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Sample records for left cardiac chambers

  1. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  2. Differences between left and right ventricular chamber geometry affect cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Blanca; Li, Li; Eason, James C; Efimov, Igor R; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2005-07-22

    Although effects of shock strength and waveform on cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks have been extensively documented, the contribution of ventricular anatomy to shock-induced polarization and postshock propagation and thus, to shock outcome, has never been quantified; this is caused by lack of experimental methodology capable of mapping 3-D electrical activity. The goal of this study was to use optical imaging experiments and 3-D bidomain simulations to investigate the role of structural differences between left and right ventricles in vulnerability to electric shocks in rabbit hearts. The ventricles were paced apically, and uniform-field, truncated-exponential, monophasic shocks of reversed polarity were applied over a range of coupling intervals (CIs) in experiment and model. Experiments and simulations revealed that reversing the direction of externally-applied field (RV- or LV- shocks) alters the shape of the vulnerability area (VA), the 2-D grid encompassing episodes of arrhythmia induction. For RV- shocks, VA was nearly rectangular indicating little dependence of postshock arrhythmogenesis on CI. For LV- shocks, the probability of arrhythmia induction was higher for longer than for shorter CIs. The 3-D simulations demonstrated that these effects stem from the fact that reversal of field direction results in relocation of the main postshock excitable area from LV wall (RV- shocks) to septum (LV- shocks). Furthermore, the effect of septal (but not LV) excitable area in postshock propagation was found to strongly depend on preshock state. Knowledge regarding the location of the main postshock excitable area within the 3-D ventricular volume could be important for improving defibrillation efficacy. PMID:15976315

  3. Congenital cardiac malformation with three-chambered right atrium and a persistent left cranial vena cava in a dog.

    PubMed

    Yang, Vicky K; Nussbaum, Lindsay; Rush, John E; Cunningham, Suzanne M; MacGregor, John; Antoon, Kristen N

    2015-03-01

    This report describes an unusual congenital abnormality in a dog in which multiple distinct membranes were observed within the right atrium, creating obstruction to venous return from both the cranial vena cava and the caudal vena cava. A persistent left cranial vena cava was also identified. In addition to a membrane in the typical location for cor triatriatum dexter, the dog also had a perforated membrane separating the main right atrial body and tricuspid valve from a more cranial right atrial chamber and the right cranial vena cava. Balloon dilation was performed successfully to alleviate the obstruction to systemic venous return created by the two membranes. Due to the unusual anatomic features, angiography plus echocardiography was useful to completely characterize the congenital abnormality prior to intervention. PMID:25683781

  4. Protein interactions at the heart of cardiac chamber formation.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, Cornelis J J; Moorman, Antoon F M; Barnett, Phil

    2009-12-01

    The vertebrate heart is a muscular pump that contracts in a rhythmic fashion to propel the blood through the body. During evolution, the morphologically complex four-chambered heart of birds and mammals has evolved from a single-layered tube with peristaltic contractility. The heart of Drosophila, referred to as the dorsal vessel, is a blind sac composed of myogenic cells that contract rhythmically. The fish heart is composed of a single atrial chamber connected to a single ventricular chamber. The evolutionary development of fast-contracting chambers allowed the heart to build up high blood pressures. In amphibians two atrial chambers exist, separated by a septum, connecting to a single ventricle. The division of a common atrium and ventricle into right and left-sided chambers represents an evolutionary milestone in the development of the four-chambered heart and is necessary for separation of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. In amphibians and reptiles, pulmonary and systemic circulations are incompletely separated allowing adaptable blood flows to both circulations. In contrast, the hearts of birds and mammals, in which septa completely separate the pulmonary and systemic circulations, both circulations have similar flows, but blood pressures can be regulated separately. In this review we focus, in a morphologically integrated fashion, on the molecular interactions that govern the intricate cardiac design. PMID:19647421

  5. Cardiac Cell Culture Model (CCCM) as a Left Ventricle Mimic for Cardiac Tissue Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Roussel, Thomas J.; El-Baz, Ayman; Giridharan, Guruprasad; Keller, Bradley B.; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the delivery of hemodynamic mechanical cues that play a critical role in the early development and maturation of cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiac tissue capable of replacing or augmenting cardiac function therefore requires physiologically relevant environments that can deliver complex mechanical cues for cardiomyocyte functional maturation. The goal of this work is the development and validation of a cardiac cell culture model (CCCM) microenvironment that accurately mimics pressure-volume changes seen in the left ventricle and to use this system to achieve cardiac cell maturation under conditions where mechanical loads such as pressure and stretch are gradually increased from the unloaded state to conditions seen in vivo. The CCCM platform, consisting of a cell culture chamber integrated within a flow loop was created to accomplish culture of 10 day chick embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes subject to 4 days of stimulation (10 mm Hg, ~13% stretch at a frequency of 2 Hz). Results clearly show that CCCM conditioned cardiomyocytes accelerate cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation in comparison to static unloaded controls as evidenced by increased proliferation, alignment of actin cytoskeleton, bundle-like sarcomeric α-actinin expression, higher pacing beat rate at lower threshold voltages and increased shortening. These results confirm the CCCM microenvironment can accelerate immature cardiac cell structural and functional maturation for potential cardiac regenerative applications. PMID:23952579

  6. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF PODIUM, SENATE CHAMBER; MURAL TO LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF PODIUM, SENATE CHAMBER; MURAL TO LEFT DEPICTS 'FRANK P. BLAIR'S SPEECH AT LOUISIANA 1866' - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  7. Image-based flow modeling in a two-chamber model of the left heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Seo, Jung-Hee; Shoele, Kourosh; George, Richard; Younes, Laurent; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Computational modeling of cardiac flows has been an active topic of discussion over the past decade. Modeling approaches have been consistently improved by inclusion of additional complexities and these continue to provide new insights into the dynamics of blood flow in health and disease. The vast majority of cardiac models have been single-chamber models, which have typically focused on the left or right ventricles, and in these models, the atria are modeled in highly simplistic ways. However, the left atrium acts as a mixing chamber and works with the left ventricle in a highly coordinated fashion to move the blood from the pulmonary veins to the aorta. The flow dynamics associated with this two-chamber interaction is not well understood. In addition, the flow in the left atrium has by itself significant clinical implications and our understanding of this is far less than that of the left ventricle. In the current study, we use 4D CT to create a physiological heart model that is functionally normal and use an experimentally validated sharp-interface immersed boundary flow solver to explore the atrio-ventricular interaction and develop insights into some of the questions addressed above. This research is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through NSF Grants IOS-1124804 and IIS-1344772. Computational resources are provided in part through the NSF XSEDE grants TG-CTS100002 and TG-CTS130064.

  8. Right/left assignment in drift chambers and proportional multiwire chambers (PWC's) using induced signals

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1979-01-01

    Improved multiwire chamber having means for resolving the left/right ambiguity in the location of an ionizing event. The chamber includes a plurality of spaced parallel anode wires positioned between spaced planar cathodes. Associated with each of the anode wires are a pair of localizing wires, one positioned on either side of the anode wire. The localizing wires are connected to a differential amplifier whose output polarity is determined by whether the ionizing event occurs to the right or left of the anode wire.

  9. Cardiac Dysfunction After Left Permanent Cerebral Focal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jiangyong; Farooq, Muhammad U.; Greenberg, Eric; Aloka, Feras; Bhatt, Archit; Kassab, Mounzer; Morgan, James P.; Majid, Arshad

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke can lead to cerebrogenic cardiac arrhythmias. We sought to investigate the effect of ischemic stroke on cardiac function in a mouse model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Methods Twenty-four hours after the induction of focal ischemia, cardiac function was measured in mice by endovascular catheterization of the heart. Immediately after hemodynamic measurements, mice were euthanized and brains were excised and sectioned to measure infarct volume and the severity of insular cortex injury. Myocardial damage was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Serum and heart levels of norepinephrine (NE) were also determined. Results Cardiac dysfunction occurred in 9 out of 14 mice that underwent left pMCAO. In these 9 mice, the severity of left insular cortex lesion was greater than the mice with normal heart function. The serum and heart levels of NE were significantly higher in left pMCAO mice with heart dysfunction. Liner regression analysis indicates significant inverse correlation between the severity of left insular cortex damage and heart dysfunction. Mice that underwent right pMCAO did not exhibit cardiac dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows that left focal cerebral ischemia can produce cardiac dysfunction, which is associated with the extent of left insular cortex damage. Furthermore, mice exhibiting cardiac dysfunction had elevated levels of NE in the serum and heart. PMID:19443809

  10. Ebstein's Anomaly, Left Ventricular Noncompaction, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    McGee, Michael; Warner, Luke; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital disorder characterized by apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Ebstein's anomaly may be seen in association with other cardiac conditions, including patent foramen ovale, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). LVNC is characterized by increased trabeculation within the left ventricular apex. Echocardiography is often used to diagnose LVNC; however, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior characterization of the myocardium. We report a case of sudden cardiac death in a patient with Ebstein's anomaly with unrecognized LVNC noted on post mortem examination with screening documenting the presence of LVNC in one of the patient's twin sons. PMID:26240764

  11. Overview of left ventricular outpouchings on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular outpouchings commonly include aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, and diverticulum and are now being increasingly detected on imaging. Distinction between these entities is of prime importance to guide proper management as outcomes for these entities differ substantially. Chest radiograph is usually nonspecific in their diagnosis. Echocardiography, multi-detector computed tomography evaluation and angiography are helpful in the diagnosis with their inherit limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a very useful tool that allows simultaneous anatomical and functional evaluation along with tissue characterization, which has diagnostic, theraputic and prognostic implications. This article gives an overview of left ventricular outpouchings with special emphasis on their differentiation using cardiac MRI. PMID:26675616

  12. Double outlet from chambers of left ventricular morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Coto, E O; Jimenez, M Q; Castaneda, A R; Rufilanchas, J J; Deverall, P B

    1979-01-01

    This series of 5 cases with double outlet of morphologically left ventricular chamber includes 4 found during a review of 1700 heart specimens (incidence 0.23%) and 1 found at operation and successfully corrected. Abnormal atrioventricular connection precluding total correction was present in the 4 anatomical cases. Clinical diagnosis may be difficult and it is suggested that axial cineangiography may make anatomical diagnosis easier. Absence of the infundibular septum and aortic laevoposition are frequent. As some cases can be surgically corrected, accurate information is required on the size of the right ventricle, the morphology and function of the atrioventricular valves, the presence, size, and position of the ventricular septal defect, and the degree and type of outflow tract obstruction. Images PMID:475930

  13. Thoracoscopic left ventricular lead implantation in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Seop; Park, Pyo Won; Lee, Young Tak; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is known to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced heart failure as a result of dyssynchrony and systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead via the coronary sinus can be difficult. When LV lead implantation is difficult, a video-assisted epicardial approach can be a good alternative. Although there are several reports of video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation, mini-thoracotomy and lead implantation under direct vision have been used in most series. A 49-yr-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent the video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation because percutaneous transvenous approach was difficult due to small cardiac veins. The patient was discharged without problems and showed improved cardiac function at the 3 follow-up months. We report the first successful total thoracoscopic LV lead implantation (without mini-thoracotomy) in Korea. PMID:23255865

  14. Embryonic Cardiac Chamber Maturation: Trabeculation, Conduction and Cardiomyocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Leigh Ann; Yang, Betsy; Liu, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the most common human birth defects. Though some congenital heart defects can be surgically corrected, treatment options for other congenital heart diseases are very limited. In many congenital heart diseases, genetic defects lead to impaired embryonic heart development or growth. One of the key development processes in cardiac development is chamber maturation, and alterations in this maturation process can manifest as a variety of congenital defects including noncompaction, systolic dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, and arrhythmia. During development, to meet the increasing metabolic demands of the developing embryo, the myocardial wall undergoes extensive remodeling characterized by the formation of muscular luminal protrusions called cardiac trabeculae, increased cardiomyocyte mass, and development of the ventricular conduction system. Though the basic morphological and cytological changes involved in early heart development are clear, much remains unknown about the complex biomolecular mechanisms governing chamber maturation. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that a wide variety of basic signaling pathways and biomechanical forces are involved in cardiac wall maturation. PMID:23720419

  15. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease. PMID:20035806

  16. Differences in Left Versus Right Ventricular Electrophysiological Properties in Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Cristina E; Heijman, Jordi; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of ion channels, transporters, signaling pathways and tissue structure at a microscopic and macroscopic scale regulate the electrophysiological activity of the heart. Each region of the heart has optimised these properties based on its specific role during the cardiac cycle, leading to well-established differences in electrophysiology, Ca2+ handling and tissue structure between atria and ventricles and between different layers of the ventricular wall. Similarly, the right ventricle (RV) and left ventricle (LV) have different embryological, structural, metabolic and electrophysiological features, but whether interventricular differences promote differential remodeling leading to arrhythmias is not well understood. In this article, we will summarise the available data on intrinsic differences between LV and RV electrophysiology and indicate how these differences affect cardiac function. Furthermore, we will discuss the differential remodeling of both chambers in pathological conditions and its potential impact on arrhythmogenesis. PMID:27403288

  17. A novel cardiac MR chamber volume model for mechanical dyssynchrony assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Fung, Maggie; Stainsby, Jeffrey A.; Hood, Maureen N.; Ho, Vincent B.

    2009-02-01

    A novel cardiac chamber volume model is proposed for the assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony. The tool is potentially useful for assessment of regional cardiac function and identification of mechanical dyssynchrony on MRI. Dyssynchrony results typically from a contraction delay between one or more individual left ventricular segments, which in turn leads to inefficient ventricular function and ultimately heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy has emerged as an electrical treatment of choice for heart failure patients with dyssynchrony. Prior MRI techniques have relied on assessments of actual cardiac wall changes either using standard cine MR images or specialized pulse sequences. In this abstract, we detail a semi-automated method that evaluates dyssynchrony based on segmental volumetric analysis of the left ventricular (LV) chamber as illustrated on standard cine MR images. Twelve sectors each were chosen for the basal and mid-ventricular slices and 8 sectors were chosen for apical slices for a total of 32 sectors. For each slice (i.e. basal, mid and apical), a systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI) was measured. SDI, a parameter used for 3D echocardiographic analysis of dyssynchrony, was defined as the corrected standard deviation of the time at which minimal volume is reached in each sector. The SDI measurement of a healthy volunteer was 3.54%. In a patient with acute myocardial infarction, the SDI measurements 10.98%, 16.57% and 1.41% for basal, mid-ventricular and apical LV slices, respectively. Based on published 3D echocardiogram reference threshold values, the patient's SDI corresponds to moderate basal dysfunction, severe mid-ventricular dysfunction, and normal apical LV function, which were confirmed on echocardiography. The LV chamber segmental volume analysis model and SDI is feasible using standard cine MR data and may provide more reliable assessment of patients with dyssynchrony especially if the LV myocardium is thin or if

  18. Variational Reconstruction of Left Cardiac Structure from CMR Images

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Min; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Xiaodan; Tan, Ru San; Wan, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), accounting for 17% of overall deaths in the USA, is the leading cause of death over the world. Advances in medical imaging techniques make the quantitative assessment of both the anatomy and function of heart possible. The cardiac modeling is an invariable prerequisite for quantitative analysis. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the left cardiac structure from multi-planed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images and contours. Routine CMR examination was performed to acquire both long axis and short axis images. Trained technologists delineated the endocardial contours. Multiple sets of two dimensional contours were projected into the three dimensional patient-based coordinate system and registered to each other. The union of the registered point sets was applied a variational surface reconstruction algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation and graph-cuts. The resulting triangulated surfaces were further post-processed. Quantitative evaluation on our method was performed via computing the overlapping ratio between the reconstructed model and the manually delineated long axis contours, which validates our method. We envisage that this method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess cardiac function in patients with diverse heart diseases. PMID:26689551

  19. Variational Reconstruction of Left Cardiac Structure from CMR Images.

    PubMed

    Wan, Min; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Xiaodan; Tan, Ru San; Wan, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), accounting for 17% of overall deaths in the USA, is the leading cause of death over the world. Advances in medical imaging techniques make the quantitative assessment of both the anatomy and function of heart possible. The cardiac modeling is an invariable prerequisite for quantitative analysis. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the left cardiac structure from multi-planed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images and contours. Routine CMR examination was performed to acquire both long axis and short axis images. Trained technologists delineated the endocardial contours. Multiple sets of two dimensional contours were projected into the three dimensional patient-based coordinate system and registered to each other. The union of the registered point sets was applied a variational surface reconstruction algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation and graph-cuts. The resulting triangulated surfaces were further post-processed. Quantitative evaluation on our method was performed via computing the overlapping ratio between the reconstructed model and the manually delineated long axis contours, which validates our method. We envisage that this method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess cardiac function in patients with diverse heart diseases. PMID:26689551

  20. Effects of experimental cardiac volume loading on left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morita, Tomoya; Nisa, Khoirun; Yokoyama, Nozomu; Sasaki, Noboru; Morishita, Keitaro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To elucidate the relationship between acute volume overload and left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized. A Swan-Ganz catheter was placed to measure mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). Cardiac preload was increased by IV infusion with lactated Ringer solution at 150 mL/kg/h for 90 minutes. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before (baseline) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after volume loading began. At each echocardiographic assessment point, apical 4-chamber images were recorded and analyzed to derive time-left atrial area curves. Left atrial total (for reservoir function), passive (for conduit function), and active (for booster-pump function) fractional area changes were calculated from the curves. RESULTS Volume overload resulted in a significant increase from baseline in PCWP from 15 to 90 minutes after volume loading began. All fractional area changes at 15 to 90 minutes were significantly increased from baseline. In multiple regression analysis, quadratic regression models were better fitted to the relationships between PCWP and each of the total and active fractional area changes than were linear regression models. A linear regression model was better fitted to the relationship between PCWP and passive fractional area change. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that left atrial phasic function assessed on the basis of left atrial phasic areas was enhanced during experimental cardiac volume loading in healthy dogs. The effect of volume load should be considered when evaluating left atrial phasic function by indices derived from left atrial phasic sizes. PMID:27580106

  1. Management of Acute Regurgitation in Left-Sided Cardiac Valves

    PubMed Central

    Mokadam, Nahush A.; Stout, Karen K.; Verrier, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    The management of acute, severe cardiac valvular regurgitation requires expeditious multidisciplinary care. Although acute, severe valvular regurgitation can be a true surgical emergency, accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions require clinical acumen, appropriate imaging, and sound judgment. An accurate and timely diagnosis is essential for successful outcomes and requires appropriate expertise and a sufficiently high degree of suspicion in a variety of settings. Whereas cardiovascular collapse is the most obvious and common presentation of acute cardiac valvular regurgitation, findings may be subtle, and the clinical presentation can often be nonspecific. Consequently, other acute conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, or nonvalvular heart failure may be mistaken for acute valvular regurgitation. In comparison with that of the right-sided valves, regurgitation of the left-sided valves is more common and has greater clinical impact. Therefore, this review focuses on acute regurgitation of the aortic and mitral valves. PMID:21423463

  2. Analysis of left atrial respiratory and cardiac motion for cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R.; Johnson, S. B.; Lehmann, H. I.; Robb, R. A.; Packer, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation therapy is often guided by models built from preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. One of the challenges in guiding a procedure from a preoperative model is properly synching the preoperative models with cardiac and respiratory motion through computational motion models. In this paper, we describe a methodology for evaluating cardiac and respiratory motion in the left atrium and pulmonary veins of a beating canine heart. Cardiac catheters were used to place metal clips within and near the pulmonary veins and left atrial appendage under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance and a contrast-enhanced, 64-slice multidetector CT scan was collected with the clips in place. Each clip was segmented from the CT scan at each of the five phases of the cardiac cycle at both end-inspiration and end-expiration. The centroid of each segmented clip was computed and used to evaluate both cardiac and respiratory motion of the left atrium. A total of three canine studies were completed, with 4 clips analyzed in the first study, 5 clips in the second study, and 2 clips in the third study. Mean respiratory displacement was 0.2+/-1.8 mm in the medial/lateral direction, 4.7+/-4.4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction (moving anterior on inspiration), and 9.0+/-5.0 mm superior/inferior (moving inferior with inspiration). At end inspiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 1.5+/-1.3 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and 2.1+/-2.0 mm in the anterior/posterior and 1.3+/-1.2 mm superior/inferior directions. At end expiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 2.0+/-1.5mm in the medial/lateral direction, 3.0+/-1.8mm in the anterior/posterior direction, and 1.5+/-1.5 mm in the superior/inferior directions.

  3. Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography for Left Atrial Appendage Closure.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jacqueline; Lopes, Joao Pedro; Reisman, Mark; McLaughlin, Patrick; Nicolau, Savvas; Bezerra, Hiram G

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is prevalent and percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure is increasingly performed worldwide. This procedure is technically challenging and the success and procedural complexities depend on anatomy of the LAA and surrounding structures. These are readily depicted on cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA), which offers unique imaging planes. CCTA allows not only preplanning anatomic LAA assessment, but can also be used to evaluate for pre-existing LAA thrombus, and done postprocedure for surveillance for device-related thrombus, residual leak, and complications. In this article, we review the practical utility of CCTA for LAA closure. PMID:26907169

  4. Simulating left ventricular fluid-solid mechanics through the cardiac cycle under LVAD support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M.; Nordsletten, D. A.; Kay, D.; Smith, N. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this study we have integrated novel modifications of the standard Newton-Raphson/line search algorithm and optimisation of the interpolation scheme at the fluid-solid boundary to enable the simulation of fluid-solid interaction within the cardiac left ventricle under the support of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The line search modification combined with Jacobian reuse produced close to an order of magnitude improvement in computational time across both test and whole heart simulations. Optimisation of element interpolation schemes on the fluid-solid boundary highlights the impact this choice can have on problem stability and demonstrates that, in contrast to linear fluid elements, higher order interpolation produces improved error reduction per degree of freedom. Incorporating these modifications enabled a full heart cycle under LVAD support to be modelled. Results from these simulations show that there is slower clearance of blood entering the chamber during early compared to late diastole under conditions of constant LVAD flow.

  5. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the cardiac chambers in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tomaru, Takanobu; Miwa, Atsuko; Hirose, Junichi; Sasaki, Michihiko; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Tsubouchi, Hiroyuki

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in fiberoptic technology enables us to observe the cardiac chambers percutaneously in various categories of heart disease. We applied cardioscopy in 4 patients with HCM. Two of them presented excessive or good left ventricular function and no history of congestive heart failure (CHF). The other two patients showed reduced left ventricular function with a history of CHF. Cardioscopy was successfully performed in all patients. In patients with excessive or good left ventricular function, the color of the endocardial surface was light brown mixed with white. The trabeculae were significantly thick and contracted vigorously. In patients with reduced left ventricular function, the color was whiter, and the thickness and contraction of the trabeculae were reduced obviously. Myocardial biopsy revealed that interstitial fibrosis was prominent in the latters. These results indicate that (1) cardioscopy is safe and useful for evaluation of the internal surface of the ventricle in patients with HCM, and (2) cardioscopic characteristics of the ventricle are closely related to histopathological features.

  6. Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koycheva, Reneta Yovcheva; Cholakov, Vasil; Andreev, Jivko; Penev, Margarit; Iliev, Rosen; Nancheva, Krasimira; Tsoneva, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac biomarkers are often elevated in dialysis patients showing the presence of left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of the study is to establish the plasma levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs TnT), precursor of B-natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) and their relation to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients undergoing hemodialysis without signs of acute coronary syndrome or heart failure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 48 patients - 26 men and 22 women. Pre and postdialysis levels of hs cTnT, NT-proBNP and hs CRP were measured at week interim procedure. Patients were divided in two groups according to the presence of echocardiographic evidence of LVH - gr A - 40 patients (with LVH), and gr B - 8 patients (without LVH). RESULTS: In the whole group of patients was found elevated predialysis levels of all three biomarkers with significant increase (p < 0.05) after dialysis with low-flux dialyzers. Predialysis values of NT-proBNP show moderate positive correlation with hs cTnT (r = 0.47) and weaker with hs CRP (r = 0.163). Such dependence is observed in postdialysis values of these biomarkers. There is a strong positive correlation between the pre and postdialysis levels: for hs cTnT (r = 0.966), for NT-proBNP (r = 0.918) and for hs CRP (r = 0.859). It was found a significant difference in the mean values of hs cTnT in gr. A and gr. B (0.07 ± 0.01 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and NT-proBNP (15,605.8 ± 2,072.5 versus 2,745.5 ± 533.55 pg/mL, p < 0.05). Not find a significant difference in hs CRP in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the relationship of the studied cardiac biomarkers with LVH in asymptomatic patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment.

  7. Semi-automatic algorithm for construction of the left ventricular area variation curve over a complete cardiac cycle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional echocardiography (2D-echo) allows the evaluation of cardiac structures and their movements. A wide range of clinical diagnoses are based on the performance of the left ventricle. The evaluation of myocardial function is typically performed by manual segmentation of the ventricular cavity in a series of dynamic images. This process is laborious and operator dependent. The automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in 4-chamber long-axis images during diastole is troublesome, because of the opening of the mitral valve. Methods This work presents a method for segmentation of the left ventricle in dynamic 2D-echo 4-chamber long-axis images over the complete cardiac cycle. The proposed algorithm is based on classic image processing techniques, including time-averaging and wavelet-based denoising, edge enhancement filtering, morphological operations, homotopy modification, and watershed segmentation. The proposed method is semi-automatic, requiring a single user intervention for identification of the position of the mitral valve in the first temporal frame of the video sequence. Image segmentation is performed on a set of dynamic 2D-echo images collected from an examination covering two consecutive cardiac cycles. Results The proposed method is demonstrated and evaluated on twelve healthy volunteers. The results are quantitatively evaluated using four different metrics, in a comparison with contours manually segmented by a specialist, and with four alternative methods from the literature. The method's intra- and inter-operator variabilities are also evaluated. Conclusions The proposed method allows the automatic construction of the area variation curve of the left ventricle corresponding to a complete cardiac cycle. This may potentially be used for the identification of several clinical parameters, including the area variation fraction. This parameter could potentially be used for evaluating the global systolic function of the left ventricle

  8. Cardiac Autotransplantation for Surgical Resection of a Primary Malignant Left Ventricular Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Michael J.; Walkes, Jon-Cecil M.; DeFelice, Clement A.; Wojciechowski, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare. In such tumors, surgical resection is sometimes considered necessary to correct obstruction of flow caused by the tumor and to accomplish complete resection. The anatomic difficulties associated with large, primary, intracavitary left-sided sarcomas have led us to use cardiac explantation, ex vivo tumor resection, and cardiac autotransplantation to meet the anatomic challenges of left atrial tumors. We report the case of a patient who had a large, primary, intracavitary, left ventricular sarcoma that was successfully removed by cardiac explantation and ex vivo reconstruction with use of the cardiac autotransplantation technique. This is the 1st report describing the use of cardiac autotransplantation to surgically resect an intracavitary left ventricular malignancy. PMID:17215979

  9. Differential regulation of the β-adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP level with age and sex in turkey cardiac chambers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sandra; Böhme, Julia; Kube, Christian; Haufe, Jörg; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Abraham, Getu

    2016-04-15

    Decreased responses of the heart to β-adrenoceptor stimulation with aging have been shown to occur merely in selected heart chambers in relation to increased catecholamine levels. However, there are no systematic studies that investigate all cardiac chambers with regard to receptor density and cAMP (adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate) responses. We used meat-type turkey poults (British United Turkey (B.U.T.) Big 6) with increasing age because their heart seems to decrease in weight in relation to body weight and they are often used as an animal model for heart failure. The receptor density and distribution were quantified by radioligand binding analysis using (-)-[(125)I]-iodocyanopindolol and β-adrenoceptor subtype-specific antagonists (ICI 118.551 and CGP 20712 A) in membranes of four cardiac chambers (right and left atria and ventricles) of 6-week-, 12-week-, 16/21-week-, and 57-week-old B.U.T. BIG 6 turkeys. Receptor function was determined by measuring basal and stimulated cAMP production. In both sexes, the β-adrenoceptor density decreased significantly in all chambers with age without altered β-adrenoceptor subtype distribution. The receptor affinity (KD) to the radioligand was similar in hearts of all age groups. β-adrenoceptor-(isoproterenol and guanosine 5'-triphosphate), G-protein-(NaF) and catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase (forskolin, Mn(2+)) mediated cAMP responses were not chamber-dependent. Indeed, the cAMP level was significantly lower in 57-week-old hearts than in 6-week-, 12-week-, 16/21-week-old hearts. These data suggest that with increasing age and body weight, the β-adrenoceptor signal transduction pathway was highly blunted in all cardiac chambers, occurring by decreased receptor density and cAMP responses. PMID:26957056

  10. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy

  11. M-mode echocardiograms for determination of optimal left atrial timing in patients with dual chamber pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Wish, M; Gottdiener, J S; Cohen, A I; Fletcher, R D

    1988-02-01

    To determine if the A wave of the mitral valve echocardiogram can be used as a marker for left atrial (LA) activity and assist in the programming of dual chamber pacemakers, 156 echocardiograms with the mitral A wave present were obtained from 23 patients with dual chamber pacemakers, all of whom had bipolar esophageal recordings of LA depolarization. Twelve of these patients also underwent hemodynamic study with cardiac function determined at 5 different pacemaker settings: ventricular demand pacing and dual chamber sequential pacing at 0 or 25, 150, 200 and 250 ms programming atrioventricular (AV) delay. The time delay from right atrial pacing artifact to onset and peak of mitral A wave was linearly related to the time from atrial pacing artifact to LA depolarization on the esophageal lead (p less than 0.001). As pacing mode changed from dual chamber sequential pacing (DVI) mode to atrial synchronous-ventricular pacing (VDD), the A wave came earlier relative to the ventricular pacing spike, linearly related to the LA to ventricular extension with mode change determined with the esophageal lead (r = 0.94, p less than 0.001). The time from atrial pacing to peak of A wave was shorter in patients whose optimal programmed AV delay was 150 ms compared with those whose optimal AV delay was 200 or 250 ms (p less than 0.02). At the optimal programmed delay for cardiac output, the peak of the A wave was an average of 13 +/- 36 ms after the ventricular pacing spike.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3341208

  12. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  13. [Assessment of cardiac function by left heart catheterization: an analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume (length) loops].

    PubMed

    Sasayama, S; Nonogi, H; Sakurai, T; Kawai, C; Fujita, M; Eiho, S; Kuwahara, M

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical property of the cardiac muscle has been classically analyzed in two ways; shortening of muscle fiber, and the development of tension within the muscle. In the ejecting ventricle, left ventricular (LV) function can be analyzed by the analogous two-dimensional framework of pressure-volume loops, which are provided by plotting the instantaneous volume against corresponding LV pressure. The integral pressure with respect to volume allows to assess a total external ventricular work during ejection. The diastolic pressure-volume relations reflect a chamber stiffness of the ventricle. Force-velocity relations also provide an useful conceptual framework for understanding how the ventricle contracts under given afterload, with modification of preload. In the presence of coronary artery disease, the regional nature of left ventricular contractile function should be defined as well as the global ventricular function as described above, because the latter is determined by the complex interaction of dysfunction of the ischemic myocardium and of compensatory augmentation of shortening of the normally perfused myocardium. We utilized a computer technique to analyze the local wall motion of the ischemic heart by cineventriculography. The boundaries of serial ventricular images are automatically traced and superimposed using the external reference system. Radial grids are drawn from the center of gravity of the end-diastolic image. Measurement of length of each radial grid throughout cardiac cycle provides the analysis of movement of the ventricle at a particular point on the circumference. Using phasic pressure obtained simultaneously with opacification as the common parameter, segmental pressure-length loops are constructed simultaneously at various segments. The loops are similar over the entire circumference in the normal heart, being rectangular in morphology and with synchronous behavior during contraction and relaxation. However, the marked distortion of

  14. Wtip is required for proepicardial organ specification and cardiac left/right asymmetry in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Rebecca; Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Hsu, Chaonan; Lakiza, Olga; Nomura, Hiroki; Renfrew, Erin; Garrity, Deborah; Obara, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Wilm's tumor 1 interacting protein (Wtip) was identified as an interacting partner of Wilm's tumor protein (WT1) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. WT1 is expressed in the proepicardial organ (PE) of the heart, and mouse and zebrafish wt1 knockout models appear to lack the PE. Wtip's role in the heart remains unexplored. In the present study, we demonstrate that wtip expression is identical in wt1a-, tcf21-, and tbx18-positive PE cells, and that Wtip protein localizes to the basal body of PE cells. We present the first genetic evidence that Wtip signaling in conjunction with WT1 is essential for PE specification in the zebrafish heart. By overexpressing wtip mRNA, we observed ectopic expression of PE markers in the cardiac and pharyngeal arch regions. Furthermore, wtip knockdown embryos showed perturbed cardiac looping and lacked the atrioventricular (AV) boundary. However, the chamber-specific markers amhc and vmhc were unaffected. Interestingly, knockdown of wtip disrupts early left-right (LR) asymmetry. Our studies uncover new roles for Wtip regulating PE cell specification and early LR asymmetry, and suggest that the PE may exert non-autonomous effects on heart looping and AV morphogenesis. The presence of cilia in the PE, and localization of Wtip in the basal body of ciliated cells, raises the possibility of cilia-mediated PE signaling in the embryonic heart. PMID:27484451

  15. Left Ventricular Diameter and Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Kumar; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Uy‐Evanado, Audrey; Aleong, Ryan; Chugh, Harpriya; Nichols, Gregory A.; Gunson, Karen; London, Barry; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) diameter is routinely measured on the echocardiogram but has not been jointly evaluated with the ejection fraction (EF) for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Methods and Results From a large ongoing community‐based study of SCD (The Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study; population ≈1 million), SCD cases were compared with geographic controls. LVEF and LV diameter, measured using the LV internal dimension in diastole (categorized as normal, mild, moderate, or severe dilatation using American Society of Echocardiography definitions) were assessed from echocardiograms prior but unrelated to the SCD event. Cases (n=418; 69.5±13.8 years), compared with controls (n=329; 67.7±11.9 years), more commonly had severe LV dysfunction (EF ≤35%; 30.5% versus 18.8%; P<0.01) and larger LV diameter (52.2±10.5 mm versus 49.7±7.9 mm; P<0.01). Moderate or severe LV dilatation (16.3% versus 8.2%; P=0.001) and severe LV dilatation (8.1% versus 2.1%; P<0.001) were significantly more frequent in cases. In multivariable analysis, severe LV dilatation was an independent predictor of SCD (odds ratio 2.5 [95% CI 1.03 to 5.9]; P=0.04). In addition, subjects with both EF ≤35% and severe LV dilatation had higher odds for SCD compared with those with low EF only (odds ratio 3.8 [95% CI 1.5 to 10.2] for both versus 1.7 [95% CI 1.2 to 2.5] for low EF only), suggesting that severe LV dilatation additively increased SCD risk. Conclusion LV diameter may contribute to risk stratification for SCD independent of the LVEF. This readily available echocardiographic measure warrants further prospective evaluation. PMID:25227407

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance T1 mapping of left atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Beinart, Roy; Khurram, Irfan M.; Liu, Songtao; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Halperin, Henry R.; Bluemke, David A.; Gai, Neville; van der Geest, Rob J.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping is an emerging tool for objective quantification of myocardial fibrosis. OBJECTIVES To (a) establish the feasibility of left atrial (LA) T1 measurements, (b) determine the range of LA T1 values in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) vs healthy volunteers, and (c) validate T1 mapping vs LA intracardiac electrogram voltage amplitude measures. METHODS CMR imaging at 1.5 T was performed in 51 consecutive patients before AF ablation and in 16 healthy volunteers. T1 measurements were obtained from the posterior LA myocardium by using the modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery sequence. Given the established association of reduced electrogram amplitude with fibrosis, intracardiac point-by-point bipolar LA voltage measures were recorded for the validation of T1 measurements. RESULTS The median LA T1 relaxation time was shorter in patients with AF (387 [interquartile range 364–428] ms) compared to healthy volunteers (459 [interquartile range 418–532] ms; P < .001) and was shorter in patients with AF with prior ablation compared to patients without prior ablation (P = .035). In a generalized estimating equations model, adjusting for data clusters per participant, age, rhythm during CMR, prior ablation, AF type, hypertension, and diabetes, each 100-ms increase in T1 relaxation time was associated with 0.1 mV increase in intracardiac bipolar LA voltage (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS Measurement of the LA myocardium T1 relaxation time is feasible and strongly associated with invasive voltage measures. This methodology may improve the quantification of fibrotic changes in thin-walled myocardial tissues. PMID:23643513

  17. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers—including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group—were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  18. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  19. A broken heart: Right-to-left shunt in the setting of normal cardiac pressures

    PubMed Central

    Gomperts, Natalie; Fowler, Robert; Horlick, Eric; McLaughlin, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common structural cardiac variant occurring in approximately 30% of the general population. Patients are usually asymptomatic because the defect is flap-like and does not permit significant left-to-right shunting. However, pathological conditions that result in cardiac rotation or higher than normal right atrial pressures can reverse the normal left atrial to right atrial pressure gradient and cause a right-to-left shunt through a PFO. If the right-to-left shunt is persistent, systemic hypoxemia or paradoxical emboli may result. The present report describes a case of refractory hypoxemia in a critically ill patient with a PFO who had a right-to-left shunt with normal right-sided cardiac pressures. PMID:18340396

  20. A broken heart: right-to-left shunt in the setting of normal cardiac pressures.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Natalie; Fowler, Robert; Horlick, Eric; McLaughlin, Peter

    2008-03-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common structural cardiac variant occurring in approximately 30% of the general population. Patients are usually asymptomatic because the defect is flap-like and does not permit significant left-to-right shunting. However, pathological conditions that result in cardiac rotation or higher than normal right atrial pressures can reverse the normal left atrial to right atrial pressure gradient and cause a right-to-left shunt through a PFO. If the right-to-left shunt is persistent, systemic hypoxemia or paradoxical emboli may result. The present report describes a case of refractory hypoxemia in a critically ill patient with a PFO who had a right-to-left shunt with normal right-sided cardiac pressures. PMID:18340396

  1. Morphological and Volumetric Analysis of Left Atrial Appendage and Left Atrium: Cardiac Computed Tomography-Based Reproducibility Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Taina, Mikko; Korhonen, Miika; Haataja, Mika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Sipola, Petri; Mustonen, Pirjo; Vanninen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Left atrial appendage (LAA) dilatation and morphology may influence an individual's risk for intracardiac thrombi and ischemic stroke. LAA size and morphology can be evaluated using cardiac computed tomography (cCT). The present study evaluated the reproducibility of LAA volume and morphology assessments. Methods A total of 149 patients (47 females; mean age 60.9±10.6 years) with suspected cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack underwent cCT. Image quality was rated based on four categories. Ten patients were selected from each image quality category (N = 40) for volumetric reproducibility analysis by two individual readers. LAA and left atrium (LA) volume were measured in both two-chamber (2CV) and transversal view (TV) orientation. Intertechnique reproducibility was assessed between 2CV and TV (200 measurement pairs). LAA morphology (A = Cactus, B = ChickenWing, C = WindSock, D = CauliFlower), LAA opening height, number of LAA lobes, trabeculation, and orientation of the LAA tip was analysed in all study subjects by three individual readers (447 interobserver measurement pairs). The reproducibility of volume measurements was assessed by intra-class correlation (ICC) and the reproducibility of LAA morphology assessments by Cohen's kappa. Results The intra-observer and interobserver reproducibility of LAA and LA volume measurements was excellent (ICCs>0.9). The LAA (ICC = 0.954) and LA (ICC = 0.945) volume measurements were comparable between 2CV and TV. Morphological classification (ĸ = 0.24) and assessments of LAA opening height (ĸ = 0.1), number of LAA lobes (ĸ = 0.16), trabeculation (ĸ = 0.15), and orientation of the LAA tip (ĸ = 0.37) was only slightly to fairly reproducible. Conclusions LA and LAA volume measurements on cCT provide excellent reproducibility, whereas visual assessment of LAA morphological features is challenging and results in unsatisfactory agreement between readers

  2. A review of heart chamber segmentation for structural and functional analysis using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Lekadir, Karim; Gooya, Ali; Shao, Ling; Petersen, Steffen E; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a key imaging modality in clinical cardiology practice due to its unique capabilities for non-invasive imaging of the cardiac chambers and great vessels. A wide range of CMR sequences have been developed to assess various aspects of cardiac structure and function, and significant advances have also been made in terms of imaging quality and acquisition times. A lot of research has been dedicated to the development of global and regional quantitative CMR indices that help the distinction between health and pathology. The goal of this review paper is to discuss the structural and functional CMR indices that have been proposed thus far for clinical assessment of the cardiac chambers. We include indices definitions, the requirements for the calculations, exemplar applications in cardiovascular diseases, and the corresponding normal ranges. Furthermore, we review the most recent state-of-the art techniques for the automatic segmentation of the cardiac boundaries, which are necessary for the calculation of the CMR indices. Finally, we provide a detailed discussion of the existing literature and of the future challenges that need to be addressed to enable a more robust and comprehensive assessment of the cardiac chambers in clinical practice. PMID:26811173

  3. Left Ventricular Aneurysm and Ventricular Tachycardia as Initial Presentation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Jmeian, Ashraf; Thawabi, Mohammad; Goldfarb, Irvin; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a rare, potentially fatal disease. It has a wide range of clinical presentations that range from asymptomatic electrocardiogram changes to sudden cardiac death. Ventricular aneurysms and ventricular tachycardia are seen late in the disease, and are rarely the presenting manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis of CS is challenging and often missed or delayed. Case Report: We report a 35-year-old patient who presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia and ST-elevation on electrocardiogram. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronaries and left ventricular aneurysm. Subsequent 2D-echocardiography showed an infiltrative disease pattern. Cardiac MRI was done and showed late gadolinium enhancement in the septum, apex and lateral wall. The patient was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis and treated with immune suppression and antiarrhythmic agent. In addition underwent AICD implantation. Conclusion: Our case highlights the importance of suspecting cardiac sarcoidosis in young patients presenting with electrocardiogram changes, and present an atypical presentation of this disease. PMID:25839003

  4. An appreciation of some timing functions of a cardiac resynchronization device capable of left ventricular sensing.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Kucher, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Some systems for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) offer left ventricular sensing. This discussion with an illustrative case demonstrates that timing cycles in these devices may sometimes be difficult to understand because of left ventricular sensing. Programming of the left ventricular upper rate interval is crucial to optimize the resynchronization ability of the system. Interactions with the maximum sensor rate, the right ventricular upper rate interval, the left ventricular T wave protection algorithm, and the minimum ventricular tachycardia detection rate have to be considered. PMID:27605233

  5. Ghost in the left ventricle on electrocardiogram-gated cardiac computed tomography by turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sung Su; Sung, Yon Mi; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Park, Jae Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on an extremely rare case of a fake lesion in the left ventricle on electrocardiogram-gated cardiac computed tomography simulating thrombus or tumor by turbulent flow in a 14-year-old boy. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion and delayed enhancement images were helpful in excluding true thrombus or tumor. Awareness of this potential pitfall is critical in order to avoid unnecessary anticoagulation or surgery. PMID:25229204

  6. Synergistic prognostic values of cardiac sympathetic innervation with left ventricular hypertrophy and left atrial size in heart failure patients without reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Takahiro; Nakata, Tomoaki; Hashimoto, Akiyoshi; Yuda, Satoshi; Wakabayashi, Takeru; Kouzu, Hidemichi; Kaneko, Naofumi; Hase, Mamoru; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether cardiac sympathetic innervation assessed by metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity has long-term prognostic value in combination with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial size in heart failure (HF) patients without reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Design A single-centre prospective cohort study. Setting/participants With primary endpoints of cardiac death and rehospitalisation due to HF progression, 178 consecutive symptomatic HF patients with 74% men, mean age of 56 years and mean LVEF of 64.5% were followed up for 80 months. The entry criteria consisted of LVEF more than 50%, completion of predischarge clinical evaluations including cardiac MIBG and echocardiographic studies and at least more than 1-year follow-up when survived. Results Thirty-four patients with cardiac evens had larger left atrial dimension (LAD), increased LV mass index, reduced MIBG activity quantified as heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) than did the others. Multivariable Cox analysis showed that LAD and HMR were significant predictors (HR of 1.080 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.16, p=0.044) and 0.107 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.61, p=0.012, respectively). Thresholds of HMR (1.65) and LAD (37 mm) were closely related to identification of high-risk patients. In particular, HMR was a significant determinant of cardiac events in both patients with and without LV hypertrophy. Reduced HMR with enlarged LAD or LV hypertrophy identified patients at most increased risk; overall log-rank value, 11.5, p=0.0032 for LAD and 17.5, p=0.0002, respectively. Conclusions In HF patients without reduced LV ejection fraction, impairment of cardiac sympathetic innervation is related to cardiac outcomes independently and synergistically with LA size and LV hypertrophy. Cardiac sympathetic innervation assessment can contribute to better risk-stratification in combination with evaluation of LA size and LV mass but is needed to be evaluated for establishing aetiology

  7. Differential requirement for BMP signaling in atrial and ventricular lineages establishes cardiac chamber proportionality

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara R.; Yelon, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    The function of an organ relies upon the proper relative proportions of its individual operational components. For example, effective embryonic circulation requires the appropriate relative sizes of each of the distinct pumps created by the atrial and ventricular cardiac chambers. Although the differences between atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes are well established, little is known about the mechanisms regulating production of proportional numbers of each cell type. We find that mutation of the zebrafish type I BMP receptor gene alk8 causes reduction of atrial size without affecting the ventricle. Loss of atrial tissue is evident in the lateral mesoderm prior to heart tube formation and results from the inhibition of BMP signaling during cardiac progenitor specification stages. Comparison of the effects of decreased and increased BMP signaling further demonstrates that atrial cardiomyocyte production correlates with levels of BMP signaling while ventricular cardiomyocyte production is less susceptible to manipulation of BMP signaling. Additionally, mosaic analysis provides evidence for a cell-autonomous requirement for BMP signaling during cardiomyocyte formation and chamber fate assignment. Together, our studies uncover a new role for BMP signaling in the regulation of chamber size, supporting a model in which differential reception of cardiac inductive signals establishes chamber proportion. PMID:19232521

  8. Construction and establishment of a new environmental chamber to study real-time cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Gülay; Baron, Stephan; Norozi, Kambiz; Männer, Jörg; Hornung, Oliver; Blume, Holger; Misske, Judith; Heimann, Bodo; Wessel, Armin; Yelbuz, T Mesud

    2007-06-01

    Heart development, especially the critical phase of cardiac looping, is a complex and intricate process that has not yet been visualized "live" over long periods of time. We have constructed and established a new environmental incubator chamber that provides stable conditions for embryonic development with regard to temperature, humidity, and oxygen levels. We have integrated a video microscope in the chamber to visualize the developing heart in real time and present the first "live" recordings of a chick embryo in shell-less culture acquired over a period of 2 days. The time-lapse images we show depict a significant time window that covers the most critical and typical morphogenetic events during normal cardiac looping. Our system is of interest to researchers in the field of embryogenesis, as it can be adapted to a variety of animal models for organogenesis studies including heart and limb development. PMID:17490503

  9. A rare case of aortic sinuses of valsalva fistula to multiple cardiac chambers secondary to periannular aortic abscess formation from underlying Brucella endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Heidari, Aghighe; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant presence of abnormal connection from three aortic valsalva sinuses to cardiac chambers is a rare complication of native aortic Brucella endocarditis. This case report presents a 37-year-old Iranian female patient who had native aortic valve Brucella endocarditis complicated by periannular abscess formation and subsequent perforation to multi-cardiac chambers associated with congestive heart failure and left bundle branch block. Multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas to right atrium, main pulmonary artery, and formation of a pocket over left atrial roof were detected by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). She had received a full course of antibiotics therapy in a local hospital and was referred to our center for further surgery. TTE not only detected multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas but also revealed large vegetation in aortic and mitral valve leaflets and also small vegetation in the entrance of fistula to right atrium. However, the tricuspid valve was not involved in infective endocarditis. She underwent open cardiac surgery with double valve replacement with biologic valves and reconstruction of left sinus of valsalva fistula to supra left atrial pocket by pericardial patch repair. The two other fistulas to main pulmonary artery and right atrium were closed via related chambers. The post-operative course was complicated by renal failure and prolonged dependency to ventilator that was managed accordingly with peritoneal dialysis and tracheostomy. The patient was discharged on the 25th day after admission in relatively good condition. The TTE follow-up one year after discharge revealed mild paravalvular leakage in aortic valve position, but the function of mitral valve was normal and no residual fistulas were detected. PMID:26605134

  10. A rare case of aortic sinuses of valsalva fistula to multiple cardiac chambers secondary to periannular aortic abscess formation from underlying Brucella endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Heidari, Aghighe; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant presence of abnormal connection from three aortic valsalva sinuses to cardiac chambers is a rare complication of native aortic Brucella endocarditis. This case report presents a 37-year-old Iranian female patient who had native aortic valve Brucella endocarditis complicated by periannular abscess formation and subsequent perforation to multi-cardiac chambers associated with congestive heart failure and left bundle branch block. Multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas to right atrium, main pulmonary artery, and formation of a pocket over left atrial roof were detected by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). She had received a full course of antibiotics therapy in a local hospital and was referred to our center for further surgery. TTE not only detected multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas but also revealed large vegetation in aortic and mitral valve leaflets and also small vegetation in the entrance of fistula to right atrium. However, the tricuspid valve was not involved in infective endocarditis. She underwent open cardiac surgery with double valve replacement with biologic valves and reconstruction of left sinus of valsalva fistula to supra left atrial pocket by pericardial patch repair. The two other fistulas to main pulmonary artery and right atrium were closed via related chambers. The post-operative course was complicated by renal failure and prolonged dependency to ventilator that was managed accordingly with peritoneal dialysis and tracheostomy. The patient was discharged on the 25(th) day after admission in relatively good condition. The TTE follow-up one year after discharge revealed mild paravalvular leakage in aortic valve position, but the function of mitral valve was normal and no residual fistulas were detected. PMID:26605134

  11. Normalization of left ventricular function following cardiac resynchronization therapy: left bundle branch block as a potential etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Banyo; Takami, Mistuaki

    2008-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) not infrequently present conduction disturbances, which are most commonly exhibited as a left bundle branch block (LBBB). LBBB is associated with intraventricular conduction delay, paradoxical septal motion, and hemodynamic deterioration, indicating an impairment of left ventricular (LV) function. However, there is controversy as to whether dilated cardiomyopathy leading to HF could develop just as a result of conduction disturbances without apparent pre-existing heart disease. We report here 2 cases of patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and LBBB who had complete reversal of their LV dysfunction and enlargement after cardiac resynchronization therapy, which corrects the LV activation sequence. These cases might support the idea that conduction disturbances themselves can be a principal etiology in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:18503236

  12. Four-chamber heart modeling and automatic segmentation for 3D cardiac CT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Barbu, Adrian; Scheuering, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2008-03-01

    Multi-chamber heart segmentation is a prerequisite for quantification of the cardiac function. In this paper, we propose an automatic heart chamber segmentation system. There are two closely related tasks to develop such a system: heart modeling and automatic model fitting to an unseen volume. The heart is a complicated non-rigid organ with four chambers and several major vessel trunks attached. A flexible and accurate model is necessary to capture the heart chamber shape at an appropriate level of details. In our four-chamber surface mesh model, the following two factors are considered and traded-off: 1) accuracy in anatomy and 2) easiness for both annotation and automatic detection. Important landmarks such as valves and cusp points on the interventricular septum are explicitly represented in our model. These landmarks can be detected reliably to guide the automatic model fitting process. We also propose two mechanisms, the rotation-axis based and parallel-slice based resampling methods, to establish mesh point correspondence, which is necessary to build a statistical shape model to enforce priori shape constraints in the model fitting procedure. Using this model, we develop an efficient and robust approach for automatic heart chamber segmentation in 3D computed tomography (CT) volumes. Our approach is based on recent advances in learning discriminative object models and we exploit a large database of annotated CT volumes. We formulate the segmentation as a two step learning problem: anatomical structure localization and boundary delineation. A novel algorithm, Marginal Space Learning (MSL), is introduced to solve the 9-dimensional similarity transformation search problem for localizing the heart chambers. After determining the pose of the heart chambers, we estimate the 3D shape through learning-based boundary delineation. Extensive experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed approach, comparing favorably to the state-of-the-art. This

  13. Chamber-specific differences in human cardiac fibroblast proliferation and responsiveness toward simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Farhan; DeFranco, Alessandra; Siddiqui, Ramail; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Emelyanova, Larisa; Holmuhamedov, Alisher; Ross, Gracious; Shi, Yang; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Kress, David; Tajik, A Jamil; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblasts, the most abundant cells in the heart, contribute to cardiac fibrosis, the substrate for the development of arrythmogenesis, and therefore are potential targets for preventing arrhythmic cardiac remodeling. A chamber-specific difference in the responsiveness of fibroblasts from the atria and ventricles toward cytokine and growth factors has been described in animal models, but it is unclear whether similar differences exist in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) and whether drugs affect their proliferation differentially. Using cardiac fibroblasts from humans, differences between atrial and ventricular fibroblasts in serum-induced proliferation, DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, cyclin gene expression, and their inhibition by simvastatin were determined. The serum-induced proliferation rate of human atrial fibroblasts was more than threefold greater than ventricular fibroblasts with faster DNA synthesis and higher mRNA levels of cyclin genes. Simvastatin predominantly decreased the rate of proliferation of atrial fibroblasts, with inhibition of cell cycle progression and an increase in the G0/G1 phase in atrial fibroblasts with a higher sensitivity toward inhibition compared with ventricular fibroblasts. The DNA synthesis and mRNA levels of cyclin A, D, and E were significantly reduced by simvastatin in atrial but not in ventricular fibroblasts. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin on atrial fibroblasts was abrogated by mevalonic acid (500 μM) that bypasses 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Chamber-specific differences exist in the human heart because atrial fibroblasts have a higher proliferative capacity and are more sensitive to simvastatin-mediated inhibition through HMG-CoA reductase pathway. This mechanism may be useful in selectively preventing excessive atrial fibrosis without inhibiting adaptive ventricular remodeling during cardiac injury. PMID:27335167

  14. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  15. Left ventricular apical hypoplasia: Case report on cardiomyopathy and a history of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Sani, Zahra; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Rezaeian, Nahid; Seifi, Azin; Omidvar Tehrani, Sahar; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia with several different unrecognized dimensions is a newly discovered congenital anomaly of the heart. CASE REPORT In this report, we describe a case of cardiomyopathy of this type occurring in a 13-year-old male with a history of mental retardation and sudden cardiac death (SCD) of second-degree relatives. The patient was referred for an evaluation of cardiac status. An echocardiography analysis demonstrated a spherical left ventricle (LV) appearance with mild mitral regurgitation. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed a spherical and truncated LV appearance. The right ventricle was found to have elongated and wrapped around the LV, and diverticulum was also seen in the cardiac MRI. CONCLUSION To the best of our knowledge, this is to present the first case of LV apical hypoplasia combined with LV diverticulum and a family history of SCD. As more cases featuring this cardiomyopathy type are recognized, it will be easier to elucidate the natural history and management of such cardiac anomalies. PMID:27114737

  16. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  17. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  18. Isolated congenital cardiac diverticulum originating from the left ventricular apex: Report of a pediatric case.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Bostan, Ozlem Mehtap; Toprak, Muhammed Hamza Halil; Signak, Isik Senkaya; Cil, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac anomaly defined as a localized protrusion of the ventricular free wall. Although, it is usually asymptomatic, complications such as embolism, infective endocarditis, and arrhythmias can occur. The diagnosis can be made by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, or catheter angiography. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients, whereas the management of asymptomatic patients often represents a therapeutic dilemma. We report here, a 9-month-old patient with asymptomatic congenital left ventricular (LV) diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia. PMID:27212863

  19. Isolated congenital cardiac diverticulum originating from the left ventricular apex: Report of a pediatric case

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Bostan, Ozlem Mehtap; Toprak, Muhammed Hamza Halil; Signak, Isik Senkaya; Cil, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac anomaly defined as a localized protrusion of the ventricular free wall. Although, it is usually asymptomatic, complications such as embolism, infective endocarditis, and arrhythmias can occur. The diagnosis can be made by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, or catheter angiography. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients, whereas the management of asymptomatic patients often represents a therapeutic dilemma. We report here, a 9-month-old patient with asymptomatic congenital left ventricular (LV) diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia. PMID:27212863

  20. Neurological symptoms and cerebrovascular accidents: manifestations of left-sided cardiac tumours in adults

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Droste, H.T.; Baart, J.C.; Klaver, M.M.; Sie, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    We present two adult patients with a left-sided cardiac tumour in whom the diagnosis was established by transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography. They both presented with a cerebrovascular accident. Cardiac surgery for tumour excision was offered but refused by one and successfully performed in the other. In one of the patients, right femoro-crural bypass was undertaken because of arterial insufficiency. The patient who refused surgical intervention died secondary to severe septic shock. In the other patient serial transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography showed no tumour recurrence at four years of follow-up post tumour extirpation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696276

  1. Late-presenting left internal mammary to great cardiac vein fistula treated with a vascular plug.

    PubMed

    Franco-Gutierrez, Raul; Estevez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Calviño-Santos, Ramon

    2010-10-01

    A 73-year-old patient, who underwent triple bypass surgery in another hospital in 1991 after suffering an acute myocardial infarction, was admitted to our institution after an episode of unstable angina. Evidence of a left internal mammary artery grafted to the great cardiac anterior interventricular vein (GCV), with Qp:Qs > 1.5:1, was demonstrated by angiography. We report the closure of said fistula using a percutaneous left radial artery access and the deployment of an Amplatzer vascular occlusion device via the antegrade approach. PMID:20944199

  2. Fetal-Adult Cardiac Transcriptome Analysis in Rats with Contrasting Left Ventricular Mass Reveals New Candidates for Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Katja; Riemenschneider, Mona; Schulte, Leonard; Witten, Anika; Schulz, Angela; Stoll, Monika; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of fetal gene expression patterns has been implicated in common cardiac diseases in adult life including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) in arterial hypertension. Thus, increased wall stress and neurohumoral activation are discussed to induce the return to expression of fetal genes after birth in LVH. We therefore aimed to identify novel potential candidates for LVH by analyzing fetal-adult cardiac gene expression in a genetic rat model of hypertension, i.e. the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP). To this end we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis in SHRSP to identify differences in expression patterns between day 20 of fetal development (E20) and adult animals in week 14 in comparison to a normotensive rat strain with contrasting low LV mass, i.e. Fischer (F344). 15232 probes were detected as expressed in LV tissue obtained from rats at E20 and week 14 (p < 0.05) and subsequently screened for differential expression. We identified 24 genes with SHRSP specific up-regulation and 21 genes with down-regulation as compared to F344. Further bioinformatic analysis presented Efcab6 as a new candidate for LVH that showed only in the hypertensive SHRSP rat differential expression during development (logFC = 2.41, p < 0.001) and was significantly higher expressed in adult SHRSP rats compared with adult F344 (+ 76%) and adult normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (+ 82%). Thus, it represents an interesting new target for further functional analyses and the elucidation of mechanisms leading to LVH. Here we report a new approach to identify candidate genes for cardiac hypertrophy by combining the analysis of gene expression differences between strains with a contrasting cardiac phenotype with a comparison of fetal-adult cardiac expression patterns. PMID:25646840

  3. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  4. Abnormal left ventricular torsion and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K.; Shivu, Ganesh Nallur; Tahrani, Abd; Dubb, Kiran; Abozguia, Khalid; Phan, T.T.; Narendran, Parth; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Frenneaux, Michael; Stevens, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular torsion is increased and cardiac energetics are reduced in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Our aim was to determine the relationships of these abnormalities to cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in subjects with T1DM. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 subjects with T1DM free of known coronary heart disease attending an outpatient clinic. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed using heart rate variability studies and the continuous wavelet transform method. Left ventricular function was determined by speckle tracking echocardiography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress magnetic resonance imaging were used to measure cardiac energetics and myocardial perfusion reserve index, respectively. Twenty subjects (age, 35 ± 8 years; diabetes duration, 16 ± 9 years; hemoglobin A1c, 8.0% ± 1.1%) were recruited. Forty percent of the subjects exhibited definite or borderline CAN. Log peak radial strain was significantly increased in subjects with CAN compared with those without (1.56 ± 0.06 vs 1.43 ± 0.14, respectively; P = .011). Data were adjusted for log duration of diabetes, and log left ventricular torsion correlated (r = 0.593, P = .01) with log low-frequency to high-frequency ratio during the Valsalva maneuver. Log isovolumic relaxation time correlated significantly with log Valsalva ratio and log proportion of differences in consecutive RR intervals of normal beats greater than 50 milliseconds during deep breathing. However, CAN did not correlate with cardiac energetics or myocardial perfusion reserve index. Spectral analysis of low-frequency to high-frequency ratio power during the Valsalva maneuver is associated with altered left ventricular torsion in subjects with T1DM. Parasympathetic dysfunction is closely associated with diastolic deficits. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is not however the principal cause of impaired cardiac energetics. The role of CAN in the development of cardiomyopathy

  5. Impact of weightlessness on cardiac shape and left ventricular stress/strain distributions.

    PubMed

    Iskovitz, Ilana; Kassemi, Mohammad; Thomas, James D

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a finite element model of the heart is developed to investigate the impact of different gravitational loadings of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity on the cardiac shape and strain/stress distributions in the left ventricle. The finite element model is based on realistic 3D heart geometry, detailed fiber/sheet micro-architecture, and a validated orthotropic cardiac tissue model and constitutive relationship that capture the passive behavior of the heart at end-diastole. The model predicts the trend and magnitude of cardiac shape change at different gravitational levels with great fidelity in comparison to recent cardiac sphericity measurements performed during simulated reduced-gravity parabolic flight experiments. Moreover, the numerical predictions indicate that although the left ventricular strain distributions remain relatively unaltered across the gravitational fields and the strain extrema values occur at the same relative locations, their values change noticeably with decreasing gravity. As for the stress, however, both the magnitude and location of the extrema change with a decrease in the gravitational field. Consequently, tension regions of the heart on Earth can change into compression regions in space. PMID:24048335

  6. Effect of Discontinuation of Prednisolone Therapy on Risk of Cardiac Mortality Associated With Worsening Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nagano, Nobutaka; Sugano, Yasuo; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Aiba, Takeshi; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kusano, Kengo; Noguchi, Teruo; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-15

    Prednisolone (PSL) therapy is the gold standard treatment in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). However, clinicians often have difficulty in deciding whether to discontinue PSL therapy in long-term management. Sixty-one consecutive patients with CS were divided into 2 groups based on the discontinuation of PSL during the median follow-up period of 9.9 years. PSL was discontinued in 12 patients because of improvement of clinical findings. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), findings of imaging techniques, incidence of fatal arrhythmias and heart failure, and dose of PSL. After discontinuation of PSL, 5 patients had cardiac death, and discontinuation of PSL was significantly associated with higher cardiac mortality compared with continuation (p = 0.035). Although patients with discontinuation had improvement of LVEF after PSL treatment, LVEF decreased after discontinuation of PSL. Furthermore, discontinuation of PSL was associated with greater percent decrease in LVEF compared with continuation (p = 0.037) during the follow-up period. In conclusion, in the long-term management of patients with CS, discontinuation of PSL was associated with poor clinical outcomes and decreased LVEF, suggesting the importance of PSL maintenance therapy. PMID:26805658

  7. Cardiac dysfunction and orthostatic intolerance in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and a small left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kunihisa

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unknown. Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) has been recently postulated to be the cause of CFS. Orthostatic intolerance (OI) has been known as an important symptom in predicting quality of life in CFS patients. Cardiac function may be impaired in patients with ME. The presence or absence of OI was determined both symptomatically and by using a 10-min stand-up test in 40 ME patients. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function were determined echocardiographically in the ME patients compared to 40 control subjects. OI was noted in 35 (97%) of the 36 ME patients who could stand up quickly. The mean values for the cardiothoracic ratio, systemic systolic and diastolic pressures, LV end-diastolic diameter (EDD), LV end-systolic diameter, stroke volume index, cardiac index and LV mass index were all significantly smaller in the ME group than in the controls. Both a small LVEDD (<40 mm, 45 vs. 3%) and a low cardiac index (<2 l/ min/mm2, 53 vs. 8%) were significantly more common in the ME group than in the controls. Both heart rate and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups. In conclusion, a small LV size with a low cardiac output was common in ME patients, in whom OI was extremely common. Cardiac dysfunction with a small heart appears to be related to the symptoms of ME. PMID:24736946

  8. Successful Re-Repeat Resection of Primary Left Atrial Sarcoma After Previous Tumor Resection and Cardiac Autotransplant Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Syed T; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Desai, Milind Y; Pettersson, Gosta B; Gillinov, A Marc

    2016-09-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare but aggressive tumors and can present a technical challenge with regard to surgical approach and resection. Complete surgical resection, when feasible, remains crucial for palliation of symptoms and for its role as the mainstay of cardiac sarcoma therapy. Surgical resection of recurrent cardiac sarcomas, though formidable, is technically feasible and may provide reasonable survival, especially when the recurrence is local and the metastatic load is limited. In this case report, we describe a successful third cardiac sarcoma resection procedure in a young patient with previous cardiac autotransplantation and excision of left atrial sarcoma. PMID:27549550

  9. Toward standardized mapping for left atrial analysis and cardiac ablation guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R.; Linte, C. A.; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2014-03-01

    In catheter-based cardiac ablation, the pulmonary vein ostia are important landmarks for guiding the ablation procedure, and for this reason, have been the focus of many studies quantifying their size, structure, and variability. Analysis of pulmonary vein structure, however, has been limited by the lack of a standardized reference space for population based studies. Standardized maps are important tools for characterizing anatomic variability across subjects with the goal of separating normal inter-subject variability from abnormal variability associated with disease. In this work, we describe a novel technique for computing flat maps of left atrial anatomy in a standardized space. A flat map of left atrial anatomy is created by casting a single ray through the volume and systematically rotating the camera viewpoint to obtain the entire field of view. The technique is validated by assessing preservation of relative surface areas and distances between the original 3D geometry and the flat map geometry. The proposed methodology is demonstrated on 10 subjects which are subsequently combined to form a probabilistic map of anatomic location for each of the pulmonary vein ostia and the boundary of the left atrial appendage. The probabilistic map demonstrates that the location of the inferior ostia have higher variability than the superior ostia and the variability of the left atrial appendage is similar to the superior pulmonary veins. This technique could also have potential application in mapping electrophysiology data, radio-frequency ablation burns, or treatment planning in cardiac ablation therapy.

  10. Left main coronary artery atresia and associated cardiac defects: report on concomitant surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Jatene, Marcelo; Juaneda, Ignacio; Miranda, Rogerio Dos Anjos; Gato, Rafaella; Marcial, Miguel Lorenzo Barbero

    2011-10-01

    A 9-year-old boy with congenital atresia of the left main coronary artery underwent myocardial revascularization. Coarctation of the aorta and ventricular septal defect were diagnosed at the age of 1 year. At age 7 years, the child presented with syncope while exercising. Preoperative evaluation included cardiac catheterization which revealed the unexpected finding of congenital atresia of the left main coronary artery with origin of the circumflex artery from the right coronary artery. Surgical correction included myocardial revascularization by means of left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery, coarctation resection, and ventricular septal defect repair. The patient recovered uneventfully. We report the details of this extremely rare case with successful concomitant surgical management of the congenital coronary artery anomaly and the associated structural heart disease. PMID:23804483

  11. Cardiac protein synthesis and degradation during thyroxine-induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Parmacek, M S; Magid, N M; Lesch, M; Decker, R S; Samarel, A M

    1986-11-01

    Assessment of cardiac protein metabolism in thyroxine-induced left ventricular hypertrophy requires measurements of both protein synthesis and degradation. In vivo protein degradative rates can best be measured as the difference between rates of protein synthesis and growth. Accordingly, rates of left ventricular protein accumulation were determined in growing rabbits, and in animals administered intravenous L-thyroxine (200 micrograms X kg-1 X day-1) for up to 15 days. Left ventricular protein fractional synthetic rates in euthyroid and thyroxine-treated rabbits were measured by continuous infusion of [3H]leucine (200 mu Ci/h X 6 h), and results converted to milligrams protein synthesized and degraded per day. Thyroxine administration produced left ventricular hypertrophy by increasing the rate of total protein synthesis (35.7 +/- 2.0, 71.0 +/- 7.0, and 62.6 +/- 4.0 mg of left ventricular protein synthesized per day for 0-, 3-, and 9-day, thyroxine-treated rabbits, respectively). However, the increased rate of total protein synthesis was greater than the measured rate of total protein accumulation (8.1 vs. 15.9 mg protein/day for euthyroid and thyroxine-treated animals), indicating that left ventricular protein degradative rates were increased as well. These studies indicate that accelerated proteolysis may be important in the molecular and architectural remodeling of the rapidly hypertrophying heart during thyrotoxicosis. PMID:2946236

  12. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26839662

  13. Myocardial Fibrosis and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Carriers Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sean M; Shugh, Svetlana; Mazur, Wojciech; Sticka, Joshua J; Rattan, Mantosh S; Jefferies, John L; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    The goal of our study was to characterize the degree of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular dysfunction in our cohort of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Seventy percent of males with DMD have mothers who are carriers of the Xp21 mutation. Carrier phenotypic characteristics range from asymptomatic to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and cardiomyopathy. The true prevalence of cardiac involvement in DMD carriers is unknown. We performed a retrospective observational study. All female DMD carriers who underwent clinical CMR studies at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from December 6, 2006, to August 28, 2013, were evaluated. Patients underwent standard CMR assessment with LV function assessment and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). In addition, offline feature tracking strain analysis was performed on the basal, mid, and apical short axis. Twenty-two patients were studied, of which 20 underwent adequate testing for myocardial LGE. Four of 22 patients (18 %) were found to have LV dysfunction (ejection fraction <55 %). Seven of 20 DMD carriers (35 %) were found to have LGE. The patients with evidence of LGE had an overall trend to lower absolute deformation parameters; however, this did not meet statistical significance when correcting for multiple comparisons. Our study demonstrates a high rate of LGE as well as LV dysfunction in DMD carriers. Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal symptoms were not statistically different between those with and without cardiac involvement. This study demonstrates the importance of surveillance CMR evaluation of DMD carriers. PMID:25976773

  14. Three-dimensional active shape model matching for left ventricle segmentation in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Assen, Hans C.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2003-05-01

    Manual quantitative analysis of cardiac left ventricular function using multi-slice CT is labor intensive because of the large datasets. We present an automatic, robust and intrinsically three-dimensional segmentation method for cardiac CT images, based on 3D Active Shape Models (ASMs). ASMs describe shape and shape variations over a population as a mean shape and a number of eigenvariations, which can be extracted by e.g. Principal Component Analysis (PCA). During the iterative ASM matching process, the shape deformation is restricted within statistically plausible constraints (+/-3σ). Our approach has two novel aspects: the 3D-ASM application to volume data of arbitrary planar orientation, and the application to image data from another modality than which was used to train the model, without the necessity of retraining it. The 3D-ASM was trained on MR data and quantitatively evaluated on 17 multi-slice cardiac CT data sets, with respect to calculated LV volume (blood pool plus myocardium) and endocardial volume. In all cases, model matching was convergent and final results showed a good model performance. Bland-Altman analysis however, showed that bloodpool volume was slightly underestimated and LV volume was slightly overestimated by the model. Nevertheless, these errors remain within clinically acceptable margins. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that our 3D-ASM combines robustness with clinically acceptable accuracy. Without retraining for cardiac CT, we could adapt a model trained on cardiac MR data sets for application in cardiac CT volumes, demonstrating the flexibility and feasibility of our matching approach. Causes for the systematic errors are edge detection, model constraints, or image data reconstruction. For all these categories, solutions are discussed.

  15. Intracardiac Thrombosis Involving All Four Cardiac Chambers after Extracardiac Membranous Oxygenation Associated with MTHFR Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-06-01

    A 4-month-old boy diagnosed with acute myocarditis was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Follow-up echocardiography eight hours after ECMO revealed intracardiac thrombosis involving all four heart chambers. Because of the high risk of systemic embolization due to a pedunculated thrombus of the aortic valve, we performed an emergency thrombectomy. After the operation, the patient had a minor neurologic sequela of left upper arm hypertonia, which had almost disappeared at the last outpatient clinic two months later. He was diagnosed with a major mutation in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), which is related to thrombosis. PMID:27298801

  16. Intracardiac Thrombosis Involving All Four Cardiac Chambers after Extracardiac Membranous Oxygenation Associated with MTHFR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy diagnosed with acute myocarditis was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Follow-up echocardiography eight hours after ECMO revealed intracardiac thrombosis involving all four heart chambers. Because of the high risk of systemic embolization due to a pedunculated thrombus of the aortic valve, we performed an emergency thrombectomy. After the operation, the patient had a minor neurologic sequela of left upper arm hypertonia, which had almost disappeared at the last outpatient clinic two months later. He was diagnosed with a major mutation in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), which is related to thrombosis. PMID:27298801

  17. Automated detection of the left ventricular region in gated nuclear cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, A E; Arzi, M; Sau, J; Champier, J; Hadj-Moussa, S; Besson, J E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Itti, R; Mallet, J J

    1996-04-01

    An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour and its bounded area in gated isotopic ventriculography is proposed. Its purpose is to determine the ejection fraction (EF), an important parameter for measuring cardiac function. The method uses a modified version of the fuzzy C-means (MFCM) algorithm and a labeling technique. The MFCM algorithm is applied to the end diastolic (ED) frame and then the (FCM) is applied to the remaining images in a "box" of interest. The MFCM generates a number of fuzzy clusters. Each cluster is a substructure of the heart (left ventricle,...). A cluster validity index to estimate the optimum clusters number present in image data point is used. This index takes account of the homogeneity in each cluster and is connected to the geometrical property of data set. The labeling is only performed to achieve the detection process in the ED frame. Since the left ventricle (LV) cluster has the greatest area of the cardiac images sequence in ED phase, a framing operation is performed to obtain, automatically, the "box" enclosing the LV cluster. THe EF assessed in 50 patients by the proposed method and a semi-automatic one, routinely used, are presented. A good correlation between the two methods EF values is obtained (R = 0.93). The LV contour found has been judged very satisfactory by a team of trained clinicians. PMID:8626193

  18. Fat infiltration of left ventricle - a rare cause of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Acharya, Jenash; Ram, Pradhum; Khadilkar, Urmila N; Rana, Talvinder

    2016-09-01

    Cor adiposum is a rare disorder of the heart, where the normal heart tissue is replaced by fibro-fatty infiltrates. We report one such case of a middle-aged female who was declared dead shortly after a syncopal episode. At autopsy, the pericardium was intact and firmly adhered to the heart. Histopathology revealed fatty infiltrates extending into the left ventricle of the heart. A post-mortem diagnosis of Cor adiposum was made which is an uncommonly reported cause of sudden cardiac death. PMID:26975397

  19. A Collaborative Resource to Build Consensus for Automated Left Ventricular Segmentation of Cardiac MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Cowan, Brett R.; Al-Agamy, Ahmed O.; AlAttar, Mustafa A.; Ayache, Nicholas; Fahmy, Ahmed S.; Khalifa, Ayman M.; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Kadish, Alan H.; Lee, Daniel C.; Margeta, Ján; Warfield, Simon K.; Young, Alistair A.

    2013-01-01

    A collaborative framework was initiated to establish a community resource of ground truth segmentations from cardiac MRI. Multi-site, multi-vendor cardiac MRI datasets comprising 95 patients (73 men, 22 women; mean age 62.73 ± 11.24 years) with coronary artery disease and prior myocardial infarction, were randomly selected from data made available by the Cardiac Atlas Project (Fonseca et al., 2011). Three semi- and two fully-automated raters segmented the left ventricular myocardium from short-axis cardiac MR images as part of a challenge introduced at the STACOM 2011 MICCAI workshop (Suinesiaputra et al., 2012). Consensus myocardium images were generated based on the Expectation-Maximization principle implemented by the STAPLE algorithm (Warfield et al., 2004). The mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values ranged between 0.63-0.85, 0.60-0.98, 0.56-0.94 and 0.83-0.92, respectively, against the STAPLE consensus. Spatial and temporal agreement varied in different amounts for each rater. STAPLE produced high quality consensus images if the region of interest was limited to the area of discrepancy between raters. To maintain the quality of the consensus, an objective measure based on the candidate automated rater performance distribution is proposed. The consensus segmentation based on a combination of manual and automated raters were more consistent than any particular rater, even those with manual input. The consensus is expected to improve with the addition of new automated contributions. This resource is open for future contributions, and is available as a test bed for the evaluation of new segmentation algorithms, through the Cardiac Atlas Project (www.cardiacatlas.org). PMID:24091241

  20. Primary Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma Originating From the Mitral Valve Causing Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Veshti, Altin; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Demiraj, Aurel

    2015-10-01

    An 11-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of syncope and convulsion. Echocardiogram revealed a mass measuring 2 × 4 cm related to the mitral subvalvular apparatus. The mass, which appeared to be attached to the anterolateral papillary muscle, protruded into the left ventricular outflow tract causing intermittent obstruction. The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of primary synovial sarcoma. At six months following the operation, a small mass measuring 1 × 1 cm was detected in the left ventricle. The patient underwent reoperation consisting of radical resection of the subvalvular apparatus and mitral valve replacement. Histology confirmed that the mass was cardiac synovial sarcoma. One year after surgery, the patient is doing well. PMID:26467881

  1. Techniques for identification of left ventricular asynchrony for cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Peter; Faerestrand, Svein

    2005-01-01

    The most recent treatment option of medically refractory heart failure includes cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by biventricular pacing in selected patients in NYHA functional class III or IV heart failure. The widely used marker to indicate left ventricular (LV) asynchrony has been the surface ECG, but seems not to be a sufficient marker of the mechanical events within the LV and prediction of clinical response. This review presents an overview of techniques for identification of left ventricular intra- and interventricular asynchrony. Both manuscripts for electrical and mechanical asynchrony are reviewed, partly predicting response to CRT. In summary there is still no gold standard for assessment of LV asynchrony for CRT, but both traditional and new echocardiographic methods have shown asynchronous LV contraction in heart failure patients, and resynchronized LV contraction during CRT and should be implemented as additional methods for selecting patients to CRT. PMID:16943866

  2. Improved noninvasive method for measurement of cardiac output and evaluation of left-sided cardiac valve incompetence

    SciTech Connect

    Kelbaek, H.

    1989-05-01

    A time-saving method was developed to label red blood cells in vitro with /sup 99m/Tc while avoiding centrifugation. After tin incubation, extracellular tin was oxidized by sodium hypochlorite, and EDTA was added for stabilizing the complex prior to /sup 99m/Tc incubation. Labeling yields were 95%, and in vivo decay showed a high stability with a mean biologic half-life of eleven hours. The first-passage radionuclide technique for determination of cardiac output using the above-mentioned tracer was evaluated by using the left ventricle as area-of-interest with individual background correction after complete mixing of the tracer. This technique showed a high level of agreement with invasive methods. By combining this method for measurement of the forward stroke volume with the multigated equilibrium principle for determination of the total left ventricular stroke volume using similar background corrections, an exact evaluation of regurgitation fractions was obtained. In patients with aortic and mitral valve disease the noninvasive radionuclide technique gave similar but probably more accurate results as compared with contrast aortography and ventriculography. The radionuclide technique may be suitable for monitoring and selecting patients for surgical treatment.

  3. Estimating Cardiac Substructures Exposure From Diverse Radiotherapy Techniques in Treating Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Mei, Xin; Chen, Xingxing; Hu, Weigang; Hu, Silong; Zhang, Yingjian; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Xiaomao; Tuan, Jeffrey; Yu, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study compares the physical and biologically effective doses (BED) received by the heart and cardiac substructures using three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and simple IMRT (s-IMRT) in postoperative radiotherapy for patients with left-sided breast cancer. From October 2008 to February 2009, 14 patients with histologically confirmed left-sided breast cancer were enrolled and underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) simulation and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-CT to outline the left cardiac ventricle (LV) and other substructures. The linear-quadratic model was used to convert the physical doses received by critical points of inner heart to BED. The maximal dose, minimum dose, dose received by 99% of volume (D99) and dose received by 95% of volume (D95) in target areas were significantly better using IMRT and s-IMRT when compared with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05). IMRT and s-IMRT significantly reduced the maximal cardiac dose (5038.98 vs 5346.47 cGy, P = 0.002; 5146.66 vs 5346.47 cGy, P = 0.03). IMRT reduced the maximal dose to LV by 4% (P = 0.05) in comparison with 3D-CRT. The average doses to heart and LV in 3D-CRT plan were significantly lower than those in IMRT plan (P < 0.05). The average cardiac volumes receiving ≥25 Gy (V25 Gy) in IMRT, s-IMRT, and 3D-CRT plans were 73.98, 76.75, and 60.34 cm3, respectively. The average LV volumes receiving ≥25 Gy (V25 Gy) in IMRT, s-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were 23.37, 24.68, and 17.61 cm3, respectively. In the IMRT plan, the mean BED to the critical points of inner heart located within the high physical dose area were substantially lower than in 3D-CRT or s-IMRT. Compared with 3D-CRT technique, IMRT and s-IMRT had superior target dose coverage and dose uniformity. IMRT significantly reduced the maximal RT dose to heart and LV. IMRT and s-IMRT techniques did not reduce the volume of heart and LV receiving high doses. PMID

  4. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  5. Afferent fibres from pulmonary arterial baroreceptors in the left cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, K.; Sakanashi, M.; Takenaka, F.

    1974-01-01

    1. Afferent discharges were recorded from the left cardiac sympathetic nerve or the third sympathetic ramus communicans of anaesthetized cats. Twenty-one single units with baroreceptor activity were obtained. 2. The receptors of each unit were localized to the extrapulmonary part of the pulmonary artery, determined by direct mechanical probing of the wall of the pulmonary artery after death of the animals. Conduction velocity of the fibres ranged from 2·5 to 15·7 m/sec. 3. Afferent discharges occurred irregularly under artificial ventilation. The impulse activity was increased when pulmonary arterial pressure was raised by an intravenous infusion of Locke solution, or by occlusion of lung roots, and decreased by bleeding the animal from the femoral artery. 4. Above a threshold pressure, discharges occurred synchronously with the systolic pressure pulse in the pulmonary artery. A progressive further rise in pressure did not produce an increase in the number of impulses per heart beat. Occlusion of lung roots initially elicited a burst of discharges but the number of impulses for each cardiac cycle gradually decreased. 5. The receptors responded to repetitive mechanical stimuli up to a frequency of 10/sec, but failed to respond to stimuli delivered at 20/sec. 6. The results provide further evidence for the presence of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerve. These afferent fibres are likely to provide the spinal cord with specific information only on transient changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:4850456

  6. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards. PMID:27354151

  7. The left ventricular lead electrical delay predicts response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Dai, Zhenlin; Xiao, Pinxi; Pan, Chang; Zhang, Juan; Hu, Zuoying; Chen, Shaoliang

    2014-10-01

    Up to one-third of patients who undergo cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) are not responders. To identify potential responders to CRT may be sometimes difficult and time-consuming. Forty-five patients who had undergone CRT implantation for standard indications were evaluated. Electrical left ventricular (LV) lead location was assessed by left ventricular activation time (LVAT), LV lead electrical delay (LVLED), and RV-LV interlead electrical delay (RVsense-LVsense). Anatomic LV pacing location was assessed as basal or mid-ventricular between 3:00 to 5:00 (traditionally optimal site), and all the other positions (traditionally non-optimal site). CRT response was defined as a decrease in LV end-systolic volume (LVESV) exceeding 15% at six months. LVLED was larger in the responder group than that in the non-responder group (67.3 ± 8.5% vs. 55.3 ± 8.1%, P< 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, LVLED and cLBBB morphology were the two independent predictors of positive echocardiographic response to CRT (OR=1.180, P=0.003; OR=7.497, P=0.04, respectively). A cutoff value of LVLED> 54.82% predicted responders with 96.3% sensitivity and 75.2% specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.844 for LVLED (P=0.002). No relationship was found between the anatomic LV pacing sites and response to CRT (P=0.188). The larger left ventricular lead electrical delay may predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy. PMID:24996391

  8. Tomotherapy and Multifield Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning Reduce Cardiac Doses in Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: For patients with left-sided breast cancers, radiation treatment to the intact breast results in high doses to significant volumes of the heart, increasing the risk of cardiac morbidity, particularly in women with unfavorable cardiac anatomy. We compare helical tomotherapy (TOMO) and inverse planned intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using opposed tangents (3D-CRT) for reductions in cardiac volumes receiving high doses. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with left-sided breast cancers and unfavorable cardiac anatomy, determined by a maximum heart depth (MHD) of {>=}1.0 cm within the tangent fields, were planned for TOMO and IMRT with five to seven beam angles, in addition to 3D-CRT. The volumes of heart and left ventricle receiving {>=}35 Gy (V35) were compared for the plans, as were the mean doses to the contralateral breast and the volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V20) for the ipsilateral lung. Results: The mean MHD was 1.7 cm, and a significant correlation was observed between MHD and both heart and left ventricle V35. The V35s for IMRT (0.7%) and TOMO (0.5%) were significantly lower than for 3D-CRT (3.6%). The V20 for IMRT (22%) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (15%) or TOMO (18%), but the contralateral breast mean dose for TOMO (2.48 Gy) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (0.93 Gy) or IMRT (1.38 Gy). Conclusions: Both TOMO and IMRT can significantly reduce cardiac doses, with modest increases in dose to other tissues in left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  9. A robust automated left ventricle region of interest localization technique using a cardiac cine MRI atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Region of interest detection is a precursor to many medical image processing and analysis applications, including segmentation, registration and other image manipulation techniques. The optimal region of interest is often selected manually, based on empirical knowledge and features of the image dataset. However, if inconsistently identified, the selected region of interest may greatly affect the subsequent image analysis or interpretation steps, in turn leading to incomplete assessment during computer-aided diagnosis or incomplete visualization or identification of the surgical targets, if employed in the context of pre-procedural planning or image-guided interventions. Therefore, the need for robust, accurate and computationally efficient region of interest localization techniques is prevalent in many modern computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy applications. Here we propose a fully automated, robust, a priori learning-based approach that provides reliable estimates of the left and right ventricle features from cine cardiac MR images. The proposed approach leverages the temporal frame-to-frame motion extracted across a range of short axis left ventricle slice images with small training set generated from les than 10% of the population. This approach is based on histogram of oriented gradients features weighted by local intensities to first identify an initial region of interest depicting the left and right ventricles that exhibits the greatest extent of cardiac motion. This region is correlated with the homologous region that belongs to the training dataset that best matches the test image using feature vector correlation techniques. Lastly, the optimal left ventricle region of interest of the test image is identified based on the correlation of known ground truth segmentations associated with the training dataset deemed closest to the test image. The proposed approach was tested on a population of 100 patient datasets and was validated against the ground truth

  10. Comparison of Acute Alterations in Left Ventricular Relaxation and Diastolic Chamber Stiffness Induced by Hypoxia and Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, Takashi; Vogel, W. Mark; Apstein, Carl S.; Grossman, William

    1981-01-01

    To clarify conflicting reports concerning the effects of ischemia on left ventricular chamber stiffness, we compared the effects of hypoxia at constant coronary perfusion with those of global ischemia on left ventricular diastolic chamber stiffness using isolated, perfused rabbit hearts in which the left ventricle was contracting isovolumically. Since chamber volume was held constant, increases in left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) reflected increases in chamber stiffness. At a control coronary flow rate (30 ml/min), 2 min of hypoxia and pacing tachycardia (4.0 Hz) produced major increases in postpacing LVEDP (10±1 to 24±3 mm Hg, P < 0.01) and the relaxation time constant, T, (40±4 to 224±37 ms, P < 0.001), while percent lactate extraction ratio became negative (+ 18±2 to −48±15%, P < 0.001). Coronary perfusion pressure decreased (72±5 to 52±3 mm Hg, P < 0.01), and since coronary flow was held constant, the fall in coronary perfusion pressure reflected coronary dilation and a decrease in coronary vascular resistance. Following an average of 71±6s reoxygenation and initial heart rate (2.0 Hz), LVEDP and relaxation time constant T returned to control. Hypoxia alone (without pacing tachycardia) produced similar although less marked changes (LVEDP, 10±1 to 20±3 mm Hg; and T, 32±3 to 119±22 ms; P < 0.01 for both) and there was a strong correlation between LVEDP and T (r = 0.82, P < 0.001). When a similar degree of coronary vasodilatation was induced with adenosine, no change in LVEDP occurred, indicating that the increase in end diastolic pressure observed during hypoxia was not secondary to vascular engorgement, but due to an acute effect of hypoxia on the diastolic behavior of the ventricular myocardium. In contrast, global ischemia produced by low coronary flow (12−15 ml/min) resulted in a decrease in LVEDP, as well as a marked fall in left ventricular systolic pressure. In 14 global ischemia experiments, pacing tachycardia led to a

  11. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anantha Narayanan, Mahesh; DeZorzi, Christopher; Akinapelli, Abhilash; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Baskaran, Janani; Biddle, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV) myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery. PMID:26257964

  12. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  13. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  14. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction of the cardiac surgery patient; a point of view for the cardiac surgeon and cardio-anesthesiologist

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD) is defined as the inability of the ventricle to fill to a normal end-diastolic volume, both during exercise as well as at rest, while left atrial pressure does not exceed 12 mm Hg. We examined the concept of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in a cardiac surgery setting. Materials and methods Literature review was carried out in order to identify the overall experience of an important and highly underestimated issue: the unexpected adverse outcome due to ventricular stiffness, following cardiac surgery. Results Although diverse group of patients for cardiac surgery could potentially affected from diastolic dysfunction, there are only few studies looking in to the impact of DD on the postoperative outcome; Trans-thoracic echo-cardiography (TTE) is the main stay for the diagnosis of DD. Intraoperative trans-oesophageal (TOE) adds to the management. Subgroups of DD can be defined with prognostic significance. Conclusion DD with elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure can predispose to increased perioperative mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, DD is often associated with systolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy or indeed pulmonary hypertension. When the diagnosis of DD is made, peri-operative attention to this group of patients becomes mandatory. PMID:19930694

  15. Cardiac left ventricular function before and during early thyroxine treatment in severe hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, R; Müller, C; Midtbø, K; Haug, E; Nakken, K F; Hertzenberg, L; Kjørstad, K E

    1991-12-01

    In some patients with severe hypothyroidism, thyroxine replacement therapy precipitates or aggravates angina pectoris, whereas in other patients angina pectoris is ameliorated or even cured. Cardiac function in eight severely hypothyroid patients was studied by means of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) at rest and during supine bicycle exercise before thyroxine treatment, and repeated during treatment before and after administration of 160 mg of oral verapamil. There was an exercise-induced fall in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in two patients before therapy, and in two additional subjects after 17 d on suboptimal doses of thyroxine. Verapamil attenuated the fall and induced a significant increase in LVEF during exercise (P less than 0.014). No abnormal regional cardiac wall movement (RWM) was observed. After 2 months of thyroxine treatment, LVEF increased significantly during exercise both before and after verapamil (P less than 0.012 and P less than 0.005). These findings are indicative of reversible coronary artery dysfunction. We recommend that, if feasible, thyroxine should be supplemented with verapamil during the early phase of treatment. PMID:1748858

  16. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  17. Left Ventricular Flow Analysis: Recent Advances in Numerical Methods and Applications in Cardiac Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) pumps oxygenated blood from the lungs to the rest of the body through systemic circulation. The efficiency of such a pumping function is dependent on blood flow within the LV chamber. It is therefore crucial to accurately characterize LV hemodynamics. Improved understanding of LV hemodynamics is expected to provide important clinical diagnostic and prognostic information. We review the recent advances in numerical and experimental methods for characterizing LV flows and focus on analysis of intraventricular flow fields by echocardiographic particle image velocimetry (echo-PIV), due to its potential for broad and practical utility. Future research directions to advance patient-specific LV simulations include development of methods capable of resolving heart valves, higher temporal resolution, automated generation of three-dimensional (3D) geometry, and incorporating actual flow measurements into the numerical solution of the 3D cardiovascular fluid dynamics. PMID:23690874

  18. The relationship between ventricular electrical delay and left ventricular remodelling with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael R.; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Yu, Yinghong; Meyer, Timothy E.; Seth, Milan; Tchou, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between left ventricular (LV) electrical delay, as measured by the QLV interval, and outcomes in a prospectively designed substudy of the SMART-AV Trial. Methods and results This was a multicentre study of patients with advanced heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) defibrillator implantation. In 426 subjects, QLV was measured as the interval from the onset of the QRS from the surface ECG to the first large peak of the LV electrogram. Left ventricular volumes were measured by echocardiography at baseline and after 6 months of CRT by a blinded core laboratory. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. When separated by quartiles based on QLV duration, reverse remodelling response rates (>15% reduction in LV end systolic volume) increased progressively from 38.7 to 68.4% and QOL response rate (>10 points reduction) increased from 50 to 72%. Patients in the highest quartile of QLV had a 3.21-fold increase (1.58–6.50, P = 0.001) in their odds of a reverse remodelling response after correcting for QRS duration, bundle branch block type, and clinical characteristics by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusion Electrical dyssynchrony, as measured by QLV, was strongly and independently associated with reverse remodelling and QOL with CRT. Acute measurements of QLV may be useful to guide LV lead placement. PMID:21875862

  19. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Lloyd M; Knight, Kellie A; Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  20. Natakalim improves post-infarction left ventricular remodeling by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Min; Zhong, Ming-Li; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Cui, Wen-Yu; Long, Chao-Liang; Wang, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can lead to congestive heart failure and the activation of endothelial ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels may contribute to endothelial protection. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the hypothesis that natakalim, a novel K(ATP) channel opener, ameliorates post-infarction left ventricular remodeling and failure by correcting endothelial dysfunction. The effects of myocardial infarction were assessed 8 weeks following left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion in male Wistar rats. Depressed blood pressure, cardiac dysfunction, evidence of left ventricular remodeling and congestive heart failure were observed in the rats with myocardial infarction. Treatment with natakalim at daily oral doses of 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks prevented these changes. Natakalim also prevented the progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by the increase in right ventricular weight/body weight (RVW/BW) and relative lung weight, signs of cardiac dysfunction, as well as the overexpression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide mRNAs. Our results also demonstrated that natakalim enhanced the downregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, attenuated the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide (NO), inhibited the upregulated endothelin system and corrected the imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2). Overall, our findings suggest that natakalim prevents post-infarction hypertrophy and cardiac failure by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25215478

  1. The Effects of Training on the Time Components of the Left Ventricle, and Cardiac Time Components: Sedentary versus Active Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    A review of previous research was completed to determine (a) the response of the cardiac time components of the left ventricle to varying types and intensities of training programs, (b) the probable physiological explanations for these responses, and (c) the significance of the changes which did or did not occur. It was found that, at rest,…

  2. Ultrasonographic features of the persistence of superior left vena cava and pathological cardiac associations in fetus. Case series.

    PubMed

    Mărginean, Claudiu; Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Meliț, Lorena Elena; Mărginean, Maria Oana; Gozar, Liliana

    2016-06-01

    The persistence of superior left vena cava (PLSVC) is a pathological condition in fetus with risk of association with abnormalities like heterotaxy, cardiac abnormalities - atrioventricular septum defect, and conotruncal anomalies. In this paper we report 23 cases of fetuses with PLSVCs, reviewing their diagnosis, co-morbidities, and evolution in the newborns. PMID:27239657

  3. Relationship of number of phases per cardiac cycle and accuracy of measurement of left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction, and mass.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Arkadios; Baras, Panagiotis; Seimenis, Ioannis; Andreou, John; Danias, Peter G

    2004-01-01

    In cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, for any preset imaging parameters the number of phases per cardiac cycle for a single slice is proportional to breath-hold duration. We investigated the relationship between the accuracy of measurement of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (EDV and ESV, respectively), mass and ejection fraction (EF), and the number of phases acquired per cardiac cycle. Twelve adult volunteers underwent cardiac MRI and five complete LV functional studies were obtained with 8, 11, 14, 17, and 20 phases per cardiac cycle. We calculated LV volumes, EF, and mass for each acquisition, and compared them using the 20-phase acquisition as the reference standard. The scan duration was proportional to the number of phases acquired. There was a systematic underestimation of LV, EDV, and EF, with decreasing number of phases. Differences from the reference standard became significant for the 8-phase acquisition (p<0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that only those with slower heart rates (<65/min) had significant differences in EDV, but not in EF, for the 8-phase acquisition. For those with faster heart rates, no differences were detected between the different acquisitions. There were no significant differences between all acquisitions for the LV ESV and mass. We conclude that at least 11 phases per cardiac cycle are needed to maintain accuracy for cine cardiac MRI studies. Decreasing the number of phases per cardiac cycle beyond this cutoff may introduce significant error of measurement, particularly for the left ventricular EDV and EF and especially for those with bradycardia, and should be avoided. PMID:15646887

  4. Improvement of Right Ventricular Hemodynamics with Left Ventricular Endocardial Pacing during Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HYDE, EOIN R.; BEHAR, JONATHAN M.; CROZIER, ANDREW; CLARIDGE, SIMON; JACKSON, TOM; SOHAL, MANAV; GILL, JASWINDER S.; O'NEILL, MARK D.; RAZAVI, REZA; RINALDI, CHRISTOPHER A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular epicardial (BV‐CS) or endocardial left ventricular (LV) stimulation (BV‐EN) improves LV hemodynamics. The effect of CRT on right ventricular function is less clear, particularly for BV‐EN. Our objective was to compare the simultaneous acute hemodynamic response (AHR) of the right and left ventricles (RV and LV) with BV‐CS and BV‐EN in order to determine the optimal mode of CRT delivery. Methods Nine patients with previously implanted CRT devices successfully underwent a temporary pacing study. Pressure wires measured the simultaneous AHR in both ventricles during different pacing protocols. Conventional epicardial CRT was delivered in LV‐only (LV‐CS) and BV‐CS configurations and compared with BV‐EN pacing in multiple locations using a roving decapolar catheter. Results Best BV‐EN (optimal AHR of all LV endocardial pacing sites) produced a significantly greater RV AHR compared with LV‐CS and BV‐CS pacing (P < 0.05). RV AHR had a significantly increased standard deviation compared to LV AHR (P < 0.05) with a weak correlation between RV and LV AHR (Spearman rs = −0.06). Compromised biventricular optimization, whereby RV AHR was increased at the expense of a smaller decrease in LV AHR, was achieved in 56% of cases, all with BV‐EN pacing. Conclusions BV‐EN pacing produces significant increases in both LV and RV AHR, above that achievable with conventional epicardial pacing. RV AHR cannot be used as a surrogate for optimizing LV AHR; however, compromised biventricular optimization is possible. The beneficial effect of endocardial LV pacing on RV function may have important clinical benefits beyond conventional CRT. PMID:27001004

  5. Left bundle branch block and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, H N; Craige, E; Fujii, J; Nakamura, T; Bilisoly, J

    1983-10-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is associated with a prolongation of the interval from the QRS onset to the onset of left ventricular (LV) ejection. The locus and prevalence of specific sites of delay were examined in 56 patients with complete LBBB using echocardiography, phonocardiography and external pulse recordings. The results were compared with those in 52 control subjects without LBBB. The onset of the QRS complex was used as the initial reference point of measurement of time intervals. The following abnormalities were found in patients with LBBB: (1) delayed mitral valve closure (Q-MC greater than 0.08 second) was the major site of delay in 23% of patients; (2) prolongation of the LV isovolumetric contraction time (greater than 0.06 second) was the major site of delay in 41%; (3) both Q-MC and LV isovolumetric contraction time were prolonged in 18%; and (4) in 26% of patients the onset of ventricular contraction determined by the onset of the increase of the apex impulse was delayed (Q-VC greater than 0.07 second). The most common cause of delayed ejection was a prolonged LV isovolumetric contraction time, which occurred in 59% of patients. A control group of 20 patients with abnormal LV function but without LBBB had a low incidence of the 3 types of delay in LV ejection (0 to 15%). Thus, the major abnormalities in the cardiac cycle in LBBB are due to the conduction defect and not to LV dysfunction. The results of this study suggest the presence of variable abnormalities of conduction in complete LBBB. PMID:6624668

  6. Diastolic chamber properties of the left ventricle assessed by global fitting of pressure-volume data: improving the gold standard of diastolic function

    PubMed Central

    Yotti, Raquel; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; del Álamo, Juan C.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Daniel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Carlos Antoranz, J.; Mar Desco, M.; González-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Elízaga, Jaime; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In cardiovascular research, relaxation and stiffness are calculated from pressure-volume (PV) curves by separately fitting the data during the isovolumic and end-diastolic phases (end-diastolic PV relationship), respectively. This method is limited because it assumes uncoupled active and passive properties during these phases, it penalizes statistical power, and it cannot account for elastic restoring forces. We aimed to improve this analysis by implementing a method based on global optimization of all PV diastolic data. In 1,000 Monte Carlo experiments, the optimization algorithm recovered entered parameters of diastolic properties below and above the equilibrium volume (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.99). Inotropic modulation experiments in 26 pigs modified passive pressure generated by restoring forces due to changes in the operative and/or equilibrium volumes. Volume overload and coronary microembolization caused incomplete relaxation at end diastole (active pressure > 0.5 mmHg), rendering the end-diastolic PV relationship method ill-posed. In 28 patients undergoing PV cardiac catheterization, the new algorithm reduced the confidence intervals of stiffness parameters by one-fifth. The Jacobian matrix allowed visualizing the contribution of each property to instantaneous diastolic pressure on a per-patient basis. The algorithm allowed estimating stiffness from single-beat PV data (derivative of left ventricular pressure with respect to volume at end-diastolic volume intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.65, error = 0.07 ± 0.24 mmHg/ml). Thus, in clinical and preclinical research, global optimization algorithms provide the most complete, accurate, and reproducible assessment of global left ventricular diastolic chamber properties from PV data. Using global optimization, we were able to fully uncouple relaxation and passive PV curves for the first time in the intact heart. PMID:23743396

  7. Asiatic acid inhibits left ventricular remodeling and improves cardiac function in a rat model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    HUO, LIANYING; SHI, WENBING; CHONG, LING; WANG, JINLONG; ZHANG, KAI; LI, YUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling results in cardiac dysfunction and accounts for the majority of the morbidity and mortality following myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on cardiac function and left ventricular remodeling in a rat model of MI and explore the underlying mechanisms. Rats were subjected to coronary artery ligation to model MI and orally treated with AA. After 4 weeks, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was recorded, and the expression levels of a number of inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA. The degree of interstitial fibrosis was determined by evaluating the mRNA expression levels of collagen II and III. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression levels of total and phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, to investigate whether they are involved in the mechanism underlying the effect of AA on the heart. Rats subjected to MI displayed significantly impaired cardiac function compared with those subjected to a sham procedure, while this change was reversed by treatment with AA. Furthermore, AA markedly inhibited cardiac hypertrophy, reduced the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased interstitial fibrosis in the infarct border zone of MI model rats compared with those in vehicle-treated MI model rats. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 was blocked by AA in the MI rats but not in the sham rats. In summary, AA treatment preserved cardiac function and inhibited left ventricular remodeling, potentially by blocking the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 in the infarct border zone of the ischemic myocardium, indicating that AA may be a novel candidate for development as a therapy for MI. PMID:26889217

  8. Anomalous Left Circumflex Coronary Artery Arising from the Right Pulmonary Artery: A Rare Cause of Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Fursevich, Dzmitry; O'Dell, Matthew C; Flores, Miguel; Feranec, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery arising from the right pulmonary artery resulting in stress-induced cardiac arrest. The patient collapsed after running a 5K race and was resuscitated. Subsequent workup revealed the culprit anatomy, which was successfully treated with surgical ligation. To the authors' knowledge, this is only the second case of this variant coronary anomaly resulting in aborted sudden cardiac death, subsequent surgical ligation, and recovery in a healthy young adult and is the first case treated by ligation alone without coronary bypass. PMID:27014533

  9. Effect of Continued Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Ventricular Arrhythmias After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, John William; Mookadam, Farouk; Kransdorf, Evan P; Nanda, Udai; Adams, Jonathon C; Cha, Stephen; Pajaro, Octavio E; Steidley, David Eric; Scott, Robert L; Carvajal, Tomas; Saadiq, Rayya A; Srivathsan, Komandoor

    2016-08-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces ventricular arrhythmia (VA) burden in some patients with heart failure, but its effect after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is unknown. We compared VA burden in patients with CRT devices in situ who underwent LVAD implantation and continued CRT (n = 39) to those who had CRT turned off before discharge (n = 26). Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks were significantly reduced in patients with continued CRT (1.5 ± 2.7 shocks per patient vs 5.5 ± 9.3 with CRT off, p = 0.014). There was a nonsignificant reduction in cumulative VA episodes per patient with CRT continued at discharge (42 ± 105 VA per patient vs 82 ± 198 with CRT off, p = 0.29). On-treatment analysis by whether CRT was on or off identified a significantly lower burden of VA (17 ± 1 per patient-year CRT on vs 37 ± 1 per patient-year CRT off, p <0.0001) and ICD shocks (1.2 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT on vs 1.7 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT off, p = 0.018). In conclusion, continued CRT is associated with significantly reduced ICD shocks and VA burden after LVAD implantation. PMID:27328958

  10. 4-D Cardiac MR Image Analysis: Left and Right Ventricular Morphology and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, Andreas; Johnson, Ryan K.; Scholz, Thomas D.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a combination of active shape model (ASM) and active appearance model (AAM) was used to segment the left and right ventricles of normal and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) hearts on 4-D (3-D+time) MR images. For each ventricle, a 4-D model was first used to achieve robust preliminary segmentation on all cardiac phases simultaneously and a 3-D model was then applied to each phase to improve local accuracy while maintaining the overall robustness of the 4-D segmentation. On 25 normal and 25 TOF hearts, in comparison to the expert traced independent standard, our comprehensive performance assessment showed subvoxel segmentation accuracy, high overlap ratios, good ventricular volume correlations, and small percent volume differences. Following 4-D segmentation, novel quantitative shape and motion features were extracted using shape information, volume-time and dV/dt curves, analyzed and used for disease status classification. Automated discrimination between normal/TOF subjects achieved 90%–100% sensitivity and specificity. The features obtained from TOF hearts show higher variability compared to normal subjects, suggesting their potential use as disease progression indicators. The abnormal shape and motion variations of the TOF hearts were accurately captured by both the segmentation and feature characterization. PMID:19709962

  11. Left Bundle Branch Block in Acute Cardiac Events: Insights From a 23-Year Registry.

    PubMed

    Alkindi, Fahad; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Patel, Ashfaq; Gehani, Abdurrazzak A; Singh, Rajvir; Albinali, Hajar; Arabi, Abdulrahman

    2015-10-01

    Between 1991 and 2013, we evaluated the demographics, presentations, and final diagnosis of patients hospitalized with acute cardiac events and left bundle branch block (LBBB). Of 50 992 patients, 768 (1.5%) had LBBB. Compared with non-LBBB patients, patients with LBBB were mostly older, female, diabetic, and had hypertension and chronic kidney failure (CKF; P < .001 for all). Dyspnea (P < .001) and dizziness (P = .037) were more frequent in patients with LBBB. The most frequent cause of admission with LBBB was congestive heart failure (CHF; 54.2%), followed by ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI; 13.3%), valvular heart disease (9.4%), unstable angina (8.3%) and Non-STEMI (7.7%). On multivariate analysis, CKF (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-3.70) and LBBB (OR: 2.96, 95% CI: 2.01-4.42) were predictors of in-hospital mortality in the entire study population. Further analysis of patients with LBBB showed that CKF (OR: 2.93, 95% CI: 1.40-6.12) was the only predictor of in-hospital mortality. Regardless the presenting symptoms, CHF was the final diagnosis in most cases with LBBB. PMID:25477500

  12. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  13. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Assessment of Left Atrial Anatomy, Size, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kuchynka, Petr; Podzimkova, Jana; Masek, Martin; Lambert, Lukas; Cerny, Vladimir; Danek, Barbara; Palecek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been increasing evidence that comprehensive evaluation of the left atrium is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have clearly demonstrated the prognostic value of left atrial volume for long-term outcome. Furthermore, advances in catheter ablation procedures used for the treatment of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation require the need for detailed knowledge of left atrial and pulmonary venous morphology as well of atrial wall characteristics. This review article discusses the role of cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography in assessment of left atrial size, its normal and abnormal morphology, and function. Special interest is paid to the utility of these rapidly involving noninvasive imaging methods before and after atrial fibrillation ablation. PMID:26221583

  14. Left phrenic nerve anatomy relative to the coronary venous system: Implications for phrenic nerve stimulation during cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Julianne H; Goff, Ryan P; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize anatomy of the human phrenic nerve in relation to the coronary venous system, to reduce undesired phrenic nerve stimulation during left-sided lead implantations. We obtained CT scans while injecting contrast into coronary veins of 15 perfusion-fixed human heart-lung blocs. A radiopaque wire was glued to the phrenic nerve under CT, then we created three-dimensional models of anatomy and measured anatomical parameters. The left phrenic nerve typically coursed over the basal region of the anterior interventricular vein, mid region of left marginal veins, and apical region of inferior and middle cardiac veins. There was large variation associated with the average angle between nerve and veins. Average angle across all coronary sinus tributaries was fairly consistent (101.3°-111.1°). The phrenic nerve coursed closest to the middle cardiac vein and left marginal veins. The phrenic nerve overlapped a left marginal vein in >50% of specimens. PMID:25851773

  15. Cardiac wound healing post-myocardial infarction: a novel method to target extracellular matrix remodeling in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zamilpa, Rogelio; Zhang, Jianhua; Chiao, Ying Ann; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E; Halade, Ganesh V; Ma, Yonggang; Hacker, Sander O; Lindsey, Merry L

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) is a commonly used surgical model to study post-MI effects in mice. LAD occlusion induces a robust wound healing response that includes extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This chapter provides a detailed guide on the surgical procedure to permanently ligate the LAD. Additionally, we describe a prototype method to enrich cardiac tissue for ECM, which allows one to focus on ECM remodeling in the left ventricle following surgically induced MI in mice. PMID:24029944

  16. Deterioration of left ventricular chamber performance after bed rest : "cardiovascular deconditioning" or hypovolemia?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance after bed rest is characterized by hypovolemia and an excessive reduction in stroke volume (SV) in the upright position. We studied whether the reduction in SV is due to a specific adaptation of the heart to head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) or acute hypovolemia alone. METHODS AND RESULTS: We constructed left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume curves from pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and LV end-diastolic volume and Starling curves from pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and SV during lower body negative pressure and saline loading in 7 men (25+/-2 years) before and after 2 weeks of -6 degrees HDTBR and after the acute administration of intravenous furosemide. Both HDTBR and hypovolemia led to a similar reduction in plasma volume. However, baseline LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 20+/-4% after HDTBR and by 7+/-2% after hypovolemia (interaction P<0.001). Moreover, SV was reduced more and the Starling curve was steeper during orthostatic stress after HDTBR than after hypovolemia. The pressure-volume curve showed a leftward shift and the equilibrium volume of the left ventricle was decreased after HDTBR; however, after hypovolemia alone, the curve was identical, with no change in equilibrium volume. Lower body negative pressure tolerance was reduced after both conditions; it decreased by 27+/-7% (P<0.05) after HDTBR and by 18+/-8% (P<0.05) after hypovolemia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HDTBR leads to ventricular remodeling, which is not seen with equivalent degrees of acute hypovolemia. This remodeling leads to a greater decrease in SV during orthostatic stress after bed rest than hypovolemia alone, potentially contributing to orthostatic intolerance.

  17. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  18. Early cardiac toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer with or without concurrent trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Chang, Cai; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Feng, Yan; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of concurrent trastuzumab on the cardiotoxicity in patients receiving left-sided adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records of stage I-III left-sided breast cancer patients, including 64 receiving concurrent trastuzumab with radiotherapy and 73 receiving radiotherapy alone were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had normal LVEF after adjuvant chemotherapy. Information of doses volume to cardiac structures was collected. Cardiac events were assessed according to CTC 2.0. Results Median follow-up of LVEF and clinical assessment of cardiac function from the initiation of radiotherapy was 6.7 months (range 3–60.9) and 26 months (range 6.4–60.9), respectively. Grade 1 LVEF dysfunction occurred in 5 (7.8%) and 3 (4.1%) patients of the concurrent-trastuzumab and radiotherapy alone cohort, respectively. Trastuzumab was the only significant factor influencing absolute LVEF decrease in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis of concurrent-trastuzumab cohort, IMC radiotherapy and start trastuzumab during radiotherapy were independent risk factors. For concurrent cohort, mean heart dose, as well as D10-D30, D50-D55, V5-V20 of the heart and D30-D45, D65-D75, V6-V15 of the LV were significantly higher in patients developing LVEF dysfunction. Conclusions Concurrent trastuzumab and left-sided radiotherapy is well tolerated in terms of cardiotoxicity in patients with normal baseline cardiac function after adjuvant chemotherapy. However, increases in mean dose and low–dose volume of cardiac structures are associated with a higher risk of acute LVEF dysfunction. PMID:26460956

  19. Tweeting From Left to Right: Is Online Political Communication More Than an Echo Chamber?

    PubMed

    Barberá, Pablo; Jost, John T; Nagler, Jonathan; Tucker, Joshua A; Bonneau, Richard

    2015-10-01

    We estimated ideological preferences of 3.8 million Twitter users and, using a data set of nearly 150 million tweets concerning 12 political and nonpolitical issues, explored whether online communication resembles an "echo chamber" (as a result of selective exposure and ideological segregation) or a "national conversation." We observed that information was exchanged primarily among individuals with similar ideological preferences in the case of political issues (e.g., 2012 presidential election, 2013 government shutdown) but not many other current events (e.g., 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, 2014 Super Bowl). Discussion of the Newtown shootings in 2012 reflected a dynamic process, beginning as a national conversation before transforming into a polarized exchange. With respect to both political and nonpolitical issues, liberals were more likely than conservatives to engage in cross-ideological dissemination; this is an important asymmetry with respect to the structure of communication that is consistent with psychological theory and research bearing on ideological differences in epistemic, existential, and relational motivation. Overall, we conclude that previous work may have overestimated the degree of ideological segregation in social-media usage. PMID:26297377

  20. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity. PMID:26496146

  1. Deconvolution analysis in radionuclide quantitation of left-to-right cardiac shunts.

    PubMed

    Alderson, P O; Douglass, K H; Mendenhall, K G; Guadiani, V A; Watson, D C; Links, J M; Wagner, H N

    1979-06-01

    A poor bolus injection results in an unsatisfactory quantitative radionuclide angiocardiogram in as many as 20% of children with possible, left-to-right (L-R) cardiac shunts. Deconvolution analysis was applied to similar studies in experimental animals to determine whether dependence on the input bolus could be minimized. Repeated good-bolus, prolonged (greater than 2.5 sec), or multiple-peak injections were made in four normal dogs and seven dogs with surgically created atrial septal defects (ASD). QP/QS was determined using the gamma function. The mean QP/QS from ten good-bolus studies in each animal was used as the standard for comparison. In five trials in normal animals, where a prolonged or double-peak bolus led to a shunt calculation (QP/QS greater than 1.2 : 1), deconvolution resulted in QP/QS = 1.0. Deconvolution improved shunt quantitation in eight of ten trials in animals that received a prolonged bolus. The correlation between the reference QP/QS and the QP/QS calculated from uncorrected bad bolus studies was only 0.39 (p greater than 0.20). After deconvolution using a low pass filter, the correlation improved significantly (r = 0.77, p less than 0.01). The technique gave inconsistent results with multiple-peak bolus injections. Deconvolution analysis in these studies is useful in preventing normals from being classified as shunts, and in improving shunt quantitation after a prolonged bolus. Clinical testing of this technique in children with suspected L-R shunts seems warranted. PMID:536823

  2. Cardiac steatosis and left ventricular function in men with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ectopic accumulation of fat accompanies visceral obesity with detrimental effects. Lipid oversupply to cardiomyocytes leads to cardiac steatosis, and in animal studies lipotoxicity has been associated with impaired left ventricular (LV) function. In humans, studies have yielded inconclusive results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of epicardial, pericardial and myocardial fat depots on LV structure and function in male subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods A study population of 37 men with MetS and 38 men without MetS underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance and proton magnetic spectroscopy at 1.5 T to assess LV function, epicardial and pericardial fat area and myocardial triglyceride (TG) content. Results All three fat deposits were greater in the MetS than in the control group (p <0.001). LV diastolic dysfunction was associated with MetS as measured by absolute (471 mL/s vs. 667 mL/s, p = 0.002) and normalized (3.37 s-1 vs. 3.75 s-1, p = 0.02) LV early diastolic peak filling rate and the ratio of early diastole (68% vs. 78%, p = 0.001). The amount of epicardial and pericardial fat correlated inversely with LV diastolic function. However, myocardial TG content was not independently associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Conclusions In MetS, accumulation of epicardial and pericardial fat is linked to the severity of structural and functional alterations of the heart. The role of increased intramyocardial TG in MetS is more complex and merits further study. PMID:24228979

  3. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output. PMID:26643090

  4. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of the left ventricle in 3-D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-03-01

    For automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images, incorporation of temporal information may be helpful. In this study, optimal settings for calculation of temporal cross-correlations between subsequent time frames were determined, to obtain the maximum cross-correlation (MCC) values that provided the best contrast between blood and cardiac tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Both contrast and boundary gradient quality measures were assessed to optimize MCC values with respect to signal choice (radiofrequency or envelope data) and axial window size. Optimal MCC values were incorporated into a deformable model to automatically segment the left ventricular cavity. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, filtered, demodulated radiofrequency data. Results reveal that using envelope data in combination with a relatively small axial window (0.7-1.25 mm) at fine scale results in optimal contrast and boundary gradient between the two tissues over the entire cardiac cycle. Preliminary segmentation results indicate that incorporation of MCC values has additional value for automated segmentation of the left ventricle. PMID:24412178

  5. Left ventricular restoration devices.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guilherme H; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Bezerra, Hiram G; Costa, Marco A

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) remodeling results in continuous cardiac chamber enlargement and contractile dysfunction, perpetuating the syndrome of heart failure. With current exhaustion of the neurohormonal medical paradigm, surgical and device-based therapies have been increasingly investigated as a way to restore LV chamber architecture and function. Left ventricular restoration has been attempted with surgical procedures, such as partial left ventriculectomy, surgical ventricular restoration with or without revascularization, and devices, such as the Acorn CorCap, the Paracor HeartNet, and the Myocor Myosplint. Whereas all these techniques require surgical access, with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, a newer ventricular partitioning device (VPD) called Parachute, can be delivered percutaneously through the aortic valve. Designed to achieve LV restoration from within the ventricle, this VPD partitions the LV by isolating aneurysmal from normal myocardium thereby diminishing the functioning cavity. This review aims to critically appraise the above methods, with particular attention to device-based therapies. PMID:24574107

  6. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  7. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4 min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212 kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7 s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19 ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4 min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water. PMID:26385334

  8. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    PubMed

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  9. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Left Ventricular Function and Myocardial Mass: A Comparison of Coronary CT Angiography with Cardiac MRI and Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Bedia; Nayman, Alaaddin; Guler, Ibrahim; Gul, Enes Elvin; Koplay, Mustafa; Paksoy, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of this study was to compare the left ventricular parameters obtained from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) studies with two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is accepted as the gold standard in the evaluation of left ventricular functions. The study also aimed to evaluate whether or not there is a relationship between the MR-Argus and CMR tools software programs which are used in post-process calculations of data obtained by MRI. Material/Methods Forty patients with an average age of 51.4±14.9 years who had been scanned with cardiac MDCT were evaluated with cardiac MRI and 2DE. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF), cardiac output (CO), and myocardial mass values calculated by MDCT, MRI, and 2DE were compared with each other. Two different MR software programs were used to compare left ventricular functions. The CMR tools LV tutorials method is accepted as the gold standard because it can be used in three-dimensional functional evaluation. The Pearson Correlation and Bland-Altman analysis were performed to compare the results from the two MR methods (MR-Argus and CMR tools) and the results from both the MDCT and the 2DE with the CMR tools results. Results Strong positive correlations for EF values were found between the MDCT and CMR tools (r=0.702 p<0.001), and between the MR-Argus and CMR tools (r=0.746 p<0.001). The correlation between the 2DE and CMR tools (r=0.449 p<0.004), however, was only moderate. Similar results were obtained for the other parameters. The strongest correlation for ESV, EDV, and EF was between the two MR software programs. The correlation coefficient between the MDCT and CMR tools is close to the correlation coefficient between the two software programs. While the correlation between 2DE and CMR tools was satisfactory for ESV, EDV, and CO values, it was at a moderate level for the other

  11. Left ventricular diastolic function in workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Poręba, Rafał Skoczyńska, Anna; Gać, Paweł; Turczyn, Barbara; Wojakowska, Anna

    2012-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function in workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement. The studies included 115 workers (92 men and 23 women) occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement (mean age: 47.83 ± 8.29). Blood samples were taken to determine blood lipid profile, urine was collected to estimate mercury concentration (Hg-U) and echocardiographic examination was performed to evaluate diastolic function of the left ventricle. In the entire group of workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement, Spearman correlations analysis demonstrated the following significant linear relationships: between body mass index (BMI) and ratio of maximal early diastolic mitral flow velocity/early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/E') (r = 0.32, p < 0.05), between serum HDL concentration and E/E' (r = − 0.22, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and E/E' (r = 0.35, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT') (r = 0.41, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and ratio of maximal early diastolic mitral flow velocity/maximal late diastolic mitral flow velocity (E/A) (r = − 0.31, p < 0.05) and between serum HDL concentration and E/A (r = 0.43, p < 0,05). In logistic regression analysis it as shown that independent factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction risk in the study group included a higher urine mercury concentration, a higher value of BMI and a lower serum HDL concentration (OR{sub Hg}-{sub U} = 1.071, OR{sub BMI} = 1.200, OR{sub HDL} = 0.896, p < 0.05). Summing up, occupational exposure to mercury vapour may be linked to impaired left ventricular diastolic function in workers without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement. -- Highlights: ► Study aimed at evaluation of LVDD in workers occupationally exposed to Hg. ► There was significant linear relationships

  12. Usefulness of cardiac meta-iodobenzylguanidine imaging to identify patients with chronic heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction <35% at low risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takahisa; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Morita, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshio; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Kawasaki, Masato; Kikuchi, Atsushi; Kondo, Takumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimi, Masashi; Hakui, Hideyuki; Ozaki, Tatsuhisa; Sato, Yoshihiro; Seo, Masahiro; Sakata, Yasushi; Fukunami, Masatake

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are often treated with implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). However, current criteria for device use that is based largely on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) lead to many patients receiving ICDs that never deliver therapy. It is of clinical significance to identify patients who do not require ICDs. Although cardiac I-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging provides prognostic information about CHF, whether it can identify patients with CHF who do not require an ICD remains unclear. We studied 81 patients with CHF and LVEF <35%, assessed by cardiac MIBG imaging at enrollment. The heart-to-mediastinal ratio (H/M) in delayed images and washout rates were divided into 6 grades from 0 to 5, according to the degree of deviation from control values. The study patients were classified into 3 groups: low (1 to 4), intermediate (5 to 7), and high (8 to 10), according to the MIBG scores defined as the sum of the H/M and washout rate scores. Sixteen patients died of SCD during a follow-up period. Patients with low MIBG score had a significantly lower risk of SCD than those with intermediate and high scores (low [n = 19], 0%; intermediate [n = 37], 19%; high [n = 25], 36%; p = 0.001). The positive predictive value of low MIBG score for identifying patients without SCD was 100%. In conclusion, the MIBG score can identify patients with CHF and LVEF <35% who have low risk of developing SCD. PMID:25851796

  13. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  14. Electrical wave propagation in an anisotropic model of the left ventricle based on analytical description of cardiac architecture.

    PubMed

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher-Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  15. Has Microsoft® Left Behind Risk Modeling in Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Poullis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: This concept paper examines a number of key areas central to quality and risk assessment in cardiac surgery. The effect of surgeon and institutional factors with regard to outcomes in cardiac surgery is utilized to demonstrate the need to sub analyze cardiac surgeons performance in a more sophisticated manner than just operation type and patient risk factors, as in current risk models. By utilizing the mathematical/engineering concept of Fourier analysis in the breakdown of cardiac surgical results the effects of each of the core components that makes up the care package of a patient’s experiences are examined. The core components examined include: institutional, regional, patient, and surgeon effects. The limitations of current additive (Parsonnet, Euroscore) and logistic (Euroscore, Southern Thoracic Society) regression risk analysis techniques are discussed. The inadequacy of current modeling techniques is demonstrated via the use of known medical formula for calculating flow in the internal mammary artery and the calculation of blood pressure. By examining the fundamental limitations of current risk analysis techniques a new technique is proposed that embraces modern software computer technology via the use of structured query language. PMID:21449233

  16. A Voluntary Breath-Hold Treatment Technique for the Left Breast With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy Using Surface Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, David P.; Turcotte, Julie C.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts ; Sedlacek, Daniel E.; Cotter, Christopher R.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatments can be used to reduce cardiac dose for patients with left-sided breast cancer and unfavorable cardiac anatomy. A surface imaging technique was developed for accurate patient setup and reproducible real-time BH positioning. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional surface images were obtained for 20 patients. Surface imaging was used to correct the daily setup for each patient. Initial setup data were recorded for 443 fractions and were analyzed to assess random and systematic errors. Real time monitoring was used to verify surface placement during BH. The radiation beam was not turned on if the BH position difference was greater than 5 mm. Real-time surface data were analyzed for 2398 BHs and 363 treatment fractions. The mean and maximum differences were calculated. The percentage of BHs greater than tolerance was calculated. Results: The mean shifts for initial patient setup were 2.0 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.3 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The mean 3-dimensional vector shift was 7.8 mm. Random and systematic errors were less than 4 mm. Real-time surface monitoring data indicated that 22% of the BHs were outside the 5-mm tolerance (range, 7%-41%), and there was a correlation with breast volume. The mean difference between the treated and reference BH positions was 2 mm in each direction. For out-of-tolerance BHs, the average difference in the BH position was 6.3 mm, and the average maximum difference was 8.8 mm. Conclusions: Daily real-time surface imaging ensures accurate and reproducible positioning for BH treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  17. Nonischemic Left Ventricular Scar as a Substrate of Life-Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death in Competitive Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rigato, Ilaria; De Lazzari, Manuel; Susana, Angela; Niero, Alice; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Migliore, Federico; Rizzo, Stefania; Giorgi, Benedetta; De Conti, Giorgio; Sarto, Patrizio; Serratosa, Luis; Patrizi, Giampiero; De Maria, Elia; Pelliccia, Antonio; Basso, Cristina; Schiavon, Maurizio; Bauce, Barbara; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Background— The clinical profile and arrhythmic outcome of competitive athletes with isolated nonischemic left ventricular (LV) scar as evidenced by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance remain to be elucidated. Methods and Results— We compared 35 athletes (80% men, age: 14–48 years) with ventricular arrhythmias and isolated LV subepicardial/midmyocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (group A) with 38 athletes with ventricular arrhythmias and no LGE (group B) and 40 healthy control athletes (group C). A stria LGE pattern with subepicardial/midmyocardial distribution, mostly involving the lateral LV wall, was found in 27 (77%) of group A versus 0 controls (group C; P<0.001), whereas a spotty pattern of LGE localized at the junction of the right ventricle to the septum was respectively observed in 11 (31%) versus 10 (25%; P=0.52). All athletes with stria pattern showed ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant right bundle branch block morphology, 13 of 27 (48%) showed ECG repolarization abnormalities, and 5 of 27 (19%) showed echocardiographic hypokinesis of the lateral LV wall. The majority of athletes with no or spotty LGE pattern had ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant left bundle branch block morphology and no ECG or echocardiographic abnormalities. During a follow-up of 38±25 months, 6 of 27 (22%) athletes with stria pattern experienced malignant arrhythmic events such as appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock (n=4), sustained ventricular tachycardia (n=1), or sudden death (n=1), compared with none of athletes with no or LGE spotty pattern and controls. Conclusions— Isolated nonischemic LV LGE with a stria pattern may be associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death in the athlete. Because of its subepicardial/midmyocardial location, LV scar is often not detected by echocardiography. PMID:27390211

  18. Cardiac energy metabolic alterations in pressure overload–induced left and right heart failure (2013 Grover Conference Series)

    PubMed Central

    Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pressure overload of the heart, such as seen with pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension, can result in cardiac hypertrophy and the eventual development of heart failure. The development of hypertrophy and heart failure is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in the heart, including alterations in cardiac energy metabolism. Under normal conditions, the high energy (adenosine triphosphate [ATP]) demands of the heart are primarily provided by the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids, carbohydrates (glucose and lactate), and ketones. In contrast, the hypertrophied failing heart is energy deficient because of its inability to produce adequate amounts of ATP. This can be attributed to a reduction in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, with the heart becoming more reliant on glycolysis as a source of ATP production. If glycolysis is uncoupled from glucose oxidation, a decrease in cardiac efficiency can occur, which can contribute to the severity of heart failure due to pressure-overload hypertrophy. These metabolic changes are accompanied by alterations in the enzymes that are involved in the regulation of fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. It is now becoming clear that optimizing both energy production and the source of energy production are potential targets for pharmacological intervention aimed at improving cardiac function in the hypertrophied failing heart. In this review, we will focus on what alterations in energy metabolism occur in pressure overload induced left and right heart failure. We will also discuss potential targets and pharmacological approaches that can be used to treat heart failure occurring secondary to pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension. PMID:25992268

  19. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  20. Right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle and ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Mangukia, Chirantan; Sethi, Sonali; Agarwal, Saket; Mishra, Smita; Satsangi, Deepak Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle with ventricular septal defect. The blood supply to the innominate artery was by a collateral arising from the descending aorta. The embryological development of this anomaly can be explained by the hypothetical double aortic arch model proposed by Edwards with interruption of the arch at two levels. PMID:24987265

  1. Wtip is required for proepicardial organ specification and cardiac left/right asymmetry in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Powell, Rebecca; Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Hsu, Chaonan; Lakiza, Olga; Nomura, Hiroki; Renfrew, Erin; Garrity, Deborah; Obara, Tomoko

    2016-09-01

    Wilm's tumor 1 interacting protein (Wtip) was identified as an interacting partner of Wilm's tumor protein (WT1) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. WT1 is expressed in the proepicardial organ (PE) of the heart, and mouse and zebrafish wt1 knockout models appear to lack the PE. Wtip's role in the heart remains unexplored. In the present study, we demonstrate that wtip expression is identical in wt1a‑, tcf21‑, and tbx18‑positive PE cells, and that Wtip protein localizes to the basal body of PE cells. We present the first genetic evidence that Wtip signaling in conjunction with WT1 is essential for PE specification in the zebrafish heart. By overexpressing wtip mRNA, we observed ectopic expression of PE markers in the cardiac and pharyngeal arch regions. Furthermore, wtip knockdown embryos showed perturbed cardiac looping and lacked the atrioventricular (AV) boundary. However, the chamber‑specific markers amhc and vmhc were unaffected. Interestingly, knockdown of wtip disrupts early left‑right (LR) asymmetry. Our studies uncover new roles for Wtip regulating PE cell specification and early LR asymmetry, and suggest that the PE may exert non‑autonomous effects on heart looping and AV morphogenesis. The presence of cilia in the PE, and localization of Wtip in the basal body of ciliated cells, raises the possibility of cilia-mediated PE signaling in the embryonic heart. PMID:27484451

  2. Human Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Shows Cardiac Nos1 Translocation and its Increased Levels are Related to Left Ventricular Performance

    PubMed Central

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Carnicer, Ricardo; Tarazón, Estefanía; Ortega, Ana; Gil-Cayuela, Carolina; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) as a major modulator of cardiac function has been extensively studied in experimental models; however, its role in human ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) has never been analysed. Thus, the objectives of this work are to study NOS1 and NOS-related counterparts involved in regulating physiological function of myocyte, to analyze NOS1 localisation, activity, dimerisation, and its relationship with systolic function in ICM. The study has been carried out on left ventricular tissue obtained from explanted human hearts. Here we demonstrate that the upregulation of cardiac NOS1 is not accompanied by an increase in NOS activity, due in part to the alterations found in molecules involved in the regulation of its activity. We observed partial translocation of NOS1 to the sarcolemma in ischemic hearts, and a direct relationship between its protein levels and systolic ventricular function. Our findings indicate that NOS1 may be significant in the pathophysiology of human ischemic heart disease with a preservative role in maintaining myocardial homeostasis. PMID:27041589

  3. Congenital giant cardiac tumor with severe left-ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction and arrhythmia treated with pulmonary artery banding and long-term amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Daiji; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    We report a congenital giant cardiac tumor that occupied the majority of left ventricular cavity with severe left ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction. The hemodynamics were similar to univentricular physiology. He was treated with prostaglandins and bilateral pulmonary artery banding. He had frequent supraventricular tachycardia associated with ventricular pre-excitation that was controlled by long-term administration of intravenous amiodarone. The patient died due to sepsis after 3 months. PMID:22529609

  4. Relationship between migraine and cardiac and pulmonary right-to-left shunts.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, P; Nightingale, S

    2001-02-01

    A relationship between migraine with aura and the presence of right-to-left shunts has been reported in two studies. Right-to-left shunts are also associated with some forms of decompression illness. While conducting research in divers with decompression illness, it was our impression that divers with a large shunt often had a history of migraine with aura in everyday life and after dives. Therefore we routinely asked all divers about migraine symptoms. The medical records of the last 200 individuals referred for investigation of decompression illness were reviewed to determine the association between right-to-left shunts and migraine aura after diving, and migraine in daily life unconnected with diving. Migraine with aura in daily life unconnected with diving occurred significantly more frequently in individuals who had a large shunt which was present at rest (38 of 80; 47.5%) compared with those who had a shunt which was smaller or only seen after a Valsalva manoeuvre (four of 40; 10%) or those with no shunt (11 of 80; 13.8%) (P<0.001). Hemiplegic migraine occurred in 10 divers, each of whom had a shunt that was present at rest; in eight of these cases the shunt was large. The prevalence of migraine without aura was similar in all groups. Post-dive migraine aura was significantly more frequent in individuals who had a large shunt present at rest (21 of 80; 26.3%) compared with those who had a shunt that was smaller or only seen after a Valsalva manoeuvre (five of 40; 12.5%) or no shunt (one of 80; 1.3%) (P<0.001). Thus individuals with a large right-to-left shunt have an increased prevalence of migraine with aura in daily life unconnected with diving, and they also have an increased incidence of migraine aura after dives, but only when the dives liberate venous bubbles. These data suggest the possibility that, in some individuals, right-to-left shunts have a role in the aetiology of migraine with aura. The observations suggest that paradoxical gas embolism may

  5. Oxidative and proteolytic profiles of the right and left heart in a model of cancer-induced cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Borges, F H; Marinello, P C; Cecchini, A L; Blegniski, F P; Guarnier, F A; Cecchini, R

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac cachexia is a syndrome that has received increased attention in recent years. Although an association between proteolysis and cardiac cachexia has been proposed, the direct influence of oxidative stress on the process has not been demonstrated. In the present study, the right (RH) and left (LH) hearts (atrium and ventricle of each side of the heart) were collected from rats at the 5th and 10th days after phosphate buffer (control) orWalker-256 solid tumour implantation. Immediately after sacrifice, cachexia was determined in tumour-bearing animals by the formula: [(inicial body weight-final body weight+tumour weight+weight gain of control group)/(initial body weight+body mass gain of control group)]×100%; RH and LH were stored until use. Oxidative stress and proteolysis were determined in each collected sample. In addition, heart samples were collected from a separate set of animals to determine the thickness of the left and right ventricles. Cachexia values increased over time after tumour implantation from 6.85% at the 5th day to 17.76% at the 10th day. There was no significant difference in LH wet weight and ventricle thickness compared with the control, where as RH wet weight (0.109±0.09g at the 5th day and 0.093±0.09g at the 10th day) and thickness (420±16μm at the 5th day and 279±08μm at the 10th day) were significantly decreased at both time points when compared with control values (0.153±0.06g and 607±21μm, respectively). tert-Butyl-stimulated chemiluminescence analysis revealed a significant increase in the LH and decrease in the RH oxidative stress profiles. Carbonylated proteins increased in the LH (140%, p<0.05) and RH (100%, p<0.05) at the 5th day, and significantly decreased in both sides on the 10th day compared to controls. Chemotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and calpain-like activities were evaluated by chemiluminescence, and only calpain-like activity was found to increase at the 5th day in the RH. In the LH, all proteolytic

  6. Measurement of cardiac left ventricular pressure in conscious rats using a fluid-filled catheter.

    PubMed

    Schenk, J; Hebden, A; McNeill, J H

    1992-05-01

    A fluid-filled catheter consisting of 100 cm of PE50 polyethylene tubing welded to 7 cm of PE10 polyethylene tubing (PE50/PE10) was constructed for the purpose of measuring the rate of left ventricular pressure development (+dP/dt) in conscious, freely moving rats. Prior to in vivo experiments, four PE50/PE10 catheters were randomly selected, and their natural frequencies and damping ratios were determined using a square wave impact. The mean (n = 4), natural frequency of these catheters was shown to be 35.0 +/- 5.5 Hz, and the mean damping ratio was 0.83 +/- 0.10. Natural frequency plotted against increasing PE50 tubing length was shown to have a slope of -0.44 Hz/cm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. The effect of the 7-cm PE10 tubing segment on the catheter damping ratio was also demonstrated. One of the four PE50/PE10 type catheters exhibited a damping ratio of 0.74 +/- 0.09. When the 7-cm PE10 tube was removed, the damping ratio was reduced to 0.31 +/- 0.04. Left ventricular +dP/dt obtained in conscious rats with a PE50/PE10 catheter (n = 7; 6300 +/- 300 mmHg/sec) was significantly less than the +dP/dt obtained using a 100-cm PE50 catheter (n = 6; 9400 +/- 400 mmHg/sec). The results of this study make it clear that the PE50/PE10 catheter is suitable for the measurement of left ventricular +dP/dt in the conscious rat, and that catheter design has a profound influence on both the catheter natural frequency and damping ratio. PMID:1498344

  7. [Left ventricular early diastolic filling and atrial contribution assessed by ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Hishida, H; Furuta, T; Sawano, T; Kurokawa, H; Kiriyama, T; Kato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Mizuno, Y; Takeuchi, A

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluated early diastolic left ventricular (LV) filling and the atrial contribution to ventricular filling in patients (pts) with various heart diseases using ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy. Conventional equilibrium list mode ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy was performed for 19 normal subjects (N) as controls, 104 pts with old myocardial infarction (OMI), 19 pts with essential hypertension (HT), seven pts with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), three pts with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 19 pts with pure mitral stenosis (MS) and one pt with both MS and aortic regurgitation to evaluate early diastolic LV filling. The LV stroke counts corresponding to stroke volume and the early diastolic LV peak filling rate (DdV/dt) were obtained from the LV time-activity curve and its first derivative. Then the DdV/dt was normalized by stroke counts. The DdV/dt was significantly lower in pts with OMI (4.34 +/- 1.02/sec, p less than 0.001), HT (3.93 +/- 0.70/sec, p less than 0.001), IHSS (4.23 +/- 1.59/sec, p less than 0.01) and MS (4.56 +/- 1.05/sec, p less than 0.01) than in N (5.93 +/- 1.26/sec). Then, in OMI, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.45, p less than 0.05) with infarct size (% abnormal contracting segment = %ACS) obtained by contrast left ventriculography. Furthermore, in pts with HT, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.59, p less than 0.02) with the left ventricular mean wall thickness obtained by M-mode echocardiography. In pts with MS, the DdV/dt also correlated significantly (r = 0.73, p less than 0.001) with the mitral orifice area obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography. However, it has been difficult to assess the atrial contribution to ventricular filling by conventional ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy, because the LV time-activity curve in the late diastolic phase was distorted and unreliable, whenever a minimal variation of the R-R interval occurred

  8. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  9. Correlation of heart rate variability with cardiac functional and metabolic variables in cyclists with training induced left ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pluim, B; Swenne, C; Zwinderman, A; Maan, A; van der Laarse, A; Doornbos, J; Van der Wall, E E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the correlation between heart rate variability and left ventricular mass in cyclists with an athlete's heart.
METHODS—Left ventricular mass and diastolic function were determined at rest and myocardial high energy phosphates were quantified at rest and during atropine-dobutamine stress in 12 male cyclists and 10 control subjects, using magnetic resonance techniques. Ambulatory 24 hour ECG recordings were obtained, and time and frequency domain heart rate variability indices were computed.
RESULTS—In the cyclists, the mean of all RR intervals between normal beats (meanNN), the SD of the RR intervals, and their coefficient of variation were significantly greater than in control subjects (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05, respectively). For cyclists and control subjects, only meanNN correlated with left ventricular mass (r = 0.48, p = 0.038). The heart rate variability indices that correlated with functional or metabolic variables were: meanNN v E/A peak (the ratio of peak early and peak atrial filling rate) (r = 0.48, p = 0.039); the root mean square of successive differences in RR intervals among successive normal beats v E/A area (ratio of peak early and peak atrial filling volume) (r = 0.48, p = 0.040); percentage of successive RR intervals differing by more than 50 ms v the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio at rest (r = 0.54, p = 0.017); and the SD of the average RR intervals during all five minute periods v the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio during stress (r = 0.60, p = 0.007).
CONCLUSIONS—Highly trained cyclists have increased heart rate variability indices, reflecting increased cardiac vagal control compared with control subjects. Left ventricular mass has no major influence on heart rate variability, but heart rate variability is significantly correlated with high energy phosphate metabolism and diastolic function.


Keywords: heart rate variability; left ventricular mass; hypertrophy; athlete

  10. Zic3 is required in the extra-cardiac perinodal region of the lateral plate mesoderm for left-right patterning and heart development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in ZIC3 cause human X-linked heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations. A mouse model with targeted deletion of Zic3 demonstrates an early role for Zic3 in gastrulation, CNS, cardiac and left-right axial development. The observation of multiple malformations in Zic3(null) mice a...

  11. Sudden Cardiac Death Associated with Anomalous Origin of the Left Main Coronary Artery from the Right Sinus, with an Intramural Course

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Huai-Ren; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Chao, Shen-Feng; Wang, Ji-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva is extremely rare and can lead to sudden cardiac death. We report a case in which an 18-year-old college student collapsed immediately after a long-distance run of 10 km. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electrical shock for ventricular fibrillation, she experienced a return of spontaneous circulation. Cardiac catheterization and cardiac computed tomographic angiography revealed an unusually long intramural course of the left main coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva. The young woman underwent a successful unroofing operation for coronary artery correction. She remained asymptomatic upon exercise during 2.5 years of follow-up. PMID:26664310

  12. The cardiac-restricted protein ADP-ribosylhydrolase-like 1 is essential for heart chamber outgrowth and acts on muscle actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stuart J; Towers, Norma; Saldanha, José W; Shang, Catherine A; Mahmood, S Radma; Taylor, William R; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-08-15

    Adprhl1, a member of the ADP-ribosylhydrolase protein family, is expressed exclusively in the developing heart of all vertebrates. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, distribution of its mRNA is biased towards actively growing chamber myocardium. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of all Adprhl1 variants inhibits striated myofibril assembly and prevents outgrowth of the ventricle. The resulting ventricles retain normal electrical conduction and express markers of chamber muscle differentiation but are functionally inert. Using a cardiac-specific Gal4 binary expression system, we show that the abundance of Adprhl1 protein in tadpole hearts is tightly controlled through a negative regulatory mechanism targeting the 5'-coding sequence of Xenopus adprhl1. Over-expression of full length (40kDa) Adprhl1 variants modified to escape such repression, also disrupts cardiac myofibrillogenesis. Disarrayed myofibrils persist that show extensive branching, with sarcomere division occurring at the actin-Z-disc boundary. Ultimately, Adprhl1-positive cells contain thin actin threads, connected to numerous circular branch points. Recombinant Adprhl1 can localize to stripes adjacent to the Z-disc, suggesting a direct role for Adprhl1 in modifying Z-disc and actin dynamics as heart chambers grow. Modelling the structure of Adprhl1 suggests this cardiac-specific protein is a pseudoenzyme, lacking key residues necessary for ADP-ribosylhydrolase catalytic activity. PMID:27217161

  13. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection by changes in left ventricular volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.K.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1988-11-01

    Sixteen patients underwent heart transplantation (11 orthotopic, five heterotopic). Monitoring for acute rejection was by both endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) and multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning with technetium 99m-labelled red blood cells. From the scans information was obtained on left ventricular volumes (stroke, end-diastolic, and end-systolic), ejection fraction, and heart rate. Studies (208) were made in the 16 patients. There was a highly significant correlation between the reduction in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume (and a less significant correlation in end-systolic volume) and increasing acute rejection seen on EMB. Heart rate and ejection fraction did not correlate with the development of acute rejection. Correlation of a combination of changes in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume with EMB showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 96%. Radionuclide scanning is therefore a useful noninvasive tool for monitoring acute rejection.

  14. Fever and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eugene M.; Marcelin, Jasmine R.; Tande, Aaron J.; Rizza, Stacey A.; Cummins, Nathan W.

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old avid deer hunter with ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation for destination therapy two years ago. He was living an active lifestyle, tracking deer and fishing in a Midwestern forest in November. His wife removed an engorged tick on his thorax. A few days later, he experienced fever, confusion, and ataxia and was hospitalized with septic shock and ventricular fibrillation. The LVAD site had no signs of trauma, drainage, warmth, or tenderness. A peripheral blood smear revealed intraleukocytic anaplasma microcolony inclusions. After completing 14 days of doxycycline, he recovered. Typical non-device-associated infections in LVAD recipients include pneumonia, urinary tract infection, or Clostridium difficile colitis. Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is a very atypical non-LVAD infection, and the incidence of tickborne illnesses in LVAD recipients is unknown. PMID:26380334

  15. Dipyridamole-thallium tests are predictive of severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoca, M.A.; Canziani, M.E.; Gil, M.A.; Castiglioni, M.L.; Cassiolato, J.L.; Barbieri, A.; Lima, V.C.; Draibe, S.A.; Martinez, E.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In a population of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and a high prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the authors investigated the association between the results of dipyridamole-thallium tests (DTTs) and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. They observed a positive significant association between positive DTTs and the occurrence of severe forms of ventricular arrhythmias. A significant association was also observed between the presence of severe LVH and the occurrence of severe ventricular arrhythmias. However, no association was found between the presence of LVH and the positivity of the DTT. As most of their patients with positive DTTs had unimpaired coronary circulations, they conclude that positive DTTs, although falsely indicative of impaired myocardial blood supply, does have an important clinical relevance, indicating increased risk of morbidity (and, possibly, mortality) due to ventricular arrhythmias in a population of CRF patients submitted to chronic renal function replacement program.

  16. Cardiac chamber volumes by echocardiography using a new mathematical method: A promising technique for zero-G use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, J. C.; Beattie, J. M.; Gaffney, F. A.; Nixon, J. V.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate, reproducible, and non-invasive means for ventricular volume determination are needed for evaluating cardiovascular function zero-gravity. Current echocardiographic methods, particularly for the right ventricle, suffer from a large standard error. A new mathematical approach, recently described by Watanabe et al., was tested on 1 normal formalin-fixed human hearts suspended in a mineral oil bath. Volumes are estimated from multiple two-dimensional echocardiographic views recorded from a single point at sequential angles. The product of sectional cavity area and center of mass for each view summed over the range of angles (using a trapezoidal rule) gives volume. Multiple (8-14) short axis right ventricle and left ventricle views at 5.0 deg intervals were videotaped. The images were digitized by two independent observers (leading-edge to leading-edge technique) and analyzed using a graphics tablet and microcomputer. Actual volumes were determined by filling the chambers with water. These data were compared to the mean of the two echo measurements.

  17. Details of left ventricular radial wall motion supporting the ventricular theory of the third heart sound obtained by cardiac MR

    PubMed Central

    Robson, M D; Rider, O J; Pegg, T J; Dasanu, C A; Jung, B A; Rotaru, N; Clarke, K; Holloway, C J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obtaining new details of radial motion of left ventricular (LV) segments using velocity-encoding cardiac MRI. Methods: Cardiac MR examinations were performed on 14 healthy volunteers aged between 19 and 26 years. Cine images for navigator-gated phase contrast velocity mapping were acquired using a black blood segmented κ-space spoiled gradient echo sequence with a temporal resolution of 13.8 ms. Peak systolic and diastolic radial velocities as well as radial velocity curves were obtained for 16 ventricular segments. Results: Significant differences among peak radial velocities of basal and mid-ventricular segments have been recorded. Particular patterns of segmental radial velocity curves were also noted. An additional wave of outward radial movement during the phase of rapid ventricular filling, corresponding to the expected timing of the third heart sound, appeared of particular interest. Conclusion: The technique has allowed visualization of new details of LV radial wall motion. In particular, higher peak systolic radial velocities of anterior and inferior segments are suggestive of a relatively higher dynamics of anteroposterior vs lateral radial motion in systole. Specific patterns of radial motion of other LV segments may provide additional insights into LV mechanics. Advances in knowledge: The outward radial movement of LV segments impacted by the blood flow during rapid ventricular filling provides a potential substrate for the third heart sound. A biphasic radial expansion of the basal anteroseptal segment in early diastole is likely to be related to the simultaneous longitudinal LV displacement by the stretched great vessels following repolarization and their close apposition to this segment. PMID:24641347

  18. Noninvasive quantification of left ventricular mass by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Development of the method and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Maddahi, J.; Crues, J.; Berman, D.S.; Mericle, J.; Garcia, E.V.; Becerra, A.M.; Henderson, R.; Bradley, W.

    1985-05-01

    Determination of left ventricular myocardial (LV) mass may aid evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as well as percent viable myocardium in ischemic heart disease. The validity of cardiac NMR for determination of LV mass was evaluated in 9 dogs using a superconducting magnet operating at 0.35 Tesla. In-vivo gated spin echo pulsing sequences were used obtaining 0.7 cm thick slices of the heart, spaced by 1 cm, in three orthogonal planes. After sacrifice, the nonbeating hearts were imaged in-situ without gating. On each NMR slice, the LV surface area was planimetered and multiplied by slice spacing (1) and myocardial specific gravity (1.05) to obtain slice mass. For total LV mass, slice masses were added on coronal (Method (Meth) 1), transaxial (Meth 2), and sagittal (Meth 3) planes. Mass of the LV portions subject to partial volume effect were derived from an orthogonal plane. Excised LV weight ranged from 27 to 134 grams. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for planimetry of the NMR slices was high (r=.99 and r=.97, respectively). For in-situ imaging, r values of all methods were high (r=.99, .99, and .98); however, the slope and intercept of the regression line were closes to the line of identity with Meth 1 (y=0.94x+0.52). For in-vivo beating heart images, Meth 1 also had the best results (r=.99, y= 0.99x+8.3). Failure to correct for partial volume effect resulted in underestimation of in-situ and in-vivo LV masses as indicated by slope of <1 (r=,.98, y=0.77x+3.9; r=.98, y= 0.88x+0.98, respectively, Meth 1). Thus, cardiac NMR is a reproducible and accurate method for noninvasive determination of LV myocardial mass.

  19. Accurate segmentation framework for the left ventricle wall from cardiac cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliman, H.; Khalifa, F.; Elnakib, A.; Soliman, A.; Beache, G. M.; Gimel'farb, G.; Emam, A.; Elmaghraby, A.; El-Baz, A.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a novel, fast, robust, bi-directional coupled parametric deformable model to segment the left ventricle (LV) wall borders using first- and second-order visual appearance features. These features are embedded in a new stochastic external force that preserves the topology of LV wall to track the evolution of the parametric deformable models control points. To accurately estimate the marginal density of each deformable model control point, the empirical marginal grey level distributions (first-order appearance) inside and outside the boundary of the deformable model are modeled with adaptive linear combinations of discrete Gaussians (LCDG). The second order visual appearance of the LV wall is accurately modeled with a new rotationally invariant second-order Markov-Gibbs random field (MGRF). We tested the proposed segmentation approach on 15 data sets in 6 infarction patients using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average distance (AD) between the ground truth and automated segmentation contours. Our approach achieves a mean DSC value of 0.926±0.022 and AD value of 2.16±0.60 compared to two other level set methods that achieve 0.904±0.033 and 0.885±0.02 for DSC; and 2.86±1.35 and 5.72±4.70 for AD, respectively.

  20. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rettmann, Maryam E. Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A.; Kwartowitz, David M.; Gunawan, Mia; Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L.; Dalegrave, Charles; Kolasa, Mark W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved

  1. The impact of infarct size on regional and global left ventricular systolic function: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Beltrami, Matteo; Gennari, Luigi; Dastidar, A Ghosh; Nuti, Ranuccio; McAlindon, Elisa; Angelini, Gianni D; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in myocardial scarring which can have an impact on left ventricular (LV) stiffness and contractile function, ultimately leading to reduced LV systolic function and LV remodelling, However some concerns about the relation between scar extension and segmental wall motion contractility is not enough clear. Thus, the association between myocardial scar, LV regional and global function and LV remodeling should be investigated. We studied the relationship between scar extension, wall motion score index (WMSI), LV dimensions and systolic function in a group of patients with previous MI by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). 133 patients with previous (>6 month) MI were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Indexed end-systolic volume (ESVi), indexed end-diastolic volume (EDVi), LV ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV), LV mass were measured using CMR. WMSI and sum scar score (SSS) were also measured following AHA\\ACC criteria giving an arbitrary cut-off to distinguish larger from restricted late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) area. A total of 2261 segments were studied: regional wall motion abnormalities were present in 1032 segments (45%) and 724 (32%) showed presence of MI (LGE). WMSI correlated significantly with EF (r = -0.87, p < 0.0001) in all patients and in both patients with EF ≥ 40% (r = -0.77, p < 0.0001) and EF < 40% (r = -0.68, p < 0.0001). WMSI also correlated significantly with SSS (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001). The correlation between WMSI and SSS was more significant in patients with transmural MI (WMSI 2.1 ± 0.5 and SSS 17 ± 8; r = 0.55, p < 0.0001) than with non transmural MI (WMSI 1.6 ± 0.7 and SSS 6 ± 4; r = 0.34 and p = 0.02). A significant correlation was also found between EF and SSS (r = -0.55 and p < 0.0001) and between SSS and LV indexed volumes (EDVi; r = 0.44, p < 0.0001 and ESVi; r = 0.51, p < 0.0001). Infarct transmurality and extension as expressed as SSS assessed with cardiac MRI has an impact on global

  2. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Left Atrial Size and Function as Expressed by Speckle Tracking 2-Dimensional Strain.

    PubMed

    Valzania, Cinzia; Gadler, Fredrik; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rapezzi, Claudio; Eriksson, Maria J

    2016-07-15

    Changes in left atrial (LA) strain in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain not entirely explored. We prospectively evaluated long-term changes in LA size and function and their relation with left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling and noninvasive hemodynamic variables in patients treated with CRT by 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Thirty patients (62 ± 11 years, 63% men) underwent 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography before implant and after 12 months. LA area, global and regional LA strains, LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and longitudinal strain, mitral regurgitation (MR), and diastolic variables were evaluated. At 12 months, CRT responders (60%) exhibited an increase in LA strain (11.4 ± 6.5% vs 16.5 ± 7.9%, p <0.001) and a reduction in LA area (p = 0.002), which were associated with an improvement in MR, E/E' ratio, LVEF, and LV longitudinal strain. In nonresponders, a worsening in LA strain (11.4 ± 6.8% vs 8.7 ± 4.6%, p = 0.017) and LA area (p = 0.002) occurred in parallel with an increase in E/E', whereas LVEF and LV longitudinal strain were unchanged. In conclusion, over long-term follow-up, LA size and strain improved in CRT responders, while worsening in nonresponders. Changes in LV function, filling pressures, and MR seem to be related to LA reverse remodeling, giving a feedback loop. PMID:27241837

  3. QRS pattern and improvement in right and left ventricular function after cardiac resynchronization therapy: a radionuclide study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remains a challenge. We evaluated the role of baseline QRS pattern to predict response in terms of improvement in biventricular ejection fraction (EF). Methods Consecutive patients (pts) undergoing CRT implantation underwent radionuclide angiography at baseline and at mid-term follow-up. The relationship between baseline QRS pattern and mechanical dyssynchrony using phase analysis was evaluated. Changes in left and right ventricular EF (LVEF and RVEF) were analyzed with regard to baseline QRS pattern. Results We enrolled 56 pts, 32 with left bundle branch block (LBBB), 4 with right bundle branch block (RBBB) and 20 with non-specific intraventricular conduction disturbance (IVCD). A total of 48 pts completed follow-up. LBBB pts had significantly greater improvement in LVEF compared to RBBB or non-specific IVCD pts (+9.6 ± 10.9% vs. +2.6 ± 7.6%, p = 0.003). Response (defined as ≥ 5% increase in LVEF) was observed in 68% of LBBB vs. 24% of non-specific IVCD pts (p = 0.006). None of the RBBB pts were responders. RVEF was significantly improved in LBBB (+5.0 ± 9.0%, p = 0.007), but not in non-specific IVCD and RBBB pts (+0.4 ± 5.8%, p = 0.76). At multivariate analysis, LBBB was the only predictor of LVEF response (OR, 7.45; 95% CI 1.80-30.94; p = 0.006), but not QRS duration or extent of mechanical dyssynchrony. Conclusions Presence of a LBBB is a marker of a positive response to CRT in terms of biventricular improvement. Pts with non-LBBB pattern show significantly less benefit from CRT than those with LBBB. PMID:22494365

  4. Left ventricular wall thickness in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a comparison between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Sorensen, Lars L; Pozios, Iraklis; Chu, Linda; Eng, John; Abraham, Maria Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2016-06-01

    We assessed whether cardiac MRI (CMR) and echocardiography (echo) have significant differences measuring left ventricular (LV) wall thickness (WT) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) as performed in the clinical routine. Retrospectively identified, clinically diagnosed HCM patients with interventricular-septal (IVS) pattern hypertrophy who underwent CMR and echo within the same day were included. Left Ventricular WT was measured by CMR in two planes and compared to both echo and contrast echo (cecho). 72 subjects, mean age 50.7 ± 16.2 years, 68 % males. Interventricular septal WT by echo and CMR planes showed good to excellent correlation. However, measurements of the postero-lateral wall showed poor correlation. Bland-Altman plots showed greater maximal IVS WT by echo compared to CMR measurement [SAX = 1.7 mm (-5.8, 9.3); LVOT = 1.1 mm (-5.6, 7.8)]. Differences were smaller between cecho and CMR [SAX = 0.8 mm (-9.2, 10.8); LVOT = -0.2 mm (-10.0, 9.6)]. Severity of WT by quartiles showed greater differences between echo and SAX CMR WT compared to cecho. Echocardiography typically measures greater WT than CMR, with the largest differences in moderate to severe hypertrophy. Contrast echocardiography more closely approximates CMR measurements of WT. These findings have potential clinical implications for risk stratification of subjects with HCM. PMID:26896038

  5. [Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive subjects with and without left ventricular hypertrophy compared to the circadian profile of the blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Novo, S; Barbagallo, M; Abrignani, M G; Alaimo, G; Longo, B; Corrao, S; Nardi, E; Liquori, M; Forte, G; Raineri, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate possible correlations between cardiac arrhythmias and circadian pattern of blood pressure (BP) and of heart rate (HR), we studied 2 groups of 20 males with stable arterial hypertension of mild to moderate entity, with (Group I) or without (Group II) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). In patients with LVH the mean age (56 vs 46 years), the duration of the hypertensive state (48.1 vs 15.7 months), the thickening of interventricular septum (IVS; 13.7 vs 9.6 mm) and of the posterior wall of the left ventricle (13.2 vs 9.2 mm) and the mass of LV (149.8 vs 99.7 g/m2) were significantly greater (p less than 0.01). On the contrary, the 2 groups did not show significant differences concerning casual BP determined in the morning (178.3/108.4 vs 171.5/106.2 mmHg). After a pharmacological washout of 2 weeks, patients underwent a noninvasive, intermittent, monitoring of BP (every 15 min during daytime and every 30 min from 11 pm to 7 am), using a pressure meter II Del Mar Avionics, and a continuous monitoring of ECG for 24 hours, employing an instrument 445/B Del Mar Avionics. Mean 24-hour BP was not different in the 2 groups of patients (161.7/99.0 vs 158.2/98.3 mmHg); however, patients with LVH showed a significantly greater variability of BP in the morning (7 am-3 pm), while mean 24-hour HR was significantly less (71.6 vs 78.2 b/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2150345

  6. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  7. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  8. Parametric ultrasound and fluoroscopy image fusion for guidance of left ventricle lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Babic, Aleksandar; Odland, Hans Henrik; Gérard, Olivier; Samset, Eigil

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show that the response rate to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) could be improved if the left ventricle (LV) is paced at the site of the latest mechanical activation, but away from the myocardial scar. A prototype system for CRT lead placement guidance that combines LV functional information from ultrasound with live x-ray fluoroscopy was developed. Two mean anatomical models, each containing LV epi-, LV endo- and right ventricle endocardial surfaces, were computed from a database of 33 heart failure patients as a substitute for a patient-specific model. The sphericity index was used to divide the observed population into two groups. The distance between the mean and the patient-specific models was determined using a signed distance field metric (reported in mm). The average error values for LV epicardium were [Formula: see text] and for LV endocardium were [Formula: see text]. The validity of using average LV models for a CRT procedure was tested by simulating coronary vein selection in a group of 15 CRT candidates. The probability of selecting the same coronary branch, when basing the selection on the average model compared to a patient-specific model, was estimated to be [Formula: see text]. This was found to be clinically acceptable. PMID:26158110

  9. Comparison of cardiac output of the left and right side of the heart by ultrafast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfkiel, C.J.; Ferguson, J.L.; Law, W.R.; Chomka, E.V.; Brundage, B.H.

    1986-03-05

    Ultrafast computed tomography (CT) evaluation of cardiac output (CO) can be determined using indicator dilution theory. The concentration of an iodinated contrast agent injected into a vein of a subject can be measured as a function of time by serial EKG, gated CT imaging. The contrast density of the blood pool measured by CT defines the indicator concentration. CT CO is proportional to the area under a time density curve from a region of the blood pool. Proper subject position and scanning timing allows CT to measure CO in the pulmonary (PA) artery and the aorta (AO) with the same contrast bolus. Three anesthetized dogs were multiply scanned following simultaneous injections of contrast and radioactive tracer microspheres. Microsphere CO was determined by reference withdrawal method. Multiple thermodilution CO measurements were made just prior and after each CT CO procedure. 24 comparisons were made of thermodilution, microsphere and CT CO measured in the PA (right sided CO (RSCO)) and the AO (left sided CO (LSCO)). CT CO was calculated as the ratio of the volume of contrast injected to the time density curve area corrected for the relation of contrast density to CT number. RSCO agreed very closely to LSCO (r = .99, p < .001; y = 1.0x +/- .32). RSCO correlated to thermodilution (r = .96, p < .001; y = 1.2x +/- 1.3) and microsphere CO (r = .93, p < .001; y = .69x +/- 1.3). These data show that CT CO measurements can be made in the PA and AO with equal accuracy.

  10. Quantification of Right and Left Ventricular Function in Cardiac MR Imaging: Comparison of Semiautomatic and Manual Segmentation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Miguel; Masip, Lambert Raul; Couto, Miguel; Suárez-Cuenca, Jorge Juan; Martínez, Amparo; Tahoces, Pablo G.; Carreira, Jose Martin; Croisille, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a semiautomatic segmentation method for the anatomical and functional assessment of both ventricles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance (MR) examinations, reducing user interaction to a “mouse-click”. Fifty-two patients with cardiovascular diseases were examined using a 1.5-T MR imaging unit. Several parameters of both ventricles, such as end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF), were quantified by an experienced operator using the conventional method based on manually-defined contours, as the standard of reference; and a novel semiautomatic segmentation method based on edge detection, iterative thresholding and region growing techniques, for evaluation purposes. No statistically significant differences were found between the two measurement values obtained for each parameter (p > 0.05). Correlation to estimate right ventricular function was good (r > 0.8) and turned out to be excellent (r > 0.9) for the left ventricle (LV). Bland-Altman plots revealed acceptable limits of agreement between the two methods (95%). Our study findings indicate that the proposed technique allows a fast and accurate assessment of both ventricles. However, further improvements are needed to equal results achieved for the right ventricle (RV) using the conventional methodology. PMID:26835680

  11. An inverse finite element method for determining the tissue compressibility of human left ventricular wall during the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I; Hassan, Mohsen A; Mardi, Azizi N; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium's tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  12. Automatic localization of the left ventricle from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging: a new spectrum-based computer-aided tool.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Xiaodan; Tan, Ru San; Wan, Min

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cardiac image analysis is done manually. Automatic image processing can help with the repetitive tasks, and also deal with huge amounts of data, a task which would be humanly tedious. This study aims to develop a spectrum-based computer-aided tool to locate the left ventricle using images obtained via cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Discrete Fourier Transform was conducted pixelwise on the image sequence. Harmonic images of all frequencies were analyzed visually and quantitatively to determine different patterns of the left and right ventricles on spectrum. The first and fifth harmonic images were selected to perform an anisotropic weighted circle Hough detection. This tool was then tested in ten volunteers. Our tool was able to locate the left ventricle in all cases and had a significantly higher cropping ratio of 0.165 than did earlier studies. In conclusion, a new spectrum-based computer aided tool has been proposed and developed for automatic left ventricle localization. The development of this technique, which will enable the automatic location and further segmentation of the left ventricle, will have a significant impact in research and in diagnostic settings. We envisage that this automated method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess ventricular function in patients with diverse heart diseases. PMID:24722328

  13. The effect of obesity on electrocardiographic detection of hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy: recalibration against cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J C L; McIntyre, B; Dastidar, A G; Lyen, S M; Ratcliffe, L E; Burchell, A E; Hart, E C; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C; Hamilton, M C K; Paton, J F R; Nightingale, A K; Manghat, N E

    2016-03-01

    Electrocardiograph (ECG) criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are a widely used clinical tool. We recalibrated six ECG criteria for LVH against gold-standard cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and assessed the impact of obesity. One hundred and fifty consecutive tertiary hypertension clinic referrals for CMR (1.5 T) were reviewed. Patients with cardiac pathology potentially confounding hypertensive LVH were excluded (n=22). The final sample size was 128 (age: 51.0±15.2 years, 48% male). LVH was defined by CMR. From a 12-lead ECG, Sokolow-Lyon voltage and product, Cornell voltage and product, Gubner-Ungerleidger voltage and Romhilt-Estes score were evaluated, blinded to the CMR. ECG diagnostic performance was calculated. LVH by CMR was present in 37% and obesity in 51%. Obesity significantly reduced ECG sensitivity, because of significant attenuation in mean ECG values for Cornell voltage (22.2±5.7 vs 26.4±9.4 mm, P<0.05), Cornell product (2540±942 vs 3023±1185 mm • ms, P<0.05) and for Gubner-Ungerleider voltage (18.2±7.1 vs 23.3±1.2 mm, P<0.05). Obesity also significantly reduced ECG specificity, because of significantly higher prevalence of LV remodeling (no LVH but increased mass-to-volume ratio) in obese subjects without LVH (36% vs 16%, P<0.05), which correlated with higher mean ECG LVH criteria values. Obesity-specific partition values were generated at fixed 95% specificity; Cornell voltage had highest sensitivity in non-obese (56%) and Sokolow-Lyon product in obese patients (24%). Obesity significantly lowers ECG sensitivity at detecting LVH, by attenuating ECG LVH values, and lowers ECG specificity through changes associated with LV remodeling. Our obesity-specific ECG partition values could improve the diagnostic performance in obese patients with hypertension. PMID:26040440

  14. An interesting case of cryptogenic stroke in a young man due to left ventricular non-compaction: role of cardiac MRI in the accurate diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun; Das, Anindita; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old man arrived for an outpatient cardiac MRI (CMR) study to evaluate cardiac structure. At the age of 24 the patient presented with acute onset expressive aphasia and was diagnosed with ischaemic stroke. Echocardiography at that time was reported as ‘apical wall thickening consistent with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy’. CMR revealed a moderately dilated left ventricle with abnormal appearance of the left ventricular (LV) apical segments. Further evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of LV non­compaction (LVNC) cardiomyopathy with a ratio of non­compacted to compacted myocardium measuring 3. There was extensive delayed hyperenhancement signal involving multiple segments representing a significant myocardial scar which is shown to have a prognostic role. Our patient, with no significant cerebrovascular risk factors, would likely have had an embolic stroke. This case demonstrates the role of CMR in accurately diagnosing LVNC in a patient with young stroke where prior echocardiography was non­diagnostic. PMID:24962593

  15. Extended Application of the Hybrid Procedure in Neonates with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions in an Evolving Cardiac Program.

    PubMed

    Taqatqa, Anas; Diab, Karim A; Stuart, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Ilbawi, Michel; Awad, Sawsan; Caputo, Massimo; Amin, Zahid; Abdulla, Ra-Id; Kenny, Damien; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid approach to management of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) was developed as an alternative to neonatal Norwood surgery, providing a less invasive initial palliation for HLHS. We describe our experience in extending the concept of the hybrid procedure to palliate neonates with anatomically compromised systemic arterial blood flow in a variety of congenital cardiac anomalies and supporting its application as first-line palliation in centers developing their HLHS programs. Retrospective review of patients undergoing therapy for HLHS at a single institution from June 2008 to December 2014 was performed. Subject demographics, clinical and procedural data, along with follow-up, were collected. Thirteen patients had initial hybrid palliation for HLHS during the time frame indicated at a median age of 8 days (range 1-29 days) and median weight of 3.4 kg (range 2.4-4.6 kg). Diagnoses included typical HLHS (n = 6), right-dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect with arch hypoplasia (n = 4), double outlet right ventricle [subpulmonic VSD (n = 1) and intact ventricular septum (n = 1)] with hypoplastic transverse aortic arch and borderline left ventricular dimensions. Standard approach with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting was carried out in all thirteen patients. Two patients required two ductal stents at the time of index procedure. There were no intraprocedural complications. Median intubation length post-procedure was 4 days (range 1-74 days). Median hospital stay post-procedure was 47 days (range 15-270 days). The overall mortality rate on follow-up through comprehensive stage 2 over the 6-year experience was 38 % (5 out of 13). Of note, the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter 3 years of the study period when the procedure was adopted as a primary palliation for HLHS (14 % or 1 out of 7) compared to the initial 3-year period when it was reserved for higher risk cohorts (67 % or 4 out of 6

  16. Wasted septal work in left ventricular dyssynchrony: a novel principle to predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vecera, J.; Penicka, M.; Eriksen, M.; Russell, K.; Bartunek, J.; Vanderheyden, M.; Smiseth, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in heart failure is limited by many non-responders. This study explores whether degree of wasted left ventricular (LV) work identifies CRT responders. Methods and results Twenty-one patients who received CRT according to guidelines were studied before and after 8 ± 3 months. By definition, segments that shorten in systole perform positive work, whereas segments that lengthen do negative work. Work was calculated from non-invasive LV pressure and strain by speckle tracking echocardiography. For each myocardial segment and for the entire LV, wasted work was calculated as negative work in percentage of positive work. LV wall motion score index (WMSI) was assessed by echocardiography. Response to CRT was defined as ≥15% reduction in end-systolic volume (ESV). Responder rate to CRT was 71%. In responders, wasted work for septum was 117 ± 102%, indicating more negative than positive work, and decreased to 14 ± 12% with CRT (P < 0.01). In the LV free wall, wasted work was 19 ± 16% and showed no significant change. Global LV wasted work decreased from 39 ± 21 to 17 ± 7% with CRT (P < 0.01). In non-responders, there were no significant changes. In multiple linear regression analysis, septal wasted work and WMSI were the only significant predictors of ESV reduction (β = 0.14, P = 0.01; β = 1.25, P = 0.03). Septal wasted work together with WMSI showed an area under the curve of 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.71–1.0) for CRT response prediction. Conclusion Wasted work in the septum together with WMSI was a strong predictor of response to CRT. This novel principle should be studied in future larger studies. PMID:26921169

  17. Effect of Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Viral Load on Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Moyers, Brian S.; Secemsky, Eric A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Wong, Joseph K.; Havlir, Diane V.; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected patients are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Whether left ventricular (LV) dysfunction predicts SCD in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of LV on SCD in patients with HIV. We previously characterized all SCDs and AIDS deaths in 2860 consecutive patients in a public HIV clinic between 2000 and 2009. Transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs) performed during the study period were identified. The effect of ejection fraction (EF), diastolic dysfunction, pulmonary artery pressure, and LV mass on SCD and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) death were evaluated: 423 patients had at least one TTE; 13 SCDs and 55 AIDS deaths had at least one TTE. In the propensity-adjusted analysis, EF 30–39% and EF <30% predicted SCD (HR 9.5, 95% CI 1.7–53.3, p=0.01 and HR 38.5, 95% CI 7.6–195.0, p<0.001, respectively) but not AIDS death. Diastolic dysfunction also predicted SCD (HR 14.8, 95% CI 4.0–55.4, p<0.001) but not AIDS death, even after adjusting for EF. The association between EF<40% and SCD was greater in subjects with detectable vs. undetectable HIV-RNA (adjusted HR 11.7, 95% CI 2.9–47.2, p=0.001 vs. HR 2.7, 95% CI 0.3–27.6, p=0.41; p=0.07 for interaction). In conclusion, LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction predict SCD but not AIDS death in a large HIV cohort, with greater effect in those with detectable HIV RNA. Further investigation is needed to thoroughly evaluate the effect of low EF and HIV factors on SCD incidence and the potential benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in this high-risk population. PMID:24521717

  18. Effect of left ventricular dysfunction and viral load on risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Moyers, Brian S; Secemsky, Eric A; Vittinghoff, Eric; Wong, Joseph K; Havlir, Diane V; Hsue, Priscilla Y; Tseng, Zian H

    2014-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Whether left ventricular (LV) dysfunction predicts SCD in those with HIV is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of LV dysfunction on SCD in patients with HIV. We previously characterized all SCDs and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) deaths in 2,860 consecutive patients in a public HIV clinic from 2000 to 2009. Transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs) performed during the study period were identified. The effect of ejection fraction (EF), diastolic dysfunction, pulmonary artery pressure, and LV mass on SCD and AIDS death were evaluated: 423 patients had at least 1 TTE; 13 SCDs and 55 AIDS deaths had at least 1 TTE. In the propensity-adjusted analysis, EF 30% to 39% and EF<30% predicted SCD (hazard ratio [HR] 9.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 53.3, p=0.01 and HR 38.5, 95% CI 7.6 to 195.0, p<0.001, respectively) but not AIDS death. Diastolic dysfunction also predicted SCD (HR 14.8, 95% CI 4.0 to 55.4, p<0.001) but not AIDS death, even after adjusting for EF. The association between EF<40% and SCD was greater in subjects with detectable versus undetectable HIV RNA (adjusted HR 11.7, 95% CI 2.9 to 47.2, p=0.001 vs HR 2.7, 95% CI 0.3 to 27.6, p=0.41; p=0.07 for interaction). In conclusion, LV systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction predict SCD but not AIDS death in a large HIV cohort, with greater effect in those with detectable HIV RNA. Further investigation is needed to thoroughly evaluate the effect of low EF and HIV factors on SCD incidence and the potential benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in this high-risk population. PMID:24521717

  19. Analysis of the stability of housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; Oliveira, Renato Watanabe de; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with oxidative stress and various cardiovascular consequences, such as increased cardiovascular disease risk. Quantitative real-time PCR is frequently employed to assess changes in gene expression in experimental models. In this study, we analyzed the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (an experimental model of OSA) on housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats. Analyses via four different approaches-use of the geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder algorithms; and 2-ΔCt (threshold cycle) data analysis-produced similar results: all genes were found to be suitable for use, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 18S being classified as the most and the least stable, respectively. The use of more than one housekeeping gene is strongly advised. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) tem sido associada ao estresse oxidativo e a várias consequências cardiovasculares, tais como risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular. A PCR quantitativa em tempo real é frequentemente empregada para avaliar alterações na expressão gênica em modelos experimentais. Neste estudo, analisamos os efeitos da hipóxia intermitente crônica (um modelo experimental de AOS) na expressão de genes de referência no ventrículo cardíaco esquerdo de ratos. Análises a partir de quatro abordagens - uso dos algoritmos geNorm, BestKeeper e NormFinder e análise de dados 2-ΔCt (ciclo limiar) - produziram resultados semelhantes: todos os genes mostraram-se adequados para uso, sendo que gliceraldeído-3-fosfato desidrogenase e 18S foram classificados como o mais e o menos estável, respectivamente. A utilização de mais de um gene de referência é altamente recomendada. PMID:27383935

  20. Left ventricular mass and hypertrophy by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Anderson C.; Gjesdal, Ola; Almeida, André; Nacif, Marcelo; Wu, Colin; Bluemke, David A.; Brumback, Lyndia; Lima, João A. C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Left ventricular mass (LVM) and hypertrophy (LVH) are important parameters, but their use is surrounded by controversies. We compare LVM by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), investigating reproducibility aspects and the effect of echocardiography image quality. We also compare indexing methods within and between imaging modalities for classification of LVH and cardiovascular risk. METHODS MESA enrolled 880 participants in Baltimore City; 146 had echocardiograms and CMR on the same day. LVM was then assessed using standard techniques. Echocardiography image quality was rated (good/limited) according to the parasternal view. LVH was defined after indexing LVM to body surface area, height1.7, height2.7, or by the predicted LVM from a reference group. Participants were classified for cardiovascular risk according to Framingham score. Pearson’s correlation, Bland-Altman plots, percent agreement, and kappa coefficient assessed agreement within and between modalities. RESULTS LVM by echocardiography (140 ± 40 g) and by CMR were correlated (r = 0.8, p < 0.001) regardless of the echocardiography image quality. The reproducibility profile had strong correlations and agreement for both modalities. Image quality groups had similar characteristics; those with good images compared to CMR slightly superiorly. The prevalence of LVH tended to be higher with higher cardiovascular risk. The agreement for LVH between imaging modalities ranged from 77% to 98% and the kappa coefficient from 0.10 to 0.76. CONCLUSIONS Echocardiography has a reliable performance for LVM assessment and classification of LVH, with limited influence of image quality. Echocardiography and CMR differ in the assessment of LVH, and additional differences rise from the indexing methods. PMID:23930739

  1. Left Atrial Passive Emptying Function Determined by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Predicts Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence after Pulmonary Vein Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A.; Neilan, Tomas G.; Shah, Ravi V.; Farhad, Hoshang; Blankstein, Ron; Steigner, Michael; Michaud, Gregory F.; John, Roy; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background While pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) has become a mainstream therapy for selected patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), late recurrent AF is common and its risk factors remain poorly defined. The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that reduced left atrial passive emptying function (LAPEF) as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has a strong association with late recurrent AF following PVI. Methods and Results 346 AF patients referred for CMR PV mapping prior to PVI were included. Maximum LA volumes (VOLmax) and volumes before atrial contraction (VOLbac) were measured; LAPEF was calculated as (VOLmax − VOLbac)/VOLmax × 100. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to determine late recurrent AF stratified by LAPEF quintile. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to adjust for known markers of recurrence. Over a median follow-up of 27 months, 124 patients (35.8%) experienced late recurrent AF. Patients with recurrence were more likely to have non-paroxysmal AF (75.8% vs. 51.4%, P<0.01), higher mean VOLmax (60.2 ml/m2 vs. 52.8 ml/m2, P<0.01), and lower mean LAPEF (19.1% vs. 26.0%, P<0.01). Patients in the lowest LAPEF quintile were at highest risk of developing recurrent AF (two-year recurrence lowest vs. highest: 60.5% vs. 17.3%, P<0.01). After adjusting for known predictors of recurrence, patients with low LAPEF remained significantly more likely to recur (HR lowest vs. highest quintile = 3.92, 95% CI 2.01–7.65). Conclusion We found a strong association between LAPEF and recurrent AF after PVI that persisted after multivariable adjustment. PMID:24902586

  2. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 01: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Induced Cardiac Intrafraction Motion in Left-sided Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Patrick, J; Yu, E; Gaede, S

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term cardiac side effects in left-sided breast cancer patients (BREL) after post-operative radiotherapy has become one of the most debated issues in radiation oncology. Through breathing-adapted radiotherapy the volume of the heart exposed to radiation can be significantly reduced by delivering the radiation only at the end of inspiration phase of the respiratory cycle, this is referred to as inspiration gating (IG). The purpose of this study is to quantify the potential reduction in cardiac exposure during IG compared to conventional BREL radiotherapy and to assess the dosimetric impact of cardiac motion due to natural breathing. Methods: 24 BREL patients treated with tangential parallel opposed photon beams were included in this study. All patients received a standard fast helical planning CT (FH-CT) and a 4D-CT. Treatment plans were created on the FH-CT using a clinical treatment planning system. The original treatment plan was then superimposed onto the end of inspiration CT and all 10 phases of the 4D-CT to quantify the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion and IG through 4D dose accumulation. Results: Through IG the mean dose to the heart, left ventricle, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be reduced in comparison to the clinical standard BREL treatment by as much as 8.39%, 10.11%, and 13.71% respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Failure to account for respiratory motion can lead to under or overestimation in the calculated DVH for the heart, and it's sub-structures. IG can reduce cardiac exposure especially to the LAD during BREL radiotherapy.

  3. Relationship between changes of chamber mechanical parameters and mean pressure-mean flow diagrams of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Negroni, J A; Lascano, E C; Pichel, R H

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical relationship between mean ventricular pressure (P) and mean ventricular outflow (Q) was developed based on a model of the left ventricle with elastic-resistive properties. Using a polynomial interpolation method, a fifth-order polynomial equation for the P-Q relationship was obtained. Its coefficients are functions of end-diastolic volume (VD), heart rate (HR), contractile state (CS), diastolic elastance (ED), asymmetry (S) of the elastance function E(t), and ventricular internal resistance factor (K). Effect of changes of these parameters indicated that normal and enhanced CS relations diverge toward the P axis but have a common intercept toward the Q axis. A similar effect was obtained with increased asymmetry of E(t). Changes in VD, HR and ED produced a parallel shift of the P-Q relation. The effect of K was negligible, however, which would reduce the description of the P-Q relationship to a third-order polynomial equation. A flow-dependent deactivation component was introduced, altering the asymmetry factor S, which decreases in a linear proportion to Q. This factor shifted the pump function graph downwards. We conclude that the theoretical description of the P-Q relation we present reproduces the experimental behavior of pump function diagrams reported in the literature (changes in VD, HR, and CS) and predicts the possible behavior due to other parameter changes. PMID:3400909

  4. Predictive Value of Beat-to-Beat QT Variability Index across the Continuum of Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Competing Risks of Non-cardiac or Cardiovascular Death, and Sudden or Non-Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; McNitt, Scott; Vazquez, Rafael; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Han, Lichy; Sur, Sanjoli; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Berger, Ronald D.; de Luna, Antoni Bayes; Zareba, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine the predictive value of beat-to-beat QT variability in heart failure (HF) patients across the continuum of left ventricular dysfunction. Methods and Results Beat-to-beat QT variability index (QTVI), heart rate variance (LogHRV), normalized QT variance (QTVN), and coherence between heart rate variability and QT variability have been measured at rest during sinus rhythm in 533 participants of the Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca (MUSIC) HF study (mean age 63.1±11.7; males 70.6%; LVEF >35% in 254 [48%]) and in 181 healthy participants from the Intercity Digital Electrocardiogram Alliance (IDEAL) database. During a median of 3.7 years of follow-up, 116 patients died, 52 from sudden cardiac death (SCD). In multivariate competing risk analyses, the highest QTVI quartile was associated with cardiovascular death [hazard ratio (HR) 1.67(95%CI 1.14-2.47), P=0.009] and in particular with non-sudden cardiac death [HR 2.91(1.69-5.01), P<0.001]. Elevated QTVI separated 97.5% of healthy individuals from subjects at risk for cardiovascular [HR 1.57(1.04-2.35), P=0.031], and non-sudden cardiac death in multivariate competing risk model [HR 2.58(1.13-3.78), P=0.001]. No interaction between QTVI and LVEF was found. QTVI predicted neither non-cardiac death (P=0.546) nor SCD (P=0.945). Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) rather than increased QT variability was the reason for increased QTVI in this study. Conclusions Increased QTVI due to depressed HRV predicts cardiovascular mortality and non-sudden cardiac death, but neither SCD nor excracardiac mortality in HF across the continuum of left ventricular dysfunction. Abnormally augmented QTVI separates 97.5% of healthy individuals from HF patients at risk. PMID:22730411

  5. The Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Training on Cardiopulmonary Function in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy With Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect and safety of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise in ischemic cardiomyopathy and to compare the results between patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and reduced LVEF. Methods Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy with LVEF <50% were included as subjects. The patients were classified into the preserved LVEF (pLVEF; LVEF 41%–49%) group and the reduced LVEF (rLVEF; LVEF ≤40%) group. Patients underwent hourly aerobic exercise training sessions with an intensity of 60%–85% of heart rate reserve, three times a week for 6 weeks. Graded exercise test and transthoracic echocardiogram were performed in all study patients before and after completion of the CR exercise program. Results After completion of the CR exercise program, both groups (pLVEF, n=30; rLVEF, n=18) showed significant increases in LVEF and VO2max. In the pLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 45.1%±4.8% to 52.5%±9.6% (p<0.001) and from 24.1±6.3 to 28.1±8.8 mL/kg/min (p=0.002), respectively. In the rLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 29.7%±7.7% to 37.6%±10.3% (p<0.001) and from 17.6±4.7 to 21.2±5.1 mL/kg/min (p<0.001), respectively. Both groups completed their exercise program safely. Conclusion In both groups, patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy who completed a 6-week supervised CR exercise program demonstrated remarkable improvements in cardiopulmonary function. This result implies that neither of the two groups showed higher efficacy in comparison to each other, but we can conclude that CR exercise in the rLVEF group was as effective and safe as that in the pLVEF group. PMID:27606271

  6. Cardiac Dual-source Computed Tomography for the Detection of Left Main Compression Syndrome in Patients with Pulmonary Hyper-tension

    PubMed Central

    Demerouti, Eftychia; Manginas, Athanassios; Petrou, Emmanouil; Katsilouli, Spyridoula; Karyofillis, Panagiotis; Athanassopoulos, George; Karatasakis, George; Iakovou, Ioannis; Mihas, Konstantinos; Mastorakou, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Left Main Compression Syndrome (LMCS) represents an entity described as the extrinsic compression of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) by a dilated pulmonary artery (PA) trunk. We examined the presence of LMCS in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT), as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. Methods: The following parameters were measured: PA trunk diameter (PAD), the distance between PAD and LMCA (LMPA) and the distance between PA and aorta (AoPA). These measurements were related with demographic, echocardiographic, hemodynamic and clinical parameters. Angiography was performed in two patients with LMCS suspected by cardiac computed tomographic angiography. Patients without PH but with angina were examined as controls, using DSCT cardiac angiography to assess the same measurements and to detect the prevalence of coronary artery disease. Results: PA diameter value over 40.00 mm has been associated with PH and LMCS. Furthermore, LMCS did not occur at a distance smaller than 0.50 mm between the PA and the LMCA, and did not correlate with the distance between the PA and the aorta or with cardiac index and NT-proBNP. Conclusion: DSCT may represent the initial testing modality in PH patients with dilated PA trunk to exclude LMCS. A periodical rule-out of this rare entity, as assessed by DSCT, in patients with a severely dilated PA seems to be mandatory for PH patients contributing to survival improvement. PMID:27499817

  7. Postmortem mRNA Expression Patterns in Left Ventricular Myocardial Tissues and Their Implications for Forensic Diagnosis of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi Hoon; Park, Seong Hwan; Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Juck-Joon; Seo, Joong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), which is primarily caused by lethal heart disorders resulting in structural and arrhythmogenic abnormalities, is one of the prevalent modes of death in most developed countries. Myocardial ischemia, mainly due to coronary artery disease, is the most common type of heart disease leading to SCD. However, postmortem diagnosis of SCD is frequently complicated by obscure histological evidence. Here, we show that certain mRNA species, namely those encoding hemoglobin A1/2 and B (Hba1/2 and Hbb, respectively) as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4), exhibit distinct postmortem expression patterns in the left ventricular free wall of SCD subjects when compared with their expression patterns in the corresponding tissues from control subjects with non-cardiac causes of death. Hba1/2 and Hbb mRNA expression levels were higher in ischemic SCD cases with acute myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease without recent infarction, and even in cardiac death subjects without apparent pathological signs of heart injuries, than control subjects. By contrast, Pdk4 mRNA was expressed at lower levels in SCD subjects. In conclusion, we found that altered myocardial Hba1/2, Hbb, and Pdk4 mRNA expression patterns can be employed as molecular signatures of fatal cardiac dysfunction to forensically implicate SCD as the primary cause of death. PMID:24642708

  8. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  9. An Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) Reveals Multiple Expression and Functional Differences in HLHS-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Habibollah, Saba; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Collin, Joseph; Barta, Tomas; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Tesarov, Lenka; Hussain, Rafiqul; Trafford, Andrew W.; Kirkwood, Graham; Sernagor, Evelyne; Eleftheriou, Cyril G.; Przyborski, Stefan; Stojković, Miodrag; Lako, Majlinda; Keavney, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a serious congenital cardiovascular malformation resulting in hypoplasia or atresia of the left ventricle, ascending aorta, and aortic and mitral valves. Diminished flow through the left side of the heart is clearly a key contributor to the condition, but any myocardial susceptibility component is as yet undefined. Using recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we have been able to generate an iPSC model of HLHS malformation and characterize the properties of cardiac myocytes (CMs) differentiated from these and control-iPSC lines. Differentiation of HLHS-iPSCs to cardiac lineages revealed changes in the expression of key cardiac markers and a lower ability to give rise to beating clusters when compared with control-iPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). HLHS-iPSC-derived CMs show a lower level of myofibrillar organization, persistence of a fetal gene expression pattern, and changes in commitment to ventricular versus atrial lineages, and they display different calcium transient patterns and electrophysiological responses to caffeine and β-adrenergic antagonists when compared with hESC- and control-iPSC-derived CMs, suggesting that alternative mechanisms to release calcium from intracellular stores such as the inositol trisphosphate receptor may exist in HLHS in addition to the ryanodine receptor thought to function in control-iPSC-derived CMs. Together our findings demonstrate that CMs derived from an HLHS patient demonstrate a number of marker expression and functional differences to hESC/control iPSC-derived CMs, thus providing some evidence that cardiomyocyte-specific factors may influence the risk of HLHS. PMID:24591732

  10. An induced pluripotent stem cell model of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) reveals multiple expression and functional differences in HLHS-derived cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Habibollah, Saba; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Collin, Joseph; Barta, Tomas; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Tesarov, Lenka; Hussain, Rafiqul; Trafford, Andrew W; Kirkwood, Graham; Sernagor, Evelyne; Eleftheriou, Cyril G; Przyborski, Stefan; Stojković, Miodrag; Lako, Majlinda; Keavney, Bernard; Armstrong, Lyle

    2014-04-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a serious congenital cardiovascular malformation resulting in hypoplasia or atresia of the left ventricle, ascending aorta, and aortic and mitral valves. Diminished flow through the left side of the heart is clearly a key contributor to the condition, but any myocardial susceptibility component is as yet undefined. Using recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we have been able to generate an iPSC model of HLHS malformation and characterize the properties of cardiac myocytes (CMs) differentiated from these and control-iPSC lines. Differentiation of HLHS-iPSCs to cardiac lineages revealed changes in the expression of key cardiac markers and a lower ability to give rise to beating clusters when compared with control-iPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). HLHS-iPSC-derived CMs show a lower level of myofibrillar organization, persistence of a fetal gene expression pattern, and changes in commitment to ventricular versus atrial lineages, and they display different calcium transient patterns and electrophysiological responses to caffeine and β-adrenergic antagonists when compared with hESC- and control-iPSC-derived CMs, suggesting that alternative mechanisms to release calcium from intracellular stores such as the inositol trisphosphate receptor may exist in HLHS in addition to the ryanodine receptor thought to function in control-iPSC-derived CMs. Together our findings demonstrate that CMs derived from an HLHS patient demonstrate a number of marker expression and functional differences to hESC/control iPSC-derived CMs, thus providing some evidence that cardiomyocyte-specific factors may influence the risk of HLHS. PMID:24591732

  11. A Comprehensive Analysis of Cardiac Dose in Balloon-Based High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valakh, Vladimir; Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E. Day; Trombetta, Mark G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation dose to the heart in 60 patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using MammoSite or Contura applicators. Methods and Materials: We studied 60 consecutive women with breast cancer who were treated with 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions using MammoSite (n = 37) or Contura (n = 23) applicators. The whole heart and the left and right ventricles were retrospectively delineated, and dose-volume histograms were analyzed. Multiple dosimetrics were reported, such as mean dose (D{sub mean}); relative volume receiving 1.7, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (V1.7, V5, V10, and V20, respectively); dose to 1 cc (D{sub 1cc}); and maximum point dose (D{sub max}). Biologic metrics, biologically effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose were computed. The impact of lumpectomy cavity location on cardiac dose was investigated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation of D{sub mean} was 2.45 {+-} 0.94 Gy (range, 0.56-4.68) and 3.29 {+-} 1.28 Gy (range, 0.77-6.35) for the heart and the ventricles, respectively. The average whole heart V5 and V10 values were 10.2% and 1.3%, respectively, and the heart D{sub max} was >20 Gy in 7 of 60 (11.7%) patients and >25 Gy in 3 of 60 (5%) patients. No cardiac tissue received {>=}30 Gy. The V1.7, V5, V10, V20, and D{sub mean} values were all higher for the ventricles than for the whole heart. For balloons located in the upper inner quadrant of the breast, the average whole heart D{sub mean} was highest. The D{sub mean}, biologically effective dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose values for heart and ventricles decreased with increasing minimal distance from the surface of the balloon. Conclusions: On the basis of these comprehensive cardiac dosimetric data, we recommend that cardiac dose be routinely reported and kept as low as possible in balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning for patients with left-sided breast cancer so

  12. 3D left ventricular extracellular volume fraction by low-radiation dose cardiac CT: Assessment of interstitial myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Yixun; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Summers, Ronald M.; Bluemke, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial fibrosis leads to impaired cardiac function and events. Extracellular volume fraction (ECV) assessed with an iodinated contrast agent and measured by cardiac CT may be a useful noninvasive marker of fibrosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a 3-dimensional (3D) ECV calculation toolkit (ECVTK) for ECV determination by cardiac CT. Methods Twenty-four subjects (10 systolic heart failure, age, 60 ± 17 years; 5 diastolic failure, age 56 ± 20 years; 9 matched healthy subjects, age 59 ± 7 years) were evaluated. Cardiac CT examinations were done on a 320-multidetector CT scanner before and after 130 mL of iopamidol (Isovue-370; Bracco Diagnostics, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) was administered. A calcium score type sequence was performed before and 7 minutes after contrast with single gantry rotation during 1 breath hold and single cardiac phase acquisition. ECV was calculated as (ΔHUmyocardium/ΔHUblood) × (1 − Hct) where Hct is the hematocrit, and ΔHU is the change in Hounsfield unit attenuation = HUafter iodine − HUbefore iodine. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to assess myocardial structure and function. Results Mean 3D ECV values were significantly higher in the subjects with systolic heart failure than in healthy subjects and subjects with diastolic heart failure (mean, 41% ± 6%, 33% ± 2%, and 35% ± 5%, respectively; P = 0.02). Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were excellent for myocardial, blood pool, and ECV (intraclass correlation coefficient, >0.90 for all). Higher 3D ECV by cardiac CT was associated with reduced systolic circumferential strain, greater end-diastolic and -systolic volumes, and lower ejection fraction (r = 0.70, r = 0.60, r = 0.73, and r = −0.68, respectively; all P < 0.001). Conclusion 3D ECV by cardiac CT can be performed with ECVTK. We demonstrated increased ECV in subjects with systolic heart failure compared with healthy subjects. Cardiac CT results also

  13. Double inlet left ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with this condition have only one working pumping chamber (ventricle) in their heart. ... condition generally have a large left ventricle (the pumping chamber of the heart that supplies the body ...

  14. Geometric and Dosimetric Approach to Determine Probability of Late Cardiac Mortality in Left Tangential Breast Irradiation: Comparison Between Wedged Beams and Field-in-Field Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pili, Giorgio; Grimaldi, Luca; Fidanza, Christian; Florio, Elena T.; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; D'Errico, Maria P.; De Tommaso, Cristina; Tramacere, Francesco; Musaio, Francesca; Castagna, Roberta; Francavilla, Maria C.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the probability of late cardiac mortality resulting from left breast irradiation planned with tangential fields and to compare this probability between the wedged beam and field-in-field (FIF) techniques and to investigate whether some geometric/dosimetric indicators can be determined to estimate the cardiac mortality probability before treatment begins. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, differential dose-volume histograms were calculated for the wedged beam and FIF plans, and the corresponding cardiac mortality probabilities were determined using the relative seriality model. As a comparative index of the dose distribution uniformity, the planning target volume (PTV) percentages involved in 97-103% of prescribed dose were determined for the two techniques. Three geometric parameters were measured for each patient: the maximal length, indicates how much the heart contours were displaced toward the PTV, the angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and the thorax width/thickness ratio. Results: Evaluating the differential dose-volume histograms showed that the gain in uniformity between the two techniques was about 1.5. With the FIF technique, the mean dose sparing for the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery, and the lung was 15% (2.5 Gy vs. 2.2 Gy), 21% (11.3 Gy vs. 9.0 Gy), and 42% (8.0 Gy vs. 4.6 Gy) respectively, compared with the wedged beam technique. Also, the cardiac mortality probability decreased by 40% (from 0.9% to 0.5%). Three geometric parameters, the maximal length, angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and thorax width/thickness ratio, were the determining factors (p = .06 for FIF, and p = .10 for wedged beam) for evaluating the cardiac mortality probability. Conclusion: The FIF technique seemed to yield a lower cardiac mortality probability than the conventional wedged beam technique. However, although our study

  15. Left Ventricle: Fully Automated Segmentation Based on Spatiotemporal Continuity and Myocardium Information in Cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (LV-FAST)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijia; Pei, Mengchao; Codella, Noel C. F.; Kochar, Minisha; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Li, Jianqi; Prince, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    CMR quantification of LV chamber volumes typically and manually defines the basal-most LV, which adds processing time and user-dependence. This study developed an LV segmentation method that is fully automated based on the spatiotemporal continuity of the LV (LV-FAST). An iteratively decreasing threshold region growing approach was used first from the midventricle to the apex, until the LV area and shape discontinued, and then from midventricle to the base, until less than 50% of the myocardium circumference was observable. Region growth was constrained by LV spatiotemporal continuity to improve robustness of apical and basal segmentations. The LV-FAST method was compared with manual tracing on cardiac cine MRI data of 45 consecutive patients. Of the 45 patients, LV-FAST and manual selection identified the same apical slices at both ED and ES and the same basal slices at both ED and ES in 38, 38, 38, and 41 cases, respectively, and their measurements agreed within −1.6 ± 8.7 mL, −1.4 ± 7.8 mL, and 1.0 ± 5.8% for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively. LV-FAST allowed LV volume-time course quantitatively measured within 3 seconds on a standard desktop computer, which is fast and accurate for processing the cine volumetric cardiac MRI data, and enables LV filling course quantification over the cardiac cycle. PMID:25738153

  16. Minimally invasive implantation of an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit used as a temporary left ventricular assist device: a new concept for bridging to permanent cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shunsuke; Fleischer, Bernhard; Maeß, Christoph; Baraki, Hassina; Kutschka, Ingo

    2015-03-01

    The implantation of cardiac assist devices is associated with poor outcome in patients with multiple organ failure and unknown neurologic status. Therefore, temporary left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) using, for example, extracorporeal centrifugal pumps may provide the chance to further evaluate the patient's clinical course and a potential qualification for implantable LVAD therapy. On the other hand, a main disadvantage of the temporary LVAD implantation is the need for redo surgery, increasing the risk of the final LVAD Implantation. To minimize this drawback of the temporary LVAD implantation, we implanted the temporary LVAD using a minimally invasive technique. The operation was done without cardiopulmonary bypass support, and the temporary LVAD was implanted through upper hemisternotomy and left anterior mini-thoracotomy. The patient recovered from multiple organ failure and was successfully bridged to a permanent LVAD therapy. PMID:25370719

  17. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis.

  18. Cardiac incoordination induced by left bundle branch block: its relation with left ventricular systolic function in patients with and without cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Miguel; Saha, Samir; Govind, Satish; Brodin, Lars Åke; del Furia, Francesca; Bertomeu, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Background Although left bundle branch block (LBBB) alters the electrical activation of the heart, it is unknown how it might change the process of myocardial coordination (MC) and how it may affect the left ventricular (LV) systolic function. The present study assessed the effects of LBBB on MC in patients with LBBB with and without dilated (DCMP) or ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMP). Methods Tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) was performed in 86 individuals: 21 with isolated LBBB, 26 patients with DCMP + LBBB, 19 patients with ICMP + LBBB and in 20 healthy individuals (Controls). MC was assessed analyzing the myocardial velocity profiles obtained from six basal segments of the LV using TDE. The LV systolic function was assessed by standard two-dimensional echocardiography and by TDE. Results Severe alterations in MC were observed in subjects with LBBB as compared with controls (P < 0.01 for all comparisons); these derangements were even worse in patients with DCMP and ICMP (P < 0.001 for comparisons with Controls and P < 0.01 for comparison with individuals with isolated LBBB). Some parameters of MC differed significantly between DCMP and ICMP (P < 0.01). A good or very good correlation coefficient was found between variables of MC and variables of LV systolic function. Conclusion LBBB induces severe derangement in the process of MC that are more pronounced in patients with cardiomyopathies and that significantly correlates with the LV systolic function. The assessment of MC may help in the evaluation of the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:18681971

  19. Impact of the bifurcation angle on major cardiac events after cross-over single stent strategy in unprotected left main bifurcation lesions: 3-dimensional quantitative coronary angiographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Kisaki; Domei, Takenori; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Shirai, Shinichi; Ando, Kenji; Goya, Masahiko; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Nobuyoshi, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the bifurcation angle (BA) between the left main (LM) and the main branch on clinical outcomes after single stenting has never been documented. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the BA on clinical outcomes after single cross-over LM to left anterior descending artery (LAD) stenting. A total of 170 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in unprotected LM bifurcation with successful single cross-over stenting from the LM into the LAD were enrolled. The main vessel angle between the LM and the LAD was computed in end-diastole before PCI with three-dimensional (3D) quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) software. The patients were classified into three groups according to tertiles of the main vessel angle. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac event (MACE: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, any revascularization including target lesion revascularization) rates throughout a 12-month period were compared between the three groups. Baseline patient characteristics were not a significant difference between the three groups. Compared to the high angle group, the low angle group had a significantly higher incidence of MACE (p = 0.041). In conclusion, this study revealed that low BA between the LM and the LAD had an adverse clinical impact after single cross-over LM to LAD stenting. PMID:25628958

  20. The number of cardiac myocytes in the hypertrophic and hypotrophic left ventricle of the obese and calorie-restricted mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Schipke, Julia; Banmann, Ewgenija; Nikam, Sandeep; Voswinckel, Robert; Kohlstedt, Karin; Loot, Annemarieke E; Fleming, Ingrid; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Changes in body mass due to varying amounts of calorie intake occur frequently with obesity and anorexia/cachexia being at opposite sides of the scale. Here, we tested whether a high-fat diet or calorie restriction (CR) decreases the number of cardiac myocytes and affects their volume. Ten 6-8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or high-fat diet (obesity group, n = 5) for 28 weeks. Ten 8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or CR diet (CR group, n = 5) for 7 days. The left ventricles of the hearts were prepared for light and electron microscopy, and analysed by design-based stereology. In CR, neither the number of cardiac myocytes, the relationship between one- and multinucleate myocytes nor their mean volume were significantly different between the groups. In contrast, in the obese mice we observed a significant increase in cell size combined with a lower number of cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05 in the one-sided U-test) and an increase in the mean number of nuclei per myocyte. The mean volume of myofibrils and mitochondria per cardiac myocyte reflected the hypertrophic and hypotrophic remodelling in obesity and CR, respectively, but were only significant in the obese mice, indicating a more profound effect of the obesity protocol than in the CR experiments. Taken together, our data indicate that long-lasting obesity is associated with a loss of cardiomyocytes of the left ventricle, but that short-term CR does not alter the number of cardiomyocytes. PMID:25322944

  1. Quantitative Tissue‐Tracking Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) of Left Atrial Deformation and the Risk of Stroke in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuko Y.; Alissa, Abdullah; Khurram, Irfan M.; Fukumoto, Kotaro; Habibi, Mohammadali; Venkatesh, Bharath A.; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Nazarian, Saman; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Lima, Joao A.; Ashikaga, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that left atrial (LA) dysfunction may be mechanistically contributing to cerebrovascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated the association between regional LA function and a prior history of stroke during sinus rhythm in patients referred for catheter ablation of AF. Methods and Results A total of 169 patients (59±10 years, 74% male, 29% persistent AF) with a history of AF in sinus rhythm at the time of pre‐ablation cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) were analyzed. The LA volume, emptying fraction, strain (S), and strain rate (SR) were assessed by tissue‐tracking cardiac magnetic resonance. The patients with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (n=18) had greater LA volumes (Vmax and Vmin; P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), lower LA total emptying fraction (P<0.001), lower LA maximum and pre‐atrial contraction strains (Smax and SpreA; P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively), and lower absolute values of LA SR during left ventricular (LV) systole and early diastole (SRs and SRe; P=0.005 and 0.03, respectively) than those without stroke/transient ischemic attack (n=151). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the LA reservoir function, including total emptying fraction, Smax, and SRs, was associated with stroke/transient ischemic attack (odds ratio 0.94, 0.91, and 0.17; P=0.03, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively) after adjusting for the CHA2DS2‐VASc score and LA Vmin. Conclusions Depressed LA reservoir function assessed by tissue‐tracking cardiac magnetic resonance is significantly associated with a prior history of stroke/transient ischemic attack in patients with AF. Our findings suggest that assessment of LA reservoir function can improve the risk stratification of cerebrovascular events in AF patients. PMID:25917441

  2. Automatic segmentation of 4D cardiac MR images for extraction of ventricular chambers using a spatio-temporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atehortúa, Angélica; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Ourselin, Sébastien; Giraldo, Diana; Romero, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    An accurate ventricular function quantification is important to support evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis of several cardiac pathologies. However, expert heart delineation, specifically for the right ventricle, is a time consuming task with high inter-and-intra observer variability. A fully automatic 3D+time heart segmentation framework is herein proposed for short-axis-cardiac MRI sequences. This approach estimates the heart using exclusively information from the sequence itself without tuning any parameters. The proposed framework uses a coarse-to-fine approach, which starts by localizing the heart via spatio-temporal analysis, followed by a segmentation of the basal heart that is then propagated to the apex by using a non-rigid-registration strategy. The obtained volume is then refined by estimating the ventricular muscle by locally searching a prior endocardium- pericardium intensity pattern. The proposed framework was applied to 48 patients datasets supplied by the organizers of the MICCAI 2012 Right Ventricle segmentation challenge. Results show the robustness, efficiency and competitiveness of the proposed method both in terms of accuracy and computational load.

  3. Activation of the cardiac ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor reverses left ventricular hypertrophy in leptin-deficient and leptin-resistant obesity

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Shubha V. Y.; Zheng, Meizi; Schuleri, Karl H.; Phan, Alexander C.; Bedja, Djahida; Saraiva, Roberto M.; Yiginer, Omer; Vandegaer, Koenraad; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; O’Donnell, Christopher P.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Barouch, Lili A.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of the leptin signaling pathway within the heart causes left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Because human obesity is a syndrome of leptin resistance, which is not amenable to leptin treatment, the identification of parallel signal transduction pathways is of potential therapeutic value. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which acts parallel to leptin in the hypothalamus, is not previously recognized to have cardiac activity. We hypothesized that CNTF receptors are present on cardiomyocytes and their activation reverses LVH in both leptin-deficient ob/ob and leptin-resistant db/db mice. The localization of CNTF receptors (CNTFRα) to the sarcolemma in C57BL/6, ob/ob and db/db was confirmed in situ with immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting (60 and 40 kDa) on isolated myocytes. ob/ob mice were randomly assigned to receive s.c. recombinant CNTF (CNTFAx15; 0.1 mg·kg−1 per day; n = 11) calorie-restriction (n = 9), or feeding ad libitum (n = 11). db/db mice were allocated to three similar groups (n = 8, 7, and 8, respectively) plus a leptin group (1 mg·kg−1 per day; n = 7). Echocardiography showed that CNTFAx15 reduced cardiac hypertrophy [posterior wall thickness decreased by 29 ± 8% (P < 0.01) in ob/ob and by 21 ± 3% in db/db mice (P < 0.01)], which was consistent with the reduction of myocyte width. Western blotting showed that leptin and CNTFAx15 activated Stat3 and ERK1/2 pathway in cultured adult mice cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue from in ob/ob and db/db mice. Together, these findings support the role of a previously undescribed signaling pathway in obesity-associated cardiac hypertrophy and have therapeutic implications for patients with obesity-related cardiovascular disease and other causes of LVH. PMID:16537512

  4. Lactate Up-Regulates the Expression of Lactate Oxidation Complex-Related Genes in Left Ventricular Cardiac Tissue of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; da Cunha, Telma Fatima; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Coelho, Marcele de Almeida; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza; Brum, Patricia Chakur

    2015-01-01

    Background Besides its role as a fuel source in intermediary metabolism, lactate has been considered a signaling molecule modulating lactate-sensitive genes involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Even though the flux of lactate is significantly high in the heart, its role on regulation of cardiac genes regulating lactate oxidation has not been clarified yet. We tested the hypothesis that lactate would increase cardiac levels of reactive oxygen species and up-regulate the expression of genes related to lactate oxidation complex. Methods/Principal Findings Isolated hearts from male adult Wistar rats were perfused with control, lactate or acetate (20mM) added Krebs-Henseleit solution during 120 min in modified Langendorff apparatus. Reactive oxygen species (O2●-/H2O2) levels, and NADH and NADPH oxidase activities (in enriched microsomal or plasmatic membranes, respectively) were evaluated by fluorimetry while SOD and catalase activities were evaluated by spectrophotometry. mRNA levels of lactate oxidation complex and energetic enzymes MCT1, MCT4, HK, LDH, PDH, CS, PGC1α and COXIV were quantified by real time RT-PCR. Mitochondrial DNA levels were also evaluated. Hemodynamic parameters were acquired during the experiment. The key findings of this work were that lactate elevated cardiac NADH oxidase activity but not NADPH activity. This response was associated with increased cardiac O2●-/H2O2 levels and up-regulation of MCT1, MCT4, LDH and PGC1α with no changes in HK, PDH, CS, COXIV mRNA levels and mitochondrial DNA levels. Lactate increased NRF-2 nuclear expression and SOD activity probably as counter-regulatory responses to increased O2●-/H2O2. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for lactate-induced up-regulation of lactate oxidation complex associated with increased NADH oxidase activity and cardiac O2●-/H2O2 driving to an anti-oxidant response. These results unveil lactate as an important signaling molecule regulating components of

  5. Concentric left ventricular morphology in aerobically trained kayak canoeists.

    PubMed

    Gates, Phillip E; Campbell, Ian G; George, Keith P

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that upper body aerobically trained athletes (kayak canoeists) would have greater left ventricular wall thickness, but similar left ventricular diastolic chamber dimensions, compared with recreationally active and sedentary men. Ultrasound echocardiography was used to determine cardiac structure and function in highly trained kayak canoeists (n = 10), moderately active (n = 10) and sedentary men (n = 10). The septal and posterior left ventricular walls were approximately 0.2 cm thicker in kayak canoeists (P < 0.05), and left ventricular mass was 51% and 32% greater (P < 0.05) in canoeists than in the sedentary and moderately trained participants, respectively. There were no differences in left ventricular chamber dimension, suggesting that the kayak canoeists had a concentric pattern of left ventricular adaptation to aerobic upper body training. Scaling the data to body composition indices had no effect on the outcome of the statistical analysis. There were no differences in resting Doppler left ventricular diastolic or systolic function among the groups. Ejection fraction was lower in the kayak canoeists, but the magnitude of the difference was within the normal variability for this measurement. Thus aerobically upper body trained athletes demonstrated a concentric pattern of cardiac enlargement, but resting left ventricle function was not different between athletes, moderately active and sedentary individuals. PMID:15513280

  6. Combined score using clinical, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic parameters to predict left ventricular remodeling in patients having had cardiac resynchronization therapy six months earlier.

    PubMed

    Brunet-Bernard, Anne; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Fauchier, Laurent; Guiot, Aurélie; Fournet, Maxime; Reynaud, Amélie; Schnell, Frédéric; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe; Donal, Erwan

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a scoring system integrating clinical, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic measurements can predict left ventricular reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The derivation cohort consisted of 162 patients with heart failure implanted with a CRT device. Baseline clinical, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic characteristics were entered into univariate and multivariate models to predict reverse remodeling as defined by a ≥15% reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume at 6 months (60%). Combinations of predictors were then tested under different scoring systems. A new 7-point CRT response score termed L2ANDS2: Left bundle branch block (2 points), Age >70 years, Nonischemic origin, left ventricular end-diastolic Diameter <40 mm/m(2), and Septal flash (2 points) was calculated for these patients. This score was then validated against a validation cohort of 45 patients from another academic center. A highly significant incremental predictive value was noted when septal flash was added to an initial 4-factor model including left bundle branch block (difference between area under the curve C statistics = 0.125, p <0.001). The predictive accuracy using the L2ANDS2 score was then 0.79 for the C statistic. Application of the new score to the validation cohort (71% of responders) gave a similar C statistic (0.75). A score >5 had a high positive likelihood ratio (+LR = 5.64), whereas a score <2 had a high negative likelihood ratio (-LR = 0.19). In conclusion, this L2ANDS2 score provides an easy-to-use tool for the clinician to assess the pretest probability of a patient being a CRT responder. PMID:24793667

  7. Canine fetal echocardiography: correlations for the analysis of cardiac dimensions.

    PubMed

    Giannico, Amália Turner; Gil, Elaine Mayumi Ueno; Garcia, Daniela Aparecida Ayres; Sousa, Marlos Gonçalves; Froes, Tilde Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop regression models for correlation of canine fetal heart development with body size to characterize normal development or suggest cardiac anomalies. Twenty clinically healthy pregnant bitches, either brachycephalic and non-brachycephalic, were examined ultrasonographically. Transabdominal fetal echocardiography was conducted every 4 days from the beginning of cardiac chambers differentiation until parturition. Ten cardiac parameters were measured: length, width and diameter of the heart; heart area; left and right ventricular dimensions; left and right atrial dimensions; and aortic and pulmonary artery diameter. Femoral length, biparietal diameter and abdominal cross-sectional area were also recorded. Regression equations were developed for each parameter of fetal body size, and linear and logarithmic models were compared. The model with the highest correlation coefficient was chosen to produce equations to calculate relative dimensions based on the correlations. Only the left-ventricular chamber differed between the two racial groups. Biparietal diameter was the independent parameter that produced the highest correlation coefficient for the most fetal cardiac dimensions, although good correlations were also observed using femoral length and abdominal cross-sectional area. Heart width and heart diameter were used as surrogates of cardiac development, as these measurements showed the best statistical correlation. Quantitative evaluation of fetal cardiac structures can be used to monitor normal and abnormal cardiac development. PMID:26689920

  8. Identification of Left Ventricular Myocardial Ischemia and Cardiac Prognosis with Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: Updates from 2008 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Chotenimitkhun, Runyawan

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging modalities are often used to manage patients with cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used for diagnosing and evaluating myocardial ischemia and viability; moreover, stress CMR study results can be used to determine cardiac prognosis. In this article, we review recently published material regarding the performance of stress testing with CMR including a brief update regarding techniques, stress agents, diagnostic accuracy, prognosis, economic implications, and ongoing trials and future developments. PMID:21125353

  9. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the

  10. Finite element stress analysis of the human left ventricle whose irregular shape is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Hamid, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional left ventricular chamber geometrical model is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram. This left ventricular model is loaded by an internal pressure monitored by cardiac catheterization. The resulting stresses in the left ventricular model chamber's wall are determined by computerized finite element procedure. For the discretization of this left ventricular model structure, a 20-node, isoparametric finite element is employed. The analysis and formulation of the computerised procedure is presented in the paper, along with the detailed algorithms and computer programs. The procedure is applied to determine the stresses in a left ventricle at an instant, during systole. Next, a portion (represented by a finite element) of this left ventricular chamber is simulated as being infarcted by making its active-state modulus value equal to its passive-state value; the neighbouring elements are shown to relieve the 'infarcted' element of stress by themselves taking on more stress.

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions. PMID:24816034

  12. Relationship Between Changes in Pulse Pressure and Frequency Domain Components of Heart Rate Variability During Short-Term Left Ventricular Pacing in Patients with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Bożena; Ruta, Jan; Kudryński, Krzysztof; Ptaszyński, Paweł; Klimczak, Artur; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between changes in pulse pressure (PP) and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) components caused by left ventricular pacing in patients with implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Material/Methods Forty patients (mean age 63±8.5 years) with chronic heart failure (CHF) and implanted CRT were enrolled in the study. The simultaneous 5-minute recording of beat-to-beat arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) by Finometer and standard electrocardiogram with CRT switched off (CRT/0) and left ventricular pacing (CRT/LV) was performed. PP (PP=SBP-DBP) and low- and high-frequency (LF and HF) HRV components were calculated, and the relationship between these parameters was analyzed. Results Short-term CRT/LV in comparison to CRT/0 caused a statistically significant increase in the values of PP (P<0.05), LF (P<0.05), and HF (P<0.05). A statistically significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF (R=0.7384, P<0.05) was observed. The ΔHF of 6 ms2 during short-term CRT/LV predicted a PP increase of ≥10% with 84.21% sensitivity and 85.71% specificity. Conclusions During short-term left ventricular pacing in patients with CRT, a significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF was observed. ΔHF ≥6 ms2 may serve as a tool in the selection of a suitable site for placement of a left ventricular lead. PMID:27305349

  13. Sudden cardiac death associated with an extremely rare coronary anomaly of the left and right coronary arteries arising exclusively from the posterior (noncoronary) sinus of valsalva.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, John N; Makaryus, Amgad N; Catanese, Charles

    2005-11-01

    Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries are relatively uncommon conditions and have been associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. Although anomalous coronary artery distribution is widely reported in the literature, no articles to date address the origin of both the right (RCA) and left coronary arteries (LCA) from the posterior (noncoronary) sinus of Valsalva. This is a report of a 16-year-old black male in good health, who collapsed and was unable to be resuscitated after physical exertion while playing basketball. In this patient, postmortem evaluation revealed the LCA and RCA originating exclusively from the posterior (noncoronary) sinus with acute angle takeoff of the LCA which likely lead to ischemia, causing SCD. We discuss the incidence of coronary artery anomalies and the proposed mechanisms that led to SCD in these patients. PMID:16450799

  14. Association of the Frontal QRS-T Angle with Adverse Cardiac Remodeling, Impaired Left and Right Ventricular Function, and Worse Outcomes in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Ilkhanoff, Leonard; Burke, Michael A.; Freed, Benjamin H.; Lang, Roberto M.; Martinez, Eva E.; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2013-01-01

    Background No prior studies have investigated the association of QRS-T angle with cardiac structure/function and outcomes in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We hypothesized that increased frontal QRS-T angle is associated with worse cardiac function/remodeling and adverse outcomes in HFpEF. Methods We prospectively studied 376 patients with HFpEF (i.e. symptomatic HF with left ventricular [LV] ejection fraction >50%.) The frontal QRS-T angle was calculated from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Patients were divided into tertiles by frontal QRS-T angle (0–26°, 27–75°, and 76–179°), and clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic data were compared among groups. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to determine the association between QRS-T angle and outcomes. Results The mean age of the cohort was 64±13 years, 65% were women, and the mean QRS-T angle was 61±51°. Patients with increased QRS-T angle were older, had a lower body-mass index, more frequently had coronary artery disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and atrial fibrillation, and had higher B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (P<0.05 for all comparisons). After multivariable adjustment, patients with increased QRS-T angle had higher BNP levels in addition to higher LV mass index, worse diastolic function parameters, more right ventricular (RV) remodeling, and worse RV systolic function (P<0.05 for all associations). QRS-T angle was independently associated with the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalization or death on multivariable analysis, even after adjusting for BNP (HR for the highest QRS-T tertile = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4; P=0.008). Conclusions In HFpEF, increased QRS-T angle is independently associated with worse left and right ventricular function/remodeling and adverse outcomes. PMID:24075945

  15. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Function predict Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Early Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, Abdel Hamid; Bakhoum, Sameh; Sharaf, Yasser; Sabry, Dina; El-Gengehe, Ahmed T; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are mobilized from the bone marrow and increase in the early phase after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of CECs and indices of endothelial dysfunction in patients with STEMI. In 78 patients with acute STEMI, characterization of CD34+/VEGFR2+ CECs, and indices of endothelial damage/dysfunction such as brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) were determined. Blood samples for CECs assessment and quantification were obtained within 24 hours of admission and FMD was assessed during the index hospitalization. At 30 days follow up, the primary composite end point of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) consisting of all-cause mortality, recurrent non-fatal MI, or heart failure and the secondary endpoint of early adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling were analyzed. The 17 patients (22%) who developed MACE had significantly higher CEC level (P = 0.004), vWF level (P =0.028), and significantly lower FMD (P = 0.006) compared to the remaining patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that CECs level and LV ejection fraction were independent predictors of MACE. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) for CEC level, FMD, and the logistic model with both markers were 0.73, 0.75, and 0.82 respectively for prediction of the MACE. The 16 patients who developed the secondary endpoint had significantly higher CEC level compared to remaining patients (p =0.038). In conclusion, increased circulating endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction predicted the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events and adverse cardiac remodeling in patients with STEMI. PMID:26864952

  16. Continuous cardiac output and left atrial pressure monitoring by long time interval analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure waveform: proof of concept in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-02-01

    We developed a technique to continuously (i.e., automatically) monitor cardiac output (CO) and left atrial pressure (LAP) by mathematical analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) waveform. The technique is unique to the few previous related techniques in that it jointly estimates the two hemodynamic variables and analyzes the PAP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle wherein wave reflections and inertial effects cease to be major factors. First, a 6-min PAP waveform segment is analyzed so as to determine the pure exponential decay and equilibrium pressure that would eventually result if cardiac activity suddenly ceased (i.e., after the confounding wave reflections and inertial effects vanish). Then, the time constant of this exponential decay is computed and assumed to be proportional to the average pulmonary arterial resistance according to a Windkessel model, while the equilibrium pressure is regarded as average LAP. Finally, average proportional CO is determined similar to invoking Ohm's law and readily calibrated with one thermodilution measurement. To evaluate the technique, we performed experiments in five dogs in which the PAP waveform and accurate, but highly invasive, aortic flow probe CO and LAP catheter measurements were simultaneously recorded during common hemodynamic interventions. Our results showed overall calibrated CO and absolute LAP root-mean-squared errors of 15.2% and 1.7 mmHg, respectively. For comparison, the root-mean-squared error of classic end-diastolic PAP estimates of LAP was 4.7 mmHg. On future successful human testing, the technique may potentially be employed for continuous hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients with pulmonary artery catheters. PMID:19057003

  17. Acute severe cardiac failure complicating myocardial infarction. Experience with 100 patients referred for consideration of mechanical left ventricular assistance.

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, M F; Chang, V P; Windsor, H M; Shanahan, M X; Hickie, J B; Morgan, J J; Gunning, J F; Seldon, A W; Hall, G V; Michell, G; Goldfarb, D; Harrision, D G

    1975-01-01

    One hundred patients were referred with suspected acute cardiac failure following acute myocardial infarction. The diagnosis was confirmed in 72: 31 of these patients underwent elective medical treatment, with 2 survivors (6%); 41 were accepted for counter pulsation, but 9 died before this could be initiated and another 2 died shortly after vain attempts to pass the balloon catheter were abandoned; 30 patients underwent counterpulsation with 14 hospital survivors (47%). Survivor status was usually good. Results of counter pulsation were better in patients who were not shocked (with 5/5 survivors) than in those who were in shock (with 9 of 25 survivors). Results support the view that counterpulsation (alone or combined with corrective surgery) may play an important role in the complications of myocardial infarction provided intervention is early. PMID:1078977

  18. Mismatch Between Cardiac Perfusion, Sympathetic Innervation, and Left Ventricular Electroanatomical Map in a Patient with Recurrent Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Jungen, Christiane; von Gogh, Gwendolyn; Schmitt, Christiane; Kuklik, Pawel; Hoffmann, Boris; Nakajima, Kenichi; Willems, Stephan; Mester, Janos; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Recurrent ventricular tachycardia Symptoms: Multiple ICD shocks Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ventricular tachycardia ablation Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Regional cardiac sympathetic denervation causes electrophysiological heterogeneity and has been found to be a predictor of potentially lethal VT. Case Report: We present the case of 69-year-old patient admitted with recurrent ventricular tachycardia and a history of anterior myocardial infarction. In line with Tc-99m-MIBI-SPECT perfusion imaging, electroanatomical mapping revealed extensive LV anterior scarring as detected by low-voltage areas. Surprisingly, I-123-MIBG-SPECT showed an extensive deficit of sympathetic innervation inferior (mismatch) and anterolateral (match). Conclusions: Combination of electroanatomical mapping with tomographic imaging of innervation and perfusion might improve our understanding of the neural trigger of VT after myocardial infarction or substrate-based catheter ablation. PMID:27109542

  19. The Cspg2 gene, disrupted in the hdf mutant, is required for right cardiac chamber and endocardial cushion formation.

    PubMed

    Mjaatvedt, C H; Yamamura, H; Capehart, A A; Turner, D; Markwald, R R

    1998-10-01

    The heart defect (hdf) mouse is a recessive lethal that arose from a transgene insertional mutation on chromosome 13. Embryos homozygous for the transgene die in utero by embryonic day 10.5 postcoitus and exhibit specific defects along the anterior-posterior cardiac axis. The future right ventricle and conus/truncus of the single heart tube fail to form and the endocardial cushions in the atrioventricular and conus/truncus regions are absent. Because the hdf mouse mutation provided the opportunity to identify a gene required for endocardial cushion formation and for specification or maintenance of the anterior most segments of the heart, we initiated studies to further characterize the phenotype, clone the insertion site, and identify the gene disrupted. Chromosome mapping studies first identified the gene, Cspg2 (versican), as a candidate hdf gene. In addition, an antibody recognizing a glycosaminoglycan epitope on versican was found to be positive by immunohistochemistry in the extracellular matrix of normal wild-type embryonic hearts, but absent in homozygous hearts. Expression analysis of the Cspg2 gene showed that the 6/8, 6/9, and 7/9 Cspg2 exon boundaries were present in mRNA of normal wild-type embryonic hearts but absent in the homozygous mutant embryos. DNA sequence flanking the transgene was used to isolate from a normal mouse library overlapping genomic DNA segments that span the transgene insertion site. The contiguous genomic DNA segment was found to contain exon 7 of the Cspg2 in a position 3' to the transgene insertion site. These four separate lines of evidence support the hypothesis that Cspg2 is the gene disrupted by the transgene insertion in the hdf mouse line. The findings of this study and our previous studies of the hdf insertional mutant mouse have shown that normal expression of the Cspg2 gene is required for the successful development of the endocardial cushion swellings and the embryonic heart segments that give rise to the right

  20. Rapid Surface Cooling by ThermoSuit System Dramatically Reduces Scar Size, Prevents Post-Infarction Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling, and Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wangde; Herring, Michael J; Hale, Sharon L; Kloner, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background The long-term effects of transient hypothermia by the non-invasive ThermoSuit apparatus on myocardial infarct (MI) scar size, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and LV function were assessed in rat MI model. Methods and Results Rats were randomized to normothermic or hypothermic groups (n=14 in each group) and subjected to 30 minutes coronary artery occlusion and 6 weeks of reperfusion. For hypothermia therapy, rats were placed into the ThermoSuit apparatus at 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion, were taken out of the apparatus when the core body temperature reached 32°C (in ≈8 minutes), and were then allowed to rewarm. After 6 weeks of recovery, rats treated with hypothermia demonstrated markedly reduced scar size (expressed as % of left ventricular area: hypothermia, 6.5±1.1%; normothermia, 19.4±1.7%; P=1.3×10−6); and thicker anterior LV wall (hypothermia, 1.57±0.09 mm; normothermia, 1.07±0.05 mm; P=3.4×10−5); decreased postmortem left ventricular volume (hypothermia, 0.45±0.04 mL; normothermia, 0.6±0.03 mL; P=0.028); and better LV fractional shortening by echocardiography (hypothermia, 37.2±2.8%; normothermia, 18.9±2.3%; P=0.0002) and LV ejection fraction by LV contrast ventriculography (hypothermia, 66.8±2.3%; normothermia, 56.0±2.0%; P=0.0014). Conclusions Rapid, transient non-invasive surface cooling with the ThermoSuit apparatus in the acute phase of MI decreased scar size by 66.5%, attenuated adverse post-infarct left ventricular dilation and remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the chronic phase of experimental MI. PMID:26116692

  1. Albuminuria is Independently Associated with Cardiac Remodeling, Abnormal Right and Left Ventricular Function, and Worse Outcomes in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Daniel H.; Burns, Jacob A.; Aguilar, Frank G.; Beussink, Lauren; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relationship between albuminuria and cardiac structure/function in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Background Albuminuria, a marker of endothelial dysfunction, has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in HFpEF. However, the relationship between albuminuria and cardiac structure/function in HFpEF has not been well studied. Methods We measured urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and right ventricular (RV) evaluation, in a prospective study of 144 patients with HFpEF. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression was used to determine the association between UACR and echocardiographic parameters. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to determine the association between UACR and outcomes. Results The mean age was 66±11 years, 62% were female, and 42% were African-American. Higher UACR was associated with greater left ventricular (LV) mass, lower preload-recruitable stroke work, and lower global longitudinal strain. Higher UACR was also significantly associated with RV remodeling (for each doubling of UACR, RV wall thickness was 0.9 mm higher [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05–0.14 mm; P=0.001, adjusted P=0.01]) and worse RV systolic function (for each doubling of UACR, RV fractional area change was 0.56% lower [95% CI 0.14–0.98%; P=0.01, adjusted P=0.03]. The association between UACR and RV parameters persisted after excluding patients with macroalbuminuria (UACR > 300 mg/g). Increased UACR was also independently associated with worse outcomes. Conclusions In HFpEF, increased UACR is a prognostic marker and is associated with increased RV and LV remodeling, and longitudinal systolic dysfunction. PMID:25282032

  2. Independent Predictors of Survival in Primary Systemic (AL) Amyloidosis, Including Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Strain Imaging: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bellavia, Diego; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Al-Zahrani, Ghormallah B.; Abraham, Theodore P.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Miyazaki, Chinami; Lacy, Martha; Scott, Christopher G.; Oh, Jae K.; Miller, Fletcher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of Doppler myocardial imaging, including myocardial velocity imaging, strain, and strain rate imaging, in patients with primary (AL) amyloidosis is uncertain. The aim of this longitudinal study was to identify independent predictors of survival, comparing clinical data, hematologic and cardiac biomarkers, and standard echocardiographic and Doppler myocardial imaging measures in a cohort of patients with AL amyloidosis. Methods A total of 249 consecutive patients with AL amyloidosis were prospectively enrolled. The primary end point was all-cause mortality, and during a median follow-up period of 18 months, 75 patients (30%) died. Clinical and electrocardiographic data, biomarkers (brain natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin T) and standard echocardiographic and longitudinal systolic and diastolic Doppler myocardial imaging measurements for 16 left ventricular segments were tested as potential independent predictors of survival. Results Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; P = .03), New York Heart Association class III or IV (HR, 2.47; P = .01), the presence of pleural effusion (HR, 1.79; P = .08), brain natriuretic peptide level (HR, 1.29; P = .01), ejection time (HR, 0.99; P = .13), and peak longitudinal systolic strain of the basal anteroseptal segment (HR, 1.05; P = .02) were independent predictors in the final model. Conclusions Multivariate survival analysis identified independent predictors of clinical outcome in patients with AL amyloidosis: New York Heart Association class III or IV, presence of pleural effusion, brain natriuretic peptide level > 493 pg/mL, ejection time < 273 ms, and peak longitudinal systolic basal anteroseptal strain less negative than or equal to −7.5% defined a high-risk group of patients. PMID:20434879

  3. Utility of Doppler Myocardial Imaging, Cardiac Biomarkers and Clonal Immunoglobulin Genes to Assess Left Ventricular Performance and Stratify Risk Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis (AL)

    PubMed Central

    Bellavia, Diego; Abraham, Roshini S.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Burnett, John C.; Al-Zahrani, Ghormallah B.; Green, Tammy D.; Manske, Michelle K.; Gertz, Morie A.; Miller, Fletcher A.; Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of light chain amyloidosis (AL). Autologous stem cell transplant (auto-SCT) has emerged as a successful treatment modality for AL patients. In this study, we examined the effect of clonal immunoglobulin light chain genes (VL), which encodes the immunoglobulin light chain protein that ultimately forms amyloid, on cardiac function, in the context of auto-SCT and its impact on overall survival. Longitudinal Doppler myocardial imaging parameters along with cardiac biomarkers were used to assess for cardiac function pre and post auto-SCT. VL gene analysis revealed that Vλ genes, in particular VλVI, were associated with worse cardiac function parameters than Vκ genes. Clonal VL genes appeared to have an impact on left ventricular (LV) function post-transplant and also influenced mortality, with specific VL gene families associated with lower survival. Another key predictor of mortality in this report was change in tricuspid regurgitant flow velocity following auto-SCT. Correlations were also observed between systolic strain rate, systolic strain and VL genes associated with amyloid formation. In summary, clonal VL gene usage influences global cardiac function in AL, with patients having VλVI and VλII-III-associated amyloid more severely affected than those having Vκ or VλI amyloid. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging along with immunoglobulin gene analysis offers novel insights into prediction of mortality and cardiac dysfunction in AL after auto-SCT. PMID:21315556

  4. Radionuclide left ventricular dV/dt for the assessment of cardiac function in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Makey, D G; Laskey, W K; Shafer, R B

    1979-01-01

    To investigate potential uses of left-ventricular (LV) systolic ejection rate (LV dV/dt) in the evaluation of LV function, we examined the effect of exercise, angiotensin, and leg raising on LV ejection fraction and LV dV/dt in patients with coronary-artery disease. The following observations were made: a) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt changed proportionately, but in opposite directions, during supine exercise; b) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt decreased to a similar extent during angiotensin infusions; and c) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt were unchanged by leg raising. The changes in peak and mean LV dV/dt were similar. Regardless of the physiologic state, peak LV dV/dt occurred during the first third of systole. These data imply that in this population there were no specific advantages of LV dV/dt over LV ejection fraction in the evaluation of LV performance. PMID:430171

  5. High-resolution numerical simulation of Left Ventricular Hemodynamics Guided by in-vivo Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Mirabella, Lucia; Chaffins, Brandon; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Oshinski, John; Yoganathan, Ajit; University of Minnesota Collaboration; Georgia Institute of Technology Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    We study the fluid dynamics within a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) during diastole using both numerical simulations and in-vivo data. The kinematics of the LV is reconstructed from high-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data acquired on a healthy volunteer, using image segmentation and a surface registration process. The flow velocity is acquired using phase-contrast MRI at the mitral orifice and at an additional parallel plane inside the ventricle. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CURVIB method (Ge et al., JCP, 2007) with the MRI reconstructed LV wall motion imposed as boundary condition. The numerical simulations show the highly dynamic environment of the flow field. The mitral vortex ring is formed during early diastolic filling and breaks down into small scale structures. The simulated hemodynamics are compared with phase-contrast MRI measurements and previous simulations in which the LV wall motion was obtained from a lumped parameter model (Le and Sotiropoulos, Eur. J. Mechanics B - Fluids, 2012). We acknowlege NIH Grant RO1-HL-07262 and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute support.

  6. Left atrial volume assessment in atrial fibrillation using multimodality imaging: a comparison of echocardiography, invasive three-dimensional CARTO and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rabbat, Mark G; Wilber, David; Thomas, Kevin; Malick, Owais; Bashir, Atif; Agrawal, Anoop; Biswas, Santanu; Sanagala, Thriveni; Syed, Mushabbar A

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial size in atrial fibrillation is a strong predictor of successful ablation and cardiovascular events. Cardiac magnetic resonance multislice method (CMR-MSM) is the current gold standard for left atrial volume (LAV) assessment but is time consuming. We investigated whether LAV with more rapid area-length method by echocardiography (Echo-AL) or cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR-AL) and invasive measurement by 3D-CARTO mapping during ablation correlate with the CMR-MSM. We studied 250 consecutive patients prior to atrial fibrillation ablation. CMR images were acquired on 3T scanner to measure LAV by MSM and biplane area-length method. Standard echocardiography views were used to calculate LAV by biplane area-length method. LAV during ablation was measured by 3D-CARTO mapping. LAV was compared using intra-class correlation (ICC), Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman plots. CMR-MSM was used as the reference standard. Mean LAV using CMR-MSM was 112.7 ± 36.7 ml. CMR-AL method overestimated LAV by 13.3 ± 21.8 ml (11.2%, p < 0.005) whereas 3D-CARTO and Echo-AL underestimated LAV by 8.3 ± 22.6 and 24.0 ± 27.6 ml respectively (8.7% and 20.0% respectively, p < 0.005). There was no significant difference between paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. CMR-AL and 3D-CARTO correlated and agreed well with CMR-MSM (r = 0.87 and 0.74, ICC = 0.80 and 0.77 respectively). However, Echo-AL had poor correlation and agreement with CMR-MSM (r = 0.66 and ICC = 0.48). Bland-Altman plots confirmed these findings. CMR-AL method may be used as an alternative to CMR-MSM, as it is non-invasive, rapid, and correlates well with CMR-MSM. LAV by different modalities should not be used interchangeably. PMID:25761533

  7. Impact of septal flash and left ventricle contractile reserve on positive remodeling during 1 year cardiac resynchronization therapy: the multicenter ViaCRT study

    PubMed Central

    Gąsior, Zbigniew; Płońska-Gościniak, Edyta; Wita, Krystian; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Szwed, Hanna; Kasprzak, Jarosław; Tomaszewski, Andrzej; Sinkiewicz, Władysław; Wojciechowska, Celina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure (HFREF). However, the relatively high non-responder rate results in a need for more precise qualification for CRT. The ViaCRT study was designed to determine the role of contractile reserve and dyssynchrony parameters in predicting CRT response. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effect of baseline septal flash and contractile reserve (CR) on clinical and echocardiographic parameters of response to CRT in 12-month follow-up. Material and methods One hundred thirty-three guideline-selected CRT candidates (both ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction) were enrolled in the study. Baseline study population characteristics were: left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) 25 ±6%, QRS 165 ±25 ms, NYHA class III (90%) and IV (10%). Results In subjects with septal flash (SF) registered before CRT implantation improvement in LVEF (14 ±2% vs. 8 ±1%, p < 0.05) and left ventricle (LV) systolic (63 ±10 ml vs. 36 ±6 ml, p < 0.05) and diastolic (46 ±10 ml vs. 32 ±7, p < 0.05) volumes was more pronounced than in patients without SF. In patients with CR (defined as LVEF increase by 20% or 4 viable segments) improvement in echo parameters was not significantly different then in the CR– group. Neither SF nor CR was associated with improvement in NYHA class. Subgroup analysis revealed that only in non-ischemic HF patients is presence of septal flash associated with LV function improvement after CRT. Conclusions In non-ischemic HF patients septal flash is a helpful parameter in prediction of LV remodeling after 12 months of resynchronization therapy. PMID:27186179

  8. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7845801

  9. Different patterns of left ventricular rotational mechanics in cardiac amyloidosis—results from the three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic MAGYAR-Path Study

    PubMed Central

    Földeák, Dóra; Domsik, Péter; Kalapos, Anita; Sepp, Róbert; Borbényi, Zita; Forster, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is an infiltrative disease primarily caused by extracellular tissue deposition of amyloid fibrils in the myocardial interstitium. The aim of the present study was to examine left ventricular (LV) rotational mechanics in biopsy-proven CA by three-dimensional (3D) speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE). Ten patients (65.3±11.5 years, 6 males) with CA entered the study. The mean basal LV rotations were 0.3±3.8°, while mean apical LV rotations proved to be 7.0±3.3°. LV basal and apical rotations were in the same counterclockwise direction in 6 out of 10 CA patients demonstrating near absence of LV twist [LV rigid body rotation (RBR)]. Apico-basal difference was near 3 or less degrees in three patients with LV-RBR, and 6−10 degrees in the other three subjects with LV-RBR. One another patient showed normal rotational mechanics, while two patients had significant hyporotations and one had significant hyperrotations in normal directions. To conclude with, different patterns of LV rotational mechanics could be demonstrated in CA. LV RBR, the near absence of LV twist seems to be a frequent phenomenon in CA. PMID:26807368

  10. Different patterns of left ventricular rotational mechanics in cardiac amyloidosis-results from the three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic MAGYAR-Path Study.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Attila; Földeák, Dóra; Domsik, Péter; Kalapos, Anita; Sepp, Róbert; Borbényi, Zita; Forster, Tamás

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is an infiltrative disease primarily caused by extracellular tissue deposition of amyloid fibrils in the myocardial interstitium. The aim of the present study was to examine left ventricular (LV) rotational mechanics in biopsy-proven CA by three-dimensional (3D) speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE). Ten patients (65.3±11.5 years, 6 males) with CA entered the study. The mean basal LV rotations were 0.3±3.8°, while mean apical LV rotations proved to be 7.0±3.3°. LV basal and apical rotations were in the same counterclockwise direction in 6 out of 10 CA patients demonstrating near absence of LV twist [LV rigid body rotation (RBR)]. Apico-basal difference was near 3 or less degrees in three patients with LV-RBR, and 6-10 degrees in the other three subjects with LV-RBR. One another patient showed normal rotational mechanics, while two patients had significant hyporotations and one had significant hyperrotations in normal directions. To conclude with, different patterns of LV rotational mechanics could be demonstrated in CA. LV RBR, the near absence of LV twist seems to be a frequent phenomenon in CA. PMID:26807368

  11. The R21C Mutation in Cardiac Troponin I Imposes Differences in Contractile Force Generation between the Left and Right Ventricles of Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingsheng; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Rojas, Ana I; Wang, Yingcai; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked R21C (arginine to cysteine) mutation in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) on the contractile properties and myofilament protein phosphorylation in papillary muscle preparations from left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles of homozygous R21C(+/+) knock-in mice. The maximal steady-state force was significantly reduced in skinned papillary muscle strips from the LV compared to RV, with the latter displaying the level of force observed in LV or RV from wild-type (WT) mice. There were no differences in the Ca(2+) sensitivity between the RV and LV of R21C(+/+) mice; however, the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force was higher in RV-R21C(+/+) compared with RV-WT and lower in LV- R21C(+/+) compared with LV-WT. We also observed partial loss of Ca(2+) regulation at low [Ca(2+)]. In addition, R21C(+/+)-KI hearts showed no Ser23/24-cTnI phosphorylation compared to LV or RV of WT mice. However, phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was significantly higher in the RV versus LV of R21C(+/+) mice and versus LV and RV of WT mice. The difference in RLC phosphorylation between the ventricles of R21C(+/+) mice likely contributes to observed differences in contractile force and the lower tension monitored in the LV of HCM mice. PMID:25961037

  12. Successful rescue from cardiac arrest in a patient with postinfarction left ventricular blow-out rupture: "extra-pericardial aortic cannulation" for establishment total cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Suguru; Yaku, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Akihiko

    2014-08-01

    We report a quick and simple technique to establish cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a left ventricular (LV) blow-out rupture. A 74-year-old woman with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction suddenly collapsed and lost consciousness. A venous-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) device was inserted by femoral cannulation. Emergent median sternotomy was performed. The pericardium was not opened first, and the thymus was divided to expose the ascending aorta just above the pericardial reflection. After placing two purse-string sutures on the distal ascending aorta, a 7-mm aortic cannula (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan) was inserted. The pericardium was then incised. A large volume of blood was expelled from the pericardial space, and CPB was initiated with suction drainage. A two-stage venous drainage cannula was then inserted from the right atrial appendage without hemodynamic collapse. After cardiac arrest, closure of ruptured LV wall and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. The patient was weaned from CPB with an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and the previously inserted venous-arterial ECMO. Extra-pericardial aortic cannulation is an effective and reproducible method to prepare for CPB in emergent cases of LV rupture. PMID:25179976

  13. Left Ventricular Stroke Volume Quantification by Contrast Echocardiography – Comparison of Linear and Flow-Based Methods to Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Dele-Michael, Abiola O.; Fujikura, Kana; Devereux, Richard B; Islam, Fahmida; Hriljac, Ingrid; Wilson, Sean R.; Lin, Fay; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Echocardiography (echo) quantified LV stroke volume (SV) is widely used to assess systolic performance after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study compared two common echo approaches – predicated on flow (Doppler) and linear chamber dimensions (Teichholz) – to volumetric SV and global infarct parameters quantified by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Multimodality imaging was performed as part of a post-AMI registry. For echo, SV was measured by Doppler and Teichholz methods. Cine-CMR was used for volumetric SV and LVEF quantification, and delayed-enhancement CMR for infarct size. Results 142 patients underwent same-day echo and CMR. On echo, mean SV by Teichholz (78±17ml) was slightly higher than Doppler (75±16ml; Δ=3±13ml, p=0.02). Compared to SV on CMR (78±18ml), mean difference by Teichholz (Δ=−0.2±14; p=0.89) was slightly smaller than Doppler (Δ−3±14; p=0.02) but limits of agreement were similar between CMR and echo methods (Teichholz: −28, 27 ml, Doppler: −31, 24ml). For Teichholz, differences with CMR SV were greatest among patients with anteroseptal or lateral wall hypokinesis (p<0.05). For Doppler, differences were associated with aortic valve abnormalities or root dilation (p=0.01). SV by both echo methods decreased stepwise in relation to global LV injury as assessed by CMR-quantified LVEF and infarct size (p<0.01). Conclusions Teichholz and Doppler calculated SV yield similar magnitude of agreement with CMR. Teichholz differences with CMR increase with septal or lateral wall contractile dysfunction, whereas Doppler yields increased offsets in patients with aortic remodeling. PMID:23488864

  14. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  15. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Yasumi; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Hirose, Junichi

    1992-08-01

    The morphology and function of the cardiac chambers have been evaluated clinically using cineventriculography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and endomyocardial biopsy. Excluding the invasive technique of biopsy where tissue is actually removed, these other non-invasive techniques reveal only indirect evidence of endocardial and subendocardial pathology and, therefore, allow the potential for misdiagnosis from insufficient data. Fiberoptic examinations, as recently demonstrated in coronary, pulmonary, and peripheral vessels, allow direct observation of pathology otherwise unobtainable. Recently, similar techniques have been applied to examine the cardiac chambers of dogs and the right heart of humans. In this study, we examine the feasibility and safety of percutaneous fiberoptic cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis.

  16. Assessment of Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Calculation on Long-axis Views From Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huttin, Olivier; Petit, Marie-Anaïs; Bozec, Erwan; Eschalier, Romain; Juillière, Yves; Moulin, Frédéric; Lemoine, Simon; Selton-Suty, Christine; Sadoul, Nicolas; Mandry, Damien; Beaumont, Marine; Felblinger, Jacques; Girerd, Nicolas; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) accurately, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can be indicated and lays on the evaluation of multiple slices of the left ventricle in short axis (CMRSAX). The objective of this study was to assess another method consisting of the evaluation of 2 long-axis slices (CMRLAX) for LVEF determination in acute myocardial infarction. One hundred patients underwent CMR 2 to 4 days after acute myocardial infarction. LVEF was computed by the area-length method on horizontal and vertical CMRLAX images. Those results were compared to reference values obtained on contiguous CMRSAX images in one hand, and to values obtained from transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in the other hand. For CMRSAX and TTE, LVEF was computed with Simpson method. Reproducibility of LVEF measurements was additionally determined. The accuracy of volume measurements was assessed against reference aortic stroke volumes obtained by phase-contrast MR imaging. LVEF from CMRLAX had a mean value of 47 ± 8% and were on average 5% higher than reference LVEF from CMRSAX (42 ± 8%), closer to routine values from TTELAX (49 ± 8%), much better correlated with the reference LVEF from CMRSAX (R = 0.88) than that from TTE (R = 0.58), obtained with a higher reproducibility than with the 2 other techniques (% of interobserver variability: CMRLAX 5%, CMRSAX 11%, and TTE 13%), and obtained with 4-fold lower recording and calculation times than for CMRSAX. Apart from this, CMRLAX stroke volume was well correlated with phase-contrast values (R = 0.81). In patients with predominantly regional contractility abnormalities, the determination of LVEF by CMRLAX is twice more reproducible than the reference CMRSAX method, even though the LVEF is consistently overestimated compared with CMRSAX. However, the CMRLAX LVEF determination provides values closer to TTE measurements, the most available and commonly used method in clinical practice, clinical

  17. Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS): A Bayesian-Based Decision Support System for Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Loghmanpour, Natasha A.; Druzdzel, Marek J.; Antaki, James F.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the use of Bayesian Networks (BNs) for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy; a treatment for end-stage heart failure that has been steadily growing in popularity over the past decade. Despite this growth, the number of LVAD implants performed annually remains a small fraction of the estimated population of patients who might benefit from this treatment. We believe that this demonstrates a need for an accurate stratification tool that can help identify LVAD candidates at the most appropriate point in the course of their disease. We derived BNs to predict mortality at five endpoints utilizing the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) database: containing over 12,000 total enrolled patients from 153 hospital sites, collected since 2006 to the present day, and consisting of approximately 230 pre-implant clinical variables. Synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) was employed to address the uneven proportion of patients with negative outcomes and to improve the performance of the models. The resulting accuracy and area under the ROC curve (%) for predicted mortality were 30 day: 94.9 and 92.5; 90 day: 84.2 and 73.9; 6 month: 78.2 and 70.6; 1 year: 73.1 and 70.6; and 2 years: 71.4 and 70.8. To foster the translation of these models to clinical practice, they have been incorporated into a web-based application, the Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS). As clinical experience with LVAD therapy continues to grow, and additional data is collected, we aim to continually update these BN models to improve their accuracy and maintain their relevance. Ongoing work also aims to extend the BN models to predict the risk of adverse events post-LVAD implant as additional factors for consideration in decision making. PMID:25397576

  18. Evaluation of Heterogeneity in the Association between Congenital Heart Defects and Variants of Folate Metabolism Genes: Conotruncal and Left-Sided Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jin; Lupo, Philip J.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway may influence the risk of congenital heart defects. This study was undertaken to assess the associations between the inherited and maternal genotypes for variants in folate-related genes and the risk of a composite heart phenotype that included two component phenotypes: conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) and left-sided cardiac lesions (LSLs). METHODS Nine folate-related gene variants were evaluated using data from 692 case-parent triads (CTD, n=419; LSL, n=273). Log-linear analyses were used to test for heterogeneity of the genotype-phenotype association across the two component phenotypes (i.e. CTD and LSLS) and, when there was no evidence of heterogeneity, to assess the associations of the maternal and inherited genotypes with the composite phenotype. RESULTS There was little evidence of heterogeneity of the genotype-phenotype association across the two component phenotypes or of an association between the genotypes and the composite phenotype. There was evidence of heterogeneity in the association of the maternal MTR A2756G genotype (p = 0.01) with CTDs and LSLs. However, further analyses suggested that the observed associations with the maternal MTR A2756G genotype might be confounded by parental imprinting effects. CONCLUSIONS Our analyses of these data provide little evidence that the folate-related gene variants evaluated in this study influence the risk of this composite congenital heart defect phenotype. However, larger and more comprehensive studies that evaluate parent-of-origin effects, as well as additional folate-related genes, are required to more fully explore the relation between folate and congenital heart defects. PMID:21987465

  19. Variability in cardiac MR measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction, volumes and mass in healthy adults: defining a significant change at 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, N C; Chue, C D; Taylor, R J; Ferro, C J; Townend, J N; Steeds, R P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Variability in the measurement of left ventricular (LV) parameters in cardiovascular imaging has typically been assessed over a short time interval, but clinicians most commonly compare results from studies performed a year apart. To account for variation in technical, procedural and biological factors over this time frame, we quantified the within-subject changes in LV volumes, LV mass (LVM) and LV ejection fraction (EF) in a well-defined cohort of healthy adults at 12 months. Methods: Cardiac MR (CMR) was performed in 42 healthy control subjects at baseline and at 1 year (1.5 T Magnetom® Avanto; Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Analysis of steady-state free precession images was performed manually offline (Argus software; Siemens Healthcare) for assessment of LV volumes, LVM and EF by a single blinded observer. A random subset of 10 participants also underwent repeat imaging within 7 days to determine short-term interstudy reproducibility. Results: There were no significant changes in any LV parameter on repeat CMR at 12 months. The short-term interstudy biases were not significantly different from the long-term changes observed at 1 year. The smallest detectable change (SDC) for LVEF, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and LVM that could be recognized with 95% confidence were 6%, 13 ml, 7 ml and 6 g, respectively. Conclusion: The variability in CMR-derived LV measures arising from technical, procedural and biological factors remains minimal at 12 months. Thus, for patients undergoing repeat annual assessment by CMR, even small differences in LV function, size and LVM (which are greater than the SDC) may be attributed to disease-related factors. Advances in knowledge: The reproducibility and reliability of CMR data at 12 months is excellent allowing clinicians to be confident that even small changes in LV structure and function over this time frame are real. PMID:25710361

  20. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  1. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  2. Determinants of discrepancies in detection and comparison of the prognostic significance of left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Chen, Haiying; Estes, E Harvey; Mateasik, Anton; Bluemke, David A; Lima, Joao A C; Burke, Gregory L; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2015-02-15

    Despite the low sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ECG-LVH is known to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk. Understanding reasons for the discrepancies in detection of LVH by ECG versus imaging could help improve the diagnostic ability of ECG. We examined factors associated with false-positive and false-negative ECG-LVH, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. We also compared the prognostic significance of ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH as predictors of cardiovascular events. This analysis included 4,748 participants (mean age 61.9 years, 53.5% females, 61.7% nonwhites). Logistic regression with stepwise selection was used to identify factors associated with false-positive (n = 208) and false-negative (n = 387), compared with true-positive (n = 208) and true-negative (n = 4,041) ECG-LVH, respectively. A false-negative ECG-LVH status was associated with increased odds of Hispanic race/ethnicity, current smoking, hypertension, increased systolic blood pressure, prolongation of QRS duration, and higher body mass index and with lower odds of increased ejection fraction (model-generalized R(2) = 0.20). A false-positive ECG-LVH status was associated with lower odds of black race, Hispanic race/ethnicity, minor ST-T abnormalities, increased systolic blood pressure, and presence of any major electrocardiographic abnormalities (model-generalized R(2) = 0.29). Both ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease events (hazard ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 2.20 and hazard ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 2.46, respectively). In conclusion, discrepancy in LVH detection by ECG and MRI can be relatively improved by considering certain participant characteristics. Discrepancy in diagnostic performance, yet agreement on predictive ability, suggests that LVH by ECG and LVH by imaging are likely to be two distinct but somehow related

  3. Prevalence, Patterns, and Clinical Predictors of Left Ventricular Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Prior to Pulmonary Vein Antral Isolation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nance, John W.; Khurram, Irfan M.; Nazarian, Saman; DeWire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasingly used to evaluate patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and pattern of left ventricular (LV) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI and compare the clinical and demographic differences of patients with and without LV LGE. Clinical and demographic data on 62 patients (mean age 61 ± 7.9, 69% male) undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF were collected. Two observers, masked to clinical histories, independently recorded the prevalence, extent (number of myocardial segments), and pattern (subendocardial, midmyocardial, or subepicardial) of LV LGE in each patient. Clinical and demographic predictors of LV LGE were determined using logistic regression. Twenty-three patients (37%) demonstrated LV LGE affecting a mean of 3.0 ± 2.1 myocardial segments. There was no difference in LV ejection fraction between patients with and without LGE, and most (65%) patients with LGE had normal wall motion. Only age (P = 0.04) and a history of congestive heart failure (P = .03) were statistically significant independent predictors of LGE. The most common LGE pattern was midmyocardial, seen in 17 of 23 (74%) patients. Only 4 of 23 (17%) patients had LGE in an “expected” pattern based on clinical history. Of the remaining 19 patients, 4 had known congestive heart failure, 5 nonischemic cardiomyopathy, 4 known coronary artery disease, and 2 prior aortic valve replacement. Six of 23 (26%) patients had no known coronary artery, valvular, or myocardial disease. There is a high prevalence of unexpected LV scar in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF, with most patients demonstrating a nonischemic pattern of LV LGE and no wall motion abnormalities (ie, subclinical disease). The high prevalence of unexpected LGE in these patients may argue for CMR as the modality of choice for

  4. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm into the Left Atrium with Multiple Fistulous Communications: A Rare Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Chandrashekhar, Rakshita; Pratt, Jerry W.; Cole, Maria D.; Kamath, Sreenivas; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured noncoronary sinus of valsalva aneurysm with fistulous connections to multiple cardiac chambers has not been reported previously. We report a 66-year-old man who presented with worsening cough and exertional dyspnea. Transesophageal echocardiogram confirmed a large aneurysm involving the noncoronary cusp of the aortic sinus with aneurysmal extension to the left atrium. There were also two fistulous communications with the left atrium and one small fistulous connection with the right atrium. Open-heart surgery with aortic root replacement and reimplantation of coronary arteries along with primary closure and repair of aorta to the left atrial fistula was performed. PMID:26819782

  5. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm into the Left Atrium with Multiple Fistulous Communications: A Rare Cause of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Chandrashekhar, Rakshita; Pratt, Jerry W; Cole, Maria D; Kamath, Sreenivas; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured noncoronary sinus of valsalva aneurysm with fistulous connections to multiple cardiac chambers has not been reported previously. We report a 66-year-old man who presented with worsening cough and exertional dyspnea. Transesophageal echocardiogram confirmed a large aneurysm involving the noncoronary cusp of the aortic sinus with aneurysmal extension to the left atrium. There were also two fistulous communications with the left atrium and one small fistulous connection with the right atrium. Open-heart surgery with aortic root replacement and reimplantation of coronary arteries along with primary closure and repair of aorta to the left atrial fistula was performed. PMID:26819782

  6. Myoepithelial carcinoma in the mediastinum involving the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Salem, Nagla; Siddiqui, Fayez; Rashed, Ahmed; Othman, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with typical atrial flutter and was diagnosed with a large mediastinal mass, posterior to the ascending aorta, noted within the left atrium, compressing the superior vena cava and right superior pulmonary vein, and measuring >9.0 cm at its greatest diameter. Histopathological studies showed a myoepithelial carcinoma. The patient underwent tumor debulking and radiation therapy. This is the first report of a mediastinal myoepithelial carcinoma involving cardiac chambers. PMID:26429764

  7. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  8. Registration-based segmentation of murine 4D cardiac micro-CT data using symmetric normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin; Badea, Alexandra; Liu, Yilin; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-10-01

    Micro-CT can play an important role in preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease because of its high spatial and temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of 4D cardiac images requires segmentation of the cardiac chambers at each time point, an extremely time consuming process if done manually. To improve throughput this study proposes a pipeline for registration-based segmentation and functional analysis of 4D cardiac micro-CT data in the mouse. Following optimization and validation using simulations, the pipeline was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data corresponding to ten cardiac phases acquired in C57BL/6 mice (n = 5). After edge-preserving smoothing with a novel adaptation of 4D bilateral filtration, one phase within each cardiac sequence was manually segmented. Deformable registration was used to propagate these labels to all other cardiac phases for segmentation. The volumes of each cardiac chamber were calculated and used to derive stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and cardiac index. Dice coefficients and volume accuracies were used to compare manual segmentations of two additional phases with their corresponding propagated labels. Both measures were, on average, >0.90 for the left ventricle and >0.80 for the myocardium, the right ventricle, and the right atrium, consistent with trends in inter- and intra-segmenter variability. Segmentation of the left atrium was less reliable. On average, the functional metrics of interest were underestimated by 6.76% or more due to systematic label propagation errors around atrioventricular valves; however, execution of the pipeline was 80% faster than performing analogous manual segmentation of each phase.

  9. Incidence of sudden cardiac death associated with coronary artery occlusion in dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy is reduced by chronic beta-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Dellsperger, K C; Martins, J B; Clothier, J L; Marcus, M L

    1990-09-01

    Because beta-adrenergic blockade has as one of its many effects altered electrophysiological abnormalities after dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy have been subjected to coronary occlusion, we tested the hypothesis that metoprolol (200-400 mg/day) would reduce mortality rates in dogs with one-kidney, one clip left ventricular hypertrophy while a similar reduction in arterial pressure with enalapril (20-40 mg/day) would not. Dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy were given metoprolol or enalapril for 5-7 days before a 3-hour coronary occlusion. Infarct size and risk area were measured with triphenyltetrazolium chloride stain and barium angiography, respectively. For control (n = 15), left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 17), left ventricular hypertrophy plus metoprolol (n = 12), and left ventricular hypertrophy plus enalapril (n = 15) groups, mean arterial pressure, ratio of infarct size to risk area, and dogs experiencing sudden death were 110 +/- 4, 142 +/- 4, 121 +/- 7, and 120 +/- 3 mm Hg; 44 +/- 5%, 65 +/- 5%, 44 +/- 7%, and 30 +/- 4%; and 27%, 65%, 17%, and 53%, respectively. Thus, the excessive increase in early mortality occurring when dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy undergo coronary occlusion is interrupted with beta-blockade, possibly via electrophysiological effects rather than by changes in arterial pressure or infarct size. PMID:1975521

  10. [Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pomini, G; Lupia, M; Milano, A; Gribaldo, R

    1993-03-01

    Two cases of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm following myocardial infarction are presented. In the first patient a two-dimensional echocardiography study revealed a small posterior echo-free space that appeared to communicate with the left ventricle through a small defect in the left ventricular posterior wall. Conventional Doppler echocardiography and colour flow imaging demonstrated flow between the left ventricle and the paraventricular chamber. In the other patient, the same study detected an enormous false aneurysm. We found a large extramyocardial echo-free space within the pericardial cavity. The site of this space was posterolateral and communicating with the left ventricular cavity. Cardiac catheterization and surgery confirmed the diagnosis. A postoperative echocardiographic study demonstrated a persistent but smaller saccular echo-free space and a residual shunt through one site of repair in the first patient; in the other, after surgical treatment there was no residual flow, but a left ventricular dysfunction was detected. Two dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography is the best technique among the noninvasive methods, for detecting and following up left ventricular pseudoaneurysms. PMID:8325466