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Sample records for leg muscle usage

  1. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  2. Muscle oxygen saturation heterogeneity among leg muscles during ramp exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether O(2) saturation in several leg muscles changes as exercise intensity increases. Twelve healthy young males performed 20 W/min ramp bicycle exercise until exhaustion. Pulmonary O(2) uptake (VO(2)) was monitored continuously during the experiments to determine peak oxygen uptake. Muscle O(2) saturation (SmO(2)) was also monitored continuously at the belly of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, and tibialis anterior by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. Although the VL muscle mainly contributes during cycling exercise, deoxygenation was enhanced not only in the VL muscle but also in the other thigh muscles and lower leg muscles with increased exercise intensity. Furthermore, SmO(2) response during ramp cycling exercise differed considerably between leg muscles. PMID:22879044

  3. Force feedback reinforces muscle synergies in insect legs.

    PubMed

    Zill, Sasha N; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Büschges, Ansgar; Schmitz, Josef

    2015-11-01

    The nervous system solves complex biomechanical problems by activating muscles in modular, synergist groups. We have studied how force feedback in substrate grip is integrated with effects of sense organs that monitor support and propulsion in insects. Campaniform sensilla are mechanoreceptors that encode forces as cuticular strains. We tested the hypothesis that integration of force feedback from receptors of different leg segments during grip occurs through activation of specific muscle synergies. We characterized the effects of campaniform sensilla of the feet (tarsi) and proximal segments (trochanter and femur) on activities of leg muscles in stick insects and cockroaches. In both species, mechanical stimulation of tarsal sensilla activated the leg muscle that generates substrate grip (retractor unguis), as well as proximal leg muscles that produce inward pull (tibial flexor) and support/propulsion (trochanteral depressor). Stimulation of campaniform sensilla on proximal leg segments activated the same synergistic group of muscles. In stick insects, the effects of proximal receptors on distal leg muscles changed and were greatly enhanced when animals made active searching movements. In insects, the task-specific reinforcement of muscle synergies can ensure that substrate adhesion is rapidly established after substrate contact to provide a stable point for force generation. PMID:26193626

  4. Locomotion via paralyzed leg muscles: feasibility study for a leg-propelled vehicle.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R M; Gruner, J A; Feinberg, S D; Collins, S R

    1983-07-01

    Functional electrical stimulation has been used to restore some degree of controllable movement to paralyzed muscle. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using electrically stimulated paralyzed leg muscles to propel a wheelchair-type vehicle. For this, a conventional manual wheelchair was modified by the addition of a drive system which permits forward propulsion by reciprocating movements of the legs. A battery-powered electrical stimulator using surface electrodes over the quadriceps muscles controls locomotive characteristics. This vehicle has been successfully operated by paraplegic and quadriplegic test subjects. Advantages of using paralyzed leg muscles for locomotion may include improvement in locomotive capability, circulation in the lower extremities, cardiovascular and respiratory fitness, strength and size of the exercised muscles and bones, and self-image. PMID:6101225

  5. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Murphy, Aron J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0–5, 5–10, and 0–10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson’s correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40–0.54). The 5BT (5–10 and 0–10 m intervals) and RSI (5–10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37–0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0–5 m flight times (r = −0.46 to −0.51), and a longer 0–10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r2 = 0.14–0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes. PMID:26839607

  6. Muscle strategies for leg extensions on a "Reformer" apparatus.

    PubMed

    Cantergi, Débora; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Jinha, Azim; Brodt, Guilherme Auler; Herzog, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Considering the kinematics of leg extensions performed on a Reformer apparatus, one would expect high activation of hip and knee extensor muscle groups. However, because of the bi-articular nature of some lower limb muscles, and the possibility to vary the direction of force application on the Reformer bar, muscles can be coordinated theoretically in a variety of ways and still achieve the desired outcome. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the knee and hip moments during leg extensions performed on the Reformer apparatus and to estimate the forces in individual muscles crossing these joints using static optimization. Fifteen subjects performed leg extensions exercises on the Reformer apparatus using an individually chosen resistance. To our big surprise, we found that subjects performed the exercise using two conceptually different strategies (i) the first group used simultaneous hip and knee extension moments, (ii) while the second group used simultaneous hip flexion and knee extension moments to perform the exercise. These different strategies were achieved by changing the direction of the resultant force applied by the subject's feet on the Reformer bar. While leg extensions on the Reformer apparatus have been thought to strengthen the hip and knee extensors muscles, our results demonstrate that patients can perform the exercise in a different and unexpected way. In order to control the hip and knee moments and achieve the desired outcome of the exercise, the direction of force application on the Reformer bar must be controlled carefully. PMID:25262161

  7. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power. PMID:27315060

  8. Caffeine Attenuates Decreases in Leg Power Without Increased Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Beatriz G; Morales, Anderson P; Sampaio-Jorge, Felipe; Barth, Thiago; de Oliveira, Marcio B C; Coelho, Gabriela M D O; Leite, Tiago C

    2016-08-01

    Ribeiro, BG, Morales, AP, Sampaio-Jorge, F, Barth, T, de Oliveira, MBC, Coelho, GMdO, and Leite, TC. Caffeine attenuates decreases in leg power without increased muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2354-2360, 2016-Caffeine ingestion has been shown to be an effective ergogenic aid in several sports. Caffeine administration may increase exercise capacity, which could lead to a greater degree of muscle damage after exercise. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Six male handball athletes ingested placebo (PLA) or caffeine (CAF) (6 mg·kg body mass) capsules on 2 different occasions. Sixty minutes after ingestion of the capsules, serum CAF levels were evaluated. Thereafter, all participants performed a protocol of vertical jumps (VJs). The protocol consisted of 4 sets of 30 seconds of continuous VJs with 60 seconds of recovery between sets. Blood lactate (LAC) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were determined before and after the protocol. We found significant differences in serum CAF levels between PLA (0.09 ± 0.18 µg·ml) vs. CAF (6.59 ± 4.44 µg·ml) (p < 0.001). Caffeine elicited a 5.23% (p ≤ 0.05) improvement in the leg power compared with PLA. The CAF trial displayed higher LAC (p ≤ 0.05) compared with PLA (6.26 ± 2.01 vs. 4.39 ± 2.42 mmol·L, respectively) after protocol of VJs, whereas no difference in CK was observed between trials (p > 0.05). These results indicate that immediate ingestion of CAF (6 mg·kg body weight) can reduce the level of muscle fatigue and preserve leg power during the test, possibly resulting in increase in LAC. There was no increase in muscle damage, which indicates that immediate administration of (6 mg·kg body weight) CAF is safe. Thus, nutritional interventions with CAF could help athletes withstand a greater physiological overload during high-intensity training sessions. The results of this study would be applicable to sports and activities that require repetitive leg power. PMID

  9. Muscle synergies during a single-leg drop-landing in boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Pfeiffer, Ron; Sabick, Michelle; Harris, Chad; Sutter, Jeanie; Kuhlman, Seth; Shea, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation patterns during a landing task in boys and girls through the use of muscle synergies. Electromyographical data from six lower extremity muscles were collected from 11 boys and 16 girls while they performed single-leg drop-landings. Electromyographical data from six leg muscles were rectified, smoothed, and normalized to maximum dynamic muscle activity during landing. Data from 100 ms before to 100 ms after touchdown were submitted to factor analyses to extract muscle synergies along with the associated activation and weighing coefficients. Boys and girls both used three muscle synergies. The activation coefficients of these synergies captured muscle activity during the prelanding, touchdown, and postlanding phases of the single-leg drop-landing. Analysis of the weighing coefficients indicated that within the extracted muscle synergies the girls emphasized activation of the medial hamstring muscle during the prelanding and touchdown synergy whereas boys emphasized activation of the vastus medialis during the postlanding synergy. Although boys and girls use similar muscle synergies during single-leg drop-landings, they differed in which muscles were emphasized within these synergies. The observed differences in aspects related to the muscle synergies during landing may have implications with respect to knee injury risk. PMID:24145947

  10. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  11. Fingertip contact suppresses the destabilizing influence of leg muscle vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Rabin, E.; DiZio, P.

    2000-01-01

    Touch of the hand with a stationary surface at nonmechanically supportive force levels (<1 N) greatly attenuates postural sway during quiet stance. We predicted such haptic contact would also suppress the postural destabilization caused by vibrating the right peroneus brevis and longus muscles of subjects standing heel-to-toe with eyes closed. In experiment 1, ten subjects were tested under four conditions: no-vibration, no-touch; no-vibration, touch; vibration, no-touch; and vibration, touch. A hand-held physiotherapy vibrator (120 Hz) was applied approximately 5 cm above the malleolous to stimulate the peroneus longus and brevis tendons. Touch conditions involved contact of the right index finger with a laterally positioned surface (<1 N of force) at waist height. Vibration in the absence of finger contact greatly increased the mean sway amplitude of the center of pressure and of the head relative to the no-vibration, no-touch control condition (P < 0.001). The touch, no-vibration and touch-vibration conditions were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from each other and both had significantly less mean sway amplitude of head and of center of pressure than the other conditions (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, eight subjects stood heel-to-toe under touch and no-touch conditions involving 40-s duration trials of peroneus tendon vibration at different duty cycles: 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-s ON and OFF periods. The vibrator was attached to the subject's leg and remotely activated. In the no-touch conditions, subjects showed periodic postural disruptions contingent on the duty cycle and mirror image rebounds with the offset of vibration. In the touch conditions, subjects were much less disrupted and showed compensations occurring within 500 ms of vibration onset and mirror image rebounds with vibration offset. Subjects were able to suppress almost completely the destabilizing influence of the vibration in the 3- and 4-s duty cycle trials. These experiments show that haptic

  12. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  13. Determination of muscle mass changes in legs from K-40 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.; Rieksts, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The K-40 content of the upper legs was periodically measured in several subjects whose injured legs had been in a cast for 6 weeks or more. As the subjects began using the leg again, the K-40 content increased as the muscle tissue was replaced. A 25% increase in K-40 content in 6 months is typical for a normal leg use and recovery. This is equivalent to an original muscle mass loss of 20%. By measuring specific body regions, such as arms or legs, with a high-efficiency detector system, muscle mass changes which exceed a few percent can be measured. These methods could be used in space flight and bedrest studies, and in studying nutritional deficiencies due to disease or diet.

  14. How different modes of child delivery influence abdominal muscle activities in the active straight leg raise.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yu-Jeong; Hyung, Eun-Ju; Yang, Kyung-Hye; Lee, Hyun-Ok

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the activities of the abdominal muscles of women who had experienced vaginal delivery in comparison with those who had experienced Cesarean childbirth. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 14 subjects (7 vaginal delivery, 7 Cesarean section) performed an active straight leg raise to 20 cm above the ground, and we measured the activities of the internal oblique abdominal muscle, the external oblique abdominal muscle, and the rectus abdominal muscle on both sides using electromyography. The effort required to raise the leg was scored on a Likert scale. Then, the subjects conducted maximum isometric contraction for hip joint flexion with the leg raised at 20 cm, and maximum torque and abdominal muscle activities were measured using electromyography. [Results] During the active straight leg raise, abdominal muscle activities were higher in the Cesarean section subjects. The Likert scale did not show a significant difference. The activities of the abdominal muscles and the maximum torque of the hip joint flexion at maximum isometric contraction were higher in the vaginal delivery subjects. [Conclusion] The abdominal muscles of Cesarean section subjects showed greater recruitment for maintaining pelvic stability during the active straight leg raising, but were relatively weaker when powerful force was required. Therefore, we consider that more abdominal muscle training is necessary for maintaining pelvic stability of Cesarean section subjects. PMID:25202194

  15. Comparisons of muscle oxygenation changes between arm and leg muscles during incremental rowing exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Wang, Bangde; Gong, Hui; Xu, Guodong; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose is to compare the changes in muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps brachii (BB) muscles simultaneously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during incremental rowing exercise in eight rowers. Based on the BB and VL muscle oxygenation patterns, two points are used to characterize the muscle oxygenation kinetics in both the arm and the leg muscles. The first point is the breaking point (Bp), which refers to an accelerated fall in muscle oxygenation that correlates with the gas exchange threshold (GET). The second point is the leveling-off point (Lo), which suggests the upper limit of O2 extraction. The GET occurred at 63.3+/-2.4% of maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2 max). The Bp appeared at 45.0+/-3.8% and 55.6+/-2.4% V˙O2 max in the BB and VL, respectively. The Lo appeared at 63.6+/-4.1% and 86.6+/-1.0% V˙O2 max in these two muscles, respectively. Both the Bp and the Lo occurred earlier in BB compared with VL. These results suggest that arm muscles have lower oxidative capacity than leg muscles during rowing exercise. The rowers with higher exercise performances showed heavier workloads, as evaluated by Bp and Lo. The monitoring of muscle oxygenation by NIRS in arm and leg muscles during rowing could be a useful guide for evaluation and training.

  16. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Bin Aziz, Mohamed Fareez; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  17. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  18. Muscle hernias of the leg: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jesse T; Nguyen, Jenny L; Wheatley, Michael J; Nguyen, Tuan A

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a retired, elderly male war veteran with a symptomatic peroneus brevis muscle hernia causing superficial peroneal nerve compression with chosen surgical management is presented. Symptomatic muscle hernias of the extremities occur most commonly in the leg and are a rare cause of chronic leg pain. Historically, treating military surgeons pioneered the early documentation of leg hernias observed in active military recruits. A focal fascial defect can cause a muscle to herniate, forming a variable palpable subcutaneous mass, and causing pain and potentially neuropathic symptoms with nerve involvement. While the true incidence is not known, the etiology has been classified as secondary to a congenital (or constitutional) fascial weakness, or acquired fascial defect, usually secondary to direct or indirect trauma. The highest occurrence is believed to be in young, physically active males. Involvement of the tibialis anterior is most common, although other muscles have been reported. Dynamic ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used to confirm diagnosis and guide treatment. Most symptomatic cases respond successfully to conservative treatment, with surgery reserved for refractory cases. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from fasciotomy to anatomical repair of the fascial defect, with no consensus on optimal treatment. Clinicians must remember to consider muscle hernias in their repertoire of differential diagnoses for chronic leg pain or neuropathy. A comprehensive review of muscle hernias of the leg is presented to highlight their history, occurrence, presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24497767

  19. Shear Modulus of the Lower Leg Muscles in Patients with Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kei; Akagi, Ryota; Hirayama, Kuniaki; Hirose, Norikazu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayshi, Toru

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vivo kinematics of shear modulus of the lower leg muscles in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). The study population included 46 limbs with MTSS and 40 healthy limbs. The shear modulus of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, lateral head of the gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscles were measured using shear wave ultrasound elastography. As a result, the shear modulus of the lower leg muscles was significantly greater in patients with MTSS than in healthy patients (p < 0.01). Based on the differences in shear modulus of lower leg muscles between the patients with MTSS and healthy patients, the measurements obtained via shear wave ultrasound elastography could be used to evaluate risk factors of MTSS. PMID:27129903

  20. Trunk muscle activation during stabilization exercises with single and double leg support.

    PubMed

    García-Vaquero, María Pilar; Moreside, Janice M; Brontons-Gil, Evaristo; Peco-González, Noelia; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze trunk muscle activity during bridge style stabilization exercises, when combined with single and double leg support strategies. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers performed bridge exercises in 3 different positions (back, front and side bridges), with and without an elevated leg, and a quadruped exercise with contralateral arm and leg raise ("bird-dog"). Surface EMG was bilaterally recorded from rectus abdominis (RA), external and internal oblique (EO, IO), and erector spinae (ES). Back, front and side bridges primarily activated the ES (approximately 17% MVC), RA (approximately 30% MVC) and muscles required to support the lateral moment (mostly obliques), respectively. Compared with conventional bridge exercises, single leg support produced higher levels of trunk activation, predominantly in the oblique muscles. The bird-dog exercise produced greatest activity in IO on the side of the elevated arm and in the contralateral ES. In conclusion, during a common bridge with double leg support, the antigravity muscles were the most active. When performed with an elevated leg, however, rotation torques increased the activation of the trunk rotators, especially IO. This information may be useful for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists in determining appropriate exercise progression for the trunk stabilizers. PMID:22436839

  1. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jeremy D; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, Arthur J; Gribble, Paul L; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  2. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeremy D.; Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Soest, Arthur J.; Gribble, Paul L.; Kistemaker, Dinant A.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas—which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles—constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  3. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  4. Physiological cross-sectional area of human leg muscles based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukunaga, T.; Roy, R. R.; Shellock, F. G.; Hodgson, J. A.; Day, M. K.; Lee, P. L.; Kwong-Fu, H.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to determine the physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of the major muscles or muscle groups of the lower leg. For 12 healthy subjects, the boundaries of each muscle or muscle group were digitized from images taken at 1-cm intervals along the length of the leg. Muscle volumes were calculated from the summation of each anatomical CSA (ACSA) and the distance between each section. Muscle length was determined as the distance between the most proximal and distal images in which the muscle was visible. The PCSA of each muscle was calculated as muscle volume times the cosine of the angle of fiber pinnation divided by fiber length, where published fiber length:muscle length ratios were used to estimate fiber lengths. The mean volumes of the major plantarflexors were 489, 245, and 140 cm3 for the soleus and medial (MG) and lateral (LG) heads of the gastrocnemius. The mean PCSA of the soleus was 230 cm2, about three and eight times larger than the MG (68 cm2) and LG (28 cm2), respectively. These PCSA values were eight (soleus), four (MG), and three (LG) times larger than their respective maximum ACSA. The major dorsiflexor, the tibialis anterior (TA), had a muscle volume of 143 cm2, a PCSA of 19 cm2, and an ACSA of 9 cm2. With the exception of the soleus, the mean fiber length of all subjects was closely related to muscle volume across muscles. The soleus fibers were unusually short relative to the muscle volume, thus potentiating its force potential.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Human Leg Model Predicts Ankle Muscle-Tendon Morphology, State, Roles and Energetics in Walking

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Brown, Emery N.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2011-01-01

    A common feature in biological neuromuscular systems is the redundancy in joint actuation. Understanding how these redundancies are resolved in typical joint movements has been a long-standing problem in biomechanics, neuroscience and prosthetics. Many empirical studies have uncovered neural, mechanical and energetic aspects of how humans resolve these degrees of freedom to actuate leg joints for common tasks like walking. However, a unifying theoretical framework that explains the many independent empirical observations and predicts individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation is yet to be established. Here we develop a computational framework to address how the ankle joint actuation problem is resolved by the neuromuscular system in walking. Our framework is founded upon the proposal that a consideration of both neural control and leg muscle-tendon morphology is critical to obtain predictive, mechanistic insight into individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation. We examine kinetic, kinematic and electromyographic data from healthy walking subjects to find that human leg muscle-tendon morphology and neural activations enable a metabolically optimal realization of biological ankle mechanics in walking. This optimal realization (a) corresponds to independent empirical observations of operation and performance of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, (b) gives rise to an efficient load-sharing amongst ankle muscle-tendon units and (c) causes soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers to take on distinct mechanical roles of force generation and power production at the end of stance phase in walking. The framework outlined here suggests that the dynamical interplay between leg structure and neural control may be key to the high walking economy of humans, and has implications as a means to obtain insight into empirically inaccessible features of individual muscle and tendons in biomechanical tasks. PMID:21445231

  6. Amino acid metabolism in leg muscle after an endotoxin injection in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vesali, Rokhsareh F; Klaude, Maria; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    Decreased plasma amino acid concentrations and increased net release of amino acids from skeletal muscle, especially for glutamine, are common features in critically ill patients. A low dose of endotoxin administered to healthy volunteers was used as a human model for the initial phase of sepsis to study the early metabolic response to sepsis. Six healthy male volunteers were studied in the postabsorptive state. Blood samples from the forearm artery and femoral vein were taken during 4 h before and 4 h after an intravenous endotoxin injection (4 ng/kg body wt). In addition, muscle biopsies from the leg muscle were taken. Plasma concentration of the total sum of amino acids decreased by 19% (P = 0.001) and of glutamine by 25% (P = 0.004) the 3rd h after endotoxin administration. At the same time, muscle concentrations of the sum of amino acids and glutamine decreased by 11% (P = 0.05) and 9% (P = 0.09), respectively. In parallel, the efflux from the leg increased by 35% (P = 0.004) for the total sum of amino acids and by 43% (P = 0.05) for glutamine. In conclusion, intravenous endotoxin administration to healthy volunteers, used as a model for the initial phase of sepsis, resulted in a decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. At the same time, amino acid concentrations in muscle tissue decreased, whereas the efflux of amino acids from leg skeletal muscle increased. PMID:15367399

  7. Coordinated Development of Muscles and Tendon-Like Structures: Early Interactions in the Drosophila Leg

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Cedric; Laddada, Lilia; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the musculoskeletal system is a remarkable example of tissue assembly. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, precise connectivity between muscles and skeleton (or exoskeleton) via tendons or equivalent structures is fundamental for movement and stability of the body. The molecular and cellular processes underpinning muscle formation are well-established and significant advances have been made in understanding tendon development. However, the mechanisms contributing to proper connection between these two tissues have received less attention. Observations of coordinated development of tendons and muscles suggest these tissues may interact during the different steps in their development. There is growing evidence that, depending on animal model and muscle type, these interactions can take place from progenitor induction to the final step of the formation of the musculoskeletal system. Here, we briefly review and compare the mechanisms behind muscle and tendon interaction throughout the development of vertebrates and Drosophila before going on to discuss our recent findings on the coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures in Drosophila leg. By altering apodeme formation (the functional Drosophila equivalent of tendons in vertebrates) during the early steps of leg development, we affect the spatial localization of subsequent myoblasts. These findings provide the first evidence of the developmental impact of early interactions between muscle and tendon-like precursors, and confirm the appendicular Drosophila muscle system as a valuable model for studying these processes. PMID:26869938

  8. Coordinated Development of Muscles and Tendon-Like Structures: Early Interactions in the Drosophila Leg.

    PubMed

    Soler, Cedric; Laddada, Lilia; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the musculoskeletal system is a remarkable example of tissue assembly. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, precise connectivity between muscles and skeleton (or exoskeleton) via tendons or equivalent structures is fundamental for movement and stability of the body. The molecular and cellular processes underpinning muscle formation are well-established and significant advances have been made in understanding tendon development. However, the mechanisms contributing to proper connection between these two tissues have received less attention. Observations of coordinated development of tendons and muscles suggest these tissues may interact during the different steps in their development. There is growing evidence that, depending on animal model and muscle type, these interactions can take place from progenitor induction to the final step of the formation of the musculoskeletal system. Here, we briefly review and compare the mechanisms behind muscle and tendon interaction throughout the development of vertebrates and Drosophila before going on to discuss our recent findings on the coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures in Drosophila leg. By altering apodeme formation (the functional Drosophila equivalent of tendons in vertebrates) during the early steps of leg development, we affect the spatial localization of subsequent myoblasts. These findings provide the first evidence of the developmental impact of early interactions between muscle and tendon-like precursors, and confirm the appendicular Drosophila muscle system as a valuable model for studying these processes. PMID:26869938

  9. Activation Pattern of Lower Leg Muscles in Running on Asphalt, Gravel and Grass.

    PubMed

    Dolenec, Aleš; Štirn, Igor; Strojnik, Vojko

    2015-07-01

    Running is performed on different natural surfaces (outdoor) and artificial surfaces (indoor). Different surface characteristics cause modification of the lower leg muscle activation pattern to adopt ankle stiffness to these characteristics. So the purpose of our investigation was to study changes of lower leg muscles activation pattern in running on different natural running surfaces. Six male and two female runners participated. The participants ran at a freely chosen velocity in trials on asphalt while in trials on gravel, and grass surfaces they were attempting to reach similar velocities as in the trials on asphalt. Muscle activation of the peroneus brevis, tibialis anterior, soleus, and gastrocnemius medialis of the right leg was recorded. Running on asphalt increased average EMG amplitude of the m. tibialis anterior in the pre-activation phase and the m. gastrocnemius medialis in the entire contact phase compared to running on grass from 0.222 ± 0.113 V to 0.276 ± 0.136 V and from 0.214 ± 0.084 V to 0.238 ± 0.088 V, respectively. The average EMG of m. peroneus brevis in pre-activation phase increased from 0.156 ± 0.026 V to 0.184 ± 0.455 V in running on grass in comparison to running on gravel. Running on different surfaces is connected with different activation patterns of lower leg muscles. Running on asphalt requires stiff ankle joints, running on gravel requires greater stability in ankle joints, while running on grass is the least demanding on lower leg muscles. PMID:26434026

  10. Human Leg Model Predicts Muscle Forces, States, and Energetics during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Jared; Herr, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Humans employ a high degree of redundancy in joint actuation, with different combinations of muscle and tendon action providing the same net joint torque. Both the resolution of these redundancies and the energetics of such systems depend on the dynamic properties of muscles and tendons, particularly their force-length relations. Current walking models that use stock parameters when simulating muscle-tendon dynamics tend to significantly overestimate metabolic consumption, perhaps because they do not adequately consider the role of elasticity. As an alternative, we posit that the muscle-tendon morphology of the human leg has evolved to maximize the metabolic efficiency of walking at self-selected speed. We use a data-driven approach to evaluate this hypothesis, utilizing kinematic, kinetic, electromyographic (EMG), and metabolic data taken from five participants walking at self-selected speed. The kinematic and kinetic data are used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths, muscle moment arms, and joint moments while the EMG data are used to estimate muscle activations. For each subject we perform an optimization using prescribed skeletal kinematics, varying the parameters that govern the force-length curve of each tendon as well as the strength and optimal fiber length of each muscle while seeking to simultaneously minimize metabolic cost and maximize agreement with the estimated joint moments. We find that the metabolic cost of transport (MCOT) values of our participants may be correctly matched (on average 0.36±0.02 predicted, 0.35±0.02 measured) with acceptable joint torque fidelity through application of a single constraint to the muscle metabolic budget. The associated optimal muscle-tendon parameter sets allow us to estimate the forces and states of individual muscles, resolving redundancies in joint actuation and lending insight into the potential roles and control objectives of the muscles of the leg throughout the gait cycle. PMID:27175486

  11. Human Leg Model Predicts Muscle Forces, States, and Energetics during Walking.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jared; Herr, Hugh

    2016-05-01

    Humans employ a high degree of redundancy in joint actuation, with different combinations of muscle and tendon action providing the same net joint torque. Both the resolution of these redundancies and the energetics of such systems depend on the dynamic properties of muscles and tendons, particularly their force-length relations. Current walking models that use stock parameters when simulating muscle-tendon dynamics tend to significantly overestimate metabolic consumption, perhaps because they do not adequately consider the role of elasticity. As an alternative, we posit that the muscle-tendon morphology of the human leg has evolved to maximize the metabolic efficiency of walking at self-selected speed. We use a data-driven approach to evaluate this hypothesis, utilizing kinematic, kinetic, electromyographic (EMG), and metabolic data taken from five participants walking at self-selected speed. The kinematic and kinetic data are used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths, muscle moment arms, and joint moments while the EMG data are used to estimate muscle activations. For each subject we perform an optimization using prescribed skeletal kinematics, varying the parameters that govern the force-length curve of each tendon as well as the strength and optimal fiber length of each muscle while seeking to simultaneously minimize metabolic cost and maximize agreement with the estimated joint moments. We find that the metabolic cost of transport (MCOT) values of our participants may be correctly matched (on average 0.36±0.02 predicted, 0.35±0.02 measured) with acceptable joint torque fidelity through application of a single constraint to the muscle metabolic budget. The associated optimal muscle-tendon parameter sets allow us to estimate the forces and states of individual muscles, resolving redundancies in joint actuation and lending insight into the potential roles and control objectives of the muscles of the leg throughout the gait cycle. PMID:27175486

  12. Lower extremity muscle activation onset times during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance in anterior cruciate ligament injured subjects.

    PubMed

    Dingenen, Bart; Janssens, Luc; Luyckx, Thomas; Claes, Steven; Bellemans, Johan; Staes, Filip F

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate muscle activation onset times (MAOT) of both legs during a transition task from double-leg stance (DLS) to single-leg stance (SLS) in anterior cruciate ligament injured (ACLI) (n=15) and non-injured control subjects (n=15) with eyes open and eyes closed. Significantly delayed MAOT were found in the ACLI group compared to the control group for vastus lateralis, vastus medialis obliquus, hamstrings medial, hamstrings lateral, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus and gastrocnemius in both vision conditions, for gluteus maximus and gluteus medius with eyes open and for tensor fascia latae with eyes closed. Within the ACLI group, delayed MAOT of tibialis anterior with eyes open and gastrocnemius with eyes closed were found in the injured leg compared to the non-injured leg. All other muscles were not significantly different between legs. In conclusion, the ACLI group showed delayed MAOT not only around the knee, but also at the hip and ankle muscles compared to the non-injured control group. No differences between both legs of the ACLI group were found, except for tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius. These findings indirectly support including central nervous system re-education training to target the underlying mechanisms of these altered MAOT after ACL injury. PMID:26409102

  13. Motor-Neuron Pool Excitability of the Lower Leg Muscles After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Klykken, Lindsey W.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Context: Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. Objective: To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age = 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height = 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass = 66.3 ±11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals (6 females, 4 males; age = 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass = 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. Intervention(s): The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. Main Outcome Measure(s): The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (Hmax) and maximal muscle response (Mmax) and was then normalized using the Hmax:Mmax ratio. Results: The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46, 0.80) than in the uninjured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.93) (t6 = 3.62, P = .01). In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09, 0.35), but this finding was not different (t9 = −2.01, P = .07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t9 = −0.739, P = .48). We found no side-to-side differences in

  14. Control of Leg Movements Driven by EMG Activity of Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    La Scaleia, Valentina; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Hoellinger, Thomas; Wang, Letian; Cheron, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    During human walking, there exists a functional neural coupling between arms and legs, and between cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Here, we present a novel approach for associating the electromyographic (EMG) activity from upper limb muscles with leg kinematics. Our methodology takes advantage of the high involvement of shoulder muscles in most locomotor-related movements and of the natural co-ordination between arms and legs. Nine healthy subjects were asked to walk at different constant and variable speeds (3–5 km/h), while EMG activity of shoulder (deltoid) muscles and the kinematics of walking were recorded. To ensure a high level of EMG activity in deltoid, the subjects performed slightly larger arm swinging than they usually do. The temporal structure of the burst-like EMG activity was used to predict the spatiotemporal kinematic pattern of the forthcoming step. A comparison of actual and predicted stride leg kinematics showed a high degree of correspondence (r > 0.9). This algorithm has been also implemented in pilot experiments for controlling avatar walking in a virtual reality setup and an exoskeleton during over-ground stepping. The proposed approach may have important implications for the design of human–machine interfaces and neuroprosthetic technologies such as those of assistive lower limb exoskeletons. PMID:25368569

  15. Rapid onset vasodilation with single muscle contractions in the leg: influence of age

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, William E; Ueda, Kenichi; Treichler, David P; Casey, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation has been well characterized in the forearm. We sought to examine the impact of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in the leg following single muscle contractions and determine whether potential age-related impairments were similar between limbs (leg vs. arm). Fourteen young (23 ± 1 years) and 16 older (66 ± 1 years) adults performed single leg knee extensions at 20%, 40%, and 60% of work rate maximum. Femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Limb vascular conductance (VC) was calculated using blood flow (mL·min−1) and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). Peak and total vasodilator responses in the leg (change [Δ] in VC from baseline) were blunted in older adults by 44–50% across exercise intensities (P < 0.05 for all). When normalized for muscle mass, age-related differences were still evident (P < 0.05). Comparing the rapid vasodilator responses between the arm and the leg of the same individuals at similar relative intensities (20% and 40%) reveals that aging influences peak and total vasodilation equally between the limbs (no significant age × limb interaction at either intensity, P = 0.28–0.80). Our data demonstrate that (1) older adults exhibit an attenuated rapid hyperemic and vasodilator response in the leg; and (2) the age-related reductions in rapid vasodilation are similar between the arm and the leg. The mechanisms contributing to the age-related differences in contraction-induced rapid vasodilation are perhaps similar to those seen with the forearm model, but have not been confirmed. PMID:26320213

  16. Rapid onset vasodilation with single muscle contractions in the leg: influence of age.

    PubMed

    Hughes, William E; Ueda, Kenichi; Treichler, David P; Casey, Darren P

    2015-08-01

    The influence of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation has been well characterized in the forearm. We sought to examine the impact of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in the leg following single muscle contractions and determine whether potential age-related impairments were similar between limbs (leg vs. arm). Fourteen young (23 ± 1 years) and 16 older (66 ± 1 years) adults performed single leg knee extensions at 20%, 40%, and 60% of work rate maximum. Femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Limb vascular conductance (VC) was calculated using blood flow (mL·min(-1)) and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). Peak and total vasodilator responses in the leg (change [Δ] in VC from baseline) were blunted in older adults by 44-50% across exercise intensities (P < 0.05 for all). When normalized for muscle mass, age-related differences were still evident (P < 0.05). Comparing the rapid vasodilator responses between the arm and the leg of the same individuals at similar relative intensities (20% and 40%) reveals that aging influences peak and total vasodilation equally between the limbs (no significant age × limb interaction at either intensity, P = 0.28-0.80). Our data demonstrate that (1) older adults exhibit an attenuated rapid hyperemic and vasodilator response in the leg; and (2) the age-related reductions in rapid vasodilation are similar between the arm and the leg. The mechanisms contributing to the age-related differences in contraction-induced rapid vasodilation are perhaps similar to those seen with the forearm model, but have not been confirmed. PMID:26320213

  17. Inter-individual variability in adaptation of the leg muscles following a standardised endurance training programme in young women.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Jamie S; Williams, Alun G; Degens, Hans; Jones, David A

    2010-08-01

    There is considerable inter-individual variability in adaptations to endurance training. We hypothesised that those individuals with a low local leg-muscle peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak) relative to their whole-body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) would experience greater muscle training adaptations compared to those with a relatively high VO2peak. 53 untrained young women completed one-leg cycling to measure VO2peak and two-leg cycling to measure VO2max. The one-leg VO2peak was expressed as a ratio of the two-leg VO2max (Ratio(1:2)). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to indicate quadriceps muscle volume. Measurements were taken before and after completion of 6 weeks of supervised endurance training. There was large inter-individual variability in the pre-training Ratio(1:2) and large variability in the magnitude of training adaptations. The pre-training Ratio(1:2) was not related to training-induced changes in VO2max (P = 0.441) but was inversely correlated with changes in one-leg VO2peak and muscle volume (P < 0.05). No relationship was found between the training-induced changes in two-leg VO2max and one-leg VO2peak (r = 0.21; P = 0.129). It is concluded that the local leg-muscle aerobic capacity and Ratio(1:2) vary from person to person and this influences the extent of muscle adaptations following standardised endurance training. These results help to explain why muscle adaptations vary between people and suggest that setting the training stimulus at a fixed percentage of VO2max might not be a good way to standardise the training stimulus to the leg muscles of different people. PMID:20369366

  18. Effect of acute noxious stimulation to the leg or back on muscle synergies during walking.

    PubMed

    van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hodges, Paul W; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hug, François

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine how acute muscle pain affects muscle coordination during gait with consideration of muscle synergies (i.e., group of muscles activated in synchrony), amplitude of muscle activity and kinematics. A secondary aim was to determine whether any adaptation was specific to pain location. Sixteen participants walked on a treadmill during 5 conditions [control, low back pain (LBP), washout LBP, calf pain (CalfP), and washout CalfP]. Five muscle synergies were identified for all of the conditions. Cross-validation analysis showed that muscle synergy vectors extracted for the control condition accounted for >81% of variance accounted for from the other conditions. Muscle synergies were altered very little in some participants (n = 7 for LBP; n = 10 for CalfP), but were more affected in the others (n = 9 for LBP; n = 6 for CalfP). No systematic differences between pain locations were observed. Considering all participants, synergies related to propulsion and weight acceptance were largely unaffected by pain, whereas synergies related to other functions (trunk control and leg deceleration) were more affected. Gastrocnemii activity was less during both CalfP and LBP than control. Soleus activity was further reduced during CalfP, and this was associated with reduced plantar flexion. Some lower leg muscles exhibited adaptations depending on pain location (e.g., greater vastus lateralis and rectus femoris activity during CalfP than LBP). Overall, these changes in muscle coordination involve a participant-specific strategy that is important to further explore, as it may explain why some people are more likely to develop persistence of a painful condition. PMID:25298391

  19. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP). However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions. Results Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation pattern correlated significantly with the degree of spasticity. Conclusion This study confirmed the occurrence of altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with CP during cycling on a recumbent ergometer. There is a need to develop feedback systems that can inform patients and therapists of an incorrect muscle activation during cycling and support the training

  20. Actions of motor neurons and leg muscles in jumping by planthopper insects (hemiptera, issidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Bräunig, Peter

    2010-04-15

    To understand the catapult mechanism that propels jumping in a planthopper insect, the innervation and action of key muscles were analyzed. The large trochanteral depressor muscle, M133b,c, is innervated by two motor neurons and by two dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, all with axons in N3C. A smaller depressor muscle, M133a, is innervated by two neurons, one with a large-diameter cell body, a large, blind-ending dendrite, and a giant ovoid, axon measuring 50 microm by 30 microm in nerve N5A. The trochanteral levator muscles (M132) and (M131) are innervated by N4 and N3B, respectively. The actions of these muscles in a restrained jump were divisible into a three-phase pattern. First, both hind legs were moved into a cocked position by high-frequency bursts of spikes in the levator muscles lasting about 0.5 seconds. Second, and once both legs were cocked, M133b,c received a long continuous sequence of motor spikes, but the two levators spiked only sporadically. The spikes in the two motor neurons to M133b,c on one side were closely coupled to each other and to the spikes on the other side. If one hind leg was cocked then the spikes only occurred in motor neurons to that side. The final phase was the jump movement itself, which occurred when the depressor spikes ceased and which lasted 1 ms. Muscles 133b,c activated synchronously on both sides, are responsible for generating the power, and M133a and its giant neuron may play a role in triggering the release of a jump. PMID:20151364

  1. Spontaneous locomotor activity in late-stage chicken embryos is modified by stretch of leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Nina S; Ryu, Young U; Yeseta, Marie C

    2014-03-15

    Chicks initiate bilateral alternating steps several days before hatching and adaptively walk within hours of hatching, but emergence of precocious walking skills is not well understood. One of our aims was to determine whether interactions between environment and movement experience prior to hatching are instrumental in establishing precocious motor skills. However, physiological evidence of proprioceptor development in the chick has yet to be established; thus, one goal of this study was to determine when in embryogenesis proprioception circuits can code changes in muscle length. A second goal was to determine whether proprioception circuits can modulate leg muscle activity during repetitive limb movements for stepping (RLMs). We hypothesized that proprioception circuits code changes in muscle length and/or tension, and modulate locomotor circuits producing RLMs in anticipation of adaptive locomotion at hatching. To this end, leg muscle activity and kinematics were recorded in embryos during normal posture and after fitting one ankle with a restraint that supported the limb in an atypical posture. We tested the hypotheses by comparing leg muscle activity during spontaneous RLMs in control posture and ankle extension restraint. The results indicated that proprioceptors detect changes in muscle length and/or muscle tension 3 days before hatching. Ankle extension restraint produced autogenic excitation of the ankle flexor and reciprocal inhibition of the ankle extensor. Restraint also modified knee extensor activity during RLMs 1 day before hatching. We consider the strengths and limitations of these results and propose that proprioception contributes to precocious locomotor development during the final 3 days before hatching. PMID:24265423

  2. Aging affects spatial distribution of leg muscle oxygen saturation during ramp cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Osada, Takuya; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We compared muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) responses in several leg muscles and within a single muscle during ramp cycling exercise between elderly men (n = 8; age, 65 ± 3 years; ELD) and young men (n = 10; age, 23 ± 3 years; YNG). SmO2 was monitored at the distal site of the vastus lateralis (VLd), proximal site of the vastus lateralis (VLp), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and tibialis anterior (TA) by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. During submaximal exercise, significantly lower SmO2 at a given absolute work rate was observed in VLd, RF, BF, GL, and TA but not in VLp, VM, and GM in ELD than in YNG. In contrast, at all measurement sites, SmO2 at peak exercise was not significantly different between groups. These results indicate that the effects of aging on SmO2 responses are heterogeneous between leg muscles and also within a single muscle. The lower SmO2 in older men may have been caused by reduced muscle blood flow or altered blood flow distribution. PMID:23852490

  3. Age-related alterations in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in dystrophic mouse leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Previous reports have described both increased and decreased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in dystrophic muscle. Total PDE activity was measured in hind leg muscle from a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx) and a genetic control strain at 5, 8, 10, and 15 weeks of age. Total PDE activity declined in fractions isolated from mdx muscle over this time period, but was stable in fractions from control mice. Compared with age-matched controls, younger mdx muscle had higher cAMP and cGMP PDE activity. However, at 15 weeks, fractions from both strains had similar cGMP PDE activity and mdx fractions had lower cAMP PDE activity than controls. Particulate fractions from mdx muscle showed an age-related decline in sensitivity to the PDE4 inhibitor RO 20-1724. A similar loss of sensitivity to the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) was seen in a particulate fraction from mdx muscle and to a lesser degree in control muscle. These results suggest that the earlier disagreement regarding altered cyclic nucleotide metabolism in dystrophic muscle may be due to changes with age in PDE activity of dystrophic tissue. The age-related decline in particulate PDE activity seen in dystrophic muscle appears to be isozyme-specific and not due to a generalized decrease in total PDE activity. PMID:16391714

  4. Differential catabolism of muscle protein in garden warblers (Sylvia borin): flight and leg muscle act as a protein source during long-distance migration.

    PubMed

    Bauchinger, U; Biebach, H

    2001-05-01

    Samples of flight and leg muscle tissue were taken from migratory garden warblers at three different stages of migration: (1) pre-flight: when birds face an extended flight phase within the next few days, (2) post-flight: when they have just completed an extended flight phase, and (3) recovery: when they are at the end of a stop-over period following an extended flight phase. The changes in body mass are closely related to the changes in flight (P<0.001) and leg muscle mass (P<0.001), suggesting that the skeletal muscles are involved in the protein metabolism associated with migratory flight. From pre- to post-flight, the flight and the leg muscle masses decrease by about 22%, but are restored to about 12% above the pre-flight masses during the recovery period. Biochemical analyses show that following flight a selective reduction occurred in the myofibrillar (contractile) component of the flight muscle (P<0.01). As this selective reduction accounts only for a minor part of the muscle mass changes, sarcoplasmic (non-contractile) and myofibrillar proteins of both the flight and leg muscle act as a protein source during long-distance migration. As a loss of leg muscle mass is additionally observed besides the loss in flight muscle mass, mass change seems not to be strictly associated with the mechanical power output requirements during flight. Whereas the specific content of sarcoplasmic proteins in the flight muscle is nearly twice as high as that in the leg muscle (P<0.001), the specific content of myofibrillar proteins differs only slightly (P < 0.05), being comparably low in both muscles. The ratio of non-contractile to contractile proteins in the flight muscle is one of the highest observed in muscles of a vertebrate. PMID:11409626

  5. Two-stage muscle activity responses in decisions about leg movement adjustments during trip recovery.

    PubMed

    Potocanac, Zrinka; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Verschueren, Sabine; van Dieën, Jaap; Duysens, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Studies on neural decision making mostly investigated fast corrective adjustments of arm movements. However, fast leg movement corrections deserve attention as well, since they are often required to avoid falling after balance perturbations. The present study aimed at elucidating the mechanisms behind fast corrections of tripping responses by analyzing the concomitant leg muscle activity changes. This was investigated in seven young adults who were tripped in between normal walking trials and took a recovery step by elevating the tripped leg over the obstacle. In some trials, a forbidden landing zone (FZ) was presented behind the obstacle, at the subjects' preferred foot landing position, forcing a step correction. Muscle activity of the tripped leg gastrocnemius medialis (iGM), tibialis anterior (iTA), rectus femoris (iRF), and biceps femoris (iBF) muscles was compared between normal trips presented before any FZ appearance, trips with a FZ, and normal trips presented in between trips with a FZ ("catch" trials). When faced with a real or expected (catch trials) FZ, subjects shortened their recovery steps. The underlying changes in muscle activity consisted of two stages. The first stage involved reduced iGM activity, occurring at a latency shorter than voluntary reaction, followed by reduced iTA and increased iBF and iGM activities occurring at longer latencies. The fast response was not related to step shortening, but longer latency responses clearly were functional. We suggest that the initial response possibly acts as a "pause," allowing the nervous system to integrate the necessary information and prepare the subsequent, functional movement adjustment. PMID:26561597

  6. Physiotherapeutic treatment of athletic injuries to the muscle--tendon complex of the leg.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    An overview is presented of the most common soft-tissue injuries of the leg in athletes. A simple classification is made on the basis of cause, location of the injury and severity. These injuries can be classified into direct and indirect types. Direct injuries, which are usually the result of one episode of trauma, can be classified further into three grades of severity. Treatment is based on the severity of the injury and its location in the muscle--tendon complex. Indirect muscle--tendon injuries are the result of repetitive subacute microtrauma to the muscle--tendon complex or injury to the structures associated with muscle function (bursa, tendon sheath or fascia). Appropriate treatment regimens are suggested. PMID:902209

  7. A Comparison of Muscle Activities in the Lower Extremity between Flat and Normal Feet during One-leg Standing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Eun; Park, Ga-Hyeon; Lee, Yun-Seop; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the differences in muscle activation between flat and normal feet in the one-leg standing position which delivers the greatest load to the lower extremity. [Subjects] This study was conducted with 23 adults, 12 with normal feet and 12 with flat feet, with ages ranging from 21 to 30 years old, who had no neurological history or gait problems. [Methods] The leg used for one leg standing was the dominant leg of the subjects. The experimenter instructed the subjects to raise the non-dominant leg with their eyes open, and the subjects maintained a posture with the non-dominant leg's knee flexed at 90° and the hip joint flexed at 45° for six seconds. In the position of one-leg standing, a horizontal rod was set at the height of the waist line of the subjects who lightly placed two fingers of each hand on the rod to prevent inclination of the trunk to one side. Measurements were taken three times and the maximum value was used. A surface electromyogram (TeleMyo 2400T, Noraxon Co., USA) was used to measure muscle activities. [Results] We compared muscle activities between flat and normal foot, and the results show a significant difference between normal and flat feet in the muscle activity of the abductor hallucis muscle. [Conclusion] The subjects with flat feet had relatively lower activation of the abductor hallucis muscle than those with normal feet during one leg standing. We infer from this that the abductor hallucis muscle of flat foot doesn't work as well as a dynamic stabilizer, compared to a normal foot, during one leg standing. PMID:24259915

  8. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in contracting leg muscles of seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Bent, L R; Sander, M; Bolton, P S; Macefield, V G

    2013-06-01

    We previously showed that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) does not modulate the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in relaxed human leg muscles. However, given that there is little, if any, fusimotor drive to relaxed human muscles, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of muscle spindles becomes apparent during volitional contractions at levels that engage the fusimotor system. Unitary recordings were made from 28 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of seated awake human subjects. Twenty-one of the spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction; seven were silent at rest and were recruited during the contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock" but no entrainment of EMG. Despite these robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven muscle spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular input was not sufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurones recruited during a voluntary steady-state contraction, arguing against a significant role of the vestibular system in adjusting the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurones. PMID:23552997

  9. Diffusional kurtosis MRI of the lower leg: changes caused by passive muscle elongation and shortening.

    PubMed

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C; Boss, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis MRI (DKI) quantifies the deviation of water diffusion from a Gaussian distribution. We investigated the influence of passive elongation and shortening of the lower leg muscles on the DKI parameters D (diffusion coefficient) and K (kurtosis). After approval by the local ethics committee, eight healthy volunteers (age, 29.1 ± 2.9 years) underwent MRI of the lower leg at 3 T. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with 10 different b values at three ankle positions (passive dorsiflexion 10°, neutral position 0°, passive plantar flexion 40°). Parametrical maps of D and K were obtained by voxel-wise fitting of the signal intensities using a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. D and K were measured in the tibialis anterior, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. In the neutral position, D and K values were in the range between 1.66-1.79 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s and 0.21-0.39, respectively. D and K increased with passive shortening, and decreased with passive elongation, which could also be illustrated on the parametrical maps. In dorsiflexion, D (p < 0.01) and K (p = 0.036) were higher in the tibialis anterior than in the medial gastrocnemius. In plantar flexion, the opposite was found for K (p = 0.035). DKI parameters in the lower leg muscles are significantly influenced by the ankle joint position, indicating that the diffusion of water molecules in skeletal muscle deviates from a Gaussian distribution depending on muscle tonus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061811

  10. The effects of passive leg press training on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiang; Chen, Chuan-Shou; Ho, Wei-Hua; Füle, Róbert János; Chung, Pao-Hung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2013-06-01

    Passive leg press (PLP) training was developed based on the concepts of the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) and the benefits of high muscle contraction velocity. Passive leg press training enables lower limb muscle groups to apply a maximum downward force against a platform moved up and down at high frequency by an electric motor. Thus, these muscle groups accomplished both concentric and eccentric isokinetic contractions in a passive, rapid, and repetitive manner. This study investigates the effects of 10 weeks of PLP training at high and low movement frequencies have on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power. The authors selected 30 college students who had not performed systematic resistance training in the previous 6 months, including traditional resistance training at a squat frequency of 0.5 Hz, PLP training at a low frequency of 0.5 Hz, and PLP training at a high frequency of 2.5 Hz, and randomly divided them into 3 groups (n = 10). The participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, explosive force, and SSC efficiency were tested under the same experimental procedures at pre- and post-training. Results reveal that high-frequency PLP training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, peak power, and SSC efficiency (p < 0.05). Additionally, their change rate abilities were substantially superior to those of the traditional resistance training (p < 0.05). The low-frequency PLP training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, and peak power (p < 0.05). However, traditional resistance training only increased participants' 30-m sprint performance and peak power (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that jump performance, speed, and muscle power significantly improved after 10 weeks of PLP training at high movement frequency. A PLP training machine powered by an electrical motor enables muscles of the lower extremities to

  11. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  12. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. PMID:24671242

  13. Selective bilateral activation of leg muscles after cutaneous nerve stimulation during backward walking

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Firas; Jansen, Karen; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Duysens, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    During human locomotion, cutaneous reflexes have been suggested to function to preserve balance. Specifically, cutaneous reflexes in the contralateral leg's muscles (with respect to the stimulus) were suggested to play an important role in maintaining stability during locomotor tasks where stability is threatened. We used backward walking (BW) as a paradigm to induce unstable gait and analyzed the cutaneous reflex activity in both ipsilateral and contralateral lower limb muscles after stimulation of the sural nerve at different phases of the gait cycle. In BW, the tibialis anterior (TA) reflex activity in the contralateral leg was markedly higher than TA background EMG activity during its stance phase. In addition, in BW a substantial reflex suppression was observed in the ipsilateral biceps femoris during the stance-swing transition in some participants, while for medial gastrocnemius the reflex activity was equal to background activity in both legs. To test whether the pronounced crossed responses in TA could be related to instability, the responses were correlated with measures of stability (short-term maximum Lyapunov exponents and step width). These measures were higher for BW compared with forward walking, indicating that BW is less stable. However, there was no significant correlation between these measures and the amplitude of the crossed TA responses in BW. It is therefore proposed that these crossed responses are related to an attempt to briefly slow down (TA decelerates the center of mass in the single-stance period) in the light of unexpected perturbations, such as provided by the sural nerve stimulation. PMID:22773779

  14. Regulation of the microvascular circulation in the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hisashi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    To study the microvascular circulation, we examined the proportion of open and functioning capillaries in the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine of anesthetized rats. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Lycopersicon esculentum lectin was injected into the heart and allowed to circulate for 3 min to label open and functioning capillaries. Specimens were removed, frozen, sectioned and double-immunostained. Using one section, open and functioning capillaries were detected by immunostaining for this lectin bound to endothelial cells, while all capillaries were visualized by immunostaining for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31). These capillaries were semi-automatically detected and counted by fluorescence microscopy. The percentages of open and functioning capillaries were as follows: the soleus muscle, 93.0 ± 5.5%; superficial zone of the gastrocnemius muscle, 90.8 ± 6.2%; deep zone of the gastrocnemius muscle, 95.6 ± 4.0%; the plantaris muscle, 94.1 ± 2.7%; the pancreas, 86.3 ± 11.7%; and the small intestine, 91.1 ± 4.9% (n = 8, each). There was no significant difference among these data by the Kruskal-Wallis test. This study clearly demonstrated that the proportions of open and functioning capillaries are high and similar among the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine in spite of their structural and functional differences. This finding agrees with previous studies and supports the notion that the microvascular circulation is mainly controlled by changing of the blood flow in each capillary rather than changing the proportion of open and functioning capillaries. PMID:26140259

  15. A common neural element receiving rhythmic arm and leg activity as assessed by reflex modulation in arm muscles.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Syusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shinya; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Neural interactions between regulatory systems for rhythmic arm and leg movements are an intriguing issue in locomotor neuroscience. Amplitudes of early latency cutaneous reflexes (ELCRs) in stationary arm muscles are modulated during rhythmic leg or arm cycling but not during limb positioning or voluntary contraction. This suggests that interneurons mediating ELCRs to arm muscles integrate outputs from neural systems controlling rhythmic limb movements. Alternatively, outputs could be integrated at the motoneuron and/or supraspinal levels. We examined whether a separate effect on the ELCR pathways and cortico-motoneuronal excitability during arm and leg cycling is integrated by neural elements common to the lumbo-sacral and cervical spinal cord. The subjects performed bilateral leg cycling (LEG), contralateral arm cycling (ARM), and simultaneous contralateral arm and bilateral leg cycling (A&L), while ELCRs in the wrist flexor and shoulder flexor muscles were evoked by superficial radial (SR) nerve stimulation. ELCR amplitudes were facilitated by cycling tasks and were larger during A&L than during ARM and LEG. A low stimulus intensity during ARM or LEG generated a larger ELCR during A&L than the sum of ELCRs during ARM and LEG. We confirmed this nonlinear increase in single motor unit firing probability following SR nerve stimulation during A&L. Furthermore, motor-evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation did not show nonlinear potentiation during A&L. These findings suggest the existence of a common neural element of the ELCR reflex pathway that is active only during rhythmic arm and leg movement and receives convergent input from contralateral arms and legs. PMID:26961103

  16. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to ∼ 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow. PMID:20507965

  17. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:25148303

  18. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:24983846

  19. Dissociation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and leg vascular resistance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Herr, M. D.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that the increase in inactive leg vascular resistance during forearm metaboreflex activation is dissociated from muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). MSNA (microneurography), femoral artery mean blood velocity (FAMBV, Doppler), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were assessed during fatiguing static handgrip exercise (SHG, 2 min) followed by posthandgrip ischemia (PHI, 2 min). Whereas both MAP and MSNA increase during SHG, the transition from SHG to PHI is characterized by a transient reduction in MAP but sustained elevation in MSNA, facilitating separation of these factors in vivo. Femoral artery vascular resistance (FAVR) was calculated (MAP/MBV). MSNA increased by 59 +/- 20% above baseline during SHG (P < 0.05) and was 58 +/- 18 and 78 +/- 18% above baseline at 10 and 20 s of PHI, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. baseline). Compared with baseline, FAVR increased 51 +/- 22% during SHG (P < 0.0001) but returned to baseline levels during the first 30 s of PHI, reflecting the changes in MAP (P < 0.005) and not MSNA. It was concluded that control of leg muscle vascular resistance is sensitive to changes in arterial pressure and can be dissociated from sympathetic factors.

  20. Force-velocity property of leg muscles in individuals of different level of physical fitness.

    PubMed

    Cuk, Ivan; Mirkov, Dragan; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Kukolj, Milos; Ugarkovic, Dusan; Jaric, Slobodan

    2016-06-01

    The present study explored the method of testing muscle mechanical properties through the linear force-velocity (F-V) relationships obtained from loaded vertical jumps. Specifically, we hypothesised that the F-V relationship parameters depicting the force, power, and velocity of the tested muscles will differ among individuals of different physical fitness. Strength trained, physically active, and sedentary male participants (N = 10 + 10 + 10; age 20-29 years) were tested on maximum countermovement and squat jumps where manipulation of external loads provided a range of F and V data. The observed F-V relationships of the tested leg muscles were approximately linear and mainly strong (median correlation coefficients ranged from 0.77 to 0.92; all p < 0.05), independently of either the tested group or the jump type. The maximum power revealed higher values in the strength trained than in the physically active and sedentary participants. This difference originated from the differences in F-intercepts, rather than from the V-intercepts. We conclude that the observed parameters could be sensitive enough to detect the differences among both the individuals of different physical fitness and various jump types. The present findings support using loaded vertical jumps and, possibly, other maximum performance multi-joint movements for the assessment of mechanical properties of active muscles. PMID:27111493

  1. A Neuro-Mechanical Model of a Single Leg Joint Highlighting the Basic Physiological Role of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibres of an Insect Muscle System

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1) positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2) the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3) there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles. PMID:24244298

  2. A neuro-mechanical model of a single leg joint highlighting the basic physiological role of fast and slow muscle fibres of an insect muscle system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1) positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2) the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3) there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles. PMID:24244298

  3. Energy efficient hopping with Hill-type muscle properties on segmented legs.

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Andre; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic muscular properties of biological muscles are the main source of stabilization during locomotion, and superior biological performance is obtained with low energy costs. Man-made actuators struggle to reach the same energy efficiency seen in biological muscles. Here, we compare muscle properties within a one-dimensional and a two-segmented hopping leg. Different force-length-velocity relations (constant, linear, and Hill) were adopted for these two proposed models, and the stable maximum hopping heights from both cases were used to estimate the cost of hopping. We then performed a fine-grained analysis during landing and takeoff of the best performing cases, and concluded that the force-velocity Hill-type model is, at maximum hopping height, the most efficient for both linear and segmented models. While hopping at the same height the force-velocity Hill-type relation outperformed the linear relation as well. Finally, knee angles between 60° and 90° presented a lower energy expenditure than other morphologies for both Hill-type and constant relations during maximum hopping height. This work compares different muscular properties in terms of energy efficiency within different geometries, and these results can be applied to decrease energy costs of current actuators and robots during locomotion. PMID:27070710

  4. Glucose uptake heterogeneity of the leg muscles is similar between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls during walking

    PubMed Central

    Kindred, John H.; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B.; Rudroff, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulties in ambulation are one of the main problems reported by patients with multiple sclerosis. A previous study by our research group showed increased recruitment of muscle groups during walking but the influence of skeletal muscle properties, such as muscle fiber activity, has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to use the novel method of calculating glucose uptake heterogeneity in the leg muscles of patients with multiple sclerosis and compare these results to healthy controls. Methods Eight patients with multiple sclerosis (4 men) and 8 healthy controls (4 men) performed 15 min of treadmill walking at a comfortable self-selected speed following muscle strength tests. Participants were injected with ≈8 millicuries of [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose during walking after which positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging was performed. Findings No differences in muscle strength were detected between multiple sclerosis and control groups (P > 0.27). Within the multiple sclerosis group differences in muscle volume existed between the stronger and weaker legs in the vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus (P < 0.03). Glucose uptake heterogeneity between the groups was not different for any muscle group or individual muscle of the legs (P > 0.16, P ≥ 0.05). Interpretations Patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls showed similar muscle fiber activity during walking. Interpretations of these results, with respect to our previous study, suggest that walking difficulties in patients with multiple sclerosis may be more associated with altered central nervous system motor patterns rather than alterations in skeletal muscle properties. PMID:25541392

  5. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Josh L.; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R.L.; Lundgren, Lina E.; Tran, Tai T.; Sheppard, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73) were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF) in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59) were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59) also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle. Key points Greater thickness of the VL and LG muscles were significantly related to an enhanced ability to express higher levels of isometric and dynamic strength, and explosiveness in adolescent athletes. Isometric strength underpinned performance in the CMJ and SJ in these athletes. Greater lower-body isometric strength was significantly related to eccentric leg stiffness, which is potentially the result of greater neuromuscular activation in the muscle-tendon unit. PMID

  6. Synthesis of amino acids in weight bearing and non-weight bearing leg muscles of suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hypokinesia (HYP) for 6 days on the de novo synthesis of glutamine (GLN) and glutamate (GLU), and of alanine was tested in isolated leg muscles of intact, adrenalectomized (ADX) and ADX cortisol-treated rats. The net synthesis of GLN and GLU was lower in soleus muscles of HYP animals of these three groups of rats. The synthesis of alanine was lowered by HYP in ADX animals and apparently raised by HYP in ADX cortisol-treated rats. No HYP effect was seen in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of these animals. Although ADX lowered the synthesis of GLN and GLU in soleus muscles of control rats, while cortisol treatment restored this process to near normal, neither ADX nor cortisol treatment produced any effect in the HYP animals. However, effects of ADX and cortisol treatment on synthesis of GLN and GLU in EDL muscles and of alanine in both muscles seemed normal in HYP animals.

  7. Detection of changes in muscle oxygen saturation in the human leg: a comparison of two near-infrared spectroscopy devices.

    PubMed

    Nygren, Andreas; Rennerfelt, Kajsa; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device, INVOS 4100 as a method of measuring exercise and arterial occlusion induced muscle ischemia in human leg, by comparison with InSpectra tissue spectrometer Model 325, and secondly to determine the influence of skin and subcutaneous thickness on the NIRS measurements. Twenty healthy subjects (43 ± 8 years) volunteered for the study. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in the anterior tibial muscle was measured simultaneously with InSpectra Model 325 in one leg and INVOS 4100 in the contralateral leg during an exercise test until muscle exhaustion and arterial occlusion with and without exercise. The skin and subcutaneous thickness was identified by ultrasound imaging. Baseline StO2 was 87 ± 8 % detected by InSpectra and 76 ± 6 % by INVOS. Both devices detected an immediate decrease of StO2 (p < 0.001) during exercise, arterial occlusion with and without exercise, and a significant post ischemic hyperaemia (p < 0.001) during recovery. There was a significant inverse correlation between skin and subcutaneous thickness and baseline StO2 (r = -0.78, p < 0.01) as well as change in StO2 during exercise (r = -0.65, p = 0.002) for InSpectra, which was not apparent for INVOS. The results demonstrate that the cerebral/somatic oxygenation monitor (INVOS) is able to detect experimentally induced skeletal muscle ischemia in the human leg as well as the peripheral tissue spectrometer (InSpectra). Muscle oxygen saturation measurement by INVOS is less affected by skin and subcutaneous thickness than measured by InSpectra. PMID:23846128

  8. Using portable NIRS to compare arm and leg muscle oxygenation during roller skiing in biathletes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hesford, Catherine M; Laing, Stewart; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-01-01

    Portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been shown to be a useful and reliable tool for monitoring muscle oxygenation and blood volume changes during dynamic exercise in elite athletes. The wearable nature of such technology permits the measurement of specific muscles/muscle groups during realistic sport-specific exercise tasks in an outdoor environment. The aim of this case study was to observe the effect on arm and leg muscle oxygenation of roller skiing over a typical outdoor racing course. Such information is required by coaches in order to ascertain whether an athlete is using the correct technique at different stages of the course. Two wearable NIRS devices (PortaMon, Artinis Medical Systems) were used to compare muscle tissue oxygen saturation (TSI%) and total haemoglobin (tHb) changes in the quadriceps muscle group (vastus lateralis) and a muscle of the upper arm (triceps) during roller skiing. During the flat section, quadriceps ΔTSI remained steady in both subjects, whereas triceps ΔTSI showed a reduction (-10 %). During the steep uphill section of the course, arm and leg TSI decreased equally in one subject (ΔTSI = -10 %), whereas there was a difference between the two muscle groups in the other subject (ΔTSIquadriceps = -2 %; ΔTSItriceps = -7 %). A difference was also seen between subjects during the downhill section of the course. This study presents the first example of the use of portable NIRS to assess oxygenation and blood volume changes in multiple muscle groups during roller skiing in a realistic, outdoor setting. PMID:23852493

  9. Innervation pattern of a pool of nine excitatory motor neurons in the flexor tibiae muscle of a locust hind leg

    PubMed

    Sasaki; Burrows

    1998-05-21

    The flexor tibiae muscle of a locust hind leg consists of 10-11 pairs of fibre bundles in the main body of the muscle and a distal pair of bundles that form the accessory flexor muscle, all of which insert onto a common tendon. It is much smaller than the antagonistic extensor tibiae muscle and yet it is innervated by nine excitatory motor neurons, compared with only two for the extensor. To determine the pattern of innervation within the muscle by individual motor neurons, branches of the nerve (N5B2) that supplies the different muscle bundles were backfilled to reveal somata in the metathoracic ganglion. This showed that different muscle bundles are innervated by different numbers of excitatory motor neurons. Physiological mapping of the innervation was then carried out by intracellular recordings from the somata of flexor motor neurons in the metathoracic ganglion using microelectrodes. Spikes were evoked in these neurons by the injection of current, and matching junctional potentials were sought in fibres throughout the muscle using a second intracellular electrode. Each motor neuron innervates only a restricted array of muscle fibres and, although some innervate a larger array than others, none innervates fibres throughout the muscle. Some motor neurons innervate only proximal fibres and others only more distal fibres, so that the most proximal and most distal bundles of muscle fibres are innervated by non-overlapping sets of motor neurons. More motor neurons innervate proximal bundles than distal ones, and there are some asymmetries in the number of motor neurons innervating corresponding bundles on either side of the tendon. Individual motor neurons cause slow, fast or intermediate movements of the tibia, but their patterns of innervation overlap in the different muscle bundles. Furthermore, individual muscle fibres may also be innervated by motor neurons with different properties. PMID:9600870

  10. Unilateral Floor Stiffness Perturbations Systematically Evoke Contralateral Leg Muscle Responses: A New Approach to Robot-Assisted Gait Therapy.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, Jeffrey; Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    2016-04-01

    A variety of robotic rehabilitation devices have been proposed for gait rehabilitation after stoke, but have only produced moderate results when compared to conventional physiotherapy. We suggest a novel approach to robotic interventions which takes advantage of mechanisms of inter-limb coordination. In order to test the viability of this approach, we apply unilateral floor stiffness perturbations via a unique robotic device and observe evoked contralateral leg responses in kinematics, as well as muscle activations, in healthy subjects. The real-time control of floor stiffness is utilized to uniquely differentiate force and kinematic feedback, creating novel sensory perturbations. We present results of repeatable and scalable evoked kinematic and muscular response of the unperturbed leg in healthy subjects. Moreover, we provide insight into the fundamental sensorimotor mechanisms of inter-leg coordination. We also lay the foundation for model-based rehabilitation strategies for impaired walkers by presenting a mathematical model that accurately describes the relationship between the magnitude of the stiffness perturbation and the evoked muscle activity. One of the most significant advantages of this approach over current practices is the safety of the patient, since this does not require any direct manipulation of the impaired leg. The novel methods and results presented in this paper set the foundation for a paradigm shift in robotic interventions for gait rehabilitation. PMID:25872216

  11. Leg muscle volume during 30-day 6-degree head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Lee, P. L.; Ellis, S.; Selzer, R. H.; Ortendahl, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to compare the effect of two modes of lower-extremity exercise training on the mass (volume) of posterior leg group (PLG) muscles (soleus, flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and flexor digitorum longus) on 19 men (ages 32-42 years) subjected to intense dynamic-isotonic (ITE, cycle ergometer, number of subjects (N) = 7), isokinetic (IKE, torque egrometer, N = 7), and no exercise (NOE, N = 5) training for 60 min/day during head-down bed rest (HDBR). Total volume of the PLG muscles decreased (p less than 0.05) similarly: ITE = 4.3 +/- SE 1.6%, IKE = 7.7 +/- 1.6%, and NOE = 6.3 +/- 0.8%; combined volume (N = 19) loss was 6.1 +/- 0.9%. Ranges of volume changes were 2.6% to -9.0% (ITE), -2.1% to -14.9% (IKE), and -3.4% to -8/1% (NOE). Correlation coefficients (r) of muscle volume versus thickness measured with ultrasonography were: ITE r + 0.79 (p less than 0.05), IKE r = 0.27 (not significant (NS)), and NOE r = 0.63 (NS). Leg-muscle volume and thickness were highly correlated (r = 0.79) when plasma volume was maintained during HDBR with ITE. Thus, neither intensive lower extremity ITE nor IKE training influence the normal non-exercised posterior leg muscle atrophy during HDBR. The relationship of muscle volume and thickness may depend on the mode of exercise training associated with the maintenance of plasma volume.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Ravneet S.; Lott, Donovan; Mathur, Sunita; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Bendixen, Roxanna; Forbes, Sean C.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Walter, Glenn A.; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities. Methods Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed. Results Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus) was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05). Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84) and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80). Dorsiflexor (DF) and plantarflexor (PF) specific torque was significantly different between the groups. Discussion Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD. PMID:26103164

  13. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Measurement of the Effect of Leg Dominance on Muscle Oxygen Saturation During Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Paunescu, Lelia Adelina; Pereira, Chelsea; Smith, Charles P.; Soller, Babs R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of leg dominance on the symmetry of the biomechanics during cycling remains uncertain -- asymmetries have been observed in kinematics and kinetics, while symmetries were found in muscle activation. No studies have yet investigated the symmetry of muscle metabolism during cycling. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method to investigate the metabolic responses of specific muscles during cycling. PURPOSE: To determine whether there was an effect of leg dominance on thigh muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) during incrementally loaded submaximal cycling using NIRS. METHODS: Eight right leg dominant, untrained subjects (5 men, 3 women; 31+/-2 yrs; 168.6+/-1.0 cm; 67.2+/-1.8 kg, mean +/- SE) volunteered to participate. Spectra were collected bilaterally from the vastus lateralis (VL) during supine rest and cycling. SmO2 was calculated using previously published methods. Subjects pedaled at 65 rpm while resistance to pedaling was increased in 0.5 kp increments from 0.5 kp every 3 min until the subject reached 80% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. SmO2 was averaged over 3 min for each completed stage. A two-way ANOVA was performed to test for leg differences. A priori contrasts were used to compare work levels to rest. RESULTS: VL SmO2 was not different between the dominant and non-dominant legs at rest and during exercise (p=0.57). How SmO2 changed with workload was also not different between legs (p=0.32). SmO2 at 0.5 kp (60.3+/-4.0, p=0.12) and 1.0 kp (59.5+/-4.0, p=0.10) was not different from rest (69.1+/-4.0). SmO2 at 1.5 kp (55.4 4.0, p=0.02), 2.0 kp (55.7+/-5.0, p=0.04), and 2.5 kp (43.4+/-7.9, p=0.01) was significantly lower than rest. CONCLUSION: VL SmO2 during cycling is not different between dominant and non-dominant legs and decreases with moderate workload in untrained cyclists. Assuming blood flow is directed equally to both legs, similar levels of oxygen extraction (as indicated by SmO2) suggests the metabolic load of

  14. Evidence of an association between cardiac-locomotor synchronization and lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Shinta; Nishida, Yusuke; Mizushima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the occurrence of cardiac-locomotor synchronization (CLS) improves lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy men were studied while performing two treadmill protocols. The CLS protocol involved subjects walking at the frequency of their heart rate (HR) to induce CLS. The free protocol (reference) involved subjects walking at a self-selected cadence. The treadmill load was identical in the two protocols. Electrocardiographic signals for HR, foot switch signals for step rate and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals for total haemoglobin (total Hb) in the lower leg muscles were measured continuously for 10 min after HR reached a steady state. [Results] The mean HR and mean step rate did not differ between the CLS and free protocols. However, total Hb was significantly higher in the CLS protocol than in the free protocol. The rate of increase in total Hb positively correlated with the strength of CLS. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the occurrence of CLS enhances lower leg muscle blood perfusion by increasing the strength of CLS during walking. PMID:26180328

  15. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  16. Muscle activation characteristics of the front leg during baseball swings with timing correction for sudden velocity decrease.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  17. Growth responses of breast and leg muscles to essential amino acids in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Mehri, M; Bagherzadeh-Kasmani, F; Rokouei, M

    2016-03-01

    The first three essential amino acids (EAA) for broilers including methionine (Met), lysine (Lys) and threonine (Thr) may greatly influence the growth of chick muscles at early stages of life. In order to survey the potential effects of those EAA on growth muscles, a rotatable three-variable central composite design (CCD) was conducted to track the interrelationships of dietary digestible Met (dMet), Lys (dLys) and Thr (dThr) for optimization of processing yields in broiler chicks using response surface methodology. A total of 60 floor pens of six birds each were assigned to 15 dietary treatments based on CCD containing five levels of dMet (0.416% to 0.584% of diet), dLys (0.881% to 1.319% of diet) and dThr (0.532% to 0.868% of diet) from 3 to 16 days of age. Experimental treatments significantly affected breast mass (BM) and leg mass (LM) of the birds (P<0.05) in which the main effect of dLys on BM was threefold higher than the main effect of dThr, and interaction effect between dMet and dLys was observed on BM (P<0.05). However, in the case of LM, the main effect of dThr was higher than the main effects of dMet and dLys and highest interaction effect exist between dThr and dMet (P<0.05). The second-order models for BM and LM were fitted by least squares regression. Canonical analysis revealed that the stationary points for carcass components were saddle points, thus ridge analysis was performed for getting optimal values of each EAA. Ridge analyses of BM and LM models showed that the maximum BM point may be obtained with 0.58%, 1.05% and 0.76% of dMet, dLys and dThr, respectively, in diet, and maximum LM point may be achieved with 0.58%, 1.09% and 0.70% of dMet, dLys and dThr, respectively, in diet. The resultant ideal ratios of dMet and dThr to dLys were 55% and 72% for BM; 53% and 64% for LM. Moreover, sensitivity analysis showed that the most important amino acids in BM and LM models were Lys and Thr, respectively. In conclusion, providing these three amino

  18. Contributions of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles to the anterior cruciate ligament loading during single-leg landing.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Yeow, Chen Hua; Hong Goh, James Cho; Oetomo, Denny; Malekipour, Fatemeh; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2013-07-26

    The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of the Soleus and Gastrocnemius (Gastroc) muscles' forces to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during single-leg landing. Although Quadriceps (Quads) and Hamstrings (Hams) muscles were recognized as the main contributors to the ACL loading, less is known regarding the role of ankle joint plantarflexors during landing. Eight healthy subjects performed single-landing tasks from 30 and 60cm heights. Scaled generic musculoskeletal models were developed in OpenSim to calculate lower limb muscle forces. The model consisted of 10 segments with 23 degrees of freedom and 92 lower body muscle-tendon units. Knee joint reaction forces were calculated based on the estimated muscle forces and used to predict ACL forces. We hypothesized that Soleus and Gastrocs muscle forces have opposite effects on tibial loading in the anterior/posterior directions. In situations where greater landing height would lead to an increase in GRF and risk of ACL injury, we further hypothesized that posterior forces of the Soleus and Hams would increase correspondingly to help protect the ACL during a safe landing maneuver. Our results demonstrated the antagonistic and agonistic roles of Gastrocs and Soleus respectively in ACL loading. The posterior force of Soleus reached 28-32% of Ham's posterior force for both landing heights at peak GRF while the posterior force of Gastrocs on femur was negligible. ACL injury risk during single-leg landing is not only dependent on knee musculature but also influenced by muscles that do not span the knee joint, such as the Soleus. In conclusion, the role of the ankle plantarflexors should be considered when developing training strategies for ACL injury prevention. PMID:23731572

  19. Timing of Muscle Response to a Sudden Leg Perturbation: Comparison between Adolescents and Adults with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Maria Stella; Cioni, Matteo; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita; Casabona, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    Movement disturbances associated with Down syndrome reduce mechanical stability, worsening the execution of important tasks such as walking and upright standing. To compensate these deficits, persons with Down syndrome increase joint stability modulating the level of activation of single muscles or producing an agonist-antagonist co-activation. Such activations are also observed when a relaxed, extended leg is suddenly released and left to oscillate passively under the influence of gravity (Wartenberg test). In this case, the Rectus femoris of adults with Down syndrome displayed peaks of activation after the onset of the first leg flexion. With the aim to verify if these muscular reactions were acquired during the development time and to find evidences useful to give them a functional explanation, we used the Wartenberg test to compare the knee joint kinematics and the surface electromyography of the Rectus femoris and Biceps femoris caput longus between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome. During the first leg flexion, adolescents and adults showed single Rectus femoris activations while, a restricted number of participants exhibited agonist-antagonist co-activations. However, regardless the pattern of activation, adults initiated the muscle activity significantly later than adolescents. Although most of the mechanical parameters and the total movement variability were similar in the two groups, the onset of the Rectus femoris activation was well correlated with the time of the minimum acceleration variability. Thus, in adolescents the maximum mechanical stability occurred short after the onset of the leg fall, while adults reached their best joint stability late during the first flexion. These results suggest that between the adolescence and adulthood, persons with Down syndrome explore a temporal window to select an appropriate timing of muscle activation to overcome their inherent mechanical instability. PMID:24278374

  20. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Methods Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20–45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an “upright standing” reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. Results In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Conclusion Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may

  1. The influence of different floor stiffness on mechanical efficiency of leg extensor muscle.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Saggini, R; Viru, A

    1997-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of skeletal muscle is influenced by internal factors (e.g. re-use of elastic energy) and/or external conditions (e.g. floor compliance, shoe structure etc.). These factors have an effect on muscular work economy-this was investigated in the present study. Eight subjects were tested during three different series of jumps. Each series consisted of rhythmical vertical jumps performed at desired frequency and height for 1 min. The first (1) series was executed on the laboratory floor without rebound condition (subjects were asked to maintain 1 s period in an isometric condition before concentric work was performed), the second (II) and the third (III) series were performed in rebound conditions respectively on a laboratory floor (hard surface) and on a special panel possessing high compliance (a special foam rubber panel with stiffness of 14.4 kN/m). Expired air was collected during the test and recovery for determination of energy expenditure. Mechanical work was calculated from the vertical displacement of the body during the jumps. The results indicated that the net efficiency in the jumps without prestretch of the leg extensor muscles (series I) was the lowest (19.4%). In contrast, the net efficiency observed in rebound jumps (series II and III) was respectively 30.8% and 33.1%, demonstrating that the reuse of elastic energy (Wel) plays an important role for muscular work efficiency. However, the contribution of Wel to the total work performed was different p < 0.05, Student's t-test) in jumps on the special panel (41%) compared to the normal surface (37%), even if the total amount of stored elastic energy was the same in both conditions. The different efficiency observed between series II and III was attributed to the compliance of the surface on which the tests were executed. It was suggested that man could change his neuromuscular pattern to adapt muscular behaviour for matching the damped properties shown by the high compliance surface

  2. Identification and classification of involuntary leg muscle contractions in electromyographic records from individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C K; Dididze, M; Martinez, A; Morris, R W

    2014-10-01

    Involuntary muscle contractions (spasms) are common after human spinal cord injury (SCI). Our aim was to compare how well two raters independently identified and classified different types of spasms in the same electromyographic records (EMG) using predefined rules. Muscle spasms were identified by the presence, timing and pattern of EMG recorded from paralyzed leg muscles of four subjects with chronic cervical SCI. Spasms were classified as one of five types: unit, tonic, clonus, myoclonus, mixed. In 48h of data, both raters marked the same spasms most of the time. More variability in the total spasm count arose from differences between muscles (84%; within subjects) than differences between subjects (6.5%) or raters (2.6%). Agreement on spasm classification was high (89%). Differences in spasm count, and classification largely occurred when EMG was marked as a single spasm by one rater but split into multiple spasms by the other rater. EMG provides objective measurements of spasm number and type in contrast to the self-reported spasm counts that are often used to make clinical decisions about spasm management. Data on inter-rater agreement and discrepancies on muscle spasm analysis can both drive the design and evaluation of software to automate spasm identification and classification. PMID:25023162

  3. A Neuro-Mechanical Model Explaining the Physiological Role of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibres at Stop and Start of Stepping of an Insect Leg

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Grabowska, Martyna; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Stop and start of stepping are two basic actions of the musculo-skeletal system of a leg. Although they are basic phenomena, they require the coordinated activities of the leg muscles. However, little is known of the details of how these activities are generated by the interactions between the local neuronal networks controlling the fast and slow muscle fibres at the individual leg joints. In the present work, we aim at uncovering some of those details using a suitable neuro-mechanical model. It is an extension of the model in the accompanying paper and now includes all three antagonistic muscle pairs of the main joints of an insect leg, together with their dedicated neuronal control, as well as common inhibitory motoneurons and the residual stiffness of the slow muscles. This model enabled us to study putative processes of intra-leg coordination during stop and start of stepping. We also made use of the effects of sensory signals encoding the position and velocity of the leg joints. Where experimental observations are available, the corresponding simulation results are in good agreement with them. Our model makes detailed predictions as to the coordination processes of the individual muscle systems both at stop and start of stepping. In particular, it reveals a possible role of the slow muscle fibres at stop in accelerating the convergence of the leg to its steady-state position. These findings lend our model physiological relevance and can therefore be used to elucidate details of the stop and start of stepping in insects, and perhaps in other animals, too. PMID:24278108

  4. A neuro-mechanical model explaining the physiological role of fast and slow muscle fibres at stop and start of stepping of an insect leg.

    PubMed

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Grabowska, Martyna; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Stop and start of stepping are two basic actions of the musculo-skeletal system of a leg. Although they are basic phenomena, they require the coordinated activities of the leg muscles. However, little is known of the details of how these activities are generated by the interactions between the local neuronal networks controlling the fast and slow muscle fibres at the individual leg joints. In the present work, we aim at uncovering some of those details using a suitable neuro-mechanical model. It is an extension of the model in the accompanying paper and now includes all three antagonistic muscle pairs of the main joints of an insect leg, together with their dedicated neuronal control, as well as common inhibitory motoneurons and the residual stiffness of the slow muscles. This model enabled us to study putative processes of intra-leg coordination during stop and start of stepping. We also made use of the effects of sensory signals encoding the position and velocity of the leg joints. Where experimental observations are available, the corresponding simulation results are in good agreement with them. Our model makes detailed predictions as to the coordination processes of the individual muscle systems both at stop and start of stepping. In particular, it reveals a possible role of the slow muscle fibres at stop in accelerating the convergence of the leg to its steady-state position. These findings lend our model physiological relevance and can therefore be used to elucidate details of the stop and start of stepping in insects, and perhaps in other animals, too. PMID:24278108

  5. Contribution of skeletal muscle ‘ergoreceptors’ in the human leg to respiratory control in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Adam C; Francis, Darrel P; Davies, L Ceri; Ponikowski, Piotr; Coats, Andrew J S; Piepoli, Massimo F

    2000-01-01

    The role of skeletal muscle ergoreceptors (afferents sensitive to muscle contraction, differentiated into metaboreceptors, sensitive to metabolic changes, and mechanoreceptors, sensitive to mechanical changes) in the genesis of the increased ventilatory drive in chronic heart failure is controversial. We have aimed to clarify the contribution of muscle metaboreceptors in the leg to ventilation and to compare this with the contribution of mechanoreceptors. Eighteen heart failure patients and 12 controls were studied. Metaboreceptor and mechanoreceptor responses were measured in the leg by bicycle exercise with and without regional circulatory occlusion during recovery, and by active and equivalent passive limb movement, respectively. Patients, in comparison with controls, had a lower peak V̇O2 (Oxygen uptake) (18.1 ± 1.6 vs. 24.5 ± 2.5 ml min−1 kg−1, P < 0.05), and an evident metaboreceptor contribution to the ventilatory response (3.5 ± 1.6 vs. −4.0 ± 1.3 l min−1, P < 0.001). Passive limb movement increased ventilation in both patients and controls (+3.7 ± 0.4 and +2.9 ± 0.5 l min−1 from baseline, P < 0.003), but this was associated with an increase in V̇O2 (+0.1 ± 0.01 and +0.1 ± 0.02 l min−1 from baseline, P < 0.001). The ratio of the increase in ventilation to the increase in V̇O2 during passive movement was not significantly higher than that during active exercise for either patients or controls, suggesting a limited contribution from the mechanoreceptors. In chronic heart failure the presence of a muscle metaboreceptor reflex is also demonstrated in the leg, while mechanoreceptors exhibited a non-significant contribution in both patients and controls. The hypothesis of a peripheral origin of symptoms of exertional intolerance in this syndrome is confirmed as being mainly due to metabolic stimulation of the muscle metaboreceptors. PMID:11118512

  6. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity. PMID:27451322

  7. The Use of Dynamic Ultrasonography for the Confirmation of Lower Leg Muscle Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Nark Kyoung; Kim, Won Serk; Kim, Yeon Jin; Yoo, Kwang Ho; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2008-01-01

    The term muscle herniation represents focal muscular protrusions through an acquired or congenital fascial defect. The anterior tibialis muscle is the most common site of herniation. Dynamic ultrasonography has become an important tool in dermatology for diagnosing suspected muscle herniation because it is a non-invasive, highly accurate, readily available and cost-effective imaging technique. We present here the case of a 21-year-old male Korean soldier who underwent dynamic ultrasonography to confirm the diagnosis of anterior tibialis muscle herniation. PMID:27303189

  8. Leg lengthening and shortening

    MedlinePlus

    ... to very unequal leg lengths. They include: Poliomyelitis Cerebral palsy Small, weak muscles or short, tight (spastic) muscles, ... Mosby; 2012:chap 29. Read More Broken bone Cerebral palsy Legg-Calve-Perthes disease Long bones Polio Update ...

  9. Is coordination of two-joint leg muscles during load lifting consistent with the strategy of minimum fatigue?

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Isaka, T; Albrecht, A M; Gregor, R J

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if strong correlations reported for a back lift task between activity (EMG) of two-joint rectus femoris (RF), hamstrings (HA), and gastrocnemius (GA) and the difference in the joint moments could be predicted by minimizing an objective function of minimum fatigue. Four subjects lifted barbell weights (9 and 18 kg) using a back lift technique at three speeds normal, slow, and fast. Recorded ground reaction forces and coordinates of the leg joints were used to calculate the resultant joint moments. Surface EMG of five muscles crossing the knee joint were also recorded. Forces of nine muscles were calculated using static optimization and a minimum fatigue criterion. Relationships (i) (RF EMG-HA EMG) vs (knee moment hip moment) and (ii) GA EMG vs. (ankle moment knee moment) were closely related (coefficients of determination were typically 0.9 and higher). Qualitatively similar relationships were predicted by minimizing fatigue. Gastrocnemius and hamstrings had the agonistic action at both joints they cross during load lifting, and their activation and predicted forces increased with increasing flexion knee moments and extension ankle and hip moments. The rectus femoris typically had the antagonistic action at the knee and hip, and its activation and predicted force were low. Patterns of predicted muscle forces were qualitatively similar to the corresponding EMG envelopes (except in phases of low joint moments where accuracy of determining joint moments was presumably poor). It was suggested that muscle coordination in load lifting is consistent with the strategy of minimum muscle fatigue. PMID:9880059

  10. Single fiber, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) for detecting muscle microcirculation in the low leg and its technique improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongming; Oberg, P. Ake; Rohman, Hakan; Larsson, Sven-Erik

    1995-02-01

    Percutaneous, single fiber LDF of 632.8 nm (He-Ne) is used for continuous recording of low leg muscle microcirculation. An optical fiber (0 equals 0.5 mm) was placed inside the tibialis ant. muscle 10 cm below the knee joint via a plastic cannula (0 equals 1.0 mm) and using local anaesthesia of the skin. The LDF is sampled continuously by the on-line PC computer one minute before, three minutes during and for four minutes after tourniquet occlusion. Twelve healthy, non-smoking men were examined. The reactive hyperaemia and the flux reactive time after release of tourniquet was examined successfully. To get better signal-to-noise ration and deeper detected volume in the muscle, the optical characteristics of ordinary fiber tips and modified spherical and `pear'-type ends were studied. Compared with the system of 632.8 nm, a new optical system with a laser diode of 790 nm was developed. A PC computer with DSP card was used for all the signal processing in the new system.

  11. Concentration of lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic in leg skeletal muscles of three species of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Gasparik, Jozef; Vladarova, Denisa; Capcarova, Marcela; Smehyl, Peter; Slamecka, Jaroslav; Garaj, Peter; Stawarz, Robert; Massanyi, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor accumulation of lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic in leg skeletal muscle of some wild birds from selected areas of Slovakia and the correlations among the heavy metals. A total of 160 wild birds representing 3 species-Eurasian coot (Fulica atra) (n = 24), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) (n = 68) and pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) (n = 68) were involved for analyses. Concentrations of heavy metals from samples were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Metal concentrations are expressed as mg/kg wet weight. The order of lead and arsenic concentrations in muscles of wild birds were as follows: mallard > pheasant > Eurasian coot; in the case of arsenic the differences were significant (P < 0.05). Muscle of Eurasian coot accumulated the highest concentration of cadmium and mercury followed by pheasant and the lowest in mallard, but differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Moderately negative correlations were noted in pheasant between cadmium and mercury (r = -0.39), and between mercury and arsenic (r = -0.45). Moderately negative correlation between cadmium and arsenic (r = -0.31) was found for Eurasian coot. PMID:20397088

  12. A comparison of optimisation methods and knee joint degrees of freedom on muscle force predictions during single-leg hop landings.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Perraton, Luke; Fok, Laurence; Muñoz, Mario A; Clark, Ross; Pivonka, Peter; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of different optimisation methods and different knee joint degrees of freedom (DOF) on muscle force predictions during a single legged hop. Nineteen subjects performed single-legged hopping manoeuvres and subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed to predict muscle forces during the movement. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC) methods using either 1 or 3 DOF knee joint models. All sagittal and transverse plane joint angles calculated using inverse kinematics or CMC in a 1 DOF or 3 DOF knee were well-matched (RMS error<3°). Biarticular muscles (hamstrings, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) showed more differences in muscle force profiles when comparing between the different muscle prediction approaches where these muscles showed larger time delays for many of the comparisons. The muscle force magnitudes of vasti, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were not greatly influenced by the choice of muscle force prediction method with low normalised root mean squared errors (<48%) observed in most comparisons. We conclude that SO and CMC can be used to predict lower-limb muscle co-contraction during hopping movements. However, care must be taken in interpreting the magnitude of force predicted in the biarticular muscles and the soleus, especially when using a 1 DOF knee. Despite this limitation, given that SO is a more robust and computationally efficient method for predicting muscle forces than CMC, we suggest that SO can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal models that have a 1 or 3 DOF knee joint to study the relative differences and the role of muscles during hopping activities in future studies. PMID:25129166

  13. Role of glucocorticoids in the response of rat leg muscles to reduced activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Adrenalectomy did not prevent atrophy of rat soleus muscle during 6 days of tail cast suspension. Cortisol treatment enhanced the atrophy and caused atrophy of the weight-bearing soleus and both extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Unloading led to increased sarcoplasmic protein concentration in the soleus but cortisol administration increased the myhofibrillar (+stromal) protein concentration in both muscles. Suspension of hindlimbs of adrenalectomized animals led to faster protein degradation, slower sarcoplasmic protein degradation, and faster myofibrillar protein synthesis in the isolated soleus, whereas with cortisol-treated animals, the difference in synthesis of myofibrillar proteins was enhanced and that of sarcoplasmic proteins was abolished. Both soleus and EDL of suspended, cortisol-treated animals showed faster protein degradation. It is unlikely that any elevation in circulating glucocorticoids was solely responsible for atrophy of the soleus in this model, but catabolic amounts of glucocorticoids could alter the response of muscle to unloading.

  14. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles of subjects in a near-vertical position.

    PubMed

    Knellwolf, T P; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS) has no effect on the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in either relaxed or voluntarily contracting human leg muscles. However, all previous studies have been conducted on subjects in a seated position. Given that independent vestibular control of muscle spindle firing would be more valuable during postural threat, we tested the hypothesis that this modulation would become apparent for subjects in a near-vertical position. Unitary recordings were made from 18 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of awake human subjects laying supine on a motorized tilt table. All recorded spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest, and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock." The subject was then moved into a near-vertical position (75°), and the stimulation repeated. Despite robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS in either position. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular stimulus was insufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurons in the near-vertical position. However, this does not mean that the vestibular system cannot modulate the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurons in free unsupported standing, when reliance on proprioceptive feedback is higher. PMID:26936989

  15. 31P-NMR study of different hypothyroid states in rat leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, P; Klein, M; Robin-Lherbier, B; Walker, P; Escanye, J M; Brunotte, F; Robert, J; Duc, M

    1991-12-01

    Using phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, this study was undertaken to determine the effects of experimental hypothyroidism on muscle bioenergetics. The peaks of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi, phosphodiesters (PDE), sugar phosphomonoesters, and ATP were obtained at rest, during a 2-Hz hindleg muscle stimulation, and during a subsequent recovery period from four groups of anesthetized rats as follows: one control and three hypothyroid (HT) groups treated by propylthyouracil during 2, 4, and 6 wk, respectively. Resting spectra showed a significant rise in Pi by 30% and decreased intracellular pH and PCr/Pi in all three HT groups. PDE progressively increased to 200% of its initial value with hypothyroidism duration. Muscle stimulation did not lead to significant differences in PCr depletion. The percentage of PCr recovery is less in HT muscle than in control muscle. An abnormal H+ metabolism is obvious in all three HT groups. These results indicate abnormal bioenergetics in HT muscle and suggest an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism and of the H+ efflux. They also evoke a high sensitivity of cellular energetics to thyroid deficiency. PMID:1767830

  16. Clarification of functional differences between the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance: immediate effects of conditioning contraction of the toe plantar flexion muscles.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Junya; Tojima, Michio; Torii, Suguru

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the functional differences of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance by comparing postural sway in different conditioning contraction interventions. [Subjects] Thirty-four healthy, young males and females participated in this study. [Methods] The front-back and right-left direction components of maximal displacement and postural sway velocity during the single leg stance were measured in various conditioning contraction interventions for the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux or lessor toes. [Results] The main findings of this study were as follows: 1) the front-back direction component of maximal displacement was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux, and 2) the front-back direction component of the postural sway velocity was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes during the single leg stance. [Conclusion] The plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes control the postural sway velocity. Furthermore, the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux appear to control the amplitude of postural sway. PMID:26504272

  17. Increased dietary carbohydrate and endurance during single-leg cycling using a limb with normal muscle glycogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Hardman, A E; Williams, C

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that increased availability of blood-borne glucose would improve endurance after carbohydrate loading. A single-leg exercise model was employed, taking advantage of the fact that supercompensation of muscle glycogen occurs only in a previously exercised limb. Endurance time to exhaustion at 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was determined for 11 males and three females who were then allocated to a control group or a high-carbohydrate (CHO) group. For 3 days following Test 1 the control group maintained a prescribed normal diet whilst the CHO group increased the proportion of energy derived from carbohydrate (62.1 +/- 4.3% cf. 43.9 +/- 2.0%, P less than 0.01). The endurance test was then repeated using the leg that was inactive during Test 1. Endurance time was increased on Test 2 (123.7 +/- 43.2 min cf. 98.5 +/- 21.9 min, P less than 0.05 one-tailed test) for the CHO group but not for the control group (101.8 +/- 21.7 min cf. 107.5 +/- 9.1 min, NS). There was no indication of enhanced carbohydrate metabolism during Test 2 for the CHO group but mean heart rate was lower during Test 2 than during Test 1 (145 +/- 14 beat min-1 cf. 152 +/- 12 beat min-1, P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the prior consumption of a high-carbohydrate diet improves endurance during high-intensity cycling with a limb with normal muscle glycogen concentration. PMID:2681820

  18. Microvascular circulation at cool, normal and warm temperatures in rat leg muscles examined by histochemistry using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hisashi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Nosaka, Shinnosuke; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2014-07-01

    Local cooling and/or warming of the body are widely used for therapy. For safer and more effective therapy, microvascular hemodynamics needs to be clarified. To examine blood circulation in rat leg muscles at 20, 30, 37 and 40°C, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Lycopersicon esculentum lectin was injected into the cardiac ventricle. Endothelial cells of open and functioning blood vessels were labeled by this lectin for 3 min and detected by immunostaining for lectin. The percentage of open and functioning capillaries of leg muscles by the avidin-biotin method was 89.8±3.3% at 37°C, while capillaries were unclear or unstained at 20 and 30°C, probably due to a decrease of blood flow. The results using the tyramide-dinitrophenol method were 58.6±15.0% at 20°C, 68.5±12.3% at 30°C, 83.8±5.7% at 37°C and 83.3±7.8% at 40°C. The value at 20°C was significantly different from those at 37 and 40°C. The results by the tyramide-biotin method were 85.5±5.3% at 20°C, 87.3±9.7% at 30°C, 94.7±3.6% at 37°C and 92.5±2.1% at 40°C. Based on these results, it was concluded that the blood flow of each capillary considerably decreased at 20 and 30°C and probably increased at 40°C, whereas the proportion of open and functioning capillaries was essentially unchanged. PMID:24998628

  19. Quantifying fat and lean muscle in the lower legs of women with knee osteoarthritis using two different MRI systems.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Karen; Davison, Michael J; Noseworthy, Michael; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2016-06-01

    Decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass are commonly seen in the thighs of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the role of calf muscles in activities of daily living and knee mechanics, little work has investigated calf changes in knee OA. Unlike the thigh, muscle and fat in the lower leg can be imaged using a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We aimed to assess agreement between subcutaneous fat, intermuscular fat (IMF), intramuscular fat (intraMF), and lean muscle volumes acquired using a peripheral 1.0T as compared to a reference whole-body 3.0T MRI scanner. A calf MRI scan from each scanner was acquired from twenty women >55 years with knee OA. The different tissues were segmented on each of ten axial slices for every participant using SliceOmatic 5.0 (Tomovision, Magog, QC). Tissue volumes were determined for each outcome. Agreement between tissue volumes from the two scanners was assessed using intraclass correlation (ICC(2,1)) coefficients, standard error, and Bland-Altman plots. Agreement between tissue volumes was strong to very strong, with ICCs ranging from 0.842 to 0.991 for all outcomes. However, wide confidence intervals for IMF and intraMF suggest there is less confidence in agreement with segmentation of images from the 1.0T scanner generally underestimating fat volume relative to the 3.0T scanner. The 3.0T's superior between-tissue contrast likely resulted in more accurate segmentation of IMF and intraMF compared to the 1.0T scanner. Comparisons of tissue volume between studies using different scanners/sequences should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:26979605

  20. Rhesus leg muscle EMG activity during a foot pedal pressing task on Bion 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Riazansky, S. N.; Goulet, C.; Badakva, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Recktenwald, M. R.; McCall, G.; Roy, R. R.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to perform a foot lever pressing task for a food reward. EMG activity was recorded from selected lower limb muscles of 2 animals before, during, and after a 14-day spaceflight and from 3 animals during a ground-based simulation of the flight. Integrated EMG activity was calculated for each muscle during the 20-min test. Comparisons were made between data recorded before any experimental manipulations and during flight or flight simulation. Spaceflight reduced soleus (Sol) activity to 25% of preflight levels, whereas it was reduced to 50% of control in the flight simulation. During flight, medial gastrocnemius (MG) activity was reduced to 25% of preflight activity, whereas the simulation group showed normal activity levels throughout all tests. The change in MG activity was apparent in the first inflight recording, suggesting that some effect of microgravity on MG activity was immediate.

  1. Differential contribution of ACh‐muscarinic and β‐adrenergic receptors to vasodilatation in noncontracting muscle during voluntary one‐legged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kei; Matsukawa, Kanji; Liang, Nan; Endo, Kana; Idesako, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Hironobu; Kataoka, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Kazumi; Watanabe, Tae; Takahashi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have demonstrated the centrally induced cholinergic vasodilatation in skeletal muscle at the early period of voluntary one‐legged exercise and during motor imagery in humans. The purpose of this study was to examine whether central command may also cause β‐adrenergic vasodilatation during the exercise and motor imagery. Relative changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Oxy‐Hb) of bilateral vastus lateralis (VL) muscles, as index of tissue blood flow, and femoral blood flow to nonexercising limb were measured during one‐legged cycling and mental imagery of the exercise for 1 min before and after propranolol (0.1 mg/kg iv). The Oxy‐Hb of noncontracting muscle increased (P <0.05) at the early period of exercise and the increase was sustained throughout exercise, whereas the Oxy‐Hb of contracting muscle increased at the early period but thereafter decreased. We subtracted the Oxy‐Hb response with propranolol from the control response in individual subjects to identify the propranolol‐sensitive component of the Oxy‐Hb response during exercise. In both noncontracting and contracting VL muscles, the increase in Oxy‐Hb at the early period of one‐legged exercise did not involve a significant propranolol‐sensitive component. However, as the exercise proceeded, the propranolol‐sensitive component of the Oxy‐Hb response was developed during the later period of exercise. Propranolol also failed to affect the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance of nonexercising leg but significantly attenuated (P <0.05) their later increases during exercise. Subsequent atropine (10–15 μg/kg iv) abolished the initial increases in Oxy‐Hb of both VL muscles. Mental imagery of the one‐legged exercise caused the bilateral increases in Oxy‐Hb, which were not altered by propranolol but abolished by subsequent atropine. It is likely that the rapid cholinergic and delayed β‐adrenergic vasodilator mechanisms cooperate

  2. Using leg muscles as shock absorbers: theoretical predictions and experimental results of drop landing performance.

    PubMed

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Susta, D; Cotelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The use of muscles as power dissipators is investigated in this study, both from the modellistic and the experimental points of view. Theoretical predictions of the drop landing manoeuvre for a range of initial conditions have been obtained by accounting for the mechanical characteristics of knee extensor muscles, the limb geometry and assuming maximum neural activation. Resulting dynamics have been represented in the phase plane (vertical displacement versus speed) to better classify the damping performance. Predictions of safe landing in sedentary subjects were associated to dropping from a maximum (feet) height of 1.6-2.0 m (about 11 m on the moon). Athletes can extend up to 2.6-3.0 m, while for obese males (m = 100 kg, standard stature) the limit should reduce to 0.9-1.3 m. These results have been calculated by including in the model the estimated stiffness of the 'global elastic elements' acting below the squat position. Experimental landings from a height of 0.4, 0.7, 1.1 m (sedentary males (SM) and male (AM) and female (AF) athletes from the alpine ski national team) showed dynamics similar to the model predictions. While the peak power (for a drop height of about 0.7 m) was similar in SM and AF (AM shows a +40% increase, about 33 W/kg), AF stopped the downward movement after a time interval (0.219 +/- 0.030 s) from touch-down 20% significantly shorter than SM. Landing strategy and the effect of anatomical constraints are discussed in the paper. PMID:9857837

  3. Interaction of transcutaneous spinal stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Roy, François D; Bosgra, Dillen; Stein, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous spinal stimulation is a noninvasive method that can activate dorsal and/or ventral roots depending on the location and intensity of stimulation. Reflex root-evoked potentials (REPs) were studied in muscles that traditionally evoke large (soleus) and small H-reflexes (tibialis anterior), as well as muscles where H-reflexes are difficult to study (hamstrings). This study characterizes the interaction of the REP and the motor-evoked potential (MEP). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered 11-25 ms before spinal stimulation resulted in more than linear summation of the two responses. Because of overlap, the modulation was quantified after subtracting the contribution of the conditioning MEP or REP. At rest, the mean-rectified soleus response was facilitated by up to ~250 μV (21-times the MEP or 161% of the REP). The increases were more reliable during a voluntary contraction (up to ~300 μV, 517% of the MEP or 181% of the REP). At the 13-ms interval, the mean-rectified response in the pre-contracted hamstrings was increased by 227% of the MEP or 300% of the REP. In some subjects, TMS could also eliminate the post-activation depression produced using two spinal stimuli, confirming that the interaction can extend to presynaptic spinal neurons. The spatiotemporal facilitation in tibialis anterior was not significant. However, the large MEP was facilitated when the spinal stimulus preceded TMS by 100-150 ms, presumably because of rebound excitation. These strong interactions may be important for inducing motor plasticity and improved training procedures for recovery after neurological damage. PMID:24531641

  4. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M.; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Aim Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Method Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Results Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001), gluteus minimus (p<0.01) and piriformis (p<0.05)). The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects), except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848. Conclusion More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required. PMID:27459688

  5. Associations between pQCT-based fat and muscle area and density and DXA-based total and leg soft tissue mass in healthy women and men

    PubMed Central

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Thiebaud, Robert S; Chen, Zhaojing; Karabulut, Murat; Kim, So Jung; Bemben, Debra A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) can be used for muscle and fat area and density assessments. These may independently influence muscle and fat mass measurements from Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). Objective To determine associations between pQCT-derived soft tissue density and area measures and DXA-derived soft tissue mass. Methods Linear regression models were developed based on BMI and calf fat and muscle cross-sectional area (FCSA and MCSA) and density measured by pQCT in healthy women (n=76) and men (n=82) aged 20–59 years. Independent variables for these models were leg and total bone-free lean mass (BFLM) and fat mass (FM) measured by DXA. Results Sex differences (p<0.01) were found in both muscle (Mean±SE: Women: 78.6±0.4; Men: 79.9 ± 0.2 mg/cm3) and fat (Women: 0.8±0.4 Men: 9.1±0.6 mg/cm3) density. BMI, fat density, and age (R2=0.86, p<0.01) best accounted for the variability in total FM. FCSA, BMI, and fat density explained the variance in leg FM (R2=0.87, p<0.01). MCSA and muscle density explained the variance in total (R2=0.65, p<0.01) and leg BFLM (R2=0.70, p<0.01). Conclusion Calf muscle and fat area and density independently predict lean and fat tissue mass. PMID:25524966

  6. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  7. Differential Changes with Age in Multiscale Entropy of Electromyography Signals from Leg Muscles during Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun Gu; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related gait changes may be due to the loss of complexity in the neuromuscular system. This theory is disputed due to inconsistent results from single-scale analyses. Also, behavioral adaptations may confound these changes. We examined whether EMG dynamics during gait is less complex in older adults over a range of timescales using the multiscale entropy method, and whether slower walking attenuates this effect. Surface EMG was measured from the left vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius (GA), and tibialis anterior (TA) in 17 young and 18 older adults as they walked on a treadmill for 5 minutes at 0.8x-1.2x of preferred speed. Sample entropy (SE) and the complexity index (CI) of the EMG signals were calculated after successive coarse-graining to extract dynamics at timescales of 27 to 270 Hz, with m = 2 and r = 0.15 SD. SE and CI were lower across the timescales in older adults in VL and BF, but higher in GA (all p<0.001); these results held for VL and GA even after accounting for longer EMG burst durations in older adults. CI was higher during slower walking speed in VL and BF (p<0.001). Results were mostly similar for m = 3 and r = 0.01–0.35. Smaller r was more sensitive to age-related differences. The decrease in complexity with aging in the timescales studied was limited to proximal muscles, particularly VL. The increase in GA may be driven by other factors. Walking slower may reflect a behavioral adaptation that allows the nervous system to function with greater complexity. PMID:27570974

  8. Differential Changes with Age in Multiscale Entropy of Electromyography Signals from Leg Muscles during Treadmill Walking.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Gu; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2016-01-01

    Age-related gait changes may be due to the loss of complexity in the neuromuscular system. This theory is disputed due to inconsistent results from single-scale analyses. Also, behavioral adaptations may confound these changes. We examined whether EMG dynamics during gait is less complex in older adults over a range of timescales using the multiscale entropy method, and whether slower walking attenuates this effect. Surface EMG was measured from the left vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius (GA), and tibialis anterior (TA) in 17 young and 18 older adults as they walked on a treadmill for 5 minutes at 0.8x-1.2x of preferred speed. Sample entropy (SE) and the complexity index (CI) of the EMG signals were calculated after successive coarse-graining to extract dynamics at timescales of 27 to 270 Hz, with m = 2 and r = 0.15 SD. SE and CI were lower across the timescales in older adults in VL and BF, but higher in GA (all p<0.001); these results held for VL and GA even after accounting for longer EMG burst durations in older adults. CI was higher during slower walking speed in VL and BF (p<0.001). Results were mostly similar for m = 3 and r = 0.01-0.35. Smaller r was more sensitive to age-related differences. The decrease in complexity with aging in the timescales studied was limited to proximal muscles, particularly VL. The increase in GA may be driven by other factors. Walking slower may reflect a behavioral adaptation that allows the nervous system to function with greater complexity. PMID:27570974

  9. Central alterations of neuromuscular function and feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents following exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Angius, Luca; Hopker, James G; Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M

    2015-06-15

    The aims of this investigation were to describe the central alterations of neuromuscular function induced by exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise (OLDE, study 1) and to indirectly quantify feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents via muscle occlusion (MO, study 2) in healthy adult male humans. We hypothesized that these central alterations and their recovery are associated with changes in afferent feedback. Both studies consisted of two time-to-exhaustion tests at 85% peak power output. In study 1, voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave, cervicomedullary motor evoked potential (CMEP), motor evoked potential (MEP), and MEP cortical silent period (CSP) of the knee extensor muscles were measured. In study 2, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and leg muscle pain were measured during MO. Measurements were performed preexercise, at exhaustion, and after 3 min recovery. Compared with preexercise values, VAL was lower at exhaustion (-13 ± 13%, P < 0.05) and after 3 min of recovery (-6 ± 6%, P = 0.05). CMEP area/M area was lower at exhaustion (-38 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and recovered after 3 min. MEP area/M area was higher at exhaustion (+25 ± 27%, P < 0.01) and after 3 min of recovery (+17 ± 20%, P < 0.01). CSP was higher (+19 ± 9%, P < 0.01) only at exhaustion and recovered after 3 min. Markers of afferent feedback (MAP and leg muscle pain during MO) were significantly higher only at exhaustion. These findings suggest that the alterations in spinal excitability and CSP induced by high-intensity OLDE are associated with an increase in afferent feedback at exhaustion, whereas central fatigue does not fully recover even when significant afferent feedback is no longer present. PMID:25855308

  10. Restless Legs

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) causes a powerful urge to move your legs. Your legs become uncomfortable when you are lying down or sitting. ... your legs feel better, but not for long. RLS can make it hard to fall asleep and ...

  11. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces to parameters of the optimization-based human leg model revealed by analytical and numerical analyses.

    PubMed

    Raikova, R T; Prilutsky, B I

    2001-10-01

    There are different opinions in the literature on whether the cost functions: the sum of muscle stresses squared and the sum of muscle stresses cubed, can reasonably predict muscle forces in humans. One potential reason for the discrepancy in the results could be that different authors use different sets of model parameters which could substantially affect forces predicted by optimization-based models. In this study, the sensitivity of the optimal solution obtained by minimizing the above cost functions for a planar three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model of the leg with nine muscles was investigated analytically for the quadratic function and numerically for the cubic function. Analytical results revealed that, generally, the non-zero optimal force of each muscle depends in a very complex non-linear way on moments at all three joints and moment arms and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of all muscles. Deviations of the model parameters (moment arms and PCSAs) from their nominal values within a physiologically feasible range affected not only the magnitude of the forces predicted by both criteria, but also the number of non-zero forces in the optimal solution and the combination of muscles with non-zero predicted forces. Muscle force magnitudes calculated by both criteria were similar. They could change several times as model parameters changed, whereas patterns of muscle forces were typically not as sensitive. It is concluded that different opinions in the literature about the behavior of optimization-based models can be potentially explained by differences in employed model parameters. PMID:11522304

  12. Movement-induced gain modulation of somatosensory potentials and soleus H-reflexes evoked from the leg. II. Correlation with rate of stretch of extensor muscles of the leg.

    PubMed

    Staines, W R; Brooke, J D; Misiaszek, J E; McIlroy, W E

    1997-06-01

    Attenuation of initial somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) gain becomes more pronounced with increased rates of movement. Manipulation of the range of movement also might alter the SEP gain. It could alter joint receptor discharge; it should alter the discharge of muscle stretch receptors. We hypothesized that: (1) SEP gain reduction correlates with both the range and the rate of movement, and (2) manipulation of range and rate of movement to achieve similar estimated rates of stretch of a leg extensor muscle group (the vasti) results in similar decreases in SEP gain. SEPs from Cz', referenced to Fpz' (2 cm caudal to Cz and Fpz, respectively, according to the International 10-20 System), along with soleus H-reflexes were elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. Stable magnitudes of small M-waves indicated stability of stimulation. A modified cycle ergometer with an adjustable pedal crank and electric motor was used to passively rotate the right leg over three ranges (producing estimated vasti stretch of 12, 24 and 48 mm) and four rates (0, 20, 40 and 80 rpm) of movement. Two experiments were conducted. Ranges and rates of pedalling movement were combined to produce two or three equivalent estimated rates of tissue stretch of the vasti muscles at each of 4, 16, 32 and 64 mm/s. Tibial nerve stimuli were delivered when the knee was moved through its most flexed position and the hip was nearing its most flexed position. Means of SEP, H-reflex and M-wave magnitudes were tested for rate and range effects (ANOVA). A priori contrasts compared means produced by equivalent estimated rates of vasti stretch. Increasing the rate of movement significantly increased the attenuation of SEP and H-reflex gain (P<0.05). Increasing the range of movement also significantly increased these gain attenuations (P<0.05). Combining these to achieve equivalent rates of stretch, through different combinations of rate and range, resulted in equivalent

  13. Muscle activity in the lower limbs during push-down movement with a new active-exercise apparatus for the leg.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Aikawa, Shizu; Irie, Shun; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Sakane, Masataka; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Lower-limb deep vein thrombosis is a complication of orthopedic surgery. A leg-exercise apparatus named "LEX" was developed as a novel active-exercise apparatus for deep vein thrombosis prevention. Muscle activity was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of exercise with LEX in the prevention. [Subjects] Eight healthy volunteers participated in this study. [Methods] Muscle activities were determined through electromyography during exercise with LEX [LEX (+)] and during active ankle movements [LEX (-)]. The end points were peak % maximum voluntary contraction and % integrated electromyogram of rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus. [Results] LEX (+) resulted in higher average values in all muscles except the tibialis anterior. Significant differences were noted in the peak of the biceps femoris and gastrocnemius and in the integrated electromyogram of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. The LEX (+)/LEX (-) ratio of the peak was 2.2 for the biceps femoris and 2.0 for the gastrocnemius . The integrated electromyogram was 1.8 for the gastrocnemius, 1.5 for the rectus femoris, 1.4 for the vastus lateralis, and 1.2 for the soleus. [Conclusion] Higher muscle activity was observed with LEX (+). LEX might be a good tool for increasing lower-limb blood flow and deep vein thrombosis prevention. PMID:27134410

  14. Muscle activity in the lower limbs during push-down movement with a new active-exercise apparatus for the leg

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Aikawa, Shizu; Irie, Shun; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Sakane, Masataka; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lower-limb deep vein thrombosis is a complication of orthopedic surgery. A leg-exercise apparatus named “LEX” was developed as a novel active-exercise apparatus for deep vein thrombosis prevention. Muscle activity was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of exercise with LEX in the prevention. [Subjects] Eight healthy volunteers participated in this study. [Methods] Muscle activities were determined through electromyography during exercise with LEX [LEX (+)] and during active ankle movements [LEX (−)]. The end points were peak % maximum voluntary contraction and % integrated electromyogram of rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus. [Results] LEX (+) resulted in higher average values in all muscles except the tibialis anterior. Significant differences were noted in the peak of the biceps femoris and gastrocnemius and in the integrated electromyogram of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. The LEX (+)/LEX (−) ratio of the peak was 2.2 for the biceps femoris and 2.0 for the gastrocnemius . The integrated electromyogram was 1.8 for the gastrocnemius, 1.5 for the rectus femoris, 1.4 for the vastus lateralis, and 1.2 for the soleus. [Conclusion] Higher muscle activity was observed with LEX (+). LEX might be a good tool for increasing lower-limb blood flow and deep vein thrombosis prevention. PMID:27134410

  15. The relationship between the kinematics of passive movement, the stretch of extensor muscles of the leg and the change induced in the gain of the soleus H reflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Brooke, J D; Misiaszek, J E; Staines, W R

    1995-02-20

    The gain of the H reflex attenuates during passive stepping and pedalling movements of the leg. We hypothesized that the kinematics of the movement indirectly reflect the receptor origin of this attenuation. In the first experiment, H reflexes were evoked in soleus at 26 points in the cycle of slow, passive pedalling movement of the leg and at 13 points with the leg static (the ankle was always immobilized). Maximum inhibition occurred as the leg moved through its most flexed position (P < 0.05). Inhibition observed in the static leg was also strongest at this position (P < 0.05). The increase in inhibition was gradual during flexion movement, with rapid reversal of this increase during extension. In the second experiment, the length of stretch of the vasti muscles was modelled. Variable pedal crank lengths and revolutions per minute (rpm) altered leg joint displacements and angular velocities. Equivalent rates of stretch of the vasti, achieved through different combinations of joint displacements and velocities, elicited equivalent attenuations of mean reflex magnitudes in the flexed leg. Reflex gain exponentially related to rate of stretch (R2 = 0.98 P < 0.01). The results imply that gain attenuation of this spinal sensorimotor path arises from spindle discharge in heteronymous extensor muscles of knee and/or hip, concomitant with movement. PMID:7749757

  16. The effect of swinging the arms on muscle activation and production of leg force during ski skating at different skiing speeds.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Caroline; Lindinger, Stefan J; Ohtonen, Olli; Rapp, Walter; Müller, Erich; Linnamo, Vesa

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated the effects of arm swing during leg push-off in V2-alternate/G4 skating on neuromuscular activation and force production by the leg muscles. Nine skilled cross-country skiers performed V2-alternate skating without poles at moderate, high, and maximal speeds, both with free (SWING) and restricted arm swing (NOSWING). Maximal speed was 5% greater in SWING (P<0.01), while neuromuscular activation and produced forces did not differ between techniques. At both moderate and high speed the maximal (2% and 5%, respectively) and average (both 5%) vertical force and associated impulse (10% and 14%) were greater with SWING (all P<0.05). At high speed range of motion and angular velocity of knee flexion were 24% greater with SWING (both P<0.05), while average EMG of m. biceps femoris was 31% lower (all P<0.05) in SWING. In a similar manner, the average EMG of m. vastus medialis and m. biceps femoris were lower (17% and 32%, P<0.05) during the following knee extension. Thus, swinging the arms while performing V2-alternate can enhance both maximal speed and skiing economy at moderate and, in particularly, high speeds. PMID:27031075

  17. Protein turnover in the breast muscle of broiler chicks and studies addressing chlorine dioxide sanitation of hatching eggs, poultry leg problems and wheat middling diets for laying hens

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes occurred in breast muscle Ks measured by {sup 14}C-tyrosine incorporation at 10, 16, 22 and 34 days of age. Protein synthesis rates decreased as the birds matures: 30 to 11.2%/d between 10 and 34 days of age. In a second study birds fed diets low in lysine or protein-energy had reduced fractional rates of protein synthesis and free tyrosine, branched chain and large neutral amino acid concentrations as compared to control birds the same body weight. Artificial weight loading and reduced dietary protein levels were used to study the effects of body weight on the severity of leg deformities in chicks and poults. Experiments investigating the practicality of wheat middlings as an alternate feedstuff for laying hens suggested that high levels in the diet will reduce egg production, feed conversion, hen livability and egg yolk color. Lastly, chlorine dioxide foam and dipping solutions were compared with formaldehyde fumigation for sanitizing hatching eggs.

  18. Identification of hemostatic genes expressed in human and rat leg muscles and a novel gene (LPP1/PAP2A) suppressed during prolonged physical inactivity (sitting)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Partly because of functional genomics, there has been a major paradigm shift from solely thinking of skeletal muscle as contractile machinery to an understanding that it can have roles in paracrine and endocrine functions. Physical inactivity is an established risk factor for some blood clotting disorders. The effects of inactivity during sitting are most alarming when a person develops the enigmatic condition in the legs called deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or “coach syndrome,” caused in part by muscular inactivity. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle expresses genes with roles in hemostasis and if their expression level was responsive to muscular inactivity such as occurs in prolonged sitting. Methods Microarray analyses were performed on skeletal muscle samples from rats and humans to identify genes associated with hemostatic function that were significantly expressed above background based on multiple probe sets with perfect and mismatch sequences. Furthermore, we determined if any of these genes were responsive to models of physical inactivity. Multiple criteria were used to determine differential expression including significant expression above background, fold change, and non-parametric statistical tests. Results These studies demonstrate skeletal muscle tissue expresses at least 17 genes involved in hemostasis. These include the fibrinolytic factors tetranectin, annexin A2, and tPA; the anti-coagulant factors TFPI, protein C receptor, PAF acetylhydrolase; coagulation factors, and genes necessary for the posttranslational modification of these coagulation factors such as vitamin K epoxide reductase. Of special interest, lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1/PAP2A), a key gene for degrading prothrombotic and proinflammatory lysophospholipids, was suppressed locally in muscle tissue within hours after sitting in humans; this was also observed after acute and chronic physical inactivity conditions in rats, and exercise was

  19. Intensity of daily physical activity is associated with central hemodynamic and leg muscle oxygen availability in COPD.

    PubMed

    Louvaris, Zafeiris; Kortianou, Eleni A; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Nasis, Ioannis; Asimakos, Andreas; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), daily physical activity is reported to be adversely associated with the magnitude of exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle weakness. There is limited evidence whether central hemodynamic, oxygen transport, and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities also contribute to reduced daily physical activity. Nineteen patients with COPD (FEV1, 48 ± 14% predicted) underwent a treadmill walking test at a speed corresponding to the individual patient's mean walking intensity, captured by a triaxial accelerometer during a preceding 7-day period. During the indoor treadmill test, the individual patient mean walking intensity (range, 1.5 to 2.3 m/s2) was significantly correlated with changes from baseline in cardiac output recorded by impedance cardiography (range, 1.2 to 4.2 L/min; r = 0.73), systemic vascular conductance (range, 7.9 to 33.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1); r = 0.77), systemic oxygen delivery estimated from cardiac output and arterial pulse-oxymetry saturation (range, 0.15 to 0.99 L/min; r = 0.70), arterio-venous oxygen content difference calculated from oxygen uptake and cardiac output (range, 3.7 to 11.8 mlO2/100 ml; r = -0.73), and quadriceps muscle fractional oxygen saturation assessed by near-infrared spectrometry (range, -6 to 23%; r = 0.77). In addition, mean walking intensity significantly correlated with the quadriceps muscle force adjusted for body weight (range, 0.28 to 0.60; r = 0.74) and the ratio of minute ventilation over maximal voluntary ventilation (range, 38 to 89%, r = -0.58). In COPD, in addition to ventilatory limitations and peripheral muscle weakness, intensity of daily physical activity is associated with both central hemodynamic and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities regulating the adequacy of matching peripheral muscle oxygen availability by systemic oxygen transport. PMID:23845982

  20. Effect of Exercise-Induced Enhancement of the Leg-Extensor Muscle-Tendon Unit Capacities on Ambulatory Mechanics and Knee Osteoarthritis Markers in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Niehoff, Anja; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. Methods Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry. Results Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention. Conclusions This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable

  1. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  2. Metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in leg muscles from tail-cast suspended intact and adrenalectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik; Jacob, Stephan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of muscle unloading, adrenalectomy, and cortisol treatment on the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus of tail-cast suspended rats were investigated using C-14-labeled lucine, isoleucine, and valine in incubation studies. It was found that, compared to not suspended controls, the degradation of branched-chain amino acids in hind limb muscles was accelerated in tail-cast suspended rats. Adrenalectomy was found to abolish the aminotransferase flux and to diminish the dehydrogenase flux in the soleus. The data also suggest that cortisol treatment increases the rate of metabolism of branched-chain amino acids at the dehydrogenase step.

  3. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  4. Hemodynamic changes in rat leg muscles during tourniquet-induced ischemia-reperfusion injury observed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J G; Lee, J; Roe, J; Tromberg, B J; Brenner, M; Walters, T J

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that non-invasive continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) can determine the severity or reversibility of muscle damage due to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and the results will be highly correlated with those from physical examination and histological analysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed CWNIRS measurements on two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats (~400 g) that underwent 2 h (n = 6) or 3 h (n = 7) of pneumatic tourniquet application (TKA). Tissue oxyhemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxyhemoglobin [Hb] concentration changes were monitored during the 2 h or 3 h of 250 mmHg TKA and for an additional 2 h post-TKA. Rats were euthanized 24 h post-TKA and examined for injury, edema and viability of muscles. Contralateral muscles served as controls for each animal. In both groups, [HbO2] dropped immediately, then gradually decreased further after TKA and then recovered once the tourniquet was released. However, releasing after 2 h of TKA caused [HbO2] to overshoot above the baseline during reperfusion while the 3 h group continued to have lower [HbO2] than baseline. We found a significant correlation between the elapsed time from tourniquet release to the first recovery peak of [HbO2] and the muscle weight ratio between tourniquet and contralateral limb muscles (R = 0.86). Hemodynamic patterns from non-invasive CWNIRS demonstrated significant differences between 2 h and 3 h I/R. The results demonstrate that CWNIRS may be useful as a non-invasive prognostic tool for conditions involving vascular compromise such as extremity compartment syndrome. PMID:19436084

  5. Two weeks of one-leg immobilization decreases skeletal muscle respiratory capacity equally in young and elderly men.

    PubMed

    Gram, Martin; Vigelsø, Andreas; Yokota, Takashi; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Dela, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Physical inactivity affects human skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity but the influence of aging combined with physical inactivity is not known. This study investigates the effect of two weeks of immobilization followed by six weeks of supervised cycle training on muscle oxidative capacity in 17 young (23±1years) and 15 elderly (68±1years) healthy men. We applied high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized fibers from muscle biopsies at inclusion after immobilization and training. Furthermore, protein content of mitochondrial complexes I-V, mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHSP70) and voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) were measured in skeletal muscle by Western blotting. The elderly men had lower content of complexes I-V and mtHSP70 but similar respiratory capacity and content of VDAC compared to the young. In both groups the respiratory capacity and protein content of VDAC, mtHSP70 and complexes I, II, IV and V decreased with immobilization and increased with retraining. Moreover, there was no overall difference in the response between the groups. When the intrinsic mitochondrial capacity was evaluated by normalizing respiration to citrate synthase activity, the respiratory differences with immobilization and training disappeared. In conclusion, aging is not associated with a decrease in muscle respiratory capacity in spite of lower complexes I-V and mtHSP70 protein content. Furthermore, immobilization decreased and aerobic training increased the respiratory capacity and protein contents of complexes I-V, mtHSP70 and VDAC similarly in the two groups. This suggests that inactivity and training alter mitochondrial biogenesis equally in young and elderly men. PMID:25193555

  6. Leg for life? The use of sartorius muscle flap for the treatment of an infected vascular reconstructions after VA-ECMO use. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, George V.; Neamtu, Claudiu; Ionac, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO1) systems are a life-saving option in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS2), but may be encumbered by severe vascular complications in the groin. Presentation of case A pregnant woman was admitted with respiratory failure due to H1N1 influenza. VA-ECMO was inserted percutaneously by the intensivists and then accidentally removed by the patient after 8 days. 24 h later VA-ECMO was reinstalled with surgical denudation of femoral vessels in another department. 2 h later, due to active bleeding and signs of limb ischemia, the patient was referred to our department and emergency trombectomy and patch angioplasty with PTFE were performed. Evolution was further bad with wound infection (Pseudomonas, Proteus), which imposed large debridement, replacing the PTFE patch with 2 parallel venous patches and wound reconstruction through sartorius muscle rotation. The wound underwent negative pressure therapy for 10 days and was skin grafted. The patient recovered under systemic antibiotic and virostatic therapy. Discussion Major complications of using VA-ECMO devices are related to vascular access, most common bleeding at the puncture site and acute limb ischemia. In the groin, sartorius muscle flap is the most used for vascular coverage and small tissue defect reconstruction because of the ease in harvesting and low donor-site complications. Conclusion Although ischemic complications associated with VA-ECMO are accepted by intensivists under the slogan “leg for life”, for the repair of the femoral artery in the presence of groin infection the sartorius muscle remains an efficient solution for limb salvage. PMID:26408936

  7. Calibration of the Leg Muscle Responses Elicited by Predictable Perturbations of Stance and the Effect of Vision.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, Stefania; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Motor adaptation due to task practice implies a gradual shift from deliberate control of behavior to automatic processing, which is less resource- and effort-demanding. This is true both for deliberate aiming movements and for more stereotyped movements such as locomotion and equilibrium maintenance. Balance control under persisting critical conditions would require large conscious and motor effort in the absence of gradual modification of the behavior. We defined time-course of kinematic and muscle features of the process of adaptation to repeated, predictable perturbations of balance eliciting both reflex and anticipatory responses. Fifty-nine sinusoidal (10 cm, 0.6 Hz) platform displacement cycles were administered to 10 subjects eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO). Head and Center of Mass (CoM) position, ankle angle and Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Soleus (Sol) EMG were assessed. EMG bursts were classified as reflex or anticipatory based on the relationship between burst amplitude and ankle angular velocity. Muscle activity decreased over time, to a much larger extent for TA than Sol. The attenuation was larger for the reflex than the anticipatory responses. Regardless of muscle activity attenuation, latency of muscle bursts and peak-to-peak CoM displacement did not change across perturbation cycles. Vision more than doubled speed and the amount of EMG adaptation particularly for TA activity, rapidly enhanced body segment coordination, and crucially reduced head displacement. The findings give new insight on the mode of amplitude- and time-modulation of motor output during adaptation in a balancing task, advocate a protocol for assessing flexibility of balance strategies, and provide a reference for addressing balance problems in patients with movement disorders. PMID:27625599

  8. Calibration of the Leg Muscle Responses Elicited by Predictable Perturbations of Stance and the Effect of Vision

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Stefania; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Motor adaptation due to task practice implies a gradual shift from deliberate control of behavior to automatic processing, which is less resource- and effort-demanding. This is true both for deliberate aiming movements and for more stereotyped movements such as locomotion and equilibrium maintenance. Balance control under persisting critical conditions would require large conscious and motor effort in the absence of gradual modification of the behavior. We defined time-course of kinematic and muscle features of the process of adaptation to repeated, predictable perturbations of balance eliciting both reflex and anticipatory responses. Fifty-nine sinusoidal (10 cm, 0.6 Hz) platform displacement cycles were administered to 10 subjects eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO). Head and Center of Mass (CoM) position, ankle angle and Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Soleus (Sol) EMG were assessed. EMG bursts were classified as reflex or anticipatory based on the relationship between burst amplitude and ankle angular velocity. Muscle activity decreased over time, to a much larger extent for TA than Sol. The attenuation was larger for the reflex than the anticipatory responses. Regardless of muscle activity attenuation, latency of muscle bursts and peak-to-peak CoM displacement did not change across perturbation cycles. Vision more than doubled speed and the amount of EMG adaptation particularly for TA activity, rapidly enhanced body segment coordination, and crucially reduced head displacement. The findings give new insight on the mode of amplitude- and time-modulation of motor output during adaptation in a balancing task, advocate a protocol for assessing flexibility of balance strategies, and provide a reference for addressing balance problems in patients with movement disorders. PMID:27625599

  9. Fiber orientation measurements by diffusion tensor imaging improve hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intramyocellular lipids in human leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Gao, Feng; Daniele, Giuseppe; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Twelve healthy subjects underwent hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H1-MRS) acquisition (15×15×15  mm3), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a b-value of 600  s mm−2, and fat-water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the Dixon method. Subject-specific muscle fiber orientation, derived from DTI, was used to estimate the lipid proton spectral chemical shift. Pennation angles were measured as 23.78 deg in vastus lateralis (VL), 17.06 deg in soleus (SO), and 8.49 deg in tibialis anterior (TA) resulting in a chemical shift between extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) of 0.15, 0.17, and 0.19 ppm, respectively. IMCL concentrations were 8.66±1.24  mmol kg−1, 6.12±0.77  mmol kg−1, and 2.33±0.19  mmol kg−1 in SO, VL, and TA, respectively. Significant differences were observed in IMCL and EMCL pairwise comparisons in SO, VL, and TA (p<0.05). Strong correlations were observed between total fat fractions from H1-MRS and Dixon MRI for VL (r=0.794), SO (r=0.655), and TA (r=0.897). Bland-Altman analysis between fat fractions (FFMRS and FFMRI) showed good agreement with small limits of agreement (LoA): bias=−0.21% (LoA: −1.12% to 0.69%) in VL, bias=0.025% (LoA: −1.28% to 1.33%) in SO, and bias=−0.13% (LoA: −0.74% to 0.47%) in TA. The results of this study demonstrate the variation in muscle fiber orientation and lipid concentrations in these three skeletal muscle types. PMID:26158115

  10. Effects of a Pelvic Belt on the EMG Activity of the Abdominal Muscles during a Single-leg Hold in the Hook-lying Position on a Round Foam Roll.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Ji-Won; An, Duk-Hyun; Yoo, Won-Gyu; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a pelvic belt on the electromyography (EMG) activity of the abdominal muscles during a single-leg hold in the hook-lying position on a round foam roll. [Subjects] Seventeen healthy female volunteers were recruited for this study. [Methods] The participants performed single-leg-hold exercises on a round foam roll with and without a pelvic belt. Surface EMG was recorded from the rectus abdominis (RA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) bilaterally. [Results] The EMG activity of the bilateral RA, EO, and IO was significantly lower when the pelvic belt applied. [Conclusions] Our finding that the bilateral EO, IO, and RA muscles were less active with a pelvic belt during trunk-stabilizing exercises on an unstable surface suggests that the pelvic belt provided "form closure". PMID:24259855

  11. Prediction of lamb carcass leg and loin weights using leg score and width measures.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lamb carcass leg score (LS; 1 = low cull to 15 = high prime) is a subjective indicator of carcass muscling. Our objective for this study was to compare LS, live leg width (LL), and carcass leg width (LW) as single predictors, and in combination with live (LWT) or carcass weight (CWT), of harvested ...

  12. Venogram - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg. X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation like light, but of higher energy, so ... provider if you are pregnant, if you have allergies to any medication, which medications you are taking ( ...

  13. Treatment of glycogenosys type V (McArdle disease) with creatine and ketogenic diet with clinical scores and with 31P-MRS on working leg muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vorgerd, M; Zange, J

    2007-01-01

    Summary McArdle’s disease is caused by genetic defects of the musclespecific isozyme of glycogen phosphorylase, which block ATP formation from glycogen in skeletal muscle. Creatine supplementation and ketogenic diet have been tested as potential supplements for muscle energy metabolism which may improve muscle symptomatic. Outcome measures were clinical scores describing muscle symptomatic and parameters derived from 31P-MRS examinations on working muscle. In two placebo controlled cross-over studies low dose creatine showed beneficial effects on muscle symptoms and performance whereas high dose creatine distinctly worsened muscle symptomatic in patients. In both studies, however, the absence of an elevation in phosphocreatine indicated the absence of a creatine uptake by the muscle fibre. The effects of creatine on muscle symptomatic may be independent from energy metabolism in muscle. In a case study, ketogenic diet improved muscle symptomatic and performance. However, these effects again did not result in 31PMRS visible changes in muscle energy metabolism. PMID:17915573

  14. [Leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Unger, L; Stelzner, C; Machetanz, J; Schellong, S

    2013-11-01

    The lower leg is in particular prone to the development of ulceration. Many different causes may lead to ulceration. Thus, a thorough diagnosis is mandatory, and a biopsy is often required. By far the most common type is the classical venous ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency, located at the medial ankle. A more complicated-and more difficult to treat-type of venous ulcer is arthrogenic congestion syndrome with its extreme variant of a "legging" ulcer. In cases with severe peripheral arterial disease, an arterial ulcer may develop. The hypertensive ulcer Martorell is associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes; the underlying pathology is occlusion of arteriolar vessels. A typical diabetic ulceration is the necrobiosis lipoidica. Important differential diagnoses of leg ulceration include pyoderma gangrenosum and the calciphylactic ulcer. Due to a long-standing course, an ulceration may turn malignant. Vice versa, ulceration may occur as sign of a primary malignant lesion. PMID:24005788

  15. Exercise training using arms and legs versus legs along.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Gandee, R N; Norris, W A

    1981-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether levels of conditioning associated with conventional leg work are comparable to those associated with both arm and leg work. Six healthy men conditioned for 6 weeks using both arms and legs while a similar group of 5 men conditioned using legs alone. The subjects trained 3 times per week on a bicycle ergometer, and covered a distance of 3 miles (4.83 km) per session using interval training techniques. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were the primary comparative measures. There were no differences in improvement of maximal aerobic power between the 2 groups. However, the arm and leg subjects were able to do more work at a lower HR during the conditioning program. This implies considerably less physical stress on the heart and skeletal muscle, and indicates that the feeling of stress is related to metabolic rate per square area of working muscle rather than to total metabolism. Since this type of conditioning provides high levels of improvement in aerobic power wit less demands on the myocardium, it is suggested that arm and leg exercise be incorporated in the rehabilitation of cardiac patients. PMID:7247660

  16. Dystrophic calcification in muscles of legs in calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia syndrome: Accurate evaluation of the extent with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Kunal; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 35-year-old man with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia variant scleroderma who presented with dysphagia, Raynaud's phenomenon and calf pain. (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy was performed to identify the extent of the calcification. It revealed extensive dystrophic calcification in the left thigh and bilateral legs which was involving the muscles and was well-delineated on single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. Calcinosis in scleroderma usually involves the skin but can be found in deeper periarticular tissues. Myopathy is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:26430328

  17. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  18. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  19. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg ...

  20. Leg venous hemodynamics and leg volumes during a 42-day-6 ° head-down bedrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louisy, F.; Schroiff, P.; Guezennec, C.-Y.; Güell, A.

    Seven healthy subjects were submitted to a 42-day head down bedrest, where leg venous compliance (venous distensibity index VDI) and leg volumes were assessed by mercury strain gauge plethysmography with venous occlusion and optoelectronic plethysmography, respectively. Plethysmographic and volometric measurements were made, before, during (at days 1, 4, 7, 14, 21, 26, 34 and 41), and after bedrest (days 1, 4, 7, 11 and 30 of the recovery period). Results showed a continuous decrease in leg volumes throughout bedrest, when VDI increased until day 26 of bedrest, and then decreased afterwards. The recovery period was characterized by a rapid return of VDI to prebedrest levels while leg volumes progressively normalised. These results showed that leg venous compliance changes are not always dependant upon skeletal muscle changes, and that factors other than size of muscle compartment are able to determine increases in leg venous compliance during long-term bedrest.

  1. Usage Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoletti, Massimo

    Usage automata are an extension of finite stata automata, with some additional features (e.g. parameters and guards) that improve their expressivity. Usage automata are expressive enough to model security requirements of real-world applications; at the same time, they are simple enough to be statically amenable, e.g. they can be model-checked against abstractions of program usages. We study here some foundational aspects of usage automata. In particular, we discuss about their expressive power, and about their effective use in run-time mechanisms for enforcing usage policies.

  2. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  3. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems. For ...

  4. Effects of leg muscle fatigue on gait in patients with Parkinson's disease and controls with high and low levels of daily physical activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paulo Cezar Rocha; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; van Dieën, Jaap H; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are more susceptible to muscle fatigue, which can damage their gait. Physical activity can improve muscle condition, which is an important aspect during walking. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of lower limb muscle fatigue on gait in patients with PD and healthy individuals, grouped according to physical activity level. Twenty Patients with PD (PD group) and 20 matched individuals (control group) were distributed according to physical activity level into four subgroups of ten individuals (active and inactive). Participants performed three walking trials before and after lower limb muscle fatigue, induced by a repeated sit-to-stand task on a chair. Kinematic (stride length, width, duration, velocity and percentage of time in double support) and kinetic (propulsive and breaking anterior-posterior and medio-lateral impulse) gait parameters were analyzed. In both groups, participants increased stride length and velocity and decreased stride duration and braking vertical impulse after lower limb muscle fatigue. The PD groups presented higher step width and percentage of double time support than the control groups before muscle fatigue. The control groups increased step width and decreased percentage of time in double support, while the PD groups did not change these parameters. For physical activity level, active individuals presented longer stride length, greater stride velocity, higher braking and propulsive anterior-posterior impulse and shorter step width than inactive individuals. Groups sought more balance and safety after lower limb muscle fatigue. Physical activity level does not appear to modify the effects of lower limb muscle fatigue during unobstructed walking in individuals with PD or controls. PMID:27264409

  5. Leg lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S A; Bennet, G C; Evans, G A; Stirling, J

    1993-04-01

    The combined experience of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow and the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry in lengthening 52 lower limb segments with the Orthofix device is reviewed. Forty-eight segments were lengthened by callotasis, 24 in patients with achondroplasia. Attempted lengthening with chondrodiatasis was performed in 4 patients with leg length discrepancy. With callotasis, planned lengthening was achieved in 43/48 (90%) of segments. There was a small number of significant complications. Angulation or buckling of the new bone was the commonest major complication, and was seen in 10% of segments. Pin tract infection was the predominant minor complication. Premature union was noted commonly in the femurs of achondroplastics, but could usually be overcome with manipulation under anaesthesia. We confirm that callotasis achieves its objectives with fewer complications and operations than the commonly used Wagner method which it should supersede. By contrast, we had major complications in all cases with chondrodiatasis and have abandoned this method. PMID:8478826

  6. Hemodynamic studies of the legs under weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Significant among the medical findings following prolonged space flight are reduced orthostatic tolerance and ergometric work capacity. Changes in hemodynamics of the legs with increased blood pooling and reduction in cardiac output must be considered one of the most probable causes of these effects. Concern for the above plus the observed marked tissue changes occurring in the legs during flight prompted the addition of several procedures to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the leg; resting arterial blood flow, venous compliance and muscle pumping were investigated. In so far as possible, the initial reaction to pressure in the smallest possible vein segment was examined.

  7. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a nervous system problem that causes you to feel an unstoppable urge to get ... DA, Bista SR, et al. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an ...

  8. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking Obesity Many people with narcolepsy or rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder move their legs periodically during ... brain activity, heart rate, breathing, muscle activity, and eye movements are monitored while people sleep. People may also ...

  10. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  11. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise). PMID:20700602

  12. A Comparison of Two Injection Locations in Obese Patients Having Lower Leg/Foot Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-13

    Strain of Muscle and/or Tendon of Lower Leg; Fracture of Lower Leg; Crushing Injury of Lower Leg; Fracture Malunion - Ankle and/ or Foot; Complete Tear, Ankle and/or Foot Ligament; Pathological Fracture - Ankle and/or Foot; Loose Body in Joint of Ankle and/or Foot

  13. Hemodynamic studies of the legs under weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Following exposure to weightlessness, alterations in the return of blood from the legs play a crucial role in orthostatic tolerance and may be an important factor in work tolerance. To investigate some of the hemodynamic mechansism involved, an experiment was performed on the Skylab 3 and Skylab 4 missions to study arterial blood flow, venous compliance, and muscle pumping of blood. Skylab 4 results indicated that the most likely cause of increased blood flow was an increase in cardiac output secondary to increased central venous pressure caused by blood redistribution. Changes in venous compliance are thought to be primarily changes in somatic musculature which is postulated to primarily determine venous compliance of the legs. This was also thought to be demonstrated by the changes in muscle pumping. It is thought that these compliance changes, when taken with the decreased blood volume; provide a basis for the changes seen in orthostatic tolerance, work capacity and lower body negative pressure response.

  14. Dynamic Leg Exercise Improves Tolerance to Lower Body Negative Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Stout, M. S.; Murthy, G.; Whalen, R. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    These results clearly demonstrate that dynamic leg exercise against the footward force produced by LBNP substantially improves tolerance to LBNP, and that even cyclic ankle flexion without load bearing also increases tolerance. This exercise-induced increase of tolerance was actually an underestimate, because subjects who completed the tolerance test while exercising could have continued for longer periods. Exercise probably increases LBNP tolerance by multiple mechanisms. Tolerance was increased in part by skeletal muscle pumping venous blood from the legs. Rosenhamer and Linnarsson and Rosenhamer also deduced this for subjects cycling during centrifugation, although no measurements of leg volume were made in those studies: they found that male subjects cycling at 98 W could endure 3 Gz centrifugation longer than when they remained relaxed during centrifugation. Skeletal muscle pumping helps maintain cardiac filling pressure by opposing gravity-, centrifugation-, or LBNP-induced accumulation of blood and extravascular fluid in the legs.

  15. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... they sleep. This condition is called periodic limb movement disorder. All of these symptoms make it hard to ... treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an update for 2012: practice parameters ...

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Restless Legs Syndrome ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  17. Onset Time of Nerve Block: A Comparison of Two Injection Locations in Patients Having Lower Leg/ Foot Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Strain of Muscle and/or Tendon of Lower Leg; Fracture of Lower Leg; Crushing Injury of Lower Leg; Fracture Malunion - Ankle and/or Foot; Disorder of Joint of Ankle and/or Foot; Complete Tear, Ankle and/or Foot Ligament; Pathological Fracture - Ankle and/or Foot; Loose Body in Joint of Ankle and/or Foot

  18. Cardiovascular control during concomitant dynamic leg exercise and static arm exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Strange, S

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is thought to be determined by a balance between sympathetic vasoconstriction and metabolic vasodilatation. The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of high levels of sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in control of blood flow to human skeletal muscle during dynamic exercise.Muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the exercising leg was increased by static or static ischaemic arm exercise added to on-going dynamic leg exercise. Ten subjects performed light (20 W) or moderate (40 W) dynamic knee extension for 6 min with one leg alone or concomitant with bilateral static handgrip at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction force with or without forearm muscle ischaemia or post-exercise forearm muscle ischaemia.Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was measured by microneurography (peroneal nerve) and leg muscle blood flow by a constant infusion thermodilution technique (femoral vein).Activation of an exercise pressor reflex from the arms, causing a 2- to 4-fold increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and a 15–32% increase in mean arterial blood pressure, did not affect blood flow to the dynamically exercising leg muscles at any level of leg exercise. Leg vascular conductance was reduced in line with the higher perfusion pressure.The results demonstrate that the vasoconstrictor effects of high levels of muscle sympathetic nerve activity does not affect blood flow to human skeletal muscle exercising at moderate intensities. One question remaining is whether the observed decrease in muscle vascular conductance is the result of sympathetic vasoconstriction or metabolic autoregulation of muscle blood flow. PMID:9831733

  19. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure. PMID:24005251

  20. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  1. Leg Cramps during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain and relax the muscle. Drink plenty of fluids Avoid getting dehydrated. Be sure to drink plenty ... pain and relax the muscle. Drink plenty of fluids Avoid getting dehydrated. Be sure to drink plenty ...

  2. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  3. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training. PMID:10233121

  4. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  5. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  6. Gender Differences in Leg Stiffness and Stiffness Recruitment Strategy During Two-Legged Hopping

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; Arnold, Brent L.; Carcia, Christopher R.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared leg stiffness (KVERT), muscle activation, and joint movement patterns between 11 men and 10 women during hopping. Physically active and healthy men and women performed continuous 2-legged hopping at their preferred rate and at 3.0 Hz. Compared with men, women demonstrated decreased KVERT; however, after the authors normalized for body mass, gender differences in KVERT were eliminated. In comparison with men, women also demonstrated increased quadriceps and soleus activity, as well as greater quadriceps-to-hamstrings coactivation ratios. There were no significant gender differences for joint movement patterns (p > .05). The relationship between the observed gender differences in muscle recruitment and the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women requires further study. PMID:15730945

  7. 20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH CROSSED BRACE BLOCK, GROUND WIRES AND GUIDE WIRE. - Hat Point Fire Lookout Tower, Forest Service Road #4340, 24 miles from Imnaha, Imnaha, Wallowa County, OR

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Lower Leg Adipose Tissue Distribution in Youth with Myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Lorenzana, Daniel J; Mueske, Nicole M; Ryan, Deirdre D; Van Speybroeck, Alexander L; Wren, Tishya A L

    2016-07-01

    Children with myelomeningocele have a high prevalence of obesity and excess fat accumulation in their lower extremities. However, it is not known if this is subcutaneous or intramuscular fat, the latter of which has been associated with insulin resistance and metabolic disorders. This study quantified lower leg bone, muscle, and adipose tissue volume in children with myelomeningocele, classifying adipose as subcutaneous or muscle-associated. Eighty-eight children with myelomeningocele and 113 children without myelomeningocele underwent lower leg computed tomographic scans. Subcutaneous and muscle-associated adipose were classified based on location relative to the crural fascia. No differences were seen in subcutaneous adipose. Higher level disease severity was associated with increased muscle-associated adipose volume and decreased muscle volume. Bone volume tended to decrease with higher levels of involvement. Increases in lower leg adiposity in children with myelomeningocele are primarily attributable to accumulation of muscle-associated adipose, which may signify increased risk for metabolic disorders. PMID:26961265

  9. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  10. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section Other Causes of Leg Pain Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... a crowd of people walking. Photo: iStock Leg pain can come from a variety of causes. Your ...

  11. The effects of mats on back and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Stuart-Buttle, C; Marras, W S

    1994-02-01

    Prolonged standing is common in many industrial workplaces. It is also quite common for workers to complain of discomfort in the back and legs as a result of prolonged standing. Mats are often provided for the worker to relieve this fatigue. However, there is no quantitative evidence that these mats relieve leg and back fatigue. Five subjects were asked to stand on a concrete surface and two mat surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Spectral electromyographic analyses indicated that mats reduced localized muscle fatigue in the erector spinae muscle only. Furthermore, this fatigue reduction occurred only with the more compressible of the two mats tested. These results imply that localized muscular fatigue in the leg may not be relieved with 'anti-fatigue' mats, and some of these mats only benefit the back. PMID:15676945

  12. Predisposing factors of restless legs syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tunç, Tuğba; Karadağ, Yeşim Sücüllü; Doğulu, Funda; Inan, Levent E

    2007-04-15

    The occurrence of restless legs syndrome in pregnancy is well known. However, the mechanism of this association is unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the factors that predispose women to have restless legs syndrome during pregnancy. A total of 146 pregnant women were included in the study. Patients were asked questions regarding demographic characteristics, complications of pregnancy, medical therapy (vitamin and iron intake), sleep disorders, muscle cramps, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Electroneurography, routine blood biochemistry tests, complete blood count, and thyroid function tests were performed and vitamin B12, folic acid, serum iron, iron-binding capacity, ferritin, iron saturation, prolactin, estradiol, and progesterone were measured. Of the participants, 38 were diagnosed as having restless legs syndrome. In women with restless legs syndrome, additional medical problems, night cramps, and excessive daytime sleepiness were more frequent. In women without restless legs syndrome, serum hemoglobin levels were significantly higher and the use of supplemental iron or vitamins was greater. Among the women with restless legs syndrome, progesterone levels were slightly higher but this difference was not statistically significant. In summary, in this study, lower hemoglobin levels and supplementation deficits of iron and vitamins were found be the risk factors for restless legs syndrome in pregnancy. PMID:17285614

  13. Chronic traumatic wounds of the leg.

    PubMed

    Pros, Z; Tvrdek, M; Kletenský, J; Nejedlý, A; Svoboda, S

    1996-01-01

    The authors report the results of a retrospective study of the treatment of chronic defects of soft tissues and bones of the leg and foot with free muscle and musclecutaneous flaps. The study deals with the results of the use of the microsurgical techniques during the period of 11 years at the Department of Plastic Surgery of the 3rd Medical School in Prague. Discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of this technique as one the of possible therapeutic methods inclusive of the results obtained at the above mentioned department. PMID:9018862

  14. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klingelhoefer, Lisa; Bhattacharya, Kalyan; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED), is a common movement disorder characterised by an uncontrollable urge to move because of uncomfortable, sometimes painful sensations in the legs with a diurnal variation and a release with movement. The pathophysiology is only partially known and a genetic component together with dopaminergic and brain iron dysregulation plays an important role. Secondary causes for RLS need to be excluded. Treatment depends on the severity and frequency of RLS symptoms, comprises non-pharmacological (eg lifestyle changes) and pharmacological interventions (eg dopaminergic medication, alpha-2-delta calcium channel ligands, opioids) and relieves symptoms only. Augmentation is the main complication of long-term dopaminergic treatment of RLS. This article will provide a clinically useful overview of RLS with provision of diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses, possible investigations and different treatment strategies with their associated complications. PMID:27481386

  15. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  16. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27479227

  17. Leg lengthening - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as Legg-Perthes disease previous injuries or bone fractures that may stimulate excessive bone growth abnormal spinal curvatures (scoliosis) birth defects (congenital deformities) of bones, joints, muscles, tendons, or ligaments

  18. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain’s basal ganglia circuits that use the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is needed to produce smooth, purposeful muscle ... Parkinson’s disease, another disorder of the basal ganglia’s dopamine pathways, often have RLS as well. RLS also ...

  19. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous. PMID:23482536

  20. Effects of Active Individual Muscle Stretching on Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kouichi; Kodama, Takayuki; Mukaino, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of active individual muscle stretching (AID) on muscle function. [Subjects] We used the right legs of 40 healthy male students. [Methods] Subjects were divided into an AID group, which performed stretching, and a control group, which did not. We examined and compared muscle function before and after stretching in the AID and control groups using a goniometer and Cybex equipment. [Results] A significant increase in flexibility and a significant decrease in muscle strength output were observed in the AID group after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that AID induces an increase in flexibility and a temporary decrease in muscle output strength. PMID:24707080

  1. [The Activation of Interlimb Interactions Increase the Motor Output in Legs in Healthy Subjects under the Conditions of Arm and Leg Unloading].

    PubMed

    Selionov, V A; Solopova, I A; Zhvansky, D S

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effect of arm movements and movements of separate arm joints on the electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of voluntary and vibration-triggered stepping-like leg movements under the conditions of horizontal support of upper and lower limbs. The horizontal support of arms provided a significantly increase in the rate of activation of locomotor automatism by non-invasive impact on tonic sensory inputs. The addition of active arm movements during involuntary rhytmic stepping-like leg movements led to an increase in EMG activity of hip muscles and was accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of hip and shin movements. Passive arm movements had the same effect on induced leg movements. The movement of the shoulder joints led to an increase in the activity of hip muscles and an increase in the amplitude of movements of the knee and hip joints. At the same time, the movement of forearms. and wrists had similar facilitating effect on electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of rhytmic stepping-like movements, but influenced the distal segments of legs to a greater extent. Under the conditions of sub-threshold vibration of leg muscles, voluntary arm movements led to the activation of involuntary rhytmic stepping movements. During voluntary leg movements, the addition of arm movements had a significantly smaller impact on the parameters of rhytmic stepping than during involuntary leg movements. Thus, the simultaneous movements of upper and lower limbs are an effective method of activation of neural networks connecting the rhythm generators of arms and legs. Under the conditions of arm and leg unloading, the interactions between the cervical and lumbosacral segments of the spinal cord seem to play the major role in the impact of arm movements on the patterns of leg movements. The described methods of activation of interlimb interactions can be used in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients and patients with spinal cord injuries

  2. Leg cramps and restless legs syndrome during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance during pregnancy can result in excessive daytime sleepiness, diminished daytime performance, inability to concentrate, irritability, and the potential for an increased length of labor and increased risk of operative birth. Sleep disturbance may be the result of a sleep disorder, such as leg cramps, a common yet benign disorder, or restless legs syndrome, a sensorimotor disorder. Both disrupt sleep, are distressing to the pregnant woman, and mimic one another and other serious disorders. During pregnancy, up to 30% of women can be affected by leg cramps, and up to 26% can be affected by restless legs syndrome. PMID:19410213

  3. Is leg compression beneficial for alpine skiers?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of different levels of compression (0, 20 and 40 mmHg) produced by leg garments on selected psycho-physiological measures of performance while exposed to passive vibration (60 Hz, amplitude 4-6 mm) and performing 3-min of alpine skiing tuck position. Methods Prior to, during and following the experiment the electromygraphic (EMG) activity of different muscles, cardio-respiratory data, changes in total hemoglobin, tissue oxygenation and oscillatory movement of m. vastus lateralis, blood lactate and perceptual data of 12 highly trained alpine skiers were recorded. Maximal isometric knee extension and flexion strength, balance, and jumping performance were assessed before and after the experiment. Results The knee angle (−10°) and oscillatory movement (−20-25.5%) were lower with compression (P < 0.05 in all cases). The EMG activities of the tibialis anterior (20.2-28.9%), gastrocnemius medialis (4.9-15.1%), rectus femoris (9.6-23.5%), and vastus medialis (13.1-13.7%) muscles were all elevated by compression (P < 0.05 in all cases). Total hemoglobin was maintained during the 3-min period of simulated skiing with 20 or 40 mmHg compression, but the tissue saturation index was lower (P < 0.05) than with no compression. No differences in respiratory parameters, heart rate or blood lactate concentration were observed with or maximal isometric knee extension and flexion strength, balance, and jumping performance following simulated skiing for 3 min in the downhill tuck position were the same as in the absence of compression. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that with leg compression, alpine skiers could maintain a deeper tuck position with less perceived exertion and greater deoxygenation of the vastus lateralis muscle, with no differences in whole-body oxygen consumption or blood lactate concentration. These changes occurred without compromising maximal leg strength, jumping performance or balance

  4. Exertional Leg Pain.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  5. Tension leg platform system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.B.

    1983-12-20

    A tension leg platform system for use in drilling wellbores into the floor of an offshore body of water. Includes in the system is a buoyancy control vessel having a plurality of pull down cables attached thereto which extend to the ocean floor. A plurality of spaced apart anchors disposed at the ocean floor are positioned to receive the lower ends of the respective pull down cables. A submergible hull slidably engages the respective hold down cables such that the hull can be controllably lowered to the ocean floor whereby a canopy carried on the hull will cover an uncontrollably flowing well to conduct the effluent to the water's surface.

  6. Rowing prevents muscle wasting in older men.

    PubMed

    Yoshiga, Chie C; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Oka, Jun

    2002-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of rowing on the morphology and function of the leg extensor muscle in old people. The area and the power of the leg extensor muscle were measured in 15 oarsmen--age [mean (SD)] 65 (3) years; height 171 (4) cm, body mass 68 (6) kg--and in 15 sedentary men--age 66 (4) years, height 170 (4) cm, body mass 67 (7) kg--who were matched on the basis of their body size. The leg extensor muscle area of the oarsmen was larger than that of the sedentary men [77.8 (5.4) vs 68.4 (5.1) cm(2), P < 0.05]. Also the bilateral leg extension power of the oarsmen was larger than that of the sedentary men [1,624 (217) vs 1,296 (232) W, P < 0.05]. Thus, the leg extension power per the leg extensor muscle area was not significantly different between two groups [20.9 (2.0) vs 19.9 (2.1) W x cm(-2)) and leg extension power was correlated to the leg extensor muscle area (59-89 cm(2), r = 0.74, P < 0.001). Also the 2,000-m rowing ergometer time of the oarsmen [495 (14) s; range 479-520 s] was related to leg extensor muscle area (68-89 cm(2), r = 0.63, P < 0.01). The results suggest that rowing prevents age-related muscle wasting and weakness. PMID:12436264

  7. Running in the real world: adjusting leg stiffness for different surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Louie, M.; Farley, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    A running animal coordinates the actions of many muscles, tendons, and ligaments in its leg so that the overall leg behaves like a single mechanical spring during ground contact. Experimental observations have revealed that an animal's leg stiffness is independent of both speed and gravity level, suggesting that it is dictated by inherent musculoskeletal properties. However, if leg stiffness was invariant, the biomechanics of running (e.g. peak ground reaction force and ground contact time) would change when an animal encountered different surfaces in the natural world. We found that human runners adjust their leg stiffness to accommodate changes in surface stiffness, allowing them to maintain similar running mechanics on different surfaces. These results provide important insight into mechanics and control of animal locomotion and suggest that incorporating an adjustable leg stiffness in the design of hopping and running robots is important if they are to match the agility and speed of animals on varied terrain.

  8. 3D MRI Analysis of the Lower Legs of Treated Idiopathic Congenital Talipes Equinovarus (Clubfoot)

    PubMed Central

    Duce, Suzanne L.; D’Alessandro, Mariella; Du, Yimeng; Jagpal, Baljit; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Crichton, Lena; Barker, Simon; Collinson, J. Martin; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is the commonest form of clubfoot. Its exact cause is unknown, although it is related to limb development. The aim of this study was to quantify the anatomy of the muscle, subcutaneous fat, tibia, fibula and arteries in the lower legs of teenagers and young adults with CTEV using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus to investigate the anatomical differences between CTEV participants and controls. Methodology/Principal Findings The lower legs of six CTEV (2 bilateral, 4 unilateral) and five control young adults (age 12–28) were imaged using a 3T MRI Philips scanner. 5 of the CTEV participants had undergone soft-tissue and capsular release surgery. 3D T1-weighted and 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were acquired. Segmentation software was used for volumetric, anatomical and image analysis. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were performed. The volumes of the lower affected leg, muscle, tibia and fibula in unilateral CTEV participants were consistently smaller compared to their contralateral unaffected leg, this was most pronounced in muscle. The proportion of muscle in affected CTEV legs was significantly reduced compared with control and unaffected CTEV legs, whilst proportion of muscular fat increased. No spatial abnormalities in the location or branching of arteries were detected, but hypoplastic anomalies were observed. Conclusions/Significance Combining 3D MRI and MRA is effective for quantitatively characterizing CTEV anatomy. Reduction in leg muscle volume appears to be a sensitive marker. Since 5/6 CTEV cases had soft-tissue surgery, further work is required to confirm that the treatment did not affect the MRI features observed. We propose that the proportion of muscle and intra-muscular fat within the lower leg could provide a valuable addition to current clinical CTEV classification. These measures could be useful for clinical care and guiding treatment pathways, as well as

  9. Effect of training on central factors in fatigue following two- and one-leg static exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Rube, N; Secher, N H

    1991-01-01

    Leg strength and fatigue developed during 150 repeated two- and one-leg isometric maximal voluntary contractions were determined before and after a 5-week one- (n = 6) or two- (n = 7) leg training programme including a control group of five subjects. Two- and one-leg training increased two- and one-leg strength by 59 (range 8-107) and 36% (-1-69) respectively (P less than 0.01) with no significant difference between the two groups. Two-leg training decreased (P less than 0.05) fatigue only during two-leg maximal voluntary contractions (from 20 [11-26] to 13% [6-27]); and one-leg training fatigue only during one-leg maximal voluntary contractions (from 20 [15-23] to 11% [9-24]) despite the fact that both legs were trained. Surface electromyographic activity decreased during both repeated two- and one-leg maximal voluntary contractions (P less than 0.01) but a reduction in electromyographic decay was seen (P less than 0.05) during two-leg maximal voluntary contractions after two-leg training. Training increased fast-twitch b fibre size (P less than 0.01), and glycogen depletion was seen in fast-twitch (a and b) fibres, but the relative fast-twitch b area did not increase significantly. No training effects were seen in the control group. The results show that an approximately 47% increase in muscle strength may take place without a significant change in the relative percentage of muscle fibre types or in the average muscle fibre size. Furthermore, the specificity of the training response to fatigue developed during repeated two- and one-leg maximal voluntary contractions suggests a change in the nervous influence on the motor units. PMID:2053449

  10. Development of infant leg coordination: Exploiting passive torques.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Barbara; Scholz, John; Reimann, Hendrik; Kubo, Masayoshi; Fetters, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Leg joint coordination systematically changes over the first months of life, yet there is minimal data on the underlying change in muscle torques that might account for this change in coordination. The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of torque changes to early changes in leg joint coordination. Kicking actions were analyzed of 10 full-term infants between 6 and 15-weeks of age using three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. We found 11 of 15 joint angle pairs demonstrated a change from more in-phase intralimb coordination at 6-weeks to less in-phase coordination at 15-weeks. Although the magnitude of joint torques normalized to the mass of the leg remained relatively consistent, we noted more complex patterns of torque component contribution across ages. By focusing on the change in torques associated with hip-knee joint coordination, we found that less in-phase hip-knee joint coordination at 15-weeks was associated with decreased influence of knee muscle torque and increased influence of knee gravitational and motion-dependent torques, supporting that infants coordinate hip muscle torque with passive knee gravitational and motion-dependent torques to generate kicks with reduced active knee muscle torque. We propose that between 6 and 15-weeks of age less in-phase hip-knee coordination emerges as infants exploit passive dynamics in the coordination of hip and knee motions. PMID:26117493

  11. Maneuvers during legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindrich, Devin L.; Qiao, Mu

    2009-06-01

    Maneuverability is essential for locomotion. For animals in the environment, maneuverability is directly related to survival. For humans, maneuvers such as turning are associated with increased risk for injury, either directly through tissue loading or indirectly through destabilization. Consequently, understanding the mechanics and motor control of maneuverability is a critical part of locomotion research. We briefly review the literature on maneuvering during locomotion with a focus on turning in bipeds. Walking turns can use one of several different strategies. Anticipation can be important to adjust kinematics and dynamics for smooth and stable maneuvers. During running, turns may be substantially constrained by the requirement for body orientation to match movement direction at the end of a turn. A simple mathematical model based on the requirement for rotation to match direction can describe leg forces used by bipeds (humans and ostriches). During running turns, both humans and ostriches control body rotation by generating fore-aft forces. However, whereas humans must generate large braking forces to prevent body over-rotation, ostriches do not. For ostriches, generating the lateral forces necessary to change movement direction results in appropriate body rotation. Although ostriches required smaller braking forces due in part to increased rotational inertia relative to body mass, other movement parameters also played a role. Turning performance resulted from the coordinated behavior of an integrated biomechanical system. Results from preliminary experiments on horizontal-plane stabilization support the hypothesis that controlling body rotation is an important aspect of stable maneuvers. In humans, body orientation relative to movement direction is rapidly stabilized during running turns within the minimum of two steps theoretically required to complete analogous maneuvers. During straight running and cutting turns, humans exhibit spring-mass behavior in the

  12. Astronaut Richard Linnehan, mission specialist, performs a test on his leg using the Torque Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Richard Linnehan, mission specialist, performs a test on his leg using the Torque Velocity Dynamometer (TVD). Dr. Thirsk was measuring changes in muscle forces of the leg in this particular view. The TVD hardware is also used to measure arm muscle forces and velocity at the bicep and tricep areas. Crew members for the mission performed all experiment protocols prior to flight to develop a baseline and will also perform post-flight tests to complete the analysis. Additionally, muscle biopsies were taken before the flight and will be conducted after the flight.

  13. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL USAGE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, which summarizes the use of agricultural chemicals is issued by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) as part of its series on Agricultural Chemical Usage. Other publications in the series present statistics for on-farm agricultural chemical usage for f...

  14. A biologically based neural system coordinates the joints and legs of a tetrapod.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Alexander; Schmidt, Manuela; Fischer, Martin; Quinn, Roger

    2015-10-01

    A biologically inspired neural control system has been developed that coordinates a tetrapod trotting gait in the sagittal plane. The developed neuromechanical system is used to explore properties of connections in inter-leg and intra-leg coordination. The neural controller is built with biologically based neurons and synapses, and connections are based on data from literature where available. It is applied to a planar biomechanical model of a rat with 14 joints, each actuated by a pair of antagonistic Hill muscle models. The controller generates tension in the muscles through activation of simulated motoneurons. The hind leg and inter-leg control networks are based on pathways discovered in cat research tuned to the kinematic motions of a rat. The foreleg network was developed by extrapolating analogous pathways from the hind legs. The formulated intra-leg and inter-leg networks properly coordinate the joints and produce motions similar to those of a walking rat. Changing the strength of a single inter-leg connection is sufficient to account for differences in phase timing in different trotting rats. PMID:26351756

  15. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features ... chap 16. Read More Compartment syndrome Leg or foot amputation Peripheral artery disease - legs Type 1 diabetes ...

  16. Lipid storage changes in human skeletal muscle during detraining

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Wen, Caiyun; Li, Jiance; Harris, M. Brennan; Liu, Yung-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training is known to increase intramuscular triglyceride content in both trained and untrained legs. The purpose of the study was to determine the changes of intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) of both trained and untrained legs during detraining. We measured both IMCL and EMCL levels in previously trained vs. untrained legs during 4-weeks of detraining after 6-weeks of strength training. Eight young men (aged 21.4 ± 1.4 years) trained their vastus lateralis muscle in one leg using a dynamometer, whereas the contralateral leg served as untrained control. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), IMCL, EMCL, total creatine (creatine + phophocreatine) of extensor (vastus lateralis) muscles were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS) before training, 3 days after and 28 days after the last bout of training. CSA was increased in both legs by Day 3 after training, and was still high at Day 28 post-training; IMCL increased in both legs by Day 3 after training, then decreased at Day 28 post-training only in the untrained leg; EMCL shows no significant change by Day 3 after training, but at Day 28 post-training has increased in the trained leg and decreased in the untrained leg; total creatine did not change significantly. Conclusion: Decreases of IMCL and EMCL storages in previously untrained leg during detraining indicates an ectopic influence on tissue lipid storage by different metabolic demand among tissues in the same human body. PMID:26578981

  17. Does cycling effect motor coordination of the leg during running in elite triathletes?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Andrew R; Vicenzino, Bill; Blanch, Peter; Dowlan, Steve; Hodges, Paul W

    2008-07-01

    Triathletes report incoordination when running after cycling. We investigated the influence of the transition from cycling to running on leg movement and muscle recruitment during running in elite international level triathletes. Leg movement (three-dimensional kinematics) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle activity (surface electromyography) were compared between a control-run (no prior exercise) and a 30-min transition-run (preceded by 20 min of cycling; i.e., run versus cycle-run). The role of fatigue in motor changes was also investigated. Leg kinematics were not different between control- and transition-runs in any triathlete. Recruitment of TA was different in 5 of 14 triathletes, in whom altered TA recruitment patterns during the transition-run were more similar to recruitment patterns of TA during cycling. Changes in TA recruitment during the transition-run were not associated with altered force production of TA or other leg muscles during isometric fatigue testing, or myoelectric indicators of fatigue (median frequency, average rectified value). These findings suggest that short periods of cycling do not influence running kinematics or TA muscle activity in most elite triathletes. However, our findings are evidence that leg muscle activity during running is influenced by cycling in at least some elite triathletes despite their years of training. This influence is not related to kinematic variations and is unlikely related to fatigue but may be a direct effect of cycling on motor commands for running. PMID:17466592

  18. Prosthetic leg powered by MR brake and SMA wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, The; Munguia, Vicente; Calderon, Jose

    2014-04-01

    Current knee designs for prosthetic legs rely on electric motors for both moving and stationary states. The electric motors draw an especially high level of current to sustain a fixed position. The advantage of using magnetorheological (MR) fluid is that it requires less current and can have a variable braking torque. Besides, the proposed prosthetic leg is actuated by NiTinol wire, a popular shape memory alloy (SMA). The incorporation of NiTinol gives the leg more realistic weight distribution with appropriate arrangement of the batteries and wires. The prosthesis in this research was designed with MR brake as stopping component and SMA wire network as actuating component at the knee. The MR brake was designed with novel non-circular shape for the rotor that improved the braking torque while minimizing the power consumption. The design also helped simplify the control of braking process. The SMA wire network was design so that the knee motion was actively rotated in both directions. The SMA wires were arranged and played very similar role as the leg's muscles. The study started with the overall solid design of the knee including both MR and SMA parts. Theoretical models were derived and programmed in Simulink for both components. The simulation was capable of predicting the power required for moving the leg or hold it in a fixed position for a certain amount of time. Subsequently, the design was prototyped and tested to validate the theoretical prediction. The theoretical models were updated accordingly to correlate with the experimental data.

  19. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  20. Individual muscle contributions to circular turning mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-04-13

    Turning is an activity of daily living that involves both the acceleration of the body center-of-mass (COM) towards the center of curvature and rotation of the pelvis towards the new heading. The purpose of this study was to understand which muscles contribute to turning using experimentation, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. Ten healthy adults consented to walk around a 1-m radius circular path at their self-selected walking speed and then along a straight line at the same speed. Forward dynamics simulations of the individual subjects during the turning and straight-line walking tasks were generated to identify the contributions of individual muscle groups to the body mediolateral and anterior-posterior COM acceleration impulse and to the pelvis angular acceleration impulse. The stance leg gluteus medius and ankle plantarflexor muscles and the swing leg adductor muscles were the primary contributors to redirect the body's COM relative to straight-line walking. In some cases, contributions to mediolateral COM acceleration were modulated through changes in leg orientation rather than through changes in muscle force. While modulation of the muscle contributions generally occurred in both the inner and outer legs, greater changes were observed during inner single-leg support than during outer single-leg support. Total pelvis angular acceleration was minimal during the single-support phase, but the swing leg muscles contributed significantly to balancing the internal and external rotation of the pelvis. The understanding of which muscles contribute to turning the body during walking may help guide the development of more effective locomotor therapies for those with movement impairments. PMID:25700608

  1. Getting Your Sea Legs

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chen, Fu-Chen; Varlet, Manuel; Alcantara, Cristina; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2013-01-01

    Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning. PMID:23840560

  2. An analysis on muscle tone of lower limb muscles on flexible flat foot

    PubMed Central

    Um, Gi-Mai; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Si-Eun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine differences in the muscle tone and stiffness of leg muscles according to types of flexible flat foot. [Subjects and Methods] For 30 subjects 10 in a normal foot group (NFG), 10 in group with both flexible flat feet (BFFG), and 10 in a group with flexible flat feet on one side (OFFG), myotonometry was used to measure the muscle tone and stiffness of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA), the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the medial gastrocnemius (MG), and the long head of the biceps femoris muscle (BF) of both lower extremities. [Results] In the measurement results, only the stiffness of TA and MG of the NFG and the BFFG showed significant differences. The muscle tone and stiffness were highest in the BFFG, followed by the OFFG and NFG, although the difference was insignificant. In the case of the OFFG, there was no significant difference in muscle tone and stiffness compared to that in the NGF and the BFFG. Furthermore, in the NFG, the non-dominant leg showed greater muscle tone and stiffness than the dominant leg, although the difference was insignificant. [Conclusion] During the relax condition, the flexible flat foot generally showed a greater muscle tone and stiffness of both lower extremities compared to the normal foot. The stiffness was particularly higher in the TA and MG muscles. Therefore, the muscle tone and stiffness of the lower extremity muscles must be considered in the treatment of flat foot. PMID:26644650

  3. Restless leg syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Aarti; Clark-Bilodeau, Courtney; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn M

    2015-09-01

    Restless leg syndrome, more recently renamed Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition that disrupts sleep and occurs more frequently in the pregnant population. We present a 39-year-old woman with restless legs syndrome in the third trimester and discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic options in the pregnant population while highlighting the challenges posed by the lack of safety data of approved drugs. PMID:27512466

  4. Sustaining Behavior Changes Following a Venous Leg Ulcer Client Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Charne; Kapp, Suzanne; Donohue, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are a symptom of chronic insufficiency of the veins. This study considered the sustainability of behavior changes arising from a client focus e-Learning education program called the “Leg Ulcer Prevention Program” (LUPP) for people with a venous leg ulcer. Data from two related studies were used to enable a single sample (n = 49) examination of behavior maintenance across an average 8 to 9 months period. Physical activity levels increased over time. Leg elevation, calf muscle exercises, and soap substitute use were seen to fluctuate over the follow up time points. The use of a moisturizer showed gradual decline over time. The provision of a client-focused venous leg ulcer program was associated with behavior changes that had varied sustainability across the evaluation period. PMID:27429280

  5. Sex-specific influence of aging on exercising leg blood flow.

    PubMed

    Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Pelberg, Justin A; Mishkin, Aaron D; Proctor, David N

    2008-03-01

    Our previous work suggests that healthy human aging is associated with sex-specific differences in leg vascular responses during large muscle mass exercise (2-legged cycling) (Proctor DN, Parker BA. Microcirculation 13: 315-327, 2006). The present study determined whether age x sex interactions in exercising leg hemodynamics persist during small muscle mass exercise that is not limited by cardiac output. Thirty-one young (20-30 yr; 15 men/16 women) and 31 older (60-79 yr; 13 men/18 women) healthy, normally active adults performed graded single-leg knee extensions to maximal exertion. Femoral artery blood velocity and diameter (Doppler ultrasound), heart rate (ECG), and beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure (mean arterial pressure, radial artery tonometry) were measured during each 3-min work rate (4.8 and 8 W/stage for women and men, respectively). The results (means +/- SE) were as follows. Despite reduced resting leg blood flow and vascular conductance, older men exhibited relatively preserved exercising leg hemodynamic responses. Older women, by contrast, exhibited attenuated hyperemic (young: 52 +/- 3 ml.min(-1).W(-1); vs. older: 40 +/- 4 ml.min(-1).W(-1); P = 0.02) and vasodilatory responses (young: 0.56 +/- 0.06 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1).W(-1) vs. older: 0.37 +/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1) W(-1); P < 0.01) to exercise compared with young women. Relative (percentage of maximal) work rate comparisons of all groups combined also revealed attenuated vasodilator responses in older women (P < 0.01 for age x sex x work rate interaction). These sex-specific age differences were not abolished by consideration of hemoglobin, quadriceps muscle, muscle recruitment, and mechanical influences on muscle perfusion. Collectively, these findings suggest that local factors contribute to the sex-specific effects of aging on exercising leg hemodynamics in healthy adults. PMID:18162481

  6. Mechanical design and driving mechanism of an isokinetic functional electrical stimulation-based leg stepping trainer.

    PubMed

    Hamzaid, N A; Fornusek, C; Ruys, A; Davis, G M

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical design of a constant velocity (isokinetic) leg stepping trainer driven by functional electrical stimulation-evoked muscle contractions was the focus of this paper. The system was conceived for training the leg muscles of neurologically-impaired patients. A commercially available slider crank mechanism for elliptical stepping exercise was adapted to a motorized isokinetic driving mechanism. The exercise system permits constant-velocity pedalling at cadences of 1-60 rev x min(-1). The variable-velocity feature allows low pedalling forces for individuals with very weak leg muscles, yet provides resistance to higher pedalling effort in stronger patients. In the future, the system will be integrated with a computer-controlled neuromuscular stimulator and a feedback control unit to monitor training responses of spinal cord-injured, stroke and head injury patients. PMID:18274073

  7. A new biarticular actuator design facilitates control of leg function in BioBiped3.

    PubMed

    Sharbafi, Maziar Ahmad; Rode, Christian; Kurowski, Stefan; Scholz, Dorian; Möckel, Rico; Radkhah, Katayon; Zhao, Guoping; Rashty, Aida Mohammadinejad; Stryk, Oskar von; Seyfarth, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Bioinspired legged locomotion comprises different aspects, such as (i) benefiting from reduced complexity control approaches as observed in humans/animals, (ii) combining embodiment with the controllers and (iii) reflecting neural control mechanisms. One of the most important lessons learned from nature is the significant role of compliance in simplifying control, enhancing energy efficiency and robustness against perturbations for legged locomotion. In this research, we investigate how body morphology in combination with actuator design may facilitate motor control of leg function. Inspired by the human leg muscular system, we show that biarticular muscles have a key role in balancing the upper body, joint coordination and swing leg control. Appropriate adjustment of biarticular spring rest length and stiffness can simplify the control and also reduce energy consumption. In order to test these findings, the BioBiped3 robot was developed as a new version of BioBiped series of biologically inspired, compliant musculoskeletal robots. In this robot, three-segmented legs actuated by mono- and biarticular series elastic actuators mimic the nine major human leg muscle groups. With the new biarticular actuators in BioBiped3, novel simplified control concepts for postural balance and for joint coordination in rebounding movements (drop jumps) were demonstrated and approved. PMID:27367459

  8. Energy storage and synchronisation of hind leg movements during jumping in planthopper insects (Hemiptera, Issidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, M

    2010-02-01

    The hind legs of Issus (Hemiptera, Issidae) move in the same plane underneath the body, an arrangement that means they must also move synchronously to power jumping. Moreover, they move so quickly that energy must be stored before a jump and then released suddenly. High speed imaging and analysis of the mechanics of the proximal joints of the hind legs show that mechanical mechanisms ensure both synchrony of movements and energy storage. The hind trochantera move first in jumping and are synchronised to within 30 micros. Synchrony is achieved by mechanical interactions between small protrusions from each trochantera which fluoresce bright blue under specific wavelengths of ultra-violet light and which touch at the midline when the legs are cocked before a jump. In dead Issus, a depression force applied to a cocked hind leg, or to the tendon of its trochanteral depressor muscle causes a simultaneous depression of both hind legs. The protrusion of the hind leg that moves first nudges the other hind leg so that both move synchronously. Contractions of the trochanteral depressor muscles that precede a jump bend the metathoracic pleural arches of the internal skeleton. Large areas of these bow-shaped structures fluoresce bright blue in ultraviolet light, and the intensity of this fluorescence depends on the pH of the bathing saline. These are key signatures of the rubber-like protein resilin. The remainder of a pleural arch consists of stiff cuticle. Bending these composite structures stores energy and their recoil powers jumping. PMID:20086132

  9. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders. PMID:26504610

  10. LOWER EXTREMITY MANIFESTATIONS OF PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF LEG ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently under-diagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of PAD patients report no exertional leg symptoms and approximately 45–50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline is common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared to people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of PAD patients, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication. PMID:25908727

  11. Legged vehicle for underwater mobile operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbert, Jim; Ayers, Joseph

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes technical information gained from an investigation into utilizing SMA actuators as muscle components for the biologically based lobster system to be developed under this project. In order for the SMA actuators to be of value in controlling leg motion of the lobster they must be able to contract and relax in a controlled manner much like muscles. SMA wires made of Nitinol do contract when heated and relax when cooled. The heating mechanism in this application is directly related to current density passed through the wire. If a large number of cycles are required, as in our application, the contraction should be limited to about 3 percent. This can provide a cycle life of millions provided that proper protection from overstressing, overstraining, and overheating are designed into the system. SMA contraction time can be quite fast (0.1 seconds or less) depending on the current pulse amplitude and width. SMA wires are very strong relative to their size. A 4 percent contraction can exert stresses of 25,000 psi. Control of each actuator requires that current pulses of proper amplitude and duration be applied at the correct times in order to not overheat the wires. Proper control of SMA wires for this application will require sensory feedback.

  12. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  13. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  14. Nutritional supplements usage by Portuguese athletes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica; Fernandes, Maria João; Moreira, Pedro; Teixeira, Vítor Hugo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of nutritional supplements (NS) usage, the type of supplements used, the reasons for usage, and the source of nutritional advice among Portuguese athletes. Two hundred ninety-two athletes (68 % male, 12 - 37 years old) from 13 national sports federations completed a questionnaire that sought information on socio-demographics, sports data, and NS usage. Most athletes (66 %) consumed NS, with a median consumption of 4 supplements per athlete. The most popular supplements included multivitamins/minerals (67 %), sport drinks (62 %), and magnesium (53 %). Significant differences for the type of NS consumed were found between gender and age groups and the number of weekly training hours. Most athletes used NS to accelerate recovery (63 %), improve sports performance (62 %), and have more energy/reduce fatigue (60 %). Athletes sought advice on supplementation mainly from physicians (56 %) and coaches (46 %). Age and gender were found to influence reasons for use and the source of information. Reasons for NS usage were supported scientifically in some cases (e. g., muscle gain upon protein supplementation), but others did not have a scientific basis (e. g., use of glutamine and magnesium). Given the high percentage of NS users, there is an urgent need to provide athletes with education and access to scientific and unbiased information, so that athletes can make assertive and rational choices about the utilization of these products. PMID:24220164

  15. Energy Metabolism during Repeated Sets of Leg Press Exercise Leading to Failure or Not

    PubMed Central

    Gorostiaga, Esteban M.; Navarro-Amézqueta, Ion; Calbet, José A. L.; Hellsten, Ylva; Cusso, Roser; Guerrero, Mario; Granados, Cristina; González-Izal, Miriam; Ibañez, Javier; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the influence of the number of repetitions per set on power output and muscle metabolism during leg press exercise. Six trained men (age 34±6 yr) randomly performed either 5 sets of 10 repetitions (10REP), or 10 sets of 5 repetitions (5REP) of bilateral leg press exercise, with the same initial load and rest intervals between sets. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before the first set, and after the first and the final sets. Compared with 5REP, 10REP resulted in a markedly greater decrease (P<0.05) of the power output, muscle PCr and ATP content, and markedly higher (P<0.05) levels of muscle lactate and IMP. Significant correlations (P<0.01) were observed between changes in muscle PCr and muscle lactate (R2 = 0.46), between changes in muscle PCr and IMP (R2 = 0.44) as well as between changes in power output and changes in muscle ATP (R2 = 0.59) and lactate (R2 = 0.64) levels. Reducing the number of repetitions per set by 50% causes a lower disruption to the energy balance in the muscle. The correlations suggest that the changes in PCr and muscle lactate mainly occur simultaneously during exercise, whereas IMP only accumulates when PCr levels are low. The decrease in ATP stores may contribute to fatigue. PMID:22808209

  16. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  17. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  18. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  19. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  20. Leg Strength Comparison between Younger and Middle-age Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sukwon; Lockhart, Thurmon; Nam, Chang S.

    2009-01-01

    Although a risk of occupational musculoskeletal diseases has been identified with age-related strength degradation, strength measures from working group are somewhat sparse. This is especially true for the lower extremity strength measures in dynamic conditions (i.e., isokinetic). The objective of this study was to quantify the lower extremity muscle strength characteristics of three age groups (young, middle, and the elderly). Total of 42 subjects participated in the study: 14 subjects for each age group. A commercial dynamometer was used to evaluate isokinetic and isometric strength at ankle and knee joints. 2 × 2 (Age group (younger, middle-age, and older adult groups) × Gender (male and female)) between-subject design and Post-hoc analysis were performed to evaluate strength differences among three age groups. Post-hoc analysis indicated that, overall, middle-age workers’ leg strengths (i.e. ankle and knee muscles) were significantly different from younger adults while middle-age workers’ leg strengths were virtually identical to older adults’ leg strengths. These results suggested that, overall, 14 middle-age workers in the present study could be at a higher risk of musculoskeletal injuries. Future studies looking at the likelihood of musculoskeletal injuries at different work places and from different working postures at various age levels should be required to validate the current findings. The future study would be a valuable asset in finding intervention strategies such that middle-age workers could stay healthier longer. PMID:20436934

  1. What is a clinically meaningful improvement in leg-extensor power for mobility-limited older adults?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Muscle power is a key predictor of physical function in older adults; however, clinically meaningful improvements in leg-extensor muscle power have yet to be identified. The purpose of this study is to establish the minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) and substantial improvem...

  2. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  3. Different vasodilator responses of human arms and legs

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, Sean C; Leuenberger, Urs A; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Handly, Brian D; Proctor, David N

    2004-01-01

    Forearm vascular responses to intra-arterial infusions of endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators have been thoroughly characterized in humans. While the forearm is a well-established experimental model for studying human vascular function, it is of limited consequence to systemic cardiovascular control owing to its small muscle mass and blood flow requirements. In the present study we determined whether these responses could be generalized to the leg. Based upon blood pressure differences between the leg and arm during upright posture, we hypothesized that the responsiveness to endothelium-dependent vasodilators would be greater in the forearm than the leg. Brachial and femoral artery blood flow (Q, ultrasound Doppler) at rest and during intra-arterial infusions of endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine and substance P) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) vasodilators were measured in eight healthy men (22–27 years old). Resting blood flows in the forearm before infusion of acetylcholine, substance P or sodium nitroprusside were 25 ± 4, 30 ± 7 and 29 ± 5 ml min−1, respectively, and in the leg were 370 ± 32, 409 ± 62 and 330 ± 30 ml min−1, respectively. At the highest infusion rate of acetylcholine (16 μg (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) there was a greater (P < 0.05) increase in Q to the forearm (1864 ± 476%) than to the leg (569 ± 86%). Similarly, at the highest infusion rate of substance P (125 pg (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) there was a greater (P < 0.05) increase in Q to the forearm (911 ± 286%) than to the leg (243 ± 58%). The responses to sodium nitroprusside (1 μg (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) were also greater (P < 0.05) in the forearm (925 ± 164%) than in the leg (326 ± 65%). These data indicate that vascular responses to both endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator agents are blunted in the leg compared to the forearm. PMID:14990681

  4. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  5. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee Bong; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26798622

  6. Why is the force-velocity relationship in leg press tasks quasi-linear rather than hyperbolic?

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Maarten F

    2012-06-01

    Force-velocity relationships reported in the literature for functional tasks involving a combination of joint rotations tend to be quasi-linear. The purpose of this study was to explain why they are not hyperbolic, like Hill's relationship. For this purpose, a leg press task was simulated with a musculoskeletal model of the human leg, which had stimulation of knee extensor muscles as only independent input. In the task the ankles moved linearly, away from the hips, against an imposed external force that was reduced over contractions from 95 to 5% of the maximum isometric value. Contractions started at 70% of leg length, and force and velocity values were extracted when 80% of leg length was reached. It was shown that the relationship between leg extension velocity and external force was quasi-linear, while the relationship between leg extension velocity and muscle force was hyperbolic. The discrepancy was explained by the fact that segmental dynamics canceled more and more of the muscle force as the external force was further reduced and velocity became higher. External power output peaked when the imposed external force was ∼50% of maximum, while muscle power output peaked when the imposed force was only ∼15% of maximum; in the latter case ∼70% of muscle power was buffered by the leg segments. According to the results of this study, there is no need to appeal to neural mechanisms to explain why, in leg press tasks, the force-velocity relationship is quasi-linear rather than hyperbolic. PMID:22442026

  7. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  8. Force encoding in stick insect legs delineates a reference frame for motor control

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Josef; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of forces is integral to motor control. However, it is unclear how information from sense organs that detect forces at individual muscles or joints is incorporated into a frame of reference for motor control. Campaniform sensilla are receptors that monitor forces by cuticular strains. We studied how loads and muscle forces are encoded by trochanteral campaniform sensilla in stick insects. Forces were applied to the middle leg to emulate loading and/or muscle contractions. Selective sensory ablations limited activities recorded in the main leg nerve to specific receptor groups. The trochanteral campaniform sensilla consist of four discrete groups. We found that the dorsal groups (Groups 3 and 4) encoded force increases and decreases in the plane of movement of the coxo-trochanteral joint. Group 3 receptors discharged to increases in dorsal loading and decreases in ventral load. Group 4 showed the reverse directional sensitivities. Vigorous, directional responses also occurred to contractions of the trochanteral depressor muscle and to forces applied at the muscle insertion. All sensory discharges encoded the amplitude and rate of loading or muscle force. Stimulation of the receptors produced reflex effects in the depressor motoneurons that could reverse in sign during active movements. These data, in conjunction with findings of previous studies, support a model in which the trochanteral receptors function as an array that can detect forces in all directions relative to the intrinsic plane of leg movement. The array could provide requisite information about forces and simplify the control and adaptation of posture and walking. PMID:22673329

  9. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  10. Occurrence and structural organization of the exocrine glands in the legs of ants.

    PubMed

    Billen, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Apart from their obvious locomotory function and hence the presence of muscle fibres, ant legs are also endowed with an astonishing variety of exocrine glands. This paper reviews the presence and structural variety of the 20 different glands that have so far been found in the legs of ants. Four of these glands are described for the first time in this paper. Glands have been described in the three leg pairs, although considerable differences may exist. Glands occur in the various leg segments. A number of glands, especially those located in the hindlegs, may have a function in the production of trail pheromones. Other possible functions that have been reported deal with antenna cleaning, production of lubricant substances and sex pheromones. PMID:18775512

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy occurs from a lack of physical activity. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the ...

  12. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  13. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  14. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  15. Other Causes of Leg Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  16. Wound coverage considerations for defects of the lower third of the leg.

    PubMed

    Bajantri, Babu; Bharathi, R Ravindra; Sabapathy, S Raja

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical features of the lower third of the leg like subcutaneous bone surrounded by tendons with no muscles, vessels in isolated compartments with little intercommunication between them make the coverage of the wounds in the region a challenging problem. Free flaps continue to be the gold standard for the coverage of lower third leg wounds because of their ability to cover large defects with high success rates and feasibility of using it in acute situations by choosing distant recipient vessels. Reverse flow flaps are more useful for the coverage of the ankle and foot defects than lower third leg defects. The perforators in the lower third leg on which these flaps are based are often damaged during the injury. In medium-sized defects of less than 50 cm(2) size, local transposition flaps, perforator flaps, or propeller flaps can be used. Preoperative identification by the Doppler is essential before embarking on these flaps. Of the muscle flaps, the peroneus brevis flap can be used in selected cases with small defects. In spite of all recent developments, cross-leg flaps continue to remain as a useful technique. In rare occasions when other flaps are not possible or when other options fail it can be a life boat. In the author's practice free flaps continue to be the first choice for coverage of wounds in the lower third leg with gracilis muscle flap for small and medium defects, latissimus dorsi muscle flap for large defects and anterolateral thigh flap when a skin flap is preferred. PMID:23162228

  17. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training.

    PubMed

    Latella, Christopher; Kidgell, Dawson J; Pearce, Alan J

    2012-08-01

    This study used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the corticospinal responses following 8 weeks of unilateral leg strength training. Eighteen healthy, non-strength trained participants (14 male, 4 female; 18-35 years of age) were matched for age, gender, and pre-training strength; and assigned to a training or control group. The trained group participated in unilateral horizontal leg press strength training, progressively overloaded and wave periodised, thrice per week for 8 weeks. Testing occurred prior to the intervention, at the end of 4 weeks and at the completion of training at 8 weeks. Participants were tested in both legs for one repetition maximum strength, muscle thickness, maximal electromyography (EMG) activity, and corticospinal excitability and inhibition. No changes were observed in muscle thickness in either leg. The trained leg showed an increase in strength of 21.2% (P = 0.001) and 29.0% (P = 0.007, compared to pre-testing) whilst the untrained contralateral leg showed 17.4% (P = 0.01) and 20.4% (P = 0.004, compared to pre-testing) increases in strength at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. EMG and corticospinal excitability did not change; however, corticospinal inhibition was significantly reduced by 17.7 ms (P = 0.003) and 17.3 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the trained leg, and 25.1 ms (P = 0.001) and 20.8 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the contralateral untrained leg. This data support the theory of corticospinal adaptations underpinning cross-education gains in the lower limbs following unilateral strength training. PMID:22200796

  18. Pulmonary and leg VO2 during submaximal exercise: implications for muscular efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, D. C.; Gaesser, G. A.; Hogan, M. C.; Knight, D. R.; Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    Insights into muscle energetics during exercise (e.g., muscular efficiency) are often inferred from measurements of pulmonary gas exchange. This procedure presupposes that changes of pulmonary O2 (VO2) associated with increases of external work reflect accurately the increased muscle VO2. The present investigation addressed this issue directly by making simultaneous determinations of pulmonary and leg VO2 over a range of work rates calculated to elicit 20-90% of maximum VO2 on the basis of prior incremental (25 or 30 W/min) cycle ergometry. VO2 for both legs was calculated as the product of twice one-leg blood flow (constant-infusion thermodilution) and arteriovenous O2 content difference across the leg. Measurements were made 3-5 min after each work rate imposition to avoid incorporation of the VO2 slow component above the lactate threshold. For all 17 subjects, the slope of pulmonary VO2 (9.9 +/- 0.2 ml O2.W-1.min-1) was not different (P greater than 0.05) from that for leg VO2 (9.2 +/- 0.6 ml O2.W-1.min-1). Estimation of "delta" efficiency (i.e., delta work accomplished divided by delta energy expended, calculated from slope of VO2 vs. work rate and a caloric equivalent for O2 of 4.985 cal/ml) using pulmonary VO2 measurements (29.1 +/- 0.6%) was likewise not significantly different (P greater than 0.05) from that made using leg VO2 measurements (33.7 +/- 2.4%). These data suggest that the net VO2 cost of metabolic "support" processes outside the exercising legs changes little over a relatively broad range of exercise intensities. Thus, under the conditions of this investigation, changes of VO2 measured from expired gas reflected closely those occurring within the exercising legs.

  19. Human Space Flight Challenges: Get a Leg Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the challenges that spaceflight imposes on the Human system. It describes four of the signs and symptoms of fluid shift in the astronaut when they fly in low earth orbit. It describes how the leg muscles influence blood flow It also outlines the four phases of "fluid shift" and where the majority of the central volume of blood is located in the body And it reviews other changes to the body systems as a result of Fluid Shift

  20. Targinact for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS)--also known as Willis-Ekbom disease--is a neurological condition characterised by an overwhelming urge to move the legs, occurring during rest or inactivity, especially at night. Symptoms are highly variable in frequency and severity, and can affect sleep and quality of life. First-line management includes addressing precipitating or aggravating factors and providing explanation, reassurance and advice on self-help strategies. Drug therapy (e.g. a dopamine agonist) is used for patients with more severe symptoms. In December 2014, the marketing authorisation for a modified-release preparation containing oxycodone and naloxone (Targinact-Napp Pharmaceuticals) was expanded to include use in the treatment of severe to very severe RLS after failure of dopaminergic therapy.(10)Here we review the management of adults with RLS, including the place of oxycodone/naloxone. PMID:27079737

  1. Treatment of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Manconi, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common condition characterized by an urge to move the legs, accompanied by uncomfortable or unpleasant sensations. Symptoms predominantly occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity or by walking. Recent European epidemiological studies reported an overall prevalence of RLS up to 10%, with a female preponderance. The prevalence rates reported in south-eastern Europe are lower, as are those in Asiatic populations. Although the aetiopathogenesis of RLS is still unknown, the rapid and dramatic improvement of RLS with dopaminergic compounds suggests a dopaminergic system dysfunction as the basic mechanism. Extensive data are available for l-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists, especially for pramipexole and ropinirole. Pharmacological treatment should be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS with impaired sleep quality or quality of life. Treatment on demand is a clinical need in RLS cases that present intermittent symptoms. PMID:20123560

  2. Leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahbi, Abdullah M; Elmoukaied, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of male infertility. Many surgical approaches are used as each of them has advantages over the other and is preferred by surgeons. Vascular injury has never been reported as a complication of varicocelectomy apart from testicular artery injury. We present a 36-year-old male who developed leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy due to common femoral artery injury. He was successfully treated by using a vein graft. PMID:27022305

  3. Glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species: variation in skeletal muscle glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamine levels and rates of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Watford, Malcolm; Wu, Guoyao

    2005-04-01

    High intracellular glutamine levels have been implicated in promoting net protein synthesis and accretion in mammalian skeletal muscle. Little is known regarding glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species but chicken breast muscle exhibits high rates of protein accretion and would be predicted to maintain high glutamine levels. However, chicken breast muscle expresses high glutaminase activity and here we report that chicken breast muscle also expresses low glutamine synthetase activity (0.07+/-0.01 U/g) when compared to leg muscle (0.50+/-0.04 U/g). Free glutamine levels were 1.38+/-0.09 and 9.69+/-0.12 nmol/mg wet weight in breast and leg muscles of fed chickens, respectively. Glutamine levels were also lower in dove breast muscle (4.82+/-0.35 nmol/mg wet weight) when compared to leg muscle (16.2+/-1.0 nmol/mg wet weight) and much lower (1.80+/-0.46 nmol/mg wet weight) in lizard leg muscle. In fed chickens, rates of fractional protein synthesis were higher in leg than in breast muscle, and starvation (48 h) resulted in a decrease in both glutamine content and rate of protein synthesis in leg muscle. Thus, although tissue-specific glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species differs markedly from that in ureotelic animals, differences in rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis are associated with corresponding differences in intramuscular glutamine content. PMID:15763516

  4. Online CME usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Giorgi, Ines; Pagani, Marco; Imbriani, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the findings of the analysis of a sample of 829 online Continuous Medical Education (CME) enrolments aimed at inspecting users' preferences and behaviours. The contents of the analyzed course are provided as online SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) resources together with the corresponding Pdf downloadable versions allowing different usage patterns (online only, Pdf only, online AND Pdf, mixed online OR Pdf). The results point out that there is not a specific preference for one of the four patterns and that most of the users access both navigable modules and Pdf documents. Demographic characteristics and initial knowledge level do not influence the choice of a specific usage pattern that probably depends on internal or context factors. From the point of view of knowledge acquisition, the four patterns are equivalent. As regards users' behaviour, the analysis has pointed out two issues: 1) the attitude to conclude the course in a short time and to reach good test scores, but not the excellence; 2) learning activity tracing data were not available for all the enrolments. Cues for discussion are proposed. PMID:21893749

  5. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  6. Comparison of muscular activities in the abdomen and lower limbs while performing sit-up and leg-raise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanghoon; Lee, Taesik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the muscle activities of sit-up and leg-raise. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were healthy students in their 20s. For electromyography of sit-ups and leg-raises in the supine position, 5 muscle groups of the abdomen were selected for the attachment of sensors: the upper and lower rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, and the iliopsoas. SPSS 20.0 was used for the statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures of all factors was performed to verify the statistical significance of the measurements taken for the muscle activities and follow-up verification was made with the Bonferroni post hoc test. [Results] Sit-up and leg raise showed a significant difference. The eccentric sit-up exercise elicited a significant increase in the activation of the abdominal muscle. The leg raise and eccentric sit-up exercises elicited significant increases in the activation of hip flexor muscle. [Conclusion] The eccentric sit-up had the most outstanding effect on the abdominal muscles involved in stability of the trunk. PMID:27065536

  7. Patterns of muscle coordination during stepping responses post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Gray, V L; Pollock, C L; Wakeling, J M; Ivanova, T D; Garland, S J

    2015-12-01

    This study compared self-induced stepping reactions of seventeen participants after stroke and seventeen controls. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally from the soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the data into muscle activation patterns and examine group differences (paretic, non-paretic, control leg). The first principal component (PC1) explained 46.7% of the EMG signal of the stepping leg. Two PCs revealed distinct activation features for the stepping paretic leg: earlier TA onset at step initiation and earlier BF and SOL onset at mid-step. For the stance leg, PC1 explained 44.4% of the EMG signal and significant differences were found in the non-paretic leg compared to paretic (p < 0.001) and control (p < 0.001). In PC1, at step onset the BF and SOL EMG and the RF and TA EMG were increased over the latter half of the step. No PC loadings were distinct for the paretic leg during stance, however differences were found in the non-paretic leg: earlier TA burst and increased BF and SOL EMG at step initiation. The results suggest impairments in the paretic leg when stepping and compensatory strategies in the non-paretic stance leg. PMID:26475243

  8. The pattern of a specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg can be explained with the "boundary model" of appendage formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, Gerhard; Brenneis, Georg

    2016-02-01

    A malformed adult female specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg in the right body half is described concerning external and internal structures. The specimen was maintained in our laboratory culture after an injury in the right trunk region during a late postembryonic stage. The supernumerary leg is located between the second and third walking legs. The lateral processes connecting to these walking legs are fused to one large structure. Likewise, the coxae 1 of the second and third walking legs and of the supernumerary leg are fused to different degrees. The supernumerary leg is a complete walking leg with mirror image symmetry as evidenced by the position of joints and muscles. It is slightly smaller than the normal legs, but internally, it contains a branch of the ovary and a gut diverticulum as the other legs. The causes for this malformation pattern found in the Pycnogonum individual are reconstructed in the light of extirpation experiments in insects, which led to supernumerary mirror image legs, and the "boundary model" for appendage differentiation.

  9. Diagnostic imaging in the evaluation of leg pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Bresler, Michael; Mar, Winnie; Toman, Jordan

    2012-04-01

    The causes of leg pain in the athlete are diverse. Pain can relate to more common etiologies, such as musculotendinous injury to the hamstrings and Achilles tendon as well as stress injury to bone, with tibial stress injuries comprising the most common cause for lower leg pain in athletes. Less-common causes include chronic exertional compartment syndrome and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, both of which cause pain as a result of muscle ischemia. Radiologic evaluation plays an important role in differentiating among the many possible causes of leg pain and is often essential in determining degree of injury as well as in documenting healing before patient return to athletic activity. With PAES and hamstring and Achilles injuries, imaging may be helpful in surgical planning as well as in determining an underlying anatomic cause for injury. Several of these conditions can be evaluated with multiple different imaging modalities. The imaging modality of choice should be selected based on the sensitivity and specificity of the imaging examination but should also be tailored to each individual patient after determining comorbidities that may preclude certain types of imaging as well as assessing the patient's ability to undergo such testing. PMID:22341013

  10. TAP usage in SIMBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaïs, O.; Gregory, M.; Marc, W.

    2015-09-01

    TAP (Table Access Protocol promoted by IVOA) is available on SIMBAD web site since July 2012. We will have a look of all kinds of uses and try to figure out how people use it in SIMBAD. Thanks to ADQL (Astronomical Data Query Language), everyone can write their own query using criteria on all data available in the database. In the SIMBAD database, more than 30 tables are available. It can be rather difficult to write a complex query. We will see how many joins between tables are used, and how many fields are used in the queries. The SIMBAD usage is going to change thanks to this new feature, a new way to search in the database.