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Sample records for leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

  1. Involvement of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the light-dependent up-regulation of sorghum leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, José Antonio; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Vidal, Jean; Echevarría, Cristina; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C4-PEPC) is regulated by phosphorylation by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PEPC-k). In Digitaria sanguinalis mesophyll protoplasts, this light-mediated transduction cascade principally requires a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a Ca2+-dependent step. The present study investigates the cascade components at the higher integrated level of Sorghum bicolor leaf discs and leaves. PEPC-k up-regulation required light and photosynthetic electron transport. However, the PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 and inhibitors of calcium release from intracellular stores only partially blocked this process. Analysis of [32P]phosphate-labelled phospholipids showed a light-dependent increase in phospholipase D (PLD) activity. Treatment of leaf discs with n-butanol, which decreases the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD, led to the partial inhibition of the C4-PEPC phosphorylation, suggesting the participation of PLD/PA in the signalling cascade. PPCK1 gene expression was strictly light-dependent. Addition of neomycin or n-butanol decreased, and a combination of both inhibitors markedly reduced PPCK1 expression and the concomitant rise in PEPC-k activity. The calcium/calmodulin antagonist W7 blocked the light-dependent up-regulation of PEPC-k, pointing to a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) integrating both second messengers, calcium and PA, which were shown to increase the activity of sorghum CDPK. PMID:20410319

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase in Tobacco Leaves Is Activated by Light in a Similar but Not Identical Way as in Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chollet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a Ca2+- independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein-serine/threonine kinase (PEPC-PK) from illuminated leaves of N-sufficient tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants (Y.-H. Wang, R. Chollet [1993] FEBS Lett 328: 215-218). We now report that this C3 PEPC-kinase is reversibly light activated in vivo in a time-dependent manner. As the kinase becomes light activated, the activity and L-malate sensitivity of its target protein increases and decreases, respectively. The light activation of tobacco PEPC-PK is prevented by pretreatment of detached leaves with various photosynthesis and cytosolic protein-synthesis inhibitors. Similarly, specific inhibitors of glutamine synthetase block the light activation of tobacco leaf PEPC-kinase under both photorespiratory and nonphotorespiratory conditions. This striking effect is partially and specifically reversed by exogenous glutamine, whereas it has no apparent effect on the light activation of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf kinase. Using an in situ "activity-gel" phosphorylation assay, we have identified two major Ca2+-independent PEPC-kinase catalytic polypeptides in illuminated tobacco leaves that have the same molecular masses (approximately 30 and 37 kD) as found in illuminated maize leaves. Collectively, these results indicate that the phosphorylation of PEPC in N-sufficient leaves of tobacco (C3) and maize (C4) is regulated through similar but not identical light-signal transduction pathways. PMID:12226305

  3. Metabolite Control Overrides Circadian Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase and CO(2) Fixation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland; Hartwell; Jenkins; Wilkins; Nimmo

    1999-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) catalyzes the primary fixation of CO(2) in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Flux through the enzyme is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. PEPc kinase is controlled by changes in the level of its translatable mRNA in response to a circadian rhythm. The physiological significance of changes in the levels of PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and the involvement of metabolites in control of the kinase was investigated by subjecting Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves to anaerobic conditions at night to modulate the magnitude of malate accumulation, or to a rise in temperature at night to increase the efflux of malate from vacuole to cytosol. Changes in CO(2) fixation and PEPc kinase activity reflected those in kinase mRNA. The highest rates of CO(2) fixation and levels of kinase mRNA were observed in leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment for the first half of the night and then transferred to ambient air. In leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment overnight and transferred to ambient air at the start of the day, PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and activity, the phosphorylation state of PEPc, and fixation of atmospheric CO(2) were significantly higher than those for control leaves for the first 3 h of the light period. A nighttime temperature increase from 19 degrees C to 27 degrees C led to a rapid reduction in kinase mRNA and activity; however, this was not observed in leaves in which malate accumulation had been prevented by anaerobic treatment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a high concentration of malate reduces both kinase mRNA and the accumulation of the kinase itself. PMID:10557237

  4. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  5. Inactivation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by the Binding to Chloroplast Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Xian; Wedding, Randolph T.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) purified from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves associates with maize leaf chloroplast membrane in vitro. The binding of PEPC to the membrane results in enzyme inactivation. A protein isolated from a maize leaf chloroplast membrane preparation inactivated PEPC. Treatment with membrane preparation or with partially purified inactivating protein accelerates PEPC inactivation at low temperature (4°C). Interaction of PEPC with chloroplast membrane or inactivating protein may inactivate the enzyme by influencing dissociation of the enzyme active tetramer. PMID:16652972

  6. Light Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Etiolated Maize Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Kazumi; Sugiyama, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    An antibody for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was used to isolate and to quantitate the enzyme from greening maize (cv. KOU 6) leaves. The increase in enzyme activity during greening was due to de novo synthesis, which was paralleled by increases in enzyme protein and incorporation of leucine. The light-induced activity was due to one specific isoenzyme. The action spectrum for enzyme synthesis had red and blue peaks. Images PMID:16661613

  7. Serine-15 is the regulatory seryl-phosphorylation site in C sub 4 -leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) from maize

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jinan; Chollet, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The {sup 32}P-labeled regulatory site phosphopeptide was purified from a tryptic digest of in vitro phosphorylated/activated dark-form PEPCase by metal ion affinity and reversed-phase chromatography and subjected to automated Edman degradation analysis. The amino acid sequence of this phosphoseryl peptide is His-His-Ser(P)-Ile-Asp-Ala-Gln-Leu-Arg. This nonapeptide, which corresponds exactly to residues 13-21 in the deduced primary sequence of the maize leaf carboxylase, is far removed from a recently identified active-site cysteine (Cys-553) in the C-terminal region of the primary structure. Comparative analysis of the deduced N-terminal sequences of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and CAM leaf PEPCases suggests that the motif of Lys/Arg-X-X-Ser is an important structural requirement of the C{sub 4}- and CAM-leaf protein-serine kinases.

  8. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Lidia; Valenti, Daniela; Pizzuto, Roberto; Atlante, Anna; Passarella, Salvatore

    2007-04-01

    We report here initial studies on phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in coupled mitochondria isolated from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It was found that: (1) phosphoenolpyruvate can be metabolized by Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria by virtue of the presence of the mitochondrial pyruvate kinase, shown both immunologically and functionally, located in the inner mitochondrial compartments and distinct from the cytosolic pyruvate kinase as shown by the different pH and inhibition profiles. (2) Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria can take up externally added phosphoenolpyruvate in a proton compensated manner, in a carrier-mediated process which was investigated by measuring fluorimetrically the oxidation of intramitochondrial pyridine nucleotide which occurs as a result of phosphoenolpyruvate uptake and alternative oxidase activation. (3) The addition of phosphoenolpyruvate causes pyruvate and ATP production, as monitored via HPLC, with their efflux into the extramitochondrial phase investigated fluorimetrically. Such an efflux occurs via the putative phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate/ATP antiporters, which differ from each other and from the pyruvate and the adenine nucleotide carriers, in the light of the different sensitivity to non-penetrant compounds. These carriers were shown to regulate the rate of efflux of both pyruvate and ATP. The appearance of citrate and oxaloacetate outside mitochondria was also found as a result of phosphoenolpyruvate addition. PMID:17418088

  10. Comparative Characterization of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in C3, C4, and C3-C4 Intermediate Panicum Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases were compared in leaf preparations from C3-C4 intermediate, C3, and C4Panicum species. Values of Vmax in micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour at pH 8.3 were 57 to 75 for the enzyme from Panicum milioides, Panicum schenckii, and Panicum decipiens (all C3-C4). The values for Panicum laxum (C3) and Panicum prionitis (C4) were 20 to 40 and 952 to 1374, respectively. The Vmax values did not change at pH 7.3 except for the C4 value, which increased about 24%. At pH 8.3, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from C3 and C3-C4 species had slightly higher Km HCO3− and lower K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values than did the C4 enzyme. With each species at pH 7.3, all K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values were 2- to 4-fold greater. The enzyme from all species was inhibited 85 to 90% by 1 millimolar malate at rate-limiting phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+ levels. With low levels of malate, 0.2 millimolar, the rate curve with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate was distinctly sigmoidal, and the inhibition was not eliminated at 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate. Malate at 10 millimolar protected all phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from inactivation at 55 C at pH 5.5, but not at pH 8.3. Aspartate did not protect well. When incubated at 37 C at pH 8.3 without phosphoenolpyruvate, but with HCO3−, the enzyme from several C4 grasses lost 92 to 98% of the initial activity after 4 minutes, whereas the enzymes from C3 and C3-C4Panicum species retained 60 to 70% of their activities. In contrast, 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate stabilized the enzyme at 37 C in all plant extracts. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C3-C4 intermediate Panicum species has properties most similar to the enzyme from C3Panicum species. The higher leaf activity of the enzyme from the intermediate plants than from C3 species is not due to any unusual property assayed other than a higher Vmax. PMID:16661669

  11. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  12. Estimation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation mediated by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) in engineered Escherichia coli having high ATP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hye-Jung; Seo, Jiyoon; Na, Yoon Ah; Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Pil

    2013-06-10

    We have previously reported that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) overexpression under glycolytic conditions enables Escherichia coli to harbor a high intracellular ATP pool resulting in enhanced recombinant protein synthesis. To estimate how much PCK-mediated phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is contributed to the ATP increase under engineered conditions, the kinetics of PEP carboxylation by PCK and substrate competing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) were measured using recombinant enzymes. The PEP carboxylation catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the recombinant PCK was 660mM(-1)min(-1), whereas that of the recombinant PPC was 1500mM(-1)min(-1). Under the presence of known allosteric effectors (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, acetyl-CoA, ATP, malate, and aspartate) close to in vivo conditions, the catalytic efficiency of PCK-mediated PEP carboxylation (84mM(-1)min(-1)) was 28-folds lower than that of PPC (2370mM(-1)min(-1)). To verify the above results, an E. coli strain expressing native PCK and PPC under control of identical promoter was constructed by replacing PCK promoter region with that of PPC in chromosome. The native PCK activity (33nmol/mg-proteinmin) was 5-folds lower than PPC activity (160nmol/mg-proteinmin) in the cell extract from the promoter-exchanged strain. Intracellular modifications of ATP concentration by PCK activity and the consequences for biotechnology are further discussed. PMID:23683699

  13. Role of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylation in Acetobacter xylinum

    PubMed Central

    Benziman, Moshe

    1969-01-01

    Glucose-grown cells of Acetobacter xylinum oxidized acetate only when the reaction mixture was supplemented with catalytic quantities of glucose or intermediates of the citrate cycle. Extracts, prepared by sonic treatment, catalyzed the formation of oxalacetate when incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and bicarbonate. Oxalacetate was not formed in the presence of pyruvate plus adenosine triphosphate. The ability to promote carboxylation of PEP was lower in succinate-grown cells than in glucose-grown cells. PEP carboxylase, partially purified from extracts by ammonium sulfate fractionation, catalyzed the stoichiometric formation of oxalacetate and inorganic phosphate from PEP and bicarbonate. The enzyme was not affected by acetyl-coenzyme A or inorganic phosphate. It was inhibited by adenosine diphosphate in a manner competitive with PEP (K1 = 1.3 mm) and by dicarboxylic acids of the citrate cycle; of these, succinate was the most potent inhibitor. It is suggested that the physiological role of PEP carboxylase in A. xylinum is to affect the net formation of C4 acids from C3 precursors, which are essential for the maintainance of the citrate cycle during growth on glucose. The relationship of PEP carboxylase to other enzyme systems metabolizing PEP and oxalacetate in A. xylinum is discussed. PMID:5788692

  14. The regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis in pigeon liver

    PubMed Central

    Gevers, W.

    1967-01-01

    1. The intracellular location and maximal activities of enzymes involved in phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis have been investigated in pigeon liver. Enolase and pyruvate kinase were cytoplasmic, and the activities were 50–60 and 180–210μmoles/min./g. dry wt. at 25° respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was present exclusively, and nucleoside diphosphokinase predominantly, in the mitochondria; the particles had to be disrupted to elicit maximal activities, which were 27–33 and 400–600μmoles/min./g. dry wt. at 25° respectively. The activities of all four enzymes did not change significantly during 48hr. of starvation. 2. Conditions for incubation of washed isolated mitochondria were established, to give high rates of synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate, linear with time and proportional to mitochondrial concentration. Inorganic phosphate and added adenine nucleotides were stimulatory, whereas added Mg2+ inhibited, partly owing to activation of contaminant pyruvate kinase. Phosphoenolpyruvate formation occurred from oxaloacetate, malate, fumarate, succinate, α-oxoglutarate and citrate, in decreasing order of effectiveness. 3. The steady-state ATP/ADP ratio of mitochondrial suspensions was decreased in the presence of added 2·5mm-Mg2+ (owing to stimulation of adenylate kinase and possibly of an adenosine triphosphatase), 0·5mm-Ca2+ or 0·4mm-dinitrophenol. In each case the rate of substrate removal and oxygen uptake was increased, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis was inhibited. Citrate formation was enhanced, owing to de-inhibition of citrate synthase. These effects were not primarily related to changes in the oxaloacetate concentration. 4. Both phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nucleoside diphosphokinase were active within the atractylosidesensitive barrier to the mitochondrial metabolism of added adenine nucleotides. There was no correlation between the rate of substrate-level phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase in developing rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F. J.; Hanson, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase were measured in foetal, newborn and adult rat liver extracts by a radiochemical assay involving the fixation of [14C]bicarbonate. 2. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both foetal and adult liver occurs mainly in mitochondrial and nuclear fractions, with about 10% of the activity in the cytoplasm. 3. Similar studies of the intracellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase show that more than 90% of the activity is in the cytoplasm. However, in the 17-day foetal liver about 90% of the activity is in mitochondria and nuclei. 4. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both particulate and soluble fractions is very low in the 17-day foetal liver and increases to near adult levels before birth. 5. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase activity in the soluble cell fraction increases 25-fold in the first 2 days after birth. This same enzyme in the mitochondria has considerable activity in the foetal and adult liver and is lower in the newborn. 6. Kinetic and other studies on the properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase have shown no differences between the soluble and mitochondrial enzymes. 7. It is suggested that the appearance of the soluble phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase at birth initiates the rapid increase in overall gluconeogenesis at this stage. PMID:6049928

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  17. Activating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in combination for improvement of succinate production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase intrinsically located in the chloroplast of rice plays a crucial role in ammonium assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Chisato; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Takuya; Taniguchi, Yojiro; Murayama, Seiji; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of primary metabolism in bacteria, algae, and vascular plants, and is believed to be cytosolic. Here we show that rice (Oryza sativa L.) has a plant-type PEPC, Osppc4, that is targeted to the chloroplast. Osppc4 was expressed in all organs tested and showed high expression in the leaves. Its expression in the leaves was confined to mesophyll cells, and Osppc4 accounted for approximately one-third of total PEPC protein in the leaf blade. Recombinant Osppc4 was active in the PEPC reaction, showing Vmax comparable to cytosolic isozymes. Knockdown of Osppc4 expression by the RNAi technique resulted in stunting at the vegetative stage, which was much more marked when rice plants were grown with ammonium than with nitrate as the nitrogen source. Comparison of leaf metabolomes of ammonium-grown plants suggested that the knockdown suppressed ammonium assimilation and subsequent amino acid synthesis by reducing levels of organic acids, which are carbon skeleton donors for these processes. We also identified the chloroplastic PEPC gene in other Oryza species, all of which are adapted to waterlogged soil where the major nitrogen source is ammonium. This suggests that, in addition to glycolysis, the genus Oryza has a unique route to provide organic acids for ammonium assimilation that involves a chloroplastic PEPC, and that this route is crucial for growth with ammonium. This work provides evidence for diversity of primary ammonium assimilation in the leaves of vascular plants. PMID:20194759

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate Provision to Plastids Is Essential for Gametophyte and Sporophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Veena; Löttgert, Tanja; Geimer, Stefan; Dörmann, Peter; Krüger, Stephan; Vijayakumar, Vinod; Schreiber, Lukas; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Kirstin; Feussner, Ivo; Marin, Kay; Staehr, Pia; Bell, Kirsten; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2010-01-01

    Restriction of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) supply to plastids causes lethality of female and male gametophytes in Arabidopsis thaliana defective in both a phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator (PPT) of the inner envelope membrane and the plastid-localized enolase (ENO1) involved in glycolytic PEP provision. Homozygous double mutants of cue1 (defective in PPT1) and eno1 could not be obtained, and homozygous cue1 heterozygous eno1 mutants [cue1/eno1(+/−)] exhibited retarded vegetative growth, disturbed flower development, and up to 80% seed abortion. The phenotypes of diminished oil in seeds, reduced flavonoids and aromatic amino acids in flowers, compromised lignin biosynthesis in stems, and aberrant exine formation in pollen indicate that cue1/eno1(+/−) disrupts multiple pathways. While diminished fatty acid biosynthesis from PEP via plastidial pyruvate kinase appears to affect seed abortion, a restriction in the shikimate pathway affects formation of sporopollonin in the tapetum and lignin in the stem. Vegetative parts of cue1/eno1(+/−) contained increased free amino acids and jasmonic acid but had normal wax biosynthesis. ENO1 overexpression in cue1 rescued the leaf and root phenotypes, restored photosynthetic capacity, and improved seed yield and oil contents. In chloroplasts, ENO1 might be the only enzyme missing for a complete plastidic glycolysis. PMID:20798327

  20. The phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator is required for phenolic metabolism, palisade cell development, and plastid-dependent nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Streatfield, S J; Weber, A; Kinsman, E A; Häusler, R E; Li, J; Post-Beittenmiller, D; Kaiser, W M; Pyke, K A; Flügge, U I; Chory, J

    1999-01-01

    The Arabidopsis chlorophyll a/b binding protein (CAB) gene underexpressed 1 (cue1) mutant underexpresses light-regulated nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. cue1 also exhibits mesophyll-specific chloroplast and cellular defects, resulting in reticulate leaves. Both the gene underexpression and the leaf cell morphology phenotypes are dependent on light intensity. In this study, we determine that CUE1 encodes the plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator (PPT) and define amino acid residues that are critical for translocator function. The biosynthesis of aromatics is compromised in cue1, and the reticulate phenotype can be rescued by feeding aromatic amino acids. Determining that CUE1 encodes PPT indicates the in vivo role of the translocator in metabolic partitioning and reveals a mesophyll cell-specific requirement for the translocator in Arabidopsis leaves. The nuclear gene expression defects in cue1 suggest that a light intensity-dependent interorganellar signal is modulated through metabolites dependent on a plastid supply of phosphoenolpyruvate. PMID:10488230

  1. Structural and functional studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction. PMID:25798914

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction. PMID:25798914

  3. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Induction in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. by Cytokinin 1

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Piepenbrock, Mechtild

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), the key enzyme of Crassulacean acid metabolism, is induced by water stress in leaves of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. In water-stressed plants or excised leaves, exogenous cytokinin suppresses PEPCase transcript accumulation in the leaves. Cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) used in concentrations from 5 to 500 micromolar (a) inhibits the upregulation of PEPCase transcripts, enzyme activity, and Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in salt-stressed intact plants when sprayed once daily during the stress period, (b) inhibits the accumulation of PEPCase mRNA in leaves from well-watered plants, (c) down-regulates PEPCase transcripts within 8 hours in prestressed, intact plants after a single spraying of an individual leaf, (d) inhibits accumulation of PEPCase transcripts in excised, wilting leaves, and (e) accelerates the net decrease of PEPCase transcripts in excised leaves from prestressed plants under rehydration conditions. When roots, the main site of cytokinin biosynthesis, are excised, PEPCase induction under drought stress is intensified. We propose that roots, acting as sensors of soil water status, may regulate PEPCase gene expression in the leaves with cytokinin as a signal transducer. ImagesFigure 2Figure 7 PMID:16669088

  4. Transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by phosphorus deficiency in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Koizumi, Nozomu; Sato, Fumihiko

    2003-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyses the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate using HCO(3)(-) to generate oxaloacetic acid, is an important enzyme in the primary metabolism of plants. Although the PEPC genes (ppc) comprise only a small gene family, the function of each gene is not clear, except for roles in C(4) photosynthesis and CAM. Three PEPC genes (Nsppc1-3) from the C(3) plant Nicotiana sylvestris were used to investigate their roles and regulation in a C(3) plant, and their regulation by phosphorus depletion in particular. First, the induction of PEPC by phosphorus depletion was confirmed. Next, Nsppc1 was determined to be mainly responsive to phosphorus deficiency at the transcriptional level. Further studies using transgenic tobacco harbouring a chimeric gene consisting of the 2.0 kb promoter region of Nsppc1 and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter showed that PEPC is transcriptionally induced. It was also found that sucrose had a synergistic effect on the induction of PEPC by phosphorus deficiency. A series of transgenic tobacco containing 5'-deletion mutants of Nsppc1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed that the -539 to -442 bp Nsppc1 promoter region, relative to the translation start site, was necessary for the response to phosphorus deficiency. Gain-of-function analysis using a construct containing three tandem repeats of the -539 to -442 bp region confirmed that this region was sufficient to induce the phosphorus-deficiency response in tobacco. PMID:12598567

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase of kidney. Subcellular distribution and response to acid–base changes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, H.; Alleyne, G. A. O.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method for the assay of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is presented, based on the enzymic determination of the phosphoenolpyruvate produced by the enzyme reaction. 2. The subcellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the kidney of several animal species resembled the distribution in the liver. 3. The rise in enzyme activity in the kidney cortex of rats made acidotic by feeding with ammonium chloride was not prevented by administration of ethionine or actinomycin. 4. The possibility is suggested that in the kidney acidosis causes activation of an inactive form of the enzyme already present. PMID:5128664

  6. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  7. Metabolite Regulation of Partially Purified Soybean Nodule Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Turpin, David H.; Plaxton, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was purified 40-fold from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules to a specific activity of 5.2 units per milligram per protein and an estimated purity of 28%. Native and subunit molecular masses were determined to be 440 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is a homotetramer. The response of enzyme activity to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentration and to various effectors was influenced by assay pH and glycerol addition to the assay. At pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, the Km (PEP) was about twofold greater than at pH 7 in the presence of glycerol or at pH 8. At pH 7 or pH 8 the Km (MgPEP) was found to be significantly lower than the respective Km (PEP) values. Glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate activated PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but had no effect under the other assay conditions. Malate, aspartate, glutamate, citrate, and 2-oxoglutarate were potent inhibitors of PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but their effectiveness was decreased by raising the pH to 8 and/or by adding glycerol. In contrast, 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate were less effective inhibitors at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol than under the other assay conditions. Inorganic phosphate (up to 20 millimolar) was an activator at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol but an inhibitor under the other assay conditions. The possible significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is discussed in relation to the proposed functions of this enzyme in legume nodule metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667849

  8. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  9. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  10. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during C4 photosynthetic isotope exchange and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Baroli, Irene; Badger, Murray R; Ivakov, Alexander; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) plays a key role during C(4) photosynthesis and is involved in anaplerotic metabolism, pH regulation, and stomatal opening. Heterozygous (Pp) and homozygous (pp) forms of a PEPC-deficient mutant of the C(4) dicot Amaranthus edulis were used to study the effect of reduced PEPC activity on CO(2) assimilation rates, stomatal conductance, and (13)CO(2) (Delta(13)C) and C(18)OO (Delta(18)O) isotope discrimination during leaf gas exchange. PEPC activity was reduced to 42% and 3% and the rates of CO(2) assimilation in air dropped to 78% and 10% of the wild-type values in the Pp and pp mutants, respectively. Stomatal conductance in air (531 mubar CO(2)) was similar in the wild-type and Pp mutant but the pp mutant had only 41% of the wild-type steady-state conductance under white light and the stomata opened more slowly in response to increased light or reduced CO(2) partial pressure, suggesting that the C(4) PEPC isoform plays an essential role in stomatal opening. There was little difference in Delta(13)C between the Pp mutant (3.0 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand) and wild type (3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand), indicating that leakiness (), the ratio of CO(2) leak rate out of the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply by the C(4) cycle, a measure of the coordination of C(4) photosynthesis, was not affected by a 60% reduction in PEPC activity. In the pp mutant Delta(13)C was 16 per thousand +/- 3.2 per thousand, indicative of direct CO(2) fixation by Rubisco in the bundle sheath at ambient CO(2) partial pressure. Delta(18)O measurements indicated that the extent of isotopic equilibrium between leaf water and the CO(2) at the site of oxygen exchange () was low (0.6) in the wild-type and Pp mutant but increased to 0.9 in the pp mutant. We conclude that in vitro carbonic anhydrase activity overestimated as compared to values determined from Delta(18)O in wild-type plants. PMID:17827274

  11. Molecular characteristics of phosphoenolpyruvate: mannose phosphotransferase system in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-07-01

    To elucidate the regulatory mechanism of catabolite control in Streptococcus bovis, we investigated the molecular properties and gene expression of the mannose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar: phosphotransferase system (PTS). The mannose PTS gene cluster (man) was found to comprise a gene encoding enzyme (E) II AB (manL) and genes encoding EIIC (manM), EIID (manN), and a putative regulator (manO). The gene cluster (man operon) was transcribed from one transcriptional start site, which was located 40 bp upstream of the manL start codon. However, two transcriptional start sites were found between manN and manO in primer extension analysis, and the manO may be transcribed independently from the man operon. The man operon and manO were constitutively transcribed without being affected by culture conditions, such as the sugar supplied (glucose, galactose, fructose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, or mannose), growth rate, or pH. PMID:15297922

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent protein kinase from skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, R.L.; Bhanot, P.; Waygood, E.B.

    1986-05-01

    Soluble extracts of skeletal muscle from rat, rabbit and hamster when incubated with 0.1 mM (/sup 32/P)phosphoenolpyruvate give rise to a similar set of phosphoproteins as resolved by SDS-PAGE with Mr 25,000, 35,000, 37,000, 43,000 and 59,000. The phosphorylation of these proteins is neither inhibited by excess ATP nor achieved by incubation with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Except for the Mr 43,000 phosphoprotein, the phosphorylation of the other proteins dramatically increased in the presence of 0.1 mM CTP. Although phosphatase inhibits such as NaF and PPi were not effective, CTP may act to inhibit phosphatase activity rather than activating a protein kinase. The phosphoamino acids produced in these phosphoproteins were acid stable and only phosphoserine has been routinely identified. Using DEAE-cellulose, CM-Sephadex and Ultrogel AcA44 chromatography, the Mr 37,000 phosphoprotein has been purified from rabbit skeletal muscle to near homogeneity. No physiological role for either the protein kinase or its substrates has yet been found.

  13. Exploring biochemical and functional features of Leishmania major phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Máximo Hernán; Giordana, Lucila; Nowicki, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    This work reports the first functional characterization of leishmanial PEPCK. The recombinant Leishmania major enzyme (Lmj_PEPCK) exhibits equivalent kcat values for the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and oxaloacetate (OAA) forming reactions. The apparent Km towards OAA is 10-fold lower than that for PEP, while the Km values for ADP and ATP are equivalent. Mutagenesis studies showed that D241, D242 and H205 of Lmj_PEPCK like the homologous residues of all known PEPCKs are implicated in metal ions binding. In contrast, the replacement of R43 for Q nearly abolishes Lmj_PEPCK activity. Moreover, the Y180F variant exhibits unchanged Km values for PEP, Mn(2+), and [Formula: see text] , being the kcat for PEP- but not that for OAA-forming reaction more notably decreased. Instead, the Y180A mutant displays an increase in the Km value towards Mn(2+). Therefore in Lmj_PEPCK, Y180 seems to exert different functions to those of the analogous residue in ATP- and GTP-dependant enzymes. Besides, the guanidinium group of R43 appears to play an essential but yet unknown role. These findings promote the need for further structural studies to disclose whether Y180 and R43 participate in the catalytic mechanism or/and in the transitions between the open and the catalytically competent (closed) forms of Lmj_PEPCK. PMID:26271440

  14. Experimental evidence of phosphoenolpyruvate resynthesis from pyruvate in illuminated leaves.

    PubMed

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Mahé, Aline; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Gout, Elisabeth; Guérard, Florence; Bligny, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Day respiration is the cornerstone of nitrogen assimilation since it provides carbon skeletons to primary metabolism for glutamate (Glu) and glutamine synthesis. However, recent studies have suggested that the tricarboxylic acid pathway is rate limiting and mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenation is partly inhibited in the light. Pyruvate may serve as a carbon source for amino acid (e.g. alanine) or fatty acid synthesis, but pyruvate metabolism is not well documented, and neither is the possible resynthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Here, we examined the capacity of pyruvate to convert back to PEP using (13)C and (2)H labeling in illuminated cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) leaves. We show that the intramolecular labeling pattern in Glu, 2-oxoglutarate, and malate after (13)C-3-pyruvate feeding was consistent with (13)C redistribution from PEP via the PEP-carboxylase reaction. Furthermore, the deuterium loss in Glu after (2)H(3)-(13)C-3-pyruvate feeding suggests that conversion to PEP and back to pyruvate washed out (2)H atoms to the solvent. Our results demonstrate that in cocklebur leaves, PEP resynthesis occurred as a flux from pyruvate, approximately 0.5‰ of the net CO(2) assimilation rate. This is likely to involve pyruvate inorganic phosphate dikinase and the fundamental importance of this flux for PEP and inorganic phosphate homeostasis is discussed. PMID:21730197

  15. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from pennywort (Umbilicus rupestris). Changes in properties after exposure to water stress.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P P; Bryant, J A; Woodward, F I

    1984-01-01

    Umbilicus rupestris (pennywort) switches from C3 photosynthesis to an incomplete form of crassulacean acid metabolism (referred to as 'CAM-idling') when exposed to water stress (drought). This switch is accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. This enzyme also shows several changes in properties, including a marked decrease in sensitivity to acid pH, a lower Km for phosphoenolpyruvate, very much decreased sensitivity to the allosteric inhibitor malate, and increased responsiveness to the allosteric effector glucose 6-phosphate. The Mr of the enzyme remains unchanged, at approx. 185 000. These changes in properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are discussed in relation to the roles of the enzyme in C3 and in CAM plants. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6712622

  17. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  18. Evidence for Light-stimulated Synthesis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Leaves of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Donald R.; Sims, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    Illumination (22,000 lumens per meter2) of etiolated maize plants for 80 hours brings about a 5-fold increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity per unit of protein. An increase in carboxylase protein and incorporation of [35S]methionine into the protein occurs simultaneously with the activity increase. In green plants, the level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein and enzyme activity is dependent on the intensity of light during growth. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the activity increase results from light-stimulated de novo synthesis of phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase protein. Images PMID:16661464

  19. Purification and characterization of a novel phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from banana fruit.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R D; Plaxton, W C

    1995-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from ripened banana (Musa cavendishii L.) fruits has been purified 127-fold to apparent homogeneity and a final specific activity of 32 mumol of oxaloacetate produced/min per mg of protein. Non-denaturing PAGE of the final preparation resolved a single protein-staining band that co-migrated with PEPC activity. Polypeptides of 103 (alpha-subunit) and 100 (beta-subunit) kDa, which stain for protein with equal intensity and cross-react strongly with anti-(maize leaf PEPC) immune serum, were observed following SDS/PAGE of the final preparation. CNBr cleavage patterns of the two subunits were similar, but not identical, suggesting that these polypeptides are related, but distinct, proteins. The enzyme's native molecular mass was estimated to be about 425 kDa. These data indicate that in contrast to the homotetrameric PEPC from most other sources, the banana fruit enzyme exists as an alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer. Monospecific rabbit anti-(banana PEPC) immune serum effectively immunoprecipitated the activity of the purified enzyme. Immunoblotting studies established that the 100 kDa subunit did not arise via proteolysis of the 103 kDa subunit after tissue extraction, and that the subunit composition of banana PEPC remains uniform throughout the ripening process. PEPC displayed a typical pH activity profile with an alkaline optimum and activity rapidly decreasing below pH 7.0. Enzymic activity was absolutely dependent on the presence of a bivalent metal cation, with Mg2+ or Mn2+ fulfilling this requirement. The response of the PEPC activity to PEP concentration and to various effectors was greatly influenced by pH and glycerol addition to the assay. The enzyme was activated by hexose-monophosphates and potently inhibited by malate, succinate, aspartate and glutamate at pH 7.0, whereas the effect of these metabolites was considerably diminished or completely abolished at pH 8.0. The significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is

  20. Carbon Dioxide Metabolism in Leaf Epidermal Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Willmer, C. M.; Pallas, J. E.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A number of plant species were surveyed to obtain pure leaf epidermal tissue in quantity. Commelina communis L. and Tulipa gesnariana L. (tulip) were chosen for further work. Chlorophyll a/b ratios of epidermal tissues were 2.41 and 2.45 for C. communis and tulip, respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenases were assayed with epidermal tissue and leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, there was less ribulose 1,5-diphosphate than phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in epidermal tissue whether expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis whereas the reverse was true for leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, malic enzyme activities were higher in epidermal tissue than in the remaining leaf tissue when expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis. In both species, NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenase activities were higher in the epidermal tissue when expressed on a chlorophyll basis; however, on a protein basis, the converse was true. Microautoradiography of C. communis epidermis and histochemical tests for keto acids suggested that CO2 fixation occurred predominantly in the guard cells. The significance and possible location of the enzymes are discussed in relation to guard cell metabolism. Images PMID:16658581

  1. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  2. Evolution of the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter of the C4 species Flaveria trinervia: the role of the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Sascha; Zogel, Corinna; Koczor, Maria; Schlue, Ute; Streubel, Monika; Westhoff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The key enzymes of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C4 plants have evolved independently several times from C3 isoforms that were present in the C3 ancestral species. The C4 isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), the primary CO2-fixing enzyme of the C4 cycle, is specifically expressed at high levels in mesophyll cells of the leaves of C4 species. We are interested in understanding the molecular changes that are responsible for the evolution of this C4-characteristic PEPC expression pattern, and we are using the genus Flaveria (Asteraceae) as a model system. It is known that cis-regulatory sequences for mesophyll-specific expression of the ppcA1 gene of F. trinervia (C4) are located within a distal promoter region (DR). Results In this study we focus on the proximal region (PR) of the ppcA1 promoter of F. trinervia and present an analysis of its function in establishing a C4-specific expression pattern. We demonstrate that the PR harbours cis-regulatory determinants which account for high levels of PEPC expression in the leaf. Our results further suggest that an intron in the 5' untranslated leader region of the PR is not essential for the control of ppcA1 gene expression. Conclusion The allocation of cis-regulatory elements for enhanced expression levels to the proximal region of the ppcA1 promoter provides further insight into the regulation of PEPC expression in C4 leaves. PMID:18208593

  3. Salt stress leads to differential expression of two isogenes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, J C; Meyer, G; Michalowski, C B; Schmitt, J M; Bohnert, H J

    1989-01-01

    The common ice plant is a facultative halophyte in which Crassulacean acid metabolism, a metabolic adaptation to arid environments, can be induced by irrigating plants with high levels of NaCl or by drought. This stress-induced metabolic transition is accompanied by up to a 50-fold increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase). To analyze the molecular basis of this plant response to water stress, we have isolated and characterized two members of the PEPCase gene family from the common ice plant. The PEPCase isogenes, designated Ppc1 and Ppc2, have conserved intron-exon organizations, are 76.4% identical at the nucleotide sequence level within exons, and encode predicted polypeptides with 83% amino acid identity. Steady-state levels of mRNAs from the two genes differ dramatically when plants are salt-stressed. Transcripts of Ppc1 increase about 30-fold in leaves within 5 days of salt stress. In contrast, steady-state levels of Ppc2 transcripts decrease slightly in leaf tissue over the same stress period. Steady-state levels of transcripts of both genes decrease in roots over 5 days of salt stress. We have used in vitro transcription assays with nuclei isolated from leaves to demonstrate that the increased expression of Ppc1 caused by water stress occurs in part at the transcriptional level. PMID:2535520

  4. Carbon dioxide metabolism by Capnocytophaga ochracea: identification, characterization, and regulation of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kapke, P A; Brown, A T; Lillich, T T

    1980-01-01

    Cell suspensions of Capnocytophaga ochracea incorporated [14C]NaHCO3 into a major four-carbon fermentation product, succinate, and cell-free extracts from this organism contained high levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK is the major, if not the only, CO2(HCO-3)-fixing enzyme in C. ochracea since cell-free extracts were devoid of pyruvate-dependent and other phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent CO2(HCO-3)-fixing enzymes. The reaction products of the enzyme, which was partially purified by diethylaminoethylcellulose column chromatography, were identified as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and oxalacetate. The enzyme showed maximum activity when manganese (Mn2+) was the divalent cation in the incubation mixture, and it had an absolute requirement for the nucleoside 5-'diphosphate adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP). PEPCK showed a sigmoidal kinetic response to the Mn2+ concentration and homotropic interactions in its kinetic responses to each of its three substrates PEP, ADP, and CO2(HCO-3). The (S)0.5v values for Mn2+, PEP, ADP, and CO2(CHO-3) were approximately 0.08, 0.3, 0.1, and 10 mM, respectively, and Hill coefficients for these same ligands were 2.60, 1.7, 1.9, and 3.0, respectively. In addition, C. ochracea PEPCK is under metabolic control by the nucleoside -5'-triphosphate ATP, and it also showed a sigmoidal kinetic response to this allosteric effector. The Hill coefficient for ATP was 2.70. PMID:6769807

  5. Discovery of PPi-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Genes in Eukaryotes and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is one of the pivotal enzymes that regulates the carbon flow of the central metabolism by fixing CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to produce oxaloacetate or vice versa. Whereas ATP- and GTP-type PEPCKs have been well studied, and their protein identities are established, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi)-type PEPCK (PPi-PEPCK) is poorly characterized. Despite extensive enzymological studies, its protein identity and encoding gene remain unknown. In this study, PPi-PEPCK has been identified for the first time from a eukaryotic human parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, by conventional purification and mass spectrometric identification of the native enzyme, followed by demonstration of its enzymatic activity. A homolog of the amebic PPi-PEPCK from an anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii also exhibited PPi-PEPCK activity. The primary structure of PPi-PEPCK has no similarity to the functional homologs ATP/GTP-PEPCKs and PEP carboxylase, strongly suggesting that PPi-PEPCK arose independently from the other functional homologues and very likely has unique catalytic sites. PPi-PEPCK homologs were found in a variety of bacteria and some eukaryotes but not in archaea. The molecular identification of this long forgotten enzyme shows us the diversity and functional redundancy of enzymes involved in the central metabolism and can help us to understand the central metabolism more deeply. PMID:26269598

  6. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  7. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  8. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Plaxton, William C.; Turpin, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Two isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) with very different regulatory properties were partially purified from the green alga Selenastrum minutum. They were designated PEPC1 and PEPC2. PEPC1 showed sigmoidal kinetics with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) whereas PEPC2 exhibited a typical Michaelis-Menten response. The S0.5(PEP) of PEPC1 was 2.23 millimolar. This was fourfold greater than the S0.5(PEP) of PEPC2, which was 0.57 millimolar. PEPC1 was activated more than fourfold by 2.0 millimolar glutamine and sixfold by 2.0 millimolar dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) at a subsaturating PEP concentration of 0.625 millimolar. In contrast, PEPC2 showed only 8% and 52% activation by glutamine and DHAP, respectively. The effects of glutamine and DHAP were additive. PEPC1 was more sensitive to inhibition by glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and aspartate than PEPC2. Both isoforms were equally inhibited by malate. All of these metabolites affected only the S0.5(PEP) not the Vmax. The regulatory properties of S. minutum PEPC in vitro are discussed in terms of (a) increased rates of dark carbon fixation (shown to be catalyzed predominantly by PEPC) and (b) changes in metabolite levels in vivo during enhanced NH4+ assimilation. Finally, a model is proposed for the regulation of PEPC in vivo in relation to its role in replenishing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates consumed in NH4+ assimilation. PMID:16667617

  9. Partitioning of Nitrogen among Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Pyruvate Orthophosphate Dikinase as Related to Biomass Productivity in Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, T; Mizuno, M; Hayashi, M

    1984-07-01

    Maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) seedlings were grown under full sunlight or 50% sunlight in a temperature-controlled glasshouse at the temperatures of near optimum (30/25 degrees C) and suboptimum (17/13 degrees C) with seven levels of nitrate-N (0.4 to 12 millimolars). The contents of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPD), and ribulose-1,5-P(2) carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were immunochemically determined for each treatment with rabbit antibodies raised against the respective maize leaf proteins (anti-PEPC and anti-PPD) or spinach leaf protein (anti-RuBisCO). The content of each enzymic protein increased with increasing N and raised under reduced temperature. The positive effect of light intensity on their contents was evident only at near optimal temperature. The relative increase in PEPC and PPD content with increasing N was significantly greater than that of RuBisCO irrespective of growth conditions. These enzymic proteins comprised about 8, 6, and 35% of total soluble protein, respectively, at near optimal growth condition. In contrast to significant increase in the proportion of soluble protein allocated to PEPC and PPD seen under certain conditions, the proportion allocated to RuBisCO decreased reciprocally with an increased biomass yield by N supply.These results indicated that the levels of PEPC and PPD parallel to maize biomass more tightly than that of RuBisCO at least under near optimal growth condition. PMID:16663684

  10. The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is involved in sensitivity to the glucosylated bacteriocin sublancin.

    PubMed

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C V; Denham, E L; Mars, R A T; Stülke, J; van der Donk, W A; van Dijl, J M

    2015-11-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  11. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  12. Expression of Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in a cyanobacterium. Functional complementation of Synechococcus PCC 7942 ppc.

    PubMed Central

    Luinenburg, I; Coleman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The gene (ppc) coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 has been inactivated via insertional mutagenesis while being functionally complemented by Escherichia coli ppc. Cyanobacterial cells functionally complemented by E. coli ppc showed decreased PEPCase activity in crude cell lysates and detergent-permeabilized whole cell assays. Decreased rates of growth, reduced levels of chlorophyll a, and decreased photosynthetic O2 evolution capacity per cell when compared to wild-type cyanobacterial cells were also observed. Phycobiliprotein levels were not affected. The results are discussed in terms of the impact of reduced PEPCase activity on cyanobacterial cell metabolism and the regulatory properties of the E. coli gene product. PMID:8278492

  13. The Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System Is Involved in Sensitivity to the Glucosylated Bacteriocin Sublancin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C. V.; Denham, E. L.; Mars, R. A. T.; Stülke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  14. Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Meristems and during Initial Leaf Development in a C4 Dicotyledonous Plant.

    PubMed

    Ramsperger, V. C.; Summers, R. G.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-08-01

    Immunolocalization and fluorescent in situ hybridization were used with confocal microscopy to examine patterns of photosynthetic gene expression during initial stages of leaf development in the C4 dicot Amaranthus hypochondriacus. mRNAs encoding the large and small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase were present in the apical dome and in all cells of the leaf primordia. In contrast, these polypeptides were detected only in cells of the ground meristem, with no accumulation detected in the apical dome or in other leaf primordia cells. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase transcripts showed very little cell-type specificity as leaf structures began to differentiate, whereas their polypeptides accumulated primarily in bundle-sheath precursor cells. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase mRNAs were abundant in meristems and leaf primordia, although their corresponding polypeptides did not accumulate in leaves until the leaf vascular system began to differentiate. These polypeptides were mostly restricted to premesophyll cells from their earliest detection, whereas their transcripts remained present in nearly all leaf cells. These findings indicate that individual C4 genes are independently regulated as they become initially localized to their appropriate cell types. Furthermore, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining early patterns of C4 gene expression. PMID:12226343

  15. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry. PMID:17142488

  16. Structural and functional analysis of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene from the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7.

    PubMed Central

    Inui, M; Dumay, V; Zahn, K; Yamagata, H; Yukawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The ppc gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), from Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7 was cloned and sequenced. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 42 bp upstream of the ppc initiation codon. An R. palustris No. 7 PEPC-deficient strain showed a slower doubling time compared with the wild-type strain either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark, when pyruvate was used as a carbon source. PMID:9244286

  17. Effect of Nitrate and Ammonium Nutrition of Nonnodulated Phaseolus vulgaris L. on Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Pyruvate Kinase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Patrick; Erismann, Karl H.

    1985-01-01

    Young bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) were fed with 3.5 or 10 millimolar N in either the form of NO3− or NH4+, after being grown on N-free nutrient solution for 8 days. The pH of the nutrient solutions was either 6 or 4. The cell sap pH and the extractable activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves were measured over several days. The extractable activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (based on soluble protein) from primary leaves increased with NO3− nutrition, whereas with NH4+ nutrition and on N-free nutrient solution the activity remained at a low level. Phosphoenopyruvate carboxylase activity from the roots of NH4+-fed plants at pH 4 was finally somewhat higher than from the roots of plants grown on NO3− at the same pH. There was no difference in activity from the root between the N treatments when pH in the nutrient solutions was 6. The extractable activity of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves seemed not to be influenced by the N nutrition of the plants. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological function of both enzymes with special regard to the postulated functions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C3 plants as an anaplerotic enzyme and as part of a cellular pH stat. PMID:16664265

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2). PMID:11730863

  19. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals. PMID:24835101

  20. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation. PMID:18655006

  1. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana: contribution of glycerol kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-11-21

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. PMID:25288791

  2. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in neuronal steroidogenesis under acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Mohanraj; Ramatchandirin, Balamurugan; Balakrishnan, Sivasangari; Selvaraj, Karthikeyan; Prahalathan, Chidambaram

    2014-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key gluconeogenic enzyme found in many tissues throughout the body including brain. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on PEPCK and its role in neuronal steroidogenesis. Adult female albino rats were administered LPS (5mg/kg body weight) to induce acute inflammation. LPS administration resulted in a significant increase of PEPCK mRNA expression with concomitant increase in mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and other steroidogenic enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) and aromatase in brain tissue. Further, the inhibition of PEPCK expression by glipizide significantly decreased the mRNA expression of steroidogenic proteins and concurrently increased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines under LPS administration. The results of this study suggest a novel finding that PEPCK may have an important role in neuronal steroidogenesis; which serves as an adaptive response under inflammation. PMID:25256278

  3. Utilization of Substrate Intrinsic Binding Energy for Conformational Change and Catalytic Function in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Mcleod, Matthew J; Holyoak, Todd

    2016-01-26

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Previous work has demonstrated that the enzyme cycles between a catalytically inactive open state and a catalytically active closed state. The transition of the enzyme between these states requires the transition of several active site loops to shift from mobile, disordered structural elements to stable ordered states. The mechanism by which these disorder-order transitions are coupled to the ligation state of the active site however is not fully understood. To further investigate the mechanisms by which the mobility of the active site loops is coupled to enzymatic function and the transitioning of the enzyme between the two conformational states, we have conducted structural and functional studies of point mutants of E89. E89 is a proposed key member of the interaction network of mobile elements as it resides in the R-loop region of the enzyme active site. These new data demonstrate the importance of the R-loop in coordinating interactions between substrates at the OAA/PEP binding site and the mobile R- and Ω-loop domains. In turn, the studies more generally demonstrate the mechanisms by which the intrinsic ligand binding energy can be utilized in catalysis to drive unfavorable conformational changes, changes that are subsequently required for both optimal catalytic activity and fidelity. PMID:26709450

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is regulated by redox mechanisms and interaction with thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snašel, Jan; Zimmermann, Michael; Laubitz, Daniel; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Dostál, Jiři; Sauer, Uwe; Pichová, Iva

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health concern worldwide. Eradication of its causative agent, the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is particularly challenging due to a vast reservoir of latent carriers of the disease. Despite the misleading terminology of a so-called dormant state associated with latent infections, the bacteria have to maintain basic metabolic activities. Hypoxic conditions have been widely used as an in vitro system to study this dormancy. Such studies identified a rearrangement of central carbon metabolism to exploit fermentative processes caused by the lack of oxygen. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32) is the enzyme at the center of these metabolic rearrangements. Although Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis under standard growth conditions, the enzyme can catalyze the reverse reaction, supporting anaplerosis of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, under conditions leading to slowed or stopped bacterial replication. To study the mechanisms that regulate the switch between two Pck functions, we systematically investigated factors influencing the gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reaction kinetics. We demonstrate that a reducing environment, as found under hypoxia-triggered non-replicating conditions, accelerates the reaction in the anaplerotic direction. Furthermore, we identified proteins that interact with Pck. The interaction between Pck and the reduced form of mycobacterial thioredoxin, gene expression of which is increased under hypoxic conditions, also increased the Pck anaplerotic activity. We thus propose that a reducing environment and the protein-protein interaction with thioredoxin in particular enable the Pck anaplerotic function under fermentative growth conditions. PMID:24659783

  5. Deregulation of feedback inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase for improved lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  6. Abiotic stresses affecting water balance induce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase expression in roots of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    González, María-Cruz; Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in CO(2) fixation in C4 and CAM plants. In C3 plants, PEPC is widely expressed in most organs; however, its function is not yet clearly established. With the aim of providing clues on the function of PEPC in C3 plants, we have analyzed its pattern of expression in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. Roots showed almost double the level of PEPC activity of shoots. Further analysis of PEPC expression in roots by in situ localization techniques showed a high accumulation of PEPC transcripts and polypeptides in meristematic cells, whereas in the rest of the root PEPC localized preferentially to the vascular tissue. Treatment with NaCl and LiCl induced PEPC expression in roots. Similarly, other abiotic stresses affecting water status, such as drought or cold, induced PEPC expression. Induction was root-specific except for the cold treatment, which also induced PEPC in shoots, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, hypoxia, which does not affect water balance, did not promote any induction of PEPC expression. These results suggest an important role for this enzyme in the adaptation of plants to environmental changes. PMID:12687366

  7. A Role for Mitochondrial Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C.; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Kibbey, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  8. Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency presenting with acute liver failure following gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Saikat; Cameron, Jessie M; Shyr, Casper; Zhang, Linhua; Drögemöller, Britt; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Gupte, Girish; Preece, Mary Anne; van Karnebeek, Clara D

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with transient acute liver failure and biochemical patterns suggestive of disturbed urea cycle and mitochondrial function, for whom conventional genetic and metabolic investigations for acute liver failure failed to yield a diagnosis. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous 12-bp deletion in PCK1 (MIM 614168) encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK); enzymatic studies subsequently confirmed its pathogenic nature. We propose that PEPCK deficiency should be considered in the young child with unexplained liver failure, especially where there are marked, accumulations of TCA cycle metabolites on urine organic acid analysis and/or an amino acid profile with hyperammonaemia suggestive of a proximal urea cycle defect during the acute episode. If suspected, intravenous administration of dextrose should be initiated. Long-term management comprising avoidance of fasting with the provision of a glucose polymer emergency regimen for illness management may be sufficient to prevent future episodes of liver failure. This case report provides further insights into the (patho-)physiology of energy metabolism, confirming the power of genomic analysis of unexplained biochemical phenotypes. PMID:26971250

  9. A role for mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Kibbey, Richard G

    2014-03-14

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  10. Control of Transposon-mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances, it also regulates mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutation have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing growth of wild type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of non-metabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated. PMID:26159081

  11. Stereochemical course of the reactions catalyzed by the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: Mannitol phosphotransferase system

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.G.; Knowles, J.R. ); Khandekar, S.S.; Jacobson, G.R. )

    1990-07-24

    The authors have determined the overall stereochemical course of the reactions leading to the phosphorylation of D-mannitol by mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII{sup Mtl}) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate- (PEP) dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the presence of enzyme I and HPr of the PTS, and of membranes containing EII{sup Mtl}, the phospho group from ((R)-{sup 16}O, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O)PEP was transferred to D-mannitol to form mannitol 1-phosphate with overall inversion of the configuration at phosphorus with respect to that of PEP. Since in the course of these reactions enzyme I and HPr are each covalently phosphorylated at a single site and inversion of the chiral phospho group from PEP indicates an odd number of transfer steps overall, transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol via EII{sup Mtl} must also occur in an odd number of steps. Taken together with the fact that catalytically important phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates have been demonstrated biochemically, the results imply that EII{sup Mtl} is sequentially phosphorylated at two different sites during phospho transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol. This conclusion is consistent with the available evidence on phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates and in particular with the recent report that two different phospho peptides can be isolated from the fully phosphorylated protein.

  12. Metal Ion Interactions with Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Crassula argentea and Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien T.; Ngam-ek, Apinya; Jenkins, Joane; Grover, Scott D.

    1988-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from the CAM plant Crassula argentea and the C4 plant Zea mays were kinetically analyzed. Fe2+ and Cd2+ were found to be active metal cofactors along with the previously known active metals Mg2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. In studies with the Crassula enzyme, Mg2+ yielded the highest Vmax value but also generated the highest values of Km(metal) and Km(pep). For these five active metals lower Km(metal) values tended to be associated with lower Km(pep) values. PEP saturation curves showed more kinetic cooperativity than the corresponding metal saturation curves. The activating metal ions all have ionic radii in the range of 0.86 to 1.09 Å. Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, and Ni2+ inhibited competitively with respect to Mg2+, whereas Be2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Pd2+ showed mixed-type inhibition. Vmax trends with the five active metals were similar for the C. argentea and Z. mays enzymes except that Cd2+ was less effective with the maize enzyme. Km(metal) values were 10- to 60-fold higher in the enzyme from Z. mays. PMID:16665847

  13. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis. PMID:25900567

  14. Trypanosoma evansi contains two auxiliary enzymes of glycolytic metabolism: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz Amira; Concepción, Juan Luis; Quintero-Troconis, Ender; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Michels, Paul A M; Acosta, Héctor

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a monomorphic protist that can infect horses and other animal species of economic importance for man. Like the bloodstream form of the closely related species Trypanosoma brucei, T. evansi depends exclusively on glycolysis for its free-energy generation. In T. evansi as in other kinetoplastid organisms, the enzymes of the major part of the glycolytic pathway are present within organelles called glycosomes, which are authentic but specialized peroxisomes. Since T. evansi does not undergo stage-dependent differentiations, it occurs only as bloodstream forms, it has been assumed that the metabolic pattern of this parasite is identical to that of the bloodstream form of T. brucei. However, we report here the presence of two additional enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and PPi-dependent pyruvate phosphate dikinase in T. evansi glycosomes. Their colocalization with glycolytic enzymes within the glycosomes of this parasite has not been reported before. Both enzymes can make use of PEP for contributing to the production of ATP within the organelles. The activity of these enzymes in T. evansi glycosomes drastically changes the model assumed for the oxidation of glucose by this parasite. PMID:26968775

  15. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi. PMID:25195688

  16. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  17. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene by cooperation between hepatic nuclear factors.

    PubMed Central

    Yanuka-Kashles, O; Cohen, H; Trus, M; Aran, A; Benvenisty, N; Reshef, L

    1994-01-01

    To study the transcriptional regulation of the liver gluconeogenic phenotype, the underdifferentiated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 (Hepa) hepatoma cell line was used. These cells mimicked the fetal liver by appreciably expressing the alpha-fetoprotein and albumin genes but not the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Unlike the fetal liver, however, Hepa cells failed to express the early-expressed factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1 alpha) and HNF-4 and the late-expressed factor C/EBP alpha, thereby providing a suitable system for examining possible cooperation between these factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. Transient transfection assays of a chimeric PEPCK-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase construct showed a residual PEPCK promoter activity in the Hepa cell line, which was slightly stimulated by cotransfection with a single transcription factor from either the C/EBP family or HNF-1 alpha but not at all affected by cotransfection of HNF-4. In contrast, cotransfection of the PEPCK construct with members from the C/EBP family plus HNF-1 alpha resulted in a synergistic stimulation of the PEPCK promoter activity. This synergistic effect depended on the presence in the PEPCK promoter region of the HNF-1 recognition sequence and on the presence of two C/EBP recognition sequences. The results demonstrate a requirement for coexistence and cooperation between early and late liver-enriched transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. In addition, the results suggest redundancy between members of the C/EBP family of transcription factors in the regulation of PEPCK gene expression. Images PMID:7935427

  19. Regulation of the acuF Gene, Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Draht, Oliver W.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex. PMID:11741859

  20. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  1. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Feria, Ana-Belén; Ni, Hong; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110 kDa and 107 kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460 kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme's feedback inhibition by L-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell's immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon-nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  2. Developmental and molecular physiological evidence for the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in rapid cotton fibre elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Lu; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Cotton fibres are hair-like single-cells that elongate to several centimetres long after their initiation from the ovule epidermis at anthesis. The accumulation of malate, along with K+ and sugars, is thought to play an important role in fibre elongation through osmotic regulation and charge balance. However, there is a lack of evidence for or against such an hypothesis. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of malate. The potential role of PEPC in cotton fibre elongation is examined here. Developmentally, PEPC activity was higher at the rapid elongation phase than that at the slow elongation stage. Genotypically, PEPC activity correlated positively with the rate of fibre elongation and the final fibre length attained. Importantly, suppression of PEPC activity by LiCl that reduces its phosphorylation status decreased fibre length. To examine the molecular basis underlying PEPC activity, two cDNAs encoding PEPC, GhPEPC1 and 2, were cloned, which represents the major PEPC genes expressed in cotton fibre. RT-PCR analyses revealed that GhPEPC1 and 2 were highly expressed at the rapid elongation phase but weakly at the slow-to-terminal elongation period. In situ hybridization detected mRNA of GhPEPC1 and 2 in 1 d young fibres but not in the ovule epidermis prior to fibre initiation. Collectively, the data indicate that cotton fibre elongation requires high activity of PEPC, probably through the expression of the GhPEPC1 and 2 genes. PMID:19815688

  3. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  4. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression after gastric bypass surgery in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Hou, S S; Wang, W; Yin, M; Cheng, N; Ge, L L; Yin, J J; Xu, J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) after gastric bypass surgery (GBS) in rats with type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM). Thirty-six male Goto-Kakizaki rats, aged 12 weeks, were randomly divided into the GBS, sham operation with diet restriction (SO), and sham operation alone (control) groups (N = 12 per group). Liver specimens from all rats were obtained during the operation and 8 weeks after operation. Blood lipid levels were measured before and 8 weeks after operation. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), food intake, and body weight were recorded at weekly time points after operation. The blood glucose area under the curve (AUC) was calculated, and insulin sensitivity indices (ISI) were assessed. The expression PEPCK mRNA and protein were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. Compared with those of the SO and control groups, the blood lipid levels and the FBG in the GBS group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), as was the AUC (P < 0.05), whereas the ISI was significantly increased (P < 0.05). PEPCK mRNA and protein levels in the GBS group were lower than those in the control group, whereas those in the SO group were significantly higher than those in controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, GBS can reduce blood glucose in T2DM rats while improving glucose tolerance and hyperglycemia, and the mechanism appears to be associated with a decrease of hepatic PEPCK mRNA and protein expression. PMID:26681041

  5. Key role of hydrazine to the interaction between oxaloacetic against phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK): ONIOM calculations.

    PubMed

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Phromyothin, Darinee Sae-Tang; Hannongbua, Supa

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between oxaloacetic (OAA) and phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK) binding pocket in the presence and absence of hydrazine were carried out using quantum chemical calculations, based on the two-layered ONIOM (ONIOM2) approach. The complexes were partially optimized by ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) method while the interaction energies between OAA and individual residues surrounding the pocket were performed at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated interaction energies (INT) indicated that Arg87, Gly237, Ser286, and Arg405 are key residues for binding to OAA with the INT values of -1.93, -2.06, -2.47, and -3.16 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The interactions are mainly due to the formation of hydrogen bonding interactions with OAA. Moreover, using ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) applied on the PEPCKHS complex, two proton transfers were observed; first, the proton was transferred from the carboxylic group of OAA to hydrazine while the second one was from Asp311 to Lys244. Such reactions cause the generation of binding strength of OAA to the pocket via electrostatic interaction. The orientations of Lys243, Lys244, His264, Asp311, Phe333, and Arg405 were greatly deviated after hydrazine incorporation. These indicate that hydrazine plays an important role in terms of not only changing the conformation of the binding pocket, but is also tightly bound to OAA resulting in its conformation change in the pocket. The understanding of such interaction can be useful for the design of hydrazine-based inhibitor for antichachexia agents. PMID:23624997

  6. Association of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase activity with the cytosolic pyruvate kinase of germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1991-12-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. PMID:16668551

  7. Association of Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphatase Activity with the Cytosolic Pyruvate Kinase of Germinating Mung Beans 1

    PubMed Central

    Podestá, Florencio E.; Plaxton, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668551

  8. Multiple inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfers in the evolution of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene family.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingmei; Cai, Jing; Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  9. Facilitated diffusion of fructose via the phosphoenolpyruvate/glucose phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kornberg, Hans L.; Lambourne, Linda T. M.; Sproul, Andrew A.

    2000-01-01

    From mutants of Escherichia coli unable to utilize fructose via the phosphoenolpyruvate/glycose phosphotransferase system (PTS), further mutants were selected that grow on fructose as the sole carbon source, albeit with relatively low affinity for that hexose (Km for growth ≈8 mM but with Vmax for generation time ≈1 h 10 min); the fructose thus taken into the cells is phosphorylated to fructose 6-phosphate by ATP and a cytosolic fructo(manno)kinase (Mak). The gene effecting the translocation of fructose was identified by Hfr-mediated conjugations and by phage-mediated transduction as specifying an isoform of the membrane-spanning enzyme IIGlc of the PTS, which we designate ptsG-F. Exconjugants that had acquired ptsG+ from Hfr strains used for mapping (designated ptsG-I) grew very poorly on fructose (Vmax ≈7 h 20 min), even though they were rich in Mak activity. A mutant of E. coli also rich in Mak but unable to grow on glucose by virtue of transposon-mediated inactivations both of ptsG and of the genes specifying enzyme IIMan (manXYZ) was restored to growth on glucose by plasmids containing either ptsG-F or ptsG-I, but only the former restored growth on fructose. Sequence analysis showed that the difference between these two forms of ptsG, which was reflected also by differences in the rates at which they translocated mannose and glucose analogs such as methyl α-glucoside and 2-deoxyglucose, resided in a substitution of G in ptsG-I by T in ptsG-F in the first position of codon 12, with consequent replacement of valine by phenylalanine in the deduced amino acid sequence. PMID:10677538

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase and isocitrate lyase in both tomato fruits and leaves, and in the flesh of peach and some other fruits.

    PubMed

    Famiani, Franco; Paoletti, Andrea; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-09-01

    In this study the occurrence of a number of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis was investigated in both tomato fruits and leaves during their development and senescence and in some other fruits. The enzymes studied were phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) and glyoxysomal isocitrate lyase (ICL). PPDK was detected in the ripe flesh of tomato, and much smaller amounts were detected in the flesh of both peach and pepper, whereas it was not detected (not present or at very low abundance) in the other fruits which were investigated (apricot, aubergine, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, grape, plum, raspberry and red current). By contrast PEPCK was present in the flesh of all the fruits investigated. Very small amounts of ICL were detected in ripe tomato flesh. PEPCK was present in the skin, flesh, locular gel and columella of tomato fruit, and in these its abundance increased greatly during ripening. PPDK showed a similar distribution, however, its abundance did not increase during ripening. PEPCK was not detected in tomato leaves at any stage of their development or senescence. The content of PPDK g(-1) fresh weight (FW) increased in tomato leaves as they matured, however, it declined during their senescence. In tomato leaves the content of ICL g(-1) FW increased until the mid-stage of development, then decreased as the leaf matured, and then increased during the latter stages of senescence. In the flesh of tomato fruits the contents of PPDK and PEPCK g(-1) FW decreased during senescence. The results suggest that in fruits other than tomato the bulk of any gluconeogenic flux proceeds via PEPCK, whereas in tomato both PEPCK and PPDK could potentially be utilised. Further, the results indicate that the conversion of pyruvate/acetyl-CoA to malate by the glyoxylate cycle, for which ICL is necessary, is not a major pathway utilised by gluconeogenesis in fruits under normal conditions of growth. Finally, the results contribute to

  11. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Glucose/Mannose Phosphotransferase System of Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cochu, Armelle; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel

    2003-01-01

    In most streptococci, glucose is transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):glucose/mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) via HPr and IIABMan, two proteins involved in regulatory mechanisms. While most strains of Streptococcus thermophilus do not or poorly metabolize glucose, compelling evidence suggests that S. thermophilus possesses the genes that encode the glucose/mannose general and specific PTS proteins. The purposes of this study were to determine (i) whether these PTS genes are expressed, (ii) whether the PTS proteins encoded by these genes are able to transfer a phosphate group from PEP to glucose/mannose PTS substrates, and (iii) whether these proteins catalyze sugar transport. The pts operon is made up of the genes encoding HPr (ptsH) and enzyme I (EI) (ptsI), which are transcribed into a 0.6-kb ptsH mRNA and a 2.3-kb ptsHI mRNA. The specific glucose/mannose PTS proteins, IIABMan, IICMan, IIDMan, and the ManO protein, are encoded by manL, manM, manN, and manO, respectively, which make up the man operon. The man operon is transcribed into a single 3.5-kb mRNA. To assess the phosphotransfer competence of these PTS proteins, in vitro PEP-dependent phosphorylation experiments were conducted with purified HPr, EI, and IIABMan as well as membrane fragments containing IICMan and IIDMan. These PTS components efficiently transferred a phosphate group from PEP to glucose, mannose, 2-deoxyglucose, and (to a lesser extent) fructose, which are common streptococcal glucose/mannose PTS substrates. Whole cells were unable to catalyze the uptake of mannose and 2-deoxyglucose, demonstrating the inability of the S. thermophilus PTS proteins to operate as a proficient transport system. This inability to transport mannose and 2-deoxyglucose may be due to a defective IIC domain. We propose that in S. thermophilus, the general and specific glucose/mannose PTS proteins are not involved in glucose transport but might have regulatory functions associated with the

  12. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  13. Assessing soybean leaf area and leaf biomass by spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral radiances were correlated with soybean total leaf area index, green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf area index, green leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf biomass, and total biomass. The most significant correlations were found to exist between the IR/red radiance ratio data and green leaf area index and/or green leaf biomass (r squared equals 0.85 and 0.86, respectively). These findings demonstrate that remote sensing data can supply information basic to soybean canopy growth, development, and status by nondestructive determination of the green leaf area or green leaf biomass.

  14. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol represses transcription of the gene for the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) by deacetylating hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK-C) is a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. While this enzyme is often over-expressed in diabetes and obesity, studies showed that decrease in its expression results in lessening the diseases condition in animal...

  15. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  16. Cytosolic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Does Not Solely Control the Rate of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in the Intact Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Shawn C.; He, Tian Teng; Yan, Zheng; Lindner, Jill; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY When dietary carbohydrate is unavailable, glucose required to support metabolism in vital tissues is generated via gluconeogenesis in the liver. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), commonly considered the control point for liver gluconeogenesis, is normally regulated by circulating hormones to match systemic glucose demand. However, this regulation fails in diabetes. Because other molecular and metabolic factors can also influence gluconeogenesis, the explicit role of PEPCK protein content in the control of gluconeogenesis was unclear. In this study, metabolic control of liver gluconeogenesis was quantified in groups of mice with varying PEPCK protein content. Surprisingly, livers with a 90% reduction in PEPCK content showed only a ~40% reduction in gluconeogenic flux, indicating a lower than expected capacity for PEPCK protein content to control gluconeogenesis. However, PEPCK flux correlated tightly with TCA cycle activity, suggesting that under some conditions in mice, PEPCK expression must coordinate with hepatic energy metabolism to control gluconeogenesis. PMID:17403375

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of sucrose by Clostridium tyrobutyricum ZJU 8235: evidence for the phosphotransferase transport system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Cai, Jin; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Xu, Zhinan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2010-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of sucrose, the major sugar in industrial cane molasses, by Clostridium tyrobutyricum ZJU 8235 was investigated and this study provided the first definitive evidence for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity in butyric acid-producing bacteria. Glucose was utilized preferentially to sucrose when both substrates were present in the medium. The PEP-dependent sucrose: PTS was induced by growing C. tyrobutyricum on sucrose (but not glucose) as the sole carbon source. Extract fractionation and PTS reconstitution experiments revealed that both soluble and membrane components were required for bioactivity. Sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase and fructokinase activities were also detected in sucrose-grown cultures. Based on these findings, a pathway of sucrose metabolism in this organism was proposed that includes the forming of sucrose-6-phosphate via the PTS and its further degradation into glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. PMID:19726178

  18. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties. PMID:3707571

  19. Deletion Mapping of the Genes Coding for HPr and Enzyme I of the Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Cordaro, J. Christopher; Roseman, Saul

    1972-01-01

    Sugars transported by a bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) require two soluble proteins: HPr, a low-molecular-weight phosphate-carrier protein, and enzyme I. The structural genes coding for HPr (ptsH) and Enzyme I (ptsI) are shown to be cotransducible in Salmonella typhimurium. The gene order of this region of the Salmonella chromosome is cysA-trzA-ptsH-ptsI...(crr). A method for the isolation of trzA-pts deletion is described. One class of pts deletions extends through ptsH and into ptsI; a second class includes both ptsH and ptsI and extends into or through the crr gene. The crr gene either codes for or regulates the synthesis of a third PTS protein (factor III) which is sugar-specific. A hypothesis is presented for a mechanism of deletion formation. PMID:4562394

  20. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  1. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  2. Leaf Tissue Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Peter J.; Goldthwaite, Jonathan

    1975-01-01

    During winter, excised leaf tissue from Rumex obtusifolius degrades chlorophyll at twice the summer rate but the plant hormones, gibberellic acid and zeatin, inhibit the senescence rate by a constant percentage, regardless of season. PMID:16659225

  3. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) Gene Expression and Steatosis During Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Subgenome Replication: Role of Nonstructural Component-5A (NS5A) and CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein ß (C/EBPß)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated tra...

  4. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  5. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  6. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  7. Growth of the C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis: photosynthetic acclimation to low light through shifts in leaf anatomy and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Pengelly, Jasper J. L.; Sirault, Xavier R. R.; Tazoe, Youshi; Evans, John R.; Furbank, Robert T.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    In C4 plants, acclimation to growth at low irradiance by means of anatomical and biochemical changes to leaf tissue is considered to be limited by the need for a close interaction and coordination between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Here differences in relative growth rate (RGR), gas exchange, carbon isotope discrimination, photosynthetic enzyme activity, and leaf anatomy in the C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis grown at a low (LI; 150 μmol quanta m2 s−1) and medium (MI; 500 μmol quanta m2 s−1) irradiance and with a 12 h photoperiod over 36 d were examined. RGRs measured using a 3D non-destructive imaging technique were consistently higher in MI plants. Rates of CO2 assimilation per leaf area measured at 1500 μmmol quanta m2 s−1 were higher for MI than LI plants but did not differ on a mass basis. LI plants had lower Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities and chlorophyll content on a leaf area basis. Bundle sheath leakiness of CO2 (ϕ) calculated from real-time carbon isotope discrimination was similar for MI and LI plants at high irradiance. ϕ increased at lower irradiances, but more so in MI plants, reflecting acclimation to low growth irradiance. Leaf thickness and vein density were greater in MI plants, and mesophyll surface area exposed to intercellular airspace (Sm) and bundle sheath surface area per unit leaf area (Sb) measured from leaf cross-sections were also both significantly greater in MI compared with LI leaves. Both mesophyll and bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion were greater in MI compared with LI plants. Despite being a C4 species, F. bidentis is very plastic with respect to growth irradiance. PMID:20693408

  8. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+). PMID:24594398

  9. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  10. Metabolic analysis of Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the carboxylating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, R.R.; Eiteman, M.A.; Altman, E.

    2000-05-01

    Fermentation patterns of Escherichia coli with and without the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) enzymes were compared under anaerobic conditions with glucose as a carbon source. Time profiles of glucose and fermentation product concentrations were determined and used to calculate metabolic fluxes through central carbon pathways during exponential cell growth. The presence of the Rhizobium etli pyc gene in E. coli (JCL1242/pTrc99A-pyc) restored the succinate producing ability of E. coli ppc null mutants (JCL1242), with PYC competing favorably with both pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase. Succinate formation was slightly greater by JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc than by cells which overproduced PPC(JCL1242/pPC201, ppc{sup +}), even though PPC activity in cell extracts of JCL1242/pPC201 (ppc{sup +}) was 40-fold greater than PYC activity in extracts of JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc. Flux calculations indicate that during anaerobic metabolism the pyc{sup +} strain had a 34% greater specific glucose consumption rate, a 37% greater specific rate of ATP formation, and a 6% greater specific growth rate compared to the ppc{sup +} strain. In light of the important position of pyruvate at the juncture of NADH-generating pathways and NADH-dissimilating branches, the results show that when PPC or PYC is expressed, the metabolic network adapts by altering the flux to lactate and the molar ratio of ethanol to acetate formation.

  11. Reciprocal Changes in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Kinase with Age Are a Determinant of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Hakimi, Parvin; Kao, Clara; Kao, Allison; Liu, Ruifu; Janocha, Allison; Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Hang, Xi; Alhoraibi, Hanna; Slater, Erin; Xia, Kevin; Cao, Pengxiu; Shue, Quinn; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Erzurum, Serpil C; Dubyak, George R; Berger, Nathan A; Hanson, Richard W; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-15

    Aging involves progressive loss of cellular function and integrity, presumably caused by accumulated stochastic damage to cells. Alterations in energy metabolism contribute to aging, but how energy metabolism changes with age, how these changes affect aging, and whether they can be modified to modulate aging remain unclear. In locomotory muscle of post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a progressive decrease in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C), a longevity-associated metabolic enzyme, and a reciprocal increase in glycolytic pyruvate kinase (PK) that were necessary and sufficient to limit lifespan. Decline in PEPCK-C with age also led to loss of cellular function and integrity including muscle activity, and cellular senescence. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions of PEPCK-C, muscle activity, and AMPK signaling demonstrate that declines in PEPCK-C and muscle function with age interacted to limit reproductive life and lifespan via disrupted energy homeostasis. Quantifications of metabolic flux show that reciprocal changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age shunted energy metabolism toward glycolysis, reducing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Last, calorie restriction countered changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age to elicit anti-aging effects via TOR inhibition. Thus, a programmed metabolic event involving PEPCK-C and PK is a determinant of aging that can be modified to modulate aging. PMID:26631730

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) deficiency affects the germination, growth and fruit sugar content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Xing; Yin, Yong-Gen; Sanuki, Atsuko; Fukuda, Naoya; Ezura, Hiroshi; Matsukura, Chiaki

    2015-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key regulatory enzyme and is utilized in the gluconeogenesis pathway in plants. Although, its catalytic and regulatory properties are quite well understood, there are uncertainties regarding its physiological role in many plants tissues such as the flesh of developing fruits. To further understand the function of PEPCK in fruits and other tissues, RNAi transgenic tomato plants in which SlPEPCK transcription was down-regulated by either CaMV 35S constitutive promoter or the fruit-specific E8 promoter were generated and characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and metabolic aspects. In the PEPCK-deficient lines, prominent growth suppression of germinated seedlings was observed and other vegetative suppression appeared during the early stage of plant growth in the 35S promoter-driven lines. In particular, root elongation was most obviously suppressed in the germinated seedlings, indicating that the gluconeogenesis pathway is involved in the root growth of seedlings. Regarding the primary metabolism in fruit, the soluble sugar content tended to decrease, whereas the malate content tended to increase in ripening fruits of the RNAi lines compared with the wild type. These results indicate that activation of the gluconeogenesis pathway from organic acids to sugars occurs during ripening but is suppressed by the knocking down of the PEPCK gene, suggesting that PEPCK participates in determining the sugar/acid ratio in ripening fruit. PMID:26381194

  13. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Mediated by a Plastid Inner Envelope Phosphoenolpyruvate/Phosphate Translocator CUE1 in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Xiaozhi; Cao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Zhizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) lead to the transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of ProRD29A:LUC (LUCIFERASE) and Pro35S:NPTII (Neomycin Phosphotransferase II) reporter genes. We performed a genetic screen to find suppressors of ros1 that identified two mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN UNDEREXPRESSED1 (CUE1) gene, which encodes a plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator. The cue1 mutations released the TGS of Pro35S:NPTII and the transcriptionally silent endogenous locus TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION in a manner that was independent of DNA methylation but dependent on chromatin modification. The cue1 mutations did not affect the TGS of ProRD29A:LUC in ros1, which was dependent on RNA-directed DNA methylation. It is possible that signals from chloroplasts help to regulate the epigenetic status of a subset of genomic loci in the nucleus. PMID:19515789

  14. [Activity of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat leaves under water stress].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I; Monakhova, O F

    2006-01-01

    The activities of NADP: glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme complex comprising of phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPK; EC 4.1.1.31) in seedlings and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants of the cultivars Mironovskaya 808 and Lutescens 758 have been compared under conditions of normal water supply, water deficiency, and subsequent rehydration. GAPDH activity, which determines the carbohydrate route of photosynthetic metabolism at the initial stages, is decreased by water stress to a greater extent than that of PEPK, on the activity of which non-carbohydrate metabolic pathways depend. Pretreatment of seedlings and mature plants with natural (6-benzylaminopurine) and synthetic (tidiazuron, kartolin-2, and kartolin-4) cytokinins attenuates the loss of enzyme activities during drought and facilitates their recovery within the period of rehydration; both effects are underlain by augmentation of reparation processes. The relative intensification of non-carbohydrate pathways of photosynthetic metabolism, observed under conditions of water deficiency, is accompanied by an increase in the osmotic pressure of cell sap. Possible mechanisms of this protector effect of cytokinin preparations are discussed. PMID:16878554

  15. Cloning and expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from a cestode parasite and its solubilization from inclusion bodies using l-arginine.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Asim K; Ramnath; Dkhar, Barilin; Tandon, Veena; Das, Bidyadhar

    2016-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is an essential regulatory enzyme of glycolysis in the cestode parasite, Raillietina echinobothrida, and is considered a potential target for anthelmintic action because of its differential activity from that of its avian host. However, due to the unavailability of its structure, the mechanism of regulation of PEPCK from R. echinobothrida (rePEPCK) and its interaction with possible modulators remain unclear. Hence, in this study, the rePEPCK gene was cloned into pGEX-4T-3 and overexpressed for its characterization. On being induced by IPTG, the recombinant rePEPCK was expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs); hence, various agents, like different inducer concentrations, temperature, time, host cell types, culture media, pH, and additives, were used to bring the protein to soluble form. Finally, a significant amount (∼46%) of rePEPCK was solubilized from IBs by adding 2M l-arginine. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra analysis indicated that l-arginine (2M) had no effect on the conformation of the protein. In this study, we have reported a yield of ∼73mg of purified rePEPCK per 1L of culture. The purified rePEPCK retained its biological activity, and Km of the enzyme for its substrate was determined and discussed. The availability of recombinant rePEPCK may help in biochemical- and biophysical-studies to explore its molecular mechanisms and regulations. PMID:26363119

  16. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  17. Raspberry leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry leaf curl virus (RLCV) is limited to hosts in the genus Rubus and is transmitted persistently by the small raspberry aphid, Aphis rubicola Oestlund. It is found only in North America, principally in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada and in the Rocky Mountain regions of...

  18. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  19. The pepper phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CaPEPCK1 is involved in plant immunity against bacterial and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a member of the lyase family, is involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms. Although the major function of PEPCK in gluconeogenesis is well established, it is unclear whether this enzyme is involved in plant immunity. Here, we isolated and identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) PEPCK (CaPEPCK1) gene from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPEPCK1 was strongly expressed in pepper leaves during the incompatible interaction with avirulent Xcv and in response to environmental stresses, especially salicylic acid (SA) treatment. PEPCK activity was low in healthy leaves but dramatically increased in avirulent Xcv-infected leaves. Knock-down expression of CaPEPCK1 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in high levels of susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. CaPEPCK1 silencing in pepper compromised induction of the basal defense-marker genes CaPR1 (pathogenesis-related 1 protein), CaPR10 (pathogenesis-related 10 protein) and CaDEF1 (defensin) during Xcv infection. SA accumulation was also significantly suppressed in the CaPEPCK1-silenced pepper leaves infected with Xcv. CaPEPCK1 in an Arabidopsis overexpression (OX) line inhibited the proliferation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). CaPEPCK1-OX plants developed more rapidly, with enlarged leaves, compared to wild-type plants. The T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis orthologous mutants pck1-3 and pck1-4 were more susceptible to the bacterial Pst and oomycete Hpa pathogens than the wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPEPCK positively contributes to plant innate immunity against hemibiotrophic bacterial and obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens. PMID:26233534

  20. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function. PMID:24600021

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 gene (Pck1) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yin, Qiuyuan; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  2. Mechanisms of Activation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Escherichia coli by Ca2+ and of Desensitization by Trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Sudom, Athena; Walters, Robert; Pastushok, Landon; Goldie, Douglas; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T. J.; Goldie, Hughes

    2003-01-01

    The 1.8-Å resolution structure of the ATP-Mg2+-Ca2+-pyruvate quinary complex of Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is isomorphous to the published complex ATP-Mg2+-Mn2+-pyruvate-PCK, except for the Ca2+ and Mn2+ binding sites. Ca2+ was formerly implicated as a possible allosteric regulator of PCK, binding at the active site and at a surface activating site (Glu508 and Glu511). This report found that Ca2+ bound only at the active site, indicating that there is likely no surface allosteric site. 45Ca2+ bound to PCK with a Kd of 85 μM and n of 0.92. Glu508Gln Glu511Gln mutant PCK had normal activation by Ca2+. Separate roles of Mg2+, which binds the nucleotide, and Ca2+, which bridges the nucleotide and the anionic substrate, are implied, and the catalytic mechanism of PCK is better explained by studies of the Ca2+-bound structure. Partial trypsin digestion abolishes Ca2+ activation (desensitizes PCK). N-terminal sequencing identified sensitive sites, i.e., Arg2 and Arg396. Arg2Ser, Arg396Ser, and Arg2Ser Arg396Ser (double mutant) PCKs altered the kinetics of desensitization. C-terminal residues 397 to 540 were removed by trypsin when wild-type PCK was completely desensitized. Phe409 and Phe413 interact with residues in the Ca2+ binding site, probably stabilizing the C terminus. Phe409Ala, ΔPhe409, Phe413Ala, Δ397-521 (deletion of residues 397 to 521), Arg396(TAA) (stop codon), and Asp269Glu (Ca2+ site) mutations failed to desensitize PCK and, with the exception of Phe409Ala, appeared to have defects in the synthesis or assembly of PCK, suggesting that the structure of the C-terminal domain is important in these processes. PMID:12837799

  3. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase 1 Gene (Pck1) Displays Parallel Evolution between Old World and New World Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  4. Hepatic nuclear factor 3 is an accessory factor required for the stimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Strömstedt, P E; O'Brien, R M; Granner, D K

    1996-07-01

    Transcription of the hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene is stimulated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. The glucocorticoid response is mediated by a complex glucocorticoid response unit that consists of two glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding sites (GR1 and GR2) and two accessory factor-binding sites (AF1 and AF2). The complete unit is required for the full glucocorticoid response. The dominant insulin effect is mediated in part through an insulin response sequence that is coincident with the AF2 element. Members of the hepatic nuclear factor 3 (HNF3) and CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) families bind to the AF2 element; however, there is no correlation between binding of these factors and the ability of the AF2 element to mediate an insulin response. We show here that binding of HNF3 does correlate with the stimulation of the glucocorticoid response by the AF2 element and that C/EBP is apparently not involved in this effect. This requirement for HNF3 is quite specific since the substitution of elements known to enhance the action of the GR in other promoters fails to recapitulate AF2 accessory factor activity. By contrast, an HNF3-binding site from the transthyretin gene is able to substitute for the wild type AF2 sequence and elicit a maximal glucocorticoid response. Based on current and previous observations, the glucocorticoid response unit consists of four DNA elements that bind four different proteins. These are: AF1 (hepatic nuclear factor 4/chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor), AF2 (HNF3), GR1 (GR), and GR2 (GR). PMID:8813720

  5. The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system: regulation by protein phosphorylation and phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, Josef; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  6. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  7. Co-expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase for succinate production in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Chen, Xu; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Wan, Qing; Wu, Mingke; Zhang, Hanwen; Ma, Jiangfeng; Chen, Kequan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-03-01

    Succinate is not the dominant fermentation product from xylose in wild-type Escherichia coli K12. E. coli BA 203 is a lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), pyruvate formate lyase (pflB), and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-carboxylase (ppc) deletion strain. To increase succinate accumulation and reduce byproduct formation, engineered E. coli BA204, in which ATP-forming PEP-carboxykinase (PEPCK) is overexpressed in BA203, was constructed and produced 2.17-fold higher succinate yield. To further improve the biomass and the consumption rate of xylose, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NAD(H), was also overexpressed. Thus, co-expression of PEPCK and NAPRTase in recombinant E. coli BA209 was investigated. In BA209, the pck gene and the pncB gene each have a trc promoter, hence, both genes are well expressed. During a 72-h anaerobic fermentation in sealed bottles, the total concentration of NAD(H) in BA209 was 1.25-fold higher than that in BA204, and the NADH/NAD+ ratio decreased from 0.28 to 0.11. During the exclusively anaerobic fermentation in a 3-L bioreactor, BA209 consumed 17.1 g L⁻¹ xylose and produced 15.5 g L⁻¹ succinate. Furthermore, anaerobic fermentation of corn stalk hydrolysate contained 30.1 g L⁻¹ xylose, 2.1 g L⁻¹ glucose and 1.5 g L⁻¹ arabinose, it produced a final succinate concentration of 17.2 g L⁻¹ with a yield of 0.94 g g⁻¹ total sugars. PMID:24564896

  8. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  9. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Escherichia coli Ketopantoate Hydroxymethyltransferase Crystal Structure Confirms that It Is a Member of the (βα)8 Phosphoenolpyruvate/Pyruvate Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schmitzberger, Florian; Smith, Alison G.; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L.

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase (KPHMT) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis pathway of pantothenate (vitamin B5), the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group onto α-ketoisovalerate. Here we describe a detailed comparative analysis of the KPHMT crystal structure and the identification of structural homologues, some of which have remarkable similarities in their active sites, modes of binding to substrates, and mechanisms. We show that KPHMT forms a family within the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate superfamily. Based on the analysis, we propose that in this superfamily there should be a subdivision into two groups. This paper completes our structural analysis of the E. coli enzymes in the pantothenate pathway. PMID:12837791

  11. Leaf development: a cellular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kalve, Shweta; De Vos, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny) from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins, and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25132838

  12. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture...

  13. Insight into the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate mutase catalysis derived from site-directed mutagenesis studies of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y; Lu, Z; Huang, K; Herzberg, O; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1999-10-26

    PEP mutase catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate in biosynthetic pathways leading to phosphonate secondary metabolites. A recent X-ray structure [Huang, K., Li, Z., Jia, Y., Dunaway-Mariano, D., and Herzberg, O. (1999) Structure (in press)] of the Mytilus edulis enzyme complexed with the Mg(II) cofactor and oxalate inhibitor reveals an alpha/beta-barrel backbone-fold housing an active site in which Mg(II) is bound by the two carboxylate groups of the oxalate ligand and the side chain of D85 and, via bridging water molecules, by the side chains of D58, D85, D87, and E114. The oxalate ligand, in turn, interacts with the side chains of R159, W44, and S46 and the backbone amide NHs of G47 and L48. Modeling studies identified two feasible PEP binding modes: model A in which PEP replaces oxalate with its carboxylate group interacting with R159 and its phosphoryl group positioned close to D58 and Mg(II) shifting slightly from its original position in the crystal structure, and model B in which PEP replaces oxalate with its phosphoryl group interacting with R159 and Mg(II) retaining its original position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the key mutase active site residues (R159, D58, D85, D87, and E114) were carried out in order to evaluate the catalytic roles predicted by the two models. The observed retention of low catalytic activity in the mutants R159A, D85A, D87A, and E114A, coupled with the absence of detectable catalytic activity in D58A, was interpreted as evidence for model A in which D58 functions in nucleophilic catalysis (phosphoryl transfer), R159 functions in PEP carboxylate group binding, and the carboxylates of D85, D87 and E114 function in Mg(II) binding. These results also provide evidence against model B in which R159 serves to mediate the phosphoryl transfer. A catalytic motif, which could serve both the phosphoryl transfer and the C-C cleavage enzymes of the PEP mutase superfamily, is proposed. PMID:10571990

  14. Synthesis of HPr(Ser-P)(His-P) by enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Casabon, Israël; Couture, Manon; Vaillancourt, Katy; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2006-05-30

    HPr is a protein of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS). In Gram-positive bacteria, HPr can be phosphorylated on Ser(46) by HPr(Ser) kinase/phosphorylase (HPrK/P) and on His(15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS. In vitro studies have shown that phosphorylation on one residue greatly inhibits the second phosphorylation. However, streptococci contain significant amounts of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P) during exponential growth, and recent studies suggest that phosphorylation of HPr(Ser-P) by EI is involved in the recycling of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P). We report in this paper a study on the phosphorylation of Streptococcus salivarius HPr, HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(S46D) by EI. Our results indicate that (i) the specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) of EI for HPr(Ser-P) at pH 7.9 was approximately 5000-fold smaller than that observed for HPr, (ii) no metabolic intermediates were able to stimulate HPr(Ser-P) phosphorylation, (iii) the rate of HPr phosphorylation decreased at pHs below 6.5, while that of HPr(Ser-P) increased and was almost 10-fold higher at pH 6.1 than at pH 7.9, (iv) HPr(S46D), a mutated HPr alleged to mimic HPr(Ser-P), was also phosphorylated more efficiently under acidic conditions, and, lastly, (v) phosphorylation of Bacillus subtilis HPr(Ser-P) by B. subtilis EI was also stimulated at acidic pH. Our results suggest that the high levels of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P) in streptococci result from the combination of two factors, a high physiological concentration of HPr(Ser-P) and stimulation of HPr(Ser-P) phosphorylation by EI at acidic pH, an intracellular condition that occurs in response to the acidification of the external medium during growth of the culture. PMID:16716080

  15. Physiological and Transcriptional Characterization of Escherichia Coli Strains Lacking Interconversion of Phosphoenolpyruvate and Pyruvate When Glucose and Acetate are Coutilized

    PubMed Central

    Sabido, Andrea; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Flores, Noemí; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is a precursor involved in the biosynthesis of aromatics and other valuable compounds in Escherichia coli. The PEP:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the major glucose transport system and the largest PEP consumer. To increase intracellular PEP availability for aromatics production purposes, mutant strains of E. coli JM101 devoid of the ptsHIcrr operon (PB11 strain) have been previously generated. In this derivative, transport and growth rate on glucose decreased significantly. A laboratory evolved strain derived from PB11 that partially recovered its growth capacity on glucose was named PB12. In the present study, we blocked carbon skeletons interchange between PEP and pyruvate (PYR) in these ptsHIcrr− strains by deleting the pykA, pykF, and ppsA genes. The PB11 pykAF− ppsA− strain exhibited no growth on glucose or acetate alone, but it was viable when both substrates were consumed simultaneously. In contrast, the PB12 pykAF− ppsA− strain displayed a low growth rate on glucose or acetate alone, but in the mixture, growth was significantly improved. RT-qPCR expression analysis of PB11 pykAF− ppsA− growing with both carbon sources showed a downregulation of all central metabolic pathways compared with its parental PB11 strain. Under the same conditions, transcription of most of the genes in PB12 pykAF− ppsA− did not change, and few like aceBAK, sfcA, and poxB were overexpressed compared with PB12. We explored the aromatics production capabilities of both ptsHIcrr− pykAF− ppsA− strains and the engineered PB12 pykAF− ppsA− tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA enhanced the yield of aromatic compounds when coutilizing glucose and acetate compared with the control strain PB12 tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1150–1160. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24375081

  16. On the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PEPs) and its inhibition by sodium fluoride: potential magnesium and aluminum fluoride complexes of phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicole E; Jakeman, David L

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPs) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) using a two-step mechanism invoking a phosphorylated-His intermediate. Formation of PEP is an initial step in gluconeogenesis, and PEPs is essential for growth of Escherichia coli on 3-carbon sources such as pyruvate. The production of PEPs has also been linked to bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. As such, PEPs is of interest as a target for antibiotic development, and initial investigations of PEPs have indicated inhibition by sodium fluoride. Similar inhibition has been observed in a variety of phospho-transfer enzymes through the formation of metal fluoride complexes within the active site. Herein we quantify the inhibitory capacity of sodium fluoride through a coupled spectrophotometric assay. The observed inhibition provides indirect evidence for the formation of a MgF3(-) complex within the enzyme active site and insight into the phospho-transfer mechanism of PEPs. The effect of AlCl3 on PEPs enzyme activity was also assessed and found to decrease substrate binding and turnover. PMID:25707819

  17. The artificial leaf.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  18. Integration of Lupinus angustifolius L. (narrow-leafed lupin) genome maps and comparative mapping within legumes.

    PubMed

    Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Książkiewicz, Michał; Szczepaniak, Anna; Susek, Karolina; Podkowiński, Jan; Naganowska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) has recently been considered a reference genome for the Lupinus genus. In the present work, genetic and cytogenetic maps of L. angustifolius were supplemented with 30 new molecular markers representing lupin genome regions, harboring genes involved in nitrogen fixation during the symbiotic interaction of legumes and soil bacteria (Rhizobiaceae). Our studies resulted in the precise localization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) carrying sequence variants for early nodulin 40, nodulin 26, nodulin 45, aspartate aminotransferase P2, asparagine synthetase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. Together with previously mapped chromosomes, the integrated L. angustifolius map encompasses 73 chromosome markers, including 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 45S rDNA, and anchors 20 L. angustifolius linkage groups to corresponding chromosomes. Chromosomal identification using BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization identified two BAC clones as narrow-leafed lupin centromere-specific markers, which served as templates for preliminary studies of centromere composition within the genus. Bioinformatic analysis of these two BACs revealed that centromeric/pericentromeric regions of narrow-leafed lupin chromosomes consisted of simple sequence repeats ordered into tandem repeats containing the trinucleotide and pentanucleotide simple sequence repeats AGG and GATAC, structured into long arrays. Moreover, cross-genus microsynteny analysis revealed syntenic patterns of 31 single-locus BAC clones among several legume species. The gene and chromosome level findings provide evidence of ancient duplication events that must have occurred very early in the divergence of papilionoid lineages. This work provides a strong foundation for future comparative mapping among legumes and may facilitate understanding of mechanisms involved in shaping legume chromosomes. PMID:27168155

  19. Exserohilum Leaf Spot on Tigergrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tigergrass (Thysanolaena maxima (Roxb.) Kuntze ) is a popular ornamental grass grown throughout landscapes in South Florida. In the summer of 2006, a leaf spot was observed on tigergrass in the landscape and a commercial nursery in Homestead, FL. The causal agent of the leaf spot was isolated, cha...

  20. How to pattern a leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, an...

  1. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  2. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  3. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Rujin

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies. PMID:27135488

  4. Differentiation of C4 photosynthesis along a leaf developmental gradient in two Cleome species having different forms of Kranz anatomy.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Cousins, Asaph B; Edwards, Gerald E

    2014-07-01

    In family Cleomaceae there are NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 species having different forms of leaf anatomy. Leaves of Cleome angustifolia have Glossocardioid-type anatomy with a single complex Kranz unit which surrounds all the veins, while C. gynandra has Atriplicoid anatomy with multiple Kranz units, each surrounding an individual vein. Biochemical and ultrastructural differentiation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells were studied along a developmental gradient, from the leaf base (youngest) to the tip (mature). Initially, there is cell-specific expression of certain photosynthetic enzymes, which subsequently increase along with structural differentiation. At the base of the leaf, following division of ground tissue to form M and BS cells which are structurally similar, there is selective localization of Rubisco and glycine decarboxylase to BS cells. Thus, a biochemical C3 default stage, with Rubisco expression in both cell types, does not occur. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is selectively expressed in M cells near the base. Surprisingly, in both species, an additional layer of spongy M cells on the abaxial side of the leaf has the same differentiation with PEPC, even though it is not in contact with BS cells. During development along the longitudinal gradient there is structural differentiation of the cells, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, resulting in complete formation of Kranz anatomy. In both species, development of the C4 system occurs similarly, irrespective of having very different types of Kranz anatomy, different ontogenetic origins of BS and M, and independent evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:24550438

  5. Differentiation of C4 photosynthesis along a leaf developmental gradient in two Cleome species having different forms of Kranz anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Koteyeva, Nuria K.; Voznesenskaya, Elena V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2014-01-01

    In family Cleomaceae there are NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 species having different forms of leaf anatomy. Leaves of Cleome angustifolia have Glossocardioid-type anatomy with a single complex Kranz unit which surrounds all the veins, while C. gynandra has Atriplicoid anatomy with multiple Kranz units, each surrounding an individual vein. Biochemical and ultrastructural differentiation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells were studied along a developmental gradient, from the leaf base (youngest) to the tip (mature). Initially, there is cell-specific expression of certain photosynthetic enzymes, which subsequently increase along with structural differentiation. At the base of the leaf, following division of ground tissue to form M and BS cells which are structurally similar, there is selective localization of Rubisco and glycine decarboxylase to BS cells. Thus, a biochemical C3 default stage, with Rubisco expression in both cell types, does not occur. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is selectively expressed in M cells near the base. Surprisingly, in both species, an additional layer of spongy M cells on the abaxial side of the leaf has the same differentiation with PEPC, even though it is not in contact with BS cells. During development along the longitudinal gradient there is structural differentiation of the cells, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, resulting in complete formation of Kranz anatomy. In both species, development of the C4 system occurs similarly, irrespective of having very different types of Kranz anatomy, different ontogenetic origins of BS and M, and independent evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:24550438

  6. Cloning, expression, purification and physical and kinetic characterization of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from orange (Citrus sinensis osbeck var. Valencia) fruit juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Valeria E; Figueroa, Carlos M; Andreo, Carlos S; Iglesias, Alberto A; Podestá, Florencio E

    2010-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPCase) from orange fruit juice sacs has been cloned and heterogously expressed in high yield. The purified recombinant enzyme displays properties typical of plant PEPCase, including activation by sugar phosphates and inhibition by malate and citrate. Malate inhibition is weak in the physiological pH range, and the enzyme is also poorly affected by Glu and Asp, known inhibitors of C(3) plants PEPCases. However, it is strongly inhibited by citrate. Orange fruit PEPCase phosphorylation by mammalian protein kinase A decreased inhibition by malate. The enzyme presents an unusual high molecular mass in the absence of PEP, while in its presence it displays a more common tetrameric arrangement. The overall properties of the enzyme suggest that it is suited for organic acid synthesis and NADH reoxidation in the mature fruit. The present study provides the first analysis of a recombinant fruit PEPCase. PMID:21802611

  7. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance. PMID:24276159

  8. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV-V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  9. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. PMID:26712095

  10. Activities of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and 14C-Bicarbonate Fixation during in Vitro Culture of Pinus radiata Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash P.; Bender, Ludwig; Thorpe, Trevor A.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), as indicators of autotrophic and nonautotrophic CO2 fixation, were measured in excised cotyledons of Pinus radiata D. Don cultured for 21 days under shoot-forming (SF) and nonshoot-forming (NSF) conditions. The activity of RuBPC was found to increase in both SF and NSF cultures during the initial 5 days of culture. However, it leveled off from day 5 to day 10 and subsequently began to decrease until the end of the culture period under the SF conditions. In contrast, in the NSF cultures, RuBPC activity increased until day 15, when it was twofold higher than the maximum activity found in the SF cultures. An increase in PEPC activity of about 2.5 times the level of activity in freshly excised cotyledons was observed during the initial 5 days of culture under the SF conditions. PEPC activity began to decline after day 5 until it reached the level of activity seen in NSF cotyledons by day 15. In contrast, the activity of PEPC did not show any significant increase during the initial 10 days of culture under the NSF conditions. The Km (phosphoenolpyruvate) of PEPC from SF cotyledons was about 35% higher than that of NSF cotyledons. Cotyledons from two culture periods (days 5 and 15) were incubated for 15 seconds with NaH14CO3. The label in the malate and asparatate fractions as a percentage of total 14C incorporation was 3 times higher in the SF cotyledons than in the NSF cotyledons. A higher incorporation of 14C into products of photosynthesis under the NSF conditions was also observed. PMID:16666206

  11. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  12. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) is a pro-survival, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response gene involved in tumor cell adaptation to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Hyroššová, Petra; Novellasdemunt, Laura; Viñals, Francesc; Perales, Jose C

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M), encoded by the nuclear PCK2 gene, links TCA cycle intermediates and glycolytic pools through the conversion of mitochondrial oxaloacetate into phosphoenolpyruvate. In the liver PEPCK-M adjoins its profusely studied cytosolic isoform (PEPCK-C) potentiating gluconeogenesis and TCA flux. However, PEPCK-M is present in a variety of non-gluconeogenic tissues, including tumors of several origins. Despite its potential relevance to cancer metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for PCK2 gene regulation have not been elucidated. The present study demonstrates PEPCK-M overexpression in tumorigenic cells as well as the mechanism for the modulation of PCK2 abundance under several stress conditions. Amino acid limitation and ER stress inducers, conditions that activate the amino acid response (AAR) and the unfolded protein response (UPR), stimulate PCK2 gene transcription. Both the AAR and UPR lead to increased synthesis of ATF4, which mediates PCK2 transcriptional up-regulation through its binding to a putative ATF/CRE composite site within the PCK2 promoter functioning as an amino acid response element. In addition, activation of the GCN2-eIF2α-ATF4 and PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signaling pathways are responsible for increased PEPCK-M levels. Finally, PEPCK-M knockdown using either siRNA or shRNA were sufficient to reduce MCF7 mammary carcinoma cell growth and increase cell death under glutamine deprivation or ER stress conditions. Our data demonstrate that this enzyme has a critical role in the survival program initiated upon stress and shed light on an unexpected and important role of mitochondrial PEPCK in cancer metabolism. PMID:24973213

  13. Sequence analyses and evolutionary relationships among the energy-coupling proteins Enzyme I and HPr of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Hoischen, C.; Reizer, A.; Pham, T. N.; Saier, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported the overexpression, purification, and biochemical properties of the Bacillus subtilis Enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) (Reizer, J., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 9158-9169). We now report the sequencing of the ptsI gene of B. subtilis encoding Enzyme I (570 amino acids and 63,076 Da). Putative transcriptional regulatory signals are identified, and the pts operon is shown to be subject to carbon source-dependent regulation. Multiple alignments of the B. subtilis Enzyme I with (1) six other sequenced Enzymes I of the PTS from various bacterial species, (2) phosphoenolpyruvate synthase of Escherichia coli, and (3) bacterial and plant pyruvate: phosphate dikinases (PPDKs) revealed regions of sequence similarity as well as divergence. Statistical analyses revealed that these three types of proteins comprise a homologous family, and the phylogenetic tree of the 11 sequenced protein members of this family was constructed. This tree was compared with that of the 12 sequence HPr proteins or protein domains. Antibodies raised against the B. subtilis and E. coli Enzymes I exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with each other as well as with PPDK of Bacteroides symbiosus, providing support for the evolutionary relationships of these proteins suggested from the sequence comparisons. Putative flexible linkers tethering the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of protein members of the Enzyme I family were identified, and their potential significance with regard to Enzyme I function is discussed. The codon choice pattern of the B. subtilis and E. coli ptsI and ptsH genes was found to exhibit a bias toward optimal codons in these organisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7686067

  14. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  15. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  19. Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling using Fresnel's equation (Kumar and Silva, 1973) and Snell's Law successfully approximated the spectral curve for a 0.25-mm turgid oak leaf lying on a Halon background. Calculations were made for ten interfaces, air-wax, wax-cellulose, cellulose-water, cellulose-air, air-water, and their inverses. A water path of 0.5 mm yielded acceptable results, and it was found that assignment of more weight to those interfaces involving air versus water or cellulose, and less to those involving wax, decreased the standard deviation of the error for all wavelengths. Data suggest that the air-cell interface is not the only important contributor to the overall reflectance of a leaf. Results also argue against the assertion that the near infrared plateau is a function of cell structure within the leaf.

  20. Photoperiodism and Crassulacean acid metabolism : II. Relations between leaf aging and photoperiod in Crassulacean acid metabolism induction.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Guerrier, D; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Measurements of net CO2 exchange, malate accumulation, properties and capacity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) in leaves of different ages of two short-day dependent Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom thumb and K. velutina Welw.) show that, in both species: a) young leaves from plants grown under long days display a CO2 exchange pattern typical of C3 plants; b) leaf aging promotes CAM under long-day conditions; c) short-day treatment induces CAM in young leaves to a higher degree than aging under long days; d) at least in K. blossfeldiana, the PEPC form developed with leaf aging under long days and the enzyme form synthetized de novo in young leaves grown under short days were shown to have similar properties. Short days also promote CAM in older leaves though at a lesser extent than in young leaves: The result is that this photoperiodic treatment increases the general level of CAM performance by the whole plant. The physiological meaning of the control of PEPC capacity by photoperiodism could be to afford a precisely timed seasonal increase in CAM potentiality, enabling the plant to immediately optimize its response to the onset of drought periods. PMID:24276160

  1. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  2. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  3. Leaf proteomic analysis of three rice heritable mutants after seed space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Gu, D. P.; Zheng, Q.; Sun, Y. Q.

    2008-09-01

    To explore the proteomic changes of heritable variant rice plants induced by space environment, three mutants were selected after seed space flight by comparing the phenotypes with their on-ground controls. R955 grew more tillers and became dwarf, 971-5 acquired higher grain yield and better stress resistance, 974-5 matured earlier. Leaf proteins were extracted during the tiller development and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). More than 300 proteins were detected as reproducible Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained spots with p I values from around 4.0 to 7.0. Five proteins that changed significantly over the controls were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The main functions of these proteins were photosynthesis, stress defense and metabolism including RuBisCO activase, glycine rich RNA binding protein, peroxidase, triosephosphate isomerase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which might be probably associated with the altered phenotypes. Quantitative analyses were also applied: less total protein spots and more down-regulated protein spots were detected in the mutants, indicating there might be a major loss of protein in heritable variant rice plants after seed space flight. These results may provide new insights to understand the biological effects of space environment to rice.

  4. Leaf nitrogen dioxide uptake coupling apoplastic chemistry, carbon/sulfur assimilation, and plant nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanbo; Sun, Guangyu

    2010-10-01

    Emission and plant uptake of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO + NO(2)) significantly influence regional climate change by regulating the oxidative chemistry of the lower atmosphere, species composition and the recycling of carbon and nutrients, etc. Plant uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) is concentration-dependent and species-specific, and covaries with environmental factors. An important factor determining NO(2) influx into leaves is the replenishment of the substomatal cavity. The apoplastic chemistry of the substomatal cavity plays crucial roles in NO(2) deposition rates and the tolerance to NO(2), involving the reactions between NO(2) and apoplastic antioxidants, NO(2)-responsive germin-like proteins, apoplastic acidification, and nitrite-dependent NO synthesis, etc. Moreover, leaf apoplast is a favorable site for the colonization by microbes, which disturbs nitrogen metabolism of host plants. For most plant species, NO(2) assimilation in a leaf primarily depends on the nitrate (NO(3) (-)) assimilation pathway. NO(2)-N assimilation is coupled with carbon and sulfur (sulfate and SO(2)) assimilation as indicated by the mutual needs for metabolic intermediates (or metabolites) and the NO(2)-caused changes of key metabolic enzymes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, organic acids, and photorespiration. Moreover, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization improves the tolerance of host plants to NO(2) by enhancing the efficiency of nutrient absorption and translocation and influencing foliar chemistry. Further progress is proposed to gain a better understanding of the coordination between NO(2)-N, S and C assimilation, especially the investigation of metabolic checkpoints, and the effects of photorespiratory nitrogen cycle, diverse PEPc and the metabolites such as cysteine, O-acetylserine (OAS) and glutathione. PMID:20628880

  5. Functional relationships of leafing intensity to plant height, growth form and leaf habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, En-Rong; Milla, Rubén; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Leafing intensity, i.e. the number of leaves per unit of stem volume or mass, is a common developmental correlate of leaf size. However, the ecological significance and the functional implications of variation in leafing intensity, other than its relation to leaf size, are unknown. Here, we explore its relationships with plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit to test a series of corollaries derived from the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. Volume-based leafing intensities and plant heights were recorded for 109 woody species from the subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests of eastern China. In addition, we compiled leafing intensity data from published literature, and combined it with our data to form a 398 species dataset, to test for differences of leafing intensity between plant growth forms (i.e. herbaceous and woody) and leaf habits (i.e. deciduous and evergreens). Leafing intensity was negatively correlated with plant height and individual leaf mass. Volume-based leafing intensities were significantly higher in herbaceous species than in woody species, and also higher in deciduous than in evergreen woody species. In conclusion, leafing intensity relates strongly to plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit in directions generally in accordance to the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. These results can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of adaptive strategies involving response to herbivory, competitive ability for light and reproductive economy.

  6. How to pattern a leaf.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, N; O'Connor, D; Moon, J; Lewis, M; Hake, S

    2012-01-01

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, and function, all leaves initiate in the same manner: from the flanks of a meristem. The maize leaf is useful for analysis of patterning due to the wealth of mutants and the distinct tissues along the proximal distal axis. The blade is distal, the sheath is proximal, and the ligule forms at the blade/sheath boundary. Establishment of this boundary involves the transcription factors LIGULELESS1 and LIGULELESS2 and the kinase LIGULELESS NARROW. The meristem-specific protein KNOTTED1 (KN1) binds and modulates the lg2 gene. Given the localization of KN1 at the proximal end of the leaf from the time of inception, we hypothesize that KN1 has a role in establishing the very proximal end of the leaf, whereas an auxin maximum guides the growing distal tip. PMID:23174765

  7. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  8. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  9. Relationships between sugarcane leaf hyperspectral reflectance, leaf nitrogen content, and yield components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spectral reflectance has been used to estimate crop leaf chemical composition and other physiological characters. Leaf reflectance of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) may be of use in evaluating genotypes. The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify sugarcane genotypic variation in leaf hypers...

  10. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  11. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past five or so years blueberry growers in south Mississippi have discovered the disease Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot on some of their blueberry plants. In the past this disease was considered to be of minor importance occurring infrequently on isolated farms. But in recent years it ...

  12. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  14. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  17. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  1. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  7. Tree branch angle: maximizing effective leaf area.

    PubMed

    Honda, H; Fisher, J B

    1978-02-24

    In a computer simulation of branching pattern and leaf cluster in Terminalia catappa, right and left branch angles were varied, and the effective leaf surface areas were calculated. Theoretical branch angles that result in maximum effective leaf area are close to the values observed in nature. PMID:17757590

  8. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022...

  12. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277...

  13. Comparison of half and full-leaf shape feature extraction for leaf classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainin, Mohd Shamrie; Ahmad, Faudziah; Alfred, Rayner

    2016-08-01

    Shape is the main information for leaf feature that most of the current literatures in leaf identification utilize the whole leaf for feature extraction and to be used in the leaf identification process. In this paper, study of half-leaf features extraction for leaf identification is carried out and the results are compared with the results obtained from the leaf identification based on a full-leaf features extraction. Identification and classification is based on shape features that are represented as cosines and sinus angles. Six single classifiers obtained from WEKA and seven ensemble methods are used to compare their performance accuracies over this data. The classifiers were trained using 65 leaves in order to classify 5 different species of preliminary collection of Malaysian medicinal plants. The result shows that half-leaf features extraction can be used for leaf identification without decreasing the predictive accuracy.

  14. Phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in plants. Studies in plants with C4 photosynthesis and Crassulacean acid metabolism and in germinating seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, R P; Leegood, R C

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is phosphorylated in vivo in the cotyledons of darkened cucumber seedlings and that phosphorylation is reversed by light [Walker and Leegood (1995) FEBS Lett. 362, 70-74]. In this study the molecular mass of PEPCK was estimated in a range of gluconeogenic seedlings and in leaves of C4 plants and plants with Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Phosphorylation of PEPCK was studied in these plants by feeding tissues with [32P]Pi and assessing phosphorylation by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography of either total proteins or of immunoprecipitated protein. In gluconeogenic seedlings and most CAM plants PEPCK had a molecular mass of 74 kDa, whereas in C4 grasses the molecular mass of PEPCK was always smaller and varied from 67-71 kDa. In all gluconeogenic seedlings and leaves of CAM plants PEPCK was phosphorylated, but it was not phosphorylated in all species of C4 grasses studied. In CAM plants, phosphorylation of PEPCK occurred at night and dephosphorylation occurred during the day. In C4 grasses phosphorylation occurred when leaves were darkened and the enzyme was dephosphorylated following illumination, but it was only phosphorylated in those plants with larger (71 kDa) molecular mass forms of PEPCK. PMID:8760346

  15. Impact of the core components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, HPr and EI, on differential protein expression in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Kaddor, Chlud; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    In Ralstonia eutropha H16, seven genes encoding proteins being involved in the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified. In order to provide more insights into the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-leaky phenotype of the HPr/EI deletion mutants H16ΔptsH, H16ΔptsI, and H16ΔptsHI when grown on the non-PTS substrate gluconate, parallel fermentations for comparison of their growth behavior were performed. Samples from the exponential, the early stationary, and late stationary growth phases were investigated by microscopy, gas chromatography and (phospho-) proteome analysis. A total of 71 differentially expressed proteins were identified using 2D-PAGE, Pro-Q Diamond and Coomassie staining, and MALDI-TOF analysis. Detected proteins were classified into five major functional groups: carbon metabolism, energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, translation, and membrane transport/outer membrane proteins. Proteome analyses revealed enhanced expression of proteins involved in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in subsequent reactions in cells of strain H16 compared to the mutant H16ΔptsHI. Furthermore, proteins involved in PHB accumulation showed increased abundance in the wild-type. This expression pattern allowed us to identify proteins affecting carbon metabolism/PHB biosynthesis in strain H16 and translation/amino acid metabolism in strain H16ΔptsHI, and to gain insight into the molecular response of R. eutropha to the deletion of HPr/EI. PMID:22630130

  16. Integration and expression of Sorghum C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and chloroplastic NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase separately or together in C(3) potato plants(1).

    PubMed

    Beaujean, A; Issakidis-Bourguet, E; Catterou, M; Dubois, F; Sangwan, R S.; Sangwan-Norreel, B S.

    2001-05-01

    We have integrated two cDNAs expressing Sorghum photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C(4)-PEPC) and NADP-malate dehydrogenase (cpMDH), two key enzymes involved in the primary carbon fixation pathway of NADP-malic enzyme-type C(4) plants, separately or together into a C(3) plant (potato). Analysis of the transgenic plants showed a 1.5-fold increase in PEPC and cpMDH activities compared to untransformed plants. Immunolocalization confirmed an increase at the protein level of these two enzymes in the transgenic plants and indicated that the Sorghum cpMDH was specifically addressed to the chloroplasts of potato mesophyll cells. However, integration of either or both of the cDNAs into the potato genome did not appear to significantly modify either tuber starch grain content or the rate of photosynthetic O(2) production compared to control untransformed plants. The low level of transgene expression probably explains the lack of influence on carbon metabolism and photosynthetic rates. This general observation suggests that some complex mechanism may regulate the level of production of foreign C(4) metabolism enzymes in C(3) plants. PMID:11337077

  17. Tissue-specific, developmental, hormonal, and dietary regulation of rat phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-human growth hormone fusion genes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Short, M K; Clouthier, D E; Schaefer, I M; Hammer, R E; Magnuson, M A; Beale, E G

    1992-01-01

    The cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene is expressed in multiple tissues and is regulated in a complex tissue-specific manner. To map the cis-acting DNA elements that direct this tissue-specific expression, we made transgenic mice containing truncated PEPCK-human growth hormone (hGH) fusion genes. The transgenes contained PEPCK promoter fragments with 5' endpoints at -2088, -888, -600, -402, and -207 bp, while the 3' endpoint was at +69 bp. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the -2088 transgene was expressed in the correct cell types (hepatocytes, proximal tubular epithelium of the kidney, villar epithelium of the small intestine, epithelium of the colon, smooth muscle of the vagina and lungs, ductal epithelium of the sublingual gland, and white and brown adipocytes). Solution hybridization of hGH mRNA expressed from the transgenes indicated that white and brown fat-specific elements are located distally (-2088 to -888 bp) and that liver-, gut-, and kidney-specific elements are located proximally (-600 to +69 bp). However, elements outside of the region tested are necessary for the correct developmental pattern and level of PEPCK expression in kidney. Both the -2088 and -402 transgenes responded in a tissue-specific manner to dietary stimuli, and the -2088 transgene responded to glucocorticoid stimuli. Thus, different tissues utilize distinct cell-specific cis-acting elements to direct and regulate the PEPCK gene. Images PMID:1545785

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase, a Key Enzyme That Controls Blood Glucose, Is a Target of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Shima, Akiho; Kuramoto, Daisuke; Kikumoto, Daisuke; Matsui, Takashi; Michihara, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes a committed and rate-limiting step in hepatic gluconeogenesis, and its activity is tightly regulated to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits. PEPCK activity is primarily regulated through hormonal control of gene transcription. Transcription is additionally regulated via a cAMP response unit, which includes a cAMP response element and four binding sites for CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP). Notably, the cAMP response unit also contains a putative response element for retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα). In this paper, we characterize the effect of the RORα response element on cAMP-induced transcription. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay indicates that RORα binds this response element in a sequence-specific manner. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays indicate that RORα interacts with C/EBP at the PEPCK promoter to synergistically enhance transcription. We also found that cAMP-induced transcription depends in part on RORα and its response element. In addition, we show that suppression of RORα by siRNA significantly decreased PEPCK transcription. Finally, we found that a RORα antagonist inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis in an in vitro glucose production assay. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that PEPCK is a direct RORα target. These results define possible new roles for RORα in hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:26383638

  19. The glycolytic genes pfk and pyk from Lactobacillus casei are induced by sugars transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and repressed by CcpA.

    PubMed

    Viana, Rosa; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Deutscher, Josef; Monedero, Vicente

    2005-09-01

    In Lactobacillus casei BL23, phosphofructokinase activity was higher in cells utilizing sugars transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The phosphofructokinase gene (pfk) was cloned from L. casei and shown to be clustered with the gene encoding pyruvate kinase (pyk). pfk and pyk genes are cotranscribed and induced upon growth on sugars transported by the PTS. Contrarily to the model proposed for Lactococcus lactis, where the global catabolite regulator protein (CcpA) is involved in PTS-induced transcription of pfk and pyk, a ccpA mutation resulted in a slight increase in pfk-pyk expression in L. casei. This weak regulation was evidenced by CcpA binding to a region of the pfk-pyk promoter which contained two cre sequences significantly deviated from the consensus. The PTS induction of pfk-pyk seems to be counteracted by the CcpA-mediated repression. Our results suggest that the need to accommodate the levels of pfk-pyk mRNA to the availability of sugars is fulfilled in L. casei by a PTS/CcpA-mediated signal transduction different from L. lactis. PMID:16075200

  20. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: Functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Xiaokuang; Davis, F.C.; Ingram, L.O.; Hespell, R.B.

    1997-02-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-{beta}-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-{beta}-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. 63 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  4. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  11. SPAD-based leaf nitrogen estimation is impacted by environmental factors and crop leaf characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Chen, Jia; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Wanlin; Ling, Xiaoxia; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll meters are widely used to guide nitrogen (N) management by monitoring leaf N status in agricultural systems, but the effects of environmental factors and leaf characteristics on leaf N estimations are still unclear. In the present study, we estimated the relationships among SPAD readings, chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area for seven species grown in multiple environments. There were similar relationships between SPAD readings and chlorophyll content per leaf area for the species groups, but the relationship between chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area, and the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area varied widely among the species groups. A significant impact of light-dependent chloroplast movement on SPAD readings was observed under low leaf N supplementation in both rice and soybean but not under high N supplementation. Furthermore, the allocation of leaf N to chlorophyll was strongly influenced by short-term changes in growth light. We demonstrate that the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area is profoundly affected by environmental factors and leaf features of crop species, which should be accounted for when using a chlorophyll meter to guide N management in agricultural systems. PMID:26303807

  12. Leaf physiognomy and climate: A multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. M.; Taylor, S. E.

    1980-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that leaf physiognomy is representative of the local or microclimate conditions under which plants grow. The physiognomy of leaf samples from Oregon, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, and the Panama Canal Zone has been related to the microclimate using Walter diagrams and Thornthwaite water-budget data. A technique to aid paleoclimatologists in identifying the nature of the microclimate from leaf physiognomy utilizes statistical procedures to classify leaf samples into one of six microclimate regimes based on leaf physiognomy information available from fossilized samples.

  13. Hormonal regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium.

    PubMed

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-10-15

    In addition to floral senescence and longevity, the control of leaf senescence is a major factor determining the quality of several cut flowers, including Lilium, in the commercial market. To better understand the physiological process underlying leaf senescence in this species, we evaluated: (i) endogenous variation in the levels of phytohormones during leaf senescence, (ii) the effects of leaf darkening in senescence and associated changes in phytohormones, and (iii) the effects of spray applications of abscisic acid (ABA) and pyrabactin on leaf senescence. Results showed that while gibberellin 4 (GA(4)) and salicylic acid (SA) contents decreased, that of ABA increased during the progression of leaf senescence. However, dark-induced senescence increased ABA levels, but did not affect GA(4) and SA levels, which appeared to correlate more with changes in air temperature and/or photoperiod than with the induction of leaf senescence. Furthermore, spray applications of pyrabactin delayed the progression of leaf senescence in cut flowers. Thus, we conclude that (i) ABA plays a major role in the regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium, (ii) darkness promotes leaf senescence and increases ABA levels, and (iii) exogenous applications of pyrabactin inhibit leaf senescence in Lilium, therefore suggesting that it acts as an antagonist of ABA in senescing leaves of cut lily flowers. PMID:22854182

  14. Leaf herbivory and nutrients increase nectar alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lynn S; Wink, Michael; Distl, Melanie; Lentz, Amanda J

    2006-08-01

    Correlations between traits may constrain ecological and evolutionary responses to multispecies interactions. Many plants produce defensive compounds in nectar and leaves that could influence interactions with pollinators and herbivores, but the relationship between nectar and leaf defences is entirely unexplored. Correlations between leaf and nectar traits may be mediated by resources and prior damage. We determined the effect of nutrients and leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on Nicotiana tabacum nectar and leaf alkaloids, floral traits and moth oviposition. We found a positive phenotypic correlation between nectar and leaf alkaloids. Herbivory induced alkaloids in nectar but not in leaves, while nutrients increased alkaloids in both tissues. Moths laid the most eggs on damaged, fertilized plants, suggesting a preference for high alkaloids. Induced nectar alkaloids via leaf herbivory indicate that species interactions involving leaf and floral tissues are linked and should not be treated as independent phenomena in plant ecology or evolution. PMID:16913940

  15. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits – Vcmax and Jmax – to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-01-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between Vcmax and Jmax and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between Vcmax and Jmax and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of Vcmax and Jmax with leaf N, P, and SLA. Vcmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of Vcmax to leaf N. Jmax was strongly related to Vcmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm−2), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm−2 nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of Jmax to Vcmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  16. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits - V cmax and J max - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-08-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (J max). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between V cmax and J max and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between V cmax and J max and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of V cmax and J max with leaf N, P, and SLA. V cmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of V cmax to leaf N. J max was strongly related to V cmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm(-2)), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm(-2) nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of J max to V cmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  17. Circadian rhythms in crassulacean acid metabolism: phase relationships between gas exchange, leaf water relations and malate metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Buchanan-Bollig, I C; Smith, J A

    1984-06-01

    Gas exchange, leaf water relations, malate content and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase activity in crude extracts were examined for circadian rhythmicity in the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana. At low irradiance (20 W m(-2)) the rhythm in CO2 uptake continued for several days with a period length of approx. 22 h, whereas the transpiration rhythm was no longer apparent after 24 h. This shows that the CO2 rhythm in continuous light (LL) is not under stomatal control. Circadian oscillations in malate content were detectable for up to 72 h in LL but were of much reduced amplitude. This was reflected in the changes in leaf water relations, which quickly damped after transfer to LL. The activity of PEP carboxylase assayed immediately after extraction showed a rhythmicity for at least 18 h, but after 36 h, values from different plants were scattered. We suggest that the CO2-uptake rhythm is primarily the result of endogenous changes in the activity of PEP carboxylase, which competes to varying degrees with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase for CO2. PMID:24253720

  18. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  19. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping. PMID:23380664

  20. Gene expression during wound shock in leaf segments of C sub 3 and C sub 4 plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Heikkila, J.J.; Dumbroff, E.B. )

    1989-04-01

    The wound response in two-week-old C{sub 3} (peanut and soybean) and C{sub 4} (sorghum and corn) plants was followed in leaf segments (5 {times} 3 mm) labelled for 2 h with ({sup 35}S)methionine at 0, 2, 4 or 6 h after cutting. Absorption of the radiolabel and its subsequent incorporation into protein reached steady-state levels within 4 to 6 h. The high molecular weight proteins associated with the stress response were induced both by cutting and by exposure of the leaves to high temperatures (40{degree} and 45{degree}C). In sorghum and corn, cutting also increased the synthesis of the 98 and 102 kD forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, but only the latter form was stimulated by high temperature. Although several low molecular weight polypeptides were synthesized in response to heat shock, they were not induced in any of the four species by wounding. The control mechanisms involved in the transient would response are currently under investigation.

  1. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Phosphorylation by Metabolites and Abscisic Acid during the Development and Germination of Barley Seeds1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Ana-Belén; Alvarez, Rosario; Cochereau, Ludivine; Vidal, Jean; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Echevarría, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During barley (Hordeum vulgare) seed development, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased and PEPC-specific antibodies revealed housekeeping (103-kD) and inducible (108-kD) subunits. Bacterial-type PEPC fragments were immunologically detected in denatured protein extracts from dry and imbibed conditions; however, on nondenaturing gels, the activity of the recently reported octameric PEPC (in castor [Ricinus communis] oil seeds) was not detected. The phosphorylation state of the PEPC, as judged by l-malate 50% inhibition of initial activity values, phosphoprotein chromatography, and immunodetection of the phosphorylated N terminus, was found to be high between 8 and 18 d postanthesis (DPA) and during imbibition. In contrast, the enzyme appeared to be in a low phosphorylation state from 20 DPA up to dry seed. The time course of 32/36-kD, Ca2+-independent PEPC kinase activity exhibited a substantial increase after 30 DPA that did not coincide with the PEPC phosphorylation profile. This kinase was found to be inhibited by l-malate and not by putative protein inhibitors, and the PEPC phosphorylation status correlated with high glucose-6-phosphate to malate ratios, thereby suggesting an in vivo metabolic control of the kinase. PEPC phosphorylation was also regulated by photosynthate supply at 11 DPA. In addition, when fed exogenously to imbibing seeds, abscisic acid significantly increased PEPC kinase activity. This was further enhanced by the cytosolic protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide but blocked by protease inhibitors, thereby suggesting that the phytohormone acts on the stability of the kinase. We propose that a similar abscisic acid-dependent effect may contribute to produce the increase in PEPC kinase activity during desiccation stages. PMID:18753284

  2. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits. PMID:24595619

  3. Reciprocal Control of Anaplerotic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by in Vivo Monoubiquitination and Phosphorylation in Developing Proteoid Roots of Phosphate-Deficient Harsh Hakea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al3+, Fe3+, and Ca2+ phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme’s activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  4. Effect of Growth Rate and Glucose Concentration on the Activity of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System in Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt Grown in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ellwood, D. C.; Phipps, P. J.; Hamilton, I. R.

    1979-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt was grown anaerobically in a chemostat with a glucose limitation, as well as with an excess of glucose (amino acid limitation) at dilution rates (D) between 0.05 and 0.4 h−1 (mean generation time = 12 to 1.5 h). The glucose-limited culture produced cells having 1.5- to 6.0-fold greater glycolytic activity than the cells from the glucose-excess culture. The preferred substrate for these cells was glucose, with the glycolytic rate for sucrose being only slightly lower; the rate for fructose was half that of glucose. The glycolytic rate of the glucose-limited cells was maximum at D = 0.1 h−1, with a decline in rate as the growth rate approached D = 0.4 h−1. A comparison of the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in the two types of cells showed that the glucose-limited cells had 1.7- to 5.6-fold greater PTS activity for the three sugars than the glucose-excess-grown cells. Whereas little difference was seen between the three sugars with the latter cells, the glucose-PTS had the greatest activity with glucose-limited cells, with the maximum in cells grown at D = 0.1 h−1. Comparison of the rate of sugar uptake in the chemostat with the rate of PTS transport activity in the cells at each growth rate demonstrated that only under conditions of slow growth with a glucose limitation was the PTS system capable of supporting growth on glucose. Furthermore, PTS activity in cells grown with an excess of glucose was insignificant when compared with glucose uptake during growth in the chemostat. This evidence supports the observation that S. mutans possesses at least one other system, in addition to the PTS, for the transport of glucose into the cell. The organism was, however, devoid of glucose-proton symport transport activity. PMID:33901

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell-Wall-Localized Phosphoenolpyruvate Protein Phosphotransferase Can Function as an Adhesin: Identification of Its Host Target Molecules and Evaluation of Its Potential as a Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Blau, Karin; Kushnir, Tatyana; Shagan, Marilou; Portnoi, Maxim; Cohen, Aviad; Azriel, Shalhevet; Malka, Itai; Adawi, Asad; Kafka, Daniel; Dotan, Shahar; Guterman, Gali; Troib, Shany; Fishilevich, Tali; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Braiman, Alex; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Porat, Nurith; Goliand, Inna; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Swiatlo, Edwin; Tal, Michael; Ellis, Ronald; Elia, Natalie; Dagan, Ron

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumonia, phosphoenolpyruvate protein phosphotransferase (PtsA) is an intracellular protein of the monosaccharide phosphotransferase systems. Biochemical and immunostaining methods were applied to show that PtsA also localizes to the bacterial cell-wall. Thus, it was suspected that PtsA has functions other than its main cytoplasmic enzymatic role. Indeed, recombinant PtsA and anti-rPtsA antiserum were shown to inhibit adhesion of S. pneumoniae to cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Screening of a combinatorial peptide library expressed in a filamentous phage with rPtsA identified epitopes that were capable of inhibiting S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptides in the phages were sequenced, and homologous sequences were found in human BMPER, multimerin1, protocadherin19, integrinβ4, epsin1 and collagen type VIIα1 proteins, all of which can be found in A549 cells except the latter. Six peptides, synthesized according to the homologous sequences in the human proteins, specifically bound rPtsA in the micromolar range and significantly inhibited pneumococcal adhesion in vitro to lung- and tracheal-derived cell lines. In addition, the tested peptides inhibited lung colonization after intranasal inoculation of mice with S. pneumoniae. Immunization with rPtsA protected the mice against a sublethal intranasal and a lethal intravenous pneumococcal challenge. In addition, mouse anti rPtsA antiserum reduced bacterial virulence in the intravenous inoculation mouse model. These findings showed that the surface-localized PtsA functions as an adhesin, PtsA binding peptides derived from its putative target molecules can be considered for future development of therapeutics, and rPtsA should be regarded as a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26990554

  6. Reciprocal control of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by in vivo monoubiquitination and phosphorylation in developing proteoid roots of phosphate-deficient harsh hakea.

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Ca(2+) phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme's activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  7. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene via NO and Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Qian, Baoyun; Li, Xia; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Pingbo; Ren, Chengang; Dai, Chuanchao

    2015-03-01

    We determined the effects of endogenous nitric oxide and Ca(2+) on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) under drought. In this study, seedlings were subjected to PEG 6000 treatments using PC and wild type (WT; Kitaake). The results showed that, compared with WT, PC had higher relative water content (RWC) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under drought. During a 2-day re-watering treatment, Pn recovered faster in PC than in WT. Further analyses showed that, under the drought treatment, the amount of endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increased in WT mainly via NADPH oxidase. While in PC, the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) content increased via nitrate reductase and nitric oxide synthase on day 2 of the drought treatment and day 1 of the re-watering treatment. After 2 days of drought treatment, PC also showed higher PEPC activity, calcium content, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, C4-pepc and NAC6 transcript levels, and protein kinase activity as compared with PC without treatment. These changes did not occur in WT. Correlation analysis also proved NO associated with these indicators in PC. Based on these results, there was a particular molecular mechanism of drought tolerance in PC. The mechanism is related to the signaling processes via NO and Ca(2+) involving the protein kinase and the transcription factor, resulted in up-regulation of PEPC activity and its gene expression, such as C4pepc. Some genes encode antioxidant system, cu/zn-sod as well, which promote antioxidant system to clear MDA and superoxide anion radical, thereby conferring drought tolerance. PMID:25460871

  8. The Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System in Group A Streptococcus Acts To Reduce Streptolysin S Activity and Lesion Severity during Soft Tissue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Kanika; Le, Tuquynh; Jamin, Rebecca; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, is an important process for bacterial pathogens to successfully colonize host tissues. The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the primary mechanism by which bacteria transport sugars and sense the carbon state of the cell. The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a fastidious microorganism that has adapted to a variety of niches in the human body to elicit a wide array of diseases. A ΔptsI mutant (enzyme I [EI] deficient) generated in three different strains of M1T1 GAS was unable to grow on multiple carbon sources (PTS and non-PTS). Complementation with ptsI expressed under its native promoter in single copy was able to rescue the growth defect of the mutant. In a mouse model of GAS soft tissue infection, all ΔptsI mutants exhibited a significantly larger and more severe ulcerative lesion than mice infected with the wild type. Increased transcript levels of sagA and streptolysin S (SLS) activity during exponential-phase growth was observed. We hypothesized that early onset of SLS activity would correlate with the severity of the lesions induced by the ΔptsI mutant. In fact, infection of mice with a ΔptsI sagB double mutant resulted in a lesion comparable to that of either the wild type or a sagB mutant alone. Therefore, a functional PTS is not required for subcutaneous skin infection in mice; however, it does play a role in coordinating virulence factor expression and disease progression. PMID:24379283

  9. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis. PMID:22404138

  10. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  11. Leaf P increase outpaces leaf N in an Inner Mongolia grassland over 27 years.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zhaorong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Gan, Huijie; Zhou, Wenjia; Flynn, Dan F B; He, Jin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) have been intensively explored in short-term experiments, but rarely at longer timescales. Here, we investigated leaf N : P stoichiometry over a 27-year interval in an Inner Mongolia grassland by comparing leaf N : P concentration of 2006 with that of 1979. Across 80 species, both leaf N and P increased, but the increase in leaf N lagged behind that of leaf P, leading to a significant decrease in the N : P ratio. These changes in leaf N : P stoichiometry varied among functional groups. For leaf N, grasses increased, woody species tended to increase, whereas forbs showed no change. Unlike leaf N, leaf P of grasses and forbs increased, whereas woody species showed no change. Such changes may reflect N deposition and P release induced by soil acidification over the past decades. The interannual effect of precipitation may somewhat have reduced the soil available N, leading to the more modest increase of leaf N than of leaf P. Thus, leaf N : P stoichiometry significantly responded to long-term environmental changes in this temperate steppe, but different functional groups responded differently. Our results indicate that conclusions of plant stoichiometry under short-term N fertilization should be treated with caution when extrapolating to longer timescales. PMID:25589490

  12. Leaf Shape Recognition using Centroid Contour Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasim, Abdurrasyid; Herdiyeni, Yeni; Douady, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    This research recognizes the leaf shape using Centroid Contour Distance (CCD) as shape descriptor. CCD is an algorithm of shape representation contour-based approach which only exploits boundary information. CCD calculates the distance between the midpoint and the points on the edge corresponding to interval angle. Leaf shapes that included in this study are ellips, cordate, ovate, and lanceolate. We analyzed 200 leaf images of tropical plant. Each class consists of 50 images. The best accuracy is obtained by 96.67%. We used Probabilistic Neural Network to classify the leaf shape. Experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach for shape recognition with high accuracy.

  13. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  14. Classification and quantification of leaf curvature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Jia, Liguo; Mao, Yanfei; He, Yuke

    2010-01-01

    Various mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in polarity, cell division, and auxin response are characterized by certain types of leaf curvature. However, comparison of curvature for clarification of gene function can be difficult without a quantitative measurement of curvature. Here, a novel method for classification and quantification of leaf curvature is reported. Twenty-two mutant alleles from Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic lines deficient in leaf flatness were selected. The mutants were classified according to the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature. Based on a global measure of whole leaves and a local measure of four regions in the leaves, the curvature index (CI) was proposed to quantify the leaf curvature. The CI values accounted for the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature in all of the Arabidopsis mutants grown in growth chambers. Comparison of CI values between mutants reveals the spatial and temporal variations of leaf curvature, indicating the strength of the mutant alleles and the activities of the corresponding genes. Using the curvature indices, the extent of curvature in a complicated genetic background becomes quantitative and comparable, thus providing a useful tool for defining the genetic components of leaf development and to breed new varieties with leaf curvature desirable for the efficient capture of sunlight for photosynthesis and high yields. PMID:20400533

  15. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  16. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  17. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  18. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  19. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  20. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  1. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  2. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  3. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  4. 7 CFR 28.466 - Leaf Grade 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 6. 28.466 Section 28.466 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.466 Leaf Grade 6. Leaf Grade 6 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  5. 7 CFR 28.464 - Leaf Grade 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 4. 28.464 Section 28.464 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.464 Leaf Grade 4. Leaf Grade 4 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  6. 7 CFR 28.465 - Leaf Grade 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 5. 28.465 Section 28.465 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.465 Leaf Grade 5. Leaf Grade 5 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  7. 7 CFR 28.462 - Leaf Grade 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 2. 28.462 Section 28.462 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.462 Leaf Grade 2. Leaf Grade 2 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  8. 7 CFR 28.463 - Leaf Grade 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 3. 28.463 Section 28.463 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.463 Leaf Grade 3. Leaf Grade 3 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  9. 7 CFR 28.467 - Leaf Grade 7.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 7. 28.467 Section 28.467 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.467 Leaf Grade 7. Leaf Grade 7 is leaf which is within the range represented...

  10. 7 CFR 28.461 - Leaf Grade 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf Grade 1. 28.461 Section 28.461 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for the Leaf Grade of American Upland Cotton § 28.461 Leaf Grade 1. Leaf Grade 1 is leaf which is within the range represented...