the total sample. Up to 30% of the loci differ among individuals within populations, and about 50% of the loci differ among plants in different populations. While many important aspects of population diversity as determined by RFLPs are significantly correlated with those of isozymes, such correlation values are generally low, indicating that only a small proportion of the genetic variation detected by one class of markers can be predicted by the other. PMID:8102343

  11. Induction of Barley Leaf Urease 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuguang; Ching, Te May

    1988-01-01

    Foliar urea application on barley plants increased leaf urease activity for 5 hours with a peak of 20-fold at 2 hours. To discern the mode of urease induction, urea with or without inhibitors and [35S]methionine were incubated with leaf sections for different lengths of time. Urease was extracted, partially purified, electrophoresed, and then quantified by fluorogram. Five urease (U) isozymes were separated by PAGE. Ua and Ub might be polymers or complexes that occurred only at the peak of induced activity. U1 and U2 appeared at 0.5 and 0.75 hour, respectively, after urea induction, peaked at 2 hours, and persisted only in treated leaves for several additional hours indicating that they are transient inducible forms. U3 was the constitutive form present in control and treated leaves. Induction with cordycepin or cycloheximide completely prevented urea stimulated activity and nullified the existence of isozymes Ua, Ub, U1, and U2. 35S-U1, which was labeled in the last hour of induction, appeared on fluorogram 1 hour after induction, peaked at 2 hours, and declined at 3 hours. Results indicated that de novo synthesis of urease is activated by the influx of urea. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16666013

  12. Peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities of isolated human myeloperoxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, B E; Domeij, K; Lindvall, S; Rydell, G

    1987-01-01

    Isolated neutrophils from healthy donors were used for the isolation of four highly purified forms of myeloperoxidase as determined by spectral (A430/A280 ratio 0.80-0.87) and enzyme-activity measurements. Although the myeloperoxidases exhibited different elution profiles on cation-exchange chromatography, gel filtration indicated similar relative molecular masses. When these forms were assayed for peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities with several substrates, they all exhibited virtually the same specific activities. These results suggest that possible functional differences between the enzymes may be related to differences in their sites of action rather than to differences in enzyme activity. Myeloperoxidase from a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia also revealed a similar heterogeneity on cation-exchange chromatography. However, this myeloperoxidase contained in addition one form with a lower and one form with a higher relative molecular mass, as indicated by gel-filtration chromatography. PMID:3036098

  13. Electron Transfer between Cytochrome C and Cytochome C Peroxidase in Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong A.; Marjavaara, Pieti J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-11-10

    Cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) form an important redox pair for understanding interprotein electron transfer (ET). Measurements of ET rates from photoexcited CcP substituted with Zn porphyrin to either yeast Fe(III)Cc or horse Fe(III)Cc in crystals reveal that the molecular associations found in the respective crystal structures determine solution reactivity. Similar forward rates for yeast isozyme-1 Cc (yCc) and yCc homologue horse Cc (hCc), despite different orientations relative to CcP, suggest small-amplitude conformational gating of ET even in the crystalline state; faster back ET in the yCc compared to the hCc complex agrees with the relative coupling between redox sites predicted by the structures.

  14. Lignin-degrading peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Tien, M

    1993-07-01

    Lignin and manganese peroxidases are secreted by the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium during secondary metabolism. These enzymes play major roles in lignin degradation. The active site amino acid sequence of these lignin-degrading peroxidases is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). The mechanism by which they oxidize substrates also appears to be the similar. pH has a similar effect on lignin peroxidase compound I formation as on HRP or CcP; however, the pKa controlling compound I formation for lignin peroxidase appears to be much lower. Lignin-degrading peroxidases are able to catalyze the oxidation of substrates with high redox potential. This unique ability is consistent with a heme active site of low electron density, which is indicated by high redox potential. PMID:7763834

  15. Evolution of the amylase isozymes in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Y; Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    1999-10-01

    The relationship between the net charge of molecules and their mobility on electrophoresis was analyzed for Drosophila alpha-amylases. Most of the differences in electrophoretic mobility, 98.2%, can be explained by the charge state. Therefore five reference amino acid sites, which are informative residues for charge differences among amylase isozymes, were considered for the evolution of the isozymes in Drosophila melanogaster. The amylase isozymes in D. melanogaster can be classified into three groups, I (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3-A), II (AMY3-B and AMY4), and III (AMY5, AMY6-A, and AMY6-B), based on the differences in the reference sites. The most primitive amylase in D. melanogaster was found to belong to Group I, most likely the AMY2 isozyme. Groups II and III could have been derived from Group I. These results were confirmed by the analysis of 38 amino acid sites with charge differences in Drosophila. PMID:10626037

  16. An efficient strategy to enhance binding affinity and specificity of a known isozyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jee, Joo-Eun; Lim, Jaehong; Ong, Yong Siang; Oon, Jessica; Gao, Liqian; Choi, Hak Soo; Lee, Su Seong

    2016-07-12

    The binding profile of a known inhibitor, benzenesulfonamide, against a family of carbonic anhydrase isozymes was efficiently enhanced via high-throughput screening of customized combinatorial one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries modified with the inhibitor molecule. The screening of the conjugate libraries recognized subtle variations in the microenvironments of the target enzyme and thus facilitated the identification of short peptide sequences that bind selectively to a close proximity of the active site. The identified peptide portions contributed significantly to the overall binding of the conjugate peptides with greatly enhanced affinity as well as improved specificity towards the target isozyme. The interactions between the inhibitors and the isozymes were validated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), pull-down assay and enzymatic activity measurement. This high-throughput approach proved useful and efficient to enhance the binding profile of known inhibitors and may apply to developing effective inhibitors for a wide range of isozyme families. PMID:27339902

  17. Identification and expression of a novel carbonic anhydrase isozyme in the pufferfish Takifugu vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Kanij Rukshana; Nou, Ill-Sup; Kho, Kang Hee

    2016-08-22

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a key element for maintaining acid base balance in fish. In our present experiment, novel CA isozymes were identified from the pear puffer (Takifugu vermicularis). Based on the high homology of two predicted CA sequences of the tiger puffer (Takifugu rubripes), a 1715bp novel cDNA was obtained from T. vermicularis. The open reading frame showed a complete coding sequence of 552bp with a deduced peptide sequence of 183 amino acids that exhibited highest (97%) identity with pufferfish putative CA III and CA IV-like sequences. In addition, this translated protein sequence showed 36-37% identity with zebrafish CA IV-like, CA XVa, CA XVb, and CA XVc proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the pufferfish novel protein (pCAn) was a membrane-bound CA protein. Alignment of multiple CA sequences illustrated that most of the putative active site residues of the pCAn isozyme were situated at highly conserved regions of the CA sequences. Examination of motif distribution suggested that the pCAn isozyme was very similar to the puffer predicted CA IV-like isozyme. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed highly differential expression in the brain, gills, kidney, and muscle, whereas CA mRNA expression was almost absent in heart, liver, and intestine. Quantitative PCR expression of CA mRNA abundance suggested several-fold higher expression of pCAn isozymes in the gills compared to other tissues tested. Our results suggest that the pCAn isozyme might be related to CA IV-like isozymes. Further functional studies are needed to investigate the function of the pCAn isozyme in T. vermicularis. PMID:27188255

  18. First comparative phenetic studies of Argentinean species of Acacia (Fabaceae), using morphometric, isozymal, and RAPD approaches.

    PubMed

    Casiva, Paola V; Saidman, Beatriz O; Vilardi, Juan C; Cialdella, Ana M

    2002-05-01

    Morphological and genetic diversity among Acacia aroma, A. macracantha, A. caven, and A. furcatispina were studied with morphometric, isozymal, and RAPD approaches. The analysis of seven isozyme systems revealed 21 loci, and RAPD analysis showed 34 loci. Most of these loci allowed us to differentiate the species, with the exception of A. aroma and A. macracantha, the two most similar species. The levels of genetic variability estimated by isozymes were higher than those obtained from RAPD analyses. Morphometric characters showed highly significant differences among the species, although A. aroma and A. macracantha are differentiated only by thorn length. The phenogram obtained from isozyme data is consistent with morphological data. The RAPD phenogram based on allelic frequencies showed agreement with morphological and isozymal approaches only at the intraspecific levels, while the RAPD phenogram based on Nei and Li's similarity measures agreed with the phenograms constructed from isozyme and morphological data. High similarities and high indirect gene flow were found between A. aroma and A. macracantha, results that call the relationship between them into question. PMID:21665685

  19. Purification of homologous protein carboxyl methyltransferase isozymes from human and bovine erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.M.; Fowler, A.; Bleibaum, J.; Clarke, S.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have purified the two major isozymes of the L-isoaspartyl/D-aspartyl protein methyltransferase from both human and bovine erythrocytes. These four enzymes all have polypeptide molecular weights of approximately 26,500 and appear to be monomers in solution. Each of these enzymes cross-reacts with antibodies directed against protein carboxyl methyltransferase I from bovine brain. Their structures also appear to be similar when analyzed by dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis for the large fragments produced by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease V8 or when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for tryptic peptides. The structural relatedness of these enzymes was confirmed by sequence analysis of a total of 433 residues in 32 tryptic fragments of the human erythrocyte isozymes I and II and of the bovine erythrocyte isozyme II. They found sequence identity or probable identity in 111 out of 112 residues when they compared the human isozymes I and II and identities in 127 out of 134 residues when the human and bovine isozymes II were compared. These results suggest that the erythrocyte isozymes from both organisms may have nearly identical structures and confirm the similarities in the function of these methyltransferases that have been previously demonstrated.

  20. Evolution of the functional properties of pyruvate kinase isozymes: pyruvate kinase L from Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Guderley, H

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory properties of type L pyruvate kinase from Rana pipiens are intermediate between those of the mammalian K and L isozymes. As with mammalian type L, the levels of the frog isozyme are affected by the animal's nutritional state. The mammalian and amphibian isozymes show similar sensitivities to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation and amino acid inhibition. By contrast, the frog L isozyme shares several properties of the K class: i.e. irreversible inactivation by oxidized glutathione and lack of response to a cyclic AMP stimulated phosphorylation. Furthermore, as for some mammalian K isozymes, frog type L shows a high PEP affinity and a low cooperativity of PEP binding. Insofar as the properties of this present day enzyme reflect those of its counterpart in the amphibian ancestor of higher vertebrates, our results suggest that at its first expression, the type L resembled the type K. Many important regulatory properties of the L isozyme, especially the sensitivity to phosphorylation, were acquired more recently perhaps in association with an increased importance of constant blood glucose. PMID:3489743

  1. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  2. Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant. PMID:24078924

  3. Screening Actinomycetes for Extracellular Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, D. K.; Iqbal, M.; Miller, P.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A diverse collection of actinomycete strains were screened for production of extracellular peroxidase activity by adapting a chemiluminescence analysis system developed for horseradish peroxidase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Extracellular peroxidase activity was found to be common but quantitatively variable, and this rapid and sensitive screening system permitted identification of a small group of high-producing strains. A range of spectrophotometric assays were compared for the measurement of peroxidase activity in concentrated culture supernatants of two selected thermophilic streptomycetes. Of these, the peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the most robust and reproducible assay for quantitative studies. PMID:16535344

  4. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  5. The selectivity of beauveriolide derivatives in inhibition toward the two isozymes of acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Matsuda, Daisuke; Nagai, Kenichiro; Doi, Takayuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Takashi; Rudel, Lawrence Lee; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    The selectivity of synthetic beauveriolide derivatives in inhibition toward the two isozymes of acyl-CoA : cholesterol acyltrasferase (ACAT), ACAT1 and ACAT2, was studied in cell-based assays using ACAT1- or ACAT2-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. NBV274, 285 and 300 showed ACAT1 selective inhibition similar to that of natural beauveriolides I and III, NBV345 inhibited both isozymes with similar potency, but NBV281, 331 and 249 were found to selectively inhibit the ACAT2 isozyme. The structure-activity relationships indicated that a subtle structural difference in beauveriolide derivatives can affect the selectivity of inhibition of the ACAT isozymes. PMID:19336931

  6. Maize cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes are localized predominantly to the vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Zalabák, David; Johnová, Patricie; Plíhal, Ondřej; Šenková, Karolina; Šamajová, Olga; Jiskrová, Eva; Novák, Ondřej; Jackson, David; Mohanty, Amitabh; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The maize genome encompasses 13 genes encoding for cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes (CKXs). These enzymes are responsible for irreversible degradation of cytokinin plant hormones and thus, contribute regulating their levels. Here, we focus on the unique aspect of CKXs: their diverse subcellular distribution, important in regulating cytokinin homeostasis. Maize CKXs were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transiently expressed in maize protoplasts. Most of the isoforms, namely ZmCKX1, ZmCKX2, ZmCKX4a, ZmCKX5, ZmCKX6, ZmCKX8, ZmCKX9, and ZmCKX12, were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) several hours after transformation. GFP-fused CKXs were observed to accumulate in putative prevacuolar compartments. To gain more information about the spatiotemporal localization of the above isoforms, we prepared stable expression lines of all ZmCKX-GFP fusions in Arabidopsis thaliana Ler suspension culture. All the ER-associated isoforms except ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX9 were found to be targeted primarily to vacuoles, suggesting that ER-localization is a transition point in the intracellular secretory pathway and vacuoles serve as these isoforms' final destination. ZmCKX9 showed an ER-like localization pattern similar to those observed in the transient maize assay. Apoplastic localization of ZmCKX1 was further confirmed and ZmCKX10 showed cytosolic/nuclear localization due to the absence of the signal peptide sequence as previously reported. Additionally, we prepared GFP-fused N-terminal signal deletion mutants of ZmCKX2 and ZmCKX9 and clearly demonstrated that the localization pattern of these mutant forms was cytosolic/nuclear. This study provides the first complex model for spatiotemporal localization of the key enzymes of the cytokinin degradation/catabolism in monocotyledonous plants. PMID:27031423

  7. Na,K-ATPase Isozymes in Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Baker Bechmann, Marc; Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Maeso, María del Carmen; García, María del Pino; Ávila, Julio; Mobasheri, Ali; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to define Na,K-ATPase α and β subunit isoform expression and isozyme composition in colorectal cancer cells and liver metastases. The α1, α3, and β1 isoforms were the most highly expressed in tumor cells and metastases; in the plasma membrane of non-neoplastic cells and mainly in a cytoplasmic location in tumor cells. α1β1 and α3β1 isozymes found in tumor and metastatic cells exhibit the highest and lowest Na+ affinity respectively and the highest K+ affinity. Mesenchymal cell isozymes possess an intermediate Na+ affinity and a low K+ affinity. In cancer, these ions are likely to favor optimal conditions for the function of nuclear enzymes involved in mitosis, especially a high intra-nuclear K+ concentration. A major and striking finding of this study was that in liver, metastasized CRC cells express the α3β1 isozyme. Thus, the α3β1 isozyme could potentially serve as a novel exploratory biomarker of CRC metastatic cells in liver. PMID:26858653

  8. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  9. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  10. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  11. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Isozyme expression of Chinese and Japanese populations of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Taiwu; Liu, Yan; Song, Linsheng; Sun, Xiuqin

    2005-06-01

    Chinese and Japanese population of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids were surveyed in isozyme variability at 13 loci by polyacrytamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Isozyme banding patterns indicated these hybrids were diploid. Loci that were observed as being monomorphic in inbred populations of C. farreri were also found to be monomorphic in filial progeny; loci that observed to be polymorphic in parental type generations were also polymorphic in hybrid generations. Differences existed among allelic frequency of the four types of cross. Within the reciprocal hybrids the expression of malic enzyme (ME) isozyme was sufficient to distinguishing individual hybrids because of the band, Rf=0.38. However, there were no noticeable variations among all the samples to differentiate one from another. Inbreeding was likely to be the main problem in aquaculture. The introduction of new broodstock can improve the genetic diversity. Hybrid vigor has manifested to a certain extent in the present study.

  13. Comparison of the catalytic activities of three isozymes of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 expressed in COS7 cells.

    PubMed

    Hada, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takenori; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohkura, Kazuto; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Shinohara, Yasuo

    2014-02-01

    The enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) catalyzes the transfer of an acyl group from acyl-CoA to carnitine to form acylcarnitine, and three isozymes of it, 1a, 1b, and 1c, have been identified. Interestingly, the 1c isozyme was reported to show no enzymatic activity, but it was not clearly demonstrated whether this inactivity was due to its dysfunction or due to its poor expression. In the present study, we (a) expressed individual CPT1 isozymes in COS7 cells, (b) evaluated quantitatively their expression levels by Western blotting using the three bacterially expressed CPT1 isozymes as standards, and (c) evaluated their catalytic activities. With these experiments, we successfully demonstrated that the absence of the enzymatic activity of the 1c isozyme was due to its dysfunction. In addition, experiments on the preparation of standard CPT1 isozymes revealed that the 1c isozyme did not show the standard relationship between migration in an SDS-PAGE gel and molecular size. We further tried to determine why the 1c isozyme was inert by preparing chimeric CPT1 between 1a and 1c, but no clear conclusion could be drawn because one of the chimeric CPT1s was not sufficiently expressed. PMID:24222496

  14. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  15. Baboon alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes: phenotypic changes in liver following chronic consumption of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Holmes, R S; VandeBerg, J L

    1987-01-01

    According to the nomenclature of Vallee and Bazzone [1983] for mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes, baboon ADHs comprise three major classes of activity, which were distinguished according to the following properties: Class I ADHs. These isozymes exhibited low-Km characteristics with ethanol as substrate, high isoelectric points (8.5-9.3), and sensitivity to 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, and were the major liver (ADH-2) and kidney (ADH-1) isozymes in the baboon. Class II ADHs. These isozymes showed high-Km values for ethanol, neutral isoelectric points (7.7 for the liver ADH-4 [pi-ADH] and 7.2 for the major stomach ADH [ADH-3], respectively), and were insensitive to inhibition with 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole. Class III ADH. This enzyme was characterized by its inactivity with ethanol as substrate (up to 0.5 M), insensitivity to 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, preference for medium-chain-length alcohols as substrate (trans-2-hexen-1-ol was routinely used in this study), and an isoelectric point (6.5) similar to that of the human liver chi-ADH (pI 6.4). Major activity variation of the liver pi-ADH (ADH-4) isozyme was observed among the 114 liver samples examined, with 34 percent exhibiting a null (or low-activity) phenotype. An electrophoretic variant phenotype for the major class II stomach isozyme (ADH-3) was also found in the population studied. The baboon was used as a model for studying alcohol-induced changes in liver ADH phenotype following chronic alcohol consumption. Prepuberal male baboons were pair-fed nutritionally adequate liquid diets containing ethanol (50 percent of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrates, and liver ADH isozyme patterns from biopsy samples were monitored for 20 weeks. Dramatic decreases in class II liver ADH activity (ADH-4, or pi-ADH) were observed within 4 weeks after the start of alcohol feeding, and a shift in liver class I isozymes was found during the later stages of alcohol consumption. These changes during chronic

  16. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  17. Soybean peroxidase as an industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pokora, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    Peroxidases are a large class of enzymes which are very efficient at catalysing oxidation reactions. Horseradish peroxidase, the most abundant and commercially available peroxidase, has been utilized for many years in medical diagnostic test kits but has never been used successfully in an industrial application. One of the major drawbacks associated with the peroxidases cost and has been their lack of the thermal stability required in an industrial process. Recently, we isolated has been their lack of the peroxidase from soybean seed coats. Soybean seed coats are a commodity product available year round in very large volumes. The useful operational temperature for the soy peroxidase is 40{degrees}C higher than for horseradish peroxidase resulting in shorter reaction times and greater reactor efficiency. This process can be used to produce formaldehyde-free polyphenols as well as numerous phenolic dimers used in the manufacture of anti-oxidants, U-V absorbers, epoxies as well as other materials. The process to manufacture resins and dimers will be discussed.

  18. Recents patents in the use of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Berenize; Torres, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are hemoenzymes with a wide range of applications, from fine chemical synthesis to environmental biocatalysis. These outstanding biocatalysts are able to catalyze reactions such as heteroatom oxidation (N- and S-oxidation), epoxidation, hydroxylation, and the oxidation of alcohols and indole, often giving high yields and enantiomeric excess values. This makes these biocatalysts very useful for application to several biotechnological processes. In this paper, recent advances and patents surrounding the use of peroxidases are reviewed, covering different aspects related to the applications of peroxidases and the modifications carried out to improve their functionality as biocatalysts. PMID:19519565

  19. Manganese Deficiency Can Replace High Oxygen Levels Needed for Lignin Peroxidase Formation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Nathan; Levkowitz, Ayala; Hadar, Yitzhak; Dosoretz, Carlos G.

    1999-01-01

    The combined effects of Mn and oxygen on lignin peroxidase (LIP) activity and isozyme composition in Phanerochaete chrysosporium were studied by using shallow stationary cultures grown in the presence of limited or excess N. When no Mn was added, LIP was formed in both N-limited and N-excess cultures exposed to air, but no LIP activity was observed at Mn concentrations greater than 13 mg/liter. In oxygen-flushed, N-excess cultures, LIP was formed at all Mn concentrations, and the peak LIP activity values in the extracellular fluid were nearly identical in the presence of Mn concentrations ranging from 3 to 1,500 mg/liter. When the availability of oxygen to cultures exposed to air was increased by growing the fungus under nonimmersed liquid conditions, higher levels of Mn were needed to suppress LIP formation compared with the levels needed in shallow stationary cultures. The composition of LIP isozymes was affected by the levels of N and Mn. Addition of veratryl alcohol to cultures exposed to air did not eliminate the suppressive effect of Mn on LIP formation. A deficiency of Mn in N-excess cultures resulted in lower biomass and a lower rate of glucose consumption than in the presence of Mn. In addition, almost no activity of the antioxidant enzyme Mn superoxide dismutase was observed in Mn-deficient, N-excess cultures, but the activity of this enzyme increased as the Mn concentration increased from 3 to 13 mg/liter. No Zn/Cu superoxide dismutase activity was observed in N-excess cultures regardless of the Mn concentration. PMID:9925572

  20. Identification of Distinct Internal and External Isozymes of Carbonic Anhydrase in Chlorella saccharophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, T. G.; Colman, B.

    1993-11-01

    External carbonic anhydrase (CA) was detected in whole cells of alkaline-grown Chlorella saccharophila but was suppressed by growth at acid pH or growth on elevated levels of CO2. Internal CA activity was measured potentiometrically as an increase in activity in cell extracts over that of intact cells. Cells grown under all conditions had equal levels of internal CA activity. Two isozymes were identified after electrophoretic separation of soluble proteins on cellulose acetate plates. The fast isozyme was found in cells grown under all conditions, whereas the slow isozyme was found only in cells grown at alkaline pH. Western blot analysis following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using antibodies produced against the periplasmic form of CA from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed a single band at 39 kD, which did not change in intensity between growth conditions and was associated only with proteins eluted from the fast band. The slow isozyme was inactivated by incubation of cell extract at 30[deg]C and by incubation in 10 mM dithiothreitol, whereas the internal form was unaffected. These results indicate that external and internal forms of CA differ in structure and their activities respond differently to environmental conditions. PMID:12231991

  1. Physiological implications of the specificity of acetohydroxy acid synthase isozymes of enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Gollop, N

    1987-01-01

    The rates of formation of the two alternative products of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) have been determined by a new analytical method (N. Gollop, Z. Barak, and D. M. Chipman, Anal. Biochem., 160:323-331, 1987). For each of the three distinct isozymes of AHAS in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, a specificity ratio, R, was defined: Formula: see text, which is constant over a wide range of substrate concentrations. This is consistent with competition between pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate for an active acetaldehyde intermediate formed irreversibly after addition of the first pyruvate moiety to the enzyme. Isozyme I showed no product preference (R = 1), whereas isozymes II and III form acetohydroxybutyrate (AHB) at approximately 180- and 60-fold faster rates, respectively, than acetolactate (AL) at equal pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate concentrations. R values higher than 60 represent remarkably high specificity in favor of the substrate with one extra methylene group. In exponentially growing E. coli cells (under aerobic growth on glucose), which contain about 300 microM pyruvate and only 3 microM 2-ketobutyrate, AHAS I would produce almost entirely AL and only 1 to 2% AHB. However, isozymes II and III would synthesize AHB (on the pathway to Ile) and AL (on the pathway to valine-leucine) in essentially the ratio required for protein synthesis. The specificity ratio R of any AHAS isozyme was affected neither by the natural feedback inhibitors (Val, Ile) nor by the pH. On the basis of the specificities of the isozymes, the known regulation of AHAS I expression by the catabolite repression system, and the reported behavior of bacterial mutants containing single AHAS isozymes, we suggest that AHAS I enables a bacterium to cope with poor carbon sources, which lead to low endogenous pyruvate concentrations. Although AHAS II and III are well suited to producing the branched-chain amino acid precursors during growth on glucose, they would fail to provide

  2. Physiological implications of the specificity of acetohydroxy acid synthase isozymes of enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Gollop, N

    1987-08-01

    The rates of formation of the two alternative products of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) have been determined by a new analytical method (N. Gollop, Z. Barak, and D. M. Chipman, Anal. Biochem., 160:323-331, 1987). For each of the three distinct isozymes of AHAS in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, a specificity ratio, R, was defined: Formula: see text, which is constant over a wide range of substrate concentrations. This is consistent with competition between pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate for an active acetaldehyde intermediate formed irreversibly after addition of the first pyruvate moiety to the enzyme. Isozyme I showed no product preference (R = 1), whereas isozymes II and III form acetohydroxybutyrate (AHB) at approximately 180- and 60-fold faster rates, respectively, than acetolactate (AL) at equal pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate concentrations. R values higher than 60 represent remarkably high specificity in favor of the substrate with one extra methylene group. In exponentially growing E. coli cells (under aerobic growth on glucose), which contain about 300 microM pyruvate and only 3 microM 2-ketobutyrate, AHAS I would produce almost entirely AL and only 1 to 2% AHB. However, isozymes II and III would synthesize AHB (on the pathway to Ile) and AL (on the pathway to valine-leucine) in essentially the ratio required for protein synthesis. The specificity ratio R of any AHAS isozyme was affected neither by the natural feedback inhibitors (Val, Ile) nor by the pH. On the basis of the specificities of the isozymes, the known regulation of AHAS I expression by the catabolite repression system, and the reported behavior of bacterial mutants containing single AHAS isozymes, we suggest that AHAS I enables a bacterium to cope with poor carbon sources, which lead to low endogenous pyruvate concentrations. Although AHAS II and III are well suited to producing the branched-chain amino acid precursors during growth on glucose, they would fail to provide

  3. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases. PMID:7851395

  4. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  9. Isozyme variation among teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) provenances.

    PubMed

    Kertadikara, A W; Prat, D

    1995-05-01

    Fourteen enzyme systems were analysed in leaf parenchyma of nine native and introduced populations of teak. These enzyme systems were encoded by 20 putative loci of which 18 were polymorphic. Populations showed a general lack of heterozygosity (average FIS = 0.11). On average over the 18 polymorphic loci, the genetic differentiation among provenances varied according to the estimator: 0.09 for GST, 0.12 for FST and 0.19 for δ. The cluster analysis showed two main gene pools, the first consisted of the Indian provenances and the second of African, Indonesian and Thai provenances. Genetic distances among populations of the same group were similar, and lower than the genetic distances between populations from different groups. The factorial analysis on genotypes of seedlings also showed the same geographic differentiation into two major groups. The possible natural distribution of teak in Java is discussed. PMID:24172922

  10. (Molecular characteristics of the lignin forming peroxidase)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Since this manuscript was submitted we have conducted a more thorough physiological analysis of water relations in wild-type and peroxidase overproducing plants. These experiments include pressure bomb, plasmolysis, and membrane integrity analysis. We are also in the process of analyzing other phenotypes in peroxidase overproducer plants such as excessive browning of tissue, the rapid death of tissue in culture, and poor germination of seed. Transformed plants of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris were obtained which have peroxidase activity 3--7 fold lower than wild-type plants. This was done by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the CaMV 35S promoter and the 5' half of the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA in the antisense RNA configuration. A manuscript which describes this work is being written, and will be submitted for publication in January 1990. The anionic peroxidase gene has been cloned by hybridization to the cloned cDNA. The entire gene is contained on an 8.7kb fragment within a lambda phage clone. Several smaller DNA fragments have been subcloned, and some have been sequenced. One exon within the coding sequence has been sequenced, along with the partial sequence of two introns. Further sequencing is being carried-out to identify the promoter, which will be later joined to a reporter gene. 6 figs.

  11. Transcriptional control of ROS homeostasis by KUODA1 regulates cell expansion during leaf development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dandan; Wang, Ting; Persson, Staffan; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Schippers, Jos H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The final size of an organism, or of single organs within an organism, depends on an intricate coordination of cell proliferation and cell expansion. Although organism size is of fundamental importance, the molecular and genetic mechanisms that control it remain far from understood. Here we identify a transcription factor, KUODA1 (KUA1), which specifically controls cell expansion during leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that KUA1 expression is circadian regulated and depends on an intact clock. Furthermore, KUA1 directly represses the expression of a set of genes encoding for peroxidases that control reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis in the apoplast. Disruption of KUA1 results in increased peroxidase activity and smaller leaf cells. Chemical or genetic interference with the ROS balance or peroxidase activity affects cell size in a manner consistent with the identified KUA1 function. Thus, KUA1 modulates leaf cell expansion and final organ size by controlling ROS homeostasis. PMID:24806884

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species and Induction of Lignin Peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Belinky, Paula A.; Flikshtein, Nufar; Lechenko, Sergey; Gepstein, Shimon; Dosoretz, Carlos G.

    2003-01-01

    We studied oxidative stress in lignin peroxidase (LIP)-producing cultures (cultures flushed with pure O2) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium by comparing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cumulative oxidative damage, and antioxidant enzymes with those found in non-LIP-producing cultures (cultures grown with free exchange of atmospheric air [control cultures]). A significant increase in the intracellular peroxide concentration and the degree of oxidative damage to macromolecules, e.g., DNA, lipids, and proteins, was observed when the fungus was exposed to pure O2 gas. The specific activities of manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase and the consumption of glutathione were all higher in cultures exposed to pure O2 (oxygenated cultures) than in cultures grown with atmospheric air. Significantly higher gene expression of the LIP-H2 isozyme occurred in the oxygenated cultures. A hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (50 mM), added to the culture every 12 h, completely abolished LIP expression at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect was confirmed by in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction, which significantly enhanced LIP expression. The level of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) was correlated with the starvation conditions regardless of the oxygenation regimen applied, and similar cAMP levels were obtained at high O2 concentrations and in cultures grown with atmospheric air. These results suggest that even though cAMP is a prerequisite for LIP expression, high levels of ROS, preferentially hydroxyl radicals, are required to trigger LIP synthesis. Thus, the induction of LIP expression by O2 is at least partially mediated by the intracellular ROS. PMID:14602606

  13. Modelling a Peroxidase-based Optical Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Gaidamauskaite, Evelina; Kulys, Juozas

    2007-01-01

    The response of a peroxidase-based optical biosensor was modelled digitally. A mathematical model of the optical biosensor is based on a system of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. The modelling biosensor comprises two compartments, an enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer. The digital simulation was carried out using finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration as well as of the thickness of both the enzyme and diffusion layers on the biosensor response was investigated. Calculations showed complex kinetics of the biosensor response, especially at low concentrations of the peroxidase and of the hydrogen peroxide.

  14. [Genetic differentiation of Caucasian wood mice: comparison of isozymic, chromosomal and molecular divergence].

    PubMed

    Chelomina, G N; Pavlenko, M V; Kartavtseva, I V; Boeskorov, G G; Liapunova, E A; Vorontsov, N N

    1998-02-01

    Data on the complex genetic analysis of three sympatric species of Caucasian wood mice, Apodemus ponticus, A. fulvipectus, and A. uralensis are presented. A high degree of genetic differentiation at the isozymic, karyological and molecular (nuclear DNA) levels was revealed. The genetic distances between each pair of species varied significantly within a wide range depending on the analyzed level of the organization of genetic material. Mean values of genetic divergence from one species to another were also variable. These findings indicated that evolution of chromosomes was slower than that of isozymes, and the degree of species divergence was similar on cytogenetic and molecular levels. They also suggested that the rates of species evolution could vary in different phyletic lineages and on different levels of organization. Some phyletic lineages of Apodemus could be distinguished by different directions of evolution. PMID:9589852

  15. Inhibition of rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) by suramin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M F; Bhattacharyya, A K; Collins, D C

    1995-07-01

    In this study, we show the inhibition of rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) by suramin. The enzyme activity decreased in a dose-dependent manner as suramin concentrations increased with the calculated drug dose required for 50% inhibition (at 5 microM testosterone and 200 microM NADPH) being 13 microM. Suramin showed non-competitive inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase with respect to testosterone (KT1 = 2.4 microM) and competitive inhibition with respect to NADPH (KiNADPH = 220 nM). Furthermore, suramin and NADP+, but not NAD+, protected 5 alpha-reductase from labeling by 2-azido-NADP+, a photoactive probe which has recently been used to identify the NADPH binding domain of 5 alpha-reductase. These results suggest that suramin inhibits rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) at the level of NADPH binding to the enzyme. PMID:7482629

  16. The white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus secretes laccase isozymes with different substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Mariana; Arias, María E; Copa-Patiño, José L; Flärdh, María; González, Aldo E

    2003-01-01

    Four laccase isozymes (LCC1, LCC2, LCC3 and LCC4) synthesized by Pleurotus ostreatus strain V-184 were purified and characterized. LCC1 and LCC2 have molecular masses of about 60 and 65 kDa and exhibited the same pI value (3.0). Their N termini were sequenced, revealing the same amino acid sequence and homology with laccases from other microorganisms. Laccases LCC3 and LCC4 were characterized by SDS-PAGE, estimating their molecular masses around 80 and 82 kDa, respectively. By native isoelectrofocusing, their pI values were 4.7 and 4.5, respectively. When staining with ABTS and guaiacol in native polyacrilamide gels, different specificities were observed for LCC1/LCC2 and LCC3/LCC4 isozymes. PMID:21149010

  17. Application of repeated aspartate tags to improving extracellular production of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase isozyme II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Min, Won-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Asparaginase isozyme II from Escherichia coli is a popular enzyme that has been used as a therapeutic agent against acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, fusion tag systems consisting of the pelB signal sequence and various lengths of repeated aspartate tags were devised to highly express and to release active asparaginase isozyme II extracellularly in E. coli. Among several constructs, recombinant asparaginase isozyme II fused with the pelB signal sequence and five aspartate tag was secreted efficiently into culture medium at 34.6 U/mg cell of specific activity. By batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli produced 40.8 U/ml asparaginase isozyme II in the medium. In addition, deletion of the gspDE gene reduced extracellular production of asparaginase isozyme II, indicating that secretion of recombinant asparaginase isozyme II was partially ascribed to the recognition by the general secretion machinery. This tag system composed of the pelB signal peptide, and repeated aspartates can be applied to extracellular production of other recombinant proteins. PMID:26320714

  18. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  19. Distinct 1-monoacylglycerol and 2-monoacylglycerol kinase activities of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuriko; Murakami, Chiaki; Yamaki, Atsumi; Mizuno, Satoru; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) consists of ten isozymes and is involved in a wide variety of patho-physiological events. However, the enzymological properties of DGKs have not been fully understood. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the 1-monoacylglycerol kinase (MGK) and 2-MGK activities of ten DGK isozymes. We revealed that type I (α, β and γ), type II (δ, η and κ) and type III (ε) DGKs have 7.9-19.2% 2-MGK activity compared to their DGK activities, whereas their 1-MGK activities were <3.0%. Both the 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities of the type IV DGKs (ζ and ι) were <1% relative to their DGK activities. Intriguingly, type V DGKθ has approximately 6% 1-MGK activity and <2% 2-MGK activity compared to its DGK activity. Purified DGKθ exhibited the same results, indicating that its 1-MGK activity is intrinsic. Therefore, DGK isozymes are categorized into three types with respect to their 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities: those having (1) 2-MGK activity relatively stronger than their 1-MGK activity (types I-III), (2) only negligible 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities (type IV), and (3) 1-MGK activity stronger than its 2-MGK activity (type V). The 1-MGK activity of DGKθ and the 2-MGK activity of DGKα were stronger than those of the acylglycerol kinase reported as 1-MGK and 2-MGK to date. The presence or absence of 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities may be essential to the patho-physiological functions of each DGK isozyme. PMID:27346717

  20. Importance of the Voltage Dependence of Cardiac Na/K ATPase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher M; Gagnon, Dominique G; Bernal, Adam; Meyer, Dylan J; Rosenthal, Joshua J; Artigas, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac cells express more than one isoform of the Na, K-ATPase (NKA), the heteromeric enzyme that creates the Na(+) and K(+) gradients across the plasmalemma. Cardiac isozymes contain one catalytic α-subunit isoform (α1, α2, or α3) associated with an auxiliary β-subunit isoform (β1 or β2). Past studies using biochemical approaches have revealed minor kinetic differences between isozymes formed by different α-β isoform combinations; these results make it difficult to understand the physiological requirement for multiple isoforms. In intact cells, however, NKA enzymes operate in a more complex environment, which includes a substantial transmembrane potential. We evaluated the voltage dependence of human cardiac NKA isozymes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and of native NKA isozymes in rat ventricular myocytes, using normal mammalian physiological concentrations of Na(+)o and K(+)o. We demonstrate that although α1 and α3 pumps are functional at all physiologically relevant voltages, α2β1 pumps and α2β2 pumps are inhibited by ∼75% and ∼95%, respectively, at resting membrane potentials, and only activate appreciably upon depolarization. Furthermore, phospholemman (FXYD1) inhibits pump function without significantly altering the pump's voltage dependence. Our observations provide a simple explanation for the physiological relevance of the α2 subunit (∼20% of total α subunits in rat ventricle): they act as a reserve and are recruited into action for extra pumping during the long-lasting cardiac action potential, where most of the Na(+) entry occurs. This strong voltage dependence of α2 pumps also helps explain how cardiotonic steroids, which block NKA pumps, can be a beneficial treatment for heart failure: by only inhibiting the α2 pumps, they selectively reduce NKA activity during the cardiac action potential, leading to an increase in systolic Ca(2+), due to reduced extrusion through the Na/Ca exchanger, without affecting resting Na(+) and Ca(2

  1. The effects of cyclooxygenase isozyme inhibition on incisional wound healing in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Müller-Decker, Karin; Hirschner, Wolfgang; Marks, Friedrich; Fürstenberger, Gerhard

    2002-11-01

    In addition to their proinflammatory activities, prostaglandins recently have been shown to be beneficial in the resolution of tissue injury and inflammation. Thus, inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2, the predominant prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase under these conditions, may not only result in attenuating the inflammatory response but also in delaying tissue regeneration and repair. To this end, we investigated cyclooxygenase isozyme expression and the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on wound healing upon full-thickness incisions in mouse skin. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed prominent expression of cyclooxygenase isozymes in keratinocytes of the hyperplastic epithelium, with cyclooxygenase-1 immunosignals predominating in the suprabasal compartment and cyclooxygenase-2 immunosignals spread throughout the whole epidermis. Moreover, dendritic cells, resembling Langerhans cells, as well as endothelial cells and macrophages in the vicinity of or within the granulation tissue were found to express both isozymes. Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis by oral administration of the cyclooxygenase-1-selective inhibitor SC-560 or the cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitor valdecoxib did not retard wound healing in mouse skin macroscopically. Except for a slight transient retardation of epithelialization early after wounding wound-induced neoangiogenesis, collagen deposition, and the restoration of tensile strength were not delayed by these agents. Likewise, the nonselective inhibitor indomethacin had no effect on the tensile strength of incisional skin wounds. PMID:12445211

  2. Conversion of crude Jatropha curcas seed oil into biodiesel using liquid recombinant Candida rugosa lipase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ting-Chun; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Lee, Guan-Chiun

    2015-09-01

    The versatile Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) has been widely used in biotechnological applications. However, there have not been feasibility reports on the transesterification of non-edible oils to produce biodiesel using the commercial CRL preparations, mixtures of isozymes. In the present study, four liquid recombinant CRL isozymes (CRL1-CRL4) were investigated to convert various non-edible oils into biodiesel. The results showed that recombinant CRL2 and CRL4 exhibited superior catalytic efficiencies for producing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Jatropha curcas seed oil. A maximum 95.3% FAME yield was achieved using CRL2 under the optimal conditions (50 wt% water, an initial 1 equivalent of methanol feeding, and an additional 0.5 equivalents of methanol feeding at 24h for a total reaction time of 48 h at 37 °C). We concluded that specific recombinant CRL isozymes could be excellent biocatalysts for the biodiesel production from low-cost crude Jatropha oil. PMID:26011691

  3. Effects of pristane on cytochrome P450 isozyme expression in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Howard, Carolyn B; Samuel, Jacqueline; Henderson, Shalonda B; Stevens, Jacqueline; Thomas, Paul E; Cuchens, Marvin A

    2005-04-01

    Chemical carcinogenesis studies are powerful tools to obtain information on potential mechanisms of chemical factors for malignancies. In this study Western blot analyses, using monoclonal antibodies specific for three different cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B), were employed to examine the effect(s) of 3-methylcholanthrene and/or pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) on the basal and inducible levels of expression of CYP proteins within Copenhagen rat tissues. Pristane exposure led to tissue specific differences in the CYP isozymes expressed and elicited increased CYP protein expression over 3-methylcholanthrene induced levels in microsomes isolated from liver, Peyer's Patches, and thymus. Within the context of the chemical carcinogenesis model employed in this study, these observations correlated with the induction of B-cell malignancies by low doses of 3-methylcholanthrene and of thymic lymphomas by a high 3-methylcholanthrene dose. The data suggest that pristane treatment affects CYP isozyme expression. This pristane-mediated effect clearly could be a contributing factor in the chemical carcinogenesis of the previously observed lymphoid malignancies, and a possible basis for the tumor enhancing effects of pristane. PMID:16708425

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs for anionic and neutral peroxidases from suspension-cultured-cells of sweet potato and their differential expression in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Huh, G H; Lee, S J; Bae, Y S; Liu, J R; Kwak, S S

    1997-07-01

    Two peroxidase (POD) cDNAs, swpal and swpn1, were isolated and characterized from suspension-cultured cells of sweet potato in order to understand the physiological function of POD isozymes. Sequence analysis showed that swpa1 encoded an anionic POD and swpn1 encoded a neutral POD. The swpa1 and swpn1 genes were both highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells in accordance with the high POD activity of these cells. Although both gene transcripts were detected in the stems of intact plants, their transcription levels were much lower than in suspension-cultured cells. During cell growth the pattern of mRNA accumulation of swpa1 differed from that of swpn1, suggesting that expression of these genes is differentially regulated by cell growth stage. In addition, the swpa1 and swpn1 genes responded differently to oxidative stress induced by chilling. The expression of swpa1 was weakly induced by 15 degrees C acclimation and strongly induced by 4 degrees C chilling, whereas the mRNA level of swpn1 was increased by 15 degrees C acclimation and reduced by 4 degrees chilling. This indicates that the two isozymes encoded by swpa1 and swpn1 might contribute to protection against cold-induced oxidative stress through different signaling pathways. In leaves, both genes were induced by wounding with broadly similar expression. patterns. Genomic analysis suggests that the two isozymes are encoded by different loci in the sweet potato genome. PMID:9267434

  5. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  6. Microfluidic peroxidase biochip for polyphenol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2003-03-01

    An enzyme-containing microfluidic biochip has been developed for the oxidative polymerization of phenols. The biochip consists of a simple T-junction with two feed reservoirs 20 mm apart and a microreaction channel 30 mm long. The channel is 15 microm deep and 200 microm wide at the center, giving a reaction volume of 90 nL. The biochip was fabricated using conventional photolithographic methods on a glass substrate etched using a HF-based solution. Fluid transport was enabled using electroosmotic flow. Soybean peroxidase was used as the phenol oxidizing catalyst, and in the presence of p-cresol and H(2)O(2), essentially complete conversion of the H(2)O(2) (the limiting substrate) occurred in the microchannel at a flow rate of ca. 290 nL/min. Thus, peroxidase was found to be intrinsically active even upon dramatic scale-down as achieved in microfluidic reactors. These results were extended to a series of phenols, thereby demonstrating that the microfluidic peroxidase reactor may have application in high-throughput screening of phenolic polymerization reactions for use in phenolic resin synthesis. Finally, rapid growth of poly(p-cresol) on the walls of the microreaction channel could be performed in the presence of higher H(2)O(2) concentrations. This finding suggests that solution-phase peroxidase catalysis can be used in the controlled deposition of polymers on the walls of microreactors. PMID:12514805

  7. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  8. Creation of a Thermally Tolerant Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Nakajima, H

    2016-01-01

    An artificial peroxidase with thermal tolerance and high catalytic activity has been successfully prepared by mutagenesis of an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c552 from Thermus thermophilus. The mutant enzymes were rationally designed based on the general peroxidase mechanism and spectroscopic analyses of an active intermediate formed in the catalytic reaction. Stopped flow UV-vis spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy with a rapid freezing sample technique revealed that the initial double mutant, V49D/M69A, which was designed to reproduce the peroxidase mechanism, formed an active oxo-ferryl heme intermediate with a protein radical predominantly localized on Tyr45 during the catalytic reaction. The magnetic power saturation measurement obtained from EPR studies showed little interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the tyrosyl radical. Kinetics studies indicated that the isolated oxo-ferryl heme component in the active intermediate was a possible cause of heme degradation during the reaction with H2O2. Strong interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the radical was achieved by replacing Tyr45 with tryptophan (resulting in the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant), which was similar to a tryptophanyl radical found in active intermediates of some catalase-peroxidases. Compared to the protein radical intermediates of V49D/M69A mutant, those of the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant showed higher reactivity to an organic substrate than to H2O2. The Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant exhibited improved peroxidase activity and thermal tolerance. PMID:27586345

  9. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. Results In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. Conclusions This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group

  10. Specific genetic markers for wheat, spelt, and four wild relatives: comparison of isozymes, RAPDs, and wheat microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Guadagnuolo, R; Bianchi, D S; Felber, F

    2001-08-01

    Three types of markers-isozymes, RAPDs (random amplified polymorphic DNAs), and wheat microsatellites- were tested on wheat, spelt, and four wild wheat relatives (Aegilops cylindrica, Elymus caninus, Hordeum marinum, and Agropyron junceum). The aim was to evaluate their capability to provide specific markers for differentiation of the cultivated and wild species. The markers were set up for subsequent detection of hybrids and introgression of wheat DNA into wild relatives. All markers allowed differentiation of the cultivated from the wild species. Wheat microsatellites were not amplified in all the wild relatives, whereas RAPDs and isozymes exhibited polymorphism for all species. The dendrograms obtained with RAPD and isozyme data separated Swiss wheat cultivars from those collected in Austria and England, while no difference was found between Swiss spelt and wheat. RAPD data provided a weak discrimination between English and Austrian E. caninus. The microsatellite-based dendrogram discriminated populations of Ae. cylindrica, but no clear separation of H. marinum from E. caninus was revealed. The similarity matrices based on the three different sets of data were strongly correlated. The highest value was recorded between the matrices based on RAPDs and isozymes (Mantel's test, r = 0.93). Correlations between the similarity matrix based on microsatellites and matrices based on RAPDs and isozymes were lower: 0.74 and 0.68, respectively. While microsatellites are very useful for comparisons of closely related accessions, they are less suitable for studies involving less-related taxa. Isozymes provide interesting markers for species differentiation, but their use seems less appropriate for studies of within-species genetic variation. RAPDs can produce a large set of markers, which can be used for the evaluation of both between- and within-species genetic variation, more rapidly and easily than isozymes and microsatellites. PMID:11550895

  11. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  12. PEROXIDASE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN BUFFALOGRASS AND OTHER GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant peroxidases are a family of related proteins possessing highly conserved domains. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on these conserved domains can be used to amplify DNA sequences coding for peroxidases from plants with unsequenced genomes. Polymorphisms in peroxidase genes among buffa...

  13. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  14. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  15. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases. PMID:19944669

  16. Further characterization of human eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, R L; Syse, K; Little, C; Christensen, T B

    1985-01-01

    The large and the small subunits (Mr 50 000 and 10 500 respectively) of human eosinophil peroxidase were isolated by gel filtration under reducing conditions. The subunits were very strongly associated but not apparently cross-linked by disulphide bridges. During storage, the large subunit tended to form aggregates, which required reduction to dissociate them. Amino acid analysis of the performic acid-treated large subunit showed the presence of 19 cysteic acid residues. The small subunit of eosinophil peroxidase had the same Mr value as the small subunit of myeloperoxidase. However, although these subunits have very similar amino acid compositions, they showed different patterns of peptide fragmentation after CNBr treatment. The carbohydrate of eosinophil peroxidase seemed associated exclusively with the large subunit and comprised mannose (4.5%, w/w) and N-acetylglucosamine (0.8%, w/w). The far-u.v.c.d. spectrum of the enzyme indicated the presence of relatively little ordered secondary structure. Images Fig. 3. PMID:4052025

  17. Differential substrate recognition by isozymes of plant protein-only Ribonuclease P.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael J; Karasik, Agnes; Klemm, Bradley P; Mei, Christine; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Fierke, Carol A; Koutmos, Markos

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the cleavage of leader sequences from precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Typically, these enzymes are ribonucleic protein complexes that are found in all domains of life. However, a new class of RNase P has been discovered that is composed entirely of protein, termed protein-only RNase P (PRORP). To investigate the molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition, we measured the binding affinities and cleavage kinetics ofArabidopsisPRORP1 for varied pre-tRNA substrates. This analysis revealed that PRORP1 does not make significant contacts within the trailer or beyond N-1of the leader, indicating that this enzyme recognizes primarily the tRNA body. To determine the extent to which sequence variation within the tRNA body modulates substrate selectivity and to provide insight into the evolution and function of PRORP enzymes, we measured the reactivity of the threeArabidopsisPRORP isozymes (PRORP1-3) with four pre-tRNA substrates. A 13-fold range in catalytic efficiencies (10(4)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) was observed, demonstrating moderate selectivity for pre-tRNA substrates. Although PRORPs bind the different pre-tRNA species with affinities varying by as much as 100-fold, the three isozymes have similar affinities for a given pre-tRNA, suggesting similar binding modes. However, PRORP isozymes have varying degrees of cleavage fidelity, which is dependent on the pre-tRNA species and the presence of a 3'-discriminator base. This work defines molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition that provides insight into this new class of RNA processing enzymes. PMID:26966150

  18. Transcriptomic Assessment of Isozymes in the Biphenyl Pathway of Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1†

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Edmilson R.; Hara, Hirofumi; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Davies, Julian E.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Mohn, William W.

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 grows on a broad range of aromatic compounds and vigorously degrades polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previous work identified RHA1 genes encoding multiple isozymes for most of the seven steps of the biphenyl (BPH) pathway, provided evidence for coexpression of some of these isozymes, and indicated the involvement of some of these enzymes in the degradation of BPH, ethylbenzene (ETB), and PCBs. To investigate the expression of these isozymes and better understand how they contribute to the robust degradative capacity of RHA1, we comprehensively analyzed the 9.7-Mb genome of RHA1 for BPH pathway genes and characterized the transcriptome of RHA1 growing on benzoate (BEN), BPH, and ETB. Sequence analyses revealed 54 potential BPH pathway genes, including 28 not previously reported. Transcriptomic analysis with a DNA microarray containing 70-mer probes for 8,213 RHA1 genes revealed a suite of 320 genes of diverse functions that were upregulated during growth both on BPH and on ETB, relative to growth on the control substrate, pyruvate. By contrast, only 65 genes were upregulated during growth on BEN. Quantitative PCR assays confirmed microarray results for selected genes and indicated that some of the catabolic genes were upregulated over 10,000-fold. Our analysis suggests that up to 22 enzymes, including 8 newly identified ones, may function in the BPH pathway of RHA1. The relative expression levels of catabolic genes did not differ for BPH and ETB, suggesting a common regulatory mechanism. This study delineated a suite of catabolic enzymes for biphenyl and alkyl-benzenes in RHA1, which is larger than previously recognized and which may serve as a model for catabolism in other environmentally important bacteria having large genomes. PMID:16957245

  19. Reducing Isozyme Competition Increases Target Fatty Acid Accumulation in Seed Triacylglycerols of Transgenic Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Harrie; Shockey, Jay; Zhang, Meng; Adhikari, Neil D.; Browse, John

    2015-01-01

    One goal of green chemistry is the production of industrially useful fatty acids (FAs) in crop plants. We focus on hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs) and conjugated polyenoic FAs (α-eleostearic acids [ESAs]) using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model. These FAs are found naturally in seed oils of castor (Ricinus communis) and tung tree (Vernicia fordii), respectively, and used for the production of lubricants, nylon, and paints. Transgenic oils typically contain less target FA than that produced in the source species. We hypothesized that competition between endogenous and transgenic isozymes for substrates limits accumulation of unique FAs in Arabidopsis seeds. This hypothesis was tested by introducing a mutation in Arabidopsis diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (AtDGAT1) in a line expressing castor FA hydroxylase and acyl-Coenzyme A:RcDGAT2 in its seeds. This led to a 17% increase in the proportion of HFA in seed oil. Expression of castor phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1A in this line increased the proportion of HFA by an additional 12%. To determine if our observations are more widely applicable, we investigated if isozyme competition influenced production of ESA. Expression of tung tree FA conjugase/desaturase in Arabidopsis produced approximately 7.5% ESA in seed lipids. Coexpression of VfDGAT2 increased ESA levels to approximately 11%. Overexpression of VfDGAT2 combined with suppression of AtDGAT1 increased ESA accumulation to 14% to 15%. Our results indicate that isozyme competition is a limiting factor in the engineering of unusual FAs in heterologous plant systems and that reduction of competition through mutation and RNA suppression may be a useful component of seed metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:25739701

  20. Effects of divalent metal ions on the fluorescence and glucose-quenching of yeast hexokinase isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, I.; Fame, T.

    1982-01-01

    Titrations of the quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence of yeast isozymes P-I and P-II by Mg/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, and Zn/sup 2 +/ ions and by glucose in the presence of each of these ions (10 mM) were performed at pH 5.5 and 6.5 at 20/sup 0/C. At the higher pH there was a reversal of the type of glucose-binding cooperativity for P-II from negative to positive when either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ca/sup 2 +/ was present in the buffered isozyme solution before the glucose titration, whereas Mg/sup 2 +/ caused the glucose binding to become noncooperative. Zn/sup 2 +/ and Cd/sup 2 +/ decreased the glucose quenching of P-II fluorescence drastically at pH 5.5, from a value of 15% in buffer to only 4%. Glucose bindings to the P-I isozyme exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of either Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, or Mn/sup 2 +/, as well as the buffer alone, at both pH's. At the lower pH, Ca/sup 2 +/ enhanced the efficiency of glucose quenching of P-I fluorescence several-fold, while Mn/sup 2 +/ increased it only about 40% and Mg/sup 2 +/ not at all. The biological implications of these diverse metal ion effects are discussed.

  1. [Effect of Fuzheng Huayu recipe on CYP450 isozymes in normal and liver fibrosis rats].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tian-hui; Liu, Wei; Li, Shu-ping; Yang, Tao; Wang, Chang-hong; Liu, Cheng-hai

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect of Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) on five types of isozymes of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) of normal and liver fibrosis rats by using the cocktail probe method. Dimethylnitrosamine ( DMN) was injected to induce the liver fibrosis model. After the tail vein injection with Cocktail probe solutions prepared with five CYP450s probe substrates (phenacetin-CYP1A2, omeprazole-CYP2C9, tolbutamide-CYP2C19, dextromethorphan-CYP2D6, midazolam-CYP3A4), the plasma concentrations of the five probe substrates were determined by LC-MS/MS, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by PK solutions 2. After the oral administration with FZHY, normal rats given phenacetin, omeprazole, tolbutamide and dextromethorphan showed increase in AUC(0-t) and decrease in CL to varying degrees, indicating that FZHY obviously inhibited the activities of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 in normal rats, but with no obvious effect on the activity of CYP3A4. After the oral administration with FZHY, liver fibrosis rats treated with CYP2C9 showed the significant increase in AUC(0-t) and significant decrease in Vd, hut with no obvious changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters of other four types of prove substances, suggesting that FZHY could significantly inhibit the activity of CYP2C9 in rats but had no effect on the activities of CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4. The changes in the activity of CYP450 isozymes in liver fibrosis rats may be the reason for FZHY's different effects on CYP450 isozymes in normal and liver fibrosis rats. PMID:26226765

  2. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  3. Regulation of the activity of Korean radish cationic peroxidase promoter during dedifferentiation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Soo; Choi, Suh-Yeon; Park, Jin-Hyoun; Lee, Dong Ju

    2004-12-01

    Studies of the regulation of the activity of the Korean radish cationic peroxidase (KRCP) promoter during dedifferentiation and redifferentiation are reported here. Histochemical staining with 5-bromo-4-chloro-indolyl glucuronide (X-gluc) showed that only dedifferentiated marginal cells of leaf discs of the transgenic plants, but not of the interior region, were stained blue, as leaf discs were incubated on dedifferentiation-inducing medium from 5 days after callus induction (DACI). The levels of cationic peroxidase activity and of KRCP transcripts in Korean radish seedlings (Raphanus sativus L. F1 Handsome Fall) were also upregulated by a low ratio of cytokinin to auxin, but not by high concentrations of cytokinin. To identify important cis-regulatory regions controlling callus-specific expression, a series of 5' promoter deletions was carried out with KRCP::GUS gene fusion systems. The data suggest that at least two positively regulatory regions are involved in the KRCP::GUS expression during dedifferentiation induced by a low ratio of cytokinin to auxin: one from -471 to -242 and another from -241 to +196. GUS expression, however, was quickly decreased to a basal level during regeneration of root and shoot. Thus, the downstream region between +197 and +698 seems to be enough to suppress GUS expression of all constructs during regeneration. We further show that the 142-bp fragment (-471 to -328) has at least one cis-element to bind to the nuclear proteins from Korean radish seedlings induced by dedifferentiation. PMID:15596095

  4. RS-Predictor models augmented with SMARTCyp reactivities: robust metabolic regioselectivity predictions for nine CYP isozymes.

    PubMed

    Zaretzki, Jed; Rydberg, Patrik; Bergeron, Charles; Bennett, Kristin P; Olsen, Lars; Breneman, Curt M

    2012-06-25

    RS-Predictor is a tool for creating pathway-independent, isozyme-specific, site of metabolism (SOM) prediction models using any set of known cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates and metabolites. Until now, the RS-Predictor method was only trained and validated on CYP 3A4 data, but in the present study, we report on the versatility the RS-Predictor modeling paradigm by creating and testing regioselectivity models for substrates of the nine most important CYP isozymes. Through curation of source literature, we have assembled 680 substrates distributed among CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C19, 2C8, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4, the largest publicly accessible collection of P450 ligands and metabolites released to date. A comprehensive investigation into the importance of different descriptor classes for identifying the regioselectivity mediated by each isozyme is made through the generation of multiple independent RS-Predictor models for each set of isozyme substrates. Two of these models include a density functional theory (DFT) reactivity descriptor derived from SMARTCyp. Optimal combinations of RS-Predictor and SMARTCyp are shown to have stronger performance than either method alone, while also exceeding the accuracy of the commercial regioselectivity prediction methods distributed by Optibrium and Schrödinger, correctly identifying a large proportion of the metabolites in each substrate set within the top two rank-positions: 1A2 (83.0%), 2A6 (85.7%), 2B6 (82.1%), 2C19 (86.2%), 2C8 (83.8%), 2C9 (84.5%), 2D6 (85.9%), 2E1 (82.8%), 3A4 (82.3%), and merged (86.0%). Comprehensive datamining of each substrate set and careful statistical analyses of the predictions made by the different models revealed new insights into molecular features that control metabolic regioselectivity and enable accurate prospective prediction of likely SOMs. PMID:22524152

  5. Beta-hexosaminidase isozymes and replacement therapy in Gm2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Rattazzi, M C

    1983-01-01

    The problem of cell targeting of lysosomal enzymes is a critical one in the development of strategies for therapeutic enzyme replacement in lysosomal storage diseases. In principle, posttranscriptional isozymes with different carbohydrate-chain composition may be helpful in exploiting existing glycosyl-specific receptors on target cells, if the receptor specificities are known and match the glycosyl composition of available isozymes. In practice, however, the choice is limited to isozymes that can be obtained from tissues available in abundance, such as placenta or blood plasma. Our early experiments show that one can interfere with the interaction between hepatic (RES) receptor and enzyme glycosyl chain, to obtain extrahepatic targeting of beta-hexosaminidase, with catabolic effects. This approach, of course, does not have an immediate therapeutic application, as it involves injection of large amounts of foreign material in order to inhibit hepatic uptake. Modification of the glycosyl chain may be the method of choice in selected instances [Furbish et al. 1981], but is applicability again depends on the knowledge of receptor specificity on target cells and on composition of the glycosyl chain of the enzyme in question. Our recent experiments are a first step toward obtaining enzyme forms that can be endocytosed efficiently by mechanisms that are independent of glycosyl-specific receptors. Charge-mediated, absorptive endocytosis can be obtained by covalent coupling of cationic PLL to beta-hexosaminidase. Given the abundance of negative surface charges on most cell types [Weiss, 1969], this approach may be applicable to different target cells and organs, and possibly also to lysosomal enzymes other than beta-hexosaminidase. The existence of glycosyl recognition signals on beta-hexosaminidase can be obviated by simple chemical manipulations, such as Na-metaperiodate oxidation, which effectively prevents hepatic RES uptake [Rattazzi et al, 1982]. In combination with

  6. Selectivity of pyripyropene derivatives in inhibition toward acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohte, Satoshi; Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohtawa, Masaki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Harigaya, Yoshihiro; Rudel, Lawrence L; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Selectivity of 96 semisynthetic derivatives prepared from fungal pyripyropene A, originally isolated as a potent inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), toward ACAT1 and ACAT2 isozymes was investigated in the cell-based assay using ACAT1- and ACAT2-expressing CHO cells. Eighteen derivatives including PR-71 (7-O-isocaproyl derivative) showed much more potent ACAT2 inhibition (IC50: 6.0 to 62 nM) than pyripyropene A (IC50: 70 nM). Among them, however, natural pyripyropene A showed the highest selectivity toward ACAT2 with a selectivity index (SI) of >1000, followed by PR-71 (SI, 667). PMID:18997389

  7. RS-Predictor models augmented with SMARTCyp reactivities: Robust metabolic regioselectivity predictions for nine CYP isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Zaretzki, Jed; Rydberg, Patrik; Bergeron, Charles; Bennett, Kristin P.; Olsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    RS-Predictor is a tool for creating pathway-independent, isozyme-specific site of metabolism (SOM) prediction models using any set of known cytochrome P450 substrates and metabolites. Until now, the RS-Predictor method was only trained and validated on CYP 3A4 data, but in the present study we report on the versatility the RS-Predictor modeling paradigm by creating and testing regioselectivity models for substrates of the nine most important CYP isozymes. Through curation of source literature, we have assembled 680 substrates distributed among CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C19, 2C8, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1 and 3A4, which we believe is the largest publicly accessible collection of P450 ligands and metabolites ever released. A comprehensive investigation into the importance of different descriptor classes for predicting the regioselectivity of each isozyme is made through the generation of multiple independent RS-Predictor models for each set of isozyme substrates. Two of these models include a DFT reactivity descriptor derived from SMARTCyp. Optimal combinations of RS-Predictor and SMARTCyp are shown to have stronger performance than either method alone, while also exceeding the accuracy of the commercial regioselectivity prediction methods distributed by StarDrop and Schrödinger, correctly identifying a large proportion of the metabolites in each substrate set within the top two rank-positions: 1A2(83.0%), 2A6(85.7%), 2B6(82.1%), 2C19(86.2%), 2C8(83.8%), 2C9(84.5%), 2D6(85.9%), 2E1(82.8%), 3A4(82.3%) and merged(86.0%). Comprehensive datamining of each substrate set and careful statistical analyses of the predictions made by the different models revealed new insights into molecular features that control metabolic regioselectivity and enable accurate prospective prediction of likely SOMs. PMID:22524152

  8. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage. PMID:27448725

  9. Plastid Localization of the Key Carotenoid Enzyme Phytoene Synthase Is Altered by Isozyme, Allelic Variation, and Activity[W

    PubMed Central

    Shumskaya, Maria; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Monaco, Regina R.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have unique physiological roles related to specific plastid suborganellar locations. Carotenoid metabolic engineering could enhance plant adaptation to climate change and improve food security and nutritional value. However, lack of fundamental knowledge on carotenoid pathway localization limits targeted engineering. Phytoene synthase (PSY), a major rate-controlling carotenoid enzyme, is represented by multiple isozymes residing at unknown plastid sites. In maize (Zea mays), the three isozymes were transiently expressed and found either in plastoglobuli or in stroma and thylakoid membranes. PSY1, with one to two residue modifications of naturally occurring functional variants, exhibited altered localization, associated with distorted plastid shape and formation of a fibril phenotype. Mutating the active site of the enzyme reversed this phenotype. Discovery of differential PSY locations, linked with activity and isozyme type, advances the engineering potential for modifying carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23023170

  10. The Reaction of Coumarins with Horseradish Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard W.; Sirois, J.-Claude; Morita, Hirokazu

    1975-01-01

    The peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of indole-3-acetate is inhibited by naturally occurring coumarins such as scopoletin. This inhibition is due to the preferential reactivity of the coumarins with the peroxidase compounds I, II, and III. In view of the possible growth regulatory role of coumarins in plants, the mechanism of oxidation of scopoletin by horse-radish peroxidase has been investigated. Peroxidase catalyzed coumarin oxidation requires either an electron donor and molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. If peroxide is present, the reaction is mediated by peroxidase compound II which reacts rapidly and stoichiometrically with scopoletin. Different oxidation products are formed, depending on whether IAA or hydrogen peroxide promotes the reaction. A scopoletin-free radical intermediate has been isolated from the peroxide reaction mixture but was not detected in the peroxide-free system. When indole-3-acetate is the electron donor, reduced peroxidase combines with molecular oxygen to give peroxidase compound III. Added scopoletin is cooxidized with indole-3-acetate. Compared to the scopoletin peroxidation, this reaction is slower and yields fewer coumarin oxidation products. The differences observed between the two scopoletin oxidation pathways reflect: (a) the competition between indole-3-acetate and scopoletin for peroxidase compounds; (b) the lower reactivity of scopoletin with peroxidase compound III compared with peroxidase compound II. The peroxide-promoted reaction is eliminated by catalase, while the indole-3-acetate initiated oxidation is not affected by excess quantities of either catalase or superoxidase dismutase. PMID:16659024

  11. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  12. Protein kinase C in the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: reassessing the tissue-specific regulation of PKC isozymes during freezing

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, survives whole-body freezing and thawing each winter. The extensive adaptations required at the biochemical level are facilitated by alterations to signaling pathways, including the insulin/Akt and AMPK pathways. Past studies investigating changing tissue-specific patterns of the second messenger IP3 in adapted frogs have suggested important roles for protein kinase C (PKC) in response to stress. In addition to their dependence on second messengers, phosphorylation of three PKC sites by upstream kinases (most notably PDK1) is needed for full PKC activation, according to widely-accepted models. The present study uses phospho-specific immunoblotting to investigate phosphorylation states of PKC—as they relate to distinct tissues, PKC isozymes, and phosphorylation sites—in control and frozen frogs. In contrast to past studies where second messengers of PKC increased during the freezing process, phosphorylation of PKC tended to generally decline in most tissues of frozen frogs. All PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting decreased in phosphorylation levels in hind leg skeletal muscle and hearts of frozen frogs. Most PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected in livers and kidneys also declined; the only exceptions were the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641) antibody, which remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. Changes in brains of frozen frogs were unique; no decreases were observed in the phosphorylation levels of any of the PKC isozymes and/or specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting. Rather, increases were observed for the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641), phospho-PKCδ (Thr505), and phospho-PKCθ (Thr538) antibodies; all other isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected in brain remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. The results of this study

  13. Changes in myosin isozyme expression during cardiac hypertrophy in hyperthyroid rabbits.

    PubMed

    Seiden, D; Srivatsan, M; Navidad, P A

    1989-01-01

    The myosin isozyme distribution in the left ventricle and in the interventricular septum of rabbits was studied after 3, 7, 11, 14 and 21 days of L-thyroxine (500 micrograms/kg/day) administration. Histochemical procedures were employed to identify V1 and V3 by their Ca2+ ATPase activity and their proportions were quantified through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the left ventricle, the subepicardium was the first to show the shift from V3 to V1, followed by the subendocardium. The intermediate region became heterogeneous by 11 days and remained so until 21 days. The right subendocardial and the intermediate regions of the interventricular septum were heterogeneous in the normal rabbit and hyperthyroidism resulted in a shift from V3 to V1 in both the right and left subendocardial regions of the septum. Like the left ventricle, the intermediate region of the interventricular septum remained heterogeneous. Localized accumulations of collagen were seen in all regions of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. From these results we conclude that in thyrotoxic myocardial hypertrophy the isozymic shift from V3 to V1 is progressive, region-specific and is directly correlated with the period of hyperthyroidism in the first 2 weeks. Prolonged hyperthyroidism results in localized accumulation of collagen which does not exhibit any regional specificity. PMID:2528881

  14. On the distribution and characteristics of isozyme expression in Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Ureaplasma species.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S. J.; Simonson, J. M.; Razin, S.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    A summary of a survey of three genera of mycoplasmatales (Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Ureaplasma) for isozyme expression is presented. Isozyme analysis of mycoplasmas has been employed in at least three distinct areas: (1) as genetic markers for identification, individualization, and taxonomic classification; (2) as markers for cell culture contamination; and (3) as a qualitative measure of the operative metabolic pathways in the diverse species. We have found five ubiquitous enzymes: purine nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, dipeptidase, and esterase. Three enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase, were restricted to Acholeplasma species and were not detected in Mycoplasma or Ureaplasma. Four glycolytic enzymes, glucose phosphate isomerase, triose phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase, were restricted to those species of Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma capable of glucose fermentation. Two of these glycolytic enzymes, glucose phosphate isomerase and lactate dehydrogenase, were detected in serovars I and II of U. urealyticum, which is inconsistent with the non-glycolytic activity in this genus. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6679151

  15. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1–3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1–3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  16. Isozymic variations in specific and nonspecific esterase and its thermostability in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Biswas, Tapati Datta; Nayak, Sandeepta Kumar; Saha, A K; Majumdar, M K

    2012-09-01

    Esterase isozymic variations were documented in the haemolymph of developed multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm breeds during unfavorable seed crop seasons of May - September using á- and â- napthylacetate separately to identify specific and nonspecific esterase having thermotolerant potentiality. Variations existed in the isozyme pattern with three bands (Est-2, 3 and 4) in pure Nistari race and other developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds. Est-2 and Est-3 were non-specific esterases as they were observed when both á- and â-napthylacetate was used as substrates separately. Est-4 band was observed only with á-napthylacetate as substrate and was therefore confirmed to be specific á-esterase band in the haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Zymograms showed that the non-specific esterase band (Est-3) with R1 of 0.43 and specific á-esterase band (Est-4) with R(f) of 0.32 predominately withstood a temperature of 70 +/- 2 degrees C for a duration of 10 min and were confirmed as thermostable esterases in haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. This also categorized the presence of thermostable esterases in developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds of silkworm, even though the qualitative activity was more in the former than the latter. The qualitative presence of thermostable esterases and their activity could be adopted as an indicative biochemical marker in relation to thermotolerance in silkworm. PMID:23734447

  17. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Atack, John M.; Beacham, Ifor R.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Escherichia coli contains two L-asparaginase isozymes with distinct localization, kinetics and regulation. •Mutant strains were used to examine the roles of these enzymes in L-asparagine utilization. •We report that L-asparaginase II permits growth on asparagine and glycerol under anaerobic conditions. •We propose that this enzyme is the first step in a co-regulated pathway leading to fumarate. •The pathway is regulated by anaerobiosis and cAMP and provides a terminal elector acceptor. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  18. Adenylate kinase isozyme 2 is essential for growth and development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Murakami, Ryutaro; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2009-05-01

    Adenylate kinases are phylogenetically widespread, highly conserved, and involved in energy metabolism and energy transfer. Of these, adenylate kinase (AK) isozyme 2 is uniquely localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and its physiological role remains largely unknown. In this study, we selected Drosophila melanogaster to analyze its role in vivo. AK isozyme cDNAs were cloned and their gene expressions were characterized in D. melanogaster. The deduced amino acid sequences contain highly conserved motifs for P-loop, NMP binding, and LID domains of AKs. In addition, the effects of AK2 gene knockout on phenotype of AK2 mutants were examined using P-element technology. Although homozygous AK2 mutated embryos developed without any visible defects, their growth ceased and they died before reaching the third instar larval stage. Maternally provided AK2 mRNA was detected in fertilized eggs, and weak AK2 activity was observed in first and second instar larvae of the homozygous AK2 mutants, suggesting that maternally provided AK2 is sufficient for embryonic development. Disappearance of AK2 activity during larval stages resulted in growth arrest and eventual death. These results demonstrate that AK2 plays a critical role in adenine nucleotide metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is essential for growth in D. melanogaster. PMID:19416704

  19. Studies on isozymic variation among the South Indian species of Sphaerostephanos

    PubMed Central

    Varaprasadham, Irudayaraj; Marimuthu, Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the identity and phylogenetic relationships among the three medicinally important species of Sphaerostephanos from South India using isozymic profile. Methods The young fronds were homogenized with 3.5 mL of ice-cold homogenizing buffer in a pre-chilled pestle and mortar. The supernatant was subjected to electrophoresis as described by Anbalagan poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Staining solutions for isoperoxidase was prepared as per Smila method for the detection of isoenzymes. Results A total of six different bands in five different positions with different molecular weight/Rf values and four active zones have been observed in the isoperoxidase enzyme system of Sphaerostephanos. Only one band with MW/Rf 0.399 is common to two different species i.e. Sphaerostephanos arbuscula (S. arbuscula) and Sphaerostephanos unitus (S. unitus). Among the remaining four bands, two bands (Rf. 0.23, 0.47) are present in Sphaerostephanos subtruncatus (S. subtruncatus) and one distinct band has been observed individually in S. arbuscula (Rf. 0.507) and S. unitus (Rf. 0.56). Conclusions The present preliminary molecular study through isozymic analysis shows the identity of all the three species and the present results confirm distinctness of these three species based on macro-micromorphology, phytochemistry and cytology. PMID:23569778

  20. Role of PKC isozymes in low-power light-stimulated proliferation of cultured skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Kleitman, Vered; Meller, Julia; Kaufmann, Roland; Akgun, Nermin; Ruck, Angelika; Livneh, Etta; Lubart, Rachel

    2000-11-01

    Exposure of cultured skin cells to low power visible light leads to a transiently stimulated proliferation. Facilitation of this response requires the presence of active PKC, elevation of intracellular calcium, and involves reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the role of PKC(alpha) and PCK(eta) was examined using paired murine fibroblasts, differing in the level of these isozymes expression. The ability of the cells to respond to low power UVA light or HeNe laser by stimulated proliferation was correlated with an active state or overexpression of PKC(alpha) , but not PKC(eta) . A parallel response was obtained in cells that were loaded with A1PcS4 before photosensitization. Whenever this latter treatment caused a light-stimulated inhibition, it was accompanied by the intracellular calcium and photosensitizer dynamics typical of the effect of PDT on rate epithelial cells. Accordingly, added antioxidants that suppressed light-stimulated proliferation also suppressed this light-stimulated inhibition. The model systems employed in this study are the first to demonstrate the specific effect of PKC isozymes on light-stimulated proliferation, in relation to oxidative stress, and indicate their dual role in light-tissue interaction.

  1. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wakagi, Takayoshi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1-3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1-3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  2. Soybean roots retain the seed urease isozyme synthesized during embryo development

    SciTech Connect

    Torisky, R.S.; Polacco, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Roots of young soybean plants contain two urease isozymes which are separable by hydroxyapatite chromatography. These two urease species (HAP1 and HAP2) differ in: (1) native gel electrophoretic mobility, (2) pH optima, and (3) recognition by a monoclonal antibody specific for the embryo-specific urease. By these parameters HAP1 is similar to the abundant embryo-specific urease isozyme while HAP2 resembles the ubiquitous urease, found in all soybean tissues previously examined (embryo, seed coat, cultured cells). Roots of mutant soybean plants lacking the seed urease contain no HAP1 urease activity, whereas roots of mutants lacking the ubiquitous urease contain no HAP2 urease activity. However, adventitious roots generated from cuttings of any urease genotype lack HAP1 urease activity. Furthermore, ({sup 35}S) methionine labelling shows no {und de novo} synthesis of the HAP1 urease in the root, and total root HAP1 urease activity decreases sharply following germination. We conclude: (1) HAP1 is a remnant of the seed urease accumulated in the embryonic root axis during seed development, and (2) HAP2 is ubiquitous urease synthesized de novo in the root.

  3. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  4. Investigation on the relationship between leaf water use efficiency and physio-biochemical traits of winter wheat under rained condition.

    PubMed

    Baodi, Dong; Mengyu, Liu; Hongbo, Shao; Quanqi, Li; Lei, Shi; Feng, Du; Zhengbin, Zhang

    2008-04-01

    Different statistical methods and path analysis were used to study the relationship between leaf water use efficiency (WUE) and physio-biochemical traits for 19 wheat genotypes, including photosynthesis rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate (T(r)), intercellular concentration of carbon oxide (C(i)), leaf water potential (Psi(w)), leaf temperature, wax content, leaf relative water content (RWC), rate of water loss from excised-leaf (RWL), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The results showed that photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate were the most important leaf WUE variables under rained conditions. Based on the results of five statistical analyses, it is reasonable to assume that high leaf WUE wheat under the rained could be obtained by selecting breeding materials with high photosynthesis rate, low transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. PMID:18083352

  5. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of peroxidase from Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Vinita; Gundala, Prasada babu; Chinthala, Paramageetham

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are one of the most extensively studied group of enzymes which find applications in the environment, health, pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnological processes. Class III secretary peroxidase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has been characterized using bioinformatics approach Physiochemical properties and topology of alfalfa peroxidase were compared with that of soybean and horseradish peroxidase, two most popular commercially available peroxidase preparations. Lower value of instability index as predicted by ProtParam and presence of extra disulphide linkages as predicted by Cys_REC suggested alfalfa peroxidase to be more stable than either of the commercial preparations. Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) with other functionally similar proteins revealed the presence of highly conserved catalytic residues. Three dimensional model of alfalfa peroxidase was constructed based on the crystal structure of soybean peroxidase (PDB Id: 1FHF A) by homology modelling approach. The model was checked for stereo chemical quality by PROCHECH, VERIFY 3D, WHAT IF, ERRAT, 3D MATCH AND ProSA servers. The best model was selected, energy minimized and used to analyze structure function relationship with substrate hydrogen peroxide by Autodock 4.0. The enzyme substrate complex was viewed with Swiss PDB viewer and one residue ASP43 was found to stabilize the interaction by hydrogen bonds. The results of the study may be a guiding point for further investigations on alfalfa peroxidase. PMID:23275690

  6. Cytochrome c peroxidase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; Arciero, D M; Hooper, A B; Coats, J R; DiSpirito, A A

    1997-11-01

    A bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase was purified from the obligate methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath in either the fully oxidized or the half reduced form depending on the purification procedure. The cytochrome was a homo-dimer with a subunit mol mass of 35.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.5. At physiological temperatures, the enzyme contained one high-spin, low-potential (Em7 = -254 mV) and one low-spin, high-potential (Em7 = +432 mM ) heme. The low-potential heme center exhibited a spin-state transition from the penta-coordinated, high-spin configuration to a low-spin configuration upon cooling the enzyme to cryogenic temperatures. Using M. capsulatus Bath ferrocytochrome c555 as the electron donor, the KM and Vmax for peroxide reduction were 510 +/- 100 nM and 425 +/- 22 mol ferrocytochrome c555 oxidized min-1 (mole cytochrome c peroxidase)-1, respectively. PMID:9325424

  7. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed hydroxylations: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Dordick, J S; Klibanov, A M; Marletta, M A

    1986-05-20

    The hydroxylation of phenol to hydroquinone and catechol in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid and oxygen catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase was studied under conditions where the product yield was high and the side reactions were minimal. The reaction is partially uncoupled with a molar ratio of dihydroxyfumaric acid consumed to hydroxylated products of 12:1. Hydrogen peroxide does not participate in the reaction as evidenced by the lack of effect of catalase and by the direct addition of hydrogen peroxide. Conversely, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are involved as their scavengers are potent inhibitors. Experiments were all consistent with the involvement of compound III (oxygenated ferrous complex) of peroxidase in the reaction. Compound III is stable in the presence of phenol alone but decomposes rapidly in the presence of both phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid with the concomitant formation of product. Therefore, phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid must be present with compound III in order for the hydroxylation reaction to occur. A mechanism consistent with the experimental results is proposed. PMID:3718931

  8. Characterization of a new liver- and kidney-specific pfkfb3 isozyme that is downregulated by cell proliferation and dedifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Joan; Gomez, Marta; Navarro-Sabate, Aurea; Riera-Sans, Lluis; Obach, Merce; Manzano, Anna; Perales, Jose C.; Bartrons, Ramon

    2008-03-21

    The bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2) catalyzes the synthesis and degradation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P{sub 2}), a signalling molecule that controls the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in several cell types. Four genes, designated Pfkfb1-4, code several PFK-2 isozymes that differ in their kinetic properties, molecular masses, and regulation by protein kinases. In rat tissues, Pfkfb3 gene accounts for eight splice variants and two of them, ubiquitous and inducible PFK-2 isozymes, have been extensively studied and related to cell proliferation and tumour metabolism. Here, we characterize a new kidney- and liver-specific Pfkfb3 isozyme, a product of the RB2K3 splice variant, and demonstrate that its expression, in primary cultured hepatocytes, depends on hepatic cell proliferation and dedifferentiation. In parallel, our results provide further evidence that ubiquitous PFK-2 is a crucial isozyme in supporting growing and proliferant cell metabolism.

  9. Penicillium solitum produces a polygalacturonase isozyme in decayed ‘Anjou’ pear fruit capable of macerating host tissue in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A polygalacturonase (PG) isozyme was isolated from Penicillium solitum-decayed ‘Anjou’ pear fruit and purified to homogeneity using a multistep process. Both gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography revealed a single PG activity peak and analysis of the purified protein showed a single band...

  10. Initial-rate kinetics of human NMN-adenylyltransferases: substrate and metal ion specificity, inhibition by products and multisubstrate analogues, and isozyme contributions to NAD+ biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Cimadamore, Flavio; Scotti, Stefania; Petrelli, Riccardo; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio

    2007-04-24

    Initial-rate and product inhibition studies revealed distinctive ordered ternary complex kinetic mechanisms, substrate specificities, and metal ion preferences for the three isozymes of human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl-transferase (NMNAT, EC 2.7.7.1). ATP binds before NMN with nuclear isozyme NMNAT1 and Golgi apparatus NMNAT2, but the opposite order is observed with the mitochondrial isozyme NMNAT3. Only the latter utilizes ITP efficiently in place of ATP, and while NMNH conversion to NADH by NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 occurs at similar rates, conversion by NMNAT2 is much slower. These isozymes can also be discriminated by their action on tiazofurin monophosphate (TrMP), a metabolite of the antineoplastic prodrug tiazofurin. Our finding that TrMP is only a substrate with NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 reveals for the first time an organelle selectivity in the metabolism of this important drug. In search of additional ways to discriminate these isozymes, we synthesized and tested the P1-(nicotinamide/nicotinate-riboside-5')-Pn-(adenosine-5') dinucleotides Np3AD, Np4AD, and Nap4AD. In addition to being highly effective inhibitors, these multisubstrate geometric inhibitors gave inhibition patterns that are consistent with the aforementioned isozyme differences in substrate binding order. Distinctive differences in their substrate specificity and metal ion selectivity also permitted us to quantify individual isozyme contributions to NAD+ formation in human cell extracts. PMID:17402747

  11. Immunohistochemical study of temporal variations in cytochrome P-450 isozymes in rat testis and their modifications by the inductive effects of cadinenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Motohashi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Yatagai, Mitsuyoshi; Takano, Takehito

    1991-12-01

    Temporal variations in cytochrome P-450 isozymes of rat testis, PB-P-450 (forms of cytochrome P-450 strongly induced by phenobarbital) and MC-P-448 (forms of cytochrome P-450 strongly induced by 3-methylcholanthrene), were investigated immunohistochemically by the avidin-biotin-complex method using specific antibodies against PB-P-450 and MC-P-448 isozymes. Immunoreactivity to both PB-P-450 and MC-P-448 isozymes was observed in Leydig cells. The number of PB-P-450 positive Leydig cells was found to undergo significant time-of-day variation with a peak time of 0000 hours (light phase from 0800 to 2000 hours). Injection of cadinenes (300 mg/kg per day intraperitoneally at 48 and 96 h before sacrifice) induced PB-P-450 isozyme but did not induce MC-P-448 isozyme. The induction of PB-P-450 isozyme by cadinenes was time dependent, and the early dark phase (2000 and 0000 hours) was most sensitive. These results suggest that temporal variation of cytochrome P-450 isozymes is one of the important physiological variations in detoxification and activation of various xenobiotics and chemicals in the testis.

  12. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes type-III and type-IV suppress mitogenesis of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matousovic, K; Grande, J P; Chini, C C; Chini, E N; Dousa, T P

    1995-01-01

    We studied interactions between the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and cAMP-protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway in regulation of mitogenesis of mesangial cells (MC) determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, with or without added EGF. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP strongly (by 60-70%) inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into MC. Cilostamide, lixazinone or cilostazol selective inhibitors of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozyme PDE-III, inhibited mitogenesis to similar extent as forskolin and DBcAMP and activated in situ PKA, but without detectable increase in cAMP levels. Cilostamide and cilostazol were more than three times more effective at inhibiting mesangial mitogenesis than rolipram and denbufylline, inhibitors of isozyme PDE-IV, even though PDE-IV was two times more abundant in MC than was PDE-III. On the other hand, when incubated with forskolin, rolipram-enhanced cAMP accumulation was far greater (10-100x) than with cilostamide. EGF increased MAPK activity (+300%); PDE isozyme inhibitors which suppressed mitogenesis also inhibited MAPK. PDE isozyme inhibitors also suppressed PDGF-stimulated MC proliferation. We conclude that cAMP inhibits the mitogen-dependent MAPK-signaling pathway probably by decreasing the activity of Raf-1 due to PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation. Further, we surmise that minor increase in the cAMP pool metabolized by PDE-III is intimately related to regulation of mesangial proliferation. Thus, PDE isozyme inhibitors have the potential to suppress MC proliferation by a focused effect upon signaling pathways. Images PMID:7615811

  13. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of alpha-amylase isozyme 1 from barley seeds.

    PubMed

    Robert, Xavier; Gottschalk, Tine E; Haser, Richard; Svensson, Birte; Aghajari, Nushin

    2002-04-01

    The germinating barley seed contains two major alpha-amylase isozyme families, AMY1 and AMY2, involved in starch degradation to provide energy used by the plant embryo for growth. Many years of difficulty in growing three-dimensional crystals of natural AMY1 have now been overcome by a nonapeptide truncation of the enzyme C-terminus. The truncated enzyme was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 8000 as precipitant and 2-propanol as an additive. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.36, b = 72.82, c = 61.74 A and one molecule per asymmetric unit. PMID:11914496

  14. Effects of calcium ion concentration on starch hydrolysis of barley alpha-amylase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jeong-Bin; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hee; Jang, Myoung-Uoon; Park, Jung-Mi; Yi, Ah-Rum; Svensson, Birte; Kim, Tae-Jip

    2008-04-01

    Barley alpha-amylase genes, amy1 and amy2, were separately cloned into the expression vector of pPICZalphaA and recombinant Pichia strains were established by homologous recombination. Both AMYs from Pichia shared almost identical hydrolysis patterns on short maltooligosaccharides to result in glucose, maltose, or maltotriose. Against insoluble blue starch, AMY1 showed the highest activity at 0.1-5 mM calcium concentration, whereas 15-20 mM was optimal for AMY2. On the hydrolysis of soluble starch, unexpectedly, there was no significant difference between AMYs with increase of calcium. However, the relative activity on various starch substrates was significantly different between AMYs, which supports that the isozymes are clearly distinguished from each other on the basis of their unique preferences for substrates. PMID:18467868

  15. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Atack, John M; Beacham, Ifor R; Jennings, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen. PMID:23726917

  16. Carbonic Anhydrase Interaction With Lipothioars Enites: A Novel Class of Isozymes I and II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Timotheatou, Despina; Ioannou, Panayiotis V.; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes I and II with a series of As(III) derivatives, dialkyl and diaryl rac-2,3-dimyristoyloxypropyldithioarsonites, was investigated kinetically and spectrophotometrically, utilizing the native and Co(II)-substituted enzymes. Depending on the substitution pattern at the -As(SR)2 moiety of the investigated derivatives, inactive compounds were found for R = phenyl or naphthyl, and active ones for derivatives containing carboxyl groups (R = CH2COOH, cysteinyl and glutathionyl). Together with the arsonolipids previously investigated, the active compounds of this series - the "lipothioarsenites"- constitute a novel class of CA inhibitors that bind to the metal ion within the enzyme active site, as proved by changes in the electronic spectra of adducts of such inhibitors with Co(II)CA. PMID:18475756

  17. Assessing soybean leaf area and leaf biomass by spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral radiances were correlated with soybean total leaf area index, green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf area index, green leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf biomass, and total biomass. The most significant correlations were found to exist between the IR/red radiance ratio data and green leaf area index and/or green leaf biomass (r squared equals 0.85 and 0.86, respectively). These findings demonstrate that remote sensing data can supply information basic to soybean canopy growth, development, and status by nondestructive determination of the green leaf area or green leaf biomass.

  18. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  19. Biochemical properties of duplicated isozymes of phosphoglucose isomerase in the plant Clarkia xantiana.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, L D; Greve, L C

    1981-02-01

    The structural gene locus specifying subunits of cytoplasmic isoenzymes of phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) is present in duplicate in many diploid species of Clarkia (Onagraceae), a genus of annual plants native to California. We studied the kinetic properties and molecular weights of a large number of genetically defined and highly purified PGIs in C. xantiana, a number of species with the duplication, as a means of examining the biochemical consequences of the evolution of a new gene locus. This species is primarily outcrossing, but also includes several previously described predominantly self-pollinating populations. Both cytoplasmic PGI loci in the outcrossing populations are polymorphic and their enzyme products are readily separated by electrophoresis. The PGIs from the outcrossing populations were rated by electrophoresis. The PGIs from the outcrossing populations were generally closely similar in molecular weight, pH optimum, heat sensitivity, energy activation, and apparent Km (fructose-6-phosphate). The PGI loci in the selfing populations are monomorphic and specify enzymes having identical electrophoretic mobilities to those coded by the most frequent alleles of the outcrosser. The PGI isozymes in the selfers differed fivefold in Km, suggesting that they have a very different catalytic effectiveness. The high Km of the PGI-3A' isozyme (1.1mM) was anomalous among the PGIs examined and would likely be disadvantageous in a species which lacked other more normally functioning PGIs. But in the cytoplasm of the selfing plants, it is present with other PGIs that have low Km values. The PGI-3A' enzyme is a good candidate for a gene product coded by a "forbidden" mutation that could not have been established in the absence of the duplication. The rationale for this suggestion is described and it is also pointed out that the divergence of duplicated genes is influenced by many factors such as the breeding system and other population factors as well as the effect of

  20. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. PMID:26111515

  1. Accelerating peroxidase mimicking nanozymes using DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-08-01

    DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04176g

  2. Biosynthesis of ascaridole: iodide peroxidase-catalyzed synthesis of a monoterpene endoperoxide in soluble extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides fruit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A; Croteau, R

    1984-11-15

    Ascaridole, an asymmetric monoterpene endoperoxide with anthelmintic properties, occurs as a major constituent (60-80%) in the volatile oil of American wormseed fruit (Chenopodium ambrosioides: Chenopodiaceae), and as a lesser component in the leaf pocket oil of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus: Monimiaceae). Determination of optical activity and chromatographic resolution of naturally occurring ascaridole, and several synthetic derivatives, showed that both wormseed and boldo produce ascaridole in racemic form. The biosynthesis of ascaridole from the conjugated, symmetrical diene alpha-terpinene (a major component of the oil from wormseed) was shown to be catalyzed by a soluble iodide peroxidase isolated from homogenates of C. ambrosioides fruit and leaves. The enzymatic synthesis of ascaridole was confirmed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the product, which was also shown to be racemic. Optimal enzymatic activity occurred at pH 4.0 in the presence of 2.5 mM H2O2 and 1 mM NaI. Soluble enzyme extracts were fractionated by gel filtration on both Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-100, and were shown to consist of a high-molecular-weight peroxidase component (Mr greater than 1,000,000, 30% of total activity) and two other peroxidase species having apparent molecular weights of 62,000 and 45,000 (major component). Peroxidase activity was susceptible to proteolytic destruction only after periodate treatment, suggesting an association of the enzyme(s) with polysaccharide material. Ascaridole biosynthesis from alpha-terpinene was inhibited by cyanide, catalase, and reducing agents, but not by compounds that trap superoxide or quench singlet oxygen. A peroxide transfer reaction initiated by peroxidase-generated I+ is proposed for the conversion of alpha-terpinene to ascaridole. PMID:6497393

  3. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM. PMID:21804936

  4. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry. PMID:25577980

  5. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  6. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  7. fPoxDB: fungal peroxidase database for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxidases are a group of oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide to various electron acceptors. They possess a broad spectrum of impact on industry and fungal biology. There are numerous industrial applications using peroxidases, such as to catalyse highly reactive pollutants and to breakdown lignin for recycling of carbon sources. Moreover, genes encoding peroxidases play important roles in fungal pathogenicity in both humans and plants. For better understanding of fungal peroxidases at the genome-level, a novel genomics platform is required. To this end, Fungal Peroxidase Database (fPoxDB; http://peroxidase.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) has been developed to provide such a genomics platform for this important gene family. Description In order to identify and classify fungal peroxidases, 24 sequence profiles were built and applied on 331 genomes including 216 from fungi and Oomycetes. In addition, NoxR, which is known to regulate NADPH oxidases (NoxA and NoxB) in fungi, was also added to the pipeline. Collectively, 6,113 genes were predicted to encode 25 gene families, presenting well-separated distribution along the taxonomy. For instance, the genes encoding lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase were concentrated in the rot-causing basidiomycetes, reflecting their ligninolytic capability. As a genomics platform, fPoxDB provides diverse analysis resources, such as gene family predictions based on fungal sequence profiles, pre-computed results of eight bioinformatics programs, similarity search tools, a multiple sequence alignment tool, domain analysis functions, and taxonomic distribution summary, some of which are not available in the previously developed peroxidase resource. In addition, fPoxDB is interconnected with other family web systems, providing extended analysis opportunities. Conclusions fPoxDB is a fungi-oriented genomics platform for peroxidases. The sequence

  8. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum. PMID:23661464

  9. Polysaccharide fraction from higher plants which strongly interacts with the cytosolic phosphorylase isozyme. I. Isolation and characterization. [Spinacia oleracea L. ; Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Steup, M. )

    1990-11-01

    From leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. or from Pisum sativum L. and from cotyledons of germinating pea seeds a high molecular weight polysaccharide fraction was isolated. The apparent size of the fraction, as determined by gel filtration, was similar to that of dextran blue. Following acid hydrolysis the monomer content of the polysaccharide preparation was studied using high pressure liquid and thin layer chromatography. Glucose, galactose, arabinose, and ribose were the main monosaccharide compounds. The native polysaccharide preparation interacted strongly with the cytosolic isozyme of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). Interaction with the plastidic phosphorylase isozyme(s) was by far weaker. Interaction with the cytosolic isozyme was demonstrated by affinity electrophoresis, kinetic measurements, and by {sup 14}C-labeling experiments in which the glucosyl transfer from ({sup 14}C)glucose 1-phosphate to the polysaccharide preparation was monitored.

  10. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  11. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed nitric oxide formation from hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinming; Sommers, Erin M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2002-04-01

    Hydroxyurea represents an approved treatment for sickle cell anemia and a number of cancers. Chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies show horseradish peroxidase catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Gas chromatographic headspace analysis and infrared spectroscopy also reveal the production of nitrous oxide in this reaction, which provides evidence for nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These reactions also generate carbon dioxide, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. None of these products form within 1 h in the absence of hydrogen peroxide or horseradish peroxidase. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and trapping studies show the intermediacy of a nitroxide radical and a C-nitroso species during this reaction. Absorption spectroscopy indicates that both compounds I and II of horseradish peroxidase act as one-electron oxidants of hydroxyurea. Nitroxyl, generated from Angeli's salt, reacts with ferric horseradish peroxidase to produce a ferrous horseradish peroxidase-nitric oxide complex. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments with a nitric oxide specific trap reveal that horseradish peroxidase is capable of oxidizing nitroxyl to nitric oxide. A mechanistic model that includes the observed nitroxide radical and C-nitroso compound intermediates has been forwarded to explain the observed product distribution. These studies suggest that direct nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea and peroxidases may contribute to the overall pharmacological properties of this drug. PMID:11916434

  12. Stabilization of lignin peroxidases in white rot fungi by tryptophan.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, P J; Field, J A; Teunissen, P; Dobson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Supplementation of various cultures of white rot fungi with tryptophan was found to have a large stimulatory effect on lignin peroxidase activity levels. This enhancement was greater than that observed in the presence of the lignin peroxidase recycling agent veratryl alcohol. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we found that tryptophan does not act to induce lignin peroxidase expression at the level of gene transcription. Instead, the activity enhancement observed is likely to result from the protective effect of tryptophan against H2O2 inactivation. In experiments using a partially purified lignin peroxidase preparation, tryptophan and its derivative indole were determined to function in the same way as veratryl alcohol in converting compound II, an oxidized form of lignin peroxidase, to ferric enzyme, thereby completing the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, tryptophan was found to be a better substrate for lignin peroxidase than veratryl alcohol. Inclusion of either tryptophan or indole enhanced the oxidation of the azo dyes methyl orange and Eriochrome blue black. Stimulation of azo dye oxidations by veratryl alcohol has previously been shown to be due to its enzyme recycling function. Our data allow us to propose that tryptophan stabilizes lignin peroxidase by acting as a reductant for the enzyme. PMID:9212404

  13. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  14. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  15. Special Issue: Proceedings From the 9th International Congress on Isozymes, Genes, and Gene Families, San Antonio, TX, April 14-19, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrey, John R.; VandeBerg, John L.

    1998-10-01

    This volume includes 27 peer-reviewed papers, plus an overview of the International Congress on Genes, Gene Families, and Isozymes. These proceedings provide a representative portion of the outstanding scientific program compiled for the Congress. Presented is a volume that documents the vigorous state of this field, and the manner in which is has progressed to include a wide range of approaches, from classic isozyme analysis to modern molecular biology.

  16. Graft copolymers with immobilized peroxidase for organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vargas, Reinaldo Romero; Higa, Olga Zazuco; Barrak, Élcio Rogério; Bechara, Etelvino J. H.; Wlasdislaw, Blanka; Marzorati, Liliana

    1999-07-01

    The graft copolymer poly(propylene)-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (PP-G-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto polypropylene spheres and characterized by thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Maximum percentage of grafting (70%) was obtained at a total dose of 12 kGy using 30% (w/w) of acrylic acid. The Michaelis constant, KM, and the maximum reaction velocity, VMax, were determined for the free horseradish peroxidase and for the immobilized horseradish peroxidase. The enzyme affinity for the substrate ( KM/ Vmax) remains quite good after immobilization. The sulfoxidation reaction of a ketosulfide was investigated with the immobilized peroxidase.

  17. Induction of a germination specific, low molecular weight, acid phosphatase isozyme with specific phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity in lentil (Lens esculenta) seeds.

    PubMed

    Bose, S K; Taneja, V

    1998-09-29

    A germination specific isozyme of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) hydrolysing O-phospho-L-Tyrosine, pH optima 5.5 is induced in lentil seeds. When seeds at 0 h, 24 h and 36 h of germination are electrophorezed, native PAGE on specific enzyme staining shows several constitutive isozymes of acid phosphatases. At 48 h, an isozyme is induced which gradually decreases and then disappears at 108 h of germination. The short lived, induced isozyme is present in the embryo and seed-coat but not in the plumule and the radical. Induction of this isozyme is inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin-D and increased by plant growth regulators such as heteroauxin and gibbrellic acid treatment during germination. The induced isozyme is a single 30 kD polypeptide, with subunit molecular mass of 25 kD, shows activity for O-phospho-L-Tyrosine. It is strongly inhibited by vanadate (microM), molybdate, tungustate as also by iodoacetate, p-chloromercuribenzoate and diethylpyrocarbonate. This study shows for the first time that the germination induced low molecular weight Acid phosphatase is a Tyrosine phosphatase super family class IV enzyme, having a role in cellular differentiation and development during seed germination. PMID:9784397

  18. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  19. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes. PMID:26747440

  20. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  1. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  2. Stomach Chitinase from Japanese Sardine Sardinops melanostictus: Purification, Characterization, and Molecular Cloning of Chitinase Isozymes with a Long Linker

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Ikehata, Hiroki; Tada, Chihiro; Ogino, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Ikeda, Mana; Fukushima, Hideto; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Fish express two different chitinases, acidic fish chitinase-1 (AFCase-1) and acidic fish chitinase-2 (AFCase-2), in the stomach. AFCase-1 and AFCase-2 have different degradation patterns, as fish efficiently degrade chitin ingested as food. For a comparison with the enzymatic properties and the primary structures of chitinase isozymes obtained previously from the stomach of demersal fish, in this study, we purified chitinase isozymes from the stomach of Japanese sardine Sardinops melanostictus, a surface fish that feeds on plankton, characterized the properties of these isozymes, and cloned the cDNAs encoding chitinases. We also predicted 3D structure models using the primary structures of S. melanostictus stomach chitinases. Two chitinase isozymes, SmeChiA (45 kDa) and SmeChiB (56 kDa), were purified from the stomach of S. melanostictus. Moreover, two cDNAs, SmeChi-1 encoding SmeChiA, and SmeChi-2 encoding SmeChiB were cloned. The linker regions of the deduced amino acid sequences of SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 (SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2) are the longest among the fish stomach chitinases. In the cleavage pattern groups toward short substrates and the phylogenetic tree analysis, SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 were classified into AFCase-1 and AFCase-2, respectively. SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 had catalytic domains that consisted of a TIM-barrel (β/α)8–fold structure and a deep substrate-binding cleft. This is the first study showing the 3D structure models of fish stomach chitinases. PMID:26805857

  3. Separate physiological roles for two isozymes of pyridine nucleotide-linked glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in chicken.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, H. B., III; Kaplan, N. O.

    1972-01-01

    The isozymes considered are designated 'liver type' and 'muscle type' based on the tissue of highest concentration. Electrophoretic analysis shows that the liver type is found in small amounts or is undetectable in all tissues studied except liver. The muscle type is found in skeletal muscles and kidney. Presumptive hybrid enzymes occur at low levels in chicken liver and kidney. The tissue distribution of glyceron-3-P dehydrogenase in several birds capable of sustained flight is different than in chicken.

  4. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  5. Tissue-specific expression of human arylsulfatase-C isozymes and steroid sulfatase.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, D G; Chang, P L

    1987-01-01

    Steroid sulfatase (STS; E.C.3.1.6.2), which acts on 3-hydroxysteroid sulfates, and arylsulfatase-C (ARC; E.C.3.1.6.1), assayed with aromatic artificial substrates, are both membrane-bound, microsomal enzymes with alkaline pH optima. Although they copurify during preparation and their gene loci are mapped to the short arm of the human X chromosome where they appear to have escaped from X inactivation, it has not been settled whether STS and ARC are the same enzyme or not. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that ARC exists in two electrophoretically distinct forms in human fibroblasts. We now report that these two forms--the faster migrating (F) and more slowly migrating (S)--occur in human tissues. Each of 11 human tissue types from 10 subjects showed a consistent pattern of ARC isozymes. Thyroid, heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, and adrenal tissue mainly had the S form. In contrast, kidney, liver, and pancreas tissue had mainly the F form, while gonadal, lung, and intestinal tissue had both the S and the F forms. The question of escape of their gene locus from X-chromosome inactivation was examined by comparing the specific activities of ARC and STS in male-derived vis-à-vis female-derived tissues. The majority of the tissues did not show any significant difference in these activities between the sexes, the exceptions being heart muscle, gonadal, and kidney tissue. None showed the 1:2 ratio between male- and female-derived tissues expected of a locus that had escaped X inactivation. The question of identity between ARC and STS was examined by comparing the ratios of their activities in these tissue types: if the enzymes were identical, the ratios of their activities should have remained constant across the different tissue types. It was thus shown that ARC activity varied by as much as 100-fold, depending on the ARC isozymic pattern of the tissue. STS, measured as estrone sulfatase and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfatase, did not show similar variations. This

  6. INHIBITORY AND MECHANISTIC INVESTIGATIONS OF OXO-LIPIDS WITH HUMAN LIPOXYGENASE ISOZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Michelle M.; Diaz, Giovanni; Kenyon, Victor; Holman, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxo-lipids, a large family of oxidized human lipoxygenase (hLOX) products, are of increasing interest to researchers due to their involvement in different inflammatory responses in the cell. Oxo-lipids are unique because they contain electrophilic sites that can potentially form covalent bonds through a Michael addition mechanism with nucleophilic residues in protein active sites and thus increase inhibitor potency. Due to the resemblance of oxo-lipids to LOX substrates, the inhibitor potency of 4 different oxo-lipids; 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE), 15-oxo-5,8,11,13-(Z,Z,Z,E)-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxo-ETE), 12-oxo-5,8,10,14-(Z,Z,E,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-oxo-ETE), and 13-oxo-9,11-(Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid (13-oxo-ODE) were determined against a library of LOX isozymes; leukocyte 5-lipoxygenase (h5-LOX), human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1), human platelet 12-lipoxygenase (h12-LOX), human epithelial 15-lipoxygenase-2 (h15-LOX-2), soybean 15-lipoxygenase-1 (s15-LOX-1), and rabbit reticulocyte 15-LOX (r15-LOX). 15-oxo-ETE exhibited the highest potency against h12-LOX, with an IC50 = 1 ± 0.1 μM and was highly selective. Steady state inhibition kinetic experiments determined 15-oxo-ETE to be a mixed inhibitor against h12-LOX, with a Kic value of 0.087 ± 0.008 μM and a Kiu value of 2.10 ± 0.8 μM. Time-dependent studies demonstrated irreversible inhibition with 12-oxo-ETE and h15-LOX-1, however, the concentration of 12-oxo-ETE required (Ki = 36.8 ± 13.2 μM) and the time frame (k2 = 0.0019 ± .00032 s−1) were not biologically relevant. These data are the first observations that oxo-lipids can inhibit LOX isozymes and may be another mechanism in which LOX products regulate LOX activity. PMID:24924423

  7. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:7521216

  8. Arabidopsis GERANYLGERANYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sola, M Águila; Coman, Diana; Beck, Gilles; Barja, M Victoria; Colinas, Maite; Graf, Alexander; Welsch, Ralf; Rütimann, Philipp; Bühlmann, Peter; Bigler, Laurent; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Vranová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Most plastid isoprenoids, including photosynthesis-related metabolites such as carotenoids and the side chain of chlorophylls, tocopherols (vitamin E), phylloquinones (vitamin K), and plastoquinones, derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. Seven out of 10 functional GGPPS isozymes in Arabidopsis thaliana reside in plastids. We aimed to address the function of different GGPPS paralogues for plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis. We constructed a gene co-expression network (GCN) using GGPPS paralogues as guide genes and genes from the upstream and downstream pathways as query genes. Furthermore, knock-out and/or knock-down ggpps mutants were generated and their growth and metabolic phenotypes were analyzed. Also, interacting protein partners of GGPPS11 were searched for. Our data showed that GGPPS11, encoding the only plastid isozyme essential for plant development, functions as a hub gene among GGPPS paralogues and is required for the production of all major groups of plastid isoprenoids. Furthermore, we showed that the GGPPS11 protein physically interacts with enzymes that use GGPP for the production of carotenoids, chlorophylls, tocopherols, phylloquinone, and plastoquinone. GGPPS11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids. Both gene co-expression and protein-protein interaction likely contribute to the channeling of GGPP by GGPPS11. PMID:26224411

  9. A possible role of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450nor isozyme in glycolysis under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-05-01

    The denitrifying fungus Cylindrocarpon tonkinense contains two isozymes of cytochrome P450nor. One isozyme, P450nor1, uses NADH specifically as its electron donor whereas the other isozyme P450nor2 prefers NADPH to NADH. Here we show that P450nor1 is localized in both cytosol and mitochondria, like P450nor of Fusarium oxysporum, while P450nor2 is exclusively in cytosol. We also found that the addition of glucose as a carbon source to the culture media leads to the production of much more P450nor2 in the fungal cells than a non-fermentable substrate (glycerol or acetate) does. These results suggest that the NADP-dependent pentose phosphate cycle acts predominantly in C. tonkinense as the glycolysis pathway under the denitrifying conditions, which was confirmed by the observation that glucose induced enzyme activities involved in the cycle. These results showed that P450nor2 should act as the electron sink under anaerobic, denitrifying conditions to regenerate NADP+ for the pentose phosphate cycle. PMID:12834289

  10. Involvement of the "A" isozyme of methyltransferase II and the 29-kilodalton corrinoid protein in methanogenesis from monomethylamine.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, S A; Krzycki, J A

    1995-01-01

    An assay which allowed detection of proteins involved in the trimethylamine- or monomethylamine (MMA)-dependent methylation of coenzyme M (CoM) was developed. The two activities could be separated by anion-exchange chromatography. The unresolved activity responsible for MMA:CoM methyl transfer eluted from a gel permeation column in the molecular mass range of 32 kDa. The activity was purified to two monomeric proteins of 40 and 29 kDa. The preparation contained protein-bound corrinoid in a mixture of Co(II) and Co(III) states, as well as methyl-B12:CoM methyltransferase (MT2) activity. N-terminal sequence analysis demonstrated that the polypeptides were two previously identified proteins of undefined physiological function. The smaller polypeptide was the monomeric 29-kDa corrinoid protein. The larger polypeptide was the "A" isozyme of MT2. Individually purified preparations of both proteins increased the rate of MMA-dependent CoM methylation by approximately 1.7 mumol/min/mg of purified protein above background activity in the extract of methanol-grown cells. These results indicate that the 29-kDa corrinoid protein and the "A" isozyme of MT2 function in methanogenesis from MMA. A likely mechanism is that the 29-kDa corrinoid is methylated by MMA and the methyl group is then transferred by the "A" isozyme of MT2 to CoM. PMID:7635826

  11. Selective inhibition by chloramphenicol of pregnenolone-16. cap alpha. -carbonitrile-inducible rat liver cytochrome P-450 isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, P.E.; Kaminsky, L.S.; Halpert, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnenolone-16 ..cap alpha..-carbonitrile (PCN) has been shown to induce, in male rats, cytochrome P-450 isozymes responsible for the formation of R-10-hydroxywarfarin and R-dehydrowarfarin. Antibodies to the major PCN-inducible isozyme (PB/PCN-E) inhibit both activities in microsomal preparations. Recently the authors have shown that PCN treatment of female rats also induces the formation of both R-warfarin metabolites. However, in both sexes chloramphenicol (CAP) treatment selectively inhibits only the rate of formation of the R-dehydrowarfarin. A decrease in microsomal P-450 content occurs after in vivo administration of CAP to PCN-treated rats of both sexes. This is in contrast to the lack of effect of CAP on P-450 levels in phenobarbital-treated rats. Covalent binding of /sup 14/C-CAP to microsomal protein in vitro was increased 3 to 4-fold following PCN treatment. Chromatographic evidences suggests the presence of at least two PCN-induced isozymes of similar molecular weights in both male and female rat liver microsomes. These data are consistent with the multiplicity of PCN-inducible P-450 in rat liver.

  12. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  13. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  14. Stimuli-responsive peroxidase mimicking at a smart graphene interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie

    2012-07-18

    A synergistic graphene-based catalyst was engineered by the in situ growth of "naked" Au-nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene sheets. The catalyst exhibits excellent switchable peroxidase-like activity in response to specific DNA. PMID:22673613

  15. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters. PMID:25195693

  16. Grafting of Functional Molecules: Insights into Peroxidase-Derived Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyanhongo, Gibson S.; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Guebitz, Georg

    An insight into the progress made in applying heme peroxidases in grafting processes, starting from the production of simple resins to more complex polymers, is presented. The refinement of the different reaction conditions (solvents, concentrations of the reactants) and careful study of the reaction mechanisms have been instrumental in advancing enzymatic grafting processes. A number of processes described here show how peroxidase mediated catalysis could provide a new strategy as an alternative to conventional energy intensive procedures mediated by chemical catalysts.

  17. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  18. [Development of a new type soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase isozymes].

    PubMed

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming; Li, Gui-Ying

    2005-02-01

    Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids. It contains all kinds of amino acids, especially eight amino acids necessary for human, but also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as Lipoxygenase (Lox) and Trypsin inhibitor (Ti). Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, a new type soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase isozymes was developed by Institute of Crop Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences through years of biochemical marker assistant selection for null lipoxygenase by means of isoelectric focusing-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (IEF-PAGE) in the hybrid progenies of "96P17" (Female parent, a null lipoxygenase 2.3 line) and "93704" (Male parent, a null lipoxygenase 1.3 line). It is the first new soybean germplasm with null Lox1.2.3 genes in our country, which will contribute to soybean breeding for high quality, soybean production and utilization. In this paper, the development process of new type soybean germplasm is described. PMID:15759868

  19. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease. PMID:27234558

  20. Selectivity of microbial acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitors toward isozymes.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The selectivity of microbial inhibitors of acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) toward the two isozymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, was assessed in cell-based assays. Purpactin A (IC50 values of ACAT1 vs. IC50 values of ACAT2; 2.5 microM vs. 1.5 microM), terpendole C (10 microM vs. 10 microM), glisoprenin A (4.3 microM vs. 10 microM), spylidone (25 microM vs. 5.0 microM) and synthetic CL-283,546 (0.1 microM vs. 0.09 microM) inhibited ACAT1 and ACAT2 to similar extents. Beauveriolides I (0.6 microM vs. 20 microM) and III (0.9 microM vs. >20 microM) inhibited ACAT1 rather selectively, while pyripyropenes A (>80 microM vs. 0.07 microM), B (48 microM vs. 2.0 microM), C (32 microM vs. 0.36 microM) and D (38 microM vs. 1.5 microM) showed selective inhibition against ACAT2. In particular, pyripyropene A was found to be the most selective ACAT2 inhibitor with a selective index of more than 1,000. PMID:17390588

  1. Simultaneous production of fatty acid methyl esters and diglycerides by four recombinant Candida rugosa lipase's isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Huang, Myron; Hsieh, Yu-Hsun; Luo, Ying-Ting; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chen, Chin-Shuh; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2014-07-15

    In this study, the catalytic efficiency of four recombinant CRL (Candida rugosa lipase) isozymes (LIP1-LIP4) towards the production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was compared and evaluated as an alternative green method for industrial applications. The results indicated that the recombinant C. rugosa LIP1 enzyme exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency for FAME production compared to the recombinant C. rugosa LIP2-LIP4 enzymes. The optimal conditions were as follows: pH 7.0, methanol/soybean oil molar ratio: 3/1, enzyme amount: 2U (1.6 μL), reaction temperature: 20°C, 22 h of reaction time, and 3 times of methanol addition (1 mol/6h), and resulted in 61.5 ± 1.5 wt.% of FAME conversion. The reaction product contained also 10 wt.% of DAG with a ratio of 1,3-DAG to 1,2-DAG of approximately 4:6, and can be potentially used in industrial applications as a food emulsifier. PMID:24594166

  2. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, M; Chen, C S; Yoshida, A

    1991-01-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. We isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5' region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role. Images PMID:1881901

  3. Cloning of human calcineurin A: Evidence for two isozymes and identification of a polyproline structural domain

    SciTech Connect

    Guerini, D.; Klee, C.B. )

    1989-12-01

    Two types (I and II) of cDNAs encoding the large (A) subunit of calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated protein phosphatase, were isolated from human basal ganglia and brainstem mRNA. The complete sequences of the two calcineurin clones are identical except for a 54-base-pair insert in the type I clone and different 3{prime} ends including part of the coding sequence for the C termini of the two proteins. These findings suggest that calcineurin A consists of at least two isozymes that may result from alternative splicing events. The two forms of the enzyme differ in the C terminus, which contains an inhibitory domain rapidly severed by limited proteolysis. With the exception of an 18-amino acid insert, the central parts of the molecules, which harbor the catalytic domains, are identical and show extended similarities with the entire catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, defining a distinct family of protein phosphatases. The 40-residue N-terminal fragment, specific for calcineurin, contains a sequence of 11 successive prolines that is also found to bovine brain calcineurin by peptide sequencing. A role in the calmodulin activation of calcineurin is proposed for this novel structural element.

  4. Antioxidant and isozyme features of two strains of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi; Li, Yongqi; Yu, Zhiming

    2007-01-01

    Healthy sporophytes of two gametophyte mutants of Laminaria japonica with different heat resistances: kelp 901 ( 901, with comparatively stronger heat-resistance) and Rongcheng No.1 ( RC, sensitive to heat stress), were respectively collected during October to December 2002 from Yantai and Rongcheng Sea Farm in the Shandong Peninsula of China. The contents of some biochemical materials and antioxidant capacity were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions to identify if there is any relation between the overall antioxidant capacity and the heat-resistance in L. japonica and to understand possible mechanism of heat-resistance. Results show that: (1) the overall antioxidant capacity in healthy sporophyte of 901, such as vitamin E, polyphenol, and ascorbic acid contents and the enzymatic activity of SOD, POD, CAT, Gpx, PPO, and PAL, were not always higher than that of RC under controlled laboratory conditions, and no significance ( P>0.05) was shown in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in 901 and RC. Result suggested that the difference in antioxidant capacity was not a decisive factor for different heat-resistances in L. japonica; (2) the simultaneous assay on isozymes was carried out using vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considerable differences in peroxide (PRX), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), malic enzyme (ME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were obtained in 901 and RC from either the band number, relative mobility ( R f ), or staining intensity, and ME could be used as an indicator to distinguish healthy sporophyte of 901 and RC under controlled laboratory conditions.

  5. Purification and properties of two isozymes of pyruvate kinase from Mucor racemosus.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, T M; Paznokas, J L

    1987-01-01

    The dimorphic phycomycete Mucor racemosus was found to contain up to five electrophoretic forms of pyruvate kinase (ATP: pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.40) depending on growth conditions. M. racemosus hyphal cells grown on glutamic acid as the carbon source contained only the fastest electrophoretic form, designated PK1, while yeast cells grown on glucose contained only the slowest electrophoretic form, PK5. Intermediate electrophoretic forms PK2, PK3, and PK4 as well as PK1 and PK5 were found in hyphal cells grown on media containing fructose or cellibiose. All five electrophoretic forms had molecular weights of ca. 230,000 as determined from plots of log Rm versus acrylamide gel concentration. Both PK1 and PK5 were purified to homogeneity and determined to be homotetramers, with subunit molecular weights of 54,000 and 58,100, respectively. The amino acid content of PK1 and PK5 was determined and found to be similar but not identical. Analysis of limited tryptic digests and cyanogen bromide cleavage fragments of PK1 and PK5 indicate that the subunits of the two isozymes are significantly different. Images PMID:3611022

  6. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways. PMID:26291534

  7. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  8. Leaf Tissue Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Peter J.; Goldthwaite, Jonathan

    1975-01-01

    During winter, excised leaf tissue from Rumex obtusifolius degrades chlorophyll at twice the summer rate but the plant hormones, gibberellic acid and zeatin, inhibit the senescence rate by a constant percentage, regardless of season. PMID:16659225

  9. Engineering the proximal heme cavity of catalase-peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Regelsberger, Günther; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Rüker, Florian; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

    2002-07-25

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are prokaryotic heme peroxidases with homology to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and plant ascorbate peroxidases (APXs). KatGs, CCP and APXs contain identical amino acid triads in the heme pocket (distal Arg/Trp/His and proximal His/Trp/Asp), but differ dramatically in their reactivities towards hydrogen peroxide and various one-electron donors. Only KatGs have high catalase activity in addition to a peroxidase activity of broad specificity. Here, we investigated the effect of mutating the conserved proximal triad on KatG catalysis. With the exception of W341F, all variants (H290Q, W341A, D402N, D402E) exhibited a catalase activity <1% of wild-type KatG and spectral properties indicating alterations in heme coordination and spin states. Generally, the peroxidase activity was much less effected by these mutations. Compared with wild-type KatG the W341F variant had a catalase and halogenation activity of about 40% and an even increased overall peroxidase activity. This variant, for the first time, allowed to monitor the hydrogen peroxide mediated transitions of ferric KatG to compound I and back to the resting enzyme. Compound I reduction by aromatic one-electron donors (o-dianisidine, pyrogallol, aniline) was not influenced by exchanging Trp by Phe. The findings are discussed in comparison with the data known from CCP and APX and a reaction mechanism for the multifunctional activity of the W341F variant is suggested. PMID:12121764

  10. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  11. In vitro inhibition of salicylic acid derivatives on human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Esra; Senturk, Murat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-10-15

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, hCA I and II, with a series of salicylic acid derivatives was investigated by using the esterase method with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. IC(50) values for sulfasalazine, diflunisal, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-aminosalicylic acid, 4-sulfosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and 3-metylsalicylic acid were of 3.04 microM, 3.38 microM, 4.07 microM, 7.64 microM, 0.13 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.42 mM, 0.56 mM, 2.71 mM and 3.07 mM for hCA I and of 4.49 microM, 2.70 microM, 0.72 microM, 2.80 microM, 0.75 mM, 0.72 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.68 mM, 1.16 mM and 4.70 mM for hCA II, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used for the determination of the inhibition mechanism of these substituted phenols, most of which were noncompetitive inhibitors with this substrate. Some salicylic acid derivatives investigated here showed effective hCA I and II inhibitory activity, and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors eventually targeting other isoforms which have not been assayed yet for their interactions with such agents. PMID:18819808

  12. Peroxisomal membrane manganese superoxide dismutase: characterization of the isozyme from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Romero-Puertas, María C; Pastori, Gabriela M; Corpas, Francisco J; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M

    2007-01-01

    In this work the manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) bound to peroxisomal membranes of watermelon cotyledons (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) was purified to homogeneity and some of its molecular properties were determined. The stepwise purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulphate fractionation, batch anion-exchange chromatography, and anion-exchange and gel-filtration column chromatography using a fast protein liquid chromatography system. Peroxisomal membrane Mn-SOD (perMn-SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) was purified 5600-fold with a yield of 2.6 mug of enzyme g(-1) of cotyledons, and had a specific activity of 480 U mg(-1) of protein. The native molecular mass determined for perMn-SOD was 108 000 Da, and it was composed of four equal subunits of 27 kDa, which indicates that perMn-SOD is a homotetramer. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the enzyme showed a shoulder at 275 nm and two absorption maxima at 448 nm and 555 nm, respectively. By isoelectric focusing, a pI of 5.75 was determined for perMn-SOD. In immunoblot assays, purified perMn-SOD was recognized by a polyclonal antibody against Mn-SOD from pea leaves, and the peroxisomal enzyme rapidly dissociated in the presence of dithiothreitol and SDS. The potential binding of the Mn-SOD isozyme to the peroxisomal membrane was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy analysis. The properties of perMn-SOD and the mitMn-SOD are compared and the possible function in peroxisomal membranes of the peripheral protein Mn-SOD is discussed. PMID:17545229

  13. The In Situ Tryptophan Analogue Probes the Conformational Dynamics in Asparaginase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Han; Lan, Yi-Kang; Yuan, Jui-Hung; Lin, Li-Ju; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Wee, Kevin; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-26

    Dynamic water solvation is crucial to protein conformational reorganization and hence to protein structure and functionality. We report here the characterization of water dynamics on the L-asparaginase structural homology isozymes L-asparaginases I (AnsA) and II (AnsB), which are shown via fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamics in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to have distinct catalytic activity. By use of the tryptophan (Trp) analog probe 2,7-diaza-tryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp), which exhibits unique water-catalyzed proton-transfer properties, AnsA and AnsB are shown to have drastically different local water environments surrounding the single Trp. In AnsA, (2,7-aza)Trp exhibits prominent green N(7)-H emission resulting from water-catalyzed excited-state proton transfer. In stark contrast, the N(7)-H emission is virtually absent in AnsB, which supports a water-accessible and a water-scant environment in the proximity of Trp for AnsA and AnsB, respectively. In addition, careful analysis of the emission spectra and corresponding relaxation dynamics, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulations, led us to propose two structural states associated with the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network in the vicinity of Trp for the two Ans. The water molecules revealed in the proximity of the Trp residue have semiquantitative correlation with the observed emission spectral variations of (2,7-aza)Trp between AnsA and AnsB. Titration of aspartate, a competitive inhibitor of Ans, revealed an increase in N(7)-H emission intensity in AnsA but no obvious spectral changes in AnsB. The changes in the emission profiles reflect the modulation of structural states by locally confined environment and trapped-water collective motions. PMID:27119634

  14. Identification of Flavone Glucuronide Isomers by Metal Complexation and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Regioselectivity of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Isozymes in the Biotransformation of Flavones

    PubMed Central

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Flavone Glucuronide isomers of five flavones (chrysin, apigenin, luteolin, baicalein, and scutellarein) were differentiated by collision induced dissociation (CID) of [Co(II) (flavone-H) (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)2]+ complexes. The complexes were generated via post-column addition of a metal/ligand solution after separation of the glucuronide products generated upon incubation of each flavone with an array of UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase (UGT) isozymes. Elucidation of the glucuronide isomers allowed a systematic investigation of the regioselectivity of twelve human UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase (UGT) isozymes, including eight UGT1A and four UGT2B isozymes. Glucuronidation of the 7-OH position was the preferred site for all the flavones except for luteolin, which possessed adjacent hydroxyl groups on the B ring. For all flavones and UGT isozymes, glucuronidation of the 5-OH position was never observed. As confirmed by the metal complexation/MS/MS strategy, glucuronidation of the 6-OH position only occurred for baicalein and scutellarein when incubated with three of the UGT isozymes. PMID:23362992

  15. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  16. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein. PMID:26928591

  17. Horseradish peroxidase: a modern view of a classic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C

    2004-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is an important heme-containing enzyme that has been studied for more than a century. In recent years new information has become available on the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and its catalytic intermediates, mechanisms of catalysis and the function of specific amino acid residues. Site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution techniques are now used routinely to investigate the structure and function of horseradish peroxidase and offer the opportunity to develop engineered enzymes for practical applications in natural product and fine chemicals synthesis, medical diagnostics and bioremediation. A combination of horseradish peroxidase and indole-3-acetic acid or its derivatives is currently being evaluated as an agent for use in targeted cancer therapies. Physiological roles traditionally associated with the enzyme that include indole-3-acetic acid metabolism, cross-linking of biological polymers and lignification are becoming better understood at the molecular level, but the involvement of specific horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes in these processes is not yet clearly defined. Progress in this area should result from the identification of the entire peroxidase gene family of Arabidopsis thaliana, which has now been completed. PMID:14751298

  18. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  19. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  20. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  1. Effects of aqueous eucalyptus extracts on seed germination, seedling growth and activities of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase in three wheat cultivar seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Ziaebrahimi, L; Khavari-Nejad, R A; Fahimi, H; Nejadsatari, T

    2007-10-01

    Evaluation of allelopathic effects of this plant on other near cultivations especially wheat is the aim of this study. Effects of water extracts of eucalyptus leaves examined on germination and growth of three wheat cultivar seeds and seedlings. Results showed that: germination percentage strongly decreased, leaf and root lengths also affected and dry and wet weights of both roots and shoots showed similar change patterns. Activities of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase as antioxidant enzymes in roots and shoots measured. Activity of peroxidases increased in stress conditions and roots showed more increased enzyme activity than leaves. Activity of polyphenoloxidases increased only in one of three cultivars and again roots showed more activity of this enzyme in response to eucalyptus extract. Suggest that detoxification process were conducted mainly in roots of seedlings. PMID:19090161

  2. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases. PMID:26542837

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of banyan peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Palm, Gottfried J.; Kumari, Moni; Panjikar, Santosh; Jagannadham, M. V.; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications owing to their high environmental and thermal stability. A new peroxidase, named banyan peroxidase, was purified from the latex of Ficus benghalensis and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native crystals and from bromide and xenon derivatives to resolutions of up to 1.66 Å in the trigonal space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.1, c = 164.6 Å. The anomalous signal of the intrinsic iron and calcium ions was sufficient for structure solution by SAD, although the sequence is not yet known. PMID:22869125

  4. The manganese binding site of manganese peroxidase: Characterization of an Asp179Asn site-directed mutant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters-van Someren, M.; Kishi, K.; Lundell, T.

    1995-08-22

    A site-directed mutant, D179N, in the gene encoding Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase isozyme 1 (mnp1), was created by overlap extension, using polymerase chain reaction. The mutant gene was expressed in P. chrysosporium under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The mutant manganese peroxidase (MnP) was purified, and its spectra and MW were very similar to those of the wild-type enzyme. Steady-state kinetic analysis of MnP D179N revealed that the K{sub m} for the substrate Mn{sup II} was {approximately}50-fold greater than the corresponding K{sub m} for the wild-type recombinant enzyme (3.7 mM versus {approximately}70 {mu}M). Likewise, the k{sub cat} value for Mn{sup II} oxidation of the mutant protein was only 1/265 of that for the wild-type enzyme. By comparison, the apparent K{sub m} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} of MnP D179N was similar to the corresponding value of the wild-type MnP. The first-order rate constant for MnP D179N compound II reduction by Mn{sup II} was approximately 1/200 of that for the wild-type enzyme. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for MnP D179N compound II reduction by Mn{sup II} was {approximately}100-fold greater than the K{sub D} for the wild-type compound II. In contrast, the second-order rate constant for p-cresol reduction of the mutant compound II was similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. These results also suggest that the mutation affects the binding of Mn{sup II} to the enzyme and, consequently, the rate of compound II reduction by Mn{sup II}. In contrast, the mutation apparently does not have a significant effect on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleavage during compound I formation or on p-cresol reduction of compound II. The results strongly suggest that Asp179 is one of the acidic amino acid ligands in the Mn{sup II} binding site of MnP. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  7. Defense Responses in Rice Induced by Silicon Amendment against Infestation by the Leaf Folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yongqiang; Li, Pei; Gong, Shaolong; Yang, Lang; Wen, Lizhang; Hou, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) amendment to plants can confer enhanced resistance to herbivores. In the present study, the physiological and cytological mechanisms underlying the enhanced resistance of plants with Si addition were investigated for one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries, the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée). Activities of defense-related enzymes, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and polyphenol oxidase, and concentrations of malondialdehyde and soluble protein in leaves were measured in rice plants with or without leaf folder infestation and with or without Si amendment at 0.32 g Si/kg soil. Silicon amendment significantly reduced leaf folder larval survival. Silicon addition alone did not change activities of defense-related enzymes and malondialdehyde concentration in rice leaves. With leaf folder infestation, activities of the defense-related enzymes increased and malondialdehyde concentration decreased in plants amended with Si. Soluble protein content increased with Si addition when the plants were not infested, but was reduced more in the infested plants with Si amendment than in those without Si addition. Regardless of leaf folder infestation, Si amendment significantly increased leaf Si content through increases in the number and width of silica cells. Our results show that Si addition enhances rice resistance to the leaf folder through priming the feeding stress defense system, reduction in soluble protein content and cell silicification of rice leaves. PMID:27124300

  8. Differential fitness of allelic isozymes in the marine gastropods Littorina punctata and Littorina neritoides, exposed to the environmental stress of the combined effects of cadmium and mercury pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavie, Batia; Nevo, Eviatar

    1987-07-01

    The present study tested the separate and the interactive pollution effects of cadmium and mercury on the electrophoretically detected allelic isozyme frequencies of the enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase for two species of littoral marine gastropods — Littorina punctata and L. neritoides — and the enzyme amino peptidase for L. neritoides. Our results indicate differential survivorship of allelic isozyme genotypes specific for each type of pollutant and for their interaction, as well as trends common to all pollutants. Theoretically the results reflect the adaptive nature of at least some allozymic genotypes in these marine gastropods and seem inconsistent with the neutral theory of allozyme polymorphisms. Practically, the results reinforce earlier conclusions that changes in the frequency of allelic isozymes may be used as a genetic monitor of pollution.

  9. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes as targets of the intracellular signalling network: benefits of PDE inhibitors in various diseases and perspectives for future therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that specifically inactivate the intracellular messengers cAMP and cGMP in a compartmentalized manner represent an important enzyme class constituted by 11 gene-related families of isozymes (PDE1 to PDE11). Downstream receptors, PDEs play a major role in controlling the signalosome at various levels of phosphorylations and protein/protein interactions. Due to the multiplicity of isozymes, their various intracellular regulations and their different cellular and subcellular distributions, PDEs represent interesting targets in intracellular pathways. Therefore, the investigation of PDE isozyme alterations related to various pathologies and the design of specific PDE inhibitors might lead to the development of new specific therapeutic strategies in numerous pathologies. This manuscript (i) overviews the different PDEs including their endogenous regulations and their specific inhibitors; (ii) analyses the intracellular implications of PDEs in regulating signalling cascades in pathogenesis, exemplified by two diseases affecting cell cycle and proliferation; and (iii) discusses perspectives for future therapeutic developments. PMID:22014080

  10. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  11. Suicide inactivation of peroxidase from Chamaerops excelsa palm tree leaves.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Zhadan, Galina G; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L

    2011-12-01

    The concentration and time-dependences and the mechanism of the inactivation of Chamaerops excelsa peroxidase (CEP) by hydrogen peroxide were studied kinetically with four co-substrates (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine and o-phenylenediamine). The turnover number (r) of H(2)O(2) required to complete the inactivation of the enzyme varied for the different substrates, the enzyme most resistant to inactivation (r=4844) with ABTS being the most useful substrate for biotechnological applications, opening a new avenue of enquiry with this peroxidase. PMID:21925205

  12. Raspberry leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry leaf curl virus (RLCV) is limited to hosts in the genus Rubus and is transmitted persistently by the small raspberry aphid, Aphis rubicola Oestlund. It is found only in North America, principally in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada and in the Rocky Mountain regions of...

  13. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  14. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  15. Expression of phospholipase D isozymes in scar and viable tissue in congestive heart failure due to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dent, Melissa R; Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2004-01-01

    The phospholipase D (PLD) associated with the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) membrane hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid, an important phospholipid signaling molecule known to influence cardiac function. The present study was undertaken to examine PLD isozyme mRNA expression, protein contents and activities in congestive heart failure (CHF) subsequent to myocardial infarction (MI). MI was induced in rats by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. At 8 weeks after the surgical procedure, hemodynamic assessment revealed that these experimental rats were at a moderate stage of CHF. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that PLD1 and PLD2 mRNA amounts were unchanged in viable left ventricular (LV) tissue of the failing heart. Furthermore, this technique demonstrated the presence of PLD1 and PLD2 mRNA in the scar tissue. While SL PLD1 and PLD2 protein contents were elevated in the viable LV tissue of the failing heart, SL PLD1 activity was significantly decreased, whereas SL PLD2 activity was significantly increased. On the other hand, although PLD1 protein was undetectable, PLD2 protein and activity were detected in the scar tissue. Our findings suggest that differential changes in PLD isozymes may contribute to the pathophysiology of CHF and may also be involved in the processes of scar remodeling. PMID:15601581

  16. The 5 Alpha-Reductase Isozyme Family: A Review of Basic Biology and Their Role in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Azzouni, Faris; Godoy, Alejandro; Li, Yun; Mohler, James

    2012-01-01

    Despite the discovery of 5 alpha-reduction as an enzymatic step in steroid metabolism in 1951, and the discovery that dihydrotestosterone is more potent than testosterone in 1968, the significance of 5 alpha-reduced steroids in human diseases was not appreciated until the discovery of 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency in 1974. Affected males are born with ambiguous external genitalia, despite normal internal genitalia. The prostate is hypoplastic, nonpalpable on rectal examination and approximately 1/10th the size of age-matched normal glands. Benign prostate hyperplasia or prostate cancer does not develop in these patients. At puberty, the external genitalia virilize partially, however, secondary sexual hair remains sparse and male pattern baldness and acne develop rarely. Several compounds have been developed to inhibit the 5 alpha-reductase isozymes and they play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases. This review describes the basic biochemical properties, functions, tissue distribution, chromosomal location, and clinical significance of the 5 alpha-reductase isozyme family. PMID:22235201

  17. Expression and localization of type II diacylglycerol kinase isozymes δ and η in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Takako; Sakai, Hiromichi; Shionoya, Takao; Sato, Naruki; Sakane, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The functions of type II diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) δ and -η in the brain are still unclear. As a first step, we investigated the spatial and temporal expression of DGKδ and -η in the brains of mice. DGKδ2, but not DGKδ1, was highly expressed in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex; CA-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of hippocampus; mitral cell, glomerular and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb; and the granule cell layer in the cerebellum in 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKδ2 was expressed just after birth, and its expression levels dramatically increased from weeks 1 to 4. A substantial amount of DGKη (η1/η2) was detected in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex, CA1 and CA2 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, mitral cell and glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb, and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKη2 expression reached maximum levels at P5 and decreased by 4 weeks, whereas DGKη1 increased over the same time frame. These results indicate that the expression patterns of DGK isozymes differ from each other and also from other isozymes, and this suggests that DGKδ and -η play distinct and specific roles in the brain. PMID:25362140

  18. Tomato Fruit Polygalacturonase Isozyme 1 (Characterization of the [beta] Subunit and Its State of Assembly in Vivo).

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T.; Bennett, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Polygalacturonase isozyme 1 (PG1) is a heterodimer comprising a catalytic and noncatalytic or [beta] subunit, whereas polygalacturonase isozyme 2 (PG2) comprises only the catalytic subunit. To assess the state of assembly of PG1 in vivo, both subunits were purified to homogeneity and used to study assembly of the heterodimer. PG1 could be reconstituted in vitro from purified [beta] subunit and purified PG2 under a wide range of salt and pH conditions, and PG1 reconstituted in vitro was indistinguishable from PG1 isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit. Specific antibodies indicated that the [beta] subunit was present in fruit of all developmental stages, but absent in vegetative tissue. The state of assembly of PG1 in vivo was tested based on the differential thermal stability of PG1 and PG2 by heating segments of ripe fruit pericarp tissue. Temperatures well below those required to inactivate PG1 in vitro caused the loss of activity of both PG1 and PG2, suggesting that only heat-labile PG2 is present in vivo. In addition, when extracts of ripe fruit were rigorously maintained and analyzed at 4[deg]C, PG1 was absent or barely detectable. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PG1 can assemble spontaneously and is essentially absent in intact tomato fruit but forms artifactually from PG2 and the [beta] subunit during the extraction of tomato fruit tissue when low temperatures are not rigorously maintained. PMID:12232422

  19. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  20. Peroxidase activity in cotton cell culture infected with Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our studies with cotton, we have shown that the plant’s induced anionic peroxidases bind to chitin, which is a component of the cell wall of the plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae. In binding to the cell wall surface, they disrupt the integrity of the pathogen’s cell wall. Thus, these...

  1. TiO(2) nanotube arrays: intrinsic peroxidase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Hu, Peng; Wang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-11-18

    TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTA), prepared by potentiostatic anodization, were discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The colorimetric and electrochemical assays both demonstrated their excellent catalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. On this basis, a simple and inexpensive electrochemical biosensor for glucose detection was developed. PMID:24084751

  2. Structural and spectroscopic characterisation of a heme peroxidase from sorghum.

    PubMed

    Nnamchi, Chukwudi I; Parkin, Gary; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Kwon, Hanna; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Agirre, Jon; Okolo, Bartholomew N; Moneke, Anene; Nwanguma, Bennett C; Moody, Peter C E; Raven, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    A cationic class III peroxidase from Sorghum bicolor was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains a high-spin heme, as evidenced by UV-visible spectroscopy and EPR. Steady state oxidation of guaiacol was demonstrated and the enzyme was shown to have higher activity in the presence of calcium ions. A Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of -266 mV vs NHE was determined. Stopped-flow experiments with H2O2 showed formation of a typical peroxidase Compound I species, which converts to Compound II in the presence of calcium. A crystal structure of the enzyme is reported, the first for a sorghum peroxidase. The structure reveals an active site that is analogous to those for other class I heme peroxidase, and a substrate binding site (assigned as arising from binding of indole-3-acetic acid) at the γ-heme edge. Metal binding sites are observed in the structure on the distal (assigned as a Na(+) ion) and proximal (assigned as a Ca(2+)) sides of the heme, which is consistent with the Ca(2+)-dependence of the steady state and pre-steady state kinetics. It is probably the case that the structural integrity (and, thus, the catalytic activity) of the sorghum enzyme is dependent on metal ion incorporation at these positions. PMID:26666777

  3. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  4. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Aaron J.; Donze, Teresa; Palmer, Nathan A.; Bradshaw, Jeff; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M.; Lagrimini, Mark; Sarath, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next-generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans. PMID:23802005

  5. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  6. Removal of chlorophenols from wastewater by immobilized horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu

    1996-07-05

    Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on magnetite and removal of chlorophenols using immobilized enzyme were investigated. Immobilization by physical adsorption on magnetite was much more effective than that by the crosslinking method, and the enzyme was found to be immobilized at 100% of retained activity. In addition, it was discovered that horseradish peroxidase was selectively adsorbed on magnetite, and the immobilization resulted in a 20-fold purification rate for crude enzyme. When immobilized peroxidase was used to treat a solution containing various chlorophenols, p-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, each chlorophenol was almost 100% removed, and also the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) reached more than 90%, respectively. However, in the case of soluble peroxidase, complete removal of each chlorophenol could not be attained, and in particular, the removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was the lowest, with a removal rate of only 36%.

  7. Phenol removal by peroxidases extracted from Chinese cabbage root

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, H.I.; Jeong, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    More than four million tons of Chinese cabbages are produced in Korea. Most of them are used as raw materials for Kimchi, but root parts of them are discarded as agricultural wastes. A trial for the application of agricultural waste to industrial waste water treatment was made as an effort to the efficient use of natural resources and to reduce water pollution problem simultaneously. Peroxidases of both solid and liquid phases were obtained from Chinese cabbage roots by using commercial juicer. The differences in peroxidase activity among the various cultivars of Chinese cabbages in Korea were little and electrophoretic patterns of various peroxidases will be discussed. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity will be discussed also. Since peroxidases are distributed into 66% in liquid (juice) and 34% in solid phase (pulp), enzymes from both phases were applied to investigate the enzymatic removal of phenol from waste water. After phenol solution at 150 ppm being reacted with liquid phase enzyme (1,800 unit/1) for 3 hours in a batch stirred reactor, 96% of phenol could be removed through polymerization and precipitation. Also, phenol could be removed from initial 120 ppm to final 5 ppm by applying solid phase enzyme in an air lift reactor (600 unit/1). Almost equivalent efficiencies of phenol removal were observed between two systems, even though only one third of the enzymes in batch stirred reactor was applied in air lift reactor. The possible reason for this phenomenon is because peroxidases exist as immobilized forms in solid phase.

  8. Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 is a central component of the reactive oxygen gene network of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Davletova, Sholpan; Rizhsky, Ludmila; Liang, Hongjian; Shengqiang, Zhong; Oliver, David J; Coutu, Jesse; Shulaev, Vladimir; Schlauch, Karen; Mittler, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as O2- and H2O2, play a key role in plant metabolism, cellular signaling, and defense. In leaf cells, the chloroplast is considered to be a focal point of ROS metabolism. It is a major producer of O2- and H2O2 during photosynthesis, and it contains a large array of ROS-scavenging mechanisms that have been extensively studied. By contrast, the function of the cytosolic ROS-scavenging mechanisms of leaf cells is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that in the absence of the cytosolic H2O2-scavenging enzyme ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1), the entire chloroplastic H2O2-scavenging system of Arabidopsis thaliana collapses, H2O2 levels increase, and protein oxidation occurs. We further identify specific proteins oxidized in APX1-deficient plants and characterize the signaling events that ensue in knockout-Apx1 plants in response to a moderate level of light stress. Using a dominant-negative approach, we demonstrate that heat shock transcription factors play a central role in the early sensing of H2O2 stress in plants. Using knockout plants for the NADPH oxidase D protein (knockout-RbohD), we demonstrate that RbohD might be required for ROS signal amplification during light stress. Our study points to a key role for the cytosol in protecting the chloroplast during light stress and provides evidence for cross-compartment protection of thylakoid and stromal/mitochondrial APXs by cytosolic APX1. PMID:15608336

  9. Antioxidant activity evaluation by physiologically relevant assays based on haemoglobin peroxidase activity and cytochrome c-induced oxidation of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mot, Augustin C; Bischin, Cristina; Muresan, Bianca; Parvu, Marcel; Damian, Grigore; Vlase, Laurian; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-06-01

    Two new protocols for exploring antioxidant-related chemical composition and reactivity are described: one based on a chronometric variation of a haemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase assay and one based on cytochrome c-induced oxidation of lecithin liposomes. Detailed accounts are given on their design, application, critical correlations with established methods and mechanisms. These assays are proposed to be physiologically relevant and bring new information regarding a real sample, both qualitative and quantitative. The well-known assays used for evaluation of antioxidant (re)activity are revisited and compared with these new methods. Extracts of the Hedera helix L. are examined as test case, with focus on seasonal variation and on leaf, fruit and flower with respect to chromatographic, spectroscopic and reactivity properties. According to the set of assays performed, winter are the most antioxidant, followed by summer leaves, and then by flowers and fruits. PMID:26208459

  10. Magnesium Deficiency and High Light Intensity Enhance Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Glutathione Reductase in Bean Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ismail; Marschner, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The influence of varied Mg supply (10-1000 micromolar) and light intensity (100-580 microeinsteins per square meter per second) on the concentrations of ascorbate (AsA) and nonprotein SH-compounds and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.11) and the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, AsA peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) were studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves over a 13-day period. The concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of SOD and H2O2 scavenging enzymes increased with light intensity, in particular in Mg-deficient leaves. Over the 12-day period of growth for a given light intensity, the concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of these enzymes remained more or less constant in Mg-sufficient leaves. In contrast, in Mg-deficient leaves, a progressive increase was recorded, particularly in concentrations of AsA and activities of AsA peroxidase and glutathione reductase, whereas the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were only slightly enhanced. Partial shading of Mg-deficient leaf blades for 4 days prevented chlorosis, and the activities of the O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes remained at a low level. The results demonstrate the role of both light intensity and Mg nutritional status on the regulation of O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes in chloroplasts. PMID:16668779

  11. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ON ORGANIC CARBON MINERALIZATION IN SOIL, USING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified lignin peroxidase was added to sterile and nonsterile silt loam soil to study the effects of bacterial lignin peroxidase ALip-P3 of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A on the rate of organic carbon turnover in soil. ignin peroxidase ALip-P3 appears to affect the short-term tur...

  12. Variation in Yield of Near-isogenic Soybean Lines for High and Low Seed Coat Peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidase is an enzyme present in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed coats and is characterized as either high (dominant allele) or low (recessive allele) activity. Cultivar Cutler 71 is a mixture of high and low seed coat peroxidase genotypes. Mechanical mixtures of 1 high: 1 low peroxidase...

  13. Lignin-degrading Peroxidases from Genome of Selective Ligninolytic Fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2012-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora. PMID:22437835

  14. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  15. Intrinsic isotope effects suggest that the reaction coordinate symmetry for the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed hydroxylation of octane is isozyme independent

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.; Rettie, A.E.; Trager, W.F. )

    1990-04-01

    The mechanism of the omega-hydroxylation of octane by three catalytically distinct, purified forms of cytochrome P-450, namely, P-450b, P-450c, and P-450LM2, was investigated by using deuterium isotope effects. The deuterium isotope effects associated with the omega-hydroxylation of octane-1,1,1-2H3, octane-1,8-2H2, and octane-1,1,8,8-2H4 by all three isozymes were determined. From these data the intrinsic isotope effects were calculated and separated into their primary and secondary components. The primary intrinsic isotope effect for the reaction ranged from 7.69 to 9.18 while the secondary intrinsic isotope effect ranged from 1.13 to 1.25. Neither the primary nor secondary isotope effect values were statistically different for any of the isozymes investigated. These data are consistent with a symmetrical transition state for a mechanism involving initial hydrogen atom abstraction followed by hydroxyl radical recombination which is essentially independent of the specific isozyme catalyzing the reaction. It is concluded that (1) in general the porphyrin-(FeO)3+ complex behaves as a source of a triplet-like oxygen atom, (2) the regioselectivity for the site of oxidation is dictated by the apoprotein of the specific isozyme of cytochrome P-450 catalyzing the reaction, and (3) the maximum primary intrinsic isotope effect for any cytochrome P-450 catalyzed oxidation of a carbon center is about 9, assuming no tunneling effects.

  16. Association of Neuroantibodies(NAB) with Glutathione-S-Tranferase(GST) Isozyme Polymorphisms(SNP) in African-American Children with Heavy Metal Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polymorphisms in GST isozymes have implications in heavy metal accumulation, neurodegeneration, and immune-mediated disease. Blood cell DNA and sera from 131 African-American children were used to determine GST Pi [rs947895 (C>A), rs17593068 (G>T), rs6591256 (A>G), rs187...

  17. Alterations in rat cardiac myosin isozymes induced by whole-body irradiation are prevented by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z.; Fein, H.G.; Gainey, G.T.; Walden, T.L.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cardiac myosin isozymes and serum thyroid hormone levels were investigated in rats following 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The percent beta-myosin heavy chain increased from 21.3 {plus minus} 1.8 to 28.1 {plus minus} 6.8 (NS) at 3-day postirradiation, 37.7 {plus minus} 1.9 (P less than .001) at 6-day postirradiation, and 43.8 {plus minus} 3.3 (P less than .001) at 9-day postirradiation. Along with the change in myosin isozymes was a significant 53% decrease (P less than .001) in the serum thyroxine (T4) level by day 3 postirradiation, remaining depressed through day 9 postirradiation. The serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) level, however, was normal until day 9, when significant depression was also observed. In contrast, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly increased by fourfold at day 3, returning to near normal values by day 9 postirradiation. Daily injections of physiological doses of T3 (0.3 microgram/100 g body weight) prevented the change in the myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation. Daily pharmacological injections of T3 (3.0 micrograms/100 g body weight) to the irradiated rats produced a further decrease in the percent beta-myosin heavy chain (below control values) indicating tissue hyperthyroidism. Thus, this study suggests that the change in myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation is caused by an alteration in thyroid hormone activity.

  18. New Ideas for an Old Enzyme: A Short, Question-Based Laboratory Project for the Purification and Identification of an Unknown LDH Isozyme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme purification projects are an excellent way to introduce many aspects of protein biochemistry, but can be difficult to carry out under the constraints of a typical undergraduate laboratory course. We have designed a short laboratory project for the purification and identification of an "unknown" lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozyme that can…

  19. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  20. Agaricus bisporus and related Agaricus species on lignocellulose: production of manganese peroxidase and multicopper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Lankinen, Pauliina; Lundell, Taina

    2013-06-01

    Biotechnological, microbiological, and genetic studies of Agaricus species other than A. bisporus, the white button mushroom, have been limited so far. To expand the knowledge in the genus Agaricus, six novel wild-type isolates of Agaricus spp. were studied on their nutritional demands for enzyme production and mycelial growth. All the selected Agaricus species produced extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase activities in semi-solid rye bran cultures. Moderate MnP activities were measured for A. bisporus, A. bernardii and A. campestris. The highest laccase activities were obtained for A. bisporus and A. campestris. On soy medium, the highest mycelial tyrosinase activity was determined for A. bernardii. For A. bisporus, addition of copper caused no increase in laccase or tyrosinase activities on soy or malt extract media. Hyphal growth rate of the isolates was studied on lignocellulose amended agar plates. Fastest growth was obtained for A. bisporus on wheat bran and birch leaf litter agar. Except for A. bernardii, hyphal growth rates correlated well with MnP and laccase production levels between Agaricus species. Molecular taxonomy of the novel Agaricus spp. positioned them to distinct phylogenetic clusters with species-level identity. In conclusion, our data point to the importance of both MnP and multicopper enzymes in Agaricus spp. while growing on lignocelluloses. PMID:23454218

  1. Differential activity and structure of highly similar peroxidases. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and enzymatic analyses of lignifying Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase A2 and horseradish peroxidase A2.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K L; Indiani, C; Henriksen, A; Feis, A; Becucci, M; Gajhede, M; Smulevich, G; Welinder, K G

    2001-09-18

    Anionic Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase ATP A2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as a model for the 95% identical commercially available horseradish peroxidase HRP A2. The crystal structure of ATP A2 at 1.45 A resolution at 100 K showed a water molecule only 2.1 A from heme iron [Ostergaard, L., et al. (2000) Plant Mol. Biol. 44, 231-243], whereas spectroscopic studies of HRP A2 in solution at room temperature [Feis, A., et al. (1998) J. Raman Spectrosc. 29, 933-938] showed five-coordinated heme iron, which is common in peroxidases. Presented here, the X-ray crystallographic, single-crystal, and solution resonance Raman studies at room temperature confirmed that the sixth coordination position of heme iron of ATP A2 is essentially vacant. Furthermore, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the heme environments of recombinant ATP A2 and glycosylated plant HRP A2 are indistinguishable at neutral and alkaline pH, from room temperature to 12 K, and are highly flexible compared with other plant peroxidases. Ostergaard et al. (2000) also demonstrated that ATP A2 expression and lignin formation coincide in Arabidopsis tissues, and docking of lignin precursors into the substrate binding site of ATP A2 predicted that coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohols were good substrates. In contrast, the additional methoxy group of the sinapyl moiety gave rise to steric hindrance, not only in A2 type peroxidases but also in all peroxidases. We confirm these predictions for ATP A2, HRP A2, and HRP C. The specific activity of ATP A2 was lower than that of HRP A2 (pH 4-8), although a steady-state study at pH 5 demonstrated very little difference in their rate constants for reaction with H2O2 (k1 = 1.0 microM(-1) x s(-1). The oxidation of coniferyl alcohol, ferulic, p-coumaric, and sinapic acids by HRP A2, and ATP A2, however, gave modest but significantly different k3 rate constants of 8.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 0.2, 0.70 +/- 0.03, and 0.04 +/- 0.2 microM(-1) x

  2. Esterase isozyme polymorphism, specific and nonspecific esterase, syngenic lines development and natural occurrence of a thermostable esterase in the tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, G K; Sengupta, A K; Verma, A K; Sen, S K; Saratchandra, B

    2001-11-01

    Esterase isozyme polymorphism was documented for digestive juice and haemolymph of the tropical multivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori L., breed CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines (CB5Lm(e)-1, CB5Lm-2 and CB5Lm-5) using alpha- and beta-naphthylacetate separately as nonspecific substrates (Ogita, Z., Kasai, T., 1965. Genetico-biochemical analysis of specific esterases in Musca domestica. Jpn. J. Genet. 40, 173-184). Polymorphism existed in the isozyme pattern of alpha-esterase with two or three bands in digestive juice and three to five bands in haemolymph. No polymorphism was observed in beta-esterase isozyme pattern having four bands in digestive juice and two bands in haemolymph. During the course of esterase isozyme studies, the presence of some specific alpha-esterase bands (Est-1, 4 and 5) in haemolymph and beta-esterase bands (Est-1, 2 and 3) in digestive juice were observed. But both alpha- and beta-esterase bands Est-3 and 4 in digestive juice and Est-2 and 3 in haemolymph were found to be nonspecific. Nonspecific beta-esterase band (Est-3) in haemolymph of CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines withstood a temperature up to 80+/-1 degrees C for 10 min. No thermostable band was observed in the isozyme zymogram of alpha-esterase in digestive juice and haemolymph or beta-esterase in digestive juice. Overall, this study discusses the presence of esterase heterogeneity in the CB5 (GP) genepool, syngenic lines development, occurrence of specific alpha- and beta-esterase bands in digestive juice and haemolymph and thermostable beta-esterase band Est-3 in haemolymph in tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L. PMID:11583932

  3. Evaluation of Tetrahydropalmatine Enantiomers on the Activity of Five Cytochrome P450 Isozymes in Rats Using a Liquid Chromatography / Mass Spectrometric Method and a Cocktail Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Wuhong; Zhao, Liang; Le, Jian; Zhang, Yinying; Liu, Yinli; Zhang, Guoqing; Chai, Yifeng; Hong, Zhanying

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of tetrahydropalmatine (THP) enantiomers on the activity of five cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isozymes in vivo. A liquid chromatography / mass spectrometric (LC-MS) method was developed for simultaneous determination of five specific probe substrates including metoprolol (2D6), caffeine (1A2), dapsone (3A4), chlorzoxazone (2E1), and tolbutamide (2C9) in rat plasma. Analytes were separated with the mobile phase consisting of 0.1% acetic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile in a gradient elution. The mass spectrometric detection via selected ion monitoring (SIM) was operated in both positive ion mode (for metoprolol m/z 268, caffeine m/z 195, and dapsone m/z 249) and negative ion mode (for chlorzoxazone m/z 168 and tolbutamide m/z 269) in the same run. Linear correlation was obtained (r(2)  > 0.99) over the concentration range of 0.050-25.0 µg/mL for caffeine and dapsone, 0.025-10.0 µg/mL for metoprolol, 0.050-50.0 µg/mL for chlorzoxazone, and 0.25-100.0 µg/mL for tolbutamide. Intra- and interday precision were less than 12.09%. The matrix effect ranged from 87.50% to 109.25% and the absolute recoveries were greater than 70%. The method was successfully applied to evaluate the effect of THP enantiomers on the activity of CYP450 isozymes by a cocktail approach. The pharmacokinetic results of five probe drugs indicated that there were stereoselective differences between the two THP enantiomers, i.e., d-THP had the potential to inhibit the activities of CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 isozymes, while l-THP inhibited CYP1A2 isozyme and induced CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 isozymes. PMID:26032585

  4. Data on the catalytic mechanism of thiol peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Zadehvakili, B; Giles, N M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-09-01

    We have recently reported SAR data describing the pharmacological activity of a series of phenyl alkyl selenides and tellurides which catalyse the oxidation of thiols by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), "The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action" B. Zadehvakili, S.M. McNeill, J.P. Fawcett, G.I. Giles (2016) [1]. This thiol peroxidase (TPx) activity is potentially useful for a number of therapeutic applications, as it can alter the outcome of oxidative stress related pathologies and modify redox signalling. This article presents data describing the molecular changes that occur to a TPx mimic upon exposure to H2O2, and then the thiol mercaptoethanol, as characterised by UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC retention time. PMID:27331089

  5. Thermal denaturation and regeneration of japanese-radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Morita, Y

    1975-09-01

    Thermal denaturation of Japanese-radish peroxidase [EC 1.11.1.7] was investigated with respect to its spectrophotometric properties and effect on the enzymatic activity. Inactivation of the peroxidase occurred at temperatures higher than 60degrees and involved three processes, i.e., dissociation of protohemin from the holoperoxidase, a conformation change in the apperoxidase, and the modification or degradation of protohemin. The splitting process of protohemin from holoperoxidase as followed by the change in the absorption spectrum at high temperatures coincided with the degrease in the activity, and it was found to be at least biphasic. The regeneration of peroxidase on cooling to room temperature was essentially reversible at neutral pH, while at pH 5 and pH 9 these processes were irreversible. The irreversibility at acidic pH was mainly due to an irreversible change in the conformation of the apoenzyme. The difference spectrum of heat-treated apoperoxidase exhibited a denaturation blueshift with negative maxima at 287 and 294 nm, and the total protein fluorescence quantum yield. qprotein, increased by 20% compared to that of the untreated apoenzyme. On the other hand, the irreversibility at alkaline pH was largely attributable to the modification of protohemin. Apoperoxidase was more resistnat to heat denaturation but the modification or degradation of protohemin in heated enzyme was greater at alkaline pH than at acidic pH. The pyridine-ferrohemochrome spectrum of peroxidase exhibited slight shifts of the maxima of the alpha-band to shorter wavelength on heat treatment, and the paper chromatogram showed the presence of a new derivative other than protohemin. The modified product is probably (2(4)-vinyl-4(2)-hydroxyethyldeuterohemin. PMID:5412

  6. Expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding two 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Kaplan, S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase isozymes, were determined. ALA synthase catalyzes the condensation of glycine and succinyl coenzyme A, the first and rate-limiting step in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. The hemA and hemT structural gene sequences were 65% identical to each other, and the deduced HemA and HemT polypeptide sequences were 53% identical, with an additional 16% of aligned amino acids being similar. HemA and HemT were homologous to all characterized ALA synthases, including two human ALA synthase isozymes. In addition, they were evolutionarily related to 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid synthetase (BioF) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), enzymes which catalyze similar reactions. Two hemA transcripts were identified, both expressed under photosynthetic conditions at levels approximately three times higher than those found under aerobic conditions. A single transcriptional start point was identified for both transcripts, and a consensus sequence at this location indicated that an Fnr-like protein may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of hemA. Transcription of hemT was not detected in wild-type cells under the physiological growth conditions tested. In a mutant strain in which the hemA gene had been inactivated, however, hemT was expressed. In this mutant, hemT transcripts were characterized by Northern (RNA) hybridization, primer extension, and ribonuclease protection techniques. A small open reading frame of unknown function was identified upstream of, and transcribed in the same direction as, hemA. Images PMID:8468290

  7. Diets enriched with cereal brans or inulin modulate protein kinase C activity and isozyme expression in rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pajari, A M; Oikarinen, S; Gråsten, S; Mutanen, M

    2000-11-01

    The role of dietary fibres in colon carcinogenesis is controversial. To elucidate the mechanisms by which different dietary fibre sources may affect colonic tumour development, we studied the effects of diets enriched with cereal brans or inulin on protein kinase C (PKC) activity and isozyme expression in rat colon. Male Wistar rats (twelve per group) were fed one of the following AIN-93G-based diets (Reeves et al. 1993) for 4 weeks: a non-fibre high-fat diet or one of the four high-fat diets supplemented with either rye, oat or wheat bran or inulin at 100 g/kg diet. The fat concentration (20 g/100 g) and fatty acid composition of the non-fibre high-fat diet was designed to approximate that in a typical Western-type diet. In the proximal colon, rats fed the inulin diet had a significantly higher membrane PKC activity and a higher membrane PKC delta level than rats fed the non-fibre diet In the distal colon, rats fed the inulin and oat bran diets had a higher total PKC activity and a higher membrane PKC beta 2 level than rats fed the wheat-bran diet. Rats in the non-fibre and wheat-bran groups had the lowest concentrations of luminal diacylglycerol. In conclusion, feeding of wheat bran resulted in low distal PKC activity and expression of PKC beta 2, a PKC isozyme related to colonic cell proliferation and increased susceptibility for colon carcinogenesis, which may explain in part the protective effect of wheat bran against tumour development in a number of experimental colon cancer studies. The increase in PKC activity and PKC beta 2 expression by feeding inulin may be a drawback of inulin as a functional food. PMID:11177176

  8. Prokaryotic origins of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily and organelle-mediated transmission to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Bakalovic, Nenad; Teixeira, Felipe Karam; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    Members of the superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases are known to be present in a wide variety of living organisms. Extensive searching within sequencing projects identified organisms containing sequences of this superfamily. Class I peroxidases, cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), ascorbate peroxidase (APx), and catalase peroxidase (CP), are known to be present in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but have now been found in various protists. CcP sequences were detected in most mitochondria-possessing organisms except for green plants, which possess only ascorbate peroxidases. APx sequences had previously been observed only in green plants but were also found in chloroplastic protists, which acquired chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis. CP sequences that are known to be present in prokaryotes and in Ascomycetes were also detected in some Basidiomycetes and occasionally in some protists. Class II peroxidases are involved in lignin biodegradation and are found only in the Homobasidiomycetes. In fact class II peroxidases were identified in only three orders, although degenerate forms were found in different Pezizomycota orders. Class III peroxidases are specific for higher plants, and their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. We have found, however, that class III peroxidases are present in some green algae, which predate land colonization. The presence of peroxidases in all major phyla (except vertebrates) makes them powerful marker genes for understanding the early evolutionary events that led to the appearance of the ancestors of each eukaryotic group. PMID:17355904

  9. Mechanistic study of a diazo dye degradation by Soybean Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enzyme based remediation of wastewater is emerging as a novel, efficient and environmentally-friendlier approach. However, studies showing detailed mechanisms of enzyme mediated degradation of organic pollutants are not widely published. Results The present report describes a detailed study on the use of Soybean Peroxidase to efficiently degrade Trypan Blue, a diazo dye. In addition to examining various parameters that can affect the dye degradation ability of the enzyme, such as enzyme and H2O2 concentration, reaction pH and temperature, we carried out a detailed mechanistic study of Trypan Blue degradation. HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS studies were carried out to confirm dye degradation and analyze the intermediate metabolites and develop a detailed mechanistic dye degradation pathway. Conclusion We report that Soybean peroxidase causes Trypan Blue degradation via symmetrical azo bond cleavage and subsequent radical-initiated ring opening of the metabolites. Interestingly, our results also show that no high molecular weight polymers were produced during the peroxidase-H2O2 mediated degradation of the phenolic Trypan Blue. PMID:23711110

  10. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  11. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  12. Detoxification of pesticides aqueous solution using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Saad Mohamed

    2013-03-15

    There are pesticide residues in agriculture wastewater and that compounds must be removed before discharge of wastewater in native waters. Thus the aim of this study was to remove toxic pesticide in waste water by the addition of horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The process of pesticide (methyl-parathion (O,O-Diethyl- O-4-nitro-phenylthiophosphate), atrazine (1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine) and triazophos (O,O-diethyl O-1-phenyl-1H-1,2,4- triazol-3-yl phosphorothioate) removal from synthetic wastewater using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide has been analyzed. The technical feasibility of the process was studied using 0.001-3.0 mM synthetic pesticides solutions. Experiments were carried out at different time, HRP and H2O2 dose and pH to determine the optimum removing conditions. The removal of the three pesticides increases with an increase in HRP and hydrogen peroxide dose. The optimum HRP dose is 2.0 U L(-1) and 10 mM for H2O2. The contact needed to reach equilibrium was found to be 360 min. Maximum removal was achieved up to 74% at pH 8. Also, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the effluent reduced at the end of 6 h from 2111-221 mg L(-1) (at pH 8). Tests based upon horseradish peroxidase, at optimized parameters, show the reduction of toxicity to non-toxic levels. PMID:24498792

  13. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  14. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to wall-localized peroxidases from corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Terry, M. E.; Hoops, P.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls.

  15. Leaf development: a cellular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kalve, Shweta; De Vos, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny) from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins, and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25132838

  16. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD. PMID:26617011

  17. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture...

  18. Overexpression of Superoxide Dismutase Protects Plants from Oxidative Stress (Induction of Ascorbate Peroxidase in Superoxide Dismutase-Overexpressing Plants).

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A. S.; Webb, R. P.; Holaday, A. S.; Allen, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis of leaf discs from transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD+) was protected from oxidative stress caused by exposure to high light intensity and low temperature. Under the same conditions, leaf discs of plants that did not express the pea SOD isoform (SOD-) had substantially lower photosynthetic rates. Young plants of both genotypes were more sensitive to oxidative stress than mature plants, but SOD+ plants retained higher photosynthetic rates than SOD- plants at all developmental stages tested. Not surprisingly, SOD+ plants had approximately 3-fold higher SOD specific activity than SOD- plants. However, SOD+ plants also exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) specific activity and had a corresponding increase in levels of APX mRNA. Dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase specific activities were the same in both SOD+ and SOD- plants. These results indicate that transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress pea Cu/Zn SOD II can compensate for the increased levels of SOD with increased expression of the H2O2-scavenging enzyme APX. Therefore, the enhancement of the active oxygen-scavenging system that leads to increased oxidative stress protection in SOD+ plants could result not only from increased SOD levels but from the combined increases in SOD and APX activity. PMID:12232001

  19. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products. PMID:27138198

  20. Heterologous Expression of Pleurotus eryngii Peroxidase Confirms Its Ability To Oxidize Mn2+ and Different Aromatic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T.

    1999-01-01

    A versatile ligninolytic peroxidase has been cloned from Pleurotus eryngii and its allelic variant MnPL2 expressed in Aspergillus nidulans, with properties similar to those of the mature enzyme from P. eryngii. These include the ability to oxidize Mn2+ and aromatic substrates, confirming that this is a new peroxidase type sharing catalytic properties of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase. PMID:10508113

  1. Identification of an orthologous clade of peroxidases that respond to feeding by greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum) in c4 grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scully et al. FY15 – C4 grass peroxidases and greenbug herbivory TECHNICAL ABSTRACT The role of peroxidases in response to green bug-feeding has been well characterized in several plant species, but information linking specific peroxidases to resistance and the identification of peroxidases that re...

  2. The artificial leaf.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  3. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    SciTech Connect

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-04-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been madeexclamation In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection.

  4. Exserohilum Leaf Spot on Tigergrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tigergrass (Thysanolaena maxima (Roxb.) Kuntze ) is a popular ornamental grass grown throughout landscapes in South Florida. In the summer of 2006, a leaf spot was observed on tigergrass in the landscape and a commercial nursery in Homestead, FL. The causal agent of the leaf spot was isolated, cha...

  5. How to pattern a leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, an...

  6. Antioxidative effect of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Chen, Y; Zhai, L; Zhang, L; Xu, Y; Wang, S; Hu, S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigation demonstrated that oral administration of ginseng stem-leaf saponins in chickens could enhance the immune response. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens. One hundred and twenty chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups. Groups 1 to 4 received intramuscular injection of cyclophosphamide to induce oxidative stress while group 5 was injected with saline solution and served as control. Following administration of cyclophosphamide, groups 1 to 3 were orally administered ginseng stem-leaf saponins at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg BW in drinking water for 7 d, respectively. After that, the spleen, thymus, bursa, and serum were collected to measure the indices of the organs and oxidative parameters. The results showed that ginseng stem-leaf saponins significantly inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress by increasing the organ indices, total antioxidant capacity, and the levels of glutathione, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, while elevating the activity of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as decreasing the protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde. Therefore, ginseng stem-leaf saponins could be a promising agent against oxidative stress in the poultry industry. PMID:25713395

  7. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  8. Fluoride inhibits the antimicrobial peroxidase systems in human whole saliva.

    PubMed

    Hannuksela, S; Tenovuo, J; Roger, V; Lenander-Lumikari, M; Ekstrand, J

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride (F-) ions at concentrations present in vivo at the plaque/enamel interface (0.05-10 mM) inhibited the activities of lactoperoxidase (LP), myeloperoxidase (MP) and total salivary peroxidase (TSP) in a pH- and dose-dependent way. The inhibition was observed only at pH < or = 6.5 and with F- concentrations > or = 0.1 mM. At pH 5.5 LP activity was inhibited by 85% and MP by 34% with 10 mM F-. TSP activity was also inhibited only at low pH (5.5) by approximately 25%. Furthermore, the generation of the actual antimicrobial agent in vivo, hypothiocyanite (HOSCN/OSCN-), of the oral peroxidase systems was inhibited by F-, again at low pH (5.0-5.5) both in buffer (by 45%) and in saliva (by 15%). This inhibition was observed only with the highest F- concentrations studied (5-10 mM). Fluoridated toothpaste (with 0.10 or 0.14% F) mixed with saliva did not inhibit TSP or HOSCN/OSCN- generation. This may have been due to the 'buffering' effect of toothpaste which did not allow salivary pH to drop below 5.9. We conclude that the F- ions in acidic fluoride products, e.g. in gels or varnishes (but not in toothpastes), may have the potential to locally inhibit the generation of a nonimmune host defense factor, HOSCN/OSCN/SCN-, produced by oral peroxidase systems. The possible clinical significance of this finding remains to be shown. PMID:7850846

  9. FTIR study of horseradish peroxidase in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Xia, C; Niu, J; Li, S

    2001-04-20

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) method was used to study the secondary structures of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in aqueous solution and in reverse micelles for the first time. Results indicated that the structure of HRP in sodium bis(2-ethylhexy)sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles was close to that in aqueous solution. In cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylfate (SDS) reverse micelles the position of some bands changed. Results indicated that the secondary structure had a close relationship with the surfactant species of the reverse micelles. Among the three types of reverse micelles, the system of AOT reverse micelles was probably the most beneficial reaction media to HRP. PMID:11302746

  10. Isozyme hybrids within the protruding third loop domain of the barley alpha-amylase (beta/alpha)8-barrel. Implication for BASI sensitivity and substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Juge, N; Rodenburg, K W; Guo, X J; Chaix, J C; Svensson, B

    1995-04-24

    Barley alpha-amylase isozymes AMY1 and AMY2 contain three structural domains: a catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel (domain A) with a protruding loop (domain B; residues 89-152) that binds Ca2+, and a small C-terminal domain. Different parts of domain B secure isozyme specific properties as identified for three AMY1-AMY2 hybrids, obtained by homeologous recombination in yeast, with crossing-over at residues 112, 116, and 144. The AMY1 regions Val90-Thr112 and Ala145-Leu161 thus confer high affinities for the substrates alpha-D-maltoheptaoside and amylose, respectively. Leu117-Phe144, and to a lesser degree Ala145-Leu161, are critical for the stability at low pH characteristic of AMY1 and for the sensitivity to barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor specific to AMY2. PMID:7737421

  11. Synthesis and properties of lignin peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A

    SciTech Connect

    Lodha, S.J.; Korus, R.A.; Crawford, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The production of lignin peroxidase by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A was studied in shake flasks and under aerobic conditions in a 7.5-L batch fermentor. Lignin peroxidase synthesis was found to be strongly affected by catabolite repression. Lignin peroxidase was a non-growth-associated, secondary metabolite. The maximum lignin peroxidase activity was 0.064 U/mL at 36 h. In order to maximize lignin peroxidase activity, optimal conditions were determined. The optimal incubation temperature, pH, and substrate (2,4-dichlorophenol) concentration for the enzyme assays were 45{degrees}C, 6, and 3 m-M, respectively. Stability of lignin peroxidase was determined at 37, 45, and 60{degrees}C, and over the pH range 4-9.

  12. Domain B protruding at the third beta strand of the alpha/beta barrel in barley alpha-amylase confers distinct isozyme-specific properties.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, K W; Juge, N; Guo, X J; Søgaard, M; Chaix, J C; Svensson, B

    1994-04-01

    alpha-Amylases belong to the alpha/beta-barrel protein family in which the active site is created by residues located at the C-terminus of the beta strands and in the helix-connecting loops extending from these ends. In the alpha-amylase family, a small separate domain B protrudes at the C-terminus of the third beta strand of the (beta/alpha)8-barrel framework. The 80% identical barley alpha-amylase isozymes 1 and 2 (AMY1 and AMY2, respectively) differ in substrate affinity and turnover rate, CaCl2 stimulation of activity, sensitivity to the endogenous 21-kDa alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, and stability at low pH. To identify regions that confer these isozyme-specific variations, AMY1-AMY2 hybrid cDNAs were generated by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast. The hybrids AMY1-(1-90)-AMY2-(90-403) and AMY1-(1-161)-AMY2-(161-403) characterized in this study contain the 90-residue and 161-residue N-terminal sequences, respectively, of AMY1 and complementary C-terminal regions of AMY2. AMY1-(1-90)-AMY2-(90-403) comprises the 60-amino-acid domain B of AMY2 and resembles this isozyme in sensitivity to alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor and its low affinity for the substrates p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-maltoheptaoside, amylose and the inhibitor acarbose. Only AMY1-(1-161)-AMY2-(161-403) and AMY1, which both share domain B, are stable at low pH. However, AMY2 and both hybrid AMY species, but not AMY1, show maximum enzyme activity on insoluble blue starch at approximately 10 mM CaCl2. Domain B thus determines several functional and stability properties that distinguish the barley alpha-amylase isozymes. PMID:8168517

  13. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 461 Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV With Trifluoromethylsulfonamide Derivatives and Their Zinc(II) and Copper(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mincione, Giovanna; Scozzafava, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides containing a free amino group with triflic anhydride afforded compounds possessing trifluoromethanesulfonamido moieties in their molecule. The Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of these new sulfonamides were prepared and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, spectroscopic, magnetic, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). The new derivatives showed good inhibitory activity against three isozymes of carbonic anhydrase (CA), i.e., CA I, II and IV. PMID:18475762

  15. Comparison of effects of VDR versus PXR, FXR and GR ligands on the regulation of CYP3A isozymes in rat and human intestine and liver.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ansar A; Chow, Edwin C Y; van Loenen-Weemaes, Anne-miek M A; Porte, Robert J; Pang, K Sandy; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2009-05-12

    In this study, we compared the regulation of CYP3A isozymes by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) against ligands of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in precision-cut tissue slices of the rat jejunum, ileum, colon and liver, and human ileum and liver. In the rat, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) strongly induced CYP3A1 mRNA, quantified by qRT-PCR, along the entire length of the intestine, induced CYP3A2 only in ileum but had no effect on CYP3A9. In contrast, the PXR/GR ligand, dexamethasone (DEX), the PXR ligand, pregnenolone-16 alpha carbonitrile (PCN), and the FXR ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), but not the GR ligand, budesonide (BUD), induced CYP3A1 only in the ileum, none of them influenced CYP3A2 expression, and PCN, DEX and BUD but not CDCA induced CYP3A9 in jejunum, ileum and colon. In rat liver, CYP3A1, CYP3A2 and CYP3A9 mRNA expression was unaffected by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), whereas CDCA decreased the mRNA of all CYP3A isozymes; PCN induced CYP3A1 and CYP3A9, BUD induced CYP3A9, and DEX induced all three CYP3A isozymes. In human ileum and liver, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and DEX induced CYP3A4 expression, whereas CDCA induced CYP3A4 expression in liver only. In conclusion, the regulation of rat CYP3A isozymes by VDR, PXR, FXR and GR ligands differed for different segments of the rat and human intestine and liver, and the changes did not parallel expression levels of the nuclear receptors. PMID:19429418

  16. Changes in fungal population of fly ash and vinasse mixture during vermicomposting by Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida: documentation of cellulase isozymes in vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Chung, Young Ryun

    2011-06-01

    Fly ash (FA) and vinasse (VN), two industrial wastes, are generated in huge amounts and cause serious hazards to the environment. In this experiment, different proportions of these two wastes were used as food for two epigeic earthworms (Eisenia fetida and Eudrilus eugeniae) to standardize the recycling technique of these two wastes and to study their effect on fungal especially cellulolytic fungal population, cellulase activity and their isozyme pattern, chitin content and microbial biomass of waste mixture during vermicomposting. Increasing VN proportion from 25% to 50% or even higher, counts of both fungi and cellulolytic fungi in waste mixtures were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased during vermicomposting. Higher cellulase activity in treatments having 50% or more vinasse might be attributed to the significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher concentration of group I isozyme while concentrations of other isozymes (group II and III) of cellulase were statistically at par. Higher chitin content in vinasse-enriched treatments suggested that fungal biomass and fungi-to-microbial biomass ratio in these treatments were also increased due to vermicomposting. Results revealed that Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida had comparable effect on FA and VN mixture during vermicomposting. Periodical analysis of above-mentioned biochemical and microbial properties and nutrient content of final vermicompost samples indicated that equal proportion (1:1, w/w) of FA and VN is probably the optimum composition to obtain best quality vermicompost. PMID:21277188

  17. Lignin oxidation by laccase isozymes from Trametes versicolor and role of the mediator 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) in kraft lignin depolymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, R; Paice, M G; Reid, I D; Lanthier, P; Yaguchi, M

    1995-01-01

    Two laccase isozymes (I and II) produced by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor were purified, and their reactivities towards various substrates and lignins were studied. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these enzymes were determined and compared to other known laccase sequences. Laccase II showed a very high sequence similarity to a laccase which was previously reported to depolymerize lignin. The reactivities of the two isozymes on most of the substrates tested were similar, but there were some differences in the oxidation rate of polymeric substrates. We found that the two laccases produced similar qualitative effects on kraft lignin and residual lignin in kraft pulp, with no evidence of a marked preference for depolymerization by either enzyme. However, the presence of the mediator 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) prevented and reversed the polymerization of kraft lignin by either laccase. The delignification of hardwood and softwood kraft pulps with the two isozymes and the mediator was compared; either laccase was able to reduce the kappa number of pulp, but only in the presence of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate). PMID:7646025

  18. Alteration of Wax Ester Content and Composition in Euglena gracilis with Gene Silencing of 3-ketoacyl-CoA Thiolase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masami; Andoh, Hiroko; Koyama, Keiichiro; Watanabe, Yomi; Nakai, Takeo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Euglena gracilis produces wax ester under hypoxic and anaerobic culture conditions with a net synthesis of ATP. In wax ester fermentation, fatty acids are synthesized by reversing beta-oxidation in mitochondria. A major species of wax ester produced by E. gracilis is myristyl myristate (14:0-14:0Alc). Because of its shorter carbon chain length with saturated compounds, biodiesel produced from E. gracilis wax ester may have good cold flow properties with high oxidative stability. We reasoned that a slight metabolic modification would enable E. gracilis to produce a biofuel of ideal composition. In order to produce wax ester with shorter acyl chain length, we focused on isozymes of the enzyme 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase (KAT), a condensing enzyme of the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis pathway in E. gracilis. We performed a gene silencing study of KAT isozymes in E. gracilis. Six KAT isozymes were identified in the E. gracilis EST database, and silencing any three of them (EgKAT1-3) altered the wax ester amount and composition. In particular, silencing EgKAT1 induced a significant compositional shift to shorter carbon chain lengths in wax ester. A model fuel mixture inferred from the composition of wax ester in EgKAT1-silenced cells showed a significant decrease in melting point compared to that of the control cells. PMID:25860691

  19. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  20. Effect of Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution on blood and cochlea antioxidant and immunity indexes in OM rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiandong; Su, Yu; Chen, Aiting; Yuan, Hu; Liu, Liangfa; Wu, Wenming

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development and progression of otitis media (OM). In this study, we investigated the effect of Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution on blood and cochlea antioxidant and immunity indexs in OM rats. In OM model rats, blood and cochlea malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were significantly increased, whereas antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR)) were significantly decreased compared with normal rats. Treatment with Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution restored the altered parameters in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution confers protection against oxidative injuries in OM rats by increasing activities of antioxidants and immunity, suggesting a potential drug for the prevention and therapy of OM. PMID:22173336

  1. Protective effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract on DMBA-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, Rajamanickam; Kumaraguruparan, Ramasamy; Abraham, Suresh K; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in male Swiss albino mice. The frequency of bone marrow micronuclei, the extent of hepatic lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidants-reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were used as intermediate biomarkers of chemoprotection. In DMBA-treated mice, the increases in micronuclei and lipid peroxides were accompanied by compromised antioxidant defenses. Pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract (200 mg/kg body weight) significantly reduced DMBA-induced micronuclei and lipid peroxides and enhanced GSH-dependent antioxidant activities. The results of the present study suggest that ethanolic neem leaf extract exerts protective effects against DMBA-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant status. PMID:16635967

  2. Purification and characterization of a cationic peroxidase Cs in Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Soo; Lee, Dong Ju

    2005-06-01

    A short distance migrating cationic peroxidase from Korean radish seeds (Raphanus sativus) was detected. Cationic peroxidase Cs was purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized. The molecular mass of the purified cationic peroxidase Cs was estimated to be about 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE. After reconstitution of apoperoxidase Cs with protohemin, the absorption spectra revealed a new peak in the Soret region around 400 nm, which is typical in a classical type III peroxidase family. The optimum pH of peroxidase activity for o-dianisidine oxidation was observed at pH 7.0. Kinetic studies revealed that the reconstituted cationic peroxidase Cs has Km values of 1.18 mM and of 1.27 mM for o-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The cationic peroxidase Cs showed the peroxidase activities for native substrates, such as coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and scopoletin. This result suggested that cationic peroxidase Cs plays an important role in plant cell wall formation during seed germination. PMID:16008083

  3. A structural and functional perspective of DyP-type peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1 (DyP) is a heme peroxidase. This name reflects its ability to degrade several anthraquinone dyes. The substrate specificity, the amino acid sequence, and the tertiary structure of DyP are different from those of the other heme peroxidase (super)families. Therefore, many proteins showing the similar amino acid sequences to that of DyP are called DyP-type peroxidase which is a new family of heme peroxidase identified in 2007. In fact, all structures of this family show a similar structure fold. However, this family includes many proteins whose amino acid sequence identity to DyP is lower than 15% and/or whose catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is a few orders of magnitude less than that of DyP. A protein showing an activity different from peroxidase activity (dechelatase activity) has been also reported. In addition, the precise physiological roles of DyP-type peroxidases are unknown. These facts raise a question of whether calling this family DyP-type peroxidase is suitable. Here, we review the differences and similarities of structure and function among this family and propose the reasonable new classification of DyP-type peroxidase family, that is, class P, I and V. In this contribution, we discuss the adequacy of this family name. PMID:25655348

  4. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  5. Formation and properties of dimeric recombinant horseradish peroxidase in a system of reversed micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Gazaryan, I G; Klyachko, N L; Dulkis, Y K; Ouporov, I V; Levashov, A V

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type recombinant horseradish peroxidase purified and refolded from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies has been studied in the system of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulphosuccinate sodium salt (Aerosol OT)-reversed micelles in octane. In contrast with native horseradish peroxidase the wild-type recombinant enzyme forms dimeric structures as judged by sedimentation analysis. Peroxidase substrates affect the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric enzyme forms. The dependence of the catalytic activity of recombinant peroxidase on the degree of hydration of the surfactant exhibits two maxima with pyrogallol, o-phenylene- diamine, guaiacol and o-dianisidine, with different ratios of activities for the first and second maxima. The differences in activities of monomeric and dimeric forms of the recombinant horseradish peroxidase provide evidence for active-site screening in dimeric forms. This has been used to model a dimeric structure of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with the screened entrance to the active site. In the model structure obtained, three of eight glycosylation sites were screened. This might explain the absence of dimeric structures in native enzyme peroxidase. The system of reversed micelles provides, for the first time, evidence for the formation of dimeric structures by recombinant plant peroxidase with an altered substrate specificity compared with the native enzyme. Thus one can assume that haem-containing peroxidases in general are able to form dimeric structures. PMID:9371726

  6. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  7. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  8. Preparation of horseradish peroxidase hydrazide and its use in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) hydrazide that is HRP linked to adipic acid dihydrazide (HRP-ADH) and its use in enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is described. In this new strategy, horseradish peroxidase was conjugated to adipic acid dihydrazide using a carbodiimide coupling method. The resulting HRP-ADH was then coupled to cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (Cortisol-21-HS) to prepare enzyme conjugate. The prepared cortisol-21-HS coupled ADH-HRP (Cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP) enzyme conjugate was used for the development of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for direct estimation of cortisol. To the cortisol antibody coated microtiter wells, standard or serum samples (50 microL), along with cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP enzyme conjugate (100 microL) were incubated for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Bound enzyme activity was measured by using tetramethyl benzidine/hydrogen peroxide (TMB/H2O2) as substrate. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.05 microg/dL and the analytical recovery ranged from 92.9 to 101.7%. PMID:12953974

  9. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  10. New pteridine substrates for dihydropteridine reductase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Armarego, W L; Ohnishi, A; Taguchi, H

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation of 4,5-diaminopyrimidin-6(1H)-one, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-one, its 6-methyl and cis-6,7-dimethyl derivatives, and 6-methyl- and cis-6-7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterins, by horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 is enzymic and follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and its Km and kcat. values were determined. This oxidation of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterins produces quinonoid dihydropterins of established structure, and they are known to be specific substrates for dihydropteridine reductase. By analogy the peroxidase/H2O2 oxidation of the 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-ones should produce similar quinonoid dihydro species. The quinonoid species derived from 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-one and its 6-methyl and cis-6,7-dimethyl derivatives are shown to be viable substrates for human brain dihydropteridine reductase, and apparent Km and Vmax. values are reported. PMID:3718470

  11. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  12. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G Mahika; Stewart, Russell J

    2015-11-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  13. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature. PMID:23016283

  14. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  15. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Rujin

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies. PMID:27135488

  16. Unusually high conservation of untranslated sequences in cDNAs for Trimeresurus flavoviridis phospholipase A2 isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Oda, N; Nakashima, K; Sasaki, H; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Kihara, H; Ohno, M

    1992-01-01

    As a step toward understanding the structure and function of phospholipases A2 (PLA2s), we isolated and sequenced several cDNAs encoding Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom PLA2 isozymes including two [Lys49]PLA2s called basic proteins I and II, [Thr37]PLA2, and PLX'-PLA2. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these cDNAs with the previously isolated [Asp49]PLA2 cDNA revealed some interesting findings from the viewpoint of evolution. First, the homologies of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (98% and 89%, respectively) were much higher than that of the protein-coding regions (67%). The predicted secondary structure showed the characteristic stem-loop structures for both the untranslated regions of the mRNAs, suggesting that these regions play some functional role(s) in translation or stability of mRNAs. Second, base substitutions appeared to have occurred at similar rates for the three positions of codons among these PLA2s. The results are discussed in terms of evolution of PLA2s. Northern blot analysis showed that these PLA2s are specific to venom gland. Images PMID:1528861

  17. Characterization of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase isozymes from a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kaori; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) isozymes of a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H, were characterized. The coexistence of monomeric and homodimeric IDHs in this bacterium was confirmed by Western blot analysis, the genes encoding two monomeric (IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb) and one dimeric (IDH-I) IDHs were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the three IDH proteins were purified. Both of the purified IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb were found to be cold-adapted enzymes while the purified IDH-I showed mesophilic properties. However, the specific activities of IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb were lower even at low temperatures than that of IDH-I. Therefore, IDH-I was suggested to be important for the growth of this bacterium. The results of colony formation of E. coli transformants carrying the respective IDH genes and IDH activities in their crude extracts indicated that the expression of the IDH-IIa gene is cold-inducible in the E. coli cells. PMID:27033696

  18. Characterization of Arabidopsis FPS Isozymes and FPS Gene Expression Analysis Provide Insight into the Biosynthesis of Isoprenoid Precursors in Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Verónica; Manzano, David; Fernández, Francisco J.; Closa, Marta; Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Bortolotti, Cristina; Vega, M. Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase (FPS), the prenyl diphoshate synthase that catalyzes the synthesis of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In this study, we provide evidence that the two Arabidopsis short FPS isozymes FPS1S and FPS2 localize to the cytosol. Both enzymes were expressed in E. coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Despite FPS1S and FPS2 share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity, FPS2 was found to be more efficient as a catalyst, more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of NaCl, and more resistant to thermal inactivation than FPS1S. Homology modelling for FPS1S and FPS2 and analysis of the amino acid differences between the two enzymes revealed an increase in surface polarity and a greater capacity to form surface salt bridges of FPS2 compared to FPS1S. These factors most likely account for the enhanced thermostability of FPS2. Expression analysis of FPS::GUS genes in seeds showed that FPS1 and FPS2 display complementary patterns of expression particularly at late stages of seed development, which suggests that Arabidopsis seeds have two spatially segregated sources of FPP. Functional complementation studies of the Arabidopsis fps2 knockout mutant seed phenotypes demonstrated that under normal conditions FPS1S and FPS2 are functionally interchangeable. A putative role for FPS2 in maintaining seed germination capacity under adverse environmental conditions is discussed. PMID:23145086

  19. N-methylcarbazole metabolism by a purified isozyme of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450: membrane effects and autocatalytic inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurka, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The catalytic properties of purified cytochrome P-450b, the major isozyme found in hepatic microsomes from phenobarbital-pretreated rats, for the metabolism of N-methylcarbazole (NMC) were analyzed in two membranous systems in order to investigate membrane bilayer-dependent parameters. Incorporation of the enzymes of the monoxygenase system into bilayer liposomal vesicles composed of total microsomal lipid had no effect on the rates or regioselectivity of the mono-hydroxylation of the substrate when compared to the same enzymes reconstituted in a soluble system with small amounts of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). The membranous system exhibited K/sub m/ values of NMC which were 4-5 times higher than the non-vesicular system. The rapid decline in the rates of NMC metabolism by cytochrome P-450b during catalysis suggested enzyme inactivation during substrate processing. Radiolabel from (methyl-/sup 14/C)NMC was incorporated into the P-450b apoprotein as a result of enzyme turnover co-incident with the loss of enzyme activity. NMC-stimulated NADPH oxidation by the reconstituted enzyme system containing DLPC was biophasic, with a slow rate preceding a two-fold higher rate. Carbazole and some N-substituted derivatives were unique in stimulating this unusual oxidation.

  20. Mammalian subtilisin/kexin isozyme SKI-1: A widely expressed proprotein convertase with a unique cleavage specificity and cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, Nabil G.; Mowla, Seyed J.; Hamelin, Josée; Mamarbachi, Aida M.; Benjannet, Suzanne; Touré, Barry B.; Basak, Ajoy; Munzer, Jon Scott; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Zhong, Mei; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Lazure, Claude; Murphy, Richard A.; Chrétien, Michel; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw

    1999-01-01

    Using reverse transcriptase–PCR and degenerate oligonucleotides derived from the active-site residues of subtilisin/kexin-like serine proteinases, we have identified a highly conserved and phylogenetically ancestral human, rat, and mouse type I membrane-bound proteinase called subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1). Computer databank searches reveal that human SKI-1 was cloned previously but with no identified function. In situ hybridization demonstrates that SKI-1 mRNA is present in most tissues and cells. Cleavage specificity studies show that SKI-1 generates a 28-kDa product from the 32-kDa brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor, cleaving at an RGLT↓SL bond. In the endoplasmic reticulum of either LoVo or HK293 cells, proSKI-1 is processed into two membrane-bound forms of SKI-1 (120 and 106 kDa) differing by the nature of their N-glycosylation. Late along the secretory pathway some of the membrane-bound enzyme is shed into the medium as a 98-kDa form. Immunocytochemical analysis of stably transfected HK293 cells shows that SKI-1 is present in the Golgi apparatus and within small punctate structures reminiscent of endosomes. In vitro studies suggest that SKI-1 is a Ca2+-dependent serine proteinase exhibiting a wide pH optimum for cleavage of pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:9990022

  1. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  6. Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling using Fresnel's equation (Kumar and Silva, 1973) and Snell's Law successfully approximated the spectral curve for a 0.25-mm turgid oak leaf lying on a Halon background. Calculations were made for ten interfaces, air-wax, wax-cellulose, cellulose-water, cellulose-air, air-water, and their inverses. A water path of 0.5 mm yielded acceptable results, and it was found that assignment of more weight to those interfaces involving air versus water or cellulose, and less to those involving wax, decreased the standard deviation of the error for all wavelengths. Data suggest that the air-cell interface is not the only important contributor to the overall reflectance of a leaf. Results also argue against the assertion that the near infrared plateau is a function of cell structure within the leaf.

  7. Roles of Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the Decolorization of Olive Mill Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, S.; Ellouz, R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative contributions of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to the decolorization of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated. A relatively low level (25%) of OMW decolorization was found with P. chrysosporium which was grown in a medium with a high Mn(II) concentration and in which a high level of MnP (0.65 (mu)M) was produced. In contrast, a high degree of OMW decolorization (more than 70%) was observed with P. chrysosporium which was grown in a medium with a low Mn(II) concentration but which resulted in a high level of LiP activity (0.3 (mu)M). In this culture medium, increasing the Mn(II) concentration resulted in decreased levels of OMW decolorization and LiP activity. Decolorization by reconstituted cultures of P. chrysosporium was found to be more enhanced by the addition of isolated LiP than by the addition of isolated MnP. The highest OMW decolorization levels were obtained at low initial chemical oxygen demands combined with high levels of extracellular LiP. These data, plus the positive effect of veratryl alcohol on OMW decolorization and LiP activity, indicate that culture conditions which yield high levels of LiP activity lead to high levels of OMW decolorization. PMID:16534959

  8. Role of manganese peroxidases and lignin peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the decolorization of kraft bleach plant effluent.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F C; Dass, S B; Grulke, E A; Reddy, C A

    1991-01-01

    The role of lignin peroxidases (LIPs) and manganese peroxidases (MNPs) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in decolorizing kraft bleach plant effluent (BPE) was investigated. Negligible BPE decolorization was exhibited by a per mutant, which lacks the ability to produce both the LIPs and the MNPs. Also, little decolorization was seen when the wild type was grown in high-nitrogen medium, in which the production of LIPs and MNPs is blocked. A lip mutant of P. chrysosporium, which produces MNPs but not LIPs, showed about 80% of the activity exhibited by the wild type, indicating that the MNPs play an important role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with 100 ppm of Mn(II), high levels of MNPs but no LIPs were produced, and this culture also exhibited high rates of BPE decolorization, lending further support to the idea that MNPs play a key role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with no Mn(II), high levels of LIPs but negligible levels of MNPs were produced and the rate and extent of BPE decolorization by such cultures were quite low, indicating that LIPs play a relatively minor role in BPE decolorization. Furthermore, high rates of BPE decolorization were seen on days 3 and 4 of incubation, when the cultures exhibit high levels of MNP activity but little or no LIP activity. These results indicate that MNPs play a relatively more important role than LIPs in BPE decolorization by P. chrysosporium. Images PMID:1768105

  9. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants. PMID:20015833

  10. Hydroxyl-radical production in physiological reactions. A novel function of peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, S X; Schopfer, P

    1999-03-01

    Peroxidases catalyze the dehydrogenation by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) of various phenolic and endiolic substrates in a peroxidatic reaction cycle. In addition, these enzymes exhibit an oxidase activity mediating the reduction of O2 to superoxide (O2.-) and H2O2 by substrates such as NADH or dihydroxyfumarate. Here we show that horseradish peroxidase can also catalyze a third type of reaction that results in the production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) from H2O2 in the presence of O2.-. We provide evidence that to mediate this reaction, the ferric form of horseradish peroxidase must be converted by O2.- into the perferryl form (Compound III), in which the haem iron can assume the ferrous state. It is concluded that the ferric/perferryl peroxidase couple constitutes an effective biochemical catalyst for the production of .OH from O2.- and H2O2 (iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction). This reaction can be measured either by the hydroxylation of benzoate or the degradation of deoxyribose. O2.- and H2O2 can be produced by the oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase in the presence of NADH. The .OH-producing activity of horseradish peroxidase can be inhibited by inactivators of haem iron or by various O2.- and .OH scavengers. On an equimolar Fe basis, horseradish peroxidase is 1-2 orders of magnitude more active than Fe-EDTA, an inorganic catalyst of the Haber-Weiss reaction. Particularly high .OH-producing activity was found in the alkaline horseradish peroxidase isoforms and in a ligninase-type fungal peroxidase, whereas lactoperoxidase and soybean peroxidase were less active, and myeloperoxidase was inactive. Operating in the .OH-producing mode, peroxidases may be responsible for numerous destructive and toxic effects of activated oxygen reported previously. PMID:10103001

  11. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  12. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  13. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  14. Structural and Functional Features of Peroxidases with a Potential as Industrial Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    This chapter begins with a description of the main structural features of heme peroxidases representative of the two large superfamilies of plant-fungal-bacterial and animal peroxidases, and the four additional (super)families described to date. Then, we focus on several fungal peroxidases of high biotechnological potential as industrial biocatalysts. These include (1) ligninolytic peroxidases from white-rot basidiomycetes being able to oxidize high redox-potential substrates at an exposed protein radical; (2) heme-thiolate peroxidases that are structural hybrids of typical peroxidases and cytochrome P450 enzymes and, after their discovery in sooty molds, are being described in basidiomycetes with even more interesting catalytic properties, such as selective aromatic oxygenation; and (3) the so-called dye-decolorizing peroxidases that are still to be thoroughly investigated but have been identified in different basidiomycete genomes. The structural-functional description of these peroxidases includes an analysis of the heme environment and a description of their substrate oxidation sites, with the purpose of understanding their interesting catalytic properties and biotechnological potential.

  15. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  16. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidases play an important role in plant stress related interactions. This research assessed the role of peroxidases in the defense response of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm] and zoysiagrasses (Zoysia japonica Steudel) to the western chinch bug, Bli...

  17. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M. )

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  18. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  19. Adsorption and inactivation behavior of horseradish peroxidase on various substrates.

    PubMed

    Di Risio, Sabina; Yan, Ning

    2010-09-01

    To produce bioactive papers, i.e. papers incorporating biomolecules that are useful for analyte detection, adequate immobilization strategies should be devised. In this article, the physical immobilization behavior and activity of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on various papermaking substrates were studied. The papermaking substrates included amorphous and crystalline cellulose, calcium carbonate, styrene butadiene latex, polystyrene, and both negatively charged rayon and rayon with a positively charged layer. It was found that HRP adsorption improves as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases; however, excessive hydrophobicity produces enzyme deactivation. HRP-calcium carbonate binding was weak and the enzyme loading was scant. These results provided a possible explanation for the poor analytical signals observed in pigment-coated papers when used as bioactive paper supports. Electrostatic effects played a minor role in HRP adsorption behavior. PMID:20570116

  20. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  1. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  2. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  3. Production and purification of the multifunctional enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The oxidoreductase horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used in numerous industrial and medical applications. In this review, we briefly describe this well-studied enzyme and focus on its promising use in targeted cancer treatment. In combination with a plant hormone, HRP can be used in specific enzyme–prodrug therapies. Despite this outstanding application, HRP has not found its way as a biopharmaceutical into targeted cancer therapy yet. The reasons therefore lie in the present low-yield production and cumbersome purification of this enzyme from its natural source. However, surface glycosylation renders the recombinant production of HRP difficult. Here, we compare different production hosts for HRP and summarize currently used production and purification strategies for this enzyme. We further present our own strategy of glycoengineering this powerful enzyme to allow recombinant high-yield production in Pichia pastoris and subsequent simple downstream processing. PMID:24683473

  4. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    PubMed

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP. PMID:27270708

  5. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  6. Olive Leaf Extract Improves the Atherogenic Lipid Profile in Rats Fed a High Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Ercument; Vural, Kamil; Gok, Sule; Ozturk, Zeynep; Kayalar, Husniye; Ayhan, Semin; Var, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    Coronary heart disease because of atherosclerosis is still the most common cause of mortality. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol are major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the olive leaf extract on serum lipid profile, early changes of atherosclerosis and endothelium-dependent relaxations in cholesterol-fed rats. For this purpose, rats were fed by 2% cholesterol-enriched or standard chow for 8 weeks. Some rats in each group were also fed orally by olive leaf extract at doses of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Atorvastatin at dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight daily was also given as positive control. After 8 weeks, lipid profiles of rat serums were analyzed. Antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and degree of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde levels) were also measured in the hearts isolated from rats. In addition, expression of adhesion molecules and endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated thoracic aortas of rats were evaluated. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were found to be increased in cholesterol-fed rats, and both doses of olive leaf extract and atorvastatin significantly decreased those levels. In conclusion, because the olive leaf extract attenuates the increased cholesterol levels, it may have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. PMID:26328503

  7. Ethanolic leaf extract of neem (Azadirachta indica) inhibits buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, R; Bhuvaneswari, V; Ramesh, V; Nagini, S

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the chemopreventive effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract in the initiation and post-initiation phases of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. The frequency of bone marrow micronuclei as well as the concentrations of lipid peroxides, ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), and the activities of the GSH-dependent enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in the buccal pouch, liver and erythrocytes were used as biomarkers of chemoprevention. All the hamsters painted with DMBA alone for 14 weeks developed buccal pouch carcinomas that showed diminished lipid peroxidation and enhanced antioxidant status associated with increased frequencies of bone marrow micronuclei. In the liver and erythrocytes of tumour-bearing animals, enhanced lipid peroxidation was accompanied by compromised antioxidant defences. Administration of ethanolic neem leaf extract effectively suppressed DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis as revealed by the absence of tumours in the initiation phase and reduced tumour incidence in the post-initiation phase. In addition, ethanolic neem leaf extract modulated lipid peroxidation and enhanced antioxidant status in the pouch, liver and erythrocytes and reduced the incidence of bone marrow micronuclei. The results of the present study, demonstrate that ethanolic neem leaf extract inhibits the development of DMBA-induced HBP tumours by protecting against oxidative stress. PMID:15473007

  8. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  9. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  10. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  11. A Molecular Sensor To Characterize Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Cleavage by Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, Joel; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique J.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are emerging viruses including several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has greatly accelerated the discovery of novel arenavirus species. However, for many of these viruses, only genetic information is available, and their zoonotic disease potential remains unknown. During the arenavirus life cycle, processing of the viral envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) is crucial for productive infection. The ability of newly emerging arenaviruses to hijack human SKI-1/S1P appears, therefore, to be a requirement for efficient zoonotic transmission and human disease potential. Here we implement a newly developed cell-based molecular sensor for SKI-1/S1P to characterize the processing of arenavirus GPC-derived target sequences by human SKI-1/S1P in a quantitative manner. We show that only nine amino acids flanking the putative cleavage site are necessary and sufficient to accurately recapitulate the efficiency and subcellular location of arenavirus GPC processing. In a proof of concept, our sensor correctly predicts efficient processing of the GPC of the newly emergent pathogenic Lujo virus by human SKI-1/S1P and defines the exact cleavage site. Lastly, we employed our sensor to show efficient GPC processing of a panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic New World arenaviruses, suggesting that GPC cleavage represents no barrier for zoonotic transmission of these pathogens. Our SKI-1/S1P sensor thus represents a rapid and robust test system for assessment of the processing of putative cleavage sites derived from the GPCs of newly discovered arenavirus by the SKI-1/S1P of humans or any other species, based solely on sequence information. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality in humans. A crucial step in productive arenavirus

  12. Physiology and posttranscriptional regulation of methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    PubMed

    Opulencia, Rina B; Bose, Arpita; Metcalf, William W

    2009-11-01

    Methanosarcina species possess three operons (mtaCB1, mtaCB2, and mtaCB3) encoding methanol-specific methyltransferase 1 (MT1) isozymes and two genes (mtaA1 and mtaA2) with the potential to encode a methanol-specific methyltransferase 2 (MT2). Previous genetic studies showed that these genes are differentially regulated and encode enzymes with distinct levels of methyltransferase activity. Here, the effects of promoter strength on growth and on the rate of methane production were examined by constructing strains in which the mtaCB promoters were exchanged. When expressed from the strong PmtaC1 or PmtaC2 promoter, each of the MtaC and MtaB proteins supported growth and methane production at wild-type levels. In contrast, all mtaCB operons exhibited poorer growth and lower rates of methane production when PmtaC3 controlled their expression. Thus, previously observed phenotypic differences can be attributed largely to differences in promoter activity. Strains carrying various combinations of mtaC, mtaB, and mtaA expressed from the strong, tetracycline-regulated PmcrB(tetO1) promoter exhibited similar growth characteristics on methanol, showing that all combinations of MtaC, MtaB, and MtaA can form functional MT1/MT2 complexes. However, an in vitro assay of coupled MT1/MT2 activity showed significant variation between the strains. Surprisingly, these variations in activity correlated with differences in protein abundance, despite the fact that all the encoding genes were expressed from the same promoter. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and reporter gene fusion data suggest that the mtaCBA transcripts show different stabilities, which are strongly influenced by the growth substrate. PMID:19767431

  13. Dextromethorphan and debrisoquine metabolism and polymorphism of the gene for cytochrome P450 isozyme 2D50 in Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Corado, Carley R; McKemie, Daniel S; Knych, Heather K

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize polymorphisms of the gene for cytochrome P450 isozyme 2D50 (CYP2D50) and the disposition of 2 CYP2D50 probe drugs, dextromethorphan and debrisoquine, in horses. ANIMALS 23 healthy horses (22 Thoroughbreds and 1 Standardbred). PROCEDURES Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP2D50 were identified. Disposition of dextromethorphan (2 mg/kg) and debrisoquine (0.2 mg/kg) were determined after oral (dextromethorphan) or nasogastric (debrisoquine) administration to the horses. Metabolic ratios of plasma dextromethorphan and total dextrorphan (dextrorphan plus dextrorphan-O-β-glucuronide) and 4-hydroxydebrisoquine concentrations were calculated on the basis of the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve extrapolated to infinity for the parent drug divided by that for the corresponding metabolite. Pharmacokinetic data were used to categorize horses into the phenotypic drug-metabolism categories poor, extensive, and ultrarapid. Disposition patterns were compared among categories, and relationships between SNPs and metabolism categories were explored. RESULTS Gene sequencing identified 51 SNPs, including 27 nonsynonymous SNPs. Debrisoquine was minimally detected after oral administration. Disposition of dextromethorphan varied markedly among horses. Metabolic ratios for dextromethorphan ranged from 0.03 to 0.46 (mean, 0.12). On the basis of these data, 1 horse was characterized as a poor metabolizer, 18 were characterized as extensive metabolizers, and 3 were characterized as ultrarapid metabolizers. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that CYP2D50 is polymorphic and that the disposition of the probe drug varies markedly in horses. The polymorphisms may be related to rates of drug metabolism. Additional research involving more horses of various breeds is needed to fully explore the functional implication of polymorphisms in CYP2D50. PMID:27580115

  14. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  15. Functional relationships of leafing intensity to plant height, growth form and leaf habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, En-Rong; Milla, Rubén; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Leafing intensity, i.e. the number of leaves per unit of stem volume or mass, is a common developmental correlate of leaf size. However, the ecological significance and the functional implications of variation in leafing intensity, other than its relation to leaf size, are unknown. Here, we explore its relationships with plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit to test a series of corollaries derived from the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. Volume-based leafing intensities and plant heights were recorded for 109 woody species from the subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests of eastern China. In addition, we compiled leafing intensity data from published literature, and combined it with our data to form a 398 species dataset, to test for differences of leafing intensity between plant growth forms (i.e. herbaceous and woody) and leaf habits (i.e. deciduous and evergreens). Leafing intensity was negatively correlated with plant height and individual leaf mass. Volume-based leafing intensities were significantly higher in herbaceous species than in woody species, and also higher in deciduous than in evergreen woody species. In conclusion, leafing intensity relates strongly to plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit in directions generally in accordance to the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. These results can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of adaptive strategies involving response to herbivory, competitive ability for light and reproductive economy.

  16. Cadmium-induced membrane lipid peroxidation and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and peroxidase isoforms in Jerusalem artichoke seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-Ming; Chen, Yan-Zhen; Liang, Yang-Lin; Xu, Mei-Yan; Xu, Xiang-Ming

    2007-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) seedlings cultured in sandy media were treated with Hoagland nutrition solution with different concentrations of Cd(NO(3))(2) from 0 to 400 micromol/L. After 50 days' treatment, Cd accumulation, activities of peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) were measured and electrophoretograms of POD isoenzymes were analyzed. The accumulation of Cd in seedlings increased from Cd 50-100 micromol/L, after which further increases in Cd concentration resulted in only small increases in accumulation of Cd in seedlings. MDA content was markedly higher than control values indicating the enhanced membrane lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves. POD activities in leaf and root extracts increased with an increase of Cd concentration from 0 to 50 and 100 micromol/L and then decreased with further increases to 200 and 400 micromol/L. Under moderate Cd level of 50-200 micromol/L, SOD activities in leaf and root extracts increased whereas with a higher Cd level of 400 micromol/L marked inhibitions in enzyme activities were observed. With increase in Cd concentration marked elevations in CAT activities in leaves and roots were observed. Results of electrophoresis show that the alteration of POD isoenzyme was noticeable to Cd and an additional POD isoenzyme LP10 appeared. It is suggested that POD isoenzyme of Jerusalem artichoke seedlings could be used as bioindicator for soil contamination by Cd. PMID:17675753

  17. How to pattern a leaf.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, N; O'Connor, D; Moon, J; Lewis, M; Hake, S

    2012-01-01

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, and function, all leaves initiate in the same manner: from the flanks of a meristem. The maize leaf is useful for analysis of patterning due to the wealth of mutants and the distinct tissues along the proximal distal axis. The blade is distal, the sheath is proximal, and the ligule forms at the blade/sheath boundary. Establishment of this boundary involves the transcription factors LIGULELESS1 and LIGULELESS2 and the kinase LIGULELESS NARROW. The meristem-specific protein KNOTTED1 (KN1) binds and modulates the lg2 gene. Given the localization of KN1 at the proximal end of the leaf from the time of inception, we hypothesize that KN1 has a role in establishing the very proximal end of the leaf, whereas an auxin maximum guides the growing distal tip. PMID:23174765

  18. A regulatory approach on low temperature induced enzymatic and anti oxidative status in leaf of Pui vegetable (Basella alba)

    PubMed Central

    Shahidul Haque, Md.; Monirul Islam, Md.; Abdur Rakib, Md.; Asraful Haque, Md.

    2013-01-01

    Basella alba is a soft green vegetable, survives in adverse environmental circumstances, for example, very cold temperature although the mechanism and the temperature sensitivity in this species are not clarified. Pot experiment for cultivation of B. alba was carried out to examine the effects of low temperature on the synthesis of two enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf of this plant. They were exposed to 8 °C for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and the respective controls were kept in ambient room temperature for the above mentioned time. Low temperature causes the higher activity of PPO and the threshold level was found after 48 h period when compared to the respective controls. The activity was higher at 10 mM catechol, substrate for this enzyme, than 100 mM and 200 mM concentration, however, the three doses yielded the gradual increase in activity. Similar stimulatory effects on peroxidase (POD) activity in leaf were observed whenever the plants were exposed to cold for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and maximal after 48 h period. Our findings demonstrate that the higher activity of these enzymes in leaf might be an index for the regulatory mechanism of the survival of these species in such adverse environment. PMID:25183947

  19. A regulatory approach on low temperature induced enzymatic and anti oxidative status in leaf of Pui vegetable (Basella alba).

    PubMed

    Shahidul Haque, Md; Monirul Islam, Md; Abdur Rakib, Md; Asraful Haque, Md

    2014-09-01

    Basella alba is a soft green vegetable, survives in adverse environmental circumstances, for example, very cold temperature although the mechanism and the temperature sensitivity in this species are not clarified. Pot experiment for cultivation of B. alba was carried out to examine the effects of low temperature on the synthesis of two enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf of this plant. They were exposed to 8 °C for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and the respective controls were kept in ambient room temperature for the above mentioned time. Low temperature causes the higher activity of PPO and the threshold level was found after 48 h period when compared to the respective controls. The activity was higher at 10 mM catechol, substrate for this enzyme, than 100 mM and 200 mM concentration, however, the three doses yielded the gradual increase in activity. Similar stimulatory effects on peroxidase (POD) activity in leaf were observed whenever the plants were exposed to cold for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and maximal after 48 h period. Our findings demonstrate that the higher activity of these enzymes in leaf might be an index for the regulatory mechanism of the survival of these species in such adverse environment. PMID:25183947

  20. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  1. Genes Encoding Plant-Specific Class III Peroxidases Are Responsible for Increased Cold Tolerance of the brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beg Hab; Kim, Sun Young; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that one of the brassinosteroid-insensitive mutants, bri1-9, showed increased cold tolerance compared with both wild type and BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants, despite its severe growth retardation. This increased tolerance in bri1-9 resulted from the constitutively high expression of stress-inducible genes under normal conditions. In this report, we focused on the genes encoding class III plant peroxidases (AtPrxs) because we found that, compared with wild type, bri1-9 plants contain higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are not involved with the activation of NADPH oxidase and show an increased level of expression of a subset of genes encoding class III plant peroxidases. Treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), led to the reduction of cold resistance in bri1-9. Among 73 genes that encode AtPrxs in Arabidopsis, we selected four (AtPrx1, AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69) for further functional analyses in response to cold temperatures. T-DNA insertional knockout mutants showed increased sensitivity to cold stress as measured by leaf damage and ion leakage. In contrast, the overexpression of AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69 increased cold tolerance in the BRI1-GFP plants. Taken together, these results indicate that the appropriate expression of a particular subset of AtPrx genes and the resulting higher levels of ROS production are required for the cold tolerance. PMID:23180292

  2. Measurement of tomato plant gene expression on a genomic scale for tomato plants that over express peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the gene expression of transgenic tomato plants that over-express the plant defense peroxidase in comparison to the control tomato plants with normal levels of peroxidase. In general, jasmonate-related plant defenses such as putative protease inhibitors were suppressed in peroxidase-rel...

  3. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  4. Selection of suitably non-repressing carbon sources for expression of alcohol oxidase isozyme promoters in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Wakayama, Keishi; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we aimed to select suitable non-repressing carbon sources for the expression of promoters derived from the alcohol oxidase (AOD) isozyme genes, PMOD1 and PMOD2, during the growth of Pichia methanolica. Our results revealed that xylose is the best non-repressing carbon source for heterologous gene expression using both PMOD1 and PMOD2, and that glycerol is also a suitable carbon source with by which the on/off of PMOD2 expression can be controlled. PMID:25561326

  5. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0–10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0–60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  6. Site-specific Effects of DUOX1-Related Peroxidase on Intercellular Apoptosis Signaling.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Sonja; Bauer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    Intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl signaling is known as an interplay between superoxide anions/H₂O₂ of transformed target cells and dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1)-related peroxidase that is released from neighboring non-transformed or transformed effector cells. Effector cells are dispensable when the release of the peroxidase domain of DUOX1 from target cells is prevented through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Membrane-associated peroxidase is then co-localized to NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and establishes HOCl signaling specifically in transformed cells, using the same biochemical pathways as classical intercellular HOCl signaling. Membrane-associated peroxidase protects against exogenous HOCl through reversal of the peroxidase reaction. In addition, membrane-associated peroxidase protects against NO/peroxynitrite signaling as it oxidates NO and decomposes peroxynitrite. The protective function of membrane-associated peroxidase (in the absence of MMP) is analogous to that of catalase, whereas the destructive effect of the enzyme, i.e. the synthesis of HOCl, is independent of its localization and of MMP activity. PMID:26504019

  7. Uncovering a new role for peroxidase enzymes as drivers of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Leach, Damien A; Hay, Shelley J; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Ingman, Wendy V; DeNichilo, Mark O; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes released by activated immune cells at sites of inflammation. To-date their functional role in human health has mainly been limited to providing a mechanism for oxidative defence against invading bacteria and other pathogenic microorganisms. Our laboratory has recently identified a new functional role for peroxidase enzymes in stimulating fibroblast migration and collagen biosynthesis, offering a new insight into the causative association between inflammation and the pro-fibrogenic events that mediate tissue repair and regeneration. Peroxidases are found at elevated levels within and near blood vessels however, their direct involvement in angiogenesis has never been reported. Here we report for the first time that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are readily internalised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) where they promote cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These pro-angiogenic effects were attenuated using the specific peroxidase inhibitor 4-ABAH, indicating the enzyme's catalytic activity is essential in mediating this response. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that MPO and EPO regulate endothelial FAK, Akt, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and stabilisation of HIF-2α, culminating in transcriptional regulation of key angiogenesis pathways. These findings uncover for the first time an important and previously unsuspected role for peroxidases as drivers of angiogenesis, and suggest that peroxidase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of angiogenesis related diseases driven by inflammation. PMID:26386352

  8. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  9. The rice thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase OsAPX8 functions in tolerance to bacterial blight

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Jiying; Chen, Honglin; Guo, Lequn; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme. To clarify its functions in tolerance to rice bacterial blight, we produced rice lines overexpressing and suppressing tAPX (OsAPX8). The overexpressing lines exhibited increased tolerance to bacterial pathogen. The RNA interference (RNAi) lines were considerably more sensitive than the control plant. Further analysis of the H2O2 content in these transgenic plants indicated that the H2O2 accumulation of OsAPX8-overexpressing plants was considerably less than that of wild-type and RNAi plants upon challenge with bacterial pathogen. Interestingly, H2O2 was the most important factor for the serious leaf dehydration and withering of rice without major resistance genes and was not the cause of hypersensitivity. It addition, wall tightening or loosening can occur according to the level of H2O2. In addition, OsAPX8 interacted with the susceptibility protein Os8N3/Xa13, and their binding repressed the reaction of OsAPX8 in tolerance to bacterial blight. PMID:27185545

  10. Over-expression of ascorbate peroxidase in tobacco chloroplasts enhances the tolerance to salt stress and water deficit.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ghazi Hamid; Kawano, Naoyoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Shimada, Emi; Sasaki, Ryozo; Kubo, Akihiro; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The role of APX (ascorbate peroxidase) in protection against oxidative stress was examined using transgenic tobacco plants. The full length cDNA, coding Arabidopsis thaliana L. APX fused downstream to the chloroplast transit sequence from A. thaliana glutathione reductase, was cloned into appropriate binary vector and mobilized into Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C2. Leaf discs were infected with the Agrobacterium and cultured on medium supplied with kanamycin. The incorporation of the gene in tobacco genome was confirmed by Southern dot blot hybridization. Transgenic lines were generated, and the line Chl-APX5 shown to have 3.8-fold the level of APX activity in the wild-type plants. The isolated chloroplasts from this line showed higher APX activity. During early investigation, this line showed enhanced tolerance to the active oxygen-generating paraquat and sodium sulphite. The first generation of this line, also, showed enhanced tolerance to salt, PEG and water stresses, as determined by net photosynthesis. The present data indicate that overproducing the cytosolic APX in tobacco chloroplasts reduces the toxicity of H(2)O(2). PMID:15153190

  11. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT. PMID:26461310

  12. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR. PMID

  13. Identification of a copper-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase in the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum.

    PubMed

    Sauser, K R; Liu, J K; Wong, T Y

    1997-07-01

    Extracts from the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum exhibit high superoxide dismutase activity, but only traces of catalase activity. The excess hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the superoxide dismutase in S. capricornutum may be degraded by a unique peroxidase. This peroxidase has a high specificity for ascorbate as its electron donor. The enzyme has an optimum pH at 8, is insensitive to cyanide and is inhibited by oxine. Addition of low concentrations of copper to algal cultures stimulates the peroxidase activity threefold. This enzymatic system could be used as a sensitive bioindicator for copper in fresh water. PMID:9243795

  14. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  15. The multihued palette of dye-decolorizing peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs; EC 1.11.1.19) are heme enzymes that comprise a family of the dimeric α+β barrel structural superfamily of proteins. The first DyP, identified relatively recently in the fungus Bjerkandera adusta, was characterized for its ability to catalyze the decolorization of anthraquinone-based industrial dyes. These enzymes are now known to be present in all three domains of life, but do not appear to occur in plants or animals. They are involved in a range of physiological processes, although in many cases their roles remain unknown. This has not prevented the development of their biocatalytic potential, which includes the transformation of lignin. This review highlights the functional diversity of DyPs in the light of phylogenetic, structural and biochemical data. The phylogenetic analysis reveals the existence of at least five classes of DyPs. Their potential physiological roles are discussed based in part on synteny analyses. Finally, the considerable biotechnological potential of DyPs is summarized. PMID:25743546

  16. Identification of S-RNase and peroxidase in petunia nectar.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Kanobe, Charles; Thornburg, Robert W; Macintosh, Gustavo C

    2011-05-01

    Previous SDS PAGE gel analysis of the floral nectars from petunia and tobacco plants revealed significant differences in the protein patterns. Petunia floral nectar was shown to contain a number of RNase activities by in gel RNase activity assay. To identify these proteins in more detail, the bands with RNase activity were excised from gel and subjected to trypsin digestion followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. This analysis revealed that S-RNases accumulate in nectar from Petunia hybrida, where they should carry out a biological function different from self-pollen rejection. In addition, other proteins were identified by the LC-MS/MS analysis. These proteins include a peroxidase, an endochitinase, and a putative fructokinase. Each of these proteins contained a secretory signal sequence that marked them as potential nectar proteins. We developed RT-PCR assays for each of these five proteins and demonstrated that each of these proteins was expressed in the petunia floral nectary. A discussion of the role of these proteins in antimicrobial activity in nectar is presented. PMID:21093100

  17. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andón, Fernando T.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Feng, Weihong; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, Benedict J.; Hultenby, Kjell; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, Birgit D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site) and the other on the distal side of EPO. The oxidized groups on SWCNTs in both cases are stabilized by electrostatic interactions with positively charged residues. Biodegradation of SWCNTs can also be executed in an ex vivo culture system using primary murine eosinophils stimulated to undergo degranulation. Biodegradation is proven by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal Raman imaging. Thus, human EPO (in vitro) and ex vivo activated eosinophils mediate biodegradation of SWCNTs: an observation that is relevant to pulmonary responses to these materials. PMID:23447468

  18. Horseradish peroxidase and chitosan: activation, immobilization and comparative results.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2013-09-01

    Recently, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on activated wool and we envisioned that the use of chitosan would be interesting instead of wool owing to its simple chemical structure, abundant nature and biodegradability. In this work, HRP was immobilized on chitosan crosslinked with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize immobilized HRP. The number of ten reuses of immobilized HRP has been detected. The pH was shifted from 5.5 for soluble HRP to 5.0 for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP had an optimum temperature of 30 °C, which was shifted to 35 °C for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP were thermal stable up to 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The apparent kinetic constant values (K(m)) of soluble HRP and chitosan-HRP were 35 mM and 40 mM for guaiacol and 2.73 mM and 5.7 mM for H2O2, respectively. Immobilization of HRP partially protected them from metal ions compared to soluble enzyme. The chitosan-HRP was remarkably more stable against urea, Triton X-100 and organic solvents. Chitosan-HRP exhibited large number of reuses and more resistance to harmful compounds compared with wool-HRP. On the basis of results obtained in the present study, chitosan-HRP could be employed in bioremediation application. PMID:23769933

  19. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  20. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Ayad, D M; Wei, Y; Sarhan, A A

    2010-04-01

    A method has been developed to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on modified chitosan beads by means of graft copolymerization of polyethylacrylate in presence of potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator. The activity of free and immobilized HRP was studied. FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize HRP immobilization. The efficiency of the immobilization was investigated by examining the relative enzymatic activity of free enzyme before and after the HRP immobilization. The obtained values were found to reach 98.4%. The results show that the optimum temperature of immobilized HRP was 45 degrees C, which was identical to that of free enzyme, and the immobilized HRP exhibited a higher relative activity than that of free HRP over 45 degrees C. The optimal pH for immobilized HRP was 10, which was higher than that of the free HRP (pH 9.0), and the immobilization resulted in stabilization of enzyme over a broader pH range. The apparent kinetic constant value (K(m)) of immobilized HRP was 3.784 mmol ml(-1), which was higher than that of free HRP. On the other hand, the activity of immobilized HRP decreased slowly against time when compared to that of the free HRP, and could retain 65.8% residual activity after 6 consecutive cycles. PMID:20060854

  1. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater. PMID:25658750

  2. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  3. Atherogenic diets exacerbate colitis in mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Esworthy, R. Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Synold, Timothy W.; Smith, David D.; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory effect of high-fat diet has been observed beyond the cardiovascular system, but there is little evidence to support its role in triggering inflammatory bowel disease. GPx1/2-double knockout (DKO) mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2, on a C57BL/6 (B6) background, have mild ileocolitis on a conventional chow. We fed B6 DKO mice two atherogenic diets to test the dietary effect on atherosclerosis and ileocolitis. Both atherogenic diets have high cholesterol, the Chol+/CA diet has cholic acid (CA) and the Chol+ diet has no CA. The Chol+/CA diet induced severe colitis, but not ileitis, in the DKO mice compared with Chol+ and a Chol- control diet. On the Chol+/CA diet, the wild-type (WT) mice had similar levels of aortic lesions and hypercholesterolemia as DKO mice did, but had no intestinal pathology. The diet-associated inflammatory responses in the DKO mice included increase of colonic pro-inflammatory serum amyloid A 3 expression, plasma lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α levels. The Chol+/CA diet has lowered the expression of unfolded protein response genes, ATF6, CHOP, unspliced XbpU and Grp78/Bip, in WT and DKO mice on the Chol- diet. Thus, we conclude that cholesterol diet weakens colon unfolded protein response, which can aggravate spontaneous colitis leading to gut barrier breakdown. GPx has no impact on atherosclerosis without ultra-hypercholesterolemia. PMID:20848490

  4. Eosinophil peroxidase-dependent hydroxyl radical generation by human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M L; Roeder, T L; Railsback, M A; Britigan, B E

    1994-11-11

    Eosinophil production of superoxide (O2-.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is important in host defense. The present study assessed the potential of eosinophils to generate another potent cytotoxic species, the hydroxyl radical (.OH). .OH formation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated eosinophils was demonstrated using an alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butyl nitrone/ethanol spin trapping system. Additionally, .OH was spin trapped following the addition of purified eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) to a cell-free O2-./H2O2 generating systems. Effects of superoxide dismutase, catalase, azide, aminotriazole, chloride-depleted buffer, and extensive metal chelation were consistent with .OH formation via the reaction of O2-. and EPO-generated hypohalous acid. Under chloride-depleted conditions, physiologic concentrations of Br- increased .OH formation by both PMA-stimulated eosinophils and the cell-free EPO system. Physiologic concentrations of SCN-, however, did not increase .OH formation, and in the presence of both Br- and SCN-, .OH formation was similar to SCN- only. Eosinophils appear to form .OH via an EPO-dependent mechanism, the magnitude of which varies with the availability of various EPO substrates. Given the highly reactive nature of this radical and the ability of EPO to adhere to cell membranes, even small amounts of .OH formed at such sites could contribute to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:7961724

  5. Activation of lignin peroxidase in organic media by reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Michizoe, Junji; Oakazaki, Shin-Ya; Furusaki, Shintaro; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-11-20

    Activation of lignin peroxidase (LIP) in an organic solvent by reversed micelles was investigated. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) was used as a surfactant to form a reversed micelle. Lyophilized LIP from an optimized aqueous solution exhibited no enzymatic activity in any organic solvents examined in this study; however, LIP was catalytically active by being entrapped in the AOT reversed micellar solution. LIP activity in the reversed micelle was enhanced by optimizing either the preparation or the operation conditions, such as water content and pH in water pools of the reversed micelle and the reaction temperature. Stable activity was obtained in isooctane because of the stability of the reversed micelle. The optimal pH was 5 in the reversed micellar system, which shifted from pH 3 in the aqueous solution. The degradation reaction of several environmental pollutants was attempted using LIP hosted in the AOT reversed micelle. Degradation achieved after a 1-h reaction reached 81%, 50%, and 22% for p-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively. This is the first report on the utilization of LIP in organic media. PMID:15459910

  6. Oxidation of pharmaceutically active compounds by a ligninolytic fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Eibes, Gemma; Debernardi, Gianfranco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, M Teresa; Lema, Juan M

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals are an important group of emerging pollutants with increasing interest due to their rising consumption and the evidence for ecotoxicological effects associated to trace amounts in aquatic environments. In this paper, we assessed the potential degradation of a series of pharmaceuticals: antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole), antidepressives (citalopram hydrobromide and fluoxetine hydrochloride), antiepileptics (carbamazepine), anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and naproxen) and estrogen hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol) by means of a versatile peroxidase (VP) from the ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera adusta. The effects of the reaction conditions: VP activity, organic acid concentration and H(2)O(2) addition rate, on the kinetics of the VP based oxidation system were evaluated. Diclofenac and estrogens were completely degraded after only 5-25 min even with a very low VP activity (10 U l(-1)). High degradation percentages (80%) were achieved for sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Low or undetectable removal yields were observed for citalopram (up to 18%), fluoxetine (lower than 10%) and carbamazepine (not degraded). PMID:20972884

  7. Biotechnological advances towards an enhanced peroxidase production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Florian W; Gerstmann, Michaela A; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-09-10

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a high-demand enzyme for applications in diagnostics, bioremediation, biocatalysis and medicine. Current HRP preparations are isolated from horseradish roots as mixtures of biochemically diverse isoenzymes. Thus, there is a strong need for a recombinant production process enabling a steady supply with enzyme preparations of consistent high quality. However, most current recombinant production systems are limited at titers in the low mg/L range. In this study, we used the well-known yeast Pichia pastoris as host for recombinant HRP production. To enhance recombinant enzyme titers we systematically evaluated engineering approaches on the secretion process, coproduction of helper proteins, and compared expression from the strong methanol-inducible PAOX1 promoter, the strong constitutive PGAP promoter, and a novel bidirectional promoter PHTX1. Ultimately, coproduction of HRP and active Hac1 under PHTX1 control yielded a recombinant HRP titer of 132mg/L after 56h of cultivation in a methanol-independent and easy-to-do bioreactor cultivation process. With regard to the many versatile applications for HRP, the establishment of a microbial host system suitable for efficient recombinant HRP production was highly overdue. The novel HRP production platform in P. pastoris presented in this study sets a new benchmark for this medically relevant enzyme. PMID:27432633

  8. Relationships between sugarcane leaf hyperspectral reflectance, leaf nitrogen content, and yield components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spectral reflectance has been used to estimate crop leaf chemical composition and other physiological characters. Leaf reflectance of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) may be of use in evaluating genotypes. The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify sugarcane genotypic variation in leaf hypers...

  9. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  10. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past five or so years blueberry growers in south Mississippi have discovered the disease Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot on some of their blueberry plants. In the past this disease was considered to be of minor importance occurring infrequently on isolated farms. But in recent years it ...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  13. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  16. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. Tree branch angle: maximizing effective leaf area.

    PubMed

    Honda, H; Fisher, J B

    1978-02-24

    In a computer simulation of branching pattern and leaf cluster in Terminalia catappa, right and left branch angles were varied, and the effective leaf surface areas were calculated. Theoretical branch angles that result in maximum effective leaf area are close to the values observed in nature. PMID:17757590

  7. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529...

  10. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277...

  12. Comparison of half and full-leaf shape feature extraction for leaf classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainin, Mohd Shamrie; Ahmad, Faudziah; Alfred, Rayner

    2016-08-01

    Shape is the main information for leaf feature that most of the current literatures in leaf identification utilize the whole leaf for feature extraction and to be used in the leaf identification process. In this paper, study of half-leaf features extraction for leaf identification is carried out and the results are compared with the results obtained from the leaf identification based on a full-leaf features extraction. Identification and classification is based on shape features that are represented as cosines and sinus angles. Six single classifiers obtained from WEKA and seven ensemble methods are used to compare their performance accuracies over this data. The classifiers were trained using 65 leaves in order to classify 5 different species of preliminary collection of Malaysian medicinal plants. The result shows that half-leaf features extraction can be used for leaf identification without decreasing the predictive accuracy.

  13. A single amino acid substitution in isozyme GST mu in Triclabendazole resistant Fasciola hepatica (Sligo strain) can substantially influence the manifestation of anthelmintic resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, V; Estein, S; Ortiz, P; Luchessi, P; Solana, V; Solana, H

    2015-12-01

    The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica causes fascioliasis in human and domestic ruminants. Economic losses due to this infection are estimated in U$S 2000-3000 million yearly. The most common method of control is the use of anthelmintic drugs. However, there is an increased concern about the growing appearance of F. hepatica resistance to Triclabendazole (TCBZ), an anthelmintic with activity over adult and young flukes. F. hepatica has eight Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) isozymes, which are enzymes involved in the detoxification of a wide range of substrates through chemical conjugation with glutathione. In the present work we identified and characterized the GST mu gene isolated from the TCBZ-susceptible and TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica strains. Total RNA was transcribed into cDNA by reverse transcription and a 657 bp amplicon corresponding to the GST mu gene was obtained. The comparative genetic analysis of the GST mu gene of the TCBZ susceptible strain (Cullompton) and TCBZ resistant strain (Sligo) showed three nucleotide changes and one amino acid change at position 143 in the GST mu isozyme of the TCBZ-resistant strain. These results have potential relevance as they contribute better understand the mechanisms that generate resistance to anthelmintics. PMID:26542261

  14. Decreased expression of the type I isozyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in tumor cell lines of lung epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Lange-Carter, C A; Fossli, T; Jahnsen, T; Malkinson, A M

    1990-05-15

    A spontaneous transformant derived from a mouse lung epithelial cell line exhibited decreased cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. DEAE column chromatography demonstrated that this was caused by specific loss of the type I PKA isozyme (PKA I). Western immunoblot analysis indicated that indeed several mouse lung tumor-derived cell lines and spontaneous transformants of immortalized, nontumorigenic lung cell lines contained less PKA I regulatory subunit (RI) protein than normal cell lines. PKA II regulatory subunit protein differed only slightly among cell lines and showed no conspicuous trend between normal and neoplastic cells. The decrease in RI was apparently concomitant with decreased catalytic (C) subunit levels in neoplastic cells since no free catalytic subunit activity was detected by DEAE chromatography. Northern blot analysis using RI alpha and C alpha cDNA probes showed that the levels of RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs paralleled their intracellular protein concentrations; neoplastic cell lines contained significantly less RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs than the normal cell line. The decreased expression of both RI and C subunits therefore results in a net decrease of PKA I in neoplastic lung cells, an isozymic difference which may account for the differential effects of cAMP analogs on cell growth and differentiation in normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:2159459

  15. Fukinolic acid derivatives and triterpene glycosides from black cohosh inhibit CYP isozymes, but are not cytotoxic to Hep-G2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Jiang, Bei; Nuntanakorn, Paiboon; Kennelly, Edward J; Shord, Stacy; Lawal, Temitope O; Mahady, G B

    2010-04-01

    Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L. [syn. Cimifuga racemosa L.]) extracts (BCE) are marketed worldwide for the management of menopausal symptoms. However, recently more than 75 cases of hepatotoxicity associated with black cohosh ingestion have been reported. While these cases have not been fully substantiated for causality, the data suggest that herb-drug interactions may be involved rather than a direct hepatotoxic event. This work describes the in vitro inhibition of four CYP450 enzymes (1A2, 2D6, 2C9, 3A4) by black cohosh extracts and identifies the active inhibitory constituents. Ethanol extracts (75 and 80% ethanol) and a 40% isopropanol extract induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of all CYP450 isozyme activities, with median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) ranging from 21.9 microg/ml to 65.0 microg/ml. Isolation of the active chemical constituents, showed that the triterpene glycosides were weakly active (IC(50) 25-100 microM), while fukinolic acid and cimicifugic acids A and B strongly inhibited all CYP isozymes (IC(50) 1.8-12.6 microM). None of the extracts inhibited the growth of Hep-G2 cells in concentrations up to 50 microg/ml. These data suggest that BCEs are not directly hepatotoxic, but may have the potential to induce herb-drug interactions, which may in turn explain the rare cases of hepatotoxicity observed in women using multiple medications and dietary supplements, including black cohosh. PMID:20406160

  16. New ideas for an old enzyme: A short, question-based laboratory project for the purification and identification of an unknown LDH isozyme.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Aaron B

    2010-07-01

    Enzyme purification projects are an excellent way to introduce many aspects of protein biochemistry, but can be difficult to carry out under the constraints of a typical undergraduate laboratory course. We have designed a short laboratory project for the purification and identification of an "unknown" lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozyme that can fit into a multiproject course without consuming too many laboratory days. The streamlined purification utilizes ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity chromatography, and size exclusion chromatography to give good recovery of LDH with minimal equipment requirements, and can be completed in three laboratory periods of 3-4 hours. As part of this, we have designed a novel, qualitative format for an LDH activity assay that allows students to rapidly screen their column chromatography fractions without the need of a spectrophotometer or plate reader. The analysis phase of the project is question-driven, and can be completed in two laboratory periods. The students must determine which purification technique was most effective by quantifying LDH activity and total protein content at each step of the purification, and then identify their unknown isozyme through agarose gel electrophoresis. This module provides an engaging format for teaching protein biochemistry, with the flexibility to allow an instructor to modify it for their particular curriculum. PMID:21567837

  17. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  4. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  7. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Marcela . E-mail: maa@ibt.unam.mx; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-06-08

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple.

  8. Inhibition of Peroxidase Activity of Cytochrome c: De Novo Compound Discovery and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Ahmet; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Bayir, Hulya; Hu, Feizhou; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) release from mitochondria is accepted to be the point of no return for eliciting a cascade of interactions that lead to apoptosis. A strategy for containing sustained apoptosis is to reduce the mitochondrial permeability pore opening. Pore opening is enhanced by peroxidase activity of cyt c gained upon its complexation with cardiolipin in the presence of reactive oxygen species. Blocking access to the heme group has been proposed as an effective intervention method for reducing, if not eliminating, the peroxidase activity of cyt c. In the present study, using a combination of druggability simulations, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and in vitro fluorescence measurements to probe peroxidase activity, we identified three repurposable drugs and seven compounds that are validated to effectively inhibit the peroxidase activity of cyt c. PMID:26078313

  9. IMPROVED TOLERANCE TO ENVIRONMENTALLY INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESSES IN TRANSGENIC TOMATO OVEREXPRESSING ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effect on oxidative stress resistance of overexpressing, in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants, a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (APX) gene derived from pea (Pisum sativum). Transformants were selected using Kanamycin resistance and confirmed by PCR, Southern and Nort...

  10. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  11. Amino Acid Sequence of Anionic Peroxidase from the Windmill Palm Tree Trachycarpus fortunei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications. PMID:25383699

  12. Hydrogen peroxide-independent generation of superoxide catalyzed by soybean peroxidase in response to ferrous ion

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that extracellular alkalization occurs in plants under the challenges by pathogenic microbes. This may eventually induce the pH-dependent extracellular peroxidase-mediated oxidative burst at the site of microbial challenges. By employing the purified proteins of horseradish peroxidase as a model, we have recently proposed a likely role for free Fe2+ in reduction of ferric enzyme of plant peroxidases into ferrous intermediate and oxygen-bound form of enzyme known as Compound III which may eventually releases superoxide anion radical (O2•−), especially under alkaline condition, possibly contributing to the plant defense mechanism. In the present study, we employed the purified protein of soybean peroxidase (SBP) as an additional model, and examined the changes in the redox status of enzyme accompanying the generation of O2•− in response to Fe2+ under alkaline condition. PMID:26417938

  13. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  14. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens

    SciTech Connect

    Perie, F.; Gold, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of {sup 14}C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were dependent on the presence of Mn(II), suggesting that manganese peroxidase is an important component of this organism's lignin degradation system. The expression of laccase activity was independent of manganese. In contrast to previous findings with Phanero-chaete chrysosporium, lignin degradation by D. squalens proceeded in the cultures containing excess carbon and nitrogen.

  15. Determination of estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of antifertility substances using rat uterine peroxidase assay.

    PubMed

    Johri, R K; Pahwa, G S; Sharma, S C; Zutshi, U

    1991-11-01

    The effect of three compounds (clomiphene citrate, centchroman, embelin) and plant-derived methanolic extracts (Abutilon indicum and Butea monosperma) was studied on uterotropic and uterine peroxidase activities in ovariectomized rats. It was observed that these two parameters were highly correlated in response to treatment with these test materials and also to estradiol. It was suggested that the uterine peroxidase assay could be utilized as a biochemical parameter in the screening of new antifertility agents for their estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. PMID:1665776

  16. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dwarf marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required correction for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  17. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1978-01-01

    Dwarf Marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition, and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required corrections for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  18. SPAD-based leaf nitrogen estimation is impacted by environmental factors and crop leaf characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Chen, Jia; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Wanlin; Ling, Xiaoxia; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll meters are widely used to guide nitrogen (N) management by monitoring leaf N status in agricultural systems, but the effects of environmental factors and leaf characteristics on leaf N estimations are still unclear. In the present study, we estimated the relationships among SPAD readings, chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area for seven species grown in multiple environments. There were similar relationships between SPAD readings and chlorophyll content per leaf area for the species groups, but the relationship between chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area, and the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area varied widely among the species groups. A significant impact of light-dependent chloroplast movement on SPAD readings was observed under low leaf N supplementation in both rice and soybean but not under high N supplementation. Furthermore, the allocation of leaf N to chlorophyll was strongly influenced by short-term changes in growth light. We demonstrate that the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area is profoundly affected by environmental factors and leaf features of crop species, which should be accounted for when using a chlorophyll meter to guide N management in agricultural systems. PMID:26303807

  19. Leaf physiognomy and climate: A multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. M.; Taylor, S. E.

    1980-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that leaf physiognomy is representative of the local or microclimate conditions under which plants grow. The physiognomy of leaf samples from Oregon, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, and the Panama Canal Zone has been related to the microclimate using Walter diagrams and Thornthwaite water-budget data. A technique to aid paleoclimatologists in identifying the nature of the microclimate from leaf physiognomy utilizes statistical procedures to classify leaf samples into one of six microclimate regimes based on leaf physiognomy information available from fossilized samples.

  20. The horseradish peroxidase technique for cell lineage studies.

    PubMed

    Peralta, M; Denaro, F J

    2003-12-01

    The identification of cell lineage for a given cell type of a particular tissue is an important step in understanding how this process contributes to histogenesis. The importance in understanding cell lineage has relevance for both theoretical and practical reasons. For example, delineating and identifying histogenic principals is required to advance stem cell research and tissue regeneration. To document cell lineage in a given experimental preparation, a number of techniques have been developed. This typically requires the injection of a tracer compound into a founder cell. As this cell produces progeny, the tracer is passed on to the daughter cells. By detecting the tracer in the progeny or daughter cells the investigator can determine which cells originated from the cell that was originally injected with the tracer. By using such an approach it is possible to trace the developmental path from the first cells of the embryo to the specialized cells making the tissue of the adult. A number of tracer compounds have been used with good results in lineage tracing. One of these tracer compounds is horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Several variations of the technique are available depending on what species are studied or what histological requirements are made by the study. A basic technique that can be adapted to individual needs is presented. Included in this protocol on lineage tracing are the procedures for injection, fixation, and the microscope evaluation of labelled cells in the Helobdella triseralis embryo. A brief discussion of the technique will note its advantages and disadvantages. Examples of labelled cell preparations are given to illustrate the technique. PMID:14984012

  1. Glyco-variant library of the versatile enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Simona; Pletzenauer, Robert; Maresch, Daniel; Metzger, Karl; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    When the glycosylated plant enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is conjugated to specific antibodies, it presents a powerful tool for medical applications. The isolation and purification of this enzyme from plant is difficult and only gives low yields. However, HRP recombinantly produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris experiences hyperglycosylation, which impedes the use of this enzyme in medicine. Enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation are cost intensive and cumbersome and hitherto existing P. pastoris strain engineering approaches with the goal to avoid hyperglycosylation only resulted in physiologically impaired yeast strains not useful for protein production processes. Thus, the last resort to obtain less glycosylated recombinant HRP from P. pastoris is to engineer the enzyme itself. In the present study, we mutated all the eight N-glycosylation sites of HRP C1A. After determination of the most suitable mutation at each N-glycosylation site, we physiologically characterized the respective P. pastoris strains in the bioreactor and purified the produced HRP C1A glyco-variants. The biochemical characterization of the enzyme variants revealed great differences in catalytic activity and stability and allowed the combination of the most promising mutations to potentially give an unglycosylated, active HRP C1A variant useful for medical applications. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis proved to be a valuable strategy not only to reduce the overall glycan content of the recombinant enzyme but also to improve catalytic activity and stability. In the present study, we performed an integrated bioprocess covering strain generation, bioreactor cultivations, downstream processing and product characterization and present the biochemical data of the HRP glyco-library. PMID:24859724

  2. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  3. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase variants for targeted cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bonifert, Günther; Folkes, Lisa; Gmeiner, Christoph; Dachs, Gabi; Spadiut, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death. Common chemo- and radiation-therapies damage healthy tissue and cause painful side effects. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been shown to activate the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to a powerful anticancer agent in in vitro studies, but gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) studies showed ambivalent results. Thus, HRP/IAA in antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) was investigated as an alternative. However, this approach has not been intensively studied, since the enzyme preparation from plant describes an undefined mixture of isoenzymes with a heterogenic glycosylation pattern incompatible with the human system. Here, we describe the recombinant production of the two HRP isoenzymes C1A and A2A in a Pichia pastoris benchmark strain and a glyco-engineered strain with a knockout of the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) responsible for hypermannosylation. We biochemically characterized the enzyme variants, tested them with IAA and applied them on cancer cells. In the absence of H2 O2 , HRP C1A turned out to be highly active with IAA, independent of its surface glycosylation. Subsequent in vitro cytotoxicity studies with human T24 bladder carcinoma and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells underlined the applicability of recombinant HRP C1A with reduced surface glycoslyation for targeted cancer treatment. Summarizing, this is the first study describing the successful use of recombinantly produced HRP for targeted cancer treatment. Our findings might pave the way for an increased use of the powerful isoenzyme HRP C1A in cancer research in the future. PMID:26990592

  4. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Manuel A; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M; Barja, Maria V; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  5. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  6. Direct interaction of lignin and lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Johjima, T; Itoh, N; Kabuto, M; Tokimura, F; Nakagawa, T; Wariishi, H; Tanaka, H

    1999-03-01

    Binding properties of lignin peroxidase (LiP) from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium against a synthetic lignin (dehydrogenated polymerizate, DHP) were studied with a resonant mirror biosensor. Among several ligninolytic enzymes, only LiP specifically binds to DHP. Kinetic analysis revealed that the binding was reversible, and that the dissociation equilibrium constant was 330 microM. The LiP-DHP interaction was controlled by the ionization group with a pKa of 5.3, strongly suggesting that a specific amino acid residue plays a role in lignin binding. A one-electron transfer from DHP to oxidized intermediates LiP compounds I and II (LiPI and LiPII) was characterized by using a stopped-flow technique, showing that binding interactions of DHP with LiPI and LiPII led to saturation kinetics. The dissociation equilibrium constants for LiPI-DHP and LiPII-DHP interactions were calculated to be 350 and 250 microM, and the first-order rate constants for electron transfer from DHP to LiPI and to LiPII were calculated to be 46 and 16 s-1, respectively. These kinetic and spectral studies strongly suggest that LiP is capable of oxidizing lignin directly at the protein surface by a long-range electron transfer process. A close look at the crystal structure suggested that LiP possesses His-239 as a possible lignin-binding site on the surface, which is linked to Asp-238. This Asp residue is hydrogen-bonded to the proximal His-176. This His-Asp...proximal-His motif would be a possible electron transfer route to oxidize polymeric lignin. PMID:10051582

  7. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase is less compressible at higher pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Smeller, László; Fidy, Judit

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy at 10 K was used to study the effect of high pressure through the prosthetic group in horseradish peroxidase (HRP), which was Mg-mesoporphyrin (MgMP) replacing the heme of the enzyme. The same measurement was performed on MgMP in a solid-state amorphous organic matrix, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Series of FLN spectra were registered to determine the (0, 0) band shape through the inhomogeneous distribution function (IDF). In the range of 0-2 GPa a red-shift of the IDF was determined, and yielded the isothermal compressibility of MgMP-HRP as 0.066 GPa(-1), which is significantly smaller than that found earlier as 0.106 GPa(-1) by fine-tuning the pressure in the range up to 1.1 MPa. The vibrational frequencies also shifted with pressure increase, as expected. The compressibility in the DMSO matrix was smaller, 0.042 GPa(-1), both when the pressure was applied at room temperature before cooling to 10 K, or at 10 K. At 200 K or above, the bimodal (0, 0) band shape in DMSO showed a population conversion under pressure that was not observed at or below 150 K. A significant atomic rearrangement was estimated from the volume change, 3.3 +/- 0.7 cm(3)/mol upon conversion. The compressibility in proteins and in amorphous solids seems not to significantly depend on the temperature and in the protein it decreases toward higher pressures. PMID:11751329

  8. Nitration of veratryl alcohol by lignin peroxidase and tetranitromethane.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D; Joshi, D K; Gold, M H

    1998-04-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP), from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, in the presence of H2O2 and tetranitromethane (TNM), oxidizes veratryl (3,4-dimethoxybenzyl) alcohol (VA) (I) to veratraldehyde (IV), 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol (V), and 3,4-dimethoxy-nitrobenzene (VI). The formation of these products is explained by a mechanism involving the one-electron oxidation of VA by LiP to produce the corresponding cation radical, which loses a proton to generate the benzylic radical. The latter reduces TNM to generate the trinitromethane anion (VIII) and the nitrogen dioxide radical (.NO2). .NO2 couples with the VA cation radical, and the subsequent loss of a proton leads to V. Alternatively, the attack of .NO2 at C-1 of the VA cation radical, followed by aromatization and loss of formaldehyde (VII), yields VI. Isotopic labeling experiments confirm that V is generated by the reaction of .NO2 with the VA cation radical, rather than with the benzylic radical. The nitration of two other LiP substrates, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (II) and tyrosine (III), also was examined. Product analysis of reactions conducted in the presence of H2O2 with these substrates indicated less nitrated product was formed from 1,4-dimethoxybenzene and no nitrated product was formed from tyrosine. However, significant amounts of nitrated products were formed from 1,4-dimethoxybenzene and tyrosine when glucose and glucose oxidase were used as an H2O2 source. These results suggest that a reductant, either the veratryl alcohol benzylic radical or superoxide, is required in the reaction to reduce TNM to generate .NO2. These results provide further evidence for the formation of the VA cation radical and the first chemical evidence for the formation of the VA benzylic radical in LiP-catalyzed reactions. PMID:9521824

  9. Glutathione peroxidase-1 protects from CD95-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gouaze, Valerie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Frisach, Marie-Francoise; Mirault, Marc-Edouard; Levade, Thierry

    2002-11-01

    Through the induction of apoptosis, CD95 plays a crucial role in the immune response and the elimination of cancer cells. Ligation of CD95 receptor activates a complex signaling network that appears to implicate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the place of ROS production in CD95-mediated apoptosis and the role of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1). Anti-CD95 antibodies triggered an early generation of ROS in human breast cancer T47D cells that was blocked by overexpression of GPx1 and inhibition of initiator caspase activation. Enforced expression of GPx1 also resulted in inhibition of CD95-induced effector caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic cell death. Resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis was not due to an increased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules and could be reversed by glutathione-depleting agents. In addition, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL prevented CD95-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, it did not inhibit the early ROS production. Moreover, Bcl-xL but not GPx1 overexpression could suppress the staurosporine-induced late generation of ROS and subsequent cell death. Altogether, these findings suggest that GPx1 functions upstream of the mitochondrial events to inhibit the early ROS production and apoptosis induced by CD95 ligation. Finally, transgenic mice overexpressing GPx1 were partially protected from the lethal effect of anti-CD95, underlying the importance of peroxide formation (and GPx1) in CD95-triggered apoptosis. PMID:12221075

  10. Detection of Lignin Peroxidase and Xylanase by Immunocytochemical Labeling in Wood Decayed by Basidiomycetes †

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, R. A.; Abad, A. R.; Farrell, R. L.; Leathers, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    The white rot fungi used in this study caused two different forms of degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, strain BKM-F-1767, and Phellinus pini caused a preferential removal of lignin from birch wood, whereas Trametes (Coriolus) versicolor caused a nonselective attack of all cell wall components. Use of polyclonal antisera to H8 lignin peroxidase and monoclonal antisera to H2 lignin peroxidase followed by immunogold labeling with protein A-gold or protein G-gold, respectively, showed lignin peroxidase extra-and intracellularly to fungal hyphae and within the delignified cell walls after 12 weeks of laboratory decay. Lignin peroxidase was localized at sites within the cell wall where electron-dense areas of the lignified cell wall layers remained. In wood decayed by Trametes versicolor, lignin peroxidase was located primarily along the surface of eroded cell walls. No lignin peroxidase was evident in brown-rotted wood, but slight labeling occurred within hyphal cells. Use of polyclonal antisera to xylanase followed by immunogold labeling showed intense labeling on fungal hyphae and surrounding slime layers and within the woody cell wall, where evidence of degradation was apparent. Colloidal-gold-labeled xylanase was prevalent in wood decayed by all fungi used in this study. Areas of the wood with early stages of cell wall decay had the greatest concentration of gold particles, while little labeling occurred in cells in advanced stages of decay by brown or white rot fungi. Images PMID:16347939

  11. Differences in peroxidase localization of rabbit peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Bodel, P. T.; Nichols, B. A.; Bainton, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike resident peritoneal macrophages, which contain peroxidase in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and perinuclear cisternae (PN), macrophages elicited into the rabbit peritoneal cavity by various stimulants lack the enzyme. Since we had previously found that such peroxidase reactivity rapidly appears in the RER and PN of blood monocytes after surface adherence in vitro, we wondered whether the enzyme could be similarly produced in elicited macrophages by adherence. Cells from peritoneal exudates (96 hours after endotoxin injection) were harvested, suspended in culture medium, and allowed to adhere to fibrin-coated or plastic surfaces. Following culture for various intervals, they were fixed, incubated for peroxidase, and examined by electron microscopy. We observed that these elicited cells, which initially contained no cytochemically detectable peroxidase, acquired peroxidatic activity in the RER and PN within 2 hours after adherence in culture. Thus macrophages, like blood monocytes, may rapidly acquire peroxidase reactivity as a consequence of plasma membrane: external surface interaction. In view of this finding, it would seem unwise to use peroxidase localization as the basis for advocating the existence of two separate lines of peritoneal macrophages, as has been proposed by previous investigators. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:645814

  12. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases. PMID:26643175

  13. Partial purification and characterization of a peroxidase from neonatal rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Strohm, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    Peroxidase activity was partially purified from neonatal CFN rat skin. The membrane-bound peroxidase activity was extracted with 0.5 M calcium chloride and was monitored spectrophotometrically at 470 nm with 2-methoxyphenol and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Subcellular distribution studies indicated the specific activity to be highest and comparable in the 800 {times} g and 8000 {times} g pellets, lowest in the 100,000 {times} g pellet, and absent in the 100,000 {times} g supernatant. The peroxidase activity was partially purified by affinity chromatography on concanavaline-A-sepharose 4-B and by gel filtration using Bio-gel P-150. The apparent molecular weight of the native enzyme as determined by Bio-gel P-200 gel filtration was approximately 42,500 {plus minus} 2,300 daltons. Peroxidase activity increased linearly with increases in protein concentration, time, and guaiacol concentration. Activity was inhibited approximately 75% by 0.1 mM potassium cyanide or 0.05 mM sodium azide. Pyrogallol, hydroquinone, p-cresol, catechol, benzidine, 3,3{prime}-dimethoxybenzidine, tetramethylbenzidine, and p-phenylenediamine were active as substrates for rat skin peroxidase. Rat skin peroxidase was also shown to mediate non-extractable binding of ({sup 3}H)-benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol and ({sup 3}H)-2-aminofluorene to DNA and protein.

  14. Peroxidase-dependent apoplastic oxidative burst in Arabidopsis required for pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Dewdney, Julia; Blee, Kris A; Stone, Julie M; Asai, Tsuneaki; Plotnikov, Julia; Denoux, Carine; Hayes, Tezni; Gerrish, Chris; Davies, Dewi R; Ausubel, Frederick M; Bolwell, G Paul

    2006-09-01

    The oxidative burst is an early response to pathogen attack leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide. Two major mechanisms involving either NADPH oxidases or peroxidases that may exist singly or in combination in different plant species have been proposed for the generation of ROS. We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana azide-sensitive but diphenylene iodonium-insensitive apoplastic oxidative burst that generates H(2)O(2) in response to a Fusarium oxysporum cell-wall preparation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing an anti-sense cDNA encoding a type III peroxidase, French bean peroxidase type 1 (FBP1) exhibited an impaired oxidative burst and were more susceptible than wild-type plants to both fungal and bacterial pathogens. Transcriptional profiling and RT-PCR analysis showed that the anti-sense (FBP1) transgenic plants had reduced levels of specific peroxidase-encoding mRNAs, including mRNAs corresponding to Arabidopsis genes At3g49120 (AtPCb) and At3g49110 (AtPCa) that encode two class III peroxidases with a high degree of homology to FBP1. These data indicate that peroxidases play a significant role in generating H(2)O(2) during the Arabidopsis defense response and in conferring resistance to a wide range of pathogens. PMID:16889645

  15. Mode of binding of the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil to mammalian haem peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Singh, A; Kushwaha, G S; Singh, A K; Kaur, P; Sharma, S; Singh, T P

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian haem peroxidase superfamily consists of myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoperoxidase (LPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes catalyze a number of oxidative reactions of inorganic substrates such as Cl(-), Br(-), I(-) and SCN(-) as well as of various organic aromatic compounds. To date, only structures of MPO and LPO are known. The substrate-binding sites in these enzymes are located on the distal haem side. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a potent antithyroid drug that acts by inhibiting the function of TPO. It has also been shown to inhibit the action of LPO. However, its mode of binding to mammalian haem peroxidases is not yet known. In order to determine the mode of its binding to peroxidases, the structure of the complex of LPO with PTU has been determined. It showed that PTU binds to LPO in the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side. The IC50 values for the inhibition of LPO and TPO by PTU are 47 and 30 µM, respectively. A comparision of the residues surrounding the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side in LPO with those in TPO showed that all of the residues were identical except for Ala114 (LPO numbering scheme), which is replaced by Thr205 (TPO numbering scheme) in TPO. A threonine residue in place of alanine in the substrate-binding site may affect the affinity of PTU for peroxidases. PMID:25760705

  16. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Burkey, Kent; Morgan, Patrick; Fiscus, Edwin; Jones, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to O3 were compared between Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the α- and β-subunits (gpa1-4, agb1-2 and gpa1-4/agb1-2) and Col-0 wild-type plants. Plants were treated with a range of O3 concentrations (5, 125, 175 and 300 nL L−1) for 1 and 2 d in controlled environment chambers. Transcript levels of GPA1, AGB1 and RGS1 transiently increased in Col-0 exposed to 125 nL L−1 O3 compared with the 5 nL L−1 control treatment. However, silencing of α and β G-protein genes resulted in little alteration of many processes associated with O3 injury, including the induction of ROS-signalling genes, increased leaf tissue ion leakage, decreased net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and increased peroxidase activity, especially in the leaf apoplast. These results indicated that many responses to O3 stress at physiological levels were not detectably influenced by α and β G-proteins. PMID:21988569

  17. Hormonal regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium.

    PubMed

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-10-15

    In addition to floral senescence and longevity, the control of leaf senescence is a major factor determining the quality of several cut flowers, including Lilium, in the commercial market. To better understand the physiological process underlying leaf senescence in this species, we evaluated: (i) endogenous variation in the levels of phytohormones during leaf senescence, (ii) the effects of leaf darkening in senescence and associated changes in phytohormones, and (iii) the effects of spray applications of abscisic acid (ABA) and pyrabactin on leaf senescence. Results showed that while gibberellin 4 (GA(4)) and salicylic acid (SA) contents decreased, that of ABA increased during the progression of leaf senescence. However, dark-induced senescence increased ABA levels, but did not affect GA(4) and SA levels, which appeared to correlate more with changes in air temperature and/or photoperiod than with the induction of leaf senescence. Furthermore, spray applications of pyrabactin delayed the progression of leaf senescence in cut flowers. Thus, we conclude that (i) ABA plays a major role in the regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium, (ii) darkness promotes leaf senescence and increases ABA levels, and (iii) exogenous applications of pyrabactin inhibit leaf senescence in Lilium, therefore suggesting that it acts as an antagonist of ABA in senescing leaves of cut lily flowers. PMID:22854182

  18. Cytochemical localization of catalase in leaf microbodies (peroxisomes).

    PubMed

    Frederick, S E; Newcomb, E H

    1969-11-01

    Segments of mature tobacco leaves were fixed in glutaraldehyde, incubated in medium containing 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxide, and postfixed in osmium tetroxide. Electron microscopic observation of treated tissues revealed pronounced deposition of a highly electron-opaque material in microbodies but not in other organelles. The coarsely granular reaction product is presumably osmium black formed by reaction of oxidized DAB with osmium tetroxide. Reaction of the microbodies with DAB was completely inhibited by 0.02 M 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and was considerably reduced by 0.01 M potassium cyanide. These results, when considered in light of recent biochemical studies, strongly suggest that catalase is responsible for the reaction. Sharp localization of this enzyme in microbodies establishes that they are identical to the catalase-rich "peroxisomes" recently isolated from leaf cell homogenates. A browning reaction that occurred in leaves during the incubation step was inhibited by cyanide but not by aminotriazole and therefore could not have been caused by the same enzyme. This reaction and a slight deposition of dense material within primary and secondary walls are ascribed to oxidation of DAB by soluble and wall-localized peroxidases. PMID:4981071

  19. Leaf herbivory and nutrients increase nectar alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lynn S; Wink, Michael; Distl, Melanie; Lentz, Amanda J

    2006-08-01

    Correlations between traits may constrain ecological and evolutionary responses to multispecies interactions. Many plants produce defensive compounds in nectar and leaves that could influence interactions with pollinators and herbivores, but the relationship between nectar and leaf defences is entirely unexplored. Correlations between leaf and nectar traits may be mediated by resources and prior damage. We determined the effect of nutrients and leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on Nicotiana tabacum nectar and leaf alkaloids, floral traits and moth oviposition. We found a positive phenotypic correlation between nectar and leaf alkaloids. Herbivory induced alkaloids in nectar but not in leaves, while nutrients increased alkaloids in both tissues. Moths laid the most eggs on damaged, fertilized plants, suggesting a preference for high alkaloids. Induced nectar alkaloids via leaf herbivory indicate that species interactions involving leaf and floral tissues are linked and should not be treated as independent phenomena in plant ecology or evolution. PMID:16913940

  20. Chemoprotective effects of ethanolic extract of neem leaf against MNNG-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, R; Kumaraguruparan, R; Chandramohan, K V P; Nagini, S

    2003-07-01

    We evaluated the modifying effects of ethanolic extract of neem leaves (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on oxidative stress induced by the potent gastric carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in male Wistar rats. The extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were used as intermediate endpoints of chemoprevention. Three different concentrations of ethanolic neem leaf extract (100, 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) body weight) were administered by intragastric intubation (i.g) for five consecutive days followed by MNNG (i.g) 1.5 h after the final administration. Enhanced lipid peroxidation was accompanied by compromised antioxidant defences in the stomach, liver and erythrocytes of MNNG-treated rats. Pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (bw) significantly lowered the concentration of lipid peroxides and increased antioxidant levels. Our results demonstrate that neem leaf exerts its chemoprotective effects on MNNG- induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation and enhancing the antioxidant status. PMID:12889539

  1. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits - V cmax and J max - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-08-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (J max). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between V cmax and J max and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between V cmax and J max and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of V cmax and J max with leaf N, P, and SLA. V cmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of V cmax to leaf N. J max was strongly related to V cmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm(-2)), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm(-2) nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of J max to V cmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  2. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits – Vcmax and Jmax – to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-01-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between Vcmax and Jmax and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between Vcmax and Jmax and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of Vcmax and Jmax with leaf N, P, and SLA. Vcmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of Vcmax to leaf N. Jmax was strongly related to Vcmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm−2), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm−2 nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of Jmax to Vcmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  3. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-01

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater. PMID:27060866

  4. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  5. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping. PMID:23380664

  6. Contribution of phosphodiesterase isozymes to the regulation of the L-type calcium current in human cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Katsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Hosoda, Saichi

    1997-01-01

    To determine the contribution of the various phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes to the regulation of the L-type calcium current (ICa(L)) in the human myocardium, we investigated the effect of selective and non-selective PDE inhibitors on ICa(L) in single human atrial cells by use of the whole-cell patch-clamp method. We repeated some experiments in rabbit atrial myocytes, to make a species comparison. In human atrial cells, 100 μM pimobendan increased ICa(L) (evoked by depolarization to +10 mV from a holding potential of −40 mV) by 250.4±45.0% (n=15), with the concentration for half-maximal stimulation (EC50) being 1.13 μM. ICa(L) was increased by 100 μM UD-CG 212 by 174.5±30.2% (n=10) with an EC50 value of 1.78 μM in human atrial cells. These two agents inhibit PDE III selectively. A selective PDE IV inhibitor, rolipram (1–100 μM), did not itself affect ICa(L) in human atrial cells. However, 100 μM rolipram significantly enhanced the effect of 100 μM UD-CG 212 on ICa(L) (increase with UD-CG 212 alone, 167.9±33.9, n=5; increase with the two agents together, 270.0±52.2%; n=5, P<0.05). Rolipram also enhanced isoprenaline (5 nM)-stimulated ICa(L) by 52.9±9.3% (n=5) in human atrial cells. In rabbit atrial cells, ICa(L) at +10 mV was increased by 22.1±9.0% by UD-CG 212 (n=10) and by 67.4±12.0% (n=10) by pimobendan (each at 100 μM). These values were significantly lower than those obtained in human atrial cells (P<0.0001). Rolipram (1–100 μM) did not itself affect ICa(L) in rabbit atrial cells. However, ICa(L) was increased by 215.7±65.2% (n=10) by the combination of 100 μM UD-CG 212 and 100 μM rolipram. This value was almost 10 times larger than that obtained for the effect of 100 μM UD-CG 212 alone. These results imply a species difference: in the human atrium, the PDE III isoform seems dominant, whereas PDE IV may be more important in the rabbit atrium for regulating ICa(L). However, PDE IV might contribute

  7. Specific inhibition of barley alpha-amylase 2 by barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor depends on charge interactions and can be conferred to isozyme 1 by mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, K W; Vallée, F; Juge, N; Aghajari, N; Guo, X; Haser, R; Svensson, B

    2000-02-01

    alpha-Amylase 2 (AMY2) and alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) from barley bind with Ki = 0.22 nM. AMY2 is a (beta/alpha)8-barrel enzyme and the segment Leu116-Phe143 in domain B (Val89-Ile152), protruding at beta-strand 3 of the (beta/alpha)8-barrel, was shown using isozyme hybrids to be crucial for the specificity of the inhibitor for AMY2. In the AMY2-BASI crystal structure [F. Vallée, A. Kadziola, Y. Bourne, M. Juy, K. W. Rodenburg, B. Svensson & R. Haser (1998) Structure 6, 649-659] Arg128AMY2 forms a hydrogen bond with Ser77BASI, while Asp142AMY2 makes a salt-bridge with Lys140BASI. These two enzyme residues are substituted by glutamine and asparagine, respectively, to assess their contribution in binding of the inhibitor. These mutations were performed in the well-expressed, inhibitor-sensitive hybrid barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1)-(1-90)/AMY2-(90-403) with Ki = 0.33 nM, because of poor production of AMY2 in yeast. In addition Arg128, only found in AMY2, was introduced into an AMY1 context by the mutation T129R/K130P in the inhibitor-insensitive hybrid AMY1-(1-161)/AMY2-(161-403). The binding energy was reduced by 2.7-3.0 kcal.mol-1 as determined from Ki after the mutations R128Q and D142N. This corresponds to loss of a charged interaction between the protein molecules. In contrast, sensitivity to the inhibitor was gained (Ki = 7 microM) by the mutation T129R/K130P in the insensitive isozyme hybrid. Charge screening raised Ki 14-20-fold for this latter mutant, AMY2, and the sensitive isozyme hybrid, but only twofold for the R128Q and D142N mutants. Thus electrostatic stabilization was effectively introduced and lost in the different mutant enzyme-inhibitor complexes and rational engineering using an inhibitor recognition motif to confer binding to the inhibitor mimicking the natural AMY2-BASI complex. PMID:10672010

  8. Functional Characterization of Two Structurally Novel Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase2 Isozymes Responsible for the Enhanced Production of Stearate-Rich Storage Lipid in Candida tropicalis SY005

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Prabuddha; Chakraborty, Monami; Kamdar, Maulik R.; Maiti, Mrinal K.

    2014-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity is an essential enzymatic step in the formation of neutral lipid i.e., triacylglycerol in all living cells capable of accumulating storage lipid. Previously, we characterized an oleaginous yeast Candida tropicalis SY005 that yields storage lipid up to 58% under a specific nitrogen-stress condition, when the DGAT-specific transcript is drastically up-regulated. Here we report the identification, differential expression and function of two DGAT2 gene homologues- CtDGAT2a and CtDGAT2b of this C. tropicalis. Two protein isoforms are unique with respect to the presence of five additional stretches of amino acids, besides possessing three highly conserved motifs known in other reported DGAT2 enzymes. Moreover, the CtDGAT2a and CtDGAT2b are characteristically different in amino acid sequences and predicted protein structures. The CtDGAT2b isozyme was found to be catalytically 12.5% more efficient than CtDGAT2a for triacylglycerol production in a heterologous yeast system i.e., Saccharomyces cerevisiae quadruple mutant strain H1246 that is inherently defective in neutral lipid biosynthesis. The CtDGAT2b activity rescued the growth of transformed S. cerevisiae mutant cells, which are usually non-viable in the medium containing free fatty acids by incorporating them into triacylglycerol, and displayed preferential specificity towards saturated acyl species as substrate. Furthermore, we document that the efficiency of triacylglycerol production by CtDGAT2b is differentially affected by deletion, insertion or replacement of amino acids in five regions exclusively present in two CtDGAT2 isozymes. Taken together, our study characterizes two structurally novel DGAT2 isozymes, which are accountable for the enhanced production of storage lipid enriched with saturated fatty acids inherently in C. tropicalis SY005 strain as well as in transformed S. cerevisiae neutral lipid-deficient mutant cells. These two genes certainly will be useful

  9. Size- and time-dependent alteration in metabolic activities of human hepatic cytochrome P450 isozymes by gold nanoparticles via microsomal coincubations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meiling; Tang, Ling; Luo, Mengjun; Zhou, Jing; Guo, Bin; Liu, Yangyuan; Chen, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Nano-sized particles are known to interfere with drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which can be anticipated to be a potential source of unintended adverse reactions, but the mechanisms underlying the inhibition are still not well understood. Herein we report a systematic investigation of the impacts of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on five major CYP isozymes under in vitro incubations of human liver microsomes (HLMs) with tannic acid (TA)-stabilized AuNPs in the size range of 5 to 100 nm. It is found that smaller AuNPs show more pronounced inhibitory effects on CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in a dose-dependent manner, while 1A2 is the least susceptible to the AuNP inhibition. The size- and dose-dependent CYP-specific inhibition and the nonspecific drug-nanogold binding in the coincubation media can be significantly reduced by increasing the concentration ratio of microsomal proteins to AuNPs, probably via a noncompetitive mode. Remarkably, AuNPs are also found to exhibit a slow time-dependent inactivation of 2D6 and 3A4 in a β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate reduced tetrasodium salt hydrate (NADPH)-independent manner. During microsomal incubations, UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta-potential measurements were used to monitor the changes in particle properties under the miscellaneous AuNP/HLM/CYP dispersion system. An improved stability of AuNPs by mixing HLM with the gold nanocolloid reveals that the stabilization via AuNP-HLM interactions may occur on a faster time scale than the salt-induced nanoaggregation by incubation in phosphate buffer. The results suggest that the AuNP induced CYP inhibition can be partially attributed to its adhesion onto the enzymes to alter their structural conformations or onto the HLM membrane therefore impairing the integral membrane proteins. Additionally, AuNPs likely block the substrate pocket on the CYP surface, depending on both the particle characteristics and the

  10. Size- and time-dependent alteration in metabolic activities of human hepatic cytochrome P450 isozymes by gold nanoparticles via microsomal coincubations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nano-sized particles are known to interfere with drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which can be anticipated to be a potential source of unintended adverse reactions, but the mechanisms underlying the inhibition are still not well understood. Herein we report a systematic investigation of the impacts of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on five major CYP isozymes under in vitro incubations of human liver microsomes (HLMs) with tannic acid (TA)-stabilized AuNPs in the size range of 5 to 100 nm. It is found that smaller AuNPs show more pronounced inhibitory effects on CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in a dose-dependent manner, while 1A2 is the least susceptible to the AuNP inhibition. The size- and dose-dependent CYP-specific inhibition and the nonspecific drug-nanogold binding in the coincubation media can be significantly reduced by increasing the concentration ratio of microsomal proteins to AuNPs, probably via a noncompetitive mode. Remarkably, AuNPs are also found to exhibit a slow time-dependent inactivation of 2D6 and 3A4 in a β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2′-phosphate reduced tetrasodium salt hydrate (NADPH)-independent manner. During microsomal incubations, UV–vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta-potential measurements were used to monitor the changes in particle properties under the miscellaneous AuNP/HLM/CYP dispersion system. An improved stability of AuNPs by mixing HLM with the gold nanocolloid reveals that the stabilization via AuNP-HLM interactions may occur on a faster time scale than the salt-induced nanoaggregation by incubation in phosphate buffer. The results suggest that the AuNP induced CYP inhibition can be partially attributed to its adhesion onto the enzymes to alter their structural conformations or onto the HLM membrane therefore impairing the integral membrane proteins. Additionally, AuNPs likely block the substrate pocket on the CYP surface, depending on both the particle characteristics and the

  11. Phenylbutazone Oxidation via Cu,Zn-SOD Peroxidase Activity: An EPR Study.

    PubMed

    Aljuhani, Naif; Whittal, Randy M; Khan, Saifur R; Siraki, Arno G

    2015-07-20

    We investigated the effect of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD)-peroxidase activity on the oxidation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug phenylbutazone (PBZ). We utilized electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect free radical intermediates of PBZ, UV-vis spectrophotometry to monitor PBZ oxidation, oxygen analysis to determine the involvement of C-centered radicals, and LC/MS to determine the resulting metabolites. Using EPR spectroscopy and spin-trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), we found that the spin adduct of CO3(•-) (DMPO/(•)OH) was attenuated with increasing PBZ concentrations. The resulting PBZ radical, which was assigned as a carbon-centered radical based on computer simulation of hyperfine splitting constants, was trapped by both DMPO and MNP spin traps. Similar to Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity, an identical PBZ carbon-centered radical was also detected with the presence of both myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP/H2O2). Oxygen analysis revealed depletion in oxygen levels when PBZ was oxidized by SOD peroxidase-activity, further supporting carbon radical formation. In addition, UV-vis spectra showed that the λmax for PBZ (λ = 260 nm) declined in intensity and shifted to a new peak that was similar to the spectrum for 4-hydroxy-PBZ when oxidized by Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity. LC/MS evidence supported the formation of 4-hydroxy-PBZ when compared to that of a standard, and 4-hydroperoxy-PBZ was also detected in significant yield. These findings together indicate that the carbonate radical, a product of SOD peroxidase activity, appears to play a role in PBZ metabolism. Interestingly, these results are similar to findings from heme peroxidase enzymes, and the context of this metabolic pathway is discussed in terms of a mechanism for PBZ-induced toxicity. PMID:26090772

  12. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes. PMID:25503316

  13. Crystal structure analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Amanda; Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Muniz, João R C; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Palm tree peroxidases are known to be very stable enzymes and the peroxidase from the Chamaerops excelsa (CEP), which has a high pH and thermal stability, is no exception. To date, the structural and molecular events underscoring such biochemical behavior have not been explored in depth. In order to identify the structural characteristics accounting for the high stability of palm tree peroxidases, we solved and refined the X-ray structure of native CEP at a resolution of 2.6 Å. The CEP structure has an overall fold typical of plant peroxidases and confirmed the conservation of characteristic structural elements such as the heme group and calcium ions. At the same time the structure revealed important modifications in the amino acid residues in the vicinity of the exposed heme edge region, involved in substrate binding, that could account for the morphological variations among palm tree peroxidases through the disruption of molecular interactions at the second binding site. These modifications could alleviate the inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by molecular interactions at the latter binding site. Comparing the CEP crystallographic model described here with other publicly available peroxidase structures allowed the identification of a noncovalent homodimer assembly held together by a number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrate, that this dimeric arrangement results in a more stable protein quaternary structure through stabilization of the regions that are highly dynamic in other peroxidases. In addition, we resolved five N-glycosylation sites, which might also contribute to enzyme stability and resistance against proteolytic cleavage. PMID:25660651

  14. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  15. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  16. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  17. Leaf P increase outpaces leaf N in an Inner Mongolia grassland over 27 years.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zhaorong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Gan, Huijie; Zhou, Wenjia; Flynn, Dan F B; He, Jin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) have been intensively explored in short-term experiments, but rarely at longer timescales. Here, we investigated leaf N : P stoichiometry over a 27-year interval in an Inner Mongolia grassland by comparing leaf N : P concentration of 2006 with that of 1979. Across 80 species, both leaf N and P increased, but the increase in leaf N lagged behind that of leaf P, leading to a significant decrease in the N : P ratio. These changes in leaf N : P stoichiometry varied among functional groups. For leaf N, grasses increased, woody species tended to increase, whereas forbs showed no change. Unlike leaf N, leaf P of grasses and forbs increased, whereas woody species showed no change. Such changes may reflect N deposition and P release induced by soil acidification over the past decades. The interannual effect of precipitation may somewhat have reduced the soil available N, leading to the more modest increase of leaf N than of leaf P. Thus, leaf N : P stoichiometry significantly responded to long-term environmental changes in this temperate steppe, but different functional groups responded differently. Our results indicate that conclusions of plant stoichiometry under short-term N fertilization should be treated with caution when extrapolating to longer timescales. PMID:25589490

  18. Lignin Peroxidase Activity Is Not Important in Biological Bleaching and Delignification of Unbleached Kraft Pulp by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Frederick S.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery in 1983 of fungal lignin peroxidases able to catalyze the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic lignin model compounds and release some CO2 from lignin has been seen as a major advance in understanding how fungi degrade lignin. Recently, the fungus Trametes versicolor was shown to be capable of substantial decolorization and delignification of unbleached industrial kraft pulps over 2 to 5 days. The role, if any, of lignin peroxidase in this biobleaching was therefore examined. Several different assays indicated that T. versicolor can produce and secrete peroxidase proteins, but only under certain culture conditions. However, work employing a new lignin peroxidase inhibitor (metavanadate ions) and a new lignin peroxidase assay using the dye azure B indicated that secreted lignin peroxidases do not play a role in the T. versicolor pulp-bleaching system. Oxidative activity capable of degrading 2-keto-4-methiolbutyric acid (KMB) appeared unique to ligninolytic fungi and always accompanied pulp biobleaching. PMID:16348775

  19. The structure of barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 reveals a novel role of domain C in substrate recognition and binding: a pair of sugar tongs.

    PubMed

    Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Gottschalk, Tine E; Ratajczak, Fabien; Driguez, Hugues; Svensson, Birte; Aghajari, Nushin

    2003-08-01

    Though the three-dimensional structures of barley alpha-amylase isozymes AMY1 and AMY2 are very similar, they differ remarkably from each other in their affinity for Ca(2+) and when interacting with substrate analogs. A surface site recognizing maltooligosaccharides, not earlier reported for other alpha-amylases and probably associated with the different activity of AMY1 and AMY2 toward starch granules, has been identified. It is located in the C-terminal part of the enzyme and, thus, highlights a potential role of domain C. In order to scrutinize the possible biological significance of this domain in alpha-amylases, a thorough comparison of their three-dimensional structures was conducted. An additional role for an earlier-identified starch granule binding surface site is proposed, and a new calcium ion is reported. PMID:12906828

  20. Activity and isoforms of peroxidases, lignin and anatomy, during adventitious rooting in cuttings of Ebenus cretica L.

    PubMed

    Syros, Thomas; Yupsanis, Traianos; Zafiriadis, Helias; Economou, Athanasios

    2004-01-01

    Adventitious rooting of Ebenus cretica cuttings was studied in order to examine a) the rooting ability of different genotypes in relation to electrophoretic patterns of peroxidases. b) the activity and electrophoretic patterns of soluble and wall ionically bound peroxidases, the lignin content and anatomical changes in the control and IBA treated cuttings of and genotypes in the course of adventitious root formation. In addition, a fraction of soluble cationic peroxidases was separated by gel filtration chromatography from the total soluble peroxidases of a genotype. No rooting occurred in cuttings without IBA-treatment. In both genotypes, electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidases revealed two common peroxidase isoforms, while a fast-migrating anionic peroxidase isoform (A3) appeared only in genotypes. Both genotypes showed similar patterns of soluble, as well as wall ionically bound cationic peroxidase isoforms. The number of isoforms was unchanged during the rooting process (induction, initiation and expression phase) but an increase in peroxidase activity (initiation phase) followed by decrease has been found in IBA-treated cuttings. During initiation phase the lignin content was almost similar to that on day 0 in genotype while it was reduced at by about 50% in genotype at the respective time. Microscopic observations revealed anatomical differences between genotypes. According to this study, the and genotypes display differences in anatomy, lignin content, activity of soluble peroxidases and the electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidase isoforms. The A3-anionic peroxidase isoform could be used as biochemical marker to distinguish and genotypes of E. cretica and seems to be correlated to lignin synthesis in rooting process. PMID:15002666