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Sample records for left ventricle finite-element

  1. Finite element stress analysis of the human left ventricle whose irregular shape is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Hamid, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional left ventricular chamber geometrical model is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram. This left ventricular model is loaded by an internal pressure monitored by cardiac catheterization. The resulting stresses in the left ventricular model chamber's wall are determined by computerized finite element procedure. For the discretization of this left ventricular model structure, a 20-node, isoparametric finite element is employed. The analysis and formulation of the computerised procedure is presented in the paper, along with the detailed algorithms and computer programs. The procedure is applied to determine the stresses in a left ventricle at an instant, during systole. Next, a portion (represented by a finite element) of this left ventricular chamber is simulated as being infarcted by making its active-state modulus value equal to its passive-state value; the neighbouring elements are shown to relieve the 'infarcted' element of stress by themselves taking on more stress.

  2. Incorporation of a Left Ventricle Finite Element Model Defining Infarction Into the XCAT Imaging Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2011-01-01

    The 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was developed to provide a realistic and flexible model of the human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions for use in medical imaging research. A prior limitation to the phantom was that it did not accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result from cardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). We overcame this limitation in a previous study by combining the phantom with a finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the left ventricle (LV) capable of more realistically simulating regional defects caused by ischemia. In the present work, we extend this model giving it the ability to accurately simulate motion abnormalities caused by myocardial infarction (MI), a far more complex situation in terms of altered mechanics compared with the modeling of acute ischemia. The FE model geometry is based on high resolution CT images of a normal male subject. An anterior region was defined as infarcted and the material properties and fiber distribution were altered, according to the bio-physiological properties of two types of infarction, i.e., fibrous and remodeled infarction (30% thinner wall than fibrous case). Compared with the original, surface-based 4D beating heart model of the XCAT, where regional abnormalities are modeled by simply scaling down the motion in those regions, the FE model was found to provide a more accurate representation of the abnormal motion of the LV due to the effects of fibrous infarction as well as depicting the motion of remodeled infarction. In particular, the FE models allow for the accurate depiction of dyskinetic motion. The average circumferential strain results were found to be consistent with measured dyskinetic experimental results. Combined with the 4D XCAT phantom, the FE model can be used to produce realistic multimodality sets of imaging data from a variety of patients in which the normal or abnormal cardiac function is accurately represented. PMID:21041157

  3. Finite element analysis of left ventricle during cardiac cycles in viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing Jin; Xu, Feng Yu; Yang, Wen An

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effect of myocardial viscoeslasticity on heart function, this paper presents a finite element model based on a hyper-viscoelastic model for the passive myocardium and Hill's three-element model for the active contraction. The hyper-viscoelastic model considers the myocardium microstructure, while the active model is phenomenologically based on the combination of Hill's equation for the steady tetanized contraction and the specific time-length-force property of the myocardial muscle. To validate the finite element model, the end-diastole strains and the end-systole strain predicted by the model are compared with the experimental values in the literature. It is found that the proposed model not only can estimate well the pumping function of the heart, but also predicts the transverse shear strains. The finite element model is also applied to analyze the influence of viscoelasticity on the residual stresses in the myocardium. PMID:27253618

  4. Quasi-static image-based immersed boundary-finite element model of left ventricle under diastolic loading.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Huiming; Berry, Colin; Luo, Xiaoyu; Griffith, Boyce E

    2014-11-01

    Finite stress and strain analyses of the heart provide insight into the biomechanics of myocardial function and dysfunction. Herein, we describe progress toward dynamic patient-specific models of the left ventricle using an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element (FE) structural mechanics model. We use a structure-based hyperelastic strain-energy function to describe the passive mechanics of the ventricular myocardium, a realistic anatomical geometry reconstructed from clinical magnetic resonance images of a healthy human heart, and a rule-based fiber architecture. Numerical predictions of this IB/FE model are compared with results obtained by a commercial FE solver. We demonstrate that the IB/FE model yields results that are in good agreement with those of the conventional FE model under diastolic loading conditions, and the predictions of the LV model using either numerical method are shown to be consistent with previous computational and experimental data. These results are among the first to analyze the stress and strain predictions of IB models of ventricular mechanics, and they serve both to verify the IB/FE simulation framework and to validate the IB/FE model. Moreover, this work represents an important step toward using such models for fully dynamic fluid-structure interaction simulations of the heart. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24799090

  5. Quasi-static image-based immersed boundary-finite element model of left ventricle under diastolic loading

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Huiming; Berry, Colin; Luo, Xiaoyu; Griffith, Boyce E

    2014-01-01

    Finite stress and strain analyses of the heart provide insight into the biomechanics of myocardial function and dysfunction. Herein, we describe progress toward dynamic patient-specific models of the left ventricle using an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element (FE) structural mechanics model. We use a structure-based hyperelastic strain-energy function to describe the passive mechanics of the ventricular myocardium, a realistic anatomical geometry reconstructed from clinical magnetic resonance images of a healthy human heart, and a rule-based fiber architecture. Numerical predictions of this IB/FE model are compared with results obtained by a commercial FE solver. We demonstrate that the IB/FE model yields results that are in good agreement with those of the conventional FE model under diastolic loading conditions, and the predictions of the LV model using either numerical method are shown to be consistent with previous computational and experimental data. These results are among the first to analyze the stress and strain predictions of IB models of ventricular mechanics, and they serve both to verify the IB/FE simulation framework and to validate the IB/FE model. Moreover, this work represents an important step toward using such models for fully dynamic fluid–structure interaction simulations of the heart. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24799090

  6. Normal and Pathological NCAT Image and PhantomData Based onPhysiologically Realistic Left Ventricle Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Tsui,Benjamin M.W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-08-02

    The 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom, whichprovides a realistic model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac andrespiratory motions, is used in medical imaging research to evaluate andimprove imaging devices and techniques, especially dynamic cardiacapplications. One limitation of the phantom is that it lacks the abilityto accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result fromcardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal ofthis work was to enhance the 4D NCAT phantom by incorporating aphysiologically based, finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the leftventricle (LV) to simulate both normal and abnormal cardiac motions. Thegeometry of the FE mechanical model was based on gated high-resolutionx-ray multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data of a healthy malesubject. The myocardial wall was represented as transversely isotropichyperelastic material, with the fiber angle varying from -90 degrees atthe epicardial surface, through 0 degreesat the mid-wall, to 90 degreesat the endocardial surface. A time varying elastance model was used tosimulate fiber contraction, and physiological intraventricular systolicpressure-time curves were applied to simulate the cardiac motion over theentire cardiac cycle. To demonstrate the ability of the FE mechanicalmodel to accurately simulate the normal cardiac motion as well abnormalmotions indicative of CAD, a normal case and two pathologic cases weresimulated and analyzed. In the first pathologic model, a subendocardialanterior ischemic region was defined. A second model was created with atransmural ischemic region defined in the same location. The FE baseddeformations were incorporated into the 4D NCAT cardiac model through thecontrol points that define the cardiac structures in the phantom whichwere set to move according to the predictions of the mechanical model. Asimulation study was performed using the FE-NCAT combination toinvestigate how the differences in contractile function

  7. Dynamic finite-strain modelling of the human left ventricle in health and disease using an immersed boundary-finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Carrick, David; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E.; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Detailed models of the biomechanics of the heart are important both for developing improved interventions for patients with heart disease and also for patient risk stratification and treatment planning. For instance, stress distributions in the heart affect cardiac remodelling, but such distributions are not presently accessible in patients. Biomechanical models of the heart offer detailed three-dimensional deformation, stress and strain fields that can supplement conventional clinical data. In this work, we introduce dynamic computational models of the human left ventricle (LV) that are derived from clinical imaging data obtained from a healthy subject and from a patient with a myocardial infarction (MI). Both models incorporate a detailed invariant-based orthotropic description of the passive elasticity of the ventricular myocardium along with a detailed biophysical model of active tension generation in the ventricular muscle. These constitutive models are employed within a dynamic simulation framework that accounts for the inertia of the ventricular muscle and the blood that is based on an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural mechanics. The geometry of the models is based on data obtained non-invasively by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). CMR imaging data are also used to estimate the parameters of the passive and active constitutive models, which are determined so that the simulated end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes agree with the corresponding volumes determined from the CMR imaging studies. Using these models, we simulate LV dynamics from enddiastole to end-systole. The results of our simulations are shown to be in good agreement with subject-specific CMR-derived strain measurements and also with earlier clinical studies on human LV strain distributions. PMID:27041786

  8. The direct incorporation of perfusion defect information to define ischemia and infarction in a finite element model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Veress, Alexander I; Fung, George S K; Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Kicska, Gregory A; Paul Segars, W; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the process in which complex lesion geometries (specified by computer generated perfusion defects) are incorporated in the description of nonlinear finite element (FE) mechanical models used for specifying the motion of the left ventricle (LV) in the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom to simulate gated cardiac image data. An image interrogation process was developed to define the elements in the LV mesh as ischemic or infarcted based upon the values of sampled intensity levels of the perfusion maps. The intensity values were determined for each of the interior integration points of every element of the FE mesh. The average element intensity levels were then determined. The elements with average intensity values below a user-controlled threshold were defined as ischemic or infarcted depending upon the model being defined. For the infarction model cases, the thresholding and interrogation process were repeated in order to define a border zone (BZ) surrounding the infarction. This methodology was evaluated using perfusion maps created by the perfusion cardiac-torso (PCAT) phantom an extension of the 4D XCAT phantom. The PCAT was used to create 3D perfusion maps representing 90% occlusions at four locations (left anterior descending (LAD) segments 6 and 9, left circumflex (LCX) segment 11, right coronary artery (RCA) segment 1) in the coronary tree. The volumes and shapes of the defects defined in the FE mechanical models were compared with perfusion maps produced by the PCAT. The models were incorporated into the XCAT phantom. The ischemia models had reduced stroke volume (SV) by 18-59 ml. and ejection fraction (EF) values by 14-50% points compared to the normal models. The infarction models, had less reductions in SV and EF, 17-54 ml. and 14-45% points, respectively. The volumes of the ischemic/infarcted regions of the models were nearly identical to those volumes obtained from the perfusion images and were highly correlated (R

  9. Double inlet left ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with this condition have only one working pumping chamber (ventricle) in their heart. ... condition generally have a large left ventricle (the pumping chamber of the heart that supplies the body ...

  10. Left ventricular finite element model bounded by a systemic circulation model.

    PubMed

    Veress, A I; Raymond, G M; Gullberg, G T; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    2013-05-01

    A series of models were developed in which a circulatory system model was coupled to an existing series of finite element (FE) models of the left ventricle (LV). The circulatory models were used to provide realistic boundary conditions for the LV models. This was developed for the JSim analysis package and was composed of a systemic arterial, capillary, and venous system in a closed loop with a varying elastance LV and left atria to provide the driving pressures and flows matching those of the FE model. Three coupled models were developed, a normal LV under normotensive aortic loading (116/80 mm Hg), a mild hypertension (137/89 mm Hg) model, and a moderate hypertension model (165/100 mm Hg). The initial step in the modeling analysis was that the circulation was optimized to the end-diastolic pressure and volume values of the LV model. The cardiac FE models were then optimized to the systolic pressure/volume characteristics of the steady-state JSim circulatory model solution. Comparison of the stress predictions for the three models indicated that the mild hypertensive case produced a 21% increase in the average fiber stress levels, and the moderate hypertension case had a 36% increase in average stress. The circulatory work increased by 18% and 43% over that of the control for the mild and moderate hypertensive cases, respectively. PMID:24231963

  11. Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, J W; Lemole, G M

    1994-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle most often occurs after transmural myocardial infarction but may also follow cardiac operations, trauma, inflammation, or infection. In contrast to patients with true ventricular aneurysm, those with false aneurysm most commonly die of hemorrhage. Review of the reported surgical experience and of our 14 cases confirms that standard chest radiographs with an abnormal cardiac silhouette and rapidly expanding size may alert the physician to this sometimes overlooked diagnosis. Noninvasive tests such as color-flow Doppler echocardiography, 2-dimensional echocardiography, cineangiographic computed tomography, and transesophageal echocardiography allow relatively easy recognition of these apparently rare lesions with increasing frequency. Cardiac catheterization, however, is usually still necessary for a clear picture of the location and anatomy of the aneurysm and the state of the coronary arteries. Finally, a new classification is proposed, consisting of true aneurysm, false aneurysm, pseudo-false aneurysm, and mixed aneurysm. Images PMID:7888805

  12. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure. PMID:21428685

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions. PMID:24816034

  14. Finite element analysis of stresses developed in the blood sac of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Haut Donahue, T L; Dehlin, W; Gillespie, J; Weiss, W J; Rosenberg, G

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a 3D finite element (FE) model of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to predict stresses in the blood sac. The hyperelastic stress-strain curves for the segmented poly(ether polyurethane urea) (SPEUU) blood sac were determined in both tension and compression using a servo-hydraulic testing system at various strain rates. Over the range of strain rates studied, the sac was not strain rate sensitive, however the material response was different for tension versus compression. The experimental tension and compression properties were used in a FE model that consisted of the pusher plate, blood sac and pump case. A quasi-static analysis was used to allow for nonlinearities due to contact and material deformation. The 3D FE model showed that blood sac stresses are not adversely affected by the location of the inlet and outlet ports of the device and that over the systolic ejection phase of the simulation the prediction of blood sac stresses from the full 3D model and an axisymmetric model are the same. Minimizing stresses in the blood sac will increase the longevity of the blood sac in vivo. PMID:19131267

  15. MRI-based finite-element analysis of left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Walker, Joseph C; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Zhang, Peng; Wallace, Arthur W; Fata, Bahar; Hsu, Edward W; Saloner, David; Guccione, Julius M

    2005-08-01

    Tagged MRI and finite-element (FE) analysis are valuable tools in analyzing cardiac mechanics. To determine systolic material parameters in three-dimensional stress-strain relationships, we used tagged MRI to validate FE models of left ventricular (LV) aneurysm. Five sheep underwent anteroapical myocardial infarction (25% of LV mass) and 22 wk later underwent tagged MRI. Asymmetric FE models of the LV were formed to in vivo geometry from MRI and included aneurysm material properties measured with biaxial stretching, LV pressure measurements, and myofiber helix angles measured with diffusion tensor MRI. Systolic material parameters were determined that enabled FE models to reproduce midwall, systolic myocardial strains from tagged MRI (630 +/- 187 strain comparisons/animal). When contractile stress equal to 40% of the myofiber stress was added transverse to the muscle fiber, myocardial strain agreement improved by 27% between FE model predictions and experimental measurements (RMS error decreased from 0.074 +/- 0.016 to 0.054 +/- 0.011, P < 0.05). In infarct border zone (BZ), end-systolic midwall stress was elevated in both fiber (24.2 +/- 2.7 to 29.9 +/- 2.4 kPa, P < 0.01) and cross-fiber (5.5 +/- 0.7 to 11.7 +/- 1.3 kPa, P = 0.02) directions relative to noninfarct regions. Contrary to previous hypotheses but consistent with biaxial stretching experiments, active cross-fiber stress development is an integral part of LV systole; FE analysis with only uniaxial contracting stress is insufficient. Stress calculations from these validated models show 24% increase in fiber stress and 115% increase in cross-fiber stress at the BZ relative to remote regions, which may contribute to LV remodeling. PMID:15778283

  16. [Surgical treatment of double outlet left ventricle].

    PubMed

    Planché, C; Pernot, C; Batisse, A; Kachaner, J; Langlois, J; Bruniaux, J; Binet, J P

    1979-05-01

    Three young patients with double outlet left ventricle were operated on at the Centre chirurgica Marie-Lannelongue. There was one secondary death. The follow up period of the two survivors is 24 months and 8 months respectively. The diagnosis of this rare congenital abnormality is difficult because of the multiplicity of the anatomical changes and the diversity of the final clinical entity. This is reflected in the attempts at classification. These difficulties are increased by the high incidence of incomplete forms of the condition which gives rise, especially in vivo, to problems of terminology. Echocardiography provides valuable information in the diagnosis of these forms by showing the abnormal relationship between the interventricular septum and the origin of the great vessels. A complete work up is essential before any decision can be made on management. Particular importance is placed on the topographical and morphological features of the atria and ventricles, the connections of the aorta and pulmonary arteries, and the state of the pulmonary tract. Modern surgical techniques have made correction possible in most forms of the disease, but involves complex procedures which leaves doubts on their long term outcome. PMID:115403

  17. The hypertrabeculated (noncompacted) left ventricle is different from the ventricle of embryos and ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Agger, Peter; de Boer, Bouke A; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Pedersen, Michael; van der Wal, Allard C; Nils Planken, R; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2016-07-01

    Ventricular hypertrabeculation (noncompaction) is a poorly characterized condition associated with heart failure. The condition is widely assumed to be the retention of the trabeculated ventricular design of the embryo and ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebrates. This assumption appears simplistic and counterfactual. Here, we measured a set of anatomical parameters in hypertrabeculation in man and in the ventricles of embryos and animals. We compared humans with left ventricular hypertrabeculation (N=21) with humans with structurally normal left ventricles (N=54). We measured ejection fraction and ventricular trabeculation using cardiovascular MRI. Ventricular trabeculation was further measured in series of embryonic human and 9 animal species, and in hearts of 15 adult animal species using MRI, CT, or histology. In human, hypertrabeculated left ventricles were significantly different from structurally normal left ventricles by all structural measures and ejection fraction. They were far less trabeculated than human embryonic hearts (15-40% trabeculated volume versus 55-80%). Early in development all vertebrate embryos acquired a ventricle with approximately 80% trabeculations, but only ectotherms retained the 80% trabeculation throughout development. Endothermic (warm-blooded) animals including human slowly matured in fetal and postnatal stages towards ventricles with little trabeculations, generally less than 30%. Further, the trabeculations of all embryos and adult ectotherms were very thin, less than 50 μm wide, whereas the trabeculations in adult endotherms and in the setting of hypertrabeculation were wider by orders of magnitude. It is concluded in contrast to a prevailing assumption, the hypertrabeculated left ventricle is not like the ventricle of the embryo or of adult ectotherms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes

  18. Recovery of the 3-D shape of the left ventricle from echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Coppini, G; Poli, R; Valli, G

    1995-01-01

    A computational method is reported which allows the fully automated recovery of the three-dimensional shape of the cardiac left ventricle from a reduced set of apical echo views. Two typically ill-posed problems have been faced: 1) the detection of the left ventricle contours in each view, and 2) the integration of the detected contour points (which form a sparse and partially inconsistent data set) into a single surface representation. The authors' solution to these problems is based on a careful integration of standard computer vision algorithms with neural networks. Boundary detection comprises three steps: edge detection, edge grouping, and edge classification. The first and second steps (which are typical early-vision tasks not involving specific domain-knowledge) have been performed through fast, well-established algorithms of computer vision. The higher level task of left ventricle-edge discrimination, which involves the exploitation of specific knowledge about the left ventricle silhouette, has been performed by feedforward neural networks. Following the most recent results in the field of computer vision, the first step in solving the problem of recovering the ventricle surface has been the adoption of a physically inspired model of it. Basically, the authors have modeled the left ventricle surface as a closed, thin, elastic surface and the data as a set of radial springs acting on it. The recovery process is equivalent to the settling of the surface-plus-springs system into a stable configuration of minimum potential energy. The finite element discretization of this model leads directly to an analog neural-network implementation. The efficiency of such an implementation has been remarkably enhanced through a learning algorithm which embeds specific knowledge about the shape of the left ventricle in the network. Experiments using clinical echographic sequences are described. Four apical views (each with a different rotation of the probe) have been acquired

  19. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva to left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Devi A; Lahiri, Anandaroop; George, Oommen K

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of ruptured right sinus of valsalva into the left ventricle (LV). Transthoracic echocardiography showed a marked turbulent flow from the right aortic sinus to the LV. We describe a novel technique of closure of this defect with duct occluder, involving the formation of an arterio-arterial loop, without resorting to the usual arteriovenous loop. PMID:27011698

  20. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva to left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Devi A; Lahiri, Anandaroop; George, Oommen K

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of ruptured right sinus of valsalva into the left ventricle (LV). Transthoracic echocardiography showed a marked turbulent flow from the right aortic sinus to the LV. We describe a novel technique of closure of this defect with duct occluder, involving the formation of an arterio-arterial loop, without resorting to the usual arteriovenous loop. PMID:27011698

  1. Rotational angiography of left ventricle to guide ventricular tachycardia ablation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jiri; Starek, Zdenek; Jez, Jiri; Lehar, Frantisek; Lukasova, Marketa; Kulik, Tomas; Novak, Miroslav

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional rotational angiography (3 DRA) is a novel imaging method introduced to guide complex catheter ablations of the left atrium. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of the method in visualization of left ventricular anatomy and to develop a corresponding protocol for guidance of ventricular tachycardia ablation. We performed 3D rotational angiography in 13 patients using a direct left atrial protocol for data acquisition and the 3D reconstruction of the left ventricle was achieved in all patients. Clinical data comparison has proved lower use of radiation and contrast medium during 3 DRA-guided ablations as compared to CT-guided procedures. PMID:25761532

  2. An inverse finite element method for determining the tissue compressibility of human left ventricular wall during the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I; Hassan, Mohsen A; Mardi, Azizi N; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium's tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  3. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  4. Patient-specific simulation of a trileaflet aortic heart valve in a realistic left ventricle and aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung; Stolarski, Henryk; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    We develop a patient-specific model of the left ventricle consisting of: (1) magnetic-resonance images (MRI) data for wall geometry and kinematics reconstruction of the left ventricle during one cardiac cycle and (2) an elastic trileaflet aortic heart valve implanted in (3) a realistic aorta interacting with blood flow driven by the pulsating left ventricle. Blood flow is simulated via a new fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method, which couples the sharp-interface CURVIB [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, JCP, (2007)] for handling complex moving boundaries with a new, rotation-free finite-element (FE) formulation for simulating large tissue deformations [H. Stolarski, A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, IJNME, (2013)] The new FE shell formulation has been extensively tested and validated for a range of relevant problems showing good agreements. Validation of the coupled FSI-FE-CURVIB model is carried out for a thin plate undergoing flow-induced vibrations in the wake of a square cylinder and the computed results are in good agreement with published data. The new approach has been applied to simulate dynamic interaction of a trileaflet aortic heart valve with pulsating blood flow at physiological conditions and realistic artery and left ventricle geometry.

  5. Is the human left ventricle partially a fractal pump?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2011-11-01

    Ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunctions represent a large portion of healthcare problems in the United States. Many of these problems are caused and/or characterized by their altered fluid-structure mechanics. The structure of the left ventricle in particular is complex with time dependent multi-scale geometric complexity. At relatively small scales, one facet that is still not well understood is the role of trabeculae in the pumping function of the left ventricle. We utilize fractal geometry tools to help characterize the complexity of the inner surface of the left ventricle at different times during the cardiac cycle. A high-resolution three dimensional model of the time dependent ventricular geometry was constructed from computed tomography (CT) images in a human. The scale dependent fractal dimension of the ventricle was determined using the box-counting algorithm over the cardiac cycle. It is shown that the trabeculae may indeed play an integral role in the biomechanics of pumping by regulating the mechanical leverage available to the cardiac muscle fibers.

  6. Chest tube injury to left ventricle: complication or negligence?

    PubMed

    Haron, Hairufaizi; Rashid, Norfaezan Abdul; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Azmi, Muhd Helmi; Sumin, Joanna Ooi; Zabir, Azmil Farid; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham

    2010-07-01

    An injury to the left ventricle after a chest tube insertion is a rare but lethal phenomenon that is likely to occur if precautions are not seriously addressed. We present a 15-year-old girl who was diagnosed a left empyema thoracis. An attempt to place a chest drain in this young girl was almost fatal. A left ventricular repair together with thoracotomy and decortication were successful. This case emphasizes the rarity of this lethal complication and the importance of the correct technique for chest tube insertion. PMID:20609810

  7. [Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pomini, G; Lupia, M; Milano, A; Gribaldo, R

    1993-03-01

    Two cases of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm following myocardial infarction are presented. In the first patient a two-dimensional echocardiography study revealed a small posterior echo-free space that appeared to communicate with the left ventricle through a small defect in the left ventricular posterior wall. Conventional Doppler echocardiography and colour flow imaging demonstrated flow between the left ventricle and the paraventricular chamber. In the other patient, the same study detected an enormous false aneurysm. We found a large extramyocardial echo-free space within the pericardial cavity. The site of this space was posterolateral and communicating with the left ventricular cavity. Cardiac catheterization and surgery confirmed the diagnosis. A postoperative echocardiographic study demonstrated a persistent but smaller saccular echo-free space and a residual shunt through one site of repair in the first patient; in the other, after surgical treatment there was no residual flow, but a left ventricular dysfunction was detected. Two dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography is the best technique among the noninvasive methods, for detecting and following up left ventricular pseudoaneurysms. PMID:8325466

  8. Application of NASTRAN for stress analysis of left ventricle of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Y. C.; Ritman, E. L.; Wang, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    Knowing the stress and strain distributions in the left ventricular wall of the heart is a prerequisite for the determination of the muscle elasticity and contractility in the process of assessing the functional status of the heart. NASTRAN was applied for the calculation of these stresses and strains and to help in verifying the results obtained by the computer program FEAMPS which was specifically designed for the plane-strain finite-element analysis of the left ventricular cross sections. Adopted for the analysis are the true shape and dimensions of the cross sections reconstructed from multiplanar X-ray views of a left ventricle which was surgically isolated from a dog's heart but metabolically supported to sustain its beating. A preprocessor was prepared to accommodate both FEAMPS and NASTRAN, and it has also facilitated the application of both the triangular element and isoparameteric quadrilateral element versions of NASTRAN. The stresses in several crucial regions of the left ventricular wall calculated by these two independently developed computer programs are found to be in good agreement. Such confirmation of the results is essential in the development of a method which assesses the heart performance.

  9. Blood flow and wall motion in an idealized left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Doyle, Matthew; Bourgault, Yves

    2006-11-01

    During diastole of the heart, the left ventricle (LV) expands as a result of both incoming blood flow and wall material relaxation. In this work, we simulate both of these effects, along with the fluid-structure interaction between the blood and the heart wall. As a first step leading to more realistic studies, we approximate the LV by a prolate ellipsoid and the valves by cylindrical tubes. The mitral valve is open, allowing blood to enter the LV, whereas the aortic valve is closed. To account for the effects of muscle fibers in the heart wall, we model the wall as a multi-layered orthotropic linear elastic material with different material properties in the fiber, sheet, and sheet-normal directions within each layer. Results will be presented for this idealized configuration, while simulations of blood flow in realistic canine left and right ventricles are currently underway.

  10. Left Ventricle Segmentation Using Model Fitting and Active Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Li, Bing; Garson, Chris D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    A method to perform 4D (3D over time) segmentation of the left ventricle of a mouse heart using a set of B mode cine slices acquired in vivo from a series of short axis scans is described. We incorporate previously suggested methods such as temporal propagation, the gradient vector flow active surface, superquadric models, etc. into our proposed 4D segmentation of the left ventricle. The contributions of this paper are incorporation of a novel despeckling method and the use of locally fitted superellipsoid models to provide a better initialization for the active surface segmentation algorithm. Average distances of the improved surface segmentation to a manually segmented surface throughout the entire cardiac cycle and cross-sectional contours are provided to demonstrate the improvements produced by the proposed 4D segmentation. PMID:20300558

  11. Postoperative false aneurysm of left ventricle and obstruction of left circumflex coronary artery complicating enlargement of restrictive ventricular septal defect in double-outlet right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W D; Wilcox, W D; Danielson, G K; Feldt, R H

    1980-07-01

    A case is reported of double-outlet right ventricle (DORV) with restrictive subaortic ventricular septal defect (VSD) in which enlargement of the defect at the time of surgical repair was associated with the late postoperative development of a false aneurysm of the left ventricle. The enlarging fale aneurysm caused extrinsic compression of the dominant left circumflex coronary artery, with subsequent ischemia and infarction of the posterolateral left ventricle. The anatomy and surgical implications of restrictive VSD are discussed. PMID:7382528

  12. Vortex formation and instability in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Coffey, Dane; Keefe, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy human subject. The left ventricular kinematics is modeled via a cell-based activation methodology, which is inspired by cardiac electro-physiology and yields physiologic LV wall motion. In the fluid dynamics videos, we describe in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mitral vortex ring, which is formed during early diastolic filling. The ring starts to deform as it propagates toward the apex of the heart and becomes inclined. The trailing secondary vortex tubes are formed as the result of interaction between the vortex ring and the LV wall. These vortex tubes wrap around the circumference and begin to interact with and destabilize the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the LV wall and the large-scale intraventricular flow rotates in clockwise direction. We show for the first time that the mitral vortex ring evolution is dominated by a number of vortex-vortex and vortex-wall interactions, including lateral straining and deformation of vortex ring, the interaction of two vortex tubes with unequal strengths, helicity polarization of vortex tubes and twisting instabilities of the vortex cores.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Two Pseudoaneurysms Originating From the Left Ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Cwikiel, Wojciech Keussen, Inger; Gustafsson, Ronny; Mokhtari, Arash

    2013-12-15

    A 67-year-old woman resented with an acute type A aortic dissection, which was treated surgically with aortic valve replacement as a composite graft with reimplantation of the coronary arteries. At the end of surgery, a left-ventricular venting catheter was placed through the apex and closed with a buffered suture. Consecutive computed tomography (CT) examinations verified a growing apex pseudoaneurysm. Communication between the ventricle and the pseudoaneurysm was successfully closed with an Amplatz septal plug by the transfemoral route. Follow-up CT showed an additional pseudoaneurysm, which also was successfully closed using the same method.

  14. Stress and strain adaptation in load-dependent remodeling of the embryonic left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Faas, Daniela; Sedmera, David

    2013-01-01

    Altered pressure in the developing left ventricle (LV) results in altered morphology and tissue material properties. Mechanical stress and strain may play a role in the regulating process. This study showed that confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction, and finite element analysis can provide a detailed model of stress and strain in the trabeculated embryonic heart. The method was used to test the hypothesis that end-diastolic strains are normalized after altered loading of the LV during the stages of trabecular compaction and chamber formation. Stage-29 chick LVs subjected to pressure overload and underload at stage 21 were reconstructed with full trabecular morphology from confocal images and analyzed with finite element techniques. Measured material properties and intraventricular pressures were specified in the models. The results show volume-weighted end-diastolic von Mises stress and strain averaging 50–82% higher in the trabecular tissue than in the compact wall. The volume-weighted-average stresses for the entire LV were 115, 64, and 147 Pa in control, underloaded, and overloaded models, while strains were 11, 7, and 4%; thus, neither was normalized in a volume-weighted sense. Localized epicardial strains at mid-longitudinal level were similar among the three groups and to strains measured from high-resolution ultrasound images. Sensitivity analysis showed changes in material properties are more significant than changes in geometry in the overloaded strain adaptation, although resulting stress was similar in both types of adaptation. These results emphasize the importance of appropriate metrics and the role of trabecular tissue in evaluating the evolution of stress and strain in relation to pressure-induced adaptation. PMID:23254562

  15. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  16. A new approach to assessment of the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Katrina K.; Doughty, Rob N.; Whalley, Gillian A.; Triggs, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac motion is a continuous process; however most measurements to assess cardiac function are taken at brief moments in the cardiac cycle. Using functional data analysis, repeated measurements of left ventricular volume recorded at each frame of a continuous image measured with cardiac ultrasound (echocardiography) were turned into a function of volume over time. The first derivative of the displacement of volume with respect to time is velocity; the second derivative is acceleration. Plotting volume, velocity, and acceleration against each other in a 3-dimensional plot results in a closed loop. The area within the loop is defined by the kinematics of volume change and so may represent ventricular function. • We have developed an approach to analyzing images of the left ventricle that incorporates information from throughout the cardiac cycle. • Comparing systolic and diastolic areas within a loop defined by volume, velocity, and acceleration of left ventricular volume highlights imbalances in the kinematics of the two phases, potentially indicating early sub-clinical disease. • Substantially more information about left ventricular function may be derived from a non-invasive clinically available tool such as echocardiography. PMID:27104150

  17. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Yasumi; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Hirose, Junichi

    1992-08-01

    The morphology and function of the cardiac chambers have been evaluated clinically using cineventriculography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and endomyocardial biopsy. Excluding the invasive technique of biopsy where tissue is actually removed, these other non-invasive techniques reveal only indirect evidence of endocardial and subendocardial pathology and, therefore, allow the potential for misdiagnosis from insufficient data. Fiberoptic examinations, as recently demonstrated in coronary, pulmonary, and peripheral vessels, allow direct observation of pathology otherwise unobtainable. Recently, similar techniques have been applied to examine the cardiac chambers of dogs and the right heart of humans. In this study, we examine the feasibility and safety of percutaneous fiberoptic cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis.

  18. Dynamic simulation of chorded mitral valve in a left ventricle using an immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoyu; Yin, Min; Liang, Chunlei; Wang, Tiejun; Watton, Paul

    2007-11-01

    We use an immersed boundary model to investigate the dynamic behaviour of a chorded mitral prosthesis placed within a left ventricle under physiological flow conditions. In vivo magnetic resonance images of the left ventricle are used to create a numerical ventricle model. The motion of the ventricle model is prescribed during a cardiac cycle. Fluid-structure interaction simulations are carried out to test the performance of the mitral valve in a more realistic physiological environment. These simulations enable us to assess the effect of the ventricle motion, especially its flow vortex structure, on the function of the chorded mitral valve.

  19. Transmural distribution of myocardial infarction: difference between the right and left ventricles in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ohzono, K.; Koyanagi, S.; Urabe, Y.; Harasawa, Y.; Tomoike, H.; Nakamura, M.

    1986-07-01

    The evolution of myocardial infarction 24 hours after ligating both the right coronary artery and the obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery was examined in 33 anesthetized dogs. Postmortem coronary angiography and a tracer microsphere technique were used to determine risk areas and their collateral blood flows, respectively. The mean weight of the risk areas was 11.3 +/- 0.5 g (mean +/- SEM) in the right ventricle and 10.5 +/- 0.9 g in the left ventricle (NS). The weight of infarcted tissue was 5.7 +/- 0.7 g in the right ventricle and 5.2 +/- 0.9 g in the left ventricle (NS). In both ventricles, infarct weight was linearly related to risk area size, and the percent of risk area necrosis was inversely correlated with the extent of collateral flow at 24 hours of coronary ligation, defined as the mean myocardial blood flow inside the central risk area. Ratios of infarct to risk area between the subendocardial and subepicardial layers were 0.76 +/- 0.06 and 0.28 +/- 0.05 in the right and left ventricles, respectively (p less than 0.01, between ventricles, n = 31), which coincided well with subendocardial-to-subepicardial-flow ratios at 24 hours, ie, 0.86 +/- 0.04 in the right ventricle and 0.32 +/- 0.06 in the left ventricle (p less than 0.01). The regional distribution of myocardial infarction correlated well with flow distribution inside the risk area; the slope of these relations was similar between the subendocardium and subepicardium in the right ventricle, whereas in the left ventricle it was larger in the subendocardium than in the subepicardium. Thus, in the dog, the inherent change in the regional distribution of coronary collateral blood flow is an important modifier in the evolution of myocardial infarction, especially in the left ventricle.

  20. Left ventricle wall motion tracking using curvature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Kambhamettu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents the complete implementation of the new algorithm for tracking points on the left ventricle (LV) surface from volumetric cardiac images. We define the local surface stretching as an additional motion parameter of nonrigid transformation. Stretching is constant at all points on the surface for homothetic motion, or follows a polynomial function of certain order (linear in our implementation) in conformal motion. The wall deformation and correspondence information between successive frames of LV in a heart cycle are considered important in evaluating heart behavior and improved diagnosis. We utilize small motion assumption between consecutive frames, hypothesize all possible correspondences, and compute curvature changes for each hypothesis. The computed curvature change is then compared with the one predicted by conformal motion assumption for hypotheses evaluation. We demonstrate the improved performance of the new algorithm utilizing conformal motion with linear stretching assumption over constant stretching assumption on simulated data. Then, the algorithm is applied to real cardiac (CT) images and the stretching of the LV wall is determined. The data set used in our experiments was provided by Dr. Eric Hoffman at University of Pennsylvania Medical school and consists of 16 volumetric (128 by 128 by 118) images taken through the heart cycle.

  1. Measurements, modeling, control and simulation - as applied to the human left ventricle for purposeful physiological monitoring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Rasmussen, D. N.; Linebarger, R. N.; Sandler, H.

    1971-01-01

    Interdisciplinary engineering research effort in studying the intact human left ventricle has been employed to physiologically monitor the heart and to obtain its 'state-of-health' characteristics. The left ventricle was selected for this purpose because it plays a key role in supplying energy to the body cells. The techniques for measurement of the left ventricular geometry are described; the geometry is effectively displayed to bring out the abnormalities in cardiac function. Methods of mathematical modeling, which make it possible to determine the performance of the intact left ventricular muscle, are also described. Finally, features of a control system for the left ventricle for predicting the effect of certain physiological stress situations on the ventricle performance are discussed.

  2. Quantification of Protein Expression Changes in the Aging Left Ventricle of Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jennifer E.; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Schwacke, John H.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    As the heart ages, electrophysiological and biochemical changes can occur, and the ventricle in many cases loses distensibility, impairing diastolic function. How the proteomic signature of the aged ventricle is unique in comparison to young hearts is still under active investigation. We have undertaken a quantitative proteomics study of aging left ventricles (LVs) utilizing the isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) methodology. Differential protein expression was observed for 117 proteins including proteins involved in cell signaling, the immune response, structural proteins, and proteins mediating responses to oxidative stress. For many of these proteins, this is the first report of an association with the aged myocardium. Additionally, two proteins of unknown function were identified. This work serves as the basis for making future comparisons of the aged left ventricle proteome to that of left ventricles obtained from other models of disease and heart failure. PMID:19603826

  3. Recurrent pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle with subcutaneous herniation into the chest wall. A case report.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M S; Vaijyanath, P; Taneja, K; Dubey, B; Manchanda, S C; Venugopal, P

    1998-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle is rare, and recurrence is extremely rare. We report the case of a 62-year-old man who presented at our hospital with a painless pulsatile swelling in the left breast. He had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting and left-ventricular aneurysmectomy 14 years earlier. On investigation, the swelling was diagnosed to be a pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle with subcutaneous herniation. The extreme rarity of this condition prompted us to report the case. The investigative techniques and the surgical strategy are discussed. Images PMID:9885110

  4. Patient-specific finite element modeling of the Cardiokinetix Parachute(®) device: effects on left ventricular wall stress and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Pease, Matthew; Nikolic, Serjan D; Mishra, Rakesh; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2014-06-01

    The Parachute(®) (Cardiokinetix, Inc., Menlo Park, California) is a catheter-based device intended to reverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling after antero-apical myocardial infarction. When deployed, the device partitions the LV into upper and lower chambers. To simulate its mechanical effects, we created a finite element LV model based on computed tomography (CT) images from a patient before and 6 months after Parachute(®) implantation. Acute mechanical effects were determined by in silico device implantation (VIRTUAL-Parachute). Chronic effects of the device were determined by adjusting the diastolic and systolic material parameters to better match the 6-month post-implantation CT data and LV pressure data at end-diastole (ED) (POST-OP). Regional myofiber stress and pump function were calculated in each case. The principal finding is that VIRTUAL-Parachute was associated with a 61.2 % reduction in the lower chamber myofiber stress at ED. The POST-OP model was associated with a decrease in LV diastolic stiffness and a larger reduction in myofiber stress at the upper (27.1%) and lower chamber (78.4%) at ED. Myofiber stress at end-systole and stroke volume was little changed in the POST-OP case. These results suggest that the primary mechanism of Parachute(®) is a reduction in ED myofiber stress, which may reverse eccentric post-infarct LV hypertrophy. PMID:24793158

  5. Regional myocardial shape and dimensions of the working isolated canine left ventricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E.; Tsuiki, K.; Donald, D.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    Angiographic experiments were performed on isolated canine left ventricle preparations using donor dog to supply blood to the coronary circulation via a rotary pump to control coronary flow. The angiographic record was transferred from video tape to video disk for detailed uninterrupted sequential analysis at a frequency of 60 fields/sec. It is shown that the use of a biplane X-ray technique and a metabolically supported isolated canine left ventricle preparation provides an angiographically ideal means of measuring the mechanical dynamics of the myocardium while the intact left ventricular myocardial structure and electrical activation pattern retain most of the in situ ventricular characteristics. In particular, biplane X-ray angiography of the left ventricle can provide estimates of total ventricular function such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and myocardial mass correct to within 15% under the angiographically ideal conditions of the preparation.

  6. Acute ileofemoral artery thromboembolism due to left ventricle thrombi with spontaneous coronary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Heungman; Jung, Cheol-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a very rare cause of peripheral artery thromboembolism. It is especially rare to show symptoms of acute limb ischemia without chest symptoms during a hospital visit. In this case, a rare case of SCAD led to left heart failure and caused left ventricle thrombi, which in turn caused peripheral thromboembolism. PMID:25553326

  7. Pathomorphology of myocardial circulation: comparative study in increased left or right ventricle afterload.

    PubMed

    Tverskaya, M S; Sukhoparova, V V; Karpova, V V; Raksha, A P; Kadyrova, M K; Abdulkerimova, N Z; Bobrova, N A

    2008-03-01

    Comparative study of pathomorphology of myocardial circulation under conditions of increased afterload of the left or right ventricles showed similar changes. All compartments of the coronary bed were plethoric, capillary blood stasis and perivascular edema, more pronounced in arterial vessels, were detected in both cases. These changes equally involved both ventricles and the ventricular septum. Significant differences consisted in local increase in the density of functioning capillaries. The increase was the maximum in hemodynamically overloaded ventricle and ventricular septum, presumably due to increase of their contractile activity. The density of functioning capillaries in the intact (vs. pressure overloaded) ventricle also increased, but to a lesser degree, which could be due to systemic neurohumoral effects. If increased afterload was complicated by the development of heart failure, circulatory disorders in the myocardium progressed. Significant increase in the density of functioning capillaries in all cardiac compartments indicated decreased vascular tone and exhaustion of coronary reserve. This was paralleled by a sharp arterial plethora in case of increased afterload of the left ventricle and sharp blood stasis in the microcirculatory bed in case of increased right ventricle afterload. Reduction of effective perfusion pressure in the presence of coronary dystonia can cause coronary insufficiency and myocardial ischemia in case of increased right ventricle afterload. PMID:19039949

  8. The Role of Shape and Heart Rate on the Performance of the Left Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Song, Zeying; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    The left ventricle function is to pump the oxygenated blood through the circulatory system. Ejection fraction is the main noninvasive parameter for detecting heart disease (healthy >55%), and it is thought to be the main parameter affecting efficiency. However, the effects of other parameters on efficiency have yet to be investigated. We investigate the effect of heart rate and left ventricle shape by carrying out 3D numerical simulations of a left ventricle at different heart rates and perturbed geometries under constant, normal ejection fraction. The simulation using the immersed boundary method provide the 3D flow and pressure fields, which enable direct calculation of a new hemodynamic efficiency (H-efficiency) parameter, which does not depend on any reference pressure. The H-efficiency is defined as the ratio of flux of kinetic energy (useful power) to the total cardiac power into the left ventricle control volume. Our simulations show that H-efficiency is not that sensitive to heart rate but is maximized at around normal heart rate (72 bpm). Nevertheless, it is more sensitive to the shape of the left ventricle, which affects the H-efficiency by as much as 15% under constant ejection fraction. PMID:26312776

  9. Regional myocardial shape and dimensions of the working isolated canine left ventricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Tsuiki, K.; Donald, D.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The extent to which the dynamic shape and dimensions of the isolated left ventricular myocardial wall differ throughout the myocardium and how these differences are characteristic of the anatomic location was demonstrated. The use of a biplane X-ray technique and a metabolically-supported isolated canine left ventricle preparation provided an angiographically ideal means of measuring mechanical dynamics of the myocardium while the intact left ventricular myocardial structure and electrical activation pattern retains most of the in situ ventricular characteristics.

  10. A new hybrid electro-numerical model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Kozarski, Maciej; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Górczyńska, Krystyna; Pałko, Krzysztof J; Tokarz, Arkadiusz; Darowski, Marek

    2008-09-01

    The paper presents a new project of a hybrid numerical-physical model of the left ventricle. A physical part of the model can be based on electrical or hydraulic structures. Four variants of the model with numerical and physical heart valves have been designed to investigate an effect of a heart assistance connected in series and in parallel to the natural heart. The LabVIEW real time environment has been used in the model to increase its accuracy and reliability. A prototype of the hybrid electro-numerical model of the left ventricle has been tested in an open loop and closed loop configuration. PMID:18762290

  11. Automatic short axis orientation of the left ventricle in 3D ultrasound recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, João.; Heyde, Brecht; Heeren, Laurens; Engvall, Jan; Zamorano, Jose; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Edvardsen, Thor; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The recent advent of three-dimensional echocardiography has led to an increased interest from the scientific community in left ventricle segmentation frameworks for cardiac volume and function assessment. An automatic orientation of the segmented left ventricular mesh is an important step to obtain a point-to-point correspondence between the mesh and the cardiac anatomy. Furthermore, this would allow for an automatic division of the left ventricle into the standard 17 segments and, thus, fully automatic per-segment analysis, e.g. regional strain assessment. In this work, a method for fully automatic short axis orientation of the segmented left ventricle is presented. The proposed framework aims at detecting the inferior right ventricular insertion point. 211 three-dimensional echocardiographic images were used to validate this framework by comparison to manual annotation of the inferior right ventricular insertion point. A mean unsigned error of 8, 05° +/- 18, 50° was found, whereas the mean signed error was 1, 09°. Large deviations between the manual and automatic annotations (> 30°) only occurred in 3, 79% of cases. The average computation time was 666ms in a non-optimized MATLAB environment, which potentiates real-time application. In conclusion, a successful automatic real-time method for orientation of the segmented left ventricle is proposed.

  12. Unusual Clinical Presentation of a Giant Left Ventricle Hydatid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh-Ghavidel, Alireza; Kyavar, Majid; Sadeghpour, Anita; Totonchi, Zia; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Almassi, Nooshin; Madadi, Shabnam

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman was hospitalized in our center due to chest and left shoulder pain. Having a history of tamponade and tuberculosis, she was under treatment for the previous two months. Echocardiography, chest CT and MRI documented intramyocardial and pericardial hydatid cyst which was later confirmed by further pathological studies. Later, the cyst was removed surgically. PMID:24404351

  13. Effect of diastolic flow patterns on the function of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of intraventricular flow patterns on the pumping efficiency and the blood mixing and transport characteristics of the left ventricle. The simulations employ a geometric model of the left ventricle which is derived from contrast computed tomography. A variety of diastolic flow conditions are generated for a fixed ejection fraction in order to delineate the effect of flow patterns on ventricular performance. The simulations indicate that the effect of intraventricular blood flow pattern on the pumping power is physiologically insignificant. However, diastolic flow patterns have a noticeable effect on the blood mixing as well as the residence time of blood cells in the ventricle. The implications of these findings on ventricular function are discussed.

  14. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  15. A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunfei; Luo, Xiaoyu; Feng, Yaoqi

    A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model In space environment, microgravity and radiation can have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system of the astronauts. The work in this paper is part of an ongoing effort to use mathematical models to provide a better understanding of the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the heart and blood vessels. In this study, we develop a computational left ventricle model before and after myocardium infarction based on cardiovascular mechanical theory. The anatomically realistic model has a rule-based fibre structure and a orthotropic structure-based constitutive model. The differences of deformations in the left ventricle before and after infarction are compared in details. In particular, the effects of fiber direction and fiber dispersion are examined. The disarray of both the fiber and sheet orientation is characterized by a dispersion parameter. The left ventricle volume is calculated from the MRI images and used for the optimization of the parameters of the myocardium. We provide the numerical framework for further study on effects of spaceflight on the cardiovascular system.

  16. [The index of left ventricle dilatation estimated with echocardiography in infarct patients].

    PubMed

    Scotta di Quacquaro, G; Punzi, M; Franciulli, V

    1981-03-31

    The Authors have introduced, for functional valuation of the left ventricle in infarcted patients, an echocardiographic new parameter: the index of dilatation (ID). This index constantly show oneself increased in all infarcted patients that clinically show marks of the cardiac decompensation, also when the Vcf and Fe show modest alterations. According to the Authors, the ID have in report with the PTDVS and constitute and important evidence of the left ventricular working controllable in the time. PMID:6452589

  17. A Computational Chemo-Fluidic Modeling for the Investigation of Patient-Specific Left Ventricle Thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T.

    2015-11-01

    Patients recovering from myocardial infarction (MI) are considered at high-risk for cardioembolic stroke due to the formation of left ventricle thrombus (LVT). The formation of LVT is the result of a complex interplay between the fluid dynamics inside the ventricle and the chemistry of coagulation, and the role of LV flow pattern on the thrombogenesis was not well understood. The previous computational study performed with the model ventricles suggested that the local flow residence time is the key variable governing the accumulation of coagulation factors. In the present study, a coupled, chemo-fluidic computational modeling is applied to the patient-specific cases of infracted ventricles to investigate the interaction between the LV hemodynamics and thrombogensis. In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins hospital, patient-specific LV models are constructed using the multi-modality medical imaging data. Blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the biochemical reactions for the thrombus formation are modeled with convection-diffusion-reaction equations. The formation and deposition of key coagulation chemical factors are then correlated with the hemodynamic flow metrics to explore the biophysics underlying LVT risk. Supported by the Johns Hopkins Medicine Discovery Fund and NSF Grant: CBET-1511200, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  18. Multiple Small Coronary Artery Fistulas Emptying into the Left Ventricle: A Rare but Challenging Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, Omar

    2016-01-01

    A coronary artery fistula (CAF) is an abnormal communication between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber or a great vessel. CAFs are rare based on coronary arteriography and when found they most often empty into the right ventricle and atrium and less often into the high pressure, low compliance left ventricle (LV). A patient who presented with atypical chest pain and was found to have multiple small CAFs originating from the ramus intermedius coronary artery and emptying into the LV is presented. This case highlights the challenges in providing an appropriate therapy for multiple small CAFs emptying into the LV. PMID:27525009

  19. Automated Axial Right Ventricle to Left Ventricle Diameter Ratio Computation in Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, Sara; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; San José Estépar, Raúl; Rybicki, Frank J.; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Right Ventricular to Left Ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio has been shown to be a prognostic biomarker for patients suffering from acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) images used to confirm a clinical suspicion of PE do include information of the heart, a numerical RV/LV diameter ratio is not universally reported, likely because of lack in training, inter-reader variability in the measurements, and additional effort by the radiologist. This study designs and validates a completely automated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) system to compute the axial RV/LV diameter ratio from CTPA images so that the RV/LV diameter ratio can be a more objective metric that is consistently reported in patients for whom CTPA diagnoses PE. Materials and Methods The CAD system was designed specifically for RV/LV measurements. The system was tested in 198 consecutive CTPA patients with acute PE. Its accuracy was evaluated using reference standard RV/LV radiologist measurements and its prognostic value was established for 30-day PE-specific mortality and a composite outcome of 30-day PE-specific mortality or the need for intensive therapies. The study was Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved and HIPAA compliant. Results The CAD system analyzed correctly 92.4% (183/198) of CTPA studies. The mean difference between automated and manually computed axial RV/LV ratios was 0.03±0.22. The correlation between the RV/LV diameter ratio obtained by the CAD system and that obtained by the radiologist was high (r=0.81). Compared to the radiologist, the CAD system equally achieved high accuracy for the composite outcome, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.75 vs. 0.78. Similar results were found for 30-days PE-specific mortality, with areas under the curve of 0.72 vs. 0.75. Conclusions An automated CAD system for determining the CT derived RV/LV diameter ratio in patients with acute PE has high

  20. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  1. The Impact of Obesity on the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Evrim B.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Burke, Gregory L.; Bild, Diane E.; Tracy, Russell P.; Arai, Andrew E.; Lima, João A. C.; Bluemke, David A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of left ventricular (LV) remodeling assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance to various measures of obesity in a large population-based study. BACKGROUND Obesity is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, yet its relationship with LV size and function is poorly understood. METHODS A total of 5,098 participants (age 45 to 84 years; 48% men) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease underwent cardiac magnetic resonance to assess LV size and function as well as measures of obesity, including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference, and cardiovascular risk factors. Fat mass (FM) was estimated based on height-weight models derived from bioelectrical impedance studies. The associations of obesity measures with LV size and function were evaluated using linear spline regression models for body mass index and multivariable regression models for other measures of obesity; they were displayed graphically using generalized additive models. RESULTS LV mass and end-diastolic volume were positively associated with measures of obesity in both sexes after adjustment for risk factors (e.g., 5.7-g and 6.9-g increase in LV mass per 10-kg increase in FM in women and men, respectively [p < 0.001]). LV mass-to-volume ratio was positively associated with increased body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, and estimated FM (e.g., 0.02-g/ml and 0.06-g/ml increase in mass-to-volume ratio per 10-kg increase in FM in women and men, respectively [p < 0.001]). The increased mass-to-volume ratio was due to a greater increase in LV mass relative to LV end-diastolic volume. All associations were stronger for men than for women. Ejection fraction showed no significant association with measures of obesity. CONCLUSIONS Obesity was associated with concentric LV remodeling without change in ejection fraction in a large

  2. Structure-based finite strain modelling of the human left ventricle in diastole.

    PubMed

    Wang, H M; Gao, H; Luo, X Y; Berry, C; Griffith, B E; Ogden, R W; Wang, T J

    2013-01-01

    Finite strain analyses of the left ventricle provide important information on heart function and have the potential to provide insights into the biomechanics of myocardial contractility in health and disease. Systolic dysfunction is the most common cause of heart failure; however, abnormalities of diastolic function also contribute to heart failure, and are associated with conditions including left ventricular hypertrophy and diabetes. The clinical significance of diastolic abnormalities is less well understood than systolic dysfunction, and specific treatments are presently lacking. To obtain qualitative and quantitative information on heart function in diastole, we develop a three-dimensional computational model of the human left ventricle that is derived from noninvasive imaging data. This anatomically realistic model has a rule-based fibre structure and a structure-based constitutive model. We investigate the sensitivity of this comprehensive model to small changes in the constitutive parameters and to changes in the fibre distribution. We make extensive comparisons between this model and similar models that employ different constitutive models, and we demonstrate qualitative and quantitative differences in stress and strain distributions for the different constitutive models. We also provide an initial validation of our model through comparisons to experimental data on stress and strain distributions in the left ventricle. PMID:23293070

  3. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  4. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  5. 3D Segmentation of the Left Ventricle Combining Long- and Shortaxis Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relan, Jatin; Säring, Dennis; Groth, Michael; Müllerleile, Kai; Handels, Heinz

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) is required to quantify LV remodeling after myocardial infarction. Therefore spatiotemporal Cine MR sequences including longaxis and shortaxis images are acquired. In this paper a new segmentation method for fast and robust segmentation of the left ventricle is presented. The new approach considers the position of the mitral valve and the apex as well as the longaxis contours to generate a 3D LV surface model. The segmentation result can be checked and adjusted in the shortaxis images. Finally quantitative parameters were extracted. For evaluation the LV was segmented in eight datasets of the same subject by two medical experts using a contour drawing tool and the new segmentation tool. The results of both methods were compared concerning interaction time and intra- and interobserver variance. The presented segmentation method proved to be fast. The intra- and interobserver variance is decreased for all extracted parameters.

  6. Traumatic Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery-Right Ventricle Fistula: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Ali; Asgari, Mehdi; Firouzabadi, Mehdi Dehghani; Zeraati, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic coronary artery-cameral fistulas (TCAF) are rare and may present secondary to penetrating injuries (80%) or iatrogenic traumas. Early operative intervention remains the recommended treatment modality for accidental traumatic coronary artery fistulas. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who presented with left anterior descending coronary artery-right ventricle fistula following penetrating cardiac trauma, which was successfully repaired surgically. PMID:23074613

  7. Ghost in the left ventricle on electrocardiogram-gated cardiac computed tomography by turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sung Su; Sung, Yon Mi; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Park, Jae Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on an extremely rare case of a fake lesion in the left ventricle on electrocardiogram-gated cardiac computed tomography simulating thrombus or tumor by turbulent flow in a 14-year-old boy. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion and delayed enhancement images were helpful in excluding true thrombus or tumor. Awareness of this potential pitfall is critical in order to avoid unnecessary anticoagulation or surgery. PMID:25229204

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the free wall of the left ventricle without obstruction of major coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Tesler, U F; Leccese, A

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with pseudoaneurysm of the free wall of the left ventricle secondary to myocardial infarction, in the presence of angiographically normal major coronary arteries. This is the only such case we know of, in which the patient underwent successful surgical correction. At last follow-up, the patient was in good condition with no evidence of cardiac disease, at 9 years after surgery. PMID:8680277

  9. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: computerized anatomic study of relashionship between septal and free left ventricle wall

    PubMed Central

    Juliani, Paulo Sérgio; da Costa, Éder França; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Monteiro, Rosangela; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A feature of dilated cardiomyopathy is the deformation of ventricular cavity, which contributes to systolic dysfunction. Few studies have evaluated this deformation bearing in mind ventricular regions and segments of the ventricle, which could reveal important details of the remodeling process, supporting a better understanding of its role in functional impairment and the development of new therapeutic strategies. Objective To evaluate if, in basal, equatorial and apical regions, increased internal transverse perimeter of left ventricle in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy occurs proportionally between the septal and non-septal segment. Methods We performed an anatomical study with 28 adult hearts from human cadavers. One group consisted of 18 hearts with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and another group with 10 normal hearts. After lamination and left ventricle digital image capture, in three different regions (base, equator and apex), the transversal internal perimeter of left ventricle was divided into two segments: septal and not septal. These segments were measured by proper software. It was established an index of proportionality between these segments, called septal and non-septal segment index. Then we determined whether this index was the same in both groups. Results Among patients with normal hearts and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the index of proportionality between the two segments (septal and non-septal) showed no significant difference in the three regions analyzed. The comparison results of the indices NSS/SS among normal and enlarged hearts were respectively: in base 1.99 versus 1.86 (P=0.46), in equator 2.22 versus 2.18 (P=0.79) and in apex 2.96 versus 3.56 (P=0.11). Conclusion In the idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the transversal dilatation of left ventricular internal perimeter occurs proportionally between the segments corresponding to the septum and free wall at the basal, equatorial and apical regions of this chamber

  10. Pseudoaneurysm of the free wall of the left ventricle without obstruction of major coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Tesler, U F; Leccese, A

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with pseudoaneurysm of the free wall of the left ventricle secondary to myocardial infarction, in the presence of angiographically normal major coronary arteries. This is the only such case we know of, in which the patient underwent successful surgical correction. At last follow-up, the patient was in good condition with no evidence of cardiac disease, at 9 years after surgery. Images PMID:8680277

  11. Computational modeling and analysis for left ventricle motion using CT/Echo image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kang, Nahyup; Lee, Hyoung-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2014-03-01

    In order to diagnose heart disease such as myocardial infarction, 2D strain through the speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) or the tagged MRI is often used. However out-of-plane strain measurement using STE or tagged MRI is inaccurate. Therefore, strain for whole organ which are analyzed by simulation of 3D cardiac model can be applied in clinical diagnosis. To simulate cardiac contraction in a cycle, cardiac physical properties should be reflected in cardiac model. The myocardial wall in left ventricle is represented as a transversely orthotropic hyperelastic material, with the fiber orientation varying sequentially from the epicardial surface, through about 0° at the midwall, to the endocardial surface. A time-varying elastance model is simulated to contract myocardial fiber, and physiological intraventricular systolic pressure curves are employed for the cardiac dynamics simulation in a cycle. And an exact description of the cardiac motion should be acquired in order that essential boundary conditions for cardiac simulation are obtained effectively. Real time cardiac motion can be acquired by using echocardiography and exact cardiac geometrical 3D model can be reconstructed using 3D CT data. In this research, image fusion technology from CT and echocardiography is employed in order to consider patient-specific left ventricle movement. Finally, longitudinal strain from speckle tracking echocardiography which is known to fit actual left ventricle deformation relatively well is used to verify these results.

  12. Fluid Structure Interaction simulation of heart prosthesis in patient-specific left-ventricle/aorta anatomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2009-11-01

    In order to test and optimize heart valve prosthesis and enable virtual implantation of other biomedical devices it is essential to develop and validate high-resolution FSI-CFD codes for carrying out simulations in patient-specific geometries. We have developed a powerful numerical methodology for carrying out FSI simulations of cardiovascular flows based on the CURVIB approach (Borazjani, L. Ge, and F. Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational physics, vol. 227, pp. 7587-7620 2008). We have extended our FSI method to overset grids to handle efficiently more complicated geometries e.g. simulating an MHV implanted in an anatomically realistic aorta and left-ventricle. A compliant, anatomic left-ventricle is modeled using prescribed motion in one domain. The mechanical heart valve is placed inside the second domain i.e. the body-fitted curvilinear mesh of the anatomic aorta. The simulations of an MHV with a left-ventricle model underscore the importance of inflow conditions and ventricular compliance for such simulations and demonstrate the potential of our method as a powerful tool for patient-specific simulations.

  13. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  14. Effect of trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Seo, Jung-Hee; Lardo, Albert C.; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-04-01

    The impact of surface trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle (LV) is investigated using numerical simulations. Simulations of ventricular flow are conducted for two different models of the LV derived from high-resolution cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans using an immersed boundary method-based flow solver. One model comprises a trabeculated left ventricle (TLV) that includes both trabeculae and papillary muscles, while the second model has a smooth left ventricle that is devoid of any of these surface features. Results indicate that the trabeculae and papillary muscles significantly disrupt the vortices that develop during early filling in the TLV model. Large recirculation zones are found to form in the wake of the papillary muscles; these zones enhance the blockage provided by the papillary muscles and create a path for the mitral jet to penetrate deeper into the ventricular apex during diastole. During systole, the trabeculae enhance the apical washout by `squeezing' the flow from the apical region. Finally, the trabeculae enhance viscous dissipation rate of the ventricular flow, but this effect is not significant in the overall power budget.

  15. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Tachycardia with Structural Abnormalities of the Right Ventricle and Left Ventricular Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Bortolo; Trevisi, Nicola; Martini, Nicolò; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented to the emergency room with a sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). ECG showed a QRS in left bundle branch block morphology with inferior axis. Echocardiography, ventricular angiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) revealed a normal right ventricle and a left ventricular diverticulum. Electrophysiology studies with epicardial voltage mapping identified a large fibrotic area in the inferolateral layer of the right ventricular wall and a small area of fibrotic tissue at the anterior right ventricular outflow tract. VT ablation was successfully performed with combined epicardial and endocardial approaches. PMID:26509086

  16. A robust automated left ventricle region of interest localization technique using a cardiac cine MRI atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Region of interest detection is a precursor to many medical image processing and analysis applications, including segmentation, registration and other image manipulation techniques. The optimal region of interest is often selected manually, based on empirical knowledge and features of the image dataset. However, if inconsistently identified, the selected region of interest may greatly affect the subsequent image analysis or interpretation steps, in turn leading to incomplete assessment during computer-aided diagnosis or incomplete visualization or identification of the surgical targets, if employed in the context of pre-procedural planning or image-guided interventions. Therefore, the need for robust, accurate and computationally efficient region of interest localization techniques is prevalent in many modern computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy applications. Here we propose a fully automated, robust, a priori learning-based approach that provides reliable estimates of the left and right ventricle features from cine cardiac MR images. The proposed approach leverages the temporal frame-to-frame motion extracted across a range of short axis left ventricle slice images with small training set generated from les than 10% of the population. This approach is based on histogram of oriented gradients features weighted by local intensities to first identify an initial region of interest depicting the left and right ventricles that exhibits the greatest extent of cardiac motion. This region is correlated with the homologous region that belongs to the training dataset that best matches the test image using feature vector correlation techniques. Lastly, the optimal left ventricle region of interest of the test image is identified based on the correlation of known ground truth segmentations associated with the training dataset deemed closest to the test image. The proposed approach was tested on a population of 100 patient datasets and was validated against the ground truth

  17. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-01-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  18. A Reconstruction Method of Blood Flow Velocity in Left Ventricle Using Color Flow Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jaeseong; Ahn, Chi Young; Jeon, Kiwan; Heo, Jung; Lee, DongHak; Choi, Jung-il

    2015-01-01

    Vortex flow imaging is a relatively new medical imaging method for the dynamic visualization of intracardiac blood flow, a potentially useful index of cardiac dysfunction. A reconstruction method is proposed here to quantify the distribution of blood flow velocity fields inside the left ventricle from color flow images compiled from ultrasound measurements. In this paper, a 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with a mass source term is proposed to utilize the measurable color flow ultrasound data in a plane along with the moving boundary condition. The proposed model reflects out-of-plane blood flows on the imaging plane through the mass source term. The boundary conditions to solve the system of equations are derived from the dimensions of the ventricle extracted from 2D echocardiography data. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated numerically using synthetic flow data acquired from simulating left ventricle flows. The numerical simulations show the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed method of reconstructing the intracardiac flow fields. Of particular note is the finding that the mass source term in the proposed model improves the reconstruction performance. PMID:26078773

  19. Mathematical model of the anatomy and fibre orientation field of the left ventricle of the heart

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the main factors affecting propagation of electrical waves and contraction in ventricles of the heart is anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Anisotropy is determined by orientation of myocardial fibres. Determining fibre orientation field and shape of the heart is important for anatomically accurate modelling of electrical and mechanical function of the heart. The aim of this paper is to introduce a theoretical rule-based model for anatomy and fibre orientation of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart and to compare it with experimental data. We suggest explicit analytical formulae that allow us to obtain the left ventricle form and its fibre direction field. The ventricle band concept of cardiac architecture given by Torrent-Guasp is chosen as the model postulate. Methods In our approach, anisotropy of the heart is derived from some general principles. The LV is considered as a set of identical spiral surfaces, each of which can be produced from the other by rotation around one vertical axis. Each spiral surface is filled with non-intersecting curves which represent myocardial fibres. For model verification, we use experimental data on fibre orientation in human and canine hearts. Results LV shape and anisotropy are represented by explicit analytical expressions in a curvilinear 3-D coordinate system. The derived fibre orientation field shows good qualitative agreement with experimental data. The model reveals the most thorough quantitative simulation of fibre angles at the LV middle zone. Conclusions Our analysis shows that the band concept can generate realistic anisotropy of the LV. Our model shows good qualitative agreement between the simulated fibre orientation field and the experimental data on LV anisotropy, and the model can be used for various numerical simulations to study the effects of anisotropy on cardiac excitation and mechanical function. PMID:23773421

  20. Scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Leigh, Christopher M; Waterhouse, Lyn; Williams, Ruth; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-06-01

    The heart and left ventricle of the marsupial western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus exhibit biphasic allometric growth, whereby a negative shift in the trajectory of cardiac growth occurs at pouch exit. In this study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine the scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the western grey kangaroo over a 190-fold body mass range (0.355-67.5 kg). The volume-density (%) of myofibrils, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticuli and T-tubules increase significantly during in-pouch growth, such that the absolute volume (ml) of these organelles scales with body mass (Mb; kg) with steep hyperallometry: 1.41Mb (1.38), 0.64Mb (1.29), 0.066Mb (1.45) and 0.035Mb (1.87), respectively. Maturation of the left ventricle ultrastructure coincides with pouch vacation, as organelle volume-densities scale independent of body mass across post-pouch development, such that absolute organelle volumes scale in parallel and with relatively shallow hypoallometry: 4.65Mb (0.79), 1.75Mb (0.77), 0.21Mb (0.79) and 0.35Mb (0.79), respectively. The steep hyperallometry of organelle volumes and volume-densities across in-pouch growth is consistent with the improved contractile performance of isolated cardiac muscle during fetal development in placental mammals, and is probably critical in augmenting cardiac output to levels necessary for endothermy and independent locomotion in the young kangaroo as it prepares for pouch exit. The shallow hypoallometry of organelle volumes during post-pouch growth suggests a decrease in relative cardiac requirements as body mass increases in free-roaming kangaroos, which is possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the capacity for energy storage during hopping could increase as the kangaroo grows. PMID:25908057

  1. NOTE: A cooled intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during endocardial surgical radiofrequency ablation of the left atrium: a finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berjano, Enrique J.; Hornero, Fernando

    2005-10-01

    Recent clinical studies on intraoperative monopolar radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation have reported some cases of injury to the esophagus. The aim of this study was to perform computer simulations using three-dimensional finite element models in order to investigate the feasibility of a cooled intraesophageal balloon appropriately placed to prevent injury. The models included atrial tissue and a fragment of esophagus and lung linked by connective tissue. The lesion depth in the esophagus was assessed using a 50 °C isotherm and expressed as a percentage of thickness of the esophageal wall. The results are as follows: (1) chilling the esophagus by means of a cooled balloon placed in the lumen minimizes the lesion in the esophageal wall compared to the cases in which no balloon is used (a collapsed esophagus) and with a non-cooled balloon; (2) the temperature of the cooling fluid has a more significant effect on the minimization of the lesion than the rate of cooling (the thermal transfer coefficient for forced convection); and (3) pre-cooling periods previous to RF ablation do not represent a significant improvement. Finally, the results also suggest that the use of a cooled balloon could affect the transmurality of the atrial lesion, especially in the cases where the atrium is of considerable thickness.

  2. Fat infiltration of left ventricle - a rare cause of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Acharya, Jenash; Ram, Pradhum; Khadilkar, Urmila N; Rana, Talvinder

    2016-09-01

    Cor adiposum is a rare disorder of the heart, where the normal heart tissue is replaced by fibro-fatty infiltrates. We report one such case of a middle-aged female who was declared dead shortly after a syncopal episode. At autopsy, the pericardium was intact and firmly adhered to the heart. Histopathology revealed fatty infiltrates extending into the left ventricle of the heart. A post-mortem diagnosis of Cor adiposum was made which is an uncommonly reported cause of sudden cardiac death. PMID:26975397

  3. Segmentation of the Left Ventricle in Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Using Active Shape Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wooi-Haw; Besar, Rosli

    In the quantification of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS), numerous processes are involved. Automation is desired as it will considerably reduce the laboriousness of the underlying tasks. In this paper, we propose a segmentation scheme for the delineation of left ventricle (LV) using the Active Shape Models. Our scheme will reduce the labour-intensiveness in MPS quantification, while still allowing interactive guidance from the medical experts. The proposed scheme has been applied on clinical MPS tomograms in which it has successfully delineated the LV in 94% of the test data. In addition, it has also shown to be more suitable for LV segmentation than the rivaling Active Contour Model.

  4. Level set algorithms comparison for multi-slice CT left ventricle segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ruben; La Cruz, Alexandra; Ordoñes, Andrés.; Pesántez, Daniel; Morocho, Villie; Vanegas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The comparison of several Level Set algorithms is performed with respect to 2D left ventricle segmentation in Multi-Slice CT images. Five algorithms are compared by calculating the Dice coefficient between the resulting segmentation contour and a reference contour traced by a cardiologist. The algorithms are also tested on images contaminated with Gaussian noise for several values of PSNR. Additionally an algorithm for providing the initialization shape is proposed. This algorithm is based on a combination of mathematical morphology tools with watershed and region growing algorithms. Results on the set of test images are promising and suggest the extension to 3{D MSCT database segmentation.

  5. Oxygen utilization of the human left ventricle - An indirect method for its evaluation and clinical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the oxygen consumption rate of the intact heart working (as opposed to empty but beating) human left ventricle. Use is made of experimental recordings obtained for the chamber pressure and the associated dimensions of the LV. LV dimensions are determined by cineangiocardiography, and the chamber pressure is obtained by means of fluid-filled catheters during retrograde or transeptal catheterization. An analytical method incorporating these data is then employed for the evaluation of the LV coronary oxygen consumption in five subjects. Oxygen consumption for these subjects was also obtained by the conventional clinical method in order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed method.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of the flow inside the left ventricle of the human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, S.; Querzoli, G.; Espa, S.; Cenedese, A.

    2013-11-01

    The laboratory models of the human heart left ventricle developed in the last decades gave a valuable contribution to the comprehension of the role of the fluid dynamics in the cardiac function and to support the interpretation of the data obtained in vivo. Nevertheless, some questions are still opened and new ones stem from the continuous improvements in the diagnostic imaging techniques. Many of these unresolved issues are related to the three-dimensional structure of the left ventricular flow during the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we investigated in detail this aspect using a laboratory model. The ventricle was simulated by a flexible sack varying its volume in time according to a physiologically shaped law. Velocities measured during several cycles on series of parallel planes, taken from two orthogonal points of view, were combined together in order to reconstruct the phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity field. During the diastole, three main steps are recognized in the evolution of the vortical structures: (1) straight propagation in the direction of the long axis of a vortex ring originated from the mitral orifice; (2) asymmetric development of the vortex ring on an inclined plane; and (3) single vortex formation. The analysis of three-dimensional data gives the experimental evidence of the reorganization of the flow in a single vortex persisting until the end of the diastole. This flow pattern seems to optimize the cardiac function since it directs velocity towards the aortic valve just before the systole and minimizes the fraction of blood residing within the ventricle for more cycles.

  7. Characterization of human left ventricle flow patterns using ultrasound and Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Benito, Yolanda; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    We discuss work towards understanding human left ventricle (LV) transport and mixing characteristics in normal subjects and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Prior studies have shown that the fluid dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) play a major role in dictating overall cardiac health. This study utilizes a noninvasive method to obtain planar velocity data over the apical long-axis view of the LV from color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound measurements. We use a Lagrangian measure to study unsteady behavior of blood transport inside the LV. We compute finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields to extract Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) from the empirical data. This application presents a particular challenge to Lagrangian computations due to the presence of moving flux, and no-flux, boundaries. We describe a method for unstructured grid generation from the LV motion, and LCS computation on the deforming unstructured grid. Results demonstrate that LCS reveal the moving boundaries confining the blood volume injected to the LV in diastole and ejected into the aorta in systole. We discuss findings related to the quantification of the LV vortex, whose geometry and motion is thought to be an important indicator of cardiac health.

  8. Cross-sectional echocardiography. II. Analysis of mathematic models for quantifying volume of the formalin-fixed left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, H L; Heng, M K; Meerbaum, S; Gueret, P; Hestenes, J; Dula, E; Corday, E

    1980-06-01

    Cross-sectional echocardiography was used to quantify volume in 21 canine left ventricles that were fixed in formalin and immersed in mineral oil. Area, length and diameter measurements were obtained from short- and long-axis cross-sectional images of the left ventricle and volume was calculated by seven mathematic models. Calculated volume was then compared, by linear regression and percent error analyses, with fluid volume of the left ventricle, obtained by filling the chamber with a known amount of fluid. Volumes ranged from 13-146 ml. Mathematic models using short-axis area and long-axis length gave higher correlation coefficients (r = 0.982 and r = 0.969) and lower mean errors (10-20%) than standard formulas previously used for M-mode echo and angiography. Thus, short-axis area analysis with cross-sectional echocardiography is well-suited for quantifying left ventricular volumes in dogs. PMID:7371124

  9. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  10. Cross-sectional echocardiography. I. Analysis of mathematic models for quantifying mass of the left ventricle in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, H L; Heng, M K; Meerbaum, S; Hestenes, J D; Cobo, J M; Davidson, R M; Corday, E

    1979-11-01

    Cross-sectional echocardiography was used to quantify left ventricular mass noninvasively in 21 dogs. Short- and long-axis cross-sectional images of the left ventricle were reproducibly traced at endocardial and epicardial borders during stop-motion video-tape replay. We used area, length and diameter measurements to calculate left ventricular mass by seven mathematic models, including the standard formulas used with M-mode echocardiography and cineangiography. Calculated mass was compared with excised weight of the left ventricle by regression and percent error analyses. Formulas using short-axis areas and long-axis length resulted in higher correlation coefficients (0.94--0.95) and lower mean errors (6--7%) than for standard formulas. Since short-axis areas account for regional left ventricular irregularities, noninvasive quantification of left ventricular mass by cross-sectional echocardiography in dogs is most accurate with formulas using short-axis areas. PMID:487544

  11. Measuring Regional Changes in the Diastolic Deformation of the Left Ventricle of SHR Rats Using microPET Technology and Hyperelastic Warping

    SciTech Connect

    Gullberg, Grant T; VERESS , ALEXANDER I.; WEISS, JEFFREY A.; HUESMAN, RONALD H.; REUTTER, BRYAN W.; TAYLOR , SCOTT E.; SITEK , AREK; FENG, BING; YANG , YONGFENG; GULLBERG, GRANT T.

    2008-04-04

    The objective of this research was to assess applicability of a technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle (LV) directly from microPET image data sets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image data sets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target images. For validation, the template image was defined as the end-systolic microPET image data set from a Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat. The target image was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a FE model of diastolic filling. Regression analysis revealed highly significant correlations between the simulated forward FE solution and image derived warping predictions for fiber stretch (R2 = 0.96), circumferential strain (R2 = 0.96), radial strain (R2 = 0.93), and longitudinal strain (R2 = 0.76) (p<0.001for all cases). The technology was applied to microPET image data of two spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and a WKY control. Regional analysis revealed that, the lateral freewall in the SHR subjects showed the greatest deformation compared with the other wall segments. This work indicates that warping can accurately predict the strain distributions during diastole from the analysis of microPET data sets.

  12. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of the activity of endogenous inotropic factor from porcine left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q M; Chau, T; Agbanyo, M; Navaratnam, S; Khatter, J C; Bose, D

    1993-01-01

    We report some of the unique pharmacological properties of a semipurified endogenous inotropic factor (EIF) present in the extract of the porcine left ventricle. EIF produced the following effects: (a) increase in isometric contractile force developed by electrically driven canine right ventricular trabecula, reaching a maximum with 60-100 microliters/ml concentration; (b) inhibition of Na-pump activity in canine portal vein; (c) no digitalis-like cardiac toxicity, e.g., increased diastolic tension or spontaneous diastolic mechanical oscillatory activity, despite inhibition of the sodium pump; (d) a small increase in sarcoplasmic reticular Ca release from the heart but a large increase in transsarcolemmal Ca influx as seen in biphasic contractions, an action similar to that produced by digitalis-like substances; and (e) prolongation of the action potential duration and refractory period of the canine isolated trabeculae. This latter action may confer a unique antiarrhythmic property to EIF. PMID:7508042

  14. The "bad" left ventricle. Results of coronary surgery and effect on late survival.

    PubMed

    Manley, J C; King, J F; Zeft, H J; Johnson, W D

    1976-12-01

    Between 1968 and 1971, 252 patients with severe ventricular malfunction underwent revascularization surgery. By means of single-plane ventriculography, the ventricle was divided into six segments, three anteriorly and three inferiorly, and ejection fractions were calculated. Patients were classified into four groups according to these observations. Results were assessed in regard to relief of angina, graft patency status, surgical mortality rate, and survival as determined by actuarial life-table analysis. These results were then compared to over-all medical and surgical experience contained in the Milwaukee Cardiovascular Data Registry as well as to other reported series of medical treatment for similar degrees of coronary artery disease and impairment of left ventricular function. Comparison between the surgical and medical series suggests improved survival and improved quality of life in the surgically treated patients. Thus many patients with severe ventricular malfunction, especially if associated with angina, can be reasonably considered candidates for surgery. PMID:994534

  15. Distance regularized two level sets for segmentation of left and right ventricles from cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Captur, Gabriella; Moon, James C; Guo, Shuxu; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Chunming

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new level set method for segmentation of cardiac left and right ventricles. We extend the edge based distance regularized level set evolution (DRLSE) model in Li et al. (2010) to a two-level-set formulation, with the 0-level set and k-level set representing the endocardium and epicardium, respectively. The extraction of endocardium and epicardium is obtained as a result of the interactive curve evolution of the 0 and k level sets derived from the proposed variational level set formulation. The initialization of the level set function in the proposed two-level-set DRLSE model is generated from roughly located endocardium, which can be performed by applying the original DRLSE model. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed two-level-set DRLSE model. PMID:26740057

  16. Left ventricle motion modeling and analysis by adaptive-size physically based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Chen; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new physically based modeling method which employs adaptive-size meshes to model left ventricle (LV) shape and track its motion during cardiac cycle. The mesh size increases or decreases dynamically during surface reconstruction process to locate nodes near surface areas of interest and to minimize the fitting error. Further, presented with multiple 3-D data frames, the mesh size varies as the LV undergoes nonrigid motion. Simulation results illustrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Then, the algorithm is applied to the volumetric temporal cardiac data. The LV data was acquired by the 3-D computed tomography scanner. It was provided by Dr. Eric Hoffman at University of Pennsylvania Medical school and consists of 16 volumetric (128 by 128 by 118) images taken through the heart cycle.

  17. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  18. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models

  19. Coupled Hemodynamic-Biochemical Modeling of Thrombus Formation in Infarcted Left Ventricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; George, Richard; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction have higher rates of thromboembolic events including embolic stroke and peripheral arterial thrombi. A common cause of arterial emboli in HF patients is myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent left ventricular thrombus (LVT) formation. Stagnation of blood and endocardial injury are hypothesized to promote the development of LVT. The identification of high risk patients and the pharmacologic prevention of LVT formation are the keys to preventing embolic events. Stratification of patients at risk for LVT formation is currently limited, and primarily based on global assessment of ventricular function and image based assessment of ventricular wall motion. In this study, we explore a method to predict LVT risk using a multi-physics computational model. The blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation using an immersed boundary method and this is coupled to a convection-diffusion-reaction equation based model of platelet activation and coagulation. The results are then correlated with the other hemodynamic metrics such as wall shear stress and residence time to develop quantitative metrics for the LVT risk prediction. Supported by NSF CDI-Type II grant IOS-1124804, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  20. Four-dimensional functional analysis of left and right ventricles using MR images and active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Thomas, Matthew T.; Walker, Nicholas E.; Stolpen, Alan H.; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas D.; Sonka, Milan

    2007-03-01

    Conventional analysis of cardiac ventricular function from magnetic resonance images is typically relying on short axis image information only. Usually, two cardiac phases of the cardiac cycle are analyzed- the end-diastole and end-systole. Unfortunately, the short axis ventricular coverage is incomplete and inconsistent due to the lack of image information about the ventricular apex and base. In routine clinical images, this information is only available in long axis image planes. Additionally, the standard ventricular function indices such as ejection fraction are only based on a limited temporal information and therefore do not fully describe the four-dimensional (4D, 3D+time) nature of the heart's motion. We report a novel approach in which the long and short axis image data are fused to correct for respiratory motion and form a spatio-temporal 4D data sequence with cubic voxels. To automatically segment left and right cardiac ventricles, a 4D active appearance model was built. Applying the method to cardiac segmentation of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and normal hearts, our method achieved mostly subvoxel signed surface positioning errors of 0.2+/-1.1 voxels for normal left ventricle, 0.6+/-1.5 voxels for normal right ventricle, 0.5+/-2.1 voxels for TOF left ventricle, and 1.3+/-2.6 voxels for TOF right ventricle. Using the computer segmentation results, the cardiac shape and motion indices and volume-time curves were derived as novel indices describing the ventricular function in 4D.

  1. The NESSUS finite element code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, J. B.; Nagiegaal, J. C.; Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this development is to provide a new analysis tool which integrates the structural modeling versatility of a modern finite element code with the latest advances in the area of probabilistic modeling and structural reliability. Version 2.0 of the NESSUS finite element code was released last February, and is currently being exercised on a set of problems which are representative of typical Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) applications. NESSUS 2.0 allows linear elastostatic and eigenvalue analysis of structures with uncertain geometry, material properties and boundary conditions, which are subjected to a random mechanical and thermal loading environment. The NESSUS finite element code is a key component in a broader software system consisting of five major modules. NESSUS/EXPERT is an expert system under development at Southwest Research Institute, with the objective of centralizing all component-specific knowledge useful for conducting probabilistic analysis of typical Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components. NESSUS/FEM contains the finite element code used for the structural analysis and parameter sensitivity evaluation of these components. The task of parametrizing a finite element mesh in terms of the random variables present is facilitated with the use of the probabilistic data preprocessor in NESSUS/PRE. An external database file is used for managing the bulk of the data generated by NESSUS/FEM.

  2. Postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes in the left ventricle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wulfsohn, D; Nyengaard, J R; Tang, Y

    2004-03-01

    We studied the development of myocytes and interstitium using perfusion-fixed left ventricles obtained from normal female Wistar rats at 5 days (n = 5), 25 days (n = 5), and 125 days (n = 5) of age. Using design-based stereological methods and light microscopy, we estimated the following parameters: volume of left ventricle made up by myocytes, myocyte nuclei, and interstitium; total numbers of myocyte and non-myocyte nuclei; mean volumes of myocyte nuclei; the total volume, surface area, and length of fibers; and the mean star volumes of fibers. Some derived parameters were also calculated, namely, the mean myocardium volume per nucleus and the mean fiber cross-sectional area. We found that postnatal myocyte growth after day 5 in the young rat is largely hypertrophic, while interstitial growth is hyperplastic. The increase in left ventricular mass was 10-fold over the ages studied, whereas total length, surface area, and volume of fibers increased approximately 3-, 8-, and 11-fold over the period. Relative rates of growth implied that fiber growth was dominated by an increase in length compared to other dimensions. The total number of myocyte nuclei ( approximately 30 x 10(6)) did not change between 5 and 25 days of age, but then almost doubled in 125-day-old rats. The number of non-myocyte nuclei increased 9-fold over the period studied in an exponential manner. The mean myocyte nucleus volume tripled between the ages of 5 and 25 days and then remained the same. The volume-weighted mean nucleus volume was highly variable and showed no significant trend with age. Our results provide support for the claim made by some researchers that myocyte proliferation had ceased by day 5 after birth, but do not provide evidence for binucleation of myocytes between 5 and 25 days after birth. Reported numbers of myocyte nuclei express a net growth and do not rule out both myocyte death and creation throughout the early postnatal period. We clearly detect an increase in the

  3. [Electrovectorcardiographic aspects of systolic and diastolic overloads of the left ventricle].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A; Casanova, J M

    1990-01-01

    Electrovectorcardiographic features of the ventricular depolarization and repolarization related to hemodynamic conditions were studied in typical cases of left ventricular systolic and diastolic overloads. Electrovectorcardiographic exploration was effected prospectively in 70 subjects with aortic coarctation (52 men and 18 women) and in 90 with patent ductus arteriosus (18 men and 72 women). Fifty-five subjects of the series with systolic overload (A) and sixty-five with diastolic overload (B) underwent surgical treatment. In all cases, high fidelity tracings were obtained by means of a VR-6 polygraph: standard leads, unipolar limb leads, thoracic and precordial unipolar leads from V7R to V7 or V8, high abdominal leads MD, ME, MI and, when it was possible, the corresponding intraventricular unipolar leads. Vectorcardiographic curves were recorded in three planes by Grishman's cube method and photographed using the polaroid system. In both series, ventricular conduction disturbances of proximal or peripheral types were observed. These seem to be independent of hemodynamic conditions. In the presence of aortic coarctation as well as of patent ductus arteriosus, the Q-Tc interval can be prolonged in all leads, probably owing to electrolytic disorders, or in left leads only as a reflection of elevated telediastolic pressure in the ipsilateral ventricle. PMID:2378532

  4. Case Report: Disparate flow in HeartMate II patient with extensive left ventricle repair.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Kazui, Toshinobu; Perovic, Viktor; Mikail, Philmon; Lick, Scott; Smith, Richard; Betterton, Edward W; Venkat, Raj; Iwanski, Jessika; Wong, Raymond K; Slepian, Marvin J; Khalpey, Zain

    2016-05-01

    This case study reports the operative management of a 63-year-old male patient following implantation of the HeartMate II (HMII) left ventricular assist device (LVAD), with a non-compliant left ventricle (LV) and a reduced right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume. Intraoperatively, the patient had a thin, fragile LV wall with laminated clot; a ventricular septal defect was encountered during removal of the clot. Along with an aortic valve repair, the LV and the septum were reconstructed with multiple bovine pericardium patches, thus, moderately reducing the RV and LV stroke volume. A difference in cardiac output via a Swan-Ganz catheter (approximately 1.5 l/min) was observed as opposed to the HMII's estimated flow. The result was later replicated and verified ITALIC! in vitrovia the Donovan Mock Circulation System (DMCS), where about 2 l/min lower flow on the HMII system was observed. In conclusion, the HMII flow rate displayed can be inaccurate and should only be used for trending. PMID:26531760

  5. Cancer induces cardiomyocyte remodeling and hypoinnervation in the left ventricle of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Das, Suman Kumar; Heinzel, Frank R; Schmidt, Albrecht; Post, Heiner; Schauer, Silvia; Papadakis, Tamara; Kummer, Wolfgang; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with cachexia, cardiovascular symptoms and autonomic dysregulation. We tested whether extracardiac cancer directly affects the innervation of left ventricular myocardium. Mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (tumor group, TG) or PBS (control group, CG) were analyzed after 21 days. Cardiac function (echocardiography), serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 (ELISA), structural alterations of cardiomyocytes and their innervation (design-based stereology) and levels of innervation-related mRNA (quantitative RT-PCR) were analysed. The groups did not differ in various functional parameters. Serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 were elevated in TG. The total length of axons in the left ventricle was reduced. The number of dense core vesicles per axon profile was reduced. Decreased myofibrillar volume, increased sarcoplasmic volume and increased volume of lipid droplets were indicative of metabolic alterations of TG cardiomyocytes. In the heart, the mRNA level of nerve growth factor was reduced whereas that of β1-adrenergic receptor was unchanged in TG. In the stellate ganglion of TG, mRNA levels of nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y were decreased and that of tyrosine hydroxylase was increased. In summary, cancer induces a systemic pro-inflammatory state, a significant reduction in myocardial innervation and a catabolic phenotype of cardiomyocytes in the mouse. Reduced expression of nerve growth factor may account for the reduced myocardial innervation. PMID:21637823

  6. The Effects of Training on the Time Components of the Left Ventricle, and Cardiac Time Components: Sedentary versus Active Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    A review of previous research was completed to determine (a) the response of the cardiac time components of the left ventricle to varying types and intensities of training programs, (b) the probable physiological explanations for these responses, and (c) the significance of the changes which did or did not occur. It was found that, at rest,…

  7. Probabilistic Finite Element: Variational Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this research is to provide techniques which are cost-effective and enable the engineer to evaluate the effect of uncertainties in complex finite element models. Embedding the probabilistic aspects in a variational formulation is a natural approach. In addition, a variational approach to probabilistic finite elements enables it to be incorporated within standard finite element methodologies. Therefore, once the procedures are developed, they can easily be adapted to existing general purpose programs. Furthermore, the variational basis for these methods enables them to be adapted to a wide variety of structural elements and to provide a consistent basis for incorporating probabilistic features in many aspects of the structural problem. Tasks concluded include the theoretical development of probabilistic variational equations for structural dynamics, the development of efficient numerical algorithms for probabilistic sensitivity displacement and stress analysis, and integration of methodologies into a pilot computer code.

  8. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  9. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  10. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  11. Failing Left Ventricles Have an Enhanced Post-Stimulation Potentiation Despite Their Impaired Force Frequency Relationship.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tohru; Kashimura, Takeshi; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Komei; Fujiki, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuka; Obata, Hiroaki; Hanawa, Haruo; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-05-25

    The left ventricular contractile force (LV dP/dtmax) of patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction does not increase effectively with an increase in heart rate. In other words, their force-frequency relationship (FFR) is impaired. However, it is unknown whether a longer coupling interval subsequent to tachycardia causes a stronger contraction (poststimulation potentiation, PSP) in a rate-dependent manner.In 16 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (48 ± 2 years old, LVEF 30 ± 10%) and 6 control patients (58 ± 4 years old, LVEF 70 ± 7%), FFR was assessed by right atrial pacing using a micro-manometer-tipped catheter. At each pacing rate, the increase of LV dP/dtmax over basal LV dP/dt (ΔFFR) and the increase of LV dP/dtmax of the first beat after pacing cessation over LV dP/dtmax during pacing (ΔPSP) were evaluated.Patients with DCM had smaller LV dP/dtmax at baseline (872 ± 251 versus 1370 ± 123 mmHg/second, P = 0.0002) and developed smaller ΔFFR (eg, at 120/minute, 77 ± 143 versus 331 ± 131 mmHg/second, P = 0.0011). In contrast, they showed a rate-dependent increase of LV dP/dtmax of PSP and had greater ΔPSP (eg, at 120/minute, 294 ± 173 versus -152 ± 131 mmHg/second, P < 0.0001).Failing left ventricles develop little contractile force during tachycardia despite their rate-dependent enhancement in post-stimulation potentiation, suggesting that refractoriness of contractile force underlies impaired FFR. PMID:27181036

  12. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  13. A Three-Dimensional Analytical (Rheological) Model of the Human Left Ventricle in Passive-Active States

    PubMed Central

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Brady, Allan J.; Radhakrishnan, S.

    1973-01-01

    In this paper a three-dimensional continuum model of a mammalian left ventricle is formulated. The stresses in the model satisfy the conditions of zero stress on the outer (epicardial surface-representing) boundary. The strains of the model are obtained from the actual dynamic geometry measurements (obtained from cineangiocardiography). Since the left ventricular muscle is incompressible, the dilatational strain is zero and hence the (three-dimensional) deviatric stress components are related to the corresponding strain components by Maxwell and Voigt rheological model analogues of one-dimensional systems; the parameters of the model are series and parallel elastic (SE, PE) elements and the contractile element (CE) (representing the sarcomere). The incorporation of the rheological features of the cardiac muscle into the three-dimensional constitutive equations (for the three-dimensional continuum model of the left ventricle) is a feature of this paper. A procedure is presented to determine the parameters of the constitutive equations (i.e., the SE, PE, and the parameters of the force-velocity relation for the CE) for the left ventricle of a subject from data on the dimensions and chamber pressure of the left ventricle. The values of these parameters characterize the rheology of the left ventricular muscle of the subject. In order to demonstrate clinical application of the analyses, in vivo data of the subjects' left ventricular pressure and dimensions are obtained, and the analyses are applied to the data to determine (for each subject) the values and characteristics of the elastic elements and CEs. PMID:4726883

  14. [Mathematical Modelling of the Dependence of the Performance of the Left Ventricle of the Heart on Preload and Afterload].

    PubMed

    Syomin, F A; Zberia, M V; Koubassova, N A; Tsaturyan, A K

    2015-01-01

    The results of the numerical simulation of the end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes of the left ventricle of the heart are presented. The simulation was based on a published simple kinetic model of cardiac muscle and approximation of the ventricle geometry with thick-wall cylinder where the fibre orientation varied linearly from sub-epicardium towards sub-endocardium. Blood flow was modelled with a liner compartment model. This simplified approach provides correct dependencies of the stroke volume on the pre- and afterload, namely end-diastolic pressure and peripheral resistance. The calculations show that the stroke volume is independent of arterial compliance and blood inertia. PMID:26841514

  15. Constrictive pericarditis with a calcified pericardial band at the level of left ventricle causing mid-ventricular obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mani Prasad; Gautam, Samir; Sogunuru, Guruprasad; Subramanyam, Gangapatnam

    2012-01-01

    An adolescent presented with insidious onset and gradually progressive distension of abdomen associated with bilateral ankle swelling of few months duration. He had one episode of prolonged low-grade self-limiting febrile illness during childhood but had not consulted to doctor and never had been diagnosed as case of tuberculosis or acute pericarditis. A detail clinical evaluation showed raised central venous pressure, ascites and ankle oedema. Systemic examination was not much informative except ejection systolic murmur in third left intercostal space. Echocardiography and CT scan heart showed localised thickened pericardium with calcific band around the left ventricle at mid ventricle level. The band around the heart caused the heart to have a 'dumbbell' appearance with ballooning in apical area and a rare mid-ventricular obstruction in the left. A diagnosis of chronic constrictive pericarditis with calcific band was made and the patient was referred to another centre for cardiac surgery. PMID:22605003

  16. Flow Behavior in the Left Heart Ventricle Following Apico-Aortic Bypass Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Shahrokh; Jeyhani, Morteza; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Apico-aortic bypass (AAB) surgery is an alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to reduce left ventricle (LV) overload in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). It consists in connecting the apex of the LV to the descending thoracic aorta with a valved conduit. Postoperative flow assessments show that two thirds of the outflow is conducted from the LV apex to the conduit, while only one third crosses the native aortic valve. In this study, we performed high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow pattern within an in vitro elastic model of LV in the presence of a very severe AS, before and after AAB. Results indicate that AAB effectively relieves the LV outflow obstruction; however, it also leads to abnormal ventricular flow patterns. Normal LV flow dynamics is characterized by an emerging mitral jet flow followed by the development of a vortical flow with velocities directed towards the aortic valve, while measurements in the presence of AAB show systolic flow bifurcating to the apical conduit and to the aortic valve outflow tract. This study provides the first insight into the LV flow structure after AAB including outflow jets and disturbed stagnation regions.

  17. Manifold parametrization of the left ventricle for a statistical modelling of its complete anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, D.; Garcia-Barnes, J.; Hernández-Sabate, A.; Marti, E.

    2010-03-01

    Distortion of Left Ventricle (LV) external anatomy is related to some dysfunctions, such as hypertrophy. The architecture of myocardial fibers determines LV electromechanical activation patterns as well as mechanics. Thus, their joined modelling would allow the design of specific interventions (such as peacemaker implantation and LV remodelling) and therapies (such as resynchronization). On one hand, accurate modelling of external anatomy requires either a dense sampling or a continuous infinite dimensional approach, which requires non-Euclidean statistics. On the other hand, computation of fiber models requires statistics on Riemannian spaces. Most approaches compute separate statistical models for external anatomy and fibers architecture. In this work we propose a general mathematical framework based on differential geometry concepts for computing a statistical model including, both, external and fiber anatomy. Our framework provides a continuous approach to external anatomy supporting standard statistics. We also provide a straightforward formula for the computation of the Riemannian fiber statistics. We have applied our methodology to the computation of complete anatomical atlas of canine hearts from diffusion tensor studies. The orientation of fibers over the average external geometry agrees with the segmental description of orientations reported in the literature.

  18. Automatic Endocardium Contour Tracing Method Using Standard Left Ventricles Shape Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Masahiro; Kashima, Masayuki; Sato, Kiminori; Watanabe, Mutsumi

    The necessity of ultrasonic diagnosis tools increases every year. We propose an automatic endocardium tracing method by applying prepared “Standard Left Ventricles Shape Model (SLVSM)”. The cross section of heart wall in ultrasonic image is decided depending on the position and the angle of this probe. The initial contour is adaptively determined as crossing curve line between the SLVSM and the cross section. And the endocardium contour is extracted by active contour model(ACM) in two stages. In the first stage, an endocardium contour is detected using the result of an edge extraction based on the separability of image features. In the second stage, the endocardium contour is extracted using shape correction processing. “Mitral valve processing” not only detects the position of the mitral valve at the end diastolic period, but also corrects the detected contour after the first stage of ACM. Experimental results using one healthy case and three diseased cases have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. In-vivo characterization of left-ventricle pressure-volume telemetry system in swine model.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Kyle; Konecny, Filip; El-Warrak, Alexander; Hodgson, Chad; Cadieux-Pitre, Heather; Hill, Tracy; Sobot, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We present in-vivo study related to the use of our implantable RF telemetry system for pressure-volume (PV) cardiac monitoring in a animal subject. We implant a commercial MEMS PV sensor into the subject's heart left-ventricle (LV), while the telemetry system is implanted outside of the heart and connected to the sensor with a 7-microwires tether. The RF telemetry system is suitable for commercial application in medium sized subjects, its total volume of 2.475cm(3) and a weight of 4.0g. Our designed system is 58 % smaller in volume, 44 % in weight and has a 55 % reduction in sampling power over the last reported research in PV telemetry. In-vivo data was captured in both an acute and a freely moving setting over a 24 hour period. We experimentally demonstrated viability of the methodology that includes the surgical procedure and real-time monitoring of the in-vivo data in a freely moving subject. Further improvements in catheter design will improve the data quality and safety of the subject. This real-time implantable technology allows for researchers to quantify cardiac pathologies by extracting real-time pressure-volume loops, wirelessly from within freely moving subjects. PMID:27492638

  20. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  1. [HEMODYNAMIC CHILDREN WITH ISOLATED ANOMALOUS CHORDS OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE DEPENDING ON LOCATION AND QUANTITY].

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, V G

    2015-01-01

    A total of 156 children group (children born to parents exposed to the Chernobyl disaster), in which, according to Doppler echocardiography, revealed isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle (AHLV). Analysis of morphometric parameters and central hemodynamics conducted according to the localization AHLV. Found that concomitant localization AHLV at the threshold of the number of the most influencing change morphoinetric indicators and central hemodynamics. Condition of systemic circulation indicates a decline in their adaptive capacity of the cardiovascular system due to changes in the dynamics and power of the heartbeat. The decrease in stroke volume, stroke and cardiac index suggests hypokinetic type of organization of central hemodynamics, which can be considered an early sign of stress features of the heart and blood vessels. In this subgroup of children revealed significant changes in transmitral flow, indicating the initiation they have diastolic dysfunc tion. When the number of prethreshold AHLV most pronounced changes were found in the middle of their localization. Almost a third of children in this subgroup with individual assessment also revealed signs of initiation of diastolic dysfunction. PMID:27089709

  2. Assessment of left ventricle systolic and diastolic functions in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Korkmaz, Hasan; Özer, Ömer; Atmaca, Murad

    2016-06-30

    The objective of the study was to scrutinize in detail the changes that occur in left ventricle (LV) systolic and diastolic functions using echocardiography in patients with at least 5 years of history and 40 healthy volunteers matching the patients in age and gender, who were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. All cases were examined with Tei Index, an index that could assess LV systolic and diastolic functions in conjuction, and with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) that assesses systolic function. In addition, Mitral E and A wave velocities, Isovolemic relaxation time (IVRT), Tissue Doppler Em (peak early motion) and Am (peak after motion) waves, which evaluate diastolic functions were measured. Tei Index was calculated as 0.61±0.19 in the patient group, and as 0.39±0.10 in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). LVEF was measured as 58%±5 in the patient group, and as 62%±3 in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Also the IVRT values were significantly different between the tissue Doppler Em and Em/Am ratio among the groups (p<0.001). Echocardiographic myocardial performance, LV systolic and diastolic functions in schizophrenia patients was found to be worse than those of the control group. PMID:27138830

  3. Accelerated circumferential strain quantification of the left ventricle using CIRCOME: simulation and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Finn, J. Paul

    2008-03-01

    Circumferential strain of the left ventricle reflects myocardial contractility and is considered a key index of cardiac function. It is also an important parameter in the quantitative evaluation of heart failure. Circumferential compression encoding, CIRCOME, is a novel method in cardiac MRI to evaluate this strain non-invasively and quickly. This strain encoding technique avoids the explicit measurement of the displacement field and does not require calculation of strain through spatial differentiation. CIRCOME bypasses these two time-consuming and noise sensitive steps by directly using the frequency domain (k-space) information from radially tagged myocardium, before and after deformation. It uses the ring-shaped crown region of the k-space, generated by the taglines, to reconstruct circumferentially compression-weighted images of the heart before and after deformation. CIRCOME then calculates the circumferential strain through relative changes in the compression level of corresponding regions before and after deformation. This technique can be implemented in 3D as well as 2D and may be employed to estimate the overall global or regional circumferential strain. The main parameters that affect the accuracy of this method are spatial resolution, signal to noise ratio, eccentricity of the center of radial taglines their fading and their density. Also, a variety of possible image reconstruction and filtering options may influence the accuracy of the method. This study describes the pulse sequence, algorithm, influencing factors and limiting criteria for CIRCOME and provides the simulated results.

  4. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  5. Accurate segmentation framework for the left ventricle wall from cardiac cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliman, H.; Khalifa, F.; Elnakib, A.; Soliman, A.; Beache, G. M.; Gimel'farb, G.; Emam, A.; Elmaghraby, A.; El-Baz, A.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a novel, fast, robust, bi-directional coupled parametric deformable model to segment the left ventricle (LV) wall borders using first- and second-order visual appearance features. These features are embedded in a new stochastic external force that preserves the topology of LV wall to track the evolution of the parametric deformable models control points. To accurately estimate the marginal density of each deformable model control point, the empirical marginal grey level distributions (first-order appearance) inside and outside the boundary of the deformable model are modeled with adaptive linear combinations of discrete Gaussians (LCDG). The second order visual appearance of the LV wall is accurately modeled with a new rotationally invariant second-order Markov-Gibbs random field (MGRF). We tested the proposed segmentation approach on 15 data sets in 6 infarction patients using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average distance (AD) between the ground truth and automated segmentation contours. Our approach achieves a mean DSC value of 0.926±0.022 and AD value of 2.16±0.60 compared to two other level set methods that achieve 0.904±0.033 and 0.885±0.02 for DSC; and 2.86±1.35 and 5.72±4.70 for AD, respectively.

  6. ATP synthesis and export in heart left ventricle mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Seccia, T M; Pierro, P; Vulpis, V; Marra, E; Pirrelli, A; Passarella, S

    1998-04-01

    Use was made of mitochondria isolated from heart left ventricles of either spontaneously hypertensive or age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats used as a control to find out whether hypertrophy (5-week-old rats) or hypertrophy/hypertension (24-week-old rats) can cause change in the mechanisms by which ATP is synthesised via ATP synthase and subsequently exported via the ADP/ATP translocator outside mitochondria. To do this, photometric measurements were made of the rate of ATP appearance in the extramitochondrial phase, which occurs as a result of ADP addition to mitochondria. In mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rats deficit of ATP production was found dependent on changes in the KmADP and Vmax values of both the ADP/ATP translocator and the ATP synthase. The ADP/ATP translocator was found to determine the rate of ATP production outside mitochondria in all the tested samples. In an initial investigation carried out to ascertain how cell ATP deficit can be counterbalanced, an increase in both adenylate kinase and creatine kinase activities was found in both hypertrophy and hypertrophy/hypertension. A possible increase in anaerobic glycolysis was also suggested by the increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. PMID:9852286

  7. Cardiac Cell Culture Model (CCCM) as a Left Ventricle Mimic for Cardiac Tissue Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Roussel, Thomas J.; El-Baz, Ayman; Giridharan, Guruprasad; Keller, Bradley B.; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the delivery of hemodynamic mechanical cues that play a critical role in the early development and maturation of cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiac tissue capable of replacing or augmenting cardiac function therefore requires physiologically relevant environments that can deliver complex mechanical cues for cardiomyocyte functional maturation. The goal of this work is the development and validation of a cardiac cell culture model (CCCM) microenvironment that accurately mimics pressure-volume changes seen in the left ventricle and to use this system to achieve cardiac cell maturation under conditions where mechanical loads such as pressure and stretch are gradually increased from the unloaded state to conditions seen in vivo. The CCCM platform, consisting of a cell culture chamber integrated within a flow loop was created to accomplish culture of 10 day chick embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes subject to 4 days of stimulation (10 mm Hg, ~13% stretch at a frequency of 2 Hz). Results clearly show that CCCM conditioned cardiomyocytes accelerate cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation in comparison to static unloaded controls as evidenced by increased proliferation, alignment of actin cytoskeleton, bundle-like sarcomeric α-actinin expression, higher pacing beat rate at lower threshold voltages and increased shortening. These results confirm the CCCM microenvironment can accelerate immature cardiac cell structural and functional maturation for potential cardiac regenerative applications. PMID:23952579

  8. A clinical method for mapping and quantifying blood stasis in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Vu, Vi; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Pérez Del Villar, Candelas; Rodríguez-López, Sara; Benito, Yolanda; Borja, María-Guadalupe; Pastor-Escuredo, David; Yotti, Raquel; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Kahn, Andrew M; Ibáñez, Borja; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; May-Newman, Karen; Bermejo, Javier; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2016-07-26

    In patients at risk of intraventrcular thrombosis, the benefits of chronic anticoagulation therapy need to be balanced with the pro-hemorrhagic effects of therapy. Blood stasis in the cardiac chambers is a recognized risk factor for intracardiac thrombosis and potential cardiogenic embolic events. In this work, we present a novel flow image-based method to assess the location and extent of intraventricular stasis regions inside the left ventricle (LV) by digital processing flow-velocity images obtained either by phase-contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) or 2D color-Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV). This approach is based on quantifying the distribution of the blood Residence Time (TR) from time-resolved blood velocity fields in the LV. We tested the new method in illustrative examples of normal hearts, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and one patient before and after the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The method allowed us to assess in-vivo the location and extent of the stasis regions in the LV. Original metrics were developed to integrate flow properties into simple scalars suitable for a robust and personalized assessment of the risk of thrombosis. From a clinical perspective, this work introduces the new paradigm that quantitative flow dynamics can provide the basis to obtain subclinical markers of intraventricular thrombosis risk. The early prediction of LV blood stasis may result in decrease strokes by appropriate use of anticoagulant therapy for the purpose of primary and secondary prevention. It may also have a significant impact on LVAD device design and operation set-up. PMID:26680013

  9. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  10. Echocardiographic detection of free-floating thrombus in left ventricle during coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Vaggar, Jagadeesh N.; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas; Pillai, Vivek; Sreedhar, Rupa; Cahndran, Roshith; Roy, Suddhadeb

    2015-01-01

    We report an incident of detection of a free-floating thrombus in the left ventricle (LV) using intraoperative two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during proximal coronary artery bypass graft anastomosis. A 58-year-old man presented to us with a 6-month history of chest pain without any history suggestive of myocardial infarction or transient ischemic attacks. His preoperative echocardiography revealed the systolic dysfunction of LV, mild hypokinesia of basal and mid-anterior wall, and the absence of an aneurysm. He was scheduled for on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. On intraoperative TEE before establishing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), a small immobile mass was found attached to LV apical area. After completion of distal coronary artery grafting, when the aortic cross-clamp was removed, the heart was filled partially and beating spontaneously. TEE examination using 2D mode revealed a free-floating mass in the LV, which was suspected to be a thrombus. Additional navigation using biplane and 3D modes confirmed the presence of the thrombus and distinguished it from papillary muscles and artifact. The surgeon opened the left atrium after re-establishing electromechanical quiescence and removed a thrombus measuring 1.5 cm × 1 cm from the LV. The LV mass in the apical region was no longer seen after discontinuation of CPB. Accurate TEE-detection and timely removal of the thrombus averted disastrous embolic complications. Intraoperative 2D and recent biplane and 3D echocardiography modes are useful monitoring tools during the conduct of CPB. PMID:26440248

  11. Coronary collaterals provide a constant scaffold effect on the left ventricle and limit ischemic left ventricular dysfunction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hoole, Stephen P.; White, Paul A.; Read, Philip A.; Heck, Patrick M.; West, Nick E.; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Coronary collaterals preserve left ventricular (LV) function during coronary occlusion by reducing myocardial ischemia and may directly influence LV compliance. We aimed to re-evaluate the relationship between coronary collaterals, measured quantitatively with a pressure wire, and simultaneously recorded LV contractility from conductance catheter data during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in humans. Twenty-five patients with normal LV function awaiting PCI were recruited. Pressure-derived collateral flow index (CFIp): CFIp = (Pw − Pv)/(Pa − Pv) was calculated from pressure distal to coronary balloon occlusion (Pw), central venous pressure (Pv), and aortic pressure (Pa). CFIp was compared with the changes in simultaneously recorded LV end-diastolic pressure (ΔLVEDP), end-diastolic volume, maximum rate of rise in pressure (ΔLVdP/dtmax; systolic function), and time constant of isovolumic relaxation (ΔLV τ; diastolic function), measured by a LV cavity conductance catheter. Measurements were recorded at baseline and following a 1-min coronary occlusion and were duplicated after a 30-min recovery period. There was significant LV diastolic dysfunction following coronary occlusion (ΔLVEDP: +24.5%, P < 0.0001; and ΔLV τ: +20.0%, P < 0.0001), which inversely correlated with CFIp (ΔLVEDP vs. CFIp: r = −0.54, P < 0.0001; ΔLV τ vs. CFIp: r = −0.46, P = 0.0009). Subjects with fewer collaterals had lower LVEDP at baseline (r = 0.33, P = 0.02). CFIp was inversely related to the coronary stenosis pressure gradient at rest (r = −0.31, P = 0.03). Collaterals exert a direct hemodynamic effect on the ventricle and attenuate ischemic LV diastolic dysfunction during coronary occlusion. Vessels with lesions of greater hemodynamic significance have better collateral supply. PMID:22323649

  12. Coronary collaterals provide a constant scaffold effect on the left ventricle and limit ischemic left ventricular dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoole, Stephen P; White, Paul A; Read, Philip A; Heck, Patrick M; West, Nick E; O'Sullivan, Michael; Dutka, David P

    2012-04-01

    Coronary collaterals preserve left ventricular (LV) function during coronary occlusion by reducing myocardial ischemia and may directly influence LV compliance. We aimed to re-evaluate the relationship between coronary collaterals, measured quantitatively with a pressure wire, and simultaneously recorded LV contractility from conductance catheter data during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in humans. Twenty-five patients with normal LV function awaiting PCI were recruited. Pressure-derived collateral flow index (CFI(p)): CFI(p) = (P(w) - P(v))/(P(a) - P(v)) was calculated from pressure distal to coronary balloon occlusion (P(w)), central venous pressure (P(v)), and aortic pressure (P(a)). CFI(p) was compared with the changes in simultaneously recorded LV end-diastolic pressure (ΔLVEDP), end-diastolic volume, maximum rate of rise in pressure (ΔLVdP/dt(max); systolic function), and time constant of isovolumic relaxation (ΔLV τ; diastolic function), measured by a LV cavity conductance catheter. Measurements were recorded at baseline and following a 1-min coronary occlusion and were duplicated after a 30-min recovery period. There was significant LV diastolic dysfunction following coronary occlusion (ΔLVEDP: +24.5%, P < 0.0001; and ΔLV τ: +20.0%, P < 0.0001), which inversely correlated with CFI(p) (ΔLVEDP vs. CFI(p): r = -0.54, P < 0.0001; ΔLV τ vs. CFI(p): r = -0.46, P = 0.0009). Subjects with fewer collaterals had lower LVEDP at baseline (r = 0.33, P = 0.02). CFI(p) was inversely related to the coronary stenosis pressure gradient at rest (r = -0.31, P = 0.03). Collaterals exert a direct hemodynamic effect on the ventricle and attenuate ischemic LV diastolic dysfunction during coronary occlusion. Vessels with lesions of greater hemodynamic significance have better collateral supply. PMID:22323649

  13. The influence of coronary angioplasty of the infarct-dependent artery on systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, Sh D; Guluzade, V U; Alieva, Kh A; Mirzakhanova, L R; Imanov, G G

    2009-01-01

    The target of research is to compare the changes of systolic and diastolic functions of the left ventricle in patients with at least one month infarction after infarct-dependent artery recanalization through elective stenting. The group of 60 patients was selected, 47 men and 13 women, who underwent hospitalization in Central Hospital of Oilworkers in 2006-2007. The investigation was conducted on 30 patients (24 men and 6 women), who underwent elective stenting of LAD. The control group was composed of 30 patients (23 men and 7 women) after anterior myocardial infarction without further stenting of infarct-dependent artery. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by coronary ventriculography. The patients underwent the echocardiography the day before stenting. The "Sonoline G60 (Siemens, Germany)" machine with 2.5MHz probe has been used. The echocardiography was repeated after 7 days and 3, 6, 12 months after stent implantation. The standard parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle were identified during investigation. The statistical processing was delivered through PC with Excel program set. All data are presented in (M+/-m), where the M--mean value, m--standard mean fault. Comparison of the data was conducted with Student criterion. The results of treatment of patients with and without further stenting of infarct-dependent artery were compared. It was found that the stenting of infarct-dependent artery with standard therapy in patients after myocardial infarction has better impact on systolic function, than traditional medical therapy without further reperfusion. The stenting of infarct-dependent artery facilitates earlier improvement of the systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. The diastolic relaxation grade of the left ventricle after stenting of the left coronary artery is higher, than in patients without further revascularization. PMID:19644191

  14. Visualization and simulated surgery of the left ventricle in the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, N J B; Lin, X; Zhao, Y; Clapworthy, G J; Dong, F; Redaelli, A; Parodi, O; Testi, D

    2011-06-01

    Ischaemic heart failure remains a significant health and economic problem worldwide. This paper presents a user-friendly software system that will form a part of the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH2) project, currently being developed under the European Commission Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) programme. VPH2 is an integrated medicine project, which will create a suite of modelling, simulation and visualization tools for patient-specific prediction and planning in cases of post-ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction. The work presented here describes a three-dimensional interactive visualization for simulating left ventricle restoration surgery, comprising the operations of cutting, stitching and patching, and for simulating the elastic deformation of the ventricle to its post-operative shape. This will supply the quantitative measurements required for the post-operative prediction tools being developed in parallel in the same project. PMID:22670207

  15. Non-invasive assessment of functional strain lines in the real human left ventricle via speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, A; Gabriele, S; Nardinocchi, P; Piras, P; Puddu, P E; Teresi, L; Torromeo, C; Varano, V

    2015-02-01

    A mechanics-based analysis of data from three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography is proposed, aimed at investigating deformations in myocardium and at assessing shape and function of distinct strain lines corresponding to the principal strain lines of the cardiac tissue. The analysis is based on the application of a protocol of measurement of the endocardial and epicardial principal strain lines, which was already tested on simulated left ventricles. In contrast with similar studies, it is established that endocardial principal strain lines cannot be identified with any structural fibers, not even along the systolic phase and is suggested that it is due to the capacity of the endocardial surface to contrast the dilation of the left ventricle. PMID:25547026

  16. The numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow in human patient-specific left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various non-invasive tools such as the magnetic resonance image (MRI), ultrasound imaging (USI), computed tomography (CT), and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been widely utilized to enhance our current understanding of the physiological parameters that affect the initiation and the progression of the cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with heart failure (HF). In particular, the hemodynamics of left ventricle (LV) has attracted the attention of the researchers due to its significant role in the heart functionality. In this study, CFD owing its capability of predicting detailed flow field was adopted to model the blood flow in images-based patient-specific LV over cardiac cycle. In most published studies, the blood is modeled as Newtonian that is not entirely accurate as the blood viscosity varies with the shear rate in non-linear manner. In this paper, we studied the effect of Newtonian assumption on the degree of accuracy of intraventricular hemodynamics. In doing so, various non-Newtonian models and Newtonian model are used in the analysis of the intraventricular flow and the viscosity of the blood. Initially, we used the cardiac MRI images to reconstruct the time-resolved geometry of the patient-specific LV. After the unstructured mesh generation, the simulations were conducted in the CFD commercial solver FLUENT to analyze the intraventricular hemodynamic parameters. The findings indicate that the Newtonian assumption cannot adequately simulate the flow dynamic within the LV over the cardiac cycle, which can be attributed to the pulsatile and recirculation nature of the flow and the low blood shear rate. PMID:26849955

  17. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  18. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  19. Integration of electro-anatomical and imaging data of the left ventricle: An evaluation framework.

    PubMed

    Soto-Iglesias, David; Butakoff, Constantine; Andreu, David; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Berruezo, Antonio; Camara, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Integration of electrical and structural information for scar characterization in the left ventricle (LV) is a crucial step to better guide radio-frequency ablation therapies, which are usually performed in complex ventricular tachycardia (VT) cases. This integration requires finding a common representation where to map the electrical information from the electro-anatomical map (EAM) surfaces and tissue viability information from delay-enhancement magnetic resonance images (DE-MRI). However, the development of a consistent integration method is still an open problem due to the lack of a proper evaluation framework to assess its accuracy. In this paper we present both: (i) an evaluation framework to assess the accuracy of EAM and imaging integration strategies with simulated EAM data and a set of global and local measures; and (ii) a new integration methodology based on a planar disk representation where the LV surface meshes are quasi-conformally mapped (QCM) by flattening, allowing for simultaneous visualization and joint analysis of the multi-modal data. The developed evaluation framework was applied to estimate the accuracy of the QCM-based integration strategy on a benchmark dataset of 128 synthetically generated ground-truth cases presenting different scar configurations and EAM characteristics. The obtained results demonstrate a significant reduction in global overlap errors (50-100%) with respect to state-of-the-art integration techniques, also better preserving the local topology of small structures such as conduction channels in scars. Data from seventeen VT patients were also used to study the feasibility of the QCM technique in a clinical setting, consistently outperforming the alternative integration techniques in the presence of sparse and noisy clinical data. The proposed evaluation framework has allowed a rigorous comparison of different EAM and imaging data integration strategies, providing useful information to better guide clinical practice in

  20. Optimization-Based Speckle Tracking Algorithm for Left Ventricle Strain Estimation: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Hanan; Shimoni, Sara; Hagendorff, Andreas; Smirin, Nahum; Friedman, Zvi; Adam, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a widespread method for calculating myocardial strains and estimating left ventricle function. Since echocardiographic clips are corrupted by speckle decorrelation noise, resulting in irregular, nonphysiological tissue displacement fields, smoothing is performed on the displacement data, affecting the strain results. Thus, strain results may depend on the specific implementations of 2-D STE, as well as other systems' characteristics of the various vendors. A novel algorithm (called K-SAD) is introduced, which integrates the physiological constraint of smoothness of the displacement field into an optimization process. Simulated B-mode clips, modeling healthy and abnormal cases, were processed by K-SAD. Peak global and subendocardial longitudinal strains, as well as regional strains, were calculated. In addition, 410 healthy subjects were also processed. The results of K-SAD are compared with those of one of the leading commercial product. K-SAD provides global mid-wall strain values, as well as subendocardial and regional strain values, all in good agreement with the ground-truth-simulated phantom data. K-SAD peak global longitudinal systolic strain values for 410 healthy subjects are quite similar for the different regions: - 17.02 ± 4.02%, - 19.00 ± 3.45%, and - 19.72 ± 5.06% at the basal, mid, and apical regions, respectively. Improved performance under noisy conditions was demonstrated by comparing a subgroup of 40 subjects with the best image quality with the remaining 370 cohort: K-SAD provides statistically similar global and regional results for the two cohorts. Our study indicates that the sensitivity of strain values to speckle noise, caused by the post block-matching weighted smoothing, can be significantly reduced and accuracy enhanced by employing an integrated one-stage, physiologically constrained optimization process. PMID:27214894

  1. Cardiac wound healing post-myocardial infarction: a novel method to target extracellular matrix remodeling in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zamilpa, Rogelio; Zhang, Jianhua; Chiao, Ying Ann; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E; Halade, Ganesh V; Ma, Yonggang; Hacker, Sander O; Lindsey, Merry L

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) is a commonly used surgical model to study post-MI effects in mice. LAD occlusion induces a robust wound healing response that includes extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This chapter provides a detailed guide on the surgical procedure to permanently ligate the LAD. Additionally, we describe a prototype method to enrich cardiac tissue for ECM, which allows one to focus on ECM remodeling in the left ventricle following surgically induced MI in mice. PMID:24029944

  2. Single primitive ventricle with normally related great arteries and atresia of the left A-V valve.

    PubMed Central

    Coto, E O; Raggio, J M; Malo, P; Sainz, C; Aparisi, R; Gomez-Ullate, J M

    1978-01-01

    A child aged 2 years and 9 months was angiocardiographically diagnosed to have a single ventricle with normally related great arteries and atresia of the left A-V valve. A Blalock-Hanlon procedure and division of a large patent ductus arteriosus were followed by reduction in pulmonary artery pressure, but after operation the patient showed signs of left ventricular failure unresponsive to medical treatment, necessitating pulmonary artery banding. We have found only three similar published cases, and this is the only one with full angiographic documentation. Images PMID:725830

  3. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  4. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed. PMID:21934524

  5. Lactate clearance for initiating and weaning off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a child with regressed left ventricle after arterial switch operation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Chauhan, Sandeep; Bisoi, A. K.; Sahoo, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We hereby report a child with transposition of great arteries and regressed ventricle who underwent arterial switch operation (ASO) with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and “integrated” extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit. The significance of lactate clearance as a guide to initiate and terminate veno-arterial ECMO in a post ASO child with regressed left ventricle is discussed. PMID:26750700

  6. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  7. [Demonstration of obstruction of blood outflow from the left and right ventricles in idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Makhkamova, M N

    1985-12-01

    A comparative assessment of the value of routine clinical and intracardiac investigation procedures for the diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) was carried out in 12 patients with simultaneous obstructions of the left- and right-ventricular blood outflow pathways caused by hypertrophy of the interventricular septum. It is suggested that electrocardiographic and roentgenologic evidence of overloaded right and left compartments of the heart signals are indicative of the need for simultaneous catheterization and angiocardiography of the right and left compartments that can detect right-ventricular obstruction in the IHSS patients. Intravital diagnosis of the obstruction makes possible complete correction of the defect, whereas an isolated removal of the left-ventricular obstruction is not successful in the presence of an obstruction in the right ventricle. PMID:2936921

  8. A level set approach for left ventricle detection in CT images using shape segmentation and optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, Jorge; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) segmentation plays an important role in a subsequent process for the functional analysis of the LV. Typical segmentation of the endocardium wall in the ventricle excludes papillary muscles which leads to an incorrect measure of the ejected volume in the LV. In this paper we present a new variational strategy using a 2D level set framework that includes a local term for enhancing the low contrast structures and a 2D shape model. The shape model in the level set method is propagated to all image sequences corresponding to the cardiac cycles through the optical flow approach using the Hermite transform. To evaluate our strategy we use the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance to compare the segmentation results with the manual segmentation carried out by the physician.

  9. Automatic segmentation of the left ventricle and computation of diagnostic parameters using regiongrowing and a statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Dominik; Rinck, Daniel; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Dillmann, Ruediger; Scheuering, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The manual segmentation and analysis of high-resolution multi-slice cardiac CT datasets is both labor intensive and time consuming. Therefore it is necessary to supply the cardiologist with powerful software tools to segment the myocardium and compute the relevant diagnostic parameters. In this work we present an semi-automatic cardiac segmentation approach with minimal user interaction. It is based on a combination of an adaptive slice-based regiongrowing and a modified Active Shape Model (ASM). Starting with a single manual click point in the ascending aorta, the aorta, the left atrium and the left ventricle get segmented with the slice-based adaptive regiongrowing. The approximate position of the aortic and mitral valve as well as the principal axes of the left ventricle (LV) are determined. To prevent the regiongrowing from draining into neighboring anatomical structures via CT artifacts, we implemented a draining control by examining a cubic region around the currently processed voxel. Additionally, we use moment-based parameters to integrate simple anatomical knowledge into the regiongrowing process. Using the results of the preceding regiongrowing process, a ventricle-centric and normalized coordinate system is established which is used to adapt a previously trained ASM to the image, using an iterative multi-resolution approach. After fitting the ASM to the image, we can use the generated model-points to create an exact surface model of the left ventricular myocardium for visualization and for computing the diagnostically relevant parameters, like the ventricular blood volume and the myocardial wall thickness.

  10. Endocardial left ventricle feature tracking and reconstruction from tri-plane trans-esophageal echocardiography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Cahill, Nathan; Schwarz, Karl Q.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) has been the clinical standard for over two decades for monitoring and assessing cardiac function and providing support via intra-operative visualization and guidance for minimally invasive cardiac interventions. Developments in three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition and transducer design and technology have revolutionized echocardiography imaging enabling both real-time 3D trans-esophageal and intra-cardiac image acquisition. However, in most cases the clinicians do not access the entire 3D image volume when analyzing the data, rather they focus on several key views that render the cardiac anatomy of interest during the US imaging exam. This approach enables image acquisition at a much higher spatial and temporal resolution. Two such common approaches are the bi-plane and tri-plane data acquisition protocols; as their name states, the former comprises two orthogonal image views, while the latter depicts the cardiac anatomy based on three co-axially intersecting views spaced at 600 to one another. Since cardiac anatomy is continuously changing, the intra-operative anatomy depicted using real-time US imaging also needs to be updated by tracking the key features of interest and endocardial left ventricle (LV) boundaries. Therefore, rapid automatic feature tracking in US images is critical for three reasons: 1) to perform cardiac function assessment; 2) to identify location of surgical targets for accurate tool to target navigation and on-target instrument positioning; and 3) to enable pre- to intra-op image registration as a means to fuse pre-op CT or MR images used during planning with intra-operative images for enhanced guidance. In this paper we utilize monogenic filtering, graph-cut based segmentation and robust spline smoothing in a combined work flow to process the acquired tri-plane TEE time series US images and demonstrate robust and accurate tracking of the LV endocardial features. We reconstruct the endocardial LV

  11. Systemic or Endoventricular Thrombolysis to Treat HeartWare Left Ventricle Assist Device Thrombosis: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Giuseppe M; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Sciacca, Sergio; Pietrosi, Astrid; Hernandez Baravoglia, Cesar M; Turrisi, Marco; Romano, Giuseppe; Armaro, Alessandro; Stringi, Vincenzo; Clemenza, Francesco; Pilato, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Endoventricular thrombolytic procedure (ETP) has been used to treat continuous-flow left ventricle assist device (CF-LVAD) thrombosis. The study aims to investigate the occurrence of complications after ETP. Data were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed in a series of patients who underwent CF-LVAD followed by ETP. Since November 2010, 20 patients underwent HeartWare CF-LVAD implantation at our institute. Four patients (20%) developed pump thrombosis and underwent a total of nine ETPs with tissue plasminogen activator infused into the left ventricle. The mean age was 60.2 ± 9 years. ETP was performed via either the femoral (n = 6) or radial artery (n = 3). Five ETPs (55.5%) were complicated by left and right radial artery occlusion, two by groin hematomas, and one by femoral artery false aneurysm. ETP carries a strong risk of vascular access complications that, in CF-LVAD patients, may add to the already complex clinical profile and economic burden; thus, a less invasive treatment is advisable whenever required. PMID:25735566

  12. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  13. Ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rabiya; Zilberman, Mark V; Tang, Liwen; Miller, Susan; Pandian, Natesa G

    2015-03-01

    Ectopia cordis, defined as partial or complete displacement of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity, is a rare congenital malformation. If not surgically corrected during the early years of life, ectopia cordis can prove to be a fatal abnormality. However, due to the presence of multiple intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, a corrective surgery might not always be successful. The pathology of ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia is discussed, highlighting the complexities involved in such a rare disorder. PMID:25409882

  14. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  15. Computational modeling of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: effect of spatially varying β-adrenergic stimulation in the rat left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A.; Louch, William E.; Røe, Åsmund T.; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Sikkel, Markus B.; Tranter, Matthew H.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.

    2014-01-01

    In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the left ventricle shows apical ballooning combined with basal hypercontractility. Both clinical observations in humans and recent experimental work on isolated rat ventricular myocytes suggest the dominant mechanisms of this syndrome are related to acute catecholamine overload. However, relating observed differences in single cells to the capacity of such alterations to result in the extreme changes in ventricular shape seen in Takotsubo syndrome is difficult. By using a computational model of the rat left ventricle, we investigate which mechanisms can give rise to the typical shape of the ventricle observed in this syndrome. Three potential dominant mechanisms related to effects of β-adrenergic stimulation were considered: apical-basal variation of calcium transients due to differences in L-type and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activation, apical-basal variation of calcium sensitivity due to differences in troponin I phosphorylation, and apical-basal variation in maximal active tension due to, e.g., the negative inotropic effects of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, we investigated the interaction of these spatial variations in the presence of a failing Frank-Starling mechanism. We conclude that a large portion of the apex needs to be affected by severe changes in calcium regulation or contractile function to result in apical ballooning, and smooth linear variation from apex to base is unlikely to result in the typical ventricular shape observed in this syndrome. A failing Frank-Starling mechanism significantly increases apical ballooning at end systole and may be an important additional factor underpinning Takotsubo syndrome. PMID:25239804

  16. T3 enhances Ang2 in rat aorta in myocardial I/R: comparison with left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Laura; Kusmic, Claudia; Nicolini, Giuseppina; Amato, Rosario; Casini, Giovanni; Iervasi, Giorgio; Balzan, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis is important for recovery after tissue damage in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, and tri-iodothyronine (T3) has documented effects on angiogenesis. The angiopoietins 1/2 and tyrosine kinase receptor represent an essential system in angiogenesis controlling endothelial cell survival and vascular maturation. Recently, in a 3-day ischemia/reperfusion rat model, the infusion of a low dose of T3 improved the post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function.Adopting this model, our study aimed to investigate the effects of T3 on the capillary index and the expression of angiogenic genes as the angiopoietins 1/2 and tyrosine kinase receptor system, in the thoracic aorta and in the left ventricle. In the thoracic aorta, T3 infusion significantly improved the angiogenic sprouting and angiopoietin 2 expression. Instead, Sham-T3 group did not show any significant increment of capillary density and angiopoietin 2 expression. In the area at risk (AAR) of the left ventricle, T3 infusion did not increase capillary density but restored levels of angiopoietin 1, which were reduced in I/R group. Angiopoietin 2 levels were similar to Sham group and unchanged by T3 administration. In the remote zone, T3 induced a significant increment of both angiopoietin 1/2. In conclusion, T3 infusion induced a different response of angiopoietin 1/2 between the ventricle (the AAR and the remote zone) and the thoracic aorta, probably reflecting the different action of angiopoietin 1/2 in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Overall, these data suggest a new aspect of T3-mediated cardioprotection through angiogenesis. PMID:27444191

  17. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  18. Finite element methods in numerical relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P. J.

    The finite element method is very successful in Newtonian fluid simulations, and can be extended to relativitstic fluid flows. This paper describes the general method, and then outlines some preliminary results for spherically symmetric geometries. The mixed finite element - finite difference scheme is introduced, and used for the description of spherically symmetric collapse. Baker's (Newtonian) shock modelling method and Miller's moving finite element method are also mentioned. Collapse in double-null coordinates requires non-constant time slicing, so the full finite element method in space and time is described.

  19. [Echocardiographic triangular pattern of the mitral valve during acute pressure overload of the left ventricle: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, M; Yamamoto, T; Kimura, S; Komasa, N; Makihata, S; Yasutomi, N; Saito, Y; Kawai, Y; Iwasaki, T

    1982-03-01

    The changes of mitral valve echo and hemodynamic data [isovolumic relaxation time (IRT)/square root R-R, time constant T, peak positive dP/dt/P, left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP) and left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP] during acute pressure overload produced by aortic root obstruction were analyzed in 13 mongrel dogs under sodium pentbarbital anesthesia (25 mg/kg). IRT/square root R-R, time constant T, positive dP/dt and LVSP were expressed as percent changes to the value (=100%) of pre-pressure overload, LVEDP was expressed by an absolute value as mmHg. In 7 of 13 dogs, an abnormal diastolic monophasic triangular pattern of the mitral valve was observed during acute pressure overload of the left ventricle, and values of five hemodynamic data were compared between cases with or without the triangular pattern. The values of IRT/square root R-R, time constant T, positive dP/dt/P, LVSP amd LVEDP in cases with the triangular pattern became from 200 to 500% (275 +/- 100%), from 175 to 267% (220 +/- 50%), from 55 to 112% (81 +/- 21%), from 129 to 200% (59 +/- 21%) and from 7 to 33 mmHg (16 +/- 9 mmHg), respectively. The values of IRT/square root R-R, time constant T, positive dP/dt/P, LVSP and LVEDP in cases with the non-triangular pattern became from 116 to 155% (133 +/- 17%), from 116 to 154% (136 +/- 16%), from 111 to 186% (62 +/- 34%) and from 9 to 20 mmHg (9 +/- 6 mmHg), respectively. Thus, the values of IRT/square root R-R and time constant T were significantly different between the two groups. The possible explanation for the triangular pattern of the mitral valve seems to be due to impaired active relaxation system of the left ventricle resulting in a markedly delayed opening of the mitral valve. We conclude that early diastolic isovolumic relaxation of the left ventricle is impaired by acute pressure overload, and the echocardiographic diastolic monophasic triangular pattern of the mitral valve reflects this impairment. PMID:7119493

  20. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right ventricle into the lungs, and the aorta sends oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle ... the body. Together, the pulmonary artery and the aorta are known as the great arteries. But with ...

  1. Shape regression machine and efficient segmentation of left ventricle endocardium from 2D B-mode echocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaohua Kevin

    2010-08-01

    We present a machine learning approach called shape regression machine (SRM) for efficient segmentation of an anatomic structure that exhibits a deformable shape in a medical image, e.g., left ventricle endocardial wall in an echocardiogram. The SRM achieves efficient segmentation via statistical learning of the interrelations among shape, appearance, and anatomy, which are exemplified by an annotated database. The SRM is a two-stage approach. In the first stage that estimates a rigid shape to solve an automatic initialization problem, it derives a regression solution to object detection that needs just one scan in principle and a sparse set of scans in practice, avoiding the exhaustive scanning required by the state-of-the-art classification-based detection approach while yielding comparable detection accuracy. In the second stage that estimates the nonrigid shape, it again learns a nonlinear regressor to directly associate nonrigid shape with image appearance. The underpinning of both stages is a novel image-based boosting ridge regression (IBRR) method that enables multivariate, nonlinear modeling and accommodates fast evaluation. We demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the SRM using experiments on segmenting the left ventricle endocardium from a B-mode echocardiogram of apical four chamber view. The proposed algorithm is able to automatically detect and accurately segment the LV endocardial border in about 120ms. PMID:20494610

  2. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dechow, Paul C; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wang, Qian; Grosse, Ian R

    2012-05-01

    We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how variability in material property values affects stress and strain values in a finite model of a Macaca fascicularis cranium. The material behavior of cortical bone varied in three ways: isotropic homogeneous, isotropic non-homogeneous, and orthotropic non-homogeneous. The material behavior of the trabecular bone and teeth was always treated as isotropic and homogeneous. All material property values for the cranium were randomized with a Gaussian distribution with either coefficients of variation (CVs) of 0.2 or with CVs calculated from empirical data. Latin hypercube sampling was used to determine the values of the material properties used in the finite element models. In total, four hundred and twenty six separate deterministic FE simulations were executed. We tested four hypotheses in this study: (1) uncertainty in material property values will have an insignificant effect on high stresses and a significant effect on high strains for homogeneous isotropic models; (2) the effect of variability in material property values on the stress state will increase as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increase; (3) variation in the in vivo shear strain values reported by Strait et al. (2005) and Ross et al. (2011) is not only due to variations in muscle forces and cranial morphology, but also due to variation in material property values; (4) the assumption of a uniform coefficient of variation for the material property values will result in the same trend in how moderate-to-high stresses and moderate-to-high strains vary with respect to the degree of non-homogeneity and anisotropy as the trend found when the coefficients of variation for material property values are calculated from empirical data. Our results supported the first three hypotheses and falsified the fourth. When material properties were varied with a constant CV, as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increased the level of variability in

  3. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. FEBio: finite elements for biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ateshian, Gerard A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, investigators have primarily used commercial software that is neither geared toward biological applications nor sufficiently flexible to follow the latest developments in the field. This lack of a tailored software environment has hampered research progress, as well as dissemination of models and results. To address these issues, we developed the FEBio software suite (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software/febio), a nonlinear implicit finite element (FE) framework, designed specifically for analysis in computational solid biomechanics. This paper provides an overview of the theoretical basis of FEBio and its main features. FEBio offers modeling scenarios, constitutive models, and boundary conditions, which are relevant to numerous applications in biomechanics. The open-source FEBio software is written in C++, with particular attention to scalar and parallel performance on modern computer architectures. Software verification is a large part of the development and maintenance of FEBio, and to demonstrate the general approach, the description and results of several problems from the FEBio Verification Suite are presented and compared to analytical solutions or results from other established and verified FE codes. An additional simulation is described that illustrates the application of FEBio to a research problem in biomechanics. Together with the pre- and postprocessing software PREVIEW and POSTVIEW, FEBio provides a tailored solution for research and development in computational biomechanics. PMID:22482660

  5. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  6. Successful Operative Repair of Delayed Left Ventricle Rupture From Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christina L; Boyd, Jack H

    2016-08-01

    A 21-year-old female was found to have an enlarging pericardial effusion 10 days after a 40-foot fall. Initial cardiac evaluation was negative. Ten days after presentation she developed hemodynamic compromise and chest computed tomography was concerning for cardiac rupture. The patient was taken to the operating room where the ruptured posterior ventricle was repaired, perforation in the P1 leaflet was identified and the mitral valve was replaced. The patient survived. To our knowledge, this is the first report of survival after delayed presentation of atrioventricular rupture at the level of the mitral valve. PMID:27449439

  7. Application of a PExSim for modeling a POLVAD artificial heart and the human circulatory system with left ventricle assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewnicka, Alicja; Fajdek, Bartlomiej; Janiszowski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the human circulatory system with the possible addition of a parallel assist device, which was developed for the purpose of artificial heart monitoring. Information about an identification experiment of an extracorporeal ventricle assist device POLVAD is included. The modelling methods applied and the corresponding functional blocks in a PExSim package are presented. The results of the simulation for physiological conditions, left ventricle failure and pathological conditions with parallel assistance are included.

  8. Automatic localization of the left ventricle from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging: a new spectrum-based computer-aided tool.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Xiaodan; Tan, Ru San; Wan, Min

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cardiac image analysis is done manually. Automatic image processing can help with the repetitive tasks, and also deal with huge amounts of data, a task which would be humanly tedious. This study aims to develop a spectrum-based computer-aided tool to locate the left ventricle using images obtained via cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Discrete Fourier Transform was conducted pixelwise on the image sequence. Harmonic images of all frequencies were analyzed visually and quantitatively to determine different patterns of the left and right ventricles on spectrum. The first and fifth harmonic images were selected to perform an anisotropic weighted circle Hough detection. This tool was then tested in ten volunteers. Our tool was able to locate the left ventricle in all cases and had a significantly higher cropping ratio of 0.165 than did earlier studies. In conclusion, a new spectrum-based computer aided tool has been proposed and developed for automatic left ventricle localization. The development of this technique, which will enable the automatic location and further segmentation of the left ventricle, will have a significant impact in research and in diagnostic settings. We envisage that this automated method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess ventricular function in patients with diverse heart diseases. PMID:24722328

  9. Impact of Continuous Erythropoietin Receptor Activator on Selected Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease and Left Ventricle Structure and Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Baj, Zbigniew; Majewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are very high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) on selected biomarkers of cardiovascular disease, left ventricle structure, and function in CKD. Material and Methods. Peripheral blood was collected from 25 CKD patients before and after CERA treatment and 20 healthy subjects. In serum samples, we assessed inflammatory markers (IL-1β, TNF-RI, TNF-RII, sFas, sFasL, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TGF-β1), endothelial dysfunction markers (sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1), and volume-related marker (NT-proBNP). All subjects underwent echocardiography and were evaluated for selected biochemical parameters (Hb, creatinine, and CRP). Results. Evaluated biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters of left ventricle structure were significantly increased but left ventricle EF was significantly decreased in CKD patients compared to controls. After CERA treatment, we observed a significant increase of Hb and left ventricle EF and a significant decrease of NT-proBNP and MMP-9. There was a significant negative correlation between Hb and TNF-RI, sICAM-1, and IL-1β. Conclusions. Our results indicate that selected biomarkers related to cardiovascular risk are significantly increased in CKD patients compared to controls. CERA treatment has anti-inflammatory action, diminishes endothelial dysfunction, and improves left ventricle function in these patients. PMID:27034745

  10. Graphics for Finite-Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    ELPLOT program is a passive computer graphics system that could be utilized for display of models and responses of general finite-element analyses. Program includes: Wide range of view-orientation selections, number of alternative data-input formats, extensive family of finite-element types, and capabilities for both static and dynamic-response displays.

  11. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  12. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  13. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  14. Parametric ultrasound and fluoroscopy image fusion for guidance of left ventricle lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Babic, Aleksandar; Odland, Hans Henrik; Gérard, Olivier; Samset, Eigil

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show that the response rate to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) could be improved if the left ventricle (LV) is paced at the site of the latest mechanical activation, but away from the myocardial scar. A prototype system for CRT lead placement guidance that combines LV functional information from ultrasound with live x-ray fluoroscopy was developed. Two mean anatomical models, each containing LV epi-, LV endo- and right ventricle endocardial surfaces, were computed from a database of 33 heart failure patients as a substitute for a patient-specific model. The sphericity index was used to divide the observed population into two groups. The distance between the mean and the patient-specific models was determined using a signed distance field metric (reported in mm). The average error values for LV epicardium were [Formula: see text] and for LV endocardium were [Formula: see text]. The validity of using average LV models for a CRT procedure was tested by simulating coronary vein selection in a group of 15 CRT candidates. The probability of selecting the same coronary branch, when basing the selection on the average model compared to a patient-specific model, was estimated to be [Formula: see text]. This was found to be clinically acceptable. PMID:26158110

  15. Influence of the heart rate and atrioventricular delays on vortex evolution and blood transport inside the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Shadden, Shawn

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is used to help restore coordinated pumping of the ventricles by overcoming delays in electrical conduction due to cardiac disease. This is accomplished by a specialized cardiac pacemaker that is able to adjust the atrioventricular (AV) delay.A major clinical challenge is to adjust the pacing strategy to best coordinate the blood flow mechanics of ventricular filling and ejection. To this end, we have studied the difference in the vortex formation and its evolution inside the left ventricle (LV) for 4 different AV delays in a cohort of patients with implanted pacemakers. A reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain 2D velocity over the apical long-axis view of the LV from color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound data. To study blood transport, we have identified Lagrangian coherent structures to determine moving boundaries of the blood volumes injected to the LV in diastole and ejected to the aorta in systole. In all cases, we have analyzed the differences in filling and ejection patterns and the blood transport during the E-wave and A-wave formation.Finally we have assessed the influence of the AV delay on 2 indices of stasis, direct flow and residence time.The findings shed insight to the optimization of AV delays in patients undergoing CRT. NIH award 5R21HL108268 and grants PIS09/02603 and RD06/0010 from the Plan Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica, Spain.

  16. Robust boundary detection and tracking of left ventricles on ultrasound images using active shape model and ant colony optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaonan; Gao, Yuan; Jiao, Jinling; Li, Xian; Li, Sai; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Information regarding the motion, strain and synchronization are important for cardiac diagnosis and therapy. Extraction of such information from ultrasound images remains an open problem till today. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to extract the boundaries of left ventricles and track these boundaries in ultrasound image sequences. The initial detection of boundaries was performed by an active shape model scheme. Subsequent refinement of the boundaries was done by using local variance information of the images. The main objective of this paper is the formulation of a new boundary tracking algorithm using ant colony optimization technique. The experiments conducted on the simulated image sequences and the real cardiac ultrasound image sequences shows a positive and promising result. PMID:25226995

  17. Automated Classification of Disease Patterns from Echo-cardiography Images Based on Shape Features of the Left Ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Shaoli; Parekh, Ranjan

    2010-10-26

    Computer assisted diagnosis using analysis of medical images is an area of active research in health informatics. This paper proposes a technique for indication of heart diseases by using information related to shapes of the left ventricle (LV). LV boundaries are tracked from echo-cardiography images taken from LV short axis view, corresponding to two disease conditions viz. dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and discriminated from the normal condition. The LV shapes are modeled using shape histograms generated by plotting the frequency of normalized radii lengths drawn from the centroid to the periphery, against a specific number of bins. A 3-layer neural network activated by a log-sigmoid function is used to classify the shape histograms into one of the three classes. Experimentations on a dataset of 240 images show recognition accuracies of the order of 80%.

  18. Automated Classification of Disease Patterns from Echo-cardiography Images Based on Shape Features of the Left Ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shaoli; Parekh, Ranjan

    2010-10-01

    Computer assisted diagnosis using analysis of medical images is an area of active research in health informatics. This paper proposes a technique for indication of heart diseases by using information related to shapes of the left ventricle (LV). LV boundaries are tracked from echo-cardiography images taken from LV short axis view, corresponding to two disease conditions viz. dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and discriminated from the normal condition. The LV shapes are modeled using shape histograms generated by plotting the frequency of normalized radii lengths drawn from the centroid to the periphery, against a specific number of bins. A 3-layer neural network activated by a log-sigmoid function is used to classify the shape histograms into one of the three classes. Experimentations on a dataset of 240 images show recognition accuracies of the order of 80%.

  19. [Evaluation of systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia before treatment].

    PubMed

    Jackowska, Teresa; Pleskot, Marek; Gołabek, Małgorzata; Rokicka-Milewska, Roma; Wróblewska-Kałuzewska, Maria; Wypych, Agnieszka; Matysiak, Michał; Klus, Kinga; Juraszewska, Ewa; Balwierz, Walentyna; Wójcik, Beata; Sadurska, Elzbieta; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Stencel, Dariusz; Siwinska, Aldona; Wachowiak, Jacek; Szmyd, Krzysztof; Kukawczyńska, Ewa; Chybicka, Alicja; Płoszyńska, Anna; Aleszewicz-Baranowska, Janina; Balcerska, Anna; Ostański, Mariusz; Pobudejska, Agnieszka; Sońta-Jakimczyk, Danuta; Krenke, Katarzyna; Madry, Wojtek; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Rudziński, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2001 echo-cardiography was performed in 244 children (128 boys, 116 girls) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) before the beginning of therapy with anthracyclines (medium 5.4 days after the diagnosis). The mean age at diagnosis was 5.4 years (range 9 months to 17.7 years). 189 children (97 boys and 92 girls) were included into the standard and medium risk groups and 55 (31 boys and 24 girls) into the high risk group. 29% of ALL children had disturbances in ECG. Changes in the thickness of the intraventricular septum (%IVSTh) and left ventricular posterior wall (%LVPWTh) were statistically lower, especially in children under 7 years of age. Some children showed lowering of shortening fraction (%FS - 8.6%), ejection fraction (%EF - 10.2%) and corrected velocity of fibber-shortening (Vcfc - 25.8%). Children with decreased shortening fraction (%FS) had left ventricular posterior wall thickness (%LVPWTh) impairment. Changes in diastolic function indicate impaired relaxation and compliance of the left ventricle. Decreased peak early filling velocity (E) was found. There were also longer deceleration time (EDecT) and decreased deceleration from peak E velocity (E/Dec) and longer isovolumetric relaxation time in children in standard and medium risk groups. Shorter acceleration time (EAccT) was seen in the high risk group. Evaluation of cardiac function before anthracycline chemotherapy will allow to select patients with pre-existing cardiac impairment for whom cardioprotective treatment is absolutely necessary. PMID:15686051

  20. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  1. The finite element method in thermomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal stress analysis is critical in the design and operation of energy-efficient power plant components and engines as well as in nuclear and aerospace systems. The Finite Element Method in Thermomechanics attempts to embrace a wide range of topics in the nonlinear thermomechanical analysis. The book covers the basic principles of the finite element method: the formulations for the base thermomechanical analysis, including thermoelastic-plastic-creep stress analysis; the use of Fourier series for nonaxisymmetric loadings, and stress waves in solids in thermal environments; and the base finite element code called TEPSAC.

  2. Myocardial regeneration after implantation of porcine small intestinal submucosa in the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cassiana Maria Garcez; Francisco, Julio César; Olandoski, Marcia; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Cunha, Ricardo; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski; Jorge, Lianna Ferrari; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino; do Amaral, Vivian Ferreira; Noronha, Lucia; de Macedo, Rafael Michel; Faria-Neto, José Rocha; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most cardiomyocytes do not regenerate after myocardial infarction. Porcine small intestinal submucosa has been shown to be effective in tissue repair. Objective To evaluate myocardial tissue regeneration and functional effects of SIS implantation in pigs after left ventriculotomy. Methods Fifteen pigs were assigned to two groups: porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) (N=10) and control (N=5). The SIS group underwent a mini sternotomy, left ventriculotomy and placement of a SIS patch. The control group underwent a sham procedure. Echocardiography was performed before and 60 days after the surgical procedure. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin stain and markers for actin 1A4, anti sarcomeric actin, connexin43 and factor VIII. Results Weight gain was similar in both groups. Echocardiography analysis revealed no difference between groups regarding end diastolic and systolic diameters and left ventricular ejection fraction, both pre (P=0.118, P=0.313, P=0.944) and post procedure (P=0.333, P=0.522, P=0.628). Both groups showed an increase in end diastolic (P<0,001 for both) and systolic diameter 60 days after surgery (P=0.005, SIS group and P=0.004, control group). New cardiomyocytes, blood vessels and inflammatory reactions were histologically identified in the SIS group. Conclusion SIS implantation in pigs after left ventriculotomy was associated with angiomuscular regeneration and no damage in cardiac function. PMID:25140470

  3. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  4. Noncomplicated Excision of a Mobile Pedunculated Septal Hemangioma of the Left Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Mazen, Mahmoud; Abdelgawad, Ahmed; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mona; Al-Batrek, Hani; Mahdi, Ousama; Ramadan, Mahmoud M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac tumors are quite rare, and differential diagnosis of them is challenging. CASE REPORT A young lady with a history of palpitations, dyspnea, and fatigue was proven by transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to have a mobile left ventricular mass with rounded contour attached to the mid-part of the interventricular septum. The mass was approached via a posterior inter-atrial approach to avoid left ventriculotomy and provide adequate exposure to completely excise the tumor and control its pedicle with minimal cardiac trauma. Histological examination of the mass was diagnostic of capillary and sinusoidal hemangioma. CONCLUSIONS Complete excision of cardiac hemangioma is recommended once it is diagnosed, for histopathologic diagnosis and because of the possibility of serious complications. PMID:27384944

  5. Noncomplicated Excision of a Mobile Pedunculated Septal Hemangioma of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Mazen, Mahmoud; Abdelgawad, Ahmed; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mona; Al-Batrek, Hani; Mahdi, Ousama; Ramadan, Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 27 Final Diagnosis: LV hemangioma Symptoms: Palpitation • dyspnea • fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Posterior atriotomy Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Cardiac tumors are quite rare, and differential diagnosis of them is challenging. Case Report: A young lady with a history of palpitations, dyspnea, and fatigue was proven by transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to have a mobile left ventricular mass with rounded contour attached to the mid-part of the interventricular septum. The mass was approached via a posterior inter-atrial approach to avoid left ventriculotomy and provide adequate exposure to completely excise the tumor and control its pedicle with minimal cardiac trauma. Histological examination of the mass was diagnostic of capillary and sinusoidal hemangioma. Conclusions: Complete excision of cardiac hemangioma is recommended once it is diagnosed, for histopathologic diagnosis and because of the possibility of serious complications. PMID:27384944

  6. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  7. Finite-Element Modeling For Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents study of finite-element mathematical modeling as used in analyzing stresses and strains at joints between thin, shell-like components (e.g., ducts) and thicker components (e.g., flanges or engine blocks). First approach uses global/local model to evaluate system. Provides correct total response and correct representation of stresses away from any discontinuities. Second approach involves development of special transition finite elements to model transitions between shells and thicker structural components.

  8. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of the left ventricle in 3-D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-03-01

    For automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images, incorporation of temporal information may be helpful. In this study, optimal settings for calculation of temporal cross-correlations between subsequent time frames were determined, to obtain the maximum cross-correlation (MCC) values that provided the best contrast between blood and cardiac tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Both contrast and boundary gradient quality measures were assessed to optimize MCC values with respect to signal choice (radiofrequency or envelope data) and axial window size. Optimal MCC values were incorporated into a deformable model to automatically segment the left ventricular cavity. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, filtered, demodulated radiofrequency data. Results reveal that using envelope data in combination with a relatively small axial window (0.7-1.25 mm) at fine scale results in optimal contrast and boundary gradient between the two tissues over the entire cardiac cycle. Preliminary segmentation results indicate that incorporation of MCC values has additional value for automated segmentation of the left ventricle. PMID:24412178

  9. A laboratory investigation of the flow in the left ventricle of a human heart with prosthetic, tilting-disk valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenedese, A.; del Prete, Z.; Miozzi, M.; Querzoli, G.

    2005-08-01

    The understanding of the phenomena involved in ventricular flow is becoming more and more important because of two main reasons: the continuous improvements in the field of diagnostic techniques and the increasing popularity of prosthetic devices. On one hand, more accurate investigation techniques gives the chance to better diagnose diseases before they become dangerous to the health of the patient. On the other hand, the diffusion of prosthetic devices requires very detailed assessment of the modifications that they introduce in the functioning of the heart. The present work is focussed on the experimental investigation of the flow in the left ventricle of the human heart with the presence of a tilting-disk valve in the mitral position, as this kind of valve is known to change deeply the structure of such a flow. A laboratory model has been built up, which consists of a cavity able to change its volume, representing the ventricle, on which two prosthetic valves are mounted. The facility is designed to be able to reproduce any arbitrarily assigned law of variation of the ventricular volume with time. In the present experiment, a physiologically shaped curve has been used. Velocity was measured using a feature-tracking (FT) algorithm; as a consequence, the particle trajectories are known. The flow has been studied by changing both the beat rate and the stroke volume. The flow was studied both kinematically, examining velocity and vorticity fields, and dynamically, evaluating turbulent and viscous shear stresses, and inertial forces exerted on fluid elements. The analysis of the results allows the identification of the main features of the ventricular flow, generated by a mitral, tilting-disk valve, during the whole cardiac cycle and its dependence on the frequency and the stroke volume.

  10. Left atrioventricular remodeling in the assessment of the left ventricle diastolic function in patients with heart failure: a review of the currently studied echocardiographic variables

    PubMed Central

    Danzmann, Luiz C; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Köhler, Ilmar; Torres, Marco R

    2008-01-01

    Multiparametric echocardiographic imaging of the failing heart is now increasingly used and useful in decision making in heart failure. The reasons for this, relies on the need of different strategies of handling these patients, as differentiation of systolic or diastolic dysfunction, as well as on the gamma of approaches available, such as percutaneous and surgical revascularization, devices implantations, and valvular regurgitations and stenosis corrections. Congestive heart failure in patients with normal left ventricular diameters or preserved left ventricular ejection fraction had been pointed out recently as present in a proportion so high as 40 to 50 percent of cases of heart failure, mainly due to the epidemics in well developed countries, as is the problem of not well controlled metabolic states (such as obesity and diabetes), but also due to the real word in developing countries, as is the case of hypertension epidemics and its lack of adequate control. As a matter of public utility, the guidelines in the diagnosis and treatment of such patients will have to be cheap, available, easily reproducible, and ideally will furnish answers for the clinician questions not in a binary "black or white" manner, but with graduations, so if possible it has to be quantitative. The present paper aim to focus on the current clinical applications of tissue Doppler and of left atrial function and remodeling, and its pathophysiologic relationship with the left ventricle, as will be cleared in the documented review of echocardiography that follows, considering that the need of universal data on the syndrome of the failing heart does not mean, unfortunately, that all patients and clinicians in developing countries have at their own health facilities the same imaging tools, since they are, as a general rule, expensive. PMID:19014611

  11. Echocardiographic diastolic abnormalities of the left ventricle in inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I F; Gibson, D G; Keat, A C; Brewerton, D A

    1991-01-01

    Echocardiographic early diastolic abnormalities have been shown recently in 50% of men with ankylosing spondylitis. Similar techniques were used to investigate subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis with or without spondylitis. These subjects had no clinical, radiographic, or electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac or respiratory disease. Echocardiographic abnormalities seen resembled those of ankylosing spondylitis in that the interval between minimum left ventricular dimension and mitral valve opening was prolonged in 12 of 22 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and in seven of 11 subjects with psoriatic arthritis. Isovolumic relaxation time was significantly prolonged in four subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and one with psoriatic arthritis. Unlike ankylosing spondylitis, however, there was consistent reduction in peak rate of left ventricular dimension increase in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In addition, the dimension increase during atrial systole was greater than normal in nine subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and two with psoriatic arthritis. The most likely cause of these abnormalities is increased connective tissue deposition in the myocardium. Images PMID:2029204

  12. Aortic pressure reduction redistributes transmural blood flow in dog left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Smolich, J.J.; Weissberg, P.L.; Broughton, A.; Korner, P.I. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors studied the effect of graded aortic blood pressure reduction on left ventricular (LV) blood flow in anesthetized, autonomically blocked, open-chest dogs at constant heart rate and mean left atrial pressure. Aortic diastolic pressure (ADP) was lowered from rest to 90, 75, and 60 mmHg with an arteriovenous fistula. Global and regional LV blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Mean LV blood flow fell stepwise from 145 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at rest to 116 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at ADP of 60 mmHg, whereas the endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio decreased from 1.20 to 084. The transmural redistribution of LV blood flow was not accompanied by increases in LV oxygen extraction, depression of LV contractility, LV dilatation or LV electrical dysfunction and also occurred in the presence of considerable coronary vasodilator flow reserve. Electrical evidence of subendocardial ischemia appeared at ADP of 32 mmHg and an endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio of 0.41 in a subgroup of animals. They conclude that the redistribution of LV flow during moderate aortic pressure reduction was an appropriate physiological adjustment to uneven transmural alterations in regional LV wall stress and that it preceded a more pronounced redistribution evident with myocardial ischemia.

  13. The Spatial Distribution of Actin and Mechanical Cycle of Myosin Are Different in Right and Left Ventricles of Healthy Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The contraction of the right ventricle (RV) expels blood into the pulmonary circulation, and the contraction of the left ventricle (LV) pumps blood into the systemic circulation through the aorta. The respective afterloads imposed on the LV and RV by aortic and pulmonary artery pressures create very different mechanical requirements for the two ventricles. Indeed, differences have been observed in the contractile performance between left and right ventricular myocytes in dilated cardiomyopathy, in congestive heart failure, and in energy usage and speed of contraction at light loads in healthy hearts. In spite of these functional differences, it is commonly believed that the right and left ventricular muscles are identical because there were no differences in stress development, twitch duration, work performance, or power among the RV and LV in dogs. This report shows that on a mesoscopic scale [when only a few molecules are studied (here three to six molecules of actin) in ex vivo ventricular myofibrils], the two ventricles in rigor differ in the degree of orientational disorder of actin within in filaments and during contraction in the kinetics of the cross-bridge cycle. PMID:25488019

  14. Effect of Trabeculae on the Hemodynamics of an Embryonic Left Ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Lee, Juhyun; Hsiai, Tzung; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    The left ventricular (LV) endocardium is not smooth, but has ``trabeculae'' protruding into the LV cavity. Recent studies have indicated that trabeculae significantly influence LV hemodynamics by enhancing the diastolic penetration depth of inflow and facilitating a better apical systolic washout. However, it remains unclear how the role of hemodynamics modulates the initiation of trabeculae during cardiac morphogenesis. While such an assessment of mammalian heart models is hampered by the prolonged duration of cardiac development and complexity of surrounding internal organs, embryonic zebrafish is a genetically tractable model for investigating cardiac morphogenesis. We employ a novel light-sheet fluorescent microscopy to extract 4D LV models of zebrafish and develop an ALE-based moving domain CFD solver to perform flow simulations and extract quantitative data related to flow velocities and pressure gradients. We will compare near-wall flow dynamics between the wild type zebrafish (with trabeculae) and the cloche mutant lines that fail to develop trabeculae, to provide new insights into the flow-induced mechano-transduction relevant to the initiation of trabeculae during cardiac morphogenesis. This research is supported by NIH 1R01HL121754-01 grant and Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award. Computational resources are provided through the NSF XSEDE grant TG-CTS130034. The light-sheet imaging and zebrafish model are supported by NIH 1R01HL129727.

  15. The relationship between left ventricle myocardial performance index of healthy women and geographical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Ge, Miao; Dong, Jie; Wang, Zixuan; He, Jinwei; Yang, Rongrong

    2015-11-01

    The study focused on the relationship between geographical factors and left ventricular myocardial performance index (MPI)reference value, analyed the different distribution of MPI, and then provided a scientific basis for clinical examination. This study collected MPI reference values of 2545 healthy women from 91 cities in China, used the Moran's index to determin the spatial relationship, selected 25 geographical factors, examined the significance between MPI and geographical factors by correlation analysis, through the significance test, and extracted seven significant factors to build the artificial neural network (ANN) model and principal component analysis (PCA) model. Through calculating the relative error, the ANN model was chosen as the better model to predict the values. By normality test for the predicted values, the geographical distribution was made by disjunctive kriging interpolation. The predicted values decrease from north to south. If geographical factors are obtained in one location, the MPI of healthy women in this area can be predicted by the ANN model. Synthesizing the influence of physiological and geographical could be more scientific to formulate the MPI reference value.

  16. Left ventricle myocardial border detection in three-dimensional intracardiac ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weidong; Kanani, Prapti; Allan, John; Kerber, Richard; McKay, Charles R.; Sonka, Milan

    1997-05-01

    We have previously reported an automated approach to detection of endocardial and epicardial borders in individual intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS) images. Here, we report the method's extension to 3D ICUS image data sets. Our method is based on fully automated detection of epicardial and endocardial borders inside a single interactively identified region of interest. BOrder detection is based on an optimal graph-searching approach that utilizes a priori knowledge about left ventricular (LV) anatomy and ultrasound imaging physics. Eight cadaveric pig hearts were used for validation. Two ICUS sequences were obtained from each heart, with a 10 MHz CVIS 10F catheter positioned in the LV across (1) the aortic valve and (2) the mitral valve. Performance of the 3D automated border detection method was assessed by comparing the observer- defined and computer-determined quantitative indices of LV volume and by border positioning errors. The 3D reconstruction of the lV was performed from the sequences of the detected epicardial and endocardial borders using shape- based interpolation and surface rendering.

  17. Relationship between cardioscopic images and histological changes in the left ventricle of patients with idiopathic myocarditis†

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yasumi; Uchida, Yasuto; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kanai, Masahito; Shirai, Seiichiro; Nakagawa, Osamu; Hiruta, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Aims Endomyocardial biopsy is essential for definite diagnosis of idiopathic myocarditis. However, since endomyocardial biopsy is guided by fluoroscopy, whether or not the diseased myocardium is biopsied depends on chance, and this may lead to misdiagnosis. If the endocardial surface represents changes indicative of stages of myocarditis, staging of myocarditis and targeted cardioscope-guided biopsy could be used for accurate histological diagnosis. Methods and results The relationship between left ventricular endocardial surface colour observed by cardioscopy and biopsy findings were examined in 78 patients with suspected idiopathic myocarditis. Of these, 59 patients were diagnosed histologically as idiopathic myocarditis. Endocardial colour was classified into red, milky white, purple, yellowish brown, or white. Biopsied specimens with red and milky white wall segments exhibited histological changes compatible with acute myocarditis; purple segments, active chronic myocarditis; and yellowish brown and white segments, inactive chronic myocarditis. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of red and milky white colours for detecting acute myocarditis were 100, 100, and 100%, respectively; of purple for detecting active chronic myocarditis were 83, 92, and 78%, respectively; and yellowish brown and white for detecting inactive chronic myocarditis were 82, 74, and 53, respectively. Conclusion Red and milky white endocardial surface colours predicted histological acute myocarditis, and purple predicted active chronic myocarditis. However, yellowish brown and white colours did not predict inactive chronic myocarditis. PMID:21257727

  18. [Contraction disorders of the left ventricle in ischemic heart disease. Studies using atrial stimulation].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, F; Thormann, J; Zimmermann, H; Winkler, B

    1975-01-25

    Sixty-one patients with suspected ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been investigated by atrial stimulation (AST). Group A patients had normal coronarograms and served as controls. Group B patients had pathological conronarograms (at least 50% stenosis in one of the 3 vessels) and normal ventriculograms. Group C patients had pathological coronarograms and ventricular aneurysms. During AST, group C patients exhibited lower dp/dt max and dp/dt min as well as higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and/or mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) than groups A and B. Group B differed from group A only by increased MPAP during AST. When compared to controls, contractility in group C was reduced even at rest. AST offers an excellent means of diagnosing IHD if heart rates of 140/min and above are used. An abnormal increase in MPAP serves as the simplest parameter for IHD. Elevated MPAP at rest prompts suspicion of ventricular aneurysm. It is possible to deduce a quanitative estimate of contracitility by correlating dp/dt max to LVEDP. A hyperbolic relation results. PMID:1124378

  19. Particle tracking velocimetry using echocardiographic data resolves flow in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Kaushik; Abd, Thura T.; George, Richard T.; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional contrast echocardiography was performed on patients with a history of left ventricular (LV) thrombus. The 636 x 434 pixels electrocardiograms were recorded using a GE Vivid 9E system with (M5S-D and 4V-D) probes in a 2-D mode at a magnification of 0.3 mm/pix. The concentration of 2-4.5 micron seed bubbles was adjusted to obtain individually discernable traces, and a data acquisition rate of 60-90 fps kept the inter-frame displacements suitable for matching traces, and calculating vectors, but yet low enough to allow a scanning depth and width of upto 13 cm and 60 degrees respectively. Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) guided by initial particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain the velocity distributions inside the LV with vector spacing of 3-5 mm. The data quality was greatly enhanced by implementing an iterative particle specific enhancement and tracking algorithm. Data covering 20 heart beats facilitated phase averaging. The results elucidated blood flow in the intra-ventricular septal region, lateral wall region, the apex of the LV and the mitral valve region.

  20. A semi-automatic method for left ventricle volume estimate: an in vivo validation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Sarti, A.; Saracino, G.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to the validation of the left ventricular (LV) volume estimates obtained by processing volumetric data utilizing a segmentation model based on level set technique. The validation has been performed by comparing real-time volumetric echo data (RT3DE) and magnetic resonance (MRI) data. A validation protocol has been defined. The validation protocol was applied to twenty-four estimates (range 61-467 ml) obtained from normal and pathologic subjects, which underwent both RT3DE and MRI. A statistical analysis was performed on each estimate and on clinical parameters as stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF). Assuming MRI estimates (x) as a reference, an excellent correlation was found with volume measured by utilizing the segmentation procedure (y) (y=0.89x + 13.78, r=0.98). The mean error on SV was 8 ml and the mean error on EF was 2%. This study demonstrated that the segmentation technique is reliably applicable on human hearts in clinical practice.

  1. The Clinical Benefits of Adding a Third Dimension to Assess the Left Ventricle with Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Badano, Luigi P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional echocardiography is a novel imaging technique based on acquisition and display of volumetric data sets in the beating heart. This permits a comprehensive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) anatomy and function from a single acquisition and expands the diagnostic possibilities of noninvasive cardiology. It provides the possibility of quantitating geometry and function of LV without preestablished assumptions regarding cardiac chamber shape and allows an echocardiographic assessment of the LV that is less operator-dependent and therefore more reproducible. Further developments and improvements for widespread routine applications include higher spatial and temporal resolution to improve image quality, faster acquisition, processing and reconstruction, and fully automated quantitative analysis. At present, three-dimensional echocardiography complements routine 2DE in clinical practice, overcoming some of its limitations and offering additional valuable information that has led to recommending its use for routine assessment of the LV of patients in whom information about LV size and function is critical for their clinical management. PMID:24959374

  2. Cardiac dysfunction and orthostatic intolerance in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and a small left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kunihisa

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unknown. Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) has been recently postulated to be the cause of CFS. Orthostatic intolerance (OI) has been known as an important symptom in predicting quality of life in CFS patients. Cardiac function may be impaired in patients with ME. The presence or absence of OI was determined both symptomatically and by using a 10-min stand-up test in 40 ME patients. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function were determined echocardiographically in the ME patients compared to 40 control subjects. OI was noted in 35 (97%) of the 36 ME patients who could stand up quickly. The mean values for the cardiothoracic ratio, systemic systolic and diastolic pressures, LV end-diastolic diameter (EDD), LV end-systolic diameter, stroke volume index, cardiac index and LV mass index were all significantly smaller in the ME group than in the controls. Both a small LVEDD (<40 mm, 45 vs. 3%) and a low cardiac index (<2 l/ min/mm2, 53 vs. 8%) were significantly more common in the ME group than in the controls. Both heart rate and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups. In conclusion, a small LV size with a low cardiac output was common in ME patients, in whom OI was extremely common. Cardiac dysfunction with a small heart appears to be related to the symptoms of ME. PMID:24736946

  3. Dose impaired relaxation of left ventricle affect early outcomes in CABG patients?

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Jamshid; Rezakhanloo, Fereshteh

    2010-01-01

    Although systolic dysfunction is revealed as a prognostic factor in cardiac surgery, the role of diastolic dysfunction as a predictive factor is less evaluated. In this retrospective study from 872 patients that underwent isolated coronary artery bypass graft (Jan 2008-Feb 2009), 388 patients had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (>50%). These are divided in two groups, Group 1: 361 patients without diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation) and Group 2: 27 patients with diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation). Mean age in group 1 was 57.72 year and in group 2 was 61.16 year (P = 0.07). Risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertention and dyslipidemia were similar. Although overall complication rate was higher in group 2 (11.1% vs. 2.8% P value 0.05), but when each complication was studied individually no significant statistical difference was found. Also no significant statistical difference was found in mortality (2.2% in group 1 vs 7.4% in group 2 P = 0.1). In conclusion, from clinical standpoint diastolic dysfunction can be an important factor in assessing surgical outcome in patients whom underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:21137652

  4. Hyperglycemia has a greater impact on left ventricle function in South Asians than in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Park, Chloe M; Tillin, Therese; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K; Jones, Siana; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Francis, Darrel; Sattar, Naveed; Mayet, Jamil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is associated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic and systolic dysfunction. South Asians may be at particular risk of developing LV dysfunction owing to a high prevalence of diabetes. We investigated the role of diabetes and hyperglycemia in LV dysfunction in a community-based cohort of older South Asians and white Europeans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Conventional and Doppler echocardiography was performed in 999 participants (542 Europeans and 457 South Asians aged 58-86 years) in a population-based study. Anthropometry, fasting bloods, coronary artery calcification scoring, blood pressure, and renal function were measured. RESULTS Diabetes and hyperglycemia across the spectrum of HbA1c had a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans (N-terminal-probrain natriuretic peptide β ± SE 0.09 ± 0.04, P = 0.01, vs. -0.04 ± 0.05, P = 0.4, P for HbA1c/ethnicity interaction 0.02), diastolic function (E/e' 0.69 ± 0.12, P < 0.0001, vs. 0.09 ± 0.2, P = 0.6, P for interaction 0.005), and systolic function (s' -0.11 ± 0.06, P = 0.04, vs. 0.14 ± 0.09, P = 0.1, P for interaction 0.2). Multivariable adjustment for hypertension, microvascular disease, LV mass, coronary disease, and dyslipidemia only partially accounted for the ethnic differences. Adverse LV function in diabetic South Asians could not be accounted for by poorer glycemic control or longer diabetes duration. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and hyperglycemia have a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans, incompletely explained by adverse risk factors. South Asians may require earlier and more aggressive treatment of their cardiometabolic risk factors to reduce risks of LV dysfunction. PMID:24241789

  5. Hyperglycemia has a greater impact on left ventricle function in South Asians than in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M; Tillin, Therese; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K; Jones, Siana; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Francis, Darrel; Sattar, Naveed; Mayet, Jamil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is associated with left ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction. South Asians may be at particular risk of developing LV dysfunction due to a high prevalence of diabetes. We investigated the role of diabetes and hyperglycaemia in LV dysfunction in a community-based cohort of older South Asians and White Europeans. Research Design and Methods Conventional and Doppler echocardiography was performed in 999 participants (542 Europeans, 457 South Asians aged 58-86 years) in a population-based study. Anthropometry, fasting bloods, coronary artery calcification scoring, blood pressure and renal function were measured. Results Diabetes, and hyperglycaemia across the spectrum of HbA1c had a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans (NT-proBNP beta±SE 0.09±0.04, p=0.01 versus -0.04±0.05, p=0.4, p for HbA1c/ethnicity interaction 0.02), diastolic function (E/e’ 0.69±0.12, p<0.0001 versus 0.09±0.2, p=0.6, p interaction 0.005, and systolic function (s’ -0.11±0.06, p=0.04 versus 0.14±0.09, p=0.1, p interaction 0.2). Multivariable adjustment for hypertension, microvascular disease, LV mass, coronary disease and dyslipidaemia only partially accounted for the ethnic differences. Adverse LV function in diabetic South Asians could not be accounted for by poorer glycaemic control or longer diabetes duration. Conclusions Diabetes and hyperglycaemia have a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans incompletely explained by adverse risk factors. South Asians may require earlier, and more aggressive treatment of their cardiometabolic risk factors to reduce risks of LV dysfunction. PMID:24241789

  6. Myofiber angle distributions in the ovine left ventricle do not conform to computationally optimized predictions

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Daniel B.; Nguyen, Tom C.; Riboh, Jonathan C.; Wigström, Lars; Harrington, Katherine B.; Daughters, George T.; Ingels, Neil B.; Miller, D. Craig

    2008-01-01

    Recent computational models of optimized left ventricular (LV) myofiber geometry that minimize the spatial variance in sarcomere length, stress, and ATP consumption have predicted that a midwall myofiber angle of 20° and transmural myofiber angle gradient of 140° from epicardium to endocardium is a functionally optimal LV myofiber geometry. In order to test the extent to which actual fiber angle distributions conform to this prediction, we measured local myofiber angles at an average of nine transmural depths in each of 32 sites (4 short-axis levels, 8 circumferentially distributed blocks in each level) in five normal ovine LVs. We found: 1) a mean midwall myofiber angle of −7° (SD 9), but with spatial heterogeneity (averaging 0° in the posterolateral and anterolateral wall near the papillary muscles, and −9° in all other regions); and 2) an average transmural gradient of 93° (SD 21), but with spatial heterogeneity (averaging a low of 51° in the basal posterior sector and a high of 130° in the mid-equatorial anterolateral sector). We conclude that midwall myofiber angles and transmural myofiber angle gradients in the ovine heart are regionally non-uniform and differ significantly from the predictions of present-day computationally optimized LV myofiber models. Myofiber geometry in the ovine heart may differ from other species, but model assumptions also underlie the discrepancy between experimental and computational results. To test of the predictive capability of the current computational model would we propose using an ovine specific LV geometry and comparing the computed myofiber orientations to those we report herein. PMID:18805536

  7. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  8. Three-dimensional active shape model matching for left ventricle segmentation in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Assen, Hans C.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2003-05-01

    Manual quantitative analysis of cardiac left ventricular function using multi-slice CT is labor intensive because of the large datasets. We present an automatic, robust and intrinsically three-dimensional segmentation method for cardiac CT images, based on 3D Active Shape Models (ASMs). ASMs describe shape and shape variations over a population as a mean shape and a number of eigenvariations, which can be extracted by e.g. Principal Component Analysis (PCA). During the iterative ASM matching process, the shape deformation is restricted within statistically plausible constraints (+/-3σ). Our approach has two novel aspects: the 3D-ASM application to volume data of arbitrary planar orientation, and the application to image data from another modality than which was used to train the model, without the necessity of retraining it. The 3D-ASM was trained on MR data and quantitatively evaluated on 17 multi-slice cardiac CT data sets, with respect to calculated LV volume (blood pool plus myocardium) and endocardial volume. In all cases, model matching was convergent and final results showed a good model performance. Bland-Altman analysis however, showed that bloodpool volume was slightly underestimated and LV volume was slightly overestimated by the model. Nevertheless, these errors remain within clinically acceptable margins. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that our 3D-ASM combines robustness with clinically acceptable accuracy. Without retraining for cardiac CT, we could adapt a model trained on cardiac MR data sets for application in cardiac CT volumes, demonstrating the flexibility and feasibility of our matching approach. Causes for the systematic errors are edge detection, model constraints, or image data reconstruction. For all these categories, solutions are discussed.

  9. Relationship between changes of chamber mechanical parameters and mean pressure-mean flow diagrams of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Negroni, J A; Lascano, E C; Pichel, R H

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical relationship between mean ventricular pressure (P) and mean ventricular outflow (Q) was developed based on a model of the left ventricle with elastic-resistive properties. Using a polynomial interpolation method, a fifth-order polynomial equation for the P-Q relationship was obtained. Its coefficients are functions of end-diastolic volume (VD), heart rate (HR), contractile state (CS), diastolic elastance (ED), asymmetry (S) of the elastance function E(t), and ventricular internal resistance factor (K). Effect of changes of these parameters indicated that normal and enhanced CS relations diverge toward the P axis but have a common intercept toward the Q axis. A similar effect was obtained with increased asymmetry of E(t). Changes in VD, HR and ED produced a parallel shift of the P-Q relation. The effect of K was negligible, however, which would reduce the description of the P-Q relationship to a third-order polynomial equation. A flow-dependent deactivation component was introduced, altering the asymmetry factor S, which decreases in a linear proportion to Q. This factor shifted the pump function graph downwards. We conclude that the theoretical description of the P-Q relation we present reproduces the experimental behavior of pump function diagrams reported in the literature (changes in VD, HR, and CS) and predicts the possible behavior due to other parameter changes. PMID:3400909

  10. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  11. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-07-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, 2007; Borazjani et al., 2008) [1,2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1, 2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices. PMID:23729841

  13. Drift of Scroll Wave Filaments in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergei; Dierckx, Hans; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Scroll waves are three-dimensional vortices which occur in excitable media. Their formation in the heart results in the onset of cardiac arrhythmias, and the dynamics of their filaments determine the arrhythmia type. Most studies of filament dynamics were performed in domains with simple geometries and generic description of the anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Recently, we developed an analytical model of fibre structure and anatomy of the left ventricle (LV) of the human heart. Here, we perform a systematic study of the dynamics of scroll wave filaments for the cases of positive and negative tension in this anatomical model. We study the various possible shapes of LV and different degree of anisotropy of cardiac tissue. We show that, for positive filament tension, the final position of scroll wave filament is mainly determined by the thickness of the myocardial wall but, however, anisotropy attracts the filament to the LV apex. For negative filament tension, the filament buckles, and for most cases, tends to the apex of the heart with no or slight dependency on the thickness of the LV. We discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena and their implications for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26539486

  14. Electrical wave propagation in an anisotropic model of the left ventricle based on analytical description of cardiac architecture.

    PubMed

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher-Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  15. Hyperthyroid dog left ventricle has the same oxygen consumption versus pressure-volume area (PVA) relation as euthyroid dog.

    PubMed

    Suga, H; Tanaka, N; Ohgoshi, Y; Saeki, Y; Nakanishi, T; Futaki, S; Yaku, H; Goto, Y

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effects of hyperthyroidism on the relation between O2 consumption (Vo2) and the pressure-volume area (PVA) of the left ventricle (LV) in dogs. PVA is a measure of the total mechanical energy generated per beat of LV. Dogs were treated by daily intramuscular injection of 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg L-thyroxine over 2-5 weeks. Hyperthyroid dogs had a 40 times higher serum T4, a 40% higher sinus heart rate, and a 35% higher LV Emax (an index of ventricular contractility) than euthyroid dogs. Hyperthyroid dog hearts had linear Vo2-PVA relations like euthyroid dog hearts. The regression line was Vo2 = A x PVA + B, where A was 2.30 (dimensionless) and B was 0.53 J/beat per 100 g LV. B was significantly increased with dobutamine and decreased with propranolol, whereas A was not significantly changed by them. These A and B values were comparable to euthyroid data. Hyperthyroidism did not significantly affect myosin Ca-ATPase activity and V3-type myosin predominance, but increased the speed of the force transient response to length perturbation by 20%-70%, suggesting similar increases in crossbridge cycling rate. We conclude that in spite of accelerated crossbridge cycling rate the Vo2-PVA relation was not altered by hyperthyroidism in dogs. PMID:1830045

  16. Structure and Functional Characteristics of Rat's Left Ventricle Cardiomyocytes under Antiorthostatic Suspension of Various Duration and Subsequent Reloading

    PubMed Central

    Ogneva, I. V.; Mirzoev, T. M.; Biryukov, N. S.; Veselova, O. M.; Larina, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the research was to identify the structural and functional characteristics of the rat's left ventricle under antiorthostatic suspension within 1, 3, 7 and 14 days, and subsequent 3 and 7-day reloading after a 14-day suspension. The transversal stiffness of the cardiomyocyte has been determined by the atomic force microscopy, cell respiration—by polarography and proteins content—by Western blotting. Stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton increases as soon as one day after the suspension and increases up to the 14th day, and starts decreasing during reloading, reaching the control level after 7 days. The stiffness of the contractile apparatus and the intensity of cell respiration also increases. The content of non-muscle isoforms of actin in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins does not change during the whole experiment, as does not the beta-actin content in the membrane fraction. The content of gamma-actin in the membrane fraction correlates with the change in the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton. Increased content of alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 in the membrane fraction of proteins during the suspension is consistent with increased gamma-actin content there. The opposite direction of change of alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 content suggests their involvement into the signal pathways. PMID:23093854

  17. First third filling parameters of left ventricle assessed from gated equilibrium studies in patients with various heart diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Adatepe, M.H.; Nichols, K.; Powell, O.M.; Isaacs, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors determined the first third filling fraction (1/3 FF), the maximum filling rate (1/3 FR) and the mean filling rate (1/3 MFR) for the first third diastolic filling period of the left ventricle in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), valvular heart disease (VHD), pericardial effusion (PE), cardiomyopathies (CM), chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and in 5 normals-all from resting gated equilibrium studies. Parameters are calculated from the third order Fourier fit to the LV volume curve and its derivative. 1/3 FF% = 1/3 diastolic count - end systolic count / 1/3 diastolic count x 100. Patients with CAD are divided into two groups: Group I with normal ejection fraction (EF) and wall motion (WM); Group II with abnormal EF and WM. Results are shown in the table. Abnormal filling parameters are found not only in CAD but in VHD, PE and CM. The authors conclude that the first third LV filling parameters are sensitive but non-specific indicators of filling abnormalities caused by diverse etiologic factors. Abnormal first third filling parameters may occur in the presence of a normal resting EF and WM in CAD.

  18. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  20. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  1. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.F.

    1997-05-09

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature `in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte`s two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases.

  2. Analysis of flow within a left ventricle model fully assisted with continuous flow through the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tetsuya; Funayama, Masanori; Sudo, Seiichi; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2012-08-01

    Blood compatibility of a ventricular assist device (VAD) depends on the dynamics of blood flow. The focus in most previous studies was on blood flow in the VAD. However, the tip shape and position of the VAD inflow cannula influence the dynamics of intraventricular blood flow and thus thrombus formation in the ventricle. In this study, blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) under support with a catheter-type continuous flow blood pump was investigated. The flow field was analyzed both numerically and experimentally to investigate the effects of catheter tip shape and its insertion depth on intraventricular flow patterns. A computational model of the LV cavity with a simplified shape was constructed using computer-aided design software. Models of catheters with three different tip shapes were constructed and each was integrated to the LV model. In addition, three variations of insertion depth were prepared for all models. The fully supported intraventricular flow field was calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A transparent LV model made of silicone was also fabricated to analyze the intraventricular flow field by the particle image velocimetry technique. A mock circulation loop was constructed and water containing tracer particles was circulated in the loop. The motion of particles in the LV model was recorded with a digital high-speed video camera and analyzed to reveal the flow field. The results of numerical and experimental analyses indicated the formation of two large vortices in the bisector plane of the mitral and aortic valve planes. The shape and positioning of the catheter tip affected the flow distribution in the LV, and some of these combinations elongated the upper vortex toward the ventricular apex. Assessment based on average wall shear stress on the LV wall indicated that the flow distribution improved the washout effect. The flow patterns obtained from flow visualization coincided with those calculated by CFD analysis. Through these

  3. Studies of finite element analysis of composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. O.; Holzmacher, D. E.; Lane, Z. C.; Thornton, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the area of finite element analysis is summarized. Topics discussed include finite element analysis of a picture frame shear test, BANSAP (a bandwidth reduction program for SAP IV), FEMESH (a finite element mesh generation program based on isoparametric zones), and finite element analysis of a composite bolted joint specimens.

  4. Total Mechanical Unloading Minimizes Metabolic Demand of Left Ventricle and Dramatically Reduces Infarct Size in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kakino, Takamori; Arimura, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Nishikawa, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Ikeda, Masataka; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) mechanically unloads the left ventricle (LV). Theoretical analysis indicates that partial LVAD support (p-LVAD), where LV remains ejecting, reduces LV preload while increases afterload resulting from the elevation of total cardiac output and mean aortic pressure, and consequently does not markedly decrease myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2). In contrast, total LVAD support (t-LVAD), where LV no longer ejects, markedly decreases LV preload volume and afterload pressure, thereby strikingly reduces MVO2. Since an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand is the fundamental pathophysiology of myocardial infarction (MI), we hypothesized that t-LVAD minimizes MVO2 and reduces infarct size in MI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differential impact of the support level of LVAD on MVO2 and infarct size in a canine model of ischemia-reperfusion. Methods In 5 normal mongrel dogs, we examined the impact of LVAD on MVO2 at 3 support levels: Control (no LVAD support), p-LVAD and t-LVAD. In another 16 dogs, ischemia was induced by occluding major branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery (90 min) followed by reperfusion (300 min). We activated LVAD from the beginning of ischemia until 300 min of reperfusion, and compared the infarct size among 3 different levels of LVAD support. Results t-LVAD markedly reduced MVO2 (% reduction against Control: -56 ± 9%, p<0.01) whereas p-LVAD did less (-21 ± 14%, p<0.05). t-LVAD markedly reduced infarct size compared to p-LVAD (infarct area/area at risk: Control; 41.8 ± 6.4, p-LVAD; 29.1 ± 5.6 and t-LVAD; 5.0 ± 3.1%, p<0.01). Changes in creatine kinase-MB paralleled those in infarct size. Conclusions Total LVAD support that minimizes metabolic demand maximizes the benefit of LVAD in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27124411

  5. Finite element displacement analysis of a lung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A method is given based on the technique of finite elements which determines theoretically the mechanical behavior of a lung-shaped body loaded by its own weight. The results of this theoretical analysis have been compared with actual measurements of alveolar size and pleural pressures in animal lungs.

  6. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  7. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  8. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  9. Finite Element Simulation of Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Y. Lawrence; Panahandeh, M.

    1996-01-01

    Finite element equations representing the behavior of piezoelectric materials when bounded to a typical structure and used as sensors and actuators were developed. Emphasis was placed on generating sensor output equations of piezoelectric sensors and responses of a typical structure bonded with piezoelectric sensors and actuators on the basis of finite element formulation. The model can predict not only structural responses due to both mechanical and electrical loading but also electrical potential due to mechanical or thermal effects. The resulted finite element equations were then used for simple control design and performance evaluation. In the control algorithm, voltages coming out from piezoelectric sensors, which are proportional to strains at sensing locations, are taken as input. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators are used as output. The feasibility of integrating control algorithm with the element routine developed herein and FEAP was demonstrated. In particular, optimal independent modal space control was implemented in a software package on the basis of finite element formulation. A rudimentary finite element-control algorithm package was also developed to evaluate the performance of candidate control laws. A few numerical simulations using the software package developed herein were given. The integrated software package will provide a design tool to address issues such as how adaptive smart systems will scale to a full size aircraft, the amount of piezoelectric materials and the powers needed to actuate it for desired performance. It will also provide a viable new structural control design concept for practical applications in large flexible structures such as aerospace vehicles and aircraft.

  10. Analysis of the stability of housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; Oliveira, Renato Watanabe de; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with oxidative stress and various cardiovascular consequences, such as increased cardiovascular disease risk. Quantitative real-time PCR is frequently employed to assess changes in gene expression in experimental models. In this study, we analyzed the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (an experimental model of OSA) on housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats. Analyses via four different approaches-use of the geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder algorithms; and 2-ΔCt (threshold cycle) data analysis-produced similar results: all genes were found to be suitable for use, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 18S being classified as the most and the least stable, respectively. The use of more than one housekeeping gene is strongly advised. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) tem sido associada ao estresse oxidativo e a várias consequências cardiovasculares, tais como risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular. A PCR quantitativa em tempo real é frequentemente empregada para avaliar alterações na expressão gênica em modelos experimentais. Neste estudo, analisamos os efeitos da hipóxia intermitente crônica (um modelo experimental de AOS) na expressão de genes de referência no ventrículo cardíaco esquerdo de ratos. Análises a partir de quatro abordagens - uso dos algoritmos geNorm, BestKeeper e NormFinder e análise de dados 2-ΔCt (ciclo limiar) - produziram resultados semelhantes: todos os genes mostraram-se adequados para uso, sendo que gliceraldeído-3-fosfato desidrogenase e 18S foram classificados como o mais e o menos estável, respectivamente. A utilização de mais de um gene de referência é altamente recomendada. PMID:27383935

  11. Evaluation of state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms for left ventricle infarct from late Gadolinium enhancement MR images.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rashed; Bhagirath, Pranav; Claus, Piet; Housden, R James; Chen, Zhong; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Lara Rodríguez, Laura; Vera, Sergio; Albà, Xènia; Hennemuth, Anja; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Arbel, Tal; Gonzàlez Ballester, Miguel A; Frangi, Alejandro F; Götte, Marco; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Rhode, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated the feasibility of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for guiding the management of patients with sequelae to myocardial infarction, such as ventricular tachycardia and heart failure. Clinical implementation of these developments necessitates a reproducible and reliable segmentation of the infarcted regions. It is challenging to compare new algorithms for infarct segmentation in the left ventricle (LV) with existing algorithms. Benchmarking datasets with evaluation strategies are much needed to facilitate comparison. This manuscript presents a benchmarking evaluation framework for future algorithms that segment infarct from LGE CMR of the LV. The image database consists of 30 LGE CMR images of both humans and pigs that were acquired from two separate imaging centres. A consensus ground truth was obtained for all data using maximum likelihood estimation. Six widely-used fixed-thresholding methods and five recently developed algorithms are tested on the benchmarking framework. Results demonstrate that the algorithms have better overlap with the consensus ground truth than most of the n-SD fixed-thresholding methods, with the exception of the Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) fixed-thresholding method. Some of the pitfalls of fixed thresholding methods are demonstrated in this work. The benchmarking evaluation framework, which is a contribution of this work, can be used to test and benchmark future algorithms that detect and quantify infarct in LGE CMR images of the LV. The datasets, ground truth and evaluation code have been made publicly available through the website: https://www.cardiacatlas.org/web/guest/challenges. PMID:26891066

  12. Right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle and ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Mangukia, Chirantan; Sethi, Sonali; Agarwal, Saket; Mishra, Smita; Satsangi, Deepak Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle with ventricular septal defect. The blood supply to the innominate artery was by a collateral arising from the descending aorta. The embryological development of this anomaly can be explained by the hypothetical double aortic arch model proposed by Edwards with interruption of the arch at two levels. PMID:24987265

  13. Isothiocyanates Ameliorate the Symptom of Heart Dysfunction and Mortality in a Murine AIDS Model by Inhibiting Apoptosis in the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Park, Chang-Soo; Kim, Sunoh; Jun, Woojin; Choue, Ryowon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac involvement has been reported in as many as 45–55% of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and significant cardiac morbidity is reported in 6–7% of HIV patients. We investigated the inhibitory effects of isothiocyanates (ITCs) on heart dysfunction and mortality by regulating apoptosis in the left ventricle of the heart in a murine AIDS model. Mice were divided into six groups: an uninfected group, an untreated LP-BM5 retrovirus-infected group, and four LP-BM5 retrovirus-infected groups treated with one of four ITCs (sulforaphane [SUL], indolo[3,2-b]carbazole, benzyl isothiocyanate [BITC], or phenethyl isothiocyanate [PEITC]). After 16 weeks, the median survival time of the LP-BM5 retrovirus-infected mice was 87 days, whereas that of the uninfected control group and all ITC treatment groups was over 112 days. SUL, PEITC, and BITC significantly inhibited apoptosis in the left ventricle by increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio compared with LP-BM5-infected mice. In addition, SUL and PEITC suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the left ventricle of heart tissue infected with the LP-BM5 retrovirus by inactivating cytoplasmic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). In conclusion, LP-BM5 retrovirus infection was related to survival of murine AIDS mice, and NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression may be an important mediator of left ventricle dysfunction of the heart. Furthermore, certain ITCs may have the potential to improve AIDS-related heart dysfunction due to their inhibition of apoptosis by decreasing iNOS and Bax expression through suppression of NF-κB. PMID:22925072

  14. A biplane roentgen videometry system for dynamic /60 per second/ studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, E.; Wood, E. H.; Heintzen, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A roentgen-television digital-computer technique and a display system developed for dynamic circulatory structure studies are described. Details are given for a videoroentgenographic setup which is used for obtaining biplane roentgen silhouettes of a left ventricle. A 60 per sec measurement of the shape and volume of angiographically outlined cardiac chambers can be made by this technique along with simultaneous ECG, pressure, and flow measurements accessible for real-time digital computer processing and analysis.

  15. Acute pressure overload of the right ventricle. Comparison of two models of right-left shunt. Pulmonary artery to left atrium and right atrium to left atrium: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abtract Background In right ventricular failure (RVF), an interatrial shunt can relieve symptoms of severe pulmonary hypertension by reducing right ventricular preload and increasing systemic flow. Using a pig model to determine if a pulmonary artery - left atrium shunt (PA-LA) is better than a right atrial - left atrial shunt (RA-LA), we compared the hemodynamic effects and blood gases between the two shunts. Methods Thirty, male Large White pigs weighting in average 21.3 kg ± 0.7 (SEM) were divided into two groups (15 pigs per group): In group 1, banding of the pulmonary artery and a pulmonary artery to left atrium shunt with an 8 mm graft (PA-LA) was performed and in group 2 banding of the pulmonary artery and right atrial to left atrial shunt (RA-LA) with a similar graft was performed. Hemodynamic parameters and blood gases were measured from all cardiac chambers in 10 and 20 minutes, half and one hour interval from the baseline (30 min from the banding). Cardiac output and flow of at the left anterior descending artery was also monitored. Results In both groups, a stable RVF was generated. The PA-LA shunt compared to the RA-LA shunt has better hemodynamic performance concerning the decreased right ventricle afterload, the 4 fold higher mean pressure of the shunt, the better flow in left anterior descending artery and the decreased systemic vascular resistance. Favorable to the PA-LA shunt is also the tendency - although not statistically significant - in relation to central venous pressure, left atrial filling and cardiac output. Conclusion The PA-LA shunt can effectively reverse the catastrophic effects of acute RVF offering better hemodynamic characteristics than an interatrial shunt. PMID:22011551

  16. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  17. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  18. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  19. Plasticity - Theory and finite element applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    A unified presentation is given of the development and distinctions associated with various incremental solution procedures used to solve the equations governing the nonlinear behavior of structures, and this is discussed within the framework of the finite-element method. Although the primary emphasis here is on material nonlinearities, consideration is also given to geometric nonlinearities acting separately or in combination with nonlinear material behavior. The methods discussed here are applicable to a broad spectrum of structures, ranging from simple beams to general three-dimensional bodies. The finite-element analysis methods for material nonlinearity are general in the sense that any of the available plasticity theories can be incorporated to treat strain hardening or ideally plastic behavior.

  20. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  1. Revolution in Orthodontics: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Jain, Megha; Khandelwal, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Engineering has not only developed in the field of medicine but has also become quite established in the field of dentistry, especially Orthodontics. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational procedure to calculate the stress in an element, which performs a model solution. This structural analysis allows the determination of stress resulting from external force, pressure, thermal change, and other factors. This method is extremely useful for indicating mechanical aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo. The results obtained can then be studied using visualization software within the finite element method (FEM) to view a variety of parameters, and to fully identify implications of the analysis. This is a review to show the applications of FEM in Orthodontics. It is extremely important to verify what the purpose of the study is in order to correctly apply FEM. PMID:27114948

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  4. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  5. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  6. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  7. Evolution of assumed stress hybrid finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1984-01-01

    Early versions of the assumed stress hybrid finite elements were based on the a priori satisifaction of stress equilibrium conditions. In the new version such conditions are relaxed but are introduced through additional internal displacement functions as Lagrange multipliers. A rational procedure is to choose the displacement terms such that the resulting strains are now of complete polynomials up to the same degree as that of the assumed stresses. Several example problems indicate that optimal element properties are resulted by this method.

  8. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  9. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  10. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  11. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  12. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  13. Finite element model of needle electrode sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyum, P.; Kalvøy, H.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.

    2010-04-01

    We used the Finite Element (FE) Method to estimate the sensitivity of a needle electrode for bioimpedance measurement. This current conducting needle with insulated shaft was inserted in a saline solution and current was measured at the neutral electrode. FE model resistance and reactance were calculated and successfully compared with measurements on a laboratory model. The sensitivity field was described graphically based on these FE simulations.

  14. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  15. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element method (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties, and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  16. Enhancements to modal testing using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Brian

    In calculating the natural frequencies and mode shapes from a finite element analysis, there are generally many more degrees of freedom than can be handled for the eigensolution. A reduction process is employed to reduce the number to a master set and chosen so that the modes of interest are well defined. By choosing those freedoms where the inertia terms are high or the stiffness terms are low then an automatic procedure for selecting the best freedoms can be defined. For modal testing, these master freedoms also indicate the best transducer locations for optimum low order mode identification. Having carried out the modal test, the mode shapes obtained can be forced onto the finite element model giving greatly enhanced results. By examining terms in all mode shapes from the finite element model in the frequency range of interest, the best reference or excitation position can be found. An example of the use of this technique to study the modal properties of an aero-engine compressor blade is given.

  17. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  18. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  19. Reversion of left ventricle remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats by valsartan is associated with the inhibition of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XU; XIA, KE; CHEN, PO; ALI SHEIKH, MD SAYED; YANG, DA-FENG; LI, SI-MIN; YANG, TIAN-LUN

    2015-01-01

    The development of hypertension is closely associated with cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis, and caspase-3, −8 and −9 are key enzymes of apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of valsartan on left ventricle hypertrophy and myocardial apoptosis in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and to explore the mechanisms for valsartan against apoptosis. A total of 15 SHRs (16 weeks old) were randomly divided into two groups. The SHRs in the valsartan (n=8) and SHR groups (n=7) were fed with valsartan and distilled water for 8 weeks, respectively. Wistar-Kyoto rats (n=8) were the control group. At the end of the experiments, blood pressure, parameters regarding hypertrophy, apoptosis and activities of caspase-3, −8 and −9 were measured. The results showed that valsartan significantly reduced systolic blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy, improved left ventricular remodeling, attenuated the myocardial damage and apoptosis, and decreased the activities of caspase-3, −8 and −9 in SHRs. In conclusion, valsartan is able to reverse hypertension-induced left ventricle remodeling, which is associated with, at least in part, its inhibitory effect on myocardial apoptosis in the death receptor-mediated extrinsic, as well as the mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathways. PMID:26171161

  20. A Novel Method for Quantifying Smooth Regional Variations in Myocardial Contractility Within an Infarcted Human Left Ventricle Based on Delay-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Genet, Martin; Chuan Lee, Lik; Ge, Liang; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Jeung, Nick; Martin, Alastair; Cambronero, Neil; Boyle, Andrew; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Kozerke, Sebastian; Guccione, Julius M

    2015-08-01

    Heart failure is increasing at an alarming rate, making it a worldwide epidemic. As the population ages and life expectancy increases, this trend is not likely to change. Myocardial infarction (MI)-induced adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling is responsible for nearly 70% of heart failure cases. The adverse remodeling process involves an extension of the border zone (BZ) adjacent to an MI, which is normally perfused but shows myofiber contractile dysfunction. To improve patient-specific modeling of cardiac mechanics, we sought to create a finite element model of the human LV with BZ and MI morphologies integrated directly from delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance (DE-MR) images. Instead of separating the LV into discrete regions (e.g., the MI, BZ, and remote regions) with each having a homogeneous myocardial material property, we assumed a functional relation between the DE-MR image pixel intensity and myocardial stiffness and contractility--we considered a linear variation of material properties as a function of DE-MR image pixel intensity, which is known to improve the accuracy of the model's response. The finite element model was then calibrated using measurements obtained from the same patient--namely, 3D strain measurements-using complementary spatial modulation of magnetization magnetic resonance (CSPAMM-MR) images. This led to an average circumferential strain error of 8.9% across all American Heart Association (AHA) segments. We demonstrate the utility of our method for quantifying smooth regional variations in myocardial contractility using cardiac DE-MR and CSPAMM-MR images acquired from a 78-yr-old woman who experienced an MI approximately 1 yr prior. We found a remote myocardial diastolic stiffness of C(0) = 0.102 kPa, and a remote myocardial contractility of T(max) = 146.9 kPa, which are both in the range of previously published normal human values. Moreover, we found a normalized pixel intensity range of 30% for the BZ, which is consistent with

  1. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  2. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  3. Finite element methods in probabilistic mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Mani, A.; Belytschko, Ted

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic methods, synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-order perturbation techniques, are formulated for linear and nonlinear problems. Random material, geometric properties and loads can be incorporated in these methods, in terms of their fundamental statistics. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not too large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Applications showing the effects of combined random fields and cyclic loading/stress reversal are studied and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  4. Shape optimization including finite element grid adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, N.; Taylor, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The prediction of optimal shape design for structures depends on having a sufficient level of precision in the computation of structural response. These requirements become critical in situations where the region to be designed includes stress concentrations or unilateral contact surfaces, for example. In the approach to shape optimization discussed here, a means to obtain grid adaptation is incorporated into the finite element procedures. This facility makes it possible to maintain a level of quality in the computational estimate of response that is surely adequate for the shape design problem.

  5. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  6. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  7. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  8. Chemorheology of reactive systems: Finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    The equations which govern the nonisothermal flow of reactive fluids are outlined, and the means by which finite element analysis is used to solve these equations for the sort of arbitrary boundary conditions encountered in industrial practice are described. The performance of the computer code is illustrated by several trial problems, selected more for their value in providing insight to polymer processing flows than as practical production problems. Although a good deal remains to be learned as to the performance and proper use of this numerical technique, it is undeniably useful in providing better understanding of today's complicated polymer processing problems.

  9. Finite element solutions of free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarda, P. R.; Marcus, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for using NASTRAN to determine the flow field about arbitrarily shaped bodies in the presence of a free surface. The fundamental unknown of the problem is the velocity potential which must satisfy Laplace's equation in the fluid region. Boundary conditions on the free surface may involve second order derivatives in space and time. In cases involving infinite domains either a tractable radiation condition is applied at a truncated boundary or a series expansion is used and matched to the local finite elements. Solutions are presented for harmonic, transient, and steady state problems and compared to either exact solutions or other numerical solutions.

  10. System software for the finite element machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Finite Element Machine is an experimental parallel computer developed at Langley Research Center to investigate the application of concurrent processing to structural engineering analysis. This report describes system-level software which has been developed to facilitate use of the machine by applications researchers. The overall software design is outlined, and several important parallel processing issues are discussed in detail, including processor management, communication, synchronization, and input/output. Based on experience using the system, the hardware architecture and software design are critiqued, and areas for further work are suggested.

  11. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  12. Adaptive Finite Element Methods in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Davies, H.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Nithiarasu, P.

    2006-12-01

    Adaptive finite element methods are presented for improving the quality of solutions to two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convection dominated problems in geodynamics. The methods demonstrate the application of existing technology in the engineering community to problems within the `solid' Earth sciences. Two-Dimensional `Adaptive Remeshing': The `remeshing' strategy introduced in 2D adapts the mesh automatically around regions of high solution gradient, yielding enhanced resolution of the associated flow features. The approach requires the coupling of an automatic mesh generator, a finite element flow solver and an error estimator. In this study, the procedure is implemented in conjunction with the well-known geodynamical finite element code `ConMan'. An unstructured quadrilateral mesh generator is utilised, with mesh adaptation accomplished through regeneration. This regeneration employs information provided by an interpolation based local error estimator, obtained from the computed solution on an existing mesh. The technique is validated by solving thermal and thermo-chemical problems with known benchmark solutions. In a purely thermal context, results illustrate that the method is highly successful, improving solution accuracy whilst increasing computational efficiency. For thermo-chemical simulations the same conclusions can be drawn. However, results also demonstrate that the grid based methods employed for simulating the compositional field are not competitive with the other methods (tracer particle and marker chain) currently employed in this field, even at the higher spatial resolutions allowed by the adaptive grid strategies. Three-Dimensional Adaptive Multigrid: We extend the ideas from our 2D work into the 3D realm in the context of a pre-existing 3D-spherical mantle dynamics code, `TERRA'. In its original format, `TERRA' is computationally highly efficient since it employs a multigrid solver that depends upon a grid utilizing a clever

  13. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  14. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  15. Dynamic analysis of mechanisms by finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Botsali, F.M.; Uenuevar, A.

    1996-11-01

    The need to increase productivity in order to decrease manufacturing costs lead to an increase in the working speeds of machines and mechanical systems used in manufacturing. A method is presented for investigating the dynamics of mechanisms with elastic links. Finite element method is used in the formulation of the dynamic problem. Modal transformation is used in order to reduce the number of equations of motion. Using the presented technique, elastic and rigid body motions of mechanism links are solved simultaneously. The presented method may be applied to spatial and open loop mechanisms including robot manipulators as well.

  16. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  17. Quantum algorithms and the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley; Pallister, Sam

    2016-03-01

    The finite element method is used to approximately solve boundary value problems for differential equations. The method discretizes the parameter space and finds an approximate solution by solving a large system of linear equations. Here we investigate the extent to which the finite element method can be accelerated using an efficient quantum algorithm for solving linear equations. We consider the representative general question of approximately computing a linear functional of the solution to a boundary value problem and compare the quantum algorithm's theoretical performance with that of a standard classical algorithm—the conjugate gradient method. Prior work claimed that the quantum algorithm could be exponentially faster but did not determine the overall classical and quantum run times required to achieve a predetermined solution accuracy. Taking this into account, we find that the quantum algorithm can achieve a polynomial speedup, the extent of which grows with the dimension of the partial differential equation. In addition, we give evidence that no improvement of the quantum algorithm can lead to a superpolynomial speedup when the dimension is fixed and the solution satisfies certain smoothness properties.

  18. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  19. A finite element model for ultrasonic cutting.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Margaret; MacBeath, Alan; McCulloch, Euan; Cardoni, Andrea

    2006-12-22

    Using a single-blade ultrasonic cutting device, a study of ultrasonic cutting of three very different materials is conducted using specimens of cheese, polyurethane foam and epoxy resin. Initial finite element models are created, based on the assumption that the ultrasonic blade causes a crack to propagate in a controlled mode 1 opening, and these are validated against experimental data from three point bend fracture tests and ultrasonic cutting experiments on the materials. Subsequently, the finite element model is developed to represent ultrasonic cutting of a multi-layered material. Materials are chosen whose properties allow a model to be developed that could represent a multi-layer food product or biological structure, to enable ultrasonic cutting systems to be designed for applications both in the field of food processing and surgical procedures. The model incorporates an estimation of the friction condition between the cutting blade and the material to be cut and allows adjustment of the frequency, cutting amplitude and cutting speed. PMID:16814351

  20. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  1. Time course of changes in the mechanical properties of the canine right and left ventricles during hypertrophy caused by pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, I; Laks, M M

    1980-04-01

    We developed a mathematical model of the right and left ventricles to determine whether there is a change in the mechanical properties of muscle during the hypertrophy process resulting from pulmonary arterial banding. Pressure-volume data were obtained from 10 normal dog hearts and 8 dog hearts in which the pulmonary artery was banded for periods of 2--40 weeks. These data were applied to the model, and the time course of wall stress and muscle stiffness was quantified for both ventricles. The results demonstrate that (1) myocardial stiffness is increased in pressure-overload hypertrophy (2) normal right and left ventricular muscle exhibits similar mechanical properties and (3) the relationships between wall stresses and the volume/mass ratios to the period of banding are biphasic. We concluded that (1) increase in muscle stiffness is due to several factors. In the early stages of hypertrophy, it may be predominantly due to fibrosis and, in the later stages, to substantial increases in muscle mass. (2) The progressive increase in muscle stiffness concomitant with the increase in muscle mass may be due to the presence of myocardial cellular projections and fibrosis. (3) The appropriate timing for surgical/medical intervention should take place before low volume:mass ratios and, hence, low wall stresses are attained. PMID:6444557

  2. Validation and Development of a New Automatic Algorithm for Time-Resolved Segmentation of the Left Ventricle in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tufvesson, Jane; Hedström, Erik; Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Manual delineation of the left ventricle is clinical standard for quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images despite being time consuming and observer dependent. Previous automatic methods generally do not account for one major contributor to stroke volume, the long-axis motion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for time-resolved segmentation covering the whole left ventricle, including basal slices affected by long-axis motion. Methods. Ninety subjects imaged with a cine balanced steady state free precession sequence were included in the study (training set n = 40, test set n = 50). Manual delineation was reference standard and second observer analysis was performed in a subset (n = 25). The automatic algorithm uses deformable model with expectation-maximization, followed by automatic removal of papillary muscles and detection of the outflow tract. Results. The mean differences between automatic segmentation and manual delineation were EDV −11 mL, ESV 1 mL, EF −3%, and LVM 4 g in the test set. Conclusions. The automatic LV segmentation algorithm reached accuracy comparable to interobserver for manual delineation, thereby bringing automatic segmentation one step closer to clinical routine. The algorithm and all images with manual delineations are available for benchmarking. PMID:26180818

  3. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level. PMID:25730983

  4. Fuzzy finite element analysis of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Unyime O.; Koko, Tamunoiyala S.; Orisamolu, Irewole R.; Gallant, B. Keith

    2000-06-01

    A fuzzy finite element based approach is developed for modelling smart structures with vague or imprecise uncertainties. Fuzzy sets are used to represent the uncertainties present in the piezoelectric, mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the smart structure. In order to facilitate efficient computation, a sensitivity analysis procedure is used to streamline the number of input fuzzy variables, and the vertex fuzzy analysis technique is then used to compute the possibility distributions of the responses of the smart structural system. The methodology has been developed within the framework of the SMARTCOM computational tool for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The methodology developed is found to be accurate and computationally efficient for solution of practical problems.

  5. Continuation finite element analysis of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tai-Whang

    A finite element procedure using a mixed formulation and a predictor-corrector type continuation algorithm for the analysis of two dimensional steady state flows of viscoelastic fluids is described. As a simple but nontrivial test example, radial flow immenating from a line by the numerical discretization and believed to be the cause for previous numerical failures, are shown and branch solution paths are followed by step length adjustment and by convergent tolerance relaxation. A technique for jumping over bifurcation points is presented and used to increase the Weissenberg number with no apparent limit for the radial flow problem. A second example related to extrusion of viscoelastic material is also analyzed. Steady state velocity fields, deviatoric stress distributions and pressure distributions for several different Weissenberg numbers are presented with bifurcation points and turning points noted.

  6. Quality management of finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John

    1991-09-01

    A quality management system covering the use of finite element analysis is described. The main topics are as follows: acquisition, development and verification of software (including the software suppliers software quality control system), support, documentation, error control, internal software, software acceptance and release; development and qualification of analysis methods, including software evaluation, analysis procedure qualification and documentation, procedure quality checks, control of analysis procedure errors; product design and integrity analysis, including project quality assurance and analysis planning, task specification and allocation, analysis, execution, results checking and analysis records. Other issues include the commercial and business advantages of quality systems, project and technical management and the training and experience of personnel. The items are correlated with the requirements of International Standard Organization 9001.

  7. Finite-element modeling of nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Barbour, J.C.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-02-01

    Procedures have been developed based on finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data to obtain the mechanical properties of thin films and ion-beam-modified layers independently of the properties of the underlying substrates. These procedures accurately deduce the yield strength, Young{close_quote}s elastic modulus, and layer hardness from indentations as deep as 50{percent} of the layer thickness or more. We have used these procedures to evaluate materials ranging from ion implanted metals to deposited, diamond-like carbon layers. The technique increases the applicability of indentation testing to very thin layers, composite layers, and modulated compositions. This article presents an overview of the procedures involved and illustrates them with selected examples. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  9. Finite element analysis: A boon to dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    The finite element analysis (FEA) is an upcoming and significant research tool for biomechanical analyses in biological research. It is an ultimate method for modeling complex structures and analyzing their mechanical properties. In Implantology, FEA has been used to study the stress patterns in various implant components and also in the peri-implant bone. It is also useful for studying the biomechanical properties of implants as well as for predicting the success of implants in clinical condition. FEA of simulated traumatic loads can be used to understand the biomechanics of fracture. FEA has various advantages compared with studies on real models. The experiments are repeatable, there are no ethical considerations and the study designs may be modified and changed as per the requirement. There are certain limitations of FEA too. It is a computerized in vitro study in which clinical condition may not be completely replicated. So, further FEA research should be supplemented with clinical evaluation. PMID:25737944

  10. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  11. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  12. Optimizing electroslag cladding with finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.; Meekisho, L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroslag cladding of nickel alloys onto carbon steel propeller shafts was optimized in terms of interpass temperatures. A two dimensional finite element model was used in this study to analyze the heat transfer induced by multipass electroslag cladding. Changes of interpass temperatures during a cladding experiment with uniform initial temperature distribution on a section of shaft were first simulated. It was concluded that uniform initial temperature distribution would lead to interpass temperatures out of the optimal range if continuous cladding is expected. The difference in the cooling conditions among experimental and full size shafts and its impact on interpass temperatures during the cladding were discussed. Electroslag cladding onto a much longer shaft, virtually an semi infinite long shaft, was analyzed with specific reference to the practical applications of electroslag cladding. Optimal initial preheating temperature distribution was obtained for continuous cladding on full size shafts which would keep the interpass temperatures within the required range.

  13. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  14. Finite element or Galerkin type semidiscrete schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgun, K.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element of Galerkin type semidiscrete method is proposed for numerical solution of a linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. The question of stability is reduced to the stability of a system of ordinary differential equations for which Dahlquist theory applied. Results of separating the part of numerical solution which causes the spurious oscillation near shock-like response of semidiscrete scheme to a step function initial condition are presented. In general all methods produce such oscillatory overshoots on either side of shocks. This overshoot pathology, which displays a behavior similar to Gibb's phenomena of Fourier series, is explained on the basis of dispersion of separated Fourier components which relies on linearized theory to be satisfactory. Expository results represented.

  15. Finite element analyses of CCAT preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarawit, Andrew T.; Kan, Frank W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the CCAT telescope finite element model (FEM) and the analyses performed to support the preliminary design work. CCAT will be a 25 m diameter telescope operating in the 0.2 to 2 mm wavelength range. It will be located at an elevation of 5600 m on Cerro Chajnantor in Northern Chile, near ALMA. The telescope will be equipped with wide-field cameras and spectrometers mounted at the two Nasmyth foci. The telescope will be inside an enclosure to protect it from wind buffeting, direct solar heating, and bad weather. The main structures of the telescope include a steel Mount and a carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) primary truss. The finite element model developed in this study was used to perform modal, frequency response, seismic response spectrum, stress, and deflection analyses of telescope. Modal analyses of telescope were performed to compute the structure natural frequencies and mode shapes and to obtain reduced order modal output at selected locations in the telescope structure to support the design of the Mount control system. Modal frequency response analyses were also performed to compute transfer functions at these selected locations. Seismic response spectrum analyses of the telescope subject to the Maximum Likely Earthquake were performed to compute peak accelerations and seismic demand stresses. Stress analyses were performed for gravity load to obtain gravity demand stresses. Deflection analyses for gravity load, thermal load, and differential elevation drive torque were performed so that the CCAT Observatory can verify that the structures meet the stringent telescope surface and pointing error requirements.

  16. Finite element analysis enhancement of cryogenic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiem, Clare D.; Norton, Douglas A.

    1991-12-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of large space optics enhances cryogenic testing by providing an analytical method by which to ensure that a test article survives proposed testing. The analyses presented in this paper were concerned with determining the reliability of a half meter mirror in an environment where the exact environmental profile was unknown. FEA allows the interaction between the test object and the environment to be simulated to detect potential problems prior to actual testing. These analyses examined worse case scenerios related to cooling the mirror, its structural integrity for the proposed test environment, and deformation of the reflective surface. The FEA was conducted in-house on the System's Reliability Division's VAX 11-750 and Decstation 3100 using Engineering Mechanics Research Corporation's numerically integrated elements for systems analysis finite element software. The results of the analyses showed that it would take at least 48 hours to cool the mirror to its desired testing temperature. It was also determined that the proposed mirror mount would not cause critical concentrated thermal stresses that would fracture the mirror. FEA and actual measurements of the front reflective face were compared and good agreement between computer simulation and physical tests were seen. Space deployment of large optics requires lightweight mirrors which can perform under the harsh conditions of space. The physical characteristics of these mirrors must be well understood in order that their deployment and operation are successful. Evaluating design approaches by analytical simulation, like FEA, verifies the reliability and structural integrity of a space optic during design prior to prototyping and testing. Eliminating an optic's poor design early in its life saves money, materials, and human resources while ensuring performance.

  17. Elbow stress indices using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lixin

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code) specifies rules for the design of nuclear power plant components. NB-3600 of the Code presents a simplified design method using stress indices---Scalar Coefficients used the modify straight pipe stress equations so that they can be applied to elbows, tees and other piping components. The stress indices of piping components are allowed to be determined both analytically and experimentally. This study concentrates on the determination of B2 stress indices for elbow components using finite element analysis (FEA). First, the previous theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations on elbow behavior were comprehensively reviewed, as was the philosophy behind the use of stress indices. The areas of further research was defined. Then, a comprehensive investigation was carried out to determine how the finite element method should be used to correctly simulate an elbow's structural behavior. This investigation included choice of element type, convergence of mesh density, use of boundary restraint and a reconciliation study between FEA and laboratory experiments or other theoretical formulations in both elastic and elasto-plastic domain. Results from different computer programs were also compared. Reasonably good reconciliation was obtained. Appendix II of the Code describes the experimental method to determine B2 stress indices based on load-deflection curves. This procedure was used to compute the B2 stress indices for various loading modes on one particular elbow configuration. The B2 stress indices thus determined were found to be about half of the value calculated from the Code equation. Then the effect on B2 stress indices of those factors such as internal pressure and flange attachments were studied. Finally, the investigation was extended to other configurations of elbow components. A parametric study was conducted on different elbow sizes and schedules. Regression analysis was then used to

  18. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  19. [Blood flow patterns in the left ventricle in patients with myocardial infarction and ventricular aneurysm: evaluation using real-time two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Konishiike, A; Mihata, S; Matsumori, Y; Nishian, K; Ikeoka, K; Yasutomi, N; Tanimoto, M; Makihata, S; Yamamoto, T; Iwasaki, T

    1987-12-01

    , including delayed timing in proceeding from the apex to the left ventricular outflow tract, stagnant blood at the apex and further inflow of blood toward the apex even during end-systole. The patients with sustained inflow during late systole had hypofunction of the left ventricle as demonstrated by smaller EF and larger LVDd, LVDs, and delta L. In conclusion, the observation of intracardiac blood flows by real-time 2-D Doppler echo is of help in evaluating the severity of myocardial infarction. PMID:3506597

  20. Two-dimensional tracking and TDI are consistent methods for evaluating myocardial longitudinal peak strain in left and right ventricle basal segments in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Laura; Toncelli, Loira; Gianassi, Marco; Manetti, Paolo; Di Tante, Valentina; Vono, Maria Robertina Concetta; Moretti, Andrea; Cappelli, Brunello; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Galanti, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Background Myocardial contractility can be investigated using longitudinal peak strain. It can be calculated using the Doppler-derived TDI method and the non-Doppler method based on tissue tracking on B-mode images. Both are validated and show good reproducibility, but no comparative analysis of their results has yet been conducted. This study analyzes the results obtained from the basal segments of the ventricular chambers in a group of athletes. Methods 30 regularly-trained athletes were submitted to an echocardiography at rest and after handgrip. Starting from the four-chamber view, overall myocardial function and regional velocities were evaluated. The images obtained were processed to determine strain in left and right ventricle basal segments. Strain was calculated using the TDI method and a validated "speckle tracking" or, more correctly, "feature tracking" algorithm. The statistical analysis included a Student's t-test (p < 0.05). Results The range of strain values obtained is in agreement with the data reported in the literature. In the left ventricle (LV) the average strain values of the basal segments calculated with TDI on IVS and LW at rest and after stress were: -21.05 ± 3.31; -20.41 ± 2.99 and -20.05 ± 2.61; -21.20 ± 2.37, respectively. In the right ventricle (RV) the same method gave IVS and LW strain values at rest of -22.22 ± 2.58 ; -24.42 ± 5.84, and after HG of -22.02 ± 5.20 ;-23.93 ± 6.34. The values obtained using feature tracking were: LV at rest -20.48 ± 2.65 for IVS, and -21.25 ± 2.85 for LW; LV after HG: -19.48 ± 3 for IVS and -21.69 ± 3.85 for LW. In RV at rest: -21.46 ± 3.25 for IVS and -24.13 ± 5.86 for LW; RV after HG: -24.79 ± 7.9 for IVS and -24.13 ± 7.0 for LW. Tissue Doppler and "feature tracking" methods showed the respective consistency of the results in the basal segments of myocardial ventricle walls. Conclusion Provided that echographic imaging is good, strain can be computed in athletes by both Doppler

  1. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers—including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group—were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  2. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  3. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  4. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storassili, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified.

  5. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  6. Finite element analysis in a minicomputer/mainframe environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Murphy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Design considerations were evaluated for general purpose finite element systems to maximize performance when installed on distributed computer hardware/software systems. It is shown how the features of current minicomputers complement those of a modular implementation of the finite element method for increasing the control, speed, and visibility (interactive graphics) in solving structural problems at reduced cost. The approach used is to implement a finite element system in a distributed computer environment to solve structural problems and to explore alternatives in distributing finite element computations.

  7. A multi-microprocessor system for finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.; Sawyer, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    During the last few years, advances in microprocessor technology have spurred a renewed interest in special-purpose computers. The microprocessor has become small, inexpensive, and powerful enough to be considered as a building block for special-purpose hardware. A description is presented of the architecture of a prototype 'finite element machine' currently being built. Attention is given to details regarding the finite element analysis problem, the arrangement of the processors as finite element nodes in the structural model, the influence of the architecture on the solution algorithm, interprocessor communication primitives, and the performance of the finite element machine.

  8. Early Developmental Outcome in Children with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Related Anomalies: The Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Bellinger, David C.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Tabbutt, Sarah; Lu, Minmin; Mussatto, Kathleen A.; Williams, Ismee A.; Gustafson, Kathryn E.; Mital, Seema; Pike, Nancy; Sood, Erica; Mahle, William T.; Cooper, David S.; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Krawczeski, Catherine Dent; Lewis, Alan; Menon, Shaji; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Ravishankar, Chitra; Atz, Teresa W.; Ohye, Richard G.; Gaynor, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Background Survivors of the Norwood procedure may suffer neurodevelopmental impairment. Clinical trials to improve outcomes have focused primarily on methods of vital organ support during cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods In the Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial of the Norwood procedure with modified Blalock-Taussig shunt vs. right-ventricle-to-pulmonary-artery shunt, 14-month neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed using the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) and Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development®-II. We used multivariable regression to identify risk factors for adverse outcome. Results Among 373 transplant-free survivors, 321 (86%) returned at age 14.3±1.1 (mean±SD) months. Mean PDI (74±19) and MDI (89±18) scores were lower than normative means (each P<.001). Neither PDI or MDI score was associated with type of Norwood shunt. Independent predictors of lower PDI score (R2= 26%) were clinical center (P=.003), birth weight<2.5 kg (P=.023), longer Norwood hospitalization (P<.001), and more complications between Norwood procedure discharge and age 12 months (P<.001). Independent risk factors for lower MDI score (R2= 34%) included center (P<.001), birth weight<2.5 kg (P=.04), genetic syndrome/anomalies (P=.04), lower maternal education (P=.04), longer mechanical ventilation after the Norwood procedure (P<.001), and more complications after Norwood discharge to age 12 months (P<.001). We found no significant relationship of PDI or MDI score to, perfusion type, other aspects of vital organ support (e.g. hematocrit, pH strategy), or cardiac anatomy. Conclusion Neurodevelopmental impairment in Norwood survivors is more highly associated with innate patient factors and overall morbidity in the first year than with intraoperative management strategies. Improved outcomes are likely to require interventions that occur outside the operating room. PMID:22456475

  9. Evolution of the ventricles.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S; Nayak, V M; Rajasingh, R

    1999-01-01

    We studied the evolution of ventricles by macroscopic examination of the hearts of marine cartilaginous and bony fish, and by angiocardiography and gross examination of the hearts of air-breathing freshwater fish, frogs, turtles, snakes, and crocodiles. A right-sided, thin-walled ventricular lumen is seen in the fish, frog, turtle, and snake. In fish, there is external symmetry of the ventricle, internal asymmetry, and a thick-walled left ventricle with a small inlet chamber. In animals such as frogs, turtles, and snakes, the left ventricle exists as a small-cavitied contractile sponge. The high pressure generated by this spongy left ventricle, the direction of the jet, the ventriculoarterial orientation, and the bulbar spiral valve in the frog help to separate the systemic and pulmonary circulations. In the crocodile, the right aorta is connected to the left ventricle, and there is a complete interventricular septum and an improved left ventricular lumen when compared with turtles and snakes. The heart is housed in a rigid pericardial cavity in the shark, possibly to protect it from changing underwater pressure. The pericardial cavity in various species permits movements of the heart-which vary depending on the ventriculoarterial orientation and need for the ventricle to generate torque or spin on the ejected blood- that favor run-off into the appropriate arteries and their branches. In the lower species, it is not clear whether the spongy myocardium contributes to myocardial oxygenation. In human beings, spongy myocardium constitutes a rare form of congenital heart disease. Images PMID:10524737

  10. The R21C Mutation in Cardiac Troponin I Imposes Differences in Contractile Force Generation between the Left and Right Ventricles of Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingsheng; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Rojas, Ana I; Wang, Yingcai; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked R21C (arginine to cysteine) mutation in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) on the contractile properties and myofilament protein phosphorylation in papillary muscle preparations from left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles of homozygous R21C(+/+) knock-in mice. The maximal steady-state force was significantly reduced in skinned papillary muscle strips from the LV compared to RV, with the latter displaying the level of force observed in LV or RV from wild-type (WT) mice. There were no differences in the Ca(2+) sensitivity between the RV and LV of R21C(+/+) mice; however, the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force was higher in RV-R21C(+/+) compared with RV-WT and lower in LV- R21C(+/+) compared with LV-WT. We also observed partial loss of Ca(2+) regulation at low [Ca(2+)]. In addition, R21C(+/+)-KI hearts showed no Ser23/24-cTnI phosphorylation compared to LV or RV of WT mice. However, phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was significantly higher in the RV versus LV of R21C(+/+) mice and versus LV and RV of WT mice. The difference in RLC phosphorylation between the ventricles of R21C(+/+) mice likely contributes to observed differences in contractile force and the lower tension monitored in the LV of HCM mice. PMID:25961037

  11. A Viscoelastic Hybrid Shell Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell hybrid finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at he element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses in included in the mixed variational functional. Nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to numerically simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  12. Integrated finite element model of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teply, Jan L.; Herbein, William C.

    1989-05-01

    Two problems traditionally addressed in the area of micromechanics of composite materials can be briefly summarized as follows: (1) for a macroscopically uniform volume of composite material, which is subjected to macroscopically uniform boundary tractions, displacements or heat influx, find overall thermomechanical properties in terms of the thermomechanical properties of the individual constituents; and (2) for the same material volume and boundary conditions as above, find the local stress, strain, and temperature fields in the constituents and on the interfaces. Two different types of micromechanical models are usually applied to the solutions of these two types of problems. For linear elastic materials, the micromechanical models to solve problem (1) offer simple solutions of overall thermomechanical properties either in terms of bound which are derived from periodic or random microstructures, or in terms of single estimates, which are derived from a solution of an isolated inclusion. The finite element variational approaches are applied to integrate the solutions of problems (1) and (2) into one model. The application of displacement and equilibrium variational approaches to the calculation of overall elastic-plastic properties, are extended to the solution of the second problem. The integrated model is then applied to calculate the overall properties and local stress and strain fields of boron-aluminum composites subjected to transverse tension, in-plane shear and bending.

  13. Laterally displaced pipelines: Finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Altaee, A.; Boivin, R.

    1995-12-31

    The rate effect of lateral soil movement against buried pipes in clay soils is investigated in finite element analyzes using two different computer programs, AGAC and CRISP. Rapid and slow ground movements are considered in ideal undrained and ideal drained analysis, respectively, which represent the two extreme boundaries with respect to rate of loading (rate of ground movement). The analyses address a typical full-scale buried pipe as described by Rizkalla et al. (1992). The pipe considered for the analysis has a diameter of 0.914 m and is placed in a backfilled 2.0 m wide and 1.8 m deep excavation. Results from both AGAC and CRISP analyzes are similar in terms of total lateral force versus lateral pipe movement. For example, both programs indicate the same clear difference in the resulting pipe movement for cases of rapid and slow ground movement, especially at large movement. When the ground movement is rapid, the pipe moves both laterally and upward. One the other hand, when the ground movement is slow, the pipe experiences only lateral movement and no noticeable vertical movement. The total force acting on the pipe (and stresses and strains within the pipe) is larger for the slow rate of loading. The results of analyzes presented herein agree with results of tests on a 5.5 m beam centrifuge performed by the Center for Cold Oceans Resources Engineering.

  14. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Human Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mao; Manoogian, Sarah; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for a large portion of placental abruption and fetal losses. To better understand the material properties of the human placenta, a Finite Element (FE) model of human placenta tissue was created and verified using data from uniaxial tension tests. Sixty-four tensile tests at three different strain rates of 7% strain/s, 70% strain/s, and 700% strain/s from six whole human placentas were used for model development. Nominal stresses were calculated by dividing forces at the grips by the original cross-sectional area. Nominal strains were calculated by dividing cross-head displacement by the original gauge length. A detailed methodology for interpreting experimental data for application to material model development is presented. A model of the tension coupon was created in LS-DYNA and stretched in the same manner as the uniaxial tension tests. The behavior of the material was optimized to the uniaxial tension test using a multi-island genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate good correlation between experiments and the model, with an average difference of 2% between the optimized FE and experimental first principal stress at the termination state. The material parameters found in this study can be utilized in FE models of placental tissues for behavior under dynamic loading. PMID:20184849

  16. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  17. Elective decompression of the left ventricle in pediatric patients may reduce the duration of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Douglas F; Best, Derek; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Konstantinov, Igor E; Millar, Johnny; Butt, Warwick

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of elective left heart decompression at the time of initiation of central venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) on VA ECMO duration and clinical outcomes in children in a single tertiary ECMO referral center with a large pediatric population from a national referral center for pediatric cardiac surgery. We studied 51 episodes of VA ECMO in a historical cohort of 49 pediatric patients treated between the years 1990 and 2013 in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. The cases had a variety of diagnoses including congenital cardiac abnormalities, sepsis, myocarditis, and cardiomyopathy. Left heart decompression as an elective treatment or an emergency intervention for left heart distension was effectively achieved by a number of methods, including left atrial venting, blade atrial septostomy, and left ventricular cannulation. Elective left heart decompression was associated with a reduction in time on ECMO (128 h) when compared with emergency decompression (236 h) (P = 0.013). Subgroup analysis showed that ECMO duration was greatest in noncardiac patients (elective 138 h, emergency 295 h; P = 0.02) and in patients who died despite both emergency decompression and ECMO (elective 133 h, emergency 354 h; P = 0.002). As the emergency cases had a lower pH, a higher PaCO2 , and a lower oxygenation index and were treated with a higher mean airway pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, and respiratory rate prior to receiving VA ECMO, we undertook multivariate linear regression modeling to show that only PaCO2 and the timing of left heart decompression were associated with ECMO duration. However, elective left heart decompression was not associated with a reduction in length of PICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, or duration of oxygen therapy. Elective left heart decompression was not associated with improved ECMO survival or survival to PICU discharge

  18. The number of cardiac myocytes in the hypertrophic and hypotrophic left ventricle of the obese and calorie-restricted mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Schipke, Julia; Banmann, Ewgenija; Nikam, Sandeep; Voswinckel, Robert; Kohlstedt, Karin; Loot, Annemarieke E; Fleming, Ingrid; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Changes in body mass due to varying amounts of calorie intake occur frequently with obesity and anorexia/cachexia being at opposite sides of the scale. Here, we tested whether a high-fat diet or calorie restriction (CR) decreases the number of cardiac myocytes and affects their volume. Ten 6-8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or high-fat diet (obesity group, n = 5) for 28 weeks. Ten 8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or CR diet (CR group, n = 5) for 7 days. The left ventricles of the hearts were prepared for light and electron microscopy, and analysed by design-based stereology. In CR, neither the number of cardiac myocytes, the relationship between one- and multinucleate myocytes nor their mean volume were significantly different between the groups. In contrast, in the obese mice we observed a significant increase in cell size combined with a lower number of cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05 in the one-sided U-test) and an increase in the mean number of nuclei per myocyte. The mean volume of myofibrils and mitochondria per cardiac myocyte reflected the hypertrophic and hypotrophic remodelling in obesity and CR, respectively, but were only significant in the obese mice, indicating a more profound effect of the obesity protocol than in the CR experiments. Taken together, our data indicate that long-lasting obesity is associated with a loss of cardiomyocytes of the left ventricle, but that short-term CR does not alter the number of cardiomyocytes. PMID:25322944

  19. pSnakes: a new radial active contour model and its application in the segmentation of the left ventricle from echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    de Alexandria, Auzuir Ripardo; Cortez, Paulo César; Bessa, Jessyca Almeida; da Silva Félix, John Hebert; de Abreu, José Sebastião; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C

    2014-10-01

    Active contours are image segmentation methods that minimize the total energy of the contour to be segmented. Among the active contour methods, the radial methods have lower computational complexity and can be applied in real time. This work aims to present a new radial active contour technique, called pSnakes, using the 1D Hilbert transform as external energy. The pSnakes method is based on the fact that the beams in ultrasound equipment diverge from a single point of the probe, thus enabling the use of polar coordinates in the segmentation. The control points or nodes of the active contour are obtained in pairs and are called twin nodes. The internal energies as well as the external one, Hilbertian energy, are redefined. The results showed that pSnakes can be used in image segmentation of short-axis echocardiogram images and that they were effective in image segmentation of the left ventricle. The echo-cardiologist's golden standard showed that the pSnakes was the best method when compared with other methods. The main contributions of this work are the use of pSnakes and Hilbertian energy, as the external energy, in image segmentation. The Hilbertian energy is calculated by the 1D Hilbert transform. Compared with traditional methods, the pSnakes method is more suitable for ultrasound images because it is not affected by variations in image contrast, such as noise. The experimental results obtained by the left ventricle segmentation of echocardiographic images demonstrated the advantages of the proposed model. The results presented in this paper are justified due to an improved performance of the Hilbert energy in the presence of speckle noise. PMID:24957548

  20. Impact of septal flash and left ventricle contractile reserve on positive remodeling during 1 year cardiac resynchronization therapy: the multicenter ViaCRT study

    PubMed Central

    Gąsior, Zbigniew; Płońska-Gościniak, Edyta; Wita, Krystian; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Szwed, Hanna; Kasprzak, Jarosław; Tomaszewski, Andrzej; Sinkiewicz, Władysław; Wojciechowska, Celina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure (HFREF). However, the relatively high non-responder rate results in a need for more precise qualification for CRT. The ViaCRT study was designed to determine the role of contractile reserve and dyssynchrony parameters in predicting CRT response. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effect of baseline septal flash and contractile reserve (CR) on clinical and echocardiographic parameters of response to CRT in 12-month follow-up. Material and methods One hundred thirty-three guideline-selected CRT candidates (both ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction) were enrolled in the study. Baseline study population characteristics were: left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) 25 ±6%, QRS 165 ±25 ms, NYHA class III (90%) and IV (10%). Results In subjects with septal flash (SF) registered before CRT implantation improvement in LVEF (14 ±2% vs. 8 ±1%, p < 0.05) and left ventricle (LV) systolic (63 ±10 ml vs. 36 ±6 ml, p < 0.05) and diastolic (46 ±10 ml vs. 32 ±7, p < 0.05) volumes was more pronounced than in patients without SF. In patients with CR (defined as LVEF increase by 20% or 4 viable segments) improvement in echo parameters was not significantly different then in the CR– group. Neither SF nor CR was associated with improvement in NYHA class. Subgroup analysis revealed that only in non-ischemic HF patients is presence of septal flash associated with LV function improvement after CRT. Conclusions In non-ischemic HF patients septal flash is a helpful parameter in prediction of LV remodeling after 12 months of resynchronization therapy. PMID:27186179

  1. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  2. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  3. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  4. A computer graphics program for general finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Documentation for a computer graphics program for displays from general finite element analyses is presented. A general description of display options and detailed user instructions are given. Several plots made in structural, thermal and fluid finite element analyses are included to illustrate program options. Sample data files are given to illustrate use of the program.

  5. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  6. Finite element meshing of ANSYS (trademark) solid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    A large scale, general purpose finite element computer program, ANSYS, developed and marketed by Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc. is discussed. ANSYS was perhaps the first commercially available program to offer truly interactive finite element model generation. ANSYS's purpose is for solid modeling. This application is briefly discussed and illustrated.

  7. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  8. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  10. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  11. Effects of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion on intrinsic contractility, energetics, isomyosin pattern, and myosin adenosine triphosphatase activity of rat left ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, J; Riou, B; Bertherat, J; Wisnewsky, C; Kato, N S; Weisberg, A S; Lubetzki, J; Lecarpentier, Y; Winegrad, S; Mercadier, J J

    1990-01-01

    We studied papillary muscle mechanics and energetics, myosin phenotype, and ATPase activities in left ventricles from rats bearing a growth hormone (GH)--secreting tumor. 18 wk after tumor induction, animals exhibited a dramatic increase in body weight (+101% vs. controls) but no change in the ventricular weight/body weight ratio. The maximum isometric force of papillary muscles normalized per cross-sectional area rose markedly (+42%, P less than 0.05 vs. controls), whereas the maximum unloaded shortening velocity did not change. This was observed despite a marked isomyosin shift towards V3 (32 +/- 5% vs. 8 +/- 2% in controls, P less than 0.001). Increased curvature of the force-velocity relationship (+64%, P less than 0.05 vs. controls) indicated that the muscles contracted more economically, suggesting the involvement of V3 myosin. Total calcium- and actin-activated myosin ATPase activities assayed on quickly frozen left ventricular sections were similar in tumor-bearing rats and in controls. After alkaline preincubation, these activities only decreased in tumor-bearing rats, demonstrating that V3 enzymatic sites were involved in total ATPase activity. These data demonstrate that chronic GH hypersecretion in the rat leads to a unique pattern of myocardial adaptation which allows the muscle to improve its contractile performance and economy simultaneously, thanks to myosin phenoconversion and an increase in the number of active enzymatic sites. Images PMID:2143510

  12. Comparison of the effectiveness of one- and two-suture prosthesis used to correct left laryngeal hemiplegia in the equine: followed by Nd:YAG laser ventricle ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Cindy; Tate, Lloyd P.; Correa, Maria T.

    1992-06-01

    The effectiveness of one or two suture prothesis in performing laryngoplasty was compared. Forty-six horses treated for left laryngeal hemiplegia at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM) between January 1987 and April 1991 were included in the study. Thirty-seven of the horses were treated with two sutures, while nine were treated with one suture. All horses, after recovering from general anesthesia, were sedated the following day and were subjected to a transendoscopic neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser ablation of the left laryngeal ventricle. Ability to perform after treatment relative to before treatment, reduction or elimination of respiratory noise, owner or trainer satisfaction, were compared for the two suture prosthetic procedures using chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test. No statistical significant differences were found for performance, reduction of noise, and owner or trainer satisfaction. The use of one or two sutures seemed to have no effect on the effectiveness of prosthetic laryngoplasty procedure followed by Nd:YAG ventricular ablation.

  13. Nonlinear solid finite element analysis of mitral valves with heterogeneous leaflet layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prot, V.; Skallerud, B.

    2009-02-01

    An incompressible transversely isotropic hyperelastic material for solid finite element analysis of a porcine mitral valve response is described. The material model implementation is checked in single element tests and compared with a membrane implementation in an out-of-plane loading test to study how the layered structures modify the stress response for a simple geometry. Three different collagen layer arrangements are used in finite element analysis of the mitral valve. When the leaflets are arranged in two layers with the collagen on the ventricular side, the stress in the fibre direction through the thickness in the central part of the anterior leaflet is homogenized and the peak stress is reduced. A simulation using membrane elements is also carried out for comparison with the solid finite element results. Compared to echocardiographic measurements, the finite element models bulge too much in the left atrium. This may be due to evidence of active muscle fibres in some parts of the anterior leaflet, whereas our constitutive modelling is based on passive material.

  14. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left cardiac ventricle in a 57-year-old patient after urgent coronary artery bypass grafting and surgical mitral valve replacement due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Joanna; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Rybicka-Musialik, Anna; Janusiewicz, Piotr; Malinowski, Marcin; Deja, Marek A

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in a patient after inferior wall myocardial infarction. The infarction was complicated with acute mitral insufficiency, pulmonary edema, and cardiogenic shock. Urgent surgical mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. After several months, the patient was hospitalized again because of deterioration of exercise tolerance and symptoms of acute congestive heart failure. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle was recognized and successfully treated surgically. PMID:26336464

  15. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left cardiac ventricle in a 57-year-old patient after urgent coronary artery bypass grafting and surgical mitral valve replacement due to acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Rybicka-Musialik, Anna; Janusiewicz, Piotr; Malinowski, Marcin; Deja, Marek A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in a patient after inferior wall myocardial infarction. The infarction was complicated with acute mitral insufficiency, pulmonary edema, and cardiogenic shock. Urgent surgical mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. After several months, the patient was hospitalized again because of deterioration of exercise tolerance and symptoms of acute congestive heart failure. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle was recognized and successfully treated surgically. PMID:26336464

  16. Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells Promote Myocardial Fibrosis and Reverse Remodeling of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Fatkhudinov, Timur; Bolshakova, Galina; Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Khokhlova, Oksana; Murashev, Arkady; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is increasingly recognized as a beneficial practice in various cardiac conditions, but its fundamentals remain largely unclear. The fates of transplanted multipotent stromal cells in postinfarction cardiac microenvironments are particularly understudied. To address this issue, labeled multipotent stromal cells were infused into rat myocardium at day 30 after myocardial infarction, against the background of postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Therapeutic effects of the transplantation were assessed by an exercise tolerance test. Histological examination at 14 or 30 days after the transplantation was conducted by means of immunostaining and quantitative image analysis. An improvement in the functional status of the cardiovascular system was observed after both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantations. Location of the label-positive cells within the heart was restricted to the affected part of myocardium. The transplanted cells could give rise to fibroblasts or myofibroblasts but not to cardiac myocytes or blood vessel cells. Both types of transplantation positively influenced scarring processes, and no expansion of fibrosis to border myocardium was observed. Left ventricular wall thickening associated with reduced dilatation index was promoted by transplantation of the autologous cells. According to the results, multipotent stromal cell transplantation prevents adverse remodeling and stimulates left ventricular reverse remodeling. PMID:25685158

  17. Transcriptional profiling of left ventricle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a rat model of postinfarction heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) often results in left ventricular (LV) remodeling followed by heart failure (HF). It is of great clinical importance to understand the molecular mechanisms that trigger transition from compensated LV injury to HF and to identify relevant diagnostic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate gene expression in the LV and to evaluate their reflection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods MI was induced in rats by ligation of the proximal left coronary artery. Rats with small, moderate, and large MI size were included into the experiment two months after the operation. The development of heart failure was estimated by echocardiography and catheterization. Microarrays were used to compare the LV and PBMCs transcriptomes of control and experimental animals. Results Only rats with a large MI developed extensive LV remodeling and heart failure. 840 transcripts were altered in LV of failing hearts, and especially numerous were those associated with the extracellular matrix. In contrast, no significant gene expression changes were seen in LVs of rats with moderate or small MI that had compensated LV injury. We showed that ceruloplasmin was similarly overexpressed in the heart and blood in response to HF, whereas downregulation of tetraspanin 12 was significant only in the PBMCs. Conclusion A large size of infarcted area is critical for progression of LV remodeling and HF development, associated with altered gene expression in the heart. Ceruloplasmin and tetraspanin 12 are potential convenient markers in readily obtainable PBMCs. PMID:24206753

  18. Nonlinear finite element modeling of THUNDER piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-06-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (Thin Layer Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  19. Quality assessment and control of finite element solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Babuska, Ivo

    1987-01-01

    Status and some recent developments in the techniques for assessing the reliability of finite element solutions are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: the major types of errors in the finite element solutions; techniques used for a posteriori error estimation and the reliability of these estimators; the feedback and adaptive strategies for improving the finite element solutions; and postprocessing approaches used for improving the accuracy of stresses and other important engineering data. Also, future directions for research needed to make error estimation and adaptive movement practical are identified.

  20. P-Finite-Element Program For Analysis Of Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1995-01-01

    BUCKY is p-finite-element computer program for highly accurate analysis of structures. Used to analyze buckling, bending, and in-plane stress-and-strain behaviors of plates. Provides elastic-plastic solutions for isotropic plates in states of plane stress, and axisymmetric solution sequence used to treat three-dimensional problems. Computes response of plate to variety of loading and boundary conditions by use of higher-order displacement function in p-finite-element method. Enables user to obtain results more accurate than obtained by use of traditional h-finite elements. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  2. Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, Andrew J.; Sharpley, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms. The focus of this research is to derive and implement: 1) Wavelet based methodologies for the compression, transmission, decoding, and visualization of three dimensional finite element geometry and simulation data in a network environment; 2) methodologies for interactive algorithm monitoring and tracking in computational mechanics; and 3) Methodologies for interactive algorithm steering for the acceleration of large scale finite element simulations. Also included in this report are appendices describing the derivation of wavelet based Particle Image Velocity algorithms and reduced order input-output models for nonlinear systems by utilizing wavelet approximations.

  3. Advances in 3D electromagnetic finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    Numerous advances in electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) have been made in recent years. The maturity of frequency domain and eigenmode calculations, and the growth of time domain applications is briefly reviewed. A high accuracy 3D electromagnetic finite element field solver employing quadratic hexahedral elements and quadratic mixed-order one-form basis functions will also be described. The solver is based on an object-oriented C++ class library. Test cases demonstrate that frequency errors less than 10 ppm can be achieved using modest workstations, and that the solutions have no contamination from spurious modes. The role of differential geometry and geometrical physics in finite element analysis is also discussed.

  4. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  5. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  6. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  7. An enhanced finite element technique for diffuse phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, I.; Krauß, M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a finite element technique to enhance phase-field simulations. As adaptive p-method it and can be generally applied to finite element formulations. However, diffuse interfaces have non-linear gradients within regions typically smaller compared to the size of the overall model. Thus, enhanced field interpolation with higher polynomial functions on demand allows for coarser meshing or lower regularization length for the phase transition. Our method preserves continuity of finite elements and is particularly advantageous in the context of parallelized computing. An analytical solution for the evolution of a phase-field variable governed by the Allen-Cahn equation is used to define an error measure and to investigate the proposed method. Several examples demonstrate the capability of this finite element technique.

  8. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  9. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  10. Interpolation functions in the immersed boundary and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we review the existing interpolation functions and introduce a finite element interpolation function to be used in the immersed boundary and finite element methods. This straightforward finite element interpolation function for unstructured grids enables us to obtain a sharper interface that yields more accurate interfacial solutions. The solution accuracy is compared with the existing interpolation functions such as the discretized Dirac delta function and the reproducing kernel interpolation function. The finite element shape function is easy to implement and it naturally satisfies the reproducing condition. They are interpolated through only one element layer instead of smearing to several elements. A pressure jump is clearly captured at the fluid-solid interface. Two example problems are studied and results are compared with other numerical methods. A convergence test is thoroughly conducted for the independent fluid and solid meshes in a fluid-structure interaction system. The required mesh size ratio between the fluid and solid domains is obtained.

  11. Error analysis of finite element solutions for postbuckled cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sistla, Rajaram; Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    A general method of error analysis and correction is investigated for the discrete finite-element results for cylindrical shell structures. The method for error analysis is an adaptation of the method of successive approximation. When applied to the equilibrium equations of shell theory, successive approximations derive an approximate continuous solution from the discrete finite-element results. The advantage of this continuous solution is that it contains continuous partial derivatives of an order higher than the basis functions of the finite-element solution. Preliminary numerical results are presented in this paper for the error analysis of finite-element results for a postbuckled stiffened cylindrical panel modeled by a general purpose shell code. Numerical results from the method have previously been reported for postbuckled stiffened plates. A procedure for correcting the continuous approximate solution by Newton's method is outlined.

  12. Generalized multiscale finite element method. Symmetric interior penalty coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efendiev, Y.; Galvis, J.; Lazarov, R.; Moon, M.; Sarkis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by applications to numerical simulations of flows in highly heterogeneous porous media, we develop multiscale finite element methods for second order elliptic equations. We discuss a multiscale model reduction technique in the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We propose two different finite element spaces on the coarse mesh. The first space is based on a local eigenvalue problem that uses an interior weighted L2-norm and a boundary weighted L2-norm for computing the “mass” matrix. The second choice is based on generation of a snapshot space and subsequent selection of a subspace of a reduced dimension. The approximation with these multiscale spaces is based on the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method framework. We investigate the stability and derive error estimates for the methods and further experimentally study their performance on a representative number of numerical examples.

  13. The finite element machine: An experiment in parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Peebles, S. W.; Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.; Adams, L.

    1982-01-01

    The finite element machine is a prototype computer designed to support parallel solutions to structural analysis problems. The hardware architecture and support software for the machine, initial solution algorithms and test applications, and preliminary results are described.

  14. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  15. A modified finite element procedure for underwater shock analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.K.

    1990-12-31

    Using the regular finite element method for analyzing wave propagation problems presents difficulties: (a) The finite element mesh gives spurious reflection of the traveling wave and (b) Since a finite element model has to have a finite boundary, the wave is reflected by the outside boundary. However, for underwater shock problems, only the response of the structure is of major interest, not the behavior of the wave itself, and the shock wave can be assumed to be spherical. By taking advantage of the limited scope of the underwater shock problem, a finite element procedure can be developed that eliminates the above difficulties. This procedure not only can give very accurate solutions but it may also include structural nonlinearities and effect of cavitation.

  16. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  17. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  18. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  19. Failing left ventricle to ascending aorta conduit-Hybrid implantation of a melody valve and NuMed covered stent.

    PubMed

    Gössl, Mario; Johnson, Jonathan N; Hagler, Donald J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old woman with increasing shortness of breath, a new 3/4 diastolic murmur, and a complex history of LV outflow tract obstruction. She has undergone multiple surgeries including the replacement of her old LV apex to ascending aorta conduit with a 20-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, addition of a 24-mm homograft sutured between the conduit and the LV apex, and insertion of a 21-mm Freestyle porcine valve conduit between the Gore-Tex tube graft and allograft at age 23. The current assessment showed a failing Freestyle conduit prosthesis leading to left heart decompensation. Due to substantial surgical risk, the patient underwent successful implantation of a Melody valve into the Gore-Tex tube and exclusion of the failing Freestyle bioprosthesis with a NuMed CP stent in a hybrid procedure. The case nicely illustrates the collaborative potential of cardiovascular surgeons and interventional cardiologists in the new arena of a hybrid operating room. Complex hybrid procedures like the current one, especially those including percutaneous placements of valves, offer therapeutic options for patients that are otherwise too high risk for conventional open heart surgery. PMID:23784974

  20. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  1. Quantitative study of the effect of tissue microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  2. Quantitative Study of the Effect of Tissue Microstructure on Contraction in a Computational Model of Rat Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  3. [Extracellular matrix remodeling myocardium of the left ventricle rats with experimental heart failure after perindopril and melatonin administration].

    PubMed

    Liskova, Iu V; Salikova, S P; Stadnikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the reorganization of extracellular matrix left ventricular myocardium (LVM) rats (n = 38) with experimental heart failure (EHF) as affected by perindopril and melatonin administration. Rats LVM was studied using the methods of light microscopy, immunocytochemistry and morphometry. At day 14 of EHF, marked mosaic staining cardiomyocytes acid dyes, manifest hemodynamic disturbances: venous and capillary congestion, lymphostasis, perivascular and interstitial edema, there was a increase the volume density (OD) stroma, high activity of MMP-1 and TIMP-1. After modeling the EHF to 28 days in LVM, a further increase of hemodynamic met, cardiosclerosis areas and perivascular sclerosis, a significant increase OD stroma, observed decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and TIMP-1. In rats given perindopril and melatonin for 14 days, there was a regression of pathological changes in the balance was maintained MMP-1/TIMP-1 ratio close to the group of intact rats. Cardioprotective effects of perindopril and melatonin on extracellular matrix LVM of rats with EHF is discussed. PMID:25702403

  4. Mixed finite elements for the Richards' equation: linearization procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, I. S.; Radu, F.; Knabner, P.

    2004-07-01

    We consider mixed finite element discretization for a class of degenerate parabolic problems including the Richards' equation. After regularization, time discretization is achieved by an Euler implicit scheme, while mixed finite elements are employed for the discretization in space. Based on the results obtained in (Radu et al. RANA Preprint 02-06, Eindhoven University of Technology, 2002), this paper considers a simple iterative scheme to solve the emerging nonlinear elliptic problems.

  5. Finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Rene

    1994-01-01

    The finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design is presented. The design is the result of a technology utilization request. The designer's intent is to soften the riding feeling by incorporating a mechanism attaching the wheel rim to the spokes that would allow considerable deflection upon compressive loads. A finite element analysis was conducted to verify proper structural function. Displacement and stress results are presented and conclusions are provided.

  6. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  7. Finite element analysis of vibration and damping of laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikards, Rolands

    Simple finite elements are used to form a special laminated beam and plate superelements excluding all degrees of freedom in the nodes of the middle layer, and the finite element analysis of this structure is performed. To estimate damping of structures, modal loss factors are calculated, using two methods: the 'exact' method of complex eigenvalues and the approximate energy method. It was found that both methods give satisfactory results. However, the energy method needs less computer time than the exact method.

  8. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  9. Evaluation of a hybrid, anisotropic, multilayered, quadrilateral finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. C.; Blackburn, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A multilayered finite element with bending-extensional coupling is evaluated for: (1) buckling of general laminated plates; (2) thermal stresses of laminated plates cured at elevated temperatures; (3) displacements of a bimetallic beam; and (4) displacement and stresses of a single-cell box beam with warped cover panels. Also, displacements and stresses for flat and spherical orthotropic and anisotropic segments are compared with results from higher order plate and shell finite-element analyses.

  10. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  11. Simulation of two-dimensional waterflooding using mixed finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Jaffre, J.; Cohen, G.; Dupuy, M.; Dieste, I.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the simulation of incompressible diphasic flows in two dimensions is presented, the distinctive features of which are: (1) reformation of the basic equation and specific choices of the finite element approximation of the same; (11) use of a mixed finite elements method, approximating both scalar and vector functions. Several test examples are shown, including gravity and capillary effects. The use of discontinuous basis functions proved successful for an accurate representation of sharp fronts. 16 refs.

  12. Progressively heterogeneous mismatch of regional oxygen delivery to consumption during graded coronary stenosis in pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Alders, David J C; Groeneveld, A B Johan; Binsl, Thomas W; van Beek, Johannes H G M

    2015-11-15

    In normal hearts, myocardial perfusion is fairly well matched to regional metabolic demand, although both are distributed heterogeneously. Nonuniform regional metabolic vulnerability during coronary stenosis would help to explain nonuniform necrosis during myocardial infarction. In the present study, we investigated whether metabolism-perfusion correlation diminishes during coronary stenosis, indicating increasing mismatch of regional oxygen supply to demand. Thirty anesthetized male pigs were studied: controls without coronary stenosis (n = 11); group I, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary stenosis leading to coronary perfusion pressure reduction to 70 mmHg (n = 6); group II, stenosis with perfusion pressure of about 35 mmHg (n = 6); and group III, stenosis with perfusion pressure of 45 mmHg combined with adenosine infusion (n = 7). [2-(13)C]- and [1,2-(13)C]acetate infusion was used to calculate regional O2 consumption from glutamate NMR spectra measured for multiple tissue samples of about 100 mg dry mass in the LAD region. Blood flow was measured with microspheres in the same regions. In control hearts without stenosis, regional oxygen extraction did not correlate with basal blood flow. Average myocardial O2 delivery and consumption decreased during coronary stenosis, but vasodilation with adenosine counteracted this. Regional oxygen extraction was on average decreased during stenosis, suggesting adaptation of metabolism to lower oxygen supply after half an hour of ischemia. Whereas regional O2 delivery correlated with O2 consumption in controls, this relation was progressively lost with graded coronary hypotension but partially reestablished by adenosine infusion. Therefore, coronary stenosis leads to heterogeneous metabolic stress indicated by decreasing regional O2 supply to demand matching in myocardium during partial coronary obstruction. PMID:26408545

  13. Activation of GPR30 attenuates diastolic dysfunction and left ventricle remodelling in oophorectomized mRen2.Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Jessup, Jewell A.; Lin, Marina S.; Chagas, Clarissa; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Groban, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    Aims GPR30 is a novel oestrogen receptor expressed in various tissues, including the heart. We determined the role of GPR30 in the maintenance of left ventricular (LV) structure and diastolic function after the surgical loss of ovarian hormones in the female mRen2.Lewis rat, a model emulating the cardiac phenotype of the post-menopausal woman. Methods and results Bilateral oophorectomy (OVX) or sham surgery was performed in study rats; the selective GPR30 agonist, G-1 (50 µg/kg/day), or vehicle was given subcutaneously to OVX rats from 13–15 weeks of age. Similar to the cardiac phenotype of sham rats, G-1 preserved diastolic function and structure relative to vehicle-treated OVX littermates independent of changes in blood pressure. G-1 limited the OVX-induced increase in LV filling pressure, LV mass, wall thickness, interstitial collagen deposition, atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA levels, and cardiac NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression. In vitro studies showed that G-1 inhibited angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, evidenced by reductions in cell size, protein content per cell, and atrial natriuretic factor mRNA levels. The GPR30 antagonist, G15, inhibited the protective effects of both oestradiol and G-1 on this hypertrophy. Conclusion These data show that the GPR30 agonist G-1 mitigates the adverse effects of oestrogen loss on LV remodelling and the development of diastolic dysfunction in the study rats. This expands our knowledge of the sex-specific mechanisms underlying diastolic dysfunction and provides a potential therapeutic target for reducing the progression of this cardiovascular disease process in post-menopausal women. PMID:22328091

  14. Max-flow segmentation of the left ventricle by recovering subject-specific distributions via a bound of the Bhattacharyya measure.

    PubMed

    Ben Ayed, Ismail; Chen, Hua-Mei; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ross, Ian; Li, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates fast detection of the left ventricle (LV) endo- and epicardium boundaries in a cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) sequence following the optimization of two original discrete cost functions, each containing global intensity and geometry constraints based on the Bhattacharyya similarity. The cost functions and the corresponding max-flow optimization built upon an original bound of the Bhattacharyya measure yield competitive results in nearly real-time. Within each frame, the algorithm seeks the LV cavity and myocardium regions consistent with subject-specific model distributions learned from the first frame in the sequence. Based on global rather than pixel-wise information, the proposed formulation relaxes the need of a large training set and optimization with respect to geometric transformations. Different from related active contour methods, it does not require a large number of iterative updates of the segmentation and the corresponding computationally onerous kernel density estimates (KDEs). The algorithm requires very few iterations and KDEs to converge. Furthermore, the proposed bound can be used for several other applications and, therefore, can lead to segmentation algorithms which share the flexibility of active contours and computational advantages of max-flow optimization. Quantitative evaluations over 2280 images acquired from 20 subjects demonstrated that the results correlate well with independent manual segmentations by an expert. Moreover, comparisons with a related recent active contour method showed that the proposed framework brings significant improvements in regard to accuracy and computational efficiency. PMID:21705264

  15. Comparison of peak filling rate of left ventricle pre and post coronary bypass graft in patients with and without myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, M.; Gentili, A.; Bolooki, H.; Clarke, L.; Ashkar, F.; Sfakianakis, G.; Serafini, A.

    1984-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate improvement in diastolic function by measuring peak filling rate (PFR) of left ventricle in 57 patients (pts) undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Twenty seven patients had coronary artery disease (CAD) but no history of myocardial infarction (MI) (Group 1). Twenty three patients had documented (MI) but no aneurysms (Group 2). Group 3 had 7 patients with CAD and aneurysms. The pre and post operative ejection fraction (EF) and PFR were calculated from the time activity curve of resting gated cardiac studies performed so that the time per frame was 0.03 sec. The authors conclude that PFR is a more sensitive index than EF in evaluating the post-operative improvement in ventricular function in patients undergoing CABG especially in patients with normal wall motion and normal ejection fraction and will be a useful index to use for the follow-up of these patients. Improvement in PFR correlated well with the post-operative course of the patients. All patients who decreased thin PFR had a complicated post-op-course.

  16. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  17. Citrate Synthase Is a Novel In Vivo Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Substrate That Regulates Mitochondrial Function in the Postmyocardial Infarction Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.; Cates, Courtney A.; DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y.; Ma, Yonggang; Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Halade, Ganesh V.; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Fields, Gregg B.; Weintraub, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To evaluate the role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 deletion on citrate synthase (CS) activity postmyocardial infarction (MI). Results: We fractionated left ventricle (LV) samples using a differential solubility-based approach. The insoluble protein fraction was analyzed by mass spectrometry, and we identified CS as a potential intracellular substrate of MMP-9 in the MI setting. CS protein levels increased in the insoluble fraction at day 1 post-MI in both genotypes (p<0.05) but not in the noninfarcted remote region. The CS activity decreased in the infarcted tissue of wild-type (WT) mice at day 1 post-MI (p<0.05), but this was not observed in the MMP-9 null mice, suggesting that MMP-9 deletion helps to maintain the mitochondrial activity post-MI. Additionally, inflammatory gene transcription was increased post-MI in the WT mice and attenuated in the MMP-9 null mice. MMP-9 cleaved CS in vitro, generating an ∼20 kDa fragment. Innovation: By applying a sample fractionation and proteomics approach, we were able to identify a novel MMP-9-related altered mitochondrial metabolic activity early post-MI. Conclusion: Our data suggest that MMP-9 deletion improves mitochondrial function post-MI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1974–1985. PMID:24382150

  18. Immediate regional endocardial surface expansion following coronary occlusion in the canine left ventricle: disproportionate effects of anterior versus inferior ischemia.

    PubMed

    Picard, M H; Wilkins, G T; Gillam, L D; Thomas, J D; Weyman, A E

    1991-03-01

    The exact time of onset of functional expansion after acute myocardial infarction/ischemia remains unclear in spite of its potential link to chronic pathologic infarct expansion and its potential implications for therapy. To examine this early change in ventricular morphology, 14 open-chest dogs were studied with two-dimensional echocardiography before and after occlusion (10 minutes) of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, n = 7) or circumflex artery (CIRC, n = 7). The endocardial surface area (ESA) and the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM) were reconstructed from the echocardiographic data using a previously reported technique for quantitatively mapping the ESA and extent of AWM. For the total group (N = 14), the mean ESA before occlusion was 48.9 +/- 9.8 cm2, increasing to 65.7 +/- 18.9 cm2 at 10 minutes occlusion (p less than 0.001). For the LAD subgroup, the mean ESA before occlusion was 50.7 +/- 9.3 cm2, increasing to 79.1 +/- 14.1 cm2 at 10 minutes following occlusion (p less than 0.001). For the CIRC subgroup, the mean ESA before occlusion was 47.1 +/- 10.8 cm2, increasing to 52.3 +/- 12.6 cm2 at 10 minutes after occlusion (p less than 0.001). The ESA increase for the LAD subgroup was significantly larger than that of the CIRC subgroup (LAD range 14.5 to 49.9 cm2 versus CIRC range 1.5 to 9 cm2, p less than 0.0001). Coronary occlusion resulted in similarly sized regions of AWM for both subgroups (LAD, 31.3 +/- 12.2 cm2 versus CIRC, 25.9 +/- 10.3 cm2, p = n.s.). For the LAD group, the largest increase in endocardial circumference occurred within the zone of AWM at the apex (39.9 +/- 12%). The endocardial surface area therefore expands immediately after coronary occlusion and the magnitude of this process is primarily related to the site (anteroapical) rather than to the extent of AWM. PMID:2000741

  19. Evaluation of Left Ventricle Function by Regional Fractional Area Change (RFAC) in a Mouse Model of Myocardial Infarction Secondary to Valsartan Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, Laura; Colazzo, Francesca; Fontana, Lucia; Colombo, Gualtiero I.; Piacentini, Luca; Bono, Elisa; Milano, Giuseppina; Paleari, Serena; Palermo, Annamaria; Guerrini, Uliano; Tremoli, Elena; Sironi, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aim Left ventricle (LV) regional fractional area change (RFAC) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) allows the non-invasive localization and quantification of the degree of myocardial infarction (MI), and could be applied to assess the effectiveness of pharmacological or regenerative therapies. Here we investigate the ability of RFAC to identify regional dysfunction and discriminate the effect of pharmacological treatment with valsartan, a selective antagonist of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, in a model of MI. Methods and Results C57BL/6N mice, undergoing coronary artery ligation, were divided into two groups: untreated (MI) or treated with valsartan (MI+Val). Sham-operated mice were used as a control. Cardiac dimensions and function were assessed at baseline, 24 hours, 1 and 4 weeks post surgery by CMR and echocardiography. At sacrifice histology and whole-genome gene expression profiling were performed. RFAC was able to detect significant differences between treatment groups whereas the global ejection fraction was not. RFAC showed greater loss of regional contraction in remote non-infarcted myocardium in MI group than in MI+Val group. Consistently, in the same region MI+Val mice showed reduced myocyte hypertrophy, fibroblast proliferation, and fibrosis and modulation of target genes; in addition, left atrium volumes, appendage length and duct contraction were preserved. Conclusion In this study, RFAC effectively estimated the degree of systolic dysfunction and discriminated the regions preserved by pharmacological treatment. RFAC index is a promising tool to monitor changes in LV contraction and to assess the effectiveness of therapeutic regimens in clinical settings. PMID:26291973

  20. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  1. Higher-Order Finite Elements for Computing Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2004-01-01

    Two variants of the finite-element method have been developed for use in computational simulations of radiative transfers of heat among diffuse gray surfaces. Both variants involve the use of higher-order finite elements, across which temperatures and radiative quantities are assumed to vary according to certain approximations. In this and other applications, higher-order finite elements are used to increase (relative to classical finite elements, which are assumed to be isothermal) the accuracies of final numerical results without having to refine computational meshes excessively and thereby incur excessive computation times. One of the variants is termed the radiation sub-element (RSE) method, which, itself, is subject to a number of variations. This is the simplest and most straightforward approach to representation of spatially variable surface radiation. Any computer code that, heretofore, could model surface-to-surface radiation can incorporate the RSE method without major modifications. In the basic form of the RSE method, each finite element selected for use in computing radiative heat transfer is considered to be a parent element and is divided into sub-elements for the purpose of solving the surface-to-surface radiation-exchange problem. The sub-elements are then treated as classical finite elements; that is, they are assumed to be isothermal, and their view factors and absorbed heat fluxes are calculated accordingly. The heat fluxes absorbed by the sub-elements are then transferred back to the parent element to obtain a radiative heat flux that varies spatially across the parent element. Variants of the RSE method involve the use of polynomials to interpolate and/or extrapolate to approximate spatial variations of physical quantities. The other variant of the finite-element method is termed the integration method (IM). Unlike in the RSE methods, the parent finite elements are not subdivided into smaller elements, and neither isothermality nor other

  2. [Quantitative Evaluation of Intracardiac Blood Flow by Left Ventricle Dynamic Anatovy Based On Exact Solutions of Non-Stationary Navier-Stocks Equations for Selforganized tornado-Like Flows of Viscous Incompresssible Fluid].

    PubMed

    Talygin, E A; Zazybo, N A; Zhorzholiany, S T; Krestinich, I M; Mironov, A A; Kiknadze, G I; Bokerya, L A; Gorodkov, A Y; Makarenko, V N; Alexandrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    New approach to intracardiac blood flow condition analysis based on geometric parameters of left ventricle flow channel has been suggested. Parameters, that used in this method, follow from exact solutions of nonstationary Navier-Stocks equations for selforganized tornado-like flows of viscous incompressible fluid. The main advantage of this method is considering dynamic anatomy of intracardiac cavity and trabeculae relief of left ventricle streamlined surface, both registered in a common mri-process, as flow condition indicator. Calculated quantity options that characterizes blood flow condition can be use as diagnostic criterias for estimation of violation in blood circulation function which entails heart ejection reduction. Developed approach allows to clarify heart jet organization mechanism and estimate the share of the tornado-like flow self-organization in heart ejection structure. PMID:27149823

  3. Generating anatomically accurate finite element meshes for electrical impedance tomography of the human head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Canhua; Dai, Meng; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-07-01

    For electrical impedance tomography (EIT) of brain, the use of anatomically accurate and patient-specific finite element (FE) mesh has been shown to confer significant improvements in the quality of image reconstruction. But, given the lack of a rapid method to achieve the accurate anatomic geometry of the head, the generation of patient-specifc mesh is time-comsuming. In this paper, a modified fuzzy c-means algorithm based on non-local means method is performed to implement the segmentation of different layers in the head based on head CT images. This algorithm showed a better effect, especially an accurate recognition of the ventricles and a suitable performance dealing with noise. And the FE mesh established according to the segmentation results is validated in computational simulation. So a rapid practicable method can be provided for the generation of patient-specific FE mesh of the human head that is suitable for brain EIT.

  4. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  5. Swimming training attenuates the morphological reorganization of the myocardium and local inflammation in the left ventricle of growing rats with untreated experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Edson; Natali, Antônio José; da Silva, Márcia Ferreira; Gomes, Gilton de Jesus; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Toledo, Marileila Marques; Drummond, Filipe Rios; Ramos, Regiane Maria Soares; Dos Santos, Eliziária Cardoso; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Maldonado, Izabel Regina dos Santos Costa

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac remodeling, myocardial dysfunction, low-grade inflammation, and reduced cardiac adiponectin in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Alternatively, physical exercise is an important strategy for the management of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the influence of low-intensity swimming training in cardiac cytokines, structural remodeling, and cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction in growing rats with untreated experimental DM. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n=14, per group): sedentary control (SC), exercised control (EC), sedentary diabetic (SD), and exercised diabetic (ED). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (60 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Animals from exercised groups swam (5 days/week, 90 min/day, loading up to 5% body weight around the animal's chest) for 8 weeks. The left ventricle (LV) was removed for molecular, morphological, and cardiomyocyte mechanical analysis. Diabetic animals presented cardiac remodeling with myocardial histoarchitectural disorganization, fibrosis, and necrosis. The capillary density was lower in diabetic animals. LV cardiomyocytes from diabetic animals exhibited more prolonged time to the peak of contraction and time to half relaxation than those from control animals. The cardiac levels of interleukin 10, nitric oxide, and total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin were significantly decreased in diabetic animals. Exercise training reduced the level of TNF-α, increased capillary density, and attenuated the histopathological parameters assessed in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the cardiac structural remodeling coexists with reduced levels of total and HMW adiponectin, inflammation, and cardiomyocyte contractility dysfunction in experimental DM. More important, low-intensity swimming training attenuates part of these pathological changes, indicating the beneficial role for exercise in untreated T1DM. PMID:26896925

  6. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  7. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  8. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  9. Design and finite element analysis of oval man way

    SciTech Connect

    Hari, Y.; Gryder, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an oval man way in the side wall of a cylindrical pressure vessel. ASME Code Section 8 is used to obtain the design parameters of the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The code calculations require some assumptions which may not be valid. A typical design example is taken. STAAD III finite element code with plate elements is used to model the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The stresses calculated using ASME Code Section 8 and other analytical formulas for plate and shells are compared with the stresses obtained by Finite Element Modeling. This paper gives the designer of oval man way the ability to perform a finite element analysis and compare it with the analytical calculations and assumptions made. This gives added confidence to the designer as to the validity of his calculations and assumptions.

  10. User's Guide for ENSAERO_FE Parallel Finite Element Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1999-01-01

    A high fidelity parallel static structural analysis capability is created and interfaced to the multidisciplinary analysis package ENSAERO-MPI of Ames Research Center. This new module replaces ENSAERO's lower fidelity simple finite element and modal modules. Full aircraft structures may be more accurately modeled using the new finite element capability. Parallel computation is performed by breaking the full structure into multiple substructures. This approach is conceptually similar to ENSAERO's multizonal fluid analysis capability. The new substructure code is used to solve the structural finite element equations for each substructure in parallel. NASTRANKOSMIC is utilized as a front end for this code. Its full library of elements can be used to create an accurate and realistic aircraft model. It is used to create the stiffness matrices for each substructure. The new parallel code then uses an iterative preconditioned conjugate gradient method to solve the global structural equations for the substructure boundary nodes.

  11. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J M

    2004-08-12

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  12. Electrical and Joule heating relationship investigation using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K. M.

    2015-09-01

    The finite element method is vastly used in material strength analysis. The nature of the finite element solver, which solves the Fourier equation of stress and strain analysis, made it possible to apply for conduction heat transfer Fourier Equation. Similarly the Current and voltage equation is also liner Fourier equation. The nature of the governing equation makes it possible to numerical investigate the electrical joule heating phenomena in electronic component. This paper highlights the Finite Element Method (FEM) application onto semiconductor interconnects to determine the specific contact resistance (SCR). Metal and semiconductor interconnects is used as model. The result confirms the possibility and validity of FEM utilization to investigate the Joule heating due electrical resistance.

  13. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  14. Probabilistic finite elements for fatigue and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, Ted; Liu, Wing Kam

    1992-01-01

    Attenuation is focused on the development of Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines the finite element method with statistics and reliability methods, and its application to linear, nonlinear structural mechanics problems and fracture mechanics problems. The computational tool based on the Stochastic Boundary Element Method is also given for the reliability analysis of a curvilinear fatigue crack growth. The existing PFEM's have been applied to solve for two types of problems: (1) determination of the response uncertainty in terms of the means, variance and correlation coefficients; and (2) determination the probability of failure associated with prescribed limit states.

  15. Finite Element Modelling and Analysis of Conventional Pultrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishin, P.; Barkanov, E.; Bondarchuk, A.

    2015-11-01

    Pultrusion is one of many composite manufacturing techniques and one of the most efficient methods for producing fiber reinforced polymer composite parts with a constant cross-section. Numerical simulation is helpful for understanding the manufacturing process and developing scientific means for the pultrusion tooling design. Numerical technique based on the finite element method has been developed for the simulation of pultrusion processes. It uses the general purpose finite element software ANSYS Mechanical. It is shown that the developed technique predicts the temperature and cure profiles, which are in good agreement with those published in the open literature.

  16. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  17. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  18. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  19. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  20. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a ``global-local`` finite element analysis. A ``global`` analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A ``local`` layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the ``global`` analysis are used as loads to the ``local`` analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  1. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a global-local'' finite element analysis. A global'' analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A local'' layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the global'' analysis are used as loads to the local'' analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  2. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  3. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  4. Error analysis of finite element solutions for postbuckled plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sistla, Rajaram; Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1988-01-01

    An error analysis of results from finite-element solutions of problems in shell structures is further developed, incorporating the results of an additional numerical analysis by which oscillatory behavior is eliminated. The theory is extended to plates with initial geometric imperfections, and this novel analysis is programmed as a postprocessor for a general-purpose finite-element code. Numerical results are given for the case of a stiffened panel in compression and a plate loaded in shear by a 'picture-frame' test fixture.

  5. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  6. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  7. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  8. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  9. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  10. Adaptive finite-element method for diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Chen, Zhiming; Wu, Haijun

    2005-06-01

    A second-order finite-element adaptive strategy with error control for one-dimensional grating problems is developed. The unbounded computational domain is truncated to a bounded one by a perfectly-matched-layer (PML) technique. The PML parameters, such as the thickness of the layer and the medium properties, are determined through sharp a posteriori error estimates. The adaptive finite-element method is expected to increase significantly the accuracy and efficiency of the discretization as well as reduce the computation cost. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the competitiveness of the proposed adaptive method.

  11. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  12. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  13. Azimuthally-dependent Finite Element Solution to the Cylindrical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osegueda, R.; Pierluissi, J.; Gil, L.; Revilla, A.; Villalva, G.; Dick, G.; Wang, D. SantiagoR.

    1994-01-01

    The cylindrical cavity resonator loaded with an anisotropic dielectric is analyzed as a two-dimensional problem using a finite element approach that assumes sinusoidal dependence in azimuth. This methodology allows the first finite element treatment of the technically important case of a resonator containing a sapphire element with a cylindrically aligned c axis. Second order trial functions together with quadrilateral elements are adopted in the calculations. The method was validated through comparisons with the analytical solutions for the hollow metal cavity and a coaxial cavity, as well as through measurements on a shielded sapphire resonator.

  14. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  15. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  16. Finite element methodology for integrated flow-thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Vemaganti, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    Papers entitled, An Adaptive Finite Element Procedure for Compressible Flows and Strong Viscous-Inviscid Interactions, and An Adaptive Remeshing Method for Finite Element Thermal Analysis, were presented at the June 27 to 29, 1988, meeting of the AIAA Thermophysics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, San Antonio, Texas. The papers describe research work supported under NASA/Langley Research Grant NsG-1321, and are submitted in fulfillment of the progress report requirement on the grant for the period ending February 29, 1988.

  17. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  18. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  19. Radiosity algorithms using higher order finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Troutman, R.; Max, N.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the current radiosity algorithms create a piecewise constant approximation to the actual radiosity. Through interpolation and extrapolation, a continuous solution is obtained. An accurate solution is found by increasing the number of patches which describe the scene. This has the effect of increasing the computation time as well as the memory requirements. By using techniques found in the finite element method, we can incorporate an interpolation function directly into our form factor computation. We can then use less elements to achieve a more accurate solution. Two algorithms, derived from the finite element method, are described and analyzed.

  20. Considerations of crack growth and plasticity in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. D.; Liebowitz, H.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was made of crack growth in a center-cracked specimen subjected to monotonically increasing load until the point of fast fracture. Since part of the specimen experienced unloading, the boundary value problem which was formulated was based upon incremental theory of plasticity. Experimental load and crack size records were utilized. Linear relations between plastic energy and crack growth were observed. Fracture toughness parameters, which were evaluated at the onset of unstable crack propagation from finite-element analysis, were in good agreement with those determined experimentally.

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Wenyong; Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng; Liu Dong; Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu; Chen Zhengwang; Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai; Hu Desheng

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7-45.4% and 10.8-37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6-35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0-45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5-45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V{sub {>=}12}), AMT (V{sub >11}) and LV (V{sub >10}) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving {>=}5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5-21.5%, 25.2-29.8%, and 22.8-29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6-20.6%, 23.1-29.6%, and 17.3-29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

  2. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  3. The finite element machine - An assessment of the impact of parallel computing on future finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    The requirements of complex aerospace vehicles combined with the age of structural analysis systems enhance the need to advance technology toward a new generation of structural analysis capability. Recent and impeding advances in parallel and supercomputers provide the opportunity to significantly improve these structural analysis capabilities for large order finite element problems. Long-term research in parallel computing, associated with the NASA Finite Element Machine project, is discussed. The results show the potential of parallel computers to provide substantial increases in computation speed over sequential computers. Results are given for sample problems in the areas of eigenvalue analysis and transient response.

  4. A finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Vemaganti, G.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element approach is presented for analysis of high speed viscous flows with an emphasis on predicting heating rates. Five computational issues relevant to the computation of steady flows are examined. Numerical results for supersonic and hypersonic problems address the computational issues and demonstrate the validity for the approach for analysis of high speed flows.

  5. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  6. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  7. Finite-element-based design tool for smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koko, Tamunoiyala S.; Orisamolu, Irewole R.; Smith, Malcolm J.; Akpan, Unyime O.

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated finite element-control methodology for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The method forms part of an effort to develop an integrated computational tool that includes finite element modeling; control algorithms; and deterministic, fuzzy and probabilistic optimization and integrity assessment of the structures and control systems. The finite element analysis is based on a 20 node thermopiezoelectric composite element for modeling the composite structure with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors and actuators; and control is based on the linear quadratic regulator and the independent modal space control methods. The method has been implemented in a computer code called SMARTCOM. Several example problems have been used to verify various aspects of the formulations and the analysis results from the present study compare well against other numerical or experimental results. Being based on the finite element method, the present formation can be conveniently used for the analysis and design of smart composite structures with complex geometrical configurations and loadings.

  8. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  9. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  10. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  11. Towards parallel I/O in finite element simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Pramono, Eddy; Felippa, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    I/O issues in finite element analysis on parallel processors are addressed. Viable solutions for both local and shared memory multiprocessors are presented. The approach is simple but limited by currently available hardware and software systems. Implementation is carried out on a CRAY-2 system. Performance results are reported.

  12. the finite element machine: An experiment in parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Peebles, S. W.; Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.; Adams, L.

    1982-01-01

    The Finite Element Machine at the NASA Langley Research Center is a prototype computer designed to support parallel solutions to structural analysis problems. The hardware architecture and support software for the machine, initial solution algorithms and test applications, and preliminary results are described. Directions for future work are presented.

  13. Experiences in interfacing NASTRAN with another finite element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwerzler, D. D.; Leverenz, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The coupling of NASTRAN to another finite element program developed for the static analysis of automotive structures is discussed. The two programs were coupled together to use the substructuring capability of the in-house program and the normal mode analysis capability of NASTRAN. Modifications were made to the NASTRAN program in order to make the coupling feasible.

  14. Spanwise variation of potential form drag. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The finite element method is used to calculate the spanwise variation of potential form drag of a wing at subsonic and supersonic speeds using linearly varying panels. The wing may be of arbitrary planform and nonplanar provided the wing panels are parallel to the aircraft axis.

  15. Probabilistic nonlinear finite element analysis of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells is developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated three-dimensional laminated composite shell element with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, is used. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed, and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. Reliability calculations are made by using the first-order reliability method combined with sensitivity derivatives from the finite element analysis. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables are incorporated, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. Two sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. In general, the procedure is quite effective in determining the response statistics and reliability for linear and geometric nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  16. Boundary control of parabolic systems - Finite-element approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, I.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element approximation of a Dirichlet type boundary control problem for parabolic systems is considered. An approach based on the direct approximation of an input-output semigroup formula is applied. Error estimates are derived for optimal state and optimal control, and it is noted that these estimates are actually optimal with respect to the approximation theoretic properties.

  17. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  18. Design, development and use of the finite element machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. M.; Voigt, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the considerations that went into the design of the Finite Element Machine, a research asynchronous parallel computer are described. The present status of the system is also discussed along with some indication of the type of results that were obtained.

  19. Incorporation of Hysteresis Effects into Magnetc Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Lee, S. J.; Melikhov, Y.; Jiles, D. C.; Garton, M.; Lopez, R.; Brasche, L.

    2004-02-01

    Hysteresis effects have usually been ignored in magnetic modeling due to the multi-valued property causing difficulty in its incorporation into numerical calculations such as those based on finite elements. A linear approximation of magnetic permeability or a nonlinear B-H curve formed by connecting the tips of the hysteresis loops has been widely used in magnetic modeling for these types of calculations. We have employed the Jiles-Atherton (J-A) hysteresis model for development of a finite element method algorithm incorporating hysteresis effects. J-A model is suited for numerical analysis such as finite element modeling because of the small number of degrees of freedom and its simple form of equation. A finite element method algorithm for hysteretic materials has been developed for estimation of the volume and the distribution of retained magnetic particles around a defect site. The volume of retained magnetic particles was found to depend not only on the existing current source strength but also on the remaining magnetization of a hysteretic material. Detailed algorithm and simulation results are presented.

  20. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  1. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  2. The finite element method: Is weighted volume integration essential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    In developing finite element equations for steady state and transient diffusion-type processes, weighted volume integration is generally assumed to be an intrinsic requirement. It is shown that such finite element equations can be developed directly and with ease on the basis of the elementary notion of a surface integral. Although weighted volume integration is mathematically correct, the algebraic equations stemming from it are no more informative than those derived directly on the basis of a surface integral. An interesting upshot is that the derivation based on surface integration does not require knowledge of a partial differential equation but yet is logically rigorous. It is commonly stated that weighted volume integration of the differential equation helps one carry out analyses of errors, convergence and existence, and therefore, weighted volume integration is preferable. It is suggested that because the direct derivation is logically consistent, numerical solutions emanating from it must be testable for accuracy and internal consistency in ways that the style of which may differ from the classical procedures of error- and convergence-analysis. In addition to simplifying the teaching of the finite element method, the thoughts presented in this paper may lead to establishing the finite element method independently in its own right, rather than it being a surrogate of the differential equation. The purpose of this paper is not to espouse any one particular way of formulating the finite element equations. Rather, it is one of introspection. The desire is to critically examine our traditional way of doing things and inquire whether alternate approaches may reveal to us new and interesting insights.

  3. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted. PMID:27107032

  4. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  5. Computerized symbolic manipulation in nonlinear finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of using computerized symbolic manipulation in the development of nonlinear finite elements is discussed. Three tasks which can be efficiently performed using computerized symbolic manipulation are identified: (1) generation of algebraic expressions for the stiffness coefficients of nonlinear finite elements, (2) generation of FORTRAN source code for numerical evaluation of stiffness coefficients, and (3) checking the correctness of the FORTRAN statements for the arrays of coefficients. The symbolic and algebraic manipulation system MACSYMA is used in the present study. Two sample MACSYMA programs are presented for the development of the nonlinear stiffness coefficients of two-dimensional, shear-flexible, doubly-curved deep shell elements. The first program is for displacement models and the second program is for mixed models with discontinuous stress-resultant fields at interelement boundaries.

  6. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  7. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  8. Finite element neural networks for electromagnetic inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2002-05-01

    Iterative approaches using numerical forward models are commonly used for solving inverse problems in nondestructive evaluation. The drawbacks of these approaches include their high computational cost and the difficulty in computing gradients for updating defect profiles. This paper proposes a finite element neural network (FENN) that embeds finite element models into a neural network format. This approach enables fast and accurate solution of the forward problem. The FENN can then be used as the forward model in an iterative approach to solve the inverse problem. Gradient-based optimization methods are easily applied since the FENN provides an explicit functional mapping between the defect profile and the measured signal. Results of applying the FENN to several simple electromagnetic forward and inverse problems are presented.

  9. Finite Element Simulation of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, G.; Donaldson, W.R.; Mikulics, M.; Marso, M.; Kordos, P.; Sobolewski, R.

    2009-08-19

    The successful application of finite element analysis to ultrafast optoelectronic devices is demonstrated. Finite element models have been developed for both an alloyed- and surface-contact metal–semiconductor–metal photodetectors. The simulation results agree with previously reported experimental data. The alloyed device, despite having a somewhat larger capacitance, has a non-illuminated region of lower resistance with a more-uniform and deeper-penetrating electric field and carrier transport current. The latter explains, in terms of the equivalent lumped parameters, the experimentally observed faster response of the alloyed device. The model is further used to predict improved responsivity, based on electrode spacing and antireflective coating. We project that increasing the depth of the alloyed contact beyond approximately half of the optical penetration depth will not yield significantly improved responsivity.

  10. The finite element method for calculating the marine structural design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, A.; Ticu, I.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimally design and dimension marine structures in order for them to fulfil both functional and safety requirements. A master level of structural mechanics is vital in order to check tests and analysis and to develop new structures. This study can improve the calculation and estimation of the effects of hydrodynamics and of other loads; movements, strains and internal forces in fixed and floating platforms and ships. The finite element method (FEM) ensures basic understanding of the finite element model as applied on static cases including beam and plate elements, experience with static analysis of marine structures like platforms and ships, along with the basic understanding of dynamic response of systems with one degree of freedom and simple continuous beams, and also how analysis models can be established for real structures by the use of generalized coordinates and superposition.

  11. Experimental validation of a finite-element model updating procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, S.; Weber, F.; Verhaegen, M.

    2007-02-01

    This paper validates an approach to damage detection and localization based on finite-element model updating (FEMU). The approach has the advantage over other existing methods to FEMU that it simultaneously updates all three finite-element model matrices at the same time preserving their structure (connectivity), symmetry and positive-definiteness. The approach is tested in this paper on an experimental setup consisting of a steel cable, where local mass changes and global change in the tension of the cable are introduced. The new algorithm is applied to identify the size and location of different changes in the structural parameters (mass, stiffness and damping). The obtained results clearly indicate that even small structural changes can be detected and localized with the new method. Additionally, a comparison with many other FEMU-based methods has been performed to show the superiority of the considered method.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-09-20

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  13. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  14. Finite Element Analysis Applied to Dentoalveolar Trauma: Methodology Description

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, B. R.; Moreira Neto, J. J. S.; da Silva, F. I.; de Aguiar, A. S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Dentoalveolar traumatic injuries are among the clinical conditions most frequently treated in dental practice. However, few studies so far have addressed the biomechanical aspects of these events, probably as a result of difficulties in carrying out satisfactory experimental and clinical studies as well as the unavailability of truly scientific methodologies. The aim of this paper was to describe the use of finite element analysis applied to the biomechanical evaluation of dentoalveolar trauma. For didactic purposes, the methodological process was divided into steps that go from the creation of a geometric model to the evaluation of final results, always with a focus on methodological characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages, so as to allow the reader to customize the methodology according to specific needs. Our description shows that the finite element method can faithfully reproduce dentoalveolar trauma, provided the methodology is closely followed and thoroughly evaluated. PMID:21991463

  15. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of Extrusion of Multifilamentary Superconductor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.; Sumption, M.D.; Collings, E.W.

    2004-06-28

    The extrusion of multifilamentary superconductor precursor billets has been modeled using finite element analysis. The billet configuration was 6 around 1, with the subelement consisting of Nb rods, and the outer can or sleeve was Cu. Two general cases were investigated, those in which the re-stack rods were initially; (i) round, and (ii) hexed. A thermo-mechanical, elasto-plastic, finite-element method was used to analyze the extrusion process. In this 3D FEM model, the initial state of the billet was assumed to be absent of bonding. A typical die angle (2{alpha}=45 deg.) and a series of extrusion ratios were selected to perform the simulation and the corresponding stress and strain distributions of the two billet variants processed were compared. Based on the stress and deformation created at the rod/rod and rod/sleeve interfaces, the bonding conditions generated through the extrusion were investigated.

  17. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; G. Fu; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  18. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  19. Exemplifying Quantum Systems in a Finite Element Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Toby D.

    2009-08-13

    This paper presents a description of the abstractions required for the expression and solution of the linear single-particle Schroedinger equation in a finite element basis. This paper consists of two disparate themes: First, to layout and establish the foundations of finite element analysis as an approximate numerical solution to extendable quantum mechanical systems; and second, to promote a high-performance open-source computational model for the approximate numerical solution to quantum mechanical systems. The structural foundation of the one-and two-dimensional time-independent Schroedinger equation describing an infinite potential well is explored and a brief overview of the hierarchal design of the computational library written in C++ is given.

  20. Recent developments in finite element analysis for transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    The prediction of aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime generally requires a flow field calculation to solve the governing non-linear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic partial differential equations. Finite difference techniques were developed to the point that design and analysis application are routine, and continual improvements are being made by various research groups. The principal limitation in extending finite difference methods to complex three-dimensional geometries is the construction of a suitable mesh system. Finite element techniques are attractive since their application to other problems have permitted irregular mesh elements to be employed. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent developments in the application of finite element methods to transonic flow problems and to report some recent results.

  1. Finite element simulation of temperature dependent free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelman, M. S.; Sani, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Engelman and Sani (1984) for a finite-element simulation of incompressible surface flows with a free and/or moving fluid interface, such as encountered in crystal growth and coating and polymer technology, is extended to temperature-dependent flows, including the effect of temperature-dependent surface tension. The basic algorithm of Saito and Scriven (1981) and Ruschak (1980) has been generalized and implemented in a robust and versatile finite-element code that can be employed with relative ease for the simulation of free-surface problems in complex geometries. As a result, the costly dependence on the Newton-Raphson algorithm has been eliminated by replacing it with a quasi-Newton iterative method, which nearly retains the superior convergence properties of the Newton-Raphson method.

  2. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  3. Finite element modeling of frictionally restrained composite interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamim

    1989-01-01

    The use of special interface finite elements to model frictional restraint in composite interfaces is described. These elements simulate Coulomb friction at the interface, and are incorporated into a standard finite element analysis of a two-dimensional isolated fiber pullout test. Various interfacial characteristics, such as the distribution of stresses at the interface, the extent of slip and delamination, load diffusion from fiber to matrix, and the amount of fiber extraction or depression are studied for different friction coefficients. The results are compared to those obtained analytically using a singular integral equation approach, and those obtained by assuming a constant interface shear strength. The usefulness of these elements in micromechanical modeling of fiber-reinforced composite materials is highlighted.

  4. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  5. Finite element solution theory for three-dimensional boundary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element algorithm is derived for the numerical solution of a three-dimensional flow field described by a system of initial-valued, elliptic boundary value partial differential equations. The familiar three-dimensional boundary layer equations belong to this description when diffusional processes in only one coordinate direction are important. The finite element algorithm transforms the original description into large order systems of ordinary differential equations written for the dependent variables discretized at node points of an arbitrarily irregular computational lattice. The generalized elliptic boundary conditions is piecewise valid for each dependent variable on boundaries that need not explicitly coincide with coordinate surfaces. Solutions for sample problems in laminar and turbulent boundary flows illustrate favorable solution accuracy, convergence, and versatility.

  6. Surface subsidence prediction by nonlinear finite-element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, Y. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Zaman, M. . School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science)

    1993-11-01

    An improved two-dimensional plane-strain numerical procedure based on the incremental-iterative nonlinear finite-element is developed to predict ground subsidence caused by underground mining. The procedure emphasizes the use of the following features: (1) an appropriate constitutive model that can accurately describe the nonlinear behavior of geological strata; and (2) an accurate algorithm for simulation of excavation sequences consistent with the actual underground mining process. The computer code is used to analyze a collapse that occurred in the Blue Goose Lease [number sign]1 Mine in northeastern Oklahoma. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of some selected factors on the shape and extent of subsidence profiles. Analyses of the numerical results indicate that the nonlinear finite-element technique can be employed to meaningfully predict and characterize the potential for ground subsidence due to underground mining.

  7. Cyclic creep analysis from elastic finite-element solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hwang, S. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A uniaxial approach was developed for calculating cyclic creep and stress relaxation at the critical location of a structure subjected to cyclic thermomechanical loading. This approach was incorporated into a simplified analytical procedure for predicting the stress-strain history at a crack initiation site for life prediction purposes. An elastic finite-element solution for the problem was used as input for the simplified procedure. The creep analysis includes a self-adaptive time incrementing scheme. Cumulative creep is the sum of the initial creep, the recovery from the stress relaxation and the incremental creep. The simplified analysis was exercised for four cases involving a benchmark notched plate problem. Comparisons were made with elastic-plastic-creep solutions for these cases using the MARC nonlinear finite-element computer code.

  8. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  9. Phased array antenna analysis using hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-06-01

    This research in computational electromagnetics developed a new method for predicting the near-field mutual coupling effects in phased array antennas, using the finite element method (FEM) in combination with integral equations. Accurate feed modeling is accomplished by enforcing continuity between the FEM solution and an arbitrary number of wave guide models across a ground plane aperture. A periodic integral equation is imposed above the antenna's physical structure in order to enforce the radiation condition and to confine the analysis to an array unit cell. The electric field is expanded in terms of vector finite elements, and Galerkin's method is used to write the problem as a matrix equation. A general-purpose computer code was developed and validated by comparing its results to published data for several array types. Its versatility was demonstrated with predictions of the scanning properties of arrays of printed dipoles and printed flared notches.

  10. EXODUS: A finite element file format for pre- and postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mills-Curran, W.C.; Gilkey, A.P.; Flanagan, D.P.

    1988-09-01

    The EXODUS format defines a binary file which is used for finite element analysis pre- and postprocessing. It includes data to define the finite element mesh and label both boundary condition and load application points. EXODUS accommodates multiple element types and is sufficiently general format for analysis results. A benefit of combining the mesh definition data and the results data in the same file is that the user is assured that the results data are consistent with the model. EXODUS is currently in use by the entire range of Department 1520 codes (including preprocessors, translators, linear and nonlinear analyses, and postprocessors) and is finding applications in codes outside Department 1520. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Fluid structure interaction in electrohydraulic servovalve: a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, Somashekhar S.; Singaperumal, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electrohydraulic servovalves (EHSV) promise unique application opportunities and high performance, unmatched by other drive technologies. Typical applications include aerospace, robotic manipulators, motion simulators, injection molding, CNC machines and material testing machines. EHSV available are either a flapper/nozzle type or a jet pipe type. In the present paper an attempt has been made to study the dynamics of jet pipe EHSV with built-in mechanical feedback using Finite Element Method (FEM). In jet pipe EHSV, the dynamics of spool greatly depends on pressure recovery and hence the fluid flow at spool ends. The effect of pressure recovery on spool dynamics is studied using FEM by creating the fluid-structure-interaction. The mechanical parts were created using general purpose finite elements like shell, beam, and solid elements while fluid cavities were created using hydrostatic fluid elements. The analysis was carried out using the commercially available FE code ABAQUS. The jet pipe and spool dynamics are presented in the paper.

  12. Fluid structure interaction in electrohydraulic servovalve: a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, Somashekhar S.; Singaperumal, M.

    2009-12-01

    Electrohydraulic servovalves (EHSV) promise unique application opportunities and high performance, unmatched by other drive technologies. Typical applications include aerospace, robotic manipulators, motion simulators, injection molding, CNC machines and material testing machines. EHSV available are either a flapper/nozzle type or a jet pipe type. In the present paper an attempt has been made to study the dynamics of jet pipe EHSV with built-in mechanical feedback using Finite Element Method (FEM). In jet pipe EHSV, the dynamics of spool greatly depends on pressure recovery and hence the fluid flow at spool ends. The effect of pressure recovery on spool dynamics is studied using FEM by creating the fluid-structure-interaction. The mechanical parts were created using general purpose finite elements like shell, beam, and solid elements while fluid cavities were created using hydrostatic fluid elements. The analysis was carried out using the commercially available FE code ABAQUS. The jet pipe and spool dynamics are presented in the paper.

  13. An emulator for minimizing computer resources for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R.; Utku, S.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code, SCOPE, has been developed for predicting the computer resources required for a given analysis code, computer hardware, and structural problem. The cost of running the code is a small fraction (about 3 percent) of the cost of performing the actual analysis. However, its accuracy in predicting the CPU and I/O resources depends intrinsically on the accuracy of calibration data that must be developed once for the computer hardware and the finite element analysis code of interest. Testing of the SCOPE code on the AMDAHL 470 V/8 computer and the ELAS finite element analysis program indicated small I/O errors (3.2 percent), larger CPU errors (17.8 percent), and negligible total errors (1.5 percent).

  14. An emulator for minimizing finite element analysis implementation resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Islam, M.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element analysis emulator providing a basis for efficiently establishing an optimum computer implementation strategy when many calculations are involved is described. The SCOPE emulator determines computer resources required as a function of the structural model, structural load-deflection equation characteristics, the storage allocation plan, and computer hardware capabilities. Thereby, it provides data for trading analysis implementation options to arrive at a best strategy. The models contained in SCOPE lead to micro-operation computer counts of each finite element operation as well as overall computer resource cost estimates. Application of SCOPE to the Memphis-Arkansas bridge analysis provides measures of the accuracy of resource assessments. Data indicate that predictions are within 17.3 percent for calculation times and within 3.2 percent for peripheral storage resources for the ELAS code.

  15. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  16. Finite element modelling for materials with size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaddiwudhipong, S.; Hua, J.; Tho, K. K.; Liu, Z. S.

    2006-10-01

    This paper involves the formulation of the C0 finite elements incorporating the conventional mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity theory. Higher-order variables and consequently higher-order continuity conditions are not required allowing the direct applications of conventional plasticity algorithms in the existing finite element package. Implementation of the model whether analytically or computationally is efficient and straightforward as the strain gradient effect is confined in the material constitutive relation. The accuracy of the proposed elements in simulating the response of materials with strong size effect is verified through several numerical examples. The approach is applicable and valid to any materials with non-uniform plastic deformation larger than about 100 nm onwards. The proposed model becomes imperative when the deformation is less than 10 µm as classical plasticity is unable to describe the phenomenon comprehensively at this low level of deformation.

  17. Finite-element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  18. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  19. A comparison of the capabilities of three finite element programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loendorf, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    Three finite element programs are compared to assess their capabilities as an analysis tool in a structural design process. Because of the need for repetitive analyses as an integral part of a design loop, a candidate program must be capable of handling large problems, operate efficiently, and be readily adaptable for use in computer-aided design. The three programs considered in the study, ELAS,SNAP, and NASTRAN, range from a relatively small finite element program limited to static structural analysis (ELAS) to a large complex general analysis system (NASTRAN). Results are given for comparative speeds and computer resources required for each program in the analysis of sample fuselage problems representative of practical aircraft design.

  20. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  1. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  2. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  3. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  4. Finite element method - A companion in experimental mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid experimental-numerical procedure for structural analysis is described by its applications in fracture mechanics. The procedure was first verified by the excellent agreements between the dynamic stress intensity factors obtained directly by dynamic photoelasticity and those generated by the hybrid procedure where a dynamic finite element code was executed in its generation mode. The hybrid procedure was then used to determine the dynamic fracture toughness of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  5. Finite Element Model for Hydrocephalus and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Hakseung; Park, Dae-Hyeon; Lee, Hack-Jin; Czosnyka, Zofia; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are neuropathies associated with disturbed cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Several finite element (FE) brain models were suggested to simulate the pathological changes in hydrocephalus, but with overly simplified assumptions regarding the properties of the brain parenchyma. This study proposes a two-dimensional FE brain model, capable of simulating both hydrocephalus and IIH by incorporating poro-hyperelasticity of the brain and detailed structural information (i.e., sulci). PMID:27165898

  6. Finite element analysis of the 2240 MW HTGR PCRV

    SciTech Connect

    Fugelso, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    Three-dimensional finite element calculations for the response of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel for the 2240 MW HTGR which evaluated the stress distributions and concentrations were accomplished. Constitutive equations utilized in this evaluation were linear elastic, Von Mises elastic-plastic and the empirical Kotsovos-Newman concrete fit with and without steel reinforcing. Ultimate values of the internal pressures without initial prestress were obtained. Also stresses in the annular concrete retaining cover over the stream generator were evaluated.

  7. An interactive virtual environment for finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.; Canfield, T.; Kokinis, J.; Disz, T.

    1995-06-01

    Virtual environments (VE) provide a powerful human-computer interface that opens the door to exciting new methods of interaction with high-performance computing applications in several areas of research. The authors are interested in the use of virtual environments as a user interface to real-time simulations used in rapid prototyping procedures. Consequently, the authors are developing methods for coupling finite element models of complex mechanical systems with a VE interface for real-time interaction.

  8. Study of the available finite element software packages at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Chu-Ho

    1990-01-01

    The interaction among the three finite element software packages, SDRCI/I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, and I/FEM, used at NASA, Kennedy Space Center is addressed. The procedures for using more than one of these application software packages to model and analyze a structure design are discussed. Design and stress analysis of a solid rocket booster fixture is illustrated by using four different combinations of the three software packages. Their results are compared and show small yet acceptable differences.

  9. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  10. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  11. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  12. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  13. Finite element analysis of a deployable space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the dynamic characteristics of a deployable space truss, a finite element model of the Scientific Applications Space Platform (SASP) truss has been formulated. The model incorporates all additional degrees of freedom associated with the pin-jointed members. Comparison of results with SPAR models of the truss show that the joints of the deployable truss significantly affect the vibrational modes of the structure only if the truss is relatively short.

  14. Parallel finite element simulation of large ram-air parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalro, V.; Aliabadi, S.; Garrard, W.; Tezduyar, T.; Mittal, S.; Stein, K.

    1997-06-01

    In the near future, large ram-air parachutes are expected to provide the capability of delivering 21 ton payloads from altitudes as high as 25,000 ft. In development and test and evaluation of these parachutes the size of the parachute needed and the deployment stages involved make high-performance computing (HPC) simulations a desirable alternative to costly airdrop tests. Although computational simulations based on realistic, 3D, time-dependent models will continue to be a major computational challenge, advanced finite element simulation techniques recently developed for this purpose and the execution of these techniques on HPC platforms are significant steps in the direction to meet this challenge. In this paper, two approaches for analysis of the inflation and gliding of ram-air parachutes are presented. In one of the approaches the point mass flight mechanics equations are solved with the time-varying drag and lift areas obtained from empirical data. This approach is limited to parachutes with similar configurations to those for which data are available. The other approach is 3D finite element computations based on the Navier-Stokes equations governing the airflow around the parachute canopy and Newtons law of motion governing the 3D dynamics of the canopy, with the forces acting on the canopy calculated from the simulated flow field. At the earlier stages of canopy inflation the parachute is modelled as an expanding box, whereas at the later stages, as it expands, the box transforms to a parafoil and glides. These finite element computations are carried out on the massively parallel supercomputers CRAY T3D and Thinking Machines CM-5, typically with millions of coupled, non-linear finite element equations solved simultaneously at every time step or pseudo-time step of the simulation.

  15. A tensor artificial viscosity using a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tz. V.; Rieben, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    We derive a tensor artificial viscosity suitable for use in a 2D or 3D unstructured arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code. This work is similar in nature to that of Campbell and Shashkov [1]; however, our approach is based on a finite element discretization that is fundamentally different from the mimetic finite difference framework. The finite element point of view leads to novel insights as well as improved numerical results. We begin with a generalized tensor version of the Von Neumann-Richtmyer artificial viscosity, then convert it to a variational formulation and apply a Galerkin discretization process using high order Gaussian quadrature to obtain a generalized nodal force term and corresponding zonal heating (or shock entropy) term. This technique is modular and is therefore suitable for coupling to a traditional staggered grid discretization of the momentum and energy conservation laws; however, we motivate the use of such finite element approaches for discretizing each term in the Euler equations. We review the key properties that any artificial viscosity must possess and use these to formulate specific constraints on the total artificial viscosity force term as well as the artificial viscosity coefficient. We also show, that under certain simplifying assumptions, the two-dimensional scheme from [1] can be viewed as an under-integrated version of our finite element method. This equivalence holds on general distorted quadrilateral grids. Finally, we present computational results on some standard shock hydro test problems, as well as some more challenging problems, indicating the advantages of the new approach with respect to symmetry preservation for shock wave propagation over general grids.

  16. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  17. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J. M.; James, Richard; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; Willman, Eero; Fernandez, F. Anibal

    2011-03-01

    A finite element framework is presented to combine advanced three-dimensional liquid crystal director calculations with a full-vector beam propagation analysis. This approach becomes especially valuable to analyze and design structures in which disclinations or diffraction effects play an important role. The wide applicability of the approach is illustrated in our overview from several examples including small pixel LCOS microdisplays with homeotropic alignment.

  18. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  19. Stability and Convergence of Underintegrated Finite Element Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of underintegration on the numerical stability and convergence characteristics of certain classes of finite element approximations were analyzed. Particular attention is given to hourglassing instabilities that arise from underintegrating the stiffness matrix entries and checkerboard instabilities that arise from underintegrating constrain terms such as those arising from incompressibility conditions. A fundamental result reported here is the proof that the fully integrated stiffness is restored in some cases through a post-processing operation.

  20. Quantify Resonance Inspection with Finite Element-Based Modal Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin; Dasch, Cameron; Harmon, George; Jones, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Resonance inspection uses the natural acoustic resonances of a part to identify anomalous parts. Modern instrumentation can measure the many resonant frequencies rapidly and accurately. Sophisticated sorting algorithms trained on sets of good and anomalous parts can rapidly and reliably inspect and sort parts. This paper aims at using finite-element-based modal analysis to put resonance inspection on a more quantitative basis. A production-level automotive steering knuckle is used as the example part for our study. First, the resonance frequency spectra for the knuckle are measured with two different experimental techniques. Next, scanning laser vibrometry is used to determine the mode shape corresponding to each resonance. The material properties including anisotropy are next measured to high accuracy using resonance spectroscopy on cuboids cut from the part. Then, finite element model (FEM) of the knuckle is generated by meshing the actual part geometry obtained with computed tomography (CT). The resonance frequencies and mode shapes are next predicted with a natural frequency extraction analysis after extensive mesh size sensitivity study. The good comparison between the predicted and the experimentally measured resonance spectra indicate that finite-element-based modal analyses have the potential to be a powerful tool in shortening the training process and improving the accuracy of the resonance inspection process for a complex, production level part. The finite element based analysis can also provide a means to computationally test the sensitivity of the frequencies to various possible defects such as porosity or oxide inclusions especially in the high stress regions that the part will experience in service.