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Sample records for leg ulcer caused

  1. [Leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Unger, L; Stelzner, C; Machetanz, J; Schellong, S

    2013-11-01

    The lower leg is in particular prone to the development of ulceration. Many different causes may lead to ulceration. Thus, a thorough diagnosis is mandatory, and a biopsy is often required. By far the most common type is the classical venous ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency, located at the medial ankle. A more complicated-and more difficult to treat-type of venous ulcer is arthrogenic congestion syndrome with its extreme variant of a "legging" ulcer. In cases with severe peripheral arterial disease, an arterial ulcer may develop. The hypertensive ulcer Martorell is associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes; the underlying pathology is occlusion of arteriolar vessels. A typical diabetic ulceration is the necrobiosis lipoidica. Important differential diagnoses of leg ulceration include pyoderma gangrenosum and the calciphylactic ulcer. Due to a long-standing course, an ulceration may turn malignant. Vice versa, ulceration may occur as sign of a primary malignant lesion. PMID:24005788

  2. Chronic Expanding Organized Hematoma of the Lower Leg: A Rare Cause for Nonhealing Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Langner, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare entity on the leg. A 55-year-old women presented with 2 small nonhealing leg ulcers. On examination we observed a painless bulky tumor-like mass that developed slowly after deep soft tissue infection almost 2 years ago. Vascular computed tomography suggested an organized hematoma. Important differential diagnoses include sarcoma and lymphoma. Treatment of choice is surgery. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of an organized hematoma. Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare cause of nonhealing leg ulcers. PMID:25691320

  3. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous. PMID:23482536

  4. Leg ulceration in chronic venous insufficiency caused by an absent inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hiroo; Nagai, Yayoi; Endo, Yukie; Iwasaki, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    We report here the case of a 55-year-old Japanese man with a one-year history of multiple ulcers on the left crural region. He had had pronounced varicose veins on both legs and the abdominal region for 35 years. Computed tomography images of the thoracic and abdominal regions showed the absence of an inferior vena cava, with pronounced dilatation of paravertebral venous plexus, cutaneous and azygous veins. Conservative topical treatments led to complete healing of the ulcers in one month. An absent inferior vena cava is an uncommon abnormality, often complicated by cardiac and other visceral malformations. It is a rare cause of chronic leg ulcers. PMID:19734977

  5. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  6. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  7. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27479227

  8. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  9. Venous Leg Ulcer in a Sarcoidosis Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Byun, Sang Young; Kim, In Su

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers, the most common form of leg ulcers, are relevant to the pathogenicity of pericapillary fibrin cuff. Sarcoidosis, a multiorgan granulomatous disease, causes fibrin deposition in tissues. We report a case of a 50-year-old man with venous leg ulcers coexisting with sarcoidosis. On the basis of the histologic findings, we propose the hypothesis that sarcoidosis patients are prone to the development of venous leg ulcers. PMID:26719645

  10. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance. PMID:26344539

  11. [Differential diagnosis and work up of chronic leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2014-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcers. The main causes are chronic venous insufficiency, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and diabetes. Some leg ulcers are caused by combinations of these well-known etiologic factors. The most common cause of PAOD is arteriosclerosis. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of leg ulcers. Less frequent causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infections, primary skin disease, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is made upon medical history, clinical picture, palpation of arteries, functional testing and serologic testing. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for additional clarification. Also, lesion biopsy should be taken for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology. The knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in a patient with leg ulcer. PMID:25326987

  12. Ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica as a rare cause for chronic leg ulcers: case report series of ten patients.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cindy; Stoffels-Weindorf, Maren; Hillen, Uwe; Dissemond, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica is a rare granulomatous disorder of the skin. In up to 30% of the affected patients it can lead to ulcerations, which can impair the quality of life and are also very difficult to treat. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Only few studies focussing on necrobiosis lipoidica can be found, but none of them focus on ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Therefore, we collected demographic data and comorbidities and assessed treatment options for patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Data of patients who were treated in the wound care centre of the University Hospital of Essen for ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica over the past 10 years were retrospectively analysed. Hence, data of altogether ten patients (nine women and one man) with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica were collected. Of these, 70% of the patients had diabetes mellitus of which 30% had type I diabetes and 40% had type II diabetes; 60% of the patients suffered from arterial hypertension, obesity and hypercholesterolaemia; 40% of the patients suffered from psychiatric disorders such as depression and borderline disorder. Our clinical data demonstrate an association of ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica and aspects of metabolic syndrome. This leads to a conclusion that ulcerating necrobiosis lipoidica can be seen as part of a generalised inflammatory reaction similar to the inflammatory reaction already known in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid diseases or psoriasis. In patients with clinical atypical painful ulcerations, necrobiosis lipoidica should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Therapists should be aware of associated aspects in patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica who besides diabetes often suffer from other aspects of a metabolic syndrome with increased cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, these related comorbidities should also be diagnosed and treated. PMID:24119190

  13. Clinical analysis of leg ulcers and gangrene in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Michiko; Nagai, Yayoi; Sogabe, Yoko; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Inoue, Chizuru; Okada, Etsuko; Tago, Osamu; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Leg ulcers are often complicated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however, the etiology is multifactorial. We examined the cases of leg ulceration or gangrene in seven RA patients who were hospitalized over the past 3 years. One patient was diagnosed as having pyoderma gangrenosum. Although vasculitis was suspected in three patients, no histological evidence was obtained from the skin specimens. In these patients, angiography revealed the stenosis or occlusion of digital arteries. In the remaining three patients, leg ulcers were considered to be due to venous insufficiency. Treatment should be chosen depending on the causes of leg ulcers. PMID:24304368

  14. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; Łokaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  15. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  16. Systemic ketoconazole treatment for Fusarium leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Landau, M; Srebrnik, A; Wolf, R; Bashi, E; Brenner, S

    1992-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum was isolated from a large foot ulcer in an otherwise healthy 69-year-old man. Although tissue invasion could not be proven histologically, systemic antifungal treatment was administered with satisfactory response. Fusarium species are common soil-inhabiting organisms and plant pathogens. In humans, Fusarium is considered an opportunistic agent in skin ulcers, interdigital spaces, and burned skin, but can also cause mycotic keratitis, onychomycosis, and rarely deep-seated or disseminated infections, especially in an immunocompromised host. The distinction between skin infection and saprophytic growth, as well as optimal treatment regimens for the two types of infection, have not been clearly defined. We describe a case of leg ulcers caused by Fusarium oxysporum in a 69-year-old man treated successfully with oral ketoconazole. "Silent" immunologic disturbances were found in this apparently healthy patient. The case illustrates a relatively benign infection caused by Fusarium that responded to systemic antifungal drug treatment. PMID:1500248

  17. [List of diagnostic tests and procedures in leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2013-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcer. Most patients have venous leg ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency. Less often, patients have arterial leg ulcer resulting from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, the most common cause of which is arteriosclerosis. Leg ulcer may be of a mixed arteriovenous origin. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of diabetic leg ulcer. Other causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infectious diseases, primary skin diseases, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is based on medical history, inspection, palpation of skin temperature, palpation of arteries, fascia holes, presence and degree of edema, firm painful cords, and functional testing to assess peripheral occlusive arterial disease or identify superficial and deep venous reflux of the legs. Knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in patients with leg ulcer. There are many possible etiologic factors of leg ulcers and sometimes, clinical findings are similar. Additional testing should be performed, e.g., serologic testing such as blood count, C-reactive protein, HBA1c, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, differential blood count, total proteins, electrolytes, coagulation parameters, circulating immune complex, cryoglobulins, homocysteins, AT, PAI-1, APC resistance, proteins C and S, paraproteins, ANA, ENA, ANCA, dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibodies, urea, creatinine, blood lipids, vitamins and trace elements. Also, biopsy of the lesion for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology should be included. Other tests are Raynaud (cold stimulation) test and pathergy test. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for future

  18. Case 3: chronic venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    A non-healing, sloughy venous leg ulcer quickly responded to topical treatment including octenilin Wound Gel and octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution. Full healing occurred within 6 weeks. PMID:26949848

  19. Refractory leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Yuto; Tosa, Mamiko; Iwakiri, Itaru; Nomoto, Shunichi; Kaneko, Mayuko; Kuwahara, Kousuke; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a man with refractory leg ulcers, bilateral varicosis of the lower extremities, and Buerger disease. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed Klinefelter syndrome (48 XXY). Ulcerative lesions of the lower extremities are a complication of Klinefelter syndrome. To date, the pathogenesis of ulcers in Klinefelter syndrome has not been clarified, but several factors, such as abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states, might be involved. Our present case emphasizes the importance of considering Klinefelter syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a male patient with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities. PMID:25797879

  20. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Treating venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Venous leg ulcers account for approximately 70% of all leg ulcers and affect 2.2 million Americans annually. After a comprehensive patient and wound assessment, compression therapy remains the cornerstone of standard care. Adjuvant care with topical or systemic agents is used for wounds that do not heal within 4 weeks. Once healed, long-term compression therapy with stockings or surgical intervention will reduce the incidence of recurrence. This continuing medical education article aims to outline optimal management for patients with venous leg ulcers, highlighting the role of a multidisciplinary team in delivering high quality care. PMID:26979355

  1. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  2. Compression and venous surgery for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the effects of surgery and compression in the treatment of venous ulcers and the best options for compression therapy. Randomized controlled studies reveal that surgery and compression have similar effectiveness in healing ulcers but surgery is more effective in preventing recurrence. Most leg ulcers have a venous pathophysiology and occur because of venous ambulatory hypertension caused by venous reflux and impairment of the venous pumping function. Proposed surgical interventions range from crossectomy and stripping to perforator vein interruption and endovascular procedures (laser, radiofrequency). More conservative procedures (foam sclerotherapy, conservative hemodynamic treatment) have also been proposed. PMID:22732375

  3. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing. PMID:26979354

  4. Use of sugar in the treatment of infected leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lisle, Jackie

    2002-06-01

    Mrs R is an 84-year-old retired shop-keeper with a 17-year history of recurrent leg ulceration. She has received treatment in both primary and secondary care settings, including specialist dermatology and vascular clinics. Mrs R has a long history of non-compliance to treatment regime, removing bandages and rucking them down causing compression injuries that almost resulted in amputation of her right leg. On assessment by the author, she had two partial thickness ulcers to each leg, signs of venous insufficiency and malnutrition, and swabs cultured positive for a range of bacteria. Resistance to topical antimicrobials and allergy to systemic antibiotics meant that another solution had to be tried to relieve the bacterial load on Mrs R's wounds. PMID:12066080

  5. [Innovative therapy for leg ulcers: Electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds can take a long time to heal despite appropriate therapy based upon aetiology and use of suitable dressings. The success of electrostimulation is based upon the existence within the skin of the endogenous currents involved in the wound healing process. Where skin continuity is broken by a wound, these electrical potentials are short-circuited, resulting in leakage of electrical current. Woundel(®) therapy is the only such treatment currently available in France and is based on the use of continuous pulsed current that generates an electrical field near the endogenous electrical fields. It utilises a console to deliver the electrical impulses, a dressing electrode and a dispersion electrode. The electrode dressing is left on the wound for 3 days, and venous compression bandaging may be applied to the leg, taking care to leave the connector free. Negative polarity stimulates migration of fibroblasts, resulting in elimination of fibrin. Positive polarity causes keratinocyte migration, which in turn leads to epidermisation. Electrostimulation is of recognised utility in the healing of chronic wounds: it has been assigned a high-level recommendation in the European and American guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers and bedsores with proof level of A. Further, the analgesic effect of electrostimulation has been demonstrated in several studies. Electrostimulation is already well developed in France among wound specialists, but prospective studies are planned so that it may be used at patients' homes. PMID:26188964

  6. Healthcare beliefs of Indian patients living with leg and foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine

    This article presents the results of a previously unexplored aspect of qualitative leg ulcer research. The study has examined the lived experience and cultural illness explanations of a sample of British-Indian patients living with leg and foot ulceration. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 16 Indian patients drawn from leg ulcer clinics and district nursing lists in Ealing Primary Care Trust and Hounslow Primary Care Trust. Eight respondents had venous ulceration, seven were diabetic and had ulcers of arterial aetiology, and one had ulceration due to lymphoedema. Popular perceptions of the cause of leg ulceration were influenced by the humoral theories of balance and imbalance. Other explanations included poor circulation, lowered immunity, bad blood, being cursed and doing something wrong in a past life or this life. PMID:17577191

  7. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section Other Causes of Leg Pain Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... a crowd of people walking. Photo: iStock Leg pain can come from a variety of causes. Your ...

  8. Multiple medicament allergies in two patients with chronic leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, M; Wood, B; Greig, D E

    1996-08-01

    Medicament allergies in patients with chronic leg ulcers is well recognized. In the past, topical antibiotics, rubber additives and wool alcohols have been the most common reported allergens. Allergy to topical corticosteroids has been reported. We document two cases of multiple corticosteroid allergy in patients with chronic leg ulceration. PMID:8771871

  9. Tropical leg ulcers in children: more than yaws.

    PubMed

    Fegan, David; Glennon, Mary Jacqueline; Kool, Jacob; Taleo, Fasihah

    2016-04-01

    The management of yaws has changed in recent years. Mass treatment with oral azithromycin has replaced intramuscular benzathine benzylpenicillin. Treponemal and non-treponemal serology (equivalent to TPHA and RPR) point-of-care blood testing is now available. In addition, recent studies in yaws endemic regions have shown that a significant number of leg ulcers in children which are clinically suggestive of yaws are caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. It is noteworthy that the World Health Organization has also set the ambitious goal to eliminate yaws by 2020. PMID:26289420

  10. Resolution of a leg ulcer after hysterectomy for huge uterine myoma.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Tanita, Muneo; Tagami, Hachiro

    2003-07-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common type of leg ulcers, accounting for 80% to 90% of cases. We report a large, therapy-resistant ulcer present for three months on the right leg of a 44-year-old woman who also had a huge uterine myoma. Without any other treatment, the leg ulcer regressed spontaneously three months after a hysterectomy for the uterine myoma that had been demonstrated in a CT image to be compressing the right common iliac vein in the pelvis. Uterine myoma can become the cause of venous insufficiency of the leg, when it is big enough to disturb the blood circulation in the pelvis in individuals who have incompetent perforating veins. PMID:12928542

  11. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  12. Compression therapy of leg ulcers with PAOD.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Andrea; Haase, Hermann; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Jünger, Michael

    2014-05-19

    Objectives: To assess the clinical safety of a new short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). This system combines a low resting pressure with a high working pressure. Methods: A pilot study was performed in 15 subjects with moderate PAOD, i.e. an ABPI of 0.5-0.8. Co-existing chronic venous insufficiency or leg ulcer was not mandatory. All subjects received the compression system which was reapplied at each study visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 14). The safety parameters were: sub-bandage pressure immediately after application, pressure-related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain, and adverse events. A product comfort questionnaire was completed at the last visit. Results: The average sub-bandage pressure of 30 mmHg defined by the protocol was achieved. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was found. The reported adverse device effects were as expected for compression therapies, including dry skin and pruritus. The product comfort questionnaire completed by the subjects showed a good tolerability profile. Conclusion: The short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) was safe and well tolerated in subjects with moderate PAOD. PMID:24843079

  13. Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer: an underdiagnosed Entity©.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Mayer, Dieter; Hafner, Jürg; Sibbald, R Gary

    2012-12-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer represents rapidly progressive and extremely painful ulcers that are frequently underdiagnosed. These occur most commonly on the lateral-dorsal calf and are associated with hypertension and diabetes. This article will synthesize a review of the literature for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of this painful debilitating condition. PMID:23151767

  14. Managing venous leg ulcers using compression therapy and dressings.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gail; Wicks, Gill; Will, Katrin

    Patient comfort and satisfaction with both compression therapy and wound care are critical to the success of venous leg ulcer treatment. This study observed 22 patients with venous leg ulcers treated over 12 weeks with two-layer compression hosiery and a range of wound dressings. The mean duration of the ulcers was 10.5 months and 48% had a history of recurrent ulcers. Half the ulcers healed within 12 weeks; there was an increase in the proportion of patients reporting 'no impairment' to their mobility, but it was not significant. The ease of donning the two-layer hosiery was rated as excellent or good at 86% of control visits and the ease of doffing at 78%. In 95% of cases the clinicians said they would use the same combination of products again and 73% of patients were satisfied with it. PMID:26266566

  15. A review of the treatment for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Palfreyman, Simon; King, Brenda; Walsh, Bridget

    Venous ulcers, sometimes termed varicose or stasis ulcers, are a consequence of damage to the valves in the veins of the legs, leading to raised venous pressure. They are characterized by a cyclical pattern of healing and recurrence. There is a need to have a thorough assessment of patients with leg ulcers by an appropriately experienced clinician to maximize the chance of healing the ulcer. The main treatment is the application of compression, either in the form of compression bandages or hosiery. Dressings are applied beneath the compression with a view to controlling exudate, comfort and to aid healing. There are a large number of dressing products and types available but the evidence to justify their use is poor. The main treatment for venous ulcers should therefore be the application of compression therapy with a simple, low adherent dressing. PMID:17851372

  16. Vascular leg ulcers: histopathologic study of 293 patients.

    PubMed

    Misciali, Cosimo; Dika, Emi; Baraldi, Carlotta; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Mirelli, Michele; Stella, Andrea; Bertoncelli, Marco; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2014-12-01

    Vascular leg ulcers remain a challenge for the modern health care, and a systematic pathological study on this kind of lesions has not been reported so far. A total of 293 consecutive white patients with chronic leg ulcers (present for a minimum of 6 months and up to several years) referred to the Wound Care Unit (Dermatology, University of Bologna) between March 2008 and June 2011. Thirty-four patients affected by other than vascular ulcers, neoplastic or inflammatory conditions, were excluded. The remaining 259 patients affected by vascular leg ulcers were enrolled in this study. Assessment of the patients general health, skin biopsy, and vascular Doppler of the lower limbs were performed to determine the etiology and to formulate an appropriate management plan, whereas 2 punch biopsies of 3 mm were performed on the border and on the bed of each ulcer. Doppler evaluation showed the presence of vascular hemodynamic impairment in 259 patients. Of these, 181 (69.9%) patients were affected by venous insufficiency, 58 (22.4%) by venous and arterial insufficiency, and 20 (7.7%) by arterial insufficiency. Histopathologic features revealed significant differences, thus, reflecting the clinicopathologic correlation with the underlying hemodynamic impairments. In conclusion, histopathologic and hemodynamic data correlation could provide the basis for future analysis of leg ulcers pathogenesis and may improve treatment protocols. We should underline that this observational study represents a single-institute experience and that larger series are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:25072681

  17. A systematic review of compression treatment for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, A.; Cullum, N.; Sheldon, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the clinical and cost effectiveness of compression systems for treating venous leg ulcers. METHODS: Systematic review of research. Search of 19 electronic databases including Medline, CINAHL, and Embase. Relevant journals and conference proceedings were hand searched and experts were consulted. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of healing and proportion of ulcers healed within a time period. STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials, published or unpublished, with no restriction on date or language, that evaluated compression as a treatment for venous leg ulcers. RESULTS: 24 randomised controlled trials were included in the review. The research evidence was quite weak: many trials had inadequate sample size and generally poor methodology. Compression seems to increase healing rates. Various high compression regimens are more effective than low compression. Few trials have compared the effectiveness of different high compression systems. CONCLUSIONS: Compression systems improve the healing of venous leg ulcers and should be used routinely in uncomplicated venous ulcers. Insufficient reliable evidence exists to indicate which system is the most effective. More good quality randomised controlled trials in association with economic evaluations are needed, to ascertain the most cost effective system for treating venous leg ulcers. PMID:9302954

  18. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  19. Leg ulcer in a patient associated with hydroxyurea therapy.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, Joachim; Hoeft, Daniela; Knab, Julia; Franckson, Tom; Kroger, Knut; Goos, Manfred

    2006-02-01

    Hydroxyurea is a hydroxylated derivate of urea commonly used in the treatment of various hematologic disorders. Cutaneous side-effects such as alopecia, diffuse hyperpigmentation, scaling, poikiloderma, atrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues or nail changes can develop after long-term treatment with hydroxyurea. Painful leg ulcers in association with hydroxyurea have only rarely been reported. We present a report of a 52-year-old patient with essential thrombocythemia suffering from painful leg ulcers 3 years after starting therapy with hydroxyurea. We decided to treat the leg ulcers following a modern phase-adapted wound-healing strategy and continued hydroxyurea therapy until complete healing of the ulcers. In conclusion, cutaneous ulceration of the leg is one adverse effect in patients with essential thrombocythemia during hydroxyurea therapy. Healing does not necessarily require discontinuation of the drug. Therefore, therapists should first optimize a conservative and systematic wound-healing strategy. If these interventions fail, discontinuation of hydroxyurea therapy is advisable. PMID:16445510

  20. Traffic light system for healed venous leg ulcer monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Jenny

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the conceptualisation and evolution of a trialed Doppler traffic light system for healed venous leg ulceration. This tool aims to facilitate clinical decision-making and provides a systematic approach to the ongoing assessment of arterial disease in patients with healed venous leg ulcers when used in conjunction with other purposely-designed assessment documentation to ensure the novice registered and unregistered nurse contributes safely and effectively to the care of patients. The validation and trial of this clinical decision tool is discussed in terms of the use of a recognised methodology determining its fitness for purpose and robustness. PMID:23638479

  1. Contact allergens in persons with leg ulcers: a Canadian study in contact sensitization.

    PubMed

    Smart, Victoria; Alavi, Afsaneh; Coutts, Pat; Fierheller, Marjorie; Coelho, Sunita; Linn Holness, D; Sibbald, R Gary

    2008-09-01

    Individuals with chronic leg ulcers often develop contact allergic reactions to topical preparations used to treat their wounds and the surrounding skin. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of positive patch test responses to common allergens in patients with leg ulcers or venous disease. A case series of 100 consecutive, consenting patients with chronic venous disease and other causes of leg ulcers that were available for patch testing were enrolled. The patients were tested with 38 common allergens, including those most relevant to leg ulcers. A total of 46% of the patients had at least 1 positive patch test response. Multiple reactions in the same patient were common. The most frequent groups of sensitizers were fragrances, lanolin, antibacterial agents, and rubber-related allergens. Though the prevalence of positive patch test reactions is high in this population, it is lower than commonly reported. This may be the result of clinical practice that considered the avoidance of common sensitizers in the management of patients with leg ulcers. PMID:18757387

  2. Percutaneous foam sclerotherapy for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bush, R; Bush, P

    2013-10-01

    The technique of foam sclerotherapy directed at the distal most vessels, draining the ulcer bed was first described in 2010, with excellent penetration into the underlying venous network possible with this technique. Thirty-five patients have now been treated with this technique as the initial treatment at Midwest Vein Laser, USA. There have been no complications with this technique and rapid healing occurred within 4-8 weeks after the initial treatment in 90% of the patients, and all ulcers were healed at 4 months. Here we present the representative case of a 67-year-old man treated with a modified technique that used a percutaneous approach via reticular or spider veins at the margin of the ulcer bed. PMID:24142137

  3. Topical Treatment of Nonhealing Venous Leg Ulcer with Propolis Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewski, M.; Kózka, M.; Urbanek, T.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of effectiveness of topical treatment of nonhealing chronic venous leg ulcers with propolis ointment was conducted. 56 patients were included in the study and randomized into two groups. In group 1, there were 28 patients (ulceration area: 6.9–9.78 cm2) treated by means of topical propolis ointment application and short stretch bandage compression. In group 2, there were 29 patients (ulceration area: 7.2–9.4 cm2) treated by means of Unna boot leg compression without topical propolis treatment. In the study, the efficacy of both treatment methods in patients with resistive venous leg ulcers was compared. The ulceration of patients from group 1 healed completely after 6 weeks of therapy in all cases. In all patients from group 2, the process of healing was longer but successfully completed after 16 weeks of the therapy. We found that an adjunctive propolis ointment treatment increases the efficacy of the short stretch bandage compression stocking, and this combined treatment is more effective than Unna's boot compression alone. PMID:23662121

  4. [The treatment of malignant tumors on venous leg ulcers. Case presentation and literature review].

    PubMed

    Lehnert, W; Kohl, K; Riebe, H; Jünger, M; Ladwig, A

    2008-11-01

    Malignant changes in persistent venous leg ulcers are a grave complication of chronic impaired wound healing. In our case, a venous leg ulcer had persisted on the right calf for 30 years. Exophytic tumors in the ulcer with frequent bleeding prompted biopsies. A squamous cell carcinoma was found, but only in the second biopsy. The surgical procedure was planned so that in a single session both the tumor and the underlying causes of the chronic venous insufficiency in the leg could be treated appropriately. Extirpation of the enlarged lymph nodes in the groin was combined with crossectomy and removal of the long saphenous vein, followed by circular radial excision of the ulcer scar fascia (fasciotomy). The excised tissue was examined histologically. Muscle biopsies were taken from the site of suspicious adhesions of the fascia to the calf muscle. The large, circular defects on the lower leg were covered with the appropriate dressing to condition the wound bed. After three weeks the well-granulated area was covered with meshed split skin grafts. During the operation and in the post-operative phase, machine-assisted and manual decongestion was performed, an established therapy for lymphedema, chronic venous insufficiency and chronic venous ulcers. PMID:18850078

  5. Leg ulcer plastic surgery descent by laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfer, Jacqui; Filonenko, Natalia; Salansky, Norman M.

    1994-02-01

    Low energy laser therapy (LELT) was used to treat chronic leg ulcers. Seven patients, aged 59 to 96 years, with 11 leg ulcers were referred for laser therapy by plastic surgeons. They had a history of ulceration of 3 - 50 years and five of the patients had breakdown of previous skin grafts. Laser treatments were administered with a microprocessor-controlled device. A 22 red ((lambda) equals 660 nm) laser head was utilized to provide a dose of (4 - 6) J/cm2 and 7 infrared ((lambda) equals 880 nm) head to provide a dose of (4 - 8) J/cm2. The patients were treated three to five times per week, 25 - 30 treatments per course. Three patients underwent two courses of laser therapy with three weeks interval between them. All patients, after 5 - 10 laser treatments, have gotten relief of pain and decreased the amount of analgesics used. All ulcers in six patients were completely healed and two ulcers in the seventh patient decreased in size by 75%. One may conclude the developed laser methodology might be used as a preventative measure to avoid plastic surgery or improve its success.

  6. A systematic review on the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Herber, Oliver R; Schnepp, Wilfried; Rieger, Monika A

    2007-01-01

    Background A systematic review was conducted to analyse journal articles that describe or measure the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life (QoL) in order to improve the content of an educational programme that aims to enhance self-care agency in leg ulcer patients. Method Original articles published in English and German between 1990 and 2006 were included if the findings were analysed at the level of patients. Articles were excluded if (1) they investigated the impact of specific treatments or settings on QoL or (2) focused mainly on arterial ulcers or diabetic foot ulcers. Results Twenty-four original research articles met the inclusion criteria; 11 studies used a quantitative, 11 studies a qualitative, and 2 used a mixed method approach. The findings were collapsed into 5 core domains. Quantitative studies commonly investigated the parameters of pain, sleep, social isolation, and physical mobility. Patients had significantly more pain, more restrictions regarding social functioning, less vitality, and limitations with respect to emotional roles compared to the respective controls. Other problem areas identified were restrictions in work capacity, recreation, social interaction, psychological well-being, as well as problems caused by treatment regimes. Inconclusive results were obtained regarding pain intensity, physical restrictions, and gender effects. Limitations Numerous original studies neither undertook a differentiation of participants by ulcer aetiology nor did they analyse the results according to gender differences. Conclusion As leg ulceration has an impact on QoL, national guidelines on the treatment of leg ulceration need to more specifically address these far-ranging effects identified in this review. PMID:17651490

  7. Lupus and leg ulcers--a diagnostic quandary.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venkat; Dziadzio, Magdalena; Hamdulay, Shahir; Boyce, Sara; Prasad, Nidhi; Keat, Andrew

    2007-07-01

    Leg ulcerations can occur in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies and/or vasculitis, and it has been suggested that aPL antibodies may play a pathogenetic role in skin manifestations of SLE. To our knowledge, there is only one report of an aPL antibody-negative patient who developed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) several years before the diagnosis of SLE. We describe a case of a young male affected by SLE who developed leg ulcers diagnosed as PG in the absence of aPL antibodies, where the onset of PG was associated with reactivation of SLE. Effective treatment led to significant improvement in skin lesions and SLE activity. PMID:16633706

  8. Infection in Venous Leg Ulcers: Considerations for Optimal Management in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Douglas J

    2016-02-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most common cause of chronic leg wounds, accounting for up to 70 % of all chronic leg ulcers and carrying with them a significant morbidity, especially for elderly patients. Among people aged 65 years and older, the annual prevalence is 1.7 %. Billions of dollars per year are spent caring for patients with these often difficult-to-heal and sometimes recurrent chronic wounds. Chronic non-healing wounds of the lower extremities are susceptible to microbial invasion and can lead to serious complications, such as delayed healing, cellulitis, enlargement of wound size, debilitating pain, and deeper wound infections causing systemic illness. Recognition and treatment of the infected venous leg ulcer is an essential skill set for any physician caring for geriatric patients. Most physicians rely on subjective clinical signs and patient-reported symptoms in the evaluation of infected chronic wounds. The conventional bacterial culture is a widely available tool for the diagnosis of bacterial infection but can have limitations. Systemic antibiotics, as well as topical antiseptics and antibiotics, can be employed to treat and control infection and critical colonization. Better understanding of microbial biofilms in the wound environment have caused them to emerge as an important reason for non-healing and infection due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial, immunological, and chemical attack. A sound understanding of the microbial-host environment and its complexities, as well as the pathophysiology of venous hypertension, must be appreciated to understand the need for a multimodality approach to treating an infected venous leg ulcer. Other treatment measures are often required, in addition to systemic and topical antibiotics, such as the application of wound bandages, compression therapy, and wound debridement, which can hasten clearance of the infection and help to promote healing. PMID:26833351

  9. Cost effectiveness analysis of larval therapy for leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Cynthia P; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dumville, Jo C; Nelson, E Andrea; Torgerson, David J; Worthy, Gill

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of larval therapy compared with hydrogel in the management of leg ulcers. Design Cost effectiveness and cost utility analyses carried out alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised, open trial with equal randomisation. Population Intention to treat population comprising 267 patients with a venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcers with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to debridement with bagged larvae, loose larvae, or hydrogel. Main outcome measure The time horizon was 12 months and costs were estimated from the UK National Health Service perspective. Cost effectiveness outcomes are expressed in terms of incremental costs per ulcer-free day (cost effectiveness analysis) and incremental costs per quality adjusted life years (cost utility analysis). Results The larvae arms were pooled for the main analysis. Treatment with larval therapy cost, on average, £96.70 (€109.61; $140.57) more per participant per year (95% confidence interval −£491.9 to £685.8) than treatment with hydrogel. Participants treated with larval therapy healed, on average, 2.42 days before those in the hydrogel arm (95% confidence interval −0.95 to 31.91 days) and had a slightly better health related quality of life, as the annual difference in QALYs was 0.011 (95% confidence interval −0.067 to 0.071). However, none of these differences was statistically significant. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the base case analysis was estimated at £8826 per QALY gained and £40 per ulcer-free day. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the outcome estimates. Conclusions Debridement of sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers with larval therapy is likely to produce similar health benefits and have similar costs to treatment with hydrogel. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN55114812 and National Research Register N0484123692. PMID:19304578

  10. UNUSUAL CAUSES OF CUTANEOUS ULCERATION

    PubMed Central

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Skin ulceration is a major source of morbidity and is often difficult to manage. Ulcers due to an inflammatory etiology or microvascular occlusion are particularly challenging in terms of diagnosis and treatment. The management of such ulcers requires careful assessment of associated systemic conditions and a thorough analysis of the ulcer's clinical and histologic findings. In this report, we discuss several examples of inflammatory ulcers and the approach to their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21074034

  11. Onychomycosis in patients with chronic leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Cabete, Joana; Galhardas, Célia; Apetato, Margarida; Lestre, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Nails have a limited number of reactive patterns to disease. Accordingly, toenail changes of different etiologies may mimic onychomycosis. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among patients with leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities attending a dermatology clinic. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through the analysis of clinical records and results of mycological examination. RESULTS A total of 81 patients were included, with a median age of 76.0 years. Most ulcers were of venous etiology, followed by those of mixed and arterial pathogenesis. The mycological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 27.2% of the patients. The etiologic agent was a dermatophyte in 59.1% of isolates in nail samples, while Trichophyton interdigitale was the most frequent fungal species (40.9%). CONCLUSIONS Most toenail abnormalities in patients with chronic leg ulcer were not onychomycosis. This study highlights the importance of systematic mycological examination in these patients, in order to avoid overtreatment with systemic antifungals, unnecessary costs and side effects. PMID:25672317

  12. Onychomycosis in patients with chronic leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cabete, Joana; Galhardas, Célia; Apetato, Margarida; Lestre, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Nails have a limited number of reactive patterns to disease. Accordingly, toenail changes of different etiologies may mimic onychomycosis. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among patients with leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities attending a dermatology clinic. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through the analysis of clinical records and results of mycological examination. RESULTS A total of 81 patients were included, with a median age of 76.0 years. Most ulcers were of venous etiology, followed by those of mixed and arterial pathogenesis. The mycological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 27.2% of the patients. The etiologic agent was a dermatophyte in 59.1% of isolates in nail samples, while Trichophyton interdigitale was the most frequent fungal species (40.9%). CONCLUSIONS Most toenail abnormalities in patients with chronic leg ulcer were not onychomycosis. This study highlights the importance of systematic mycological examination in these patients, in order to avoid overtreatment with systemic antifungals, unnecessary costs and side effects. PMID:25672317

  13. Aspirin can aid bandage as the best treatment for leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    2016-05-27

    Best practice for venous leg ulcers is a firm graduated compression bandage to reduce venous hypertension, aid venous return and reduce peripheral oedema. Sadly, many healed ulcers recur within three months, possibly due to prolonged inflammatory response. PMID:27231076

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis to Plectranthus amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyue-Luen; Chang, Ya-Ching; Yang, Chin-Hsun; Hong, Hong-Shang

    2005-12-01

    This report discusses a case of a 69-year-old woman who developed chronic non-healing leg ulcers after long-term topical use of Plectranthus amboinicus. The ulcer was proven to be allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus by a patch test. The ulcer healed after discontinuation of P. amboinicus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer. PMID:16364130

  15. Effects of Hypochlorous Acid Solutions on Venous Leg Ulcers (VLU): Experience With 1249 VLUs in 897 Patients.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Cheryl M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess the impact of comorbidities and identify factors that accelerate the healing rate of venous leg ulcers we performed an extensive, retrospective analysis of our experience in a diverse population. From June, 2006 to June, 2014, 897 patients with 1249 venous leg ulcers were treated at Lake Wound Clinics. Treatment protocols utilized the standard regimen of wound cleaning, debridement and compression bandaging. Wound cleaning, autolytic debridement, packing and dressing of venous leg ulcers utilized aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HCA) rather than the standard normal saline. This protocol caused all ulcers to close completely. Comorbidities that delayed healing included uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, advanced peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAD), active smoking, use of steroid medications and/or street drugs, large initial ulcer size and significant depth. Other factors, including advanced age, recurrent venous ulceration, stasis dermatitis, lipodermatosclerosis, morbid obesity and infection with one or more multidrug resistant organisms did not delay closure. From this experience we conclude that venous leg ulcer care protocols that clean, debride, pack and dress with hypochlorous acid solutions can reduce the effects of some comorbidities while accelerating healing times. Additional benefits are described. PMID:27104143

  16. Effects of Hypochlorous Acid Solutions on Venous Leg Ulcers (VLU): Experience With 1249 VLUs in 897 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Cheryl M.

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of comorbidities and identify factors that accelerate the healing rate of venous leg ulcers we performed an extensive, retrospective analysis of our experience in a diverse population. From June, 2006 to June, 2014, 897 patients with 1249 venous leg ulcers were treated at Lake Wound Clinics. Treatment protocols utilized the standard regimen of wound cleaning, debridement and compression bandaging. Wound cleaning, autolytic debridement, packing and dressing of venous leg ulcers utilized aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HCA) rather than the standard normal saline. This protocol caused all ulcers to close completely. Comorbidities that delayed healing included uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, advanced peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAD), active smoking, use of steroid medications and/or street drugs, large initial ulcer size and significant depth. Other factors, including advanced age, recurrent venous ulceration, stasis dermatitis, lipodermatosclerosis, morbid obesity and infection with one or more multidrug resistant organisms did not delay closure. From this experience we conclude that venous leg ulcer care protocols that clean, debride, pack and dress with hypochlorous acid solutions can reduce the effects of some comorbidities while accelerating healing times. Additional benefits are described. PMID:27104143

  17. Pharmacologic treatment to improve venous leg ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, Joseph D; Eberhardt, Robert T; Dean, Steven M; Ligi, Daniela; Mannello, Ferdinando

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacologic treatment for venous leg ulcers (VLUs) is an adjuvant treatment to compression therapy. It encompasses a variety of plant-derived and synthetic compounds with properties that alter venous microcirculation, endothelial function, and leukocyte activity to promote VLU healing. These compounds are often referred to as venotonics or venoactive drugs but have also been referred to as edema-protective agents, phlebotonics, vasoprotectors, phlebotropics, and venotropics. The exact mechanism of their ability to heal VLUs is not known; however, clinical trials support their efficacy. This evidence-based review assesses randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses with the objective of determining the effectiveness of venotonics to promote VLU healing. PMID:27318060

  18. Leg ulcer due to multiple arteriovenous malformations in the lower extremity of an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takashi; Tanabe, Kenichi; Morita, Miho; Nakahara, Chihoko; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2016-04-01

    A 66-year-old woman with a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presented with an irregularly shaped leg ulcer surrounded by pigmentation on the left lower limb. In addition, the circumference of her left thigh had gradually increased. The ulcer did not respond to topical treatment and enlarged, therefore, she visited our hospital. Arteriography of the left lower limb showed multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), based on which we made a diagnosis of a leg ulcer due to multiple AVMs. Transcatheter arterial embolisation with a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and lipiodol was performed six times in the period of about a year for treating the AVMs. The ulcer was managed with bed rest, surgical debridement, continuous pressure support with elastic wrap and topical treatment. After 15 months, the ulcer healed, leaving pigmentation and scarring. It is quite rare for AVMs to progress in the elderly. We speculate that the DVT had caused occult AVMs to become symptomatic following an increase in size. PMID:24720817

  19. Changes in patient's quality of life comparing conservative and surgical treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jankūnas, Vytautas; Rimdeika, Rytis; Jasenas, Marius; Samsanavicius, Donatas

    2004-01-01

    proves the decreased usage of painkillers in the group of the patients with the surgical treatment. All the patients (n=44) have had sleep disorders because of the ulcers. In the group of surgically treated patients, ulcers did not disturb the sleep after more than 3 months, and in the group, treated conservatively, the problem remained. We also found that after surgical treatment the patients were more optimistic and cried less. That shows the recovery of their emotional status. We have also found that the patients knew from the surgeon first than from the family doctor or other medical personnel about this disorder. We have made conclusions, that with the reduction of the ulcer area the pain is also reduced. Surgical treatment of ulcers (autodermoplasty) reveals a statistically reliable positive effect on patient life quality (sleep and emotions), but even 50% of patients are unaware of the real leg ulceration causes. PMID:15299989

  20. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... health issues or medication. This may include: Low iron levels This can cause problems with brain cell ... you have restless legs syndrome caused by low iron, talk with your physician and do not attempt ...

  1. [New trends in the treatment of venous leg ulcer. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Biondi, Antonio; Crisafi, Rosario Maria; Di Giunta, Michela; Scuderi, Gaspare; Motta, Salvatore; Ciuni, Roberto; Basile, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Venous leg ulcer is the most frequent cause of trophic lesions of the limbs in patients with chronic venous insufficiency. Appropriate management of cutaneous vascular lesions is based on systemic, vascular and local assessment. The Authors used a protease-modulating matrix in 126 patients suffering from venous leg ulcers with wound granulation: 81 (64.2%) patients with primary chronic reflux disorder and varicose veins and 45 (35.8%) post-thrombotic; in addition 30 patients (23.8%) had peripheral arteriopaty and 41 (32.5%) peripheral arteriopaty and diabetes. One hundred sixteen patients showed complete healing, 2 were refractory to every treatment and 8, with arteriopathy and diabetes, are on the mend. According to the literature we achieved reduction of the healing time and increased healing rate. All patients were treated in outpatient settings. In conclusion the Authors suggest protease-modulating matrix is a really effective treatment of venous leg ulcers with wound granulation. Their treatment is also feasible in outpatient treatment with a reduction in health spending and reduced absence from work. PMID:20131550

  2. Laser irradiation effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms isolated from venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Baffoni, Marina; Bessa, Lucinda J; Grande, Rossella; Di Giulio, Mara; Mongelli, Matteo; Ciarelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, represent a significant cause of morbidity in developed countries, predominantly in older patients. The aetiology of these wounds is probably multifactorial, but the role of bacteria in their pathogenesis is still unclear. Moreover, the presence of bacterial biofilms has been considered an important factor responsible for wounds chronicity. We aimed to investigate the laser action as a possible biofilm eradicating strategy, in order to attempt an additional treatment to antibiotic therapy to improve wound healing. In this work, the effect of near-infrared (NIR) laser was evaluated on mono and polymicrobial biofilms produced by two pathogenic bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus PECHA10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PECHA9, both isolated from a chronic venous leg ulcer. Laser effect was assessed by biomass measurement, colony forming unit count and cell viability assay. It was shown that the laser treatment has not affected the biofilms biomass neither the cell viability, although a small disruptive action was observed in the structure of all biofilms tested. A reduction on cell growth was observed in S. aureus and in polymicrobial biofilms. This work represents an initial in vitro approach to study the influence of NIR laser treatment on bacterial biofilms in order to explain its potentially advantageous effects in the healing process of chronic infected wounds. PMID:22182280

  3. Community leg ulcer clinics: a comparative study in two health authorities.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, D. A.; Freak, L.; Kinsella, A.; Walsh, J.; Lane, C.; Groarke, L.; McCollum, C.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the outcome and cost of care for leg ulcers in community leg ulcer clinics in Stockport District Health authority with Trafford District Health Authority as a control. DESIGN--Detailed cost and efficacy studies conducted prospectively over a three month period in both districts both before and one year after the introduction of five leg ulcer clinics in Stockport. SETTING--Two large district health authorities of broad socioeconomic mix and total population of 540,000. PATIENTS--All patients receiving treatment for an active leg ulcer, irrespective of the profession or location of their carer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The proportion of ulcerated limbs completely healed within three months and total cost of leg ulcer care. RESULTS--The introduction of community clinics in Stockport improved healing of leg ulcers from 66/252 (26%) in 1993 to 99/233 (42%) in 1994 (P < 0.001) compared with in Trafford, where 47/203 (23%) healed in 1993 and only 43/213 (20%) in 1994. This improved result in Stockport was achieved while the annual expenditure on care of leg ulcers was reduced from 409,991 pounds to only 253,371 pounds. In the same year the cost of leg ulcer care in Trafford increased from 556,039 pounds to 673,318 pounds. CONCLUSION--In the first year after the introduction of community clinics, before most patients in Stockport had access to these clinics, healing of leg ulcers was already improved whereas costs were reduced. PMID:8664719

  4. Sustaining Behavior Changes Following a Venous Leg Ulcer Client Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Charne; Kapp, Suzanne; Donohue, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are a symptom of chronic insufficiency of the veins. This study considered the sustainability of behavior changes arising from a client focus e-Learning education program called the “Leg Ulcer Prevention Program” (LUPP) for people with a venous leg ulcer. Data from two related studies were used to enable a single sample (n = 49) examination of behavior maintenance across an average 8 to 9 months period. Physical activity levels increased over time. Leg elevation, calf muscle exercises, and soap substitute use were seen to fluctuate over the follow up time points. The use of a moisturizer showed gradual decline over time. The provision of a client-focused venous leg ulcer program was associated with behavior changes that had varied sustainability across the evaluation period. PMID:27429280

  5. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption. PMID:24618089

  6. Successful Management of a Chronic Refractory Leg Ulcer in an Adolescent with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Giovanni; Santopietro, Michelina; Palumbo, Giovanna; Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Micozzi, Alessandra; Venosi, Salvatore; Laurino, Marica; Ferrazza, Giancarlo; Fino, Pasquale; Foà, Robin; Giona, Fiorina

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited hemoglobinopathy characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations. Chronic leg ulcers are a disabling complication with repercussions on the quality of life. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl with a diagnosis of SCD who developed a chronic leg ulcer that was successfully treated with a multi-disciplinary approach, including local and systemic therapies. The role of different treatments, in particular low molecular weight heparin, in the refractory chronic leg ulcer healing process will be discussed. PMID:26476907

  7. Management of Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers: Challenges and Current Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter J; Barker, Judith; Collier, Mark; Gethin, Georgina; Haesler, Emily; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Laeuchli, Severin; Mosti, Giovanni; Probst, Sebastian; Weller, Carolina

    2016-06-01

    Introduction It is well documented that the prevalence of venous leg ulcers (VLUs) is increasing, coinciding with an ageing population. Accurate global prevalence of VLUs is difficult to estimate due to the range of methodologies used in studies and accuracy of reporting. (1) Venous ulceration is the most common type of leg ulceration and a significant clinical problem, affecting approximately 1% of the population and 3% of people over 80 years of age (2) in westernised countries. Moreover, the global prevalence of VLUs is predicted to escalate dramatically, as people are living longer, often with multiple comorbidities. Recent figures on the prevalence of VLUs are based on a small number of studies, conducted in Western countries, and the evidence is weak. However, it is estimated that 93% of VLUs will heal in 12 months, and 7% remain unhealed after five years. (3) Furthermore, the recurrence rate within 3 months after wound closure is as high as 70%. (4) (-6) Thus, cost-effective adjunct evidence-based treatment strategies and services are needed to help prevent these ulcers, facilitate healing when they occur and prevent recurrence. The impact of a VLU represents social, personal, financial and psychological costs on the individual and further economic drain on the health-care system. This brings the challenge of providing a standardised leg ulcer service which delivers evidence-based treatment for the patient and their ulcer. It is recognised there are variations in practice and barriers preventing the implementation of best practice. There are patients not receiving appropriate and timely treatment in the initial development of VLUs, effective management of their VLU and preventing recurrence once the VLU has healed. Health-care professionals (HCPs) and organisations must have confidence in the development process of clinical practice guidelines and have ownership of these guidelines to ensure those of the highest quality guide their practice. These systematic

  8. [Martorell ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas; Koljonen, Virve; Senet, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Martorell ulcer (also called hypertensive leg ulcer) is an unusual, but not rare, cause of leg ulcers. It represents up to 15% of the leg ulcers hospitalized in a dermatology ward. It affects patients, aged from 40 to 85 years old, with a past long history of poorly controlled hypertension and sometimes diabetes. Clinical presentation is highly characteristic with an extremely painful, slowly extensive, superficial necrotic ulcer with a purpuric rim. Delay of healing is usually slow. Skin biopsies of the wound border, are warranted for differential diagnosis only in atypical cases. Management includes active pain control, wound debridement, skin grafting and hypertension control. PMID:23767134

  9. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  10. Managing chronic oedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Treating lymphoedema in patients with critical arterial disease can be contraindicated. This case study describes current methods of managing lymphoedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulcers. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had paraplegia and lower-limb lymphoedema with leg ulceration for 18 years, as well as arterial disease. The patient was referred to the lymphoedema/vascular service in 2013. Duplex ultrasound indicated superficial femoral occlusion. The arterial disease was treated with an angiogram and angioplasty, and when the blood supply was improved, the lymphoedema was treated. Emphasis was placed on self-care and reducing the need for community nurse involvement. Selfcare included compression bandaging, use of FarrowWrap, low-level light therapy, and ulcer dressings. Outcomes were measured using a telemedicine software programme. The patient's lymphoedema was reduced, leg ulcers healed, and quality of life transformed. PMID:27046424

  11. [Endoscopic subfascial dissection of perforating veins of lower legs in patients with venous ulcers].

    PubMed

    Sundukov, I V; Lipnitskiĭ, E M; Alekberzade, A V; Kapustniak, D A; Lagunov, M V; Krest'ianova, I A

    2009-01-01

    Prospective analysis of the results of endoscopic subfascial dissection of perforating veins of lower legs in 68 patients with venous ulcers is presented. Four patients developed postoperative wound infection. Mean duration of hospitalization was 4.5 days. The patients were able to resume routine daily activity within 8 days after surgery. Mean length of ulcer healing was 7.0 months. Complete healing required 3 months in 22.1% of the patients, 6 months in 38.2%, 9 months in 66.2%, and 1 year in 97.1%. Ulcers recurred in 2 patients. Mean clinical and disability scores 8 months after surgery were on an average very low. It is concluded that subfascial dissection of perforating veins of lower legs in patients with venous ulcers improves clinical symptoms, promotes healing of ulcers, produces minimal postoperative complications, and plays an important role in correction of concomitant pathology. PMID:19280984

  12. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (105 copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication. PMID:27076774

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with Martorell hypertensive leg ulcer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer (Martorell ulcer) is characterized by distinct alterations in the arteriolar wall of subcutaneous vessels, leading to progressive narrowing of the vascular lumen and increase of vascular resistance. These changes are similar to the alterations observed in pulmonary arterioles in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This study was aimed to assess an association between the two disorders. Methods In this case–control study, 14 patients with Martorell ulcer were clinically assessed for the presence of pulmonary hypertension using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Data from patients were compared to 28 matched hypertensive controls. Results Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) in patients with Martorell ulcer was significantly higher than in the control group (33.8 ± 16.9 vs 25.3 ± 6.5 mmHg, p = 0.023); the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 31% (5/14) in patients and 7% (2/28) in controls (p = 0.031). No differences were seen in left heart size and function between patients and controls. Conclusion This study provides first evidence that subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis, the hallmark of Martorell ulcer, is associated with PH. These findings suggest that patients with Martorell leg ulcer might be at significant risk to develop elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. Patients with leg ulcers who present with dyspnea should be evaluated by echocardiography for the presence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22686459

  14. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  15. From skin disorders to venous leg ulcers: pathophysiology and efficacy of Daflon 500 mg in ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Coleridge Smith, Philip D

    2003-01-01

    The standard treatments for venous diseases of the lower limb include compression bandaging and stockings as well as surgical removal of varicose veins. There are a number of conditions in which these conventional treatments are ineffective, particularly in the management of leg ulceration. Drug treatments for healing venous leg ulcers have yet to be developed to the stage of good clinical efficacy, but these may assist in the management of patients. Flavonoid drugs have been widely used in the management of the symptoms of venous disease for many years and have recently been studied in some detail to assess their effects on the microcirculation. Work in animal models of ischemia-reperfusion show that MPFF (micronized purified flavonoid fraction) modulates leukocyte adhesion and prevents endothelial damage. Similar biochemical effects have been observed in patients with venous disease and may explain the efficacy of this drug in the management of edema and other symptoms of venous disease. There is clinical evidence that MPFF modifies venous leg ulcer healing. PMID:12934756

  16. Pathophysiology of venous leg ulceration--an update.

    PubMed

    Dormandy, J A

    1997-01-01

    The microcirculatory component of the pathophysiology of venous ulceration is now attracting considerable research interests, but is still far from fully elucidated. Currently, the central role is filled by the inappropriately activated white cell and its interaction with the endothelium. Interstitial oedema, pericapillary fibrin cuff and capillary microthromboses could all fit in with this hypothesis. However, there are other demonstrated changes, for instance in lymphatic drainage, intrinsic fibrinolysis and hemorheological changes which also need to be taken into account. The interaction between the microcirculatory changes is an obvious target for the systemic pharmacotherapy of venous ulceration. PMID:8995347

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Kerstersia gyiorum CG1, Isolated from a Leg Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Kozyreva, Varvara; Truong, Chau-Linda; Longoria, Rose

    2015-01-01

    We report the first draft genome sequence of Kerstersia gyiorum from a leg ulcer of a patient with diabetes and osteomyelitis. The 3.94-Mb genome assembly included 3,428 annotated coding sequences with an N50 of 223,310 bp and a plasmid encoding a type IV secretion system gene and two antitoxin genes. PMID:26358603

  18. Case 11: large, infected, necrotic mixed-aetiology leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Price, Juliet; Boulton, Zoe

    2016-03-01

    This painful and malodorous ulcer was covered with 40% necrotic tissue. Combined use of octenilin Wound gel and Wound Irrigation Solution gently debrided the necrotic tissue, and helped reduce the pain and malodour. Within 6 weeks, the wound was covered with granulation tissue. PMID:26949855

  19. Quality of life in patients with leg ulcers or skin lesions – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mościcka, Paulina; Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Ślusarz, Robert; Hancke, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Attempts to determine the quality of life are advisable in patients with ulcers as the group affected with this problem is relatively large. According to one Polish randomized trial, approximately 0.3–2% of the adult population suffers from active or healed venous ulcers. Aim To compare the quality of life of patients with leg ulcers of venous and arterial etiology and those with lower limb skin lesions due to chronic venous insufficiency. Material and methods This study included 90 consecutive patients with ulcers of venous (n = 30) or arterial etiology (n = 30), or patients with trophic disorders of the skin associated with chronic venous insufficiency (n = 30) treated at the Venous Ulceration Outpatient Clinic and at the Department and Clinic of General Surgery, Dr. J. Biziel Memorial University Hospital No. 2, in Bydgoszcz. This study was designed as a questionnaire survey and included the Skindex-29 instrument for the assessment of quality of life in patients with dermatological conditions. Results Overall, the global Skinndex-29 scores of all studied participants ranged between 37 and 136 points, 23.93 points on average. The analyzed groups of patients differed significantly with respect to the average level of the global quality of life determined using the Skindex-29 questionnaire. Conclusions Significant differences were observed in the global quality of life of patients who suffered from venous or arterial leg ulcers or skin lesions resulting from chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:26755912

  20. A comparative clinical study on five types of compression therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dolibog, Pawel; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub; Dolibog, Patrycja; Blaszczak, Edward; Polak, Anna; Brzezinska-Wcislo, Ligia; Hrycek, Antoni; Urbanek, Tomasz; Ziaja, Jacek; Kolanko, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five types of compression therapy in venous leg ulcers (intermittent pneumatic vs. stockings vs. multi layer vs. two layer short stretch bandages vs. Unna boots). Primary study endpoints were analysis of changes of the total ulcer surface area, volume and linear dimensions inside observed groups. The secondary end points were comparisons between all groups the number of completely healed wounds (ulcer healing rates), Gilman index and percentage change of ulcer surface area. In total, 147 patients with unilateral venous leg ulcers were included to this study. Participants were randomly allocated to the groups: A, B, C, D and E. After two months the healing rate was the highest in group A (intermittent pneumatic compression) - 57.14%, 16/28 patients, B (ulcer stocking system) - 56.66%, 17/30 patients and C (multi layer short stretch bandage) - 58.62%, 17/29 patients. Significantly much worse rate found in group D (two layer short stretch bandages) - only 16.66%, 5/30 patients and E (Unna boots) - 20%, 6/30 patients. The analysis of changes of the percentage of Gilman index and wound total surface area confirmed that intermittent pneumatic compression, stockings and multi layer bandages are the most efficient. The two layer short - stretch bandages and Unna boots appeared again much less effective. PMID:24396284

  1. Comparison of dextranomer and streptokinase-streptodornase in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, A; Holopainen, Y V; Orava, S; Kangas, J; Kuusisto, P; Hyvärinen, E; Ervasti, E; Silvennoinen, E

    1981-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of dextranomer (Debrisan) and streptokinase-streptodornase (Varidase) was compared in a controlled randomized in-patient study. There were two patient groups: Group A consisting of 28 patients with a total of 31 venous leg ulcers and Group B consisting of 56 patients with other infected wounds (posttraumatic and postoperative wounds, amputation stumps, burn wounds, arteriosclerotic ulcers, decubital ulcers, ulcers due to bone disease, rheumatic ulcers, ulcers due to erysipelas and wounds of mixed aetiology). Both agents have a good cleansing effect as well as a good effect on infection and wet necrosis. Dextranomer stimulates the formation of granulation tissue faster than streptokinase-streptodornase. PMID:6172073

  2. An evaluation of short-stretch compression systems for chronic lower-limb leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Carr, Caryn; Shadwell, Janice; Regan, Pip; Hammett, Susan

    2015-03-01

    An evaluation of a new short-stretch compression system (CoFlex UBZ, TLC and TLC Lite, Aspen Medical Europe Ltd) was undertaken in four leg ulcer clinics. A total of 19 patients aged 42-93 years were treated for up to 4 weeks, or until healed. Collated data included age, underlying diseases, leg ulcer type, ulcer duration and current treatment. The evaluation included quality of life measurements, wear time, slippage, exudate strikethrough and pain using a numerical pain score. Patients were asked to document sleep patterns. Compression was applied according to clinical need. Inclusion criteria were non-healing wounds on the lower limb existing for more than 6 weeks that were suitable for compression. Exclusion criteria included patients with untreated peripheral disease, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)<0.5 or those unable to consent. Staff were asked to rate performance, wear time, fluid handling and conformability. Wound tissue types improved significantly for n=16 (84%) patients. Pain scores reduced significantly by week 2, n=11 (58%) patient leg ulcers had improved, n=2 (11%) patients in standard compression noted a marked reduction in malodour and sloughy tissue. n=16 (84%) rated the overall performance as 'very good' or 'good'. A detailed cost analysis was undertaken on one patient, suggesting a potential cost saving of £186.92 per month and a cost efficiency saving of 43.4%. PMID:25757382

  3. The wound/burn guidelines - 5: Guidelines for the management of lower leg ulcers/varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takaaki; Kukino, Ryuichi; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kono, Takeshi; Kodera, Masanari; Sakai, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-08-01

    Varicose veins are treated at multiple clinical departments, but as patients often visit the dermatology clinic first due to leg ulcers, the present Guidelines for the Management of Lower Leg Ulcers/Varicose Veins were prepared in consideration of the importance of the dermatologist's role. Also, the disease concept of chronic venous insufficiency or chronic venous disorders and the CEAP classification of these disorders are presented. The objective of the present guidelines is to properly guide the diagnosis and treatment of lower leg ulcers/varicose veins by systematically presenting evidence-based recommendations that support clinical decisions. PMID:26973097

  4. Critical Reviews: How we treat sickle cell patients with leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Caterina P; Kato, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The past five decades have seen an improvement in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell disease (SCD) because of prophylaxis against infectious complications, improved and expanded red cell transfusions, implementation of hydroxyurea therapy, and advances in supportive care. Now that the majority of patients in the western hemisphere reaches adulthood, end organ diseases are frequent, which include vasculopathic complications such as chronic leg ulcers. The management of patients with leg ulcers requires the hematologist to lead a team of health care professionals, and investigates the presence of associated, but potentially still occult signs of vasculopathy, such as pulmonary hypertension, renal disease, priapism and retinopathy. These complications may be asynchronous, and long term careful screening is indicated, in order to ensure early diagnosis and intervention. It is crucial to address both the immediate consequences of pain, infection and disability, and long term effects on quality of life, employment and stigma associated with chronic ulceration. Recent insights into their pathophysiology may have practical implications. We propose a holistic approach to the management of patients' physical and emotional problems and mechanisms of ulcers formation and delayed healing. An overview of topical and systemic therapies for chronic ulcers is given, with the understanding that wound care therapy is best left to the wound specialists, medical and surgical, with whom the hematologist must keep an open line of communication. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, our opinion is based on both a critical review of the literature and our personal clinical and research experience. PMID:26257201

  5. Prevalence of skin problems and leg ulceration in a sample of young injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug users suffer harm from the injecting process, and clinical services are reporting increasing numbers presenting with skin-related problems such as abscesses and leg ulcers. Skin breakdown can lead to long-term health problems and increased service costs and is often the first indication of serious systemic ill health. The extent of skin problems in injecting drug users has not previously been quantified empirically, and there is a dearth of robust topical literature. Where skin problems have been reported, this is often without clear definition and generic terms such as ‘soft tissue infection’ are used which lack specificity. The aim of this study was to identify the range and extent of skin problems including leg ulceration in a sample of injecting drug users. Definitions of skin problems were developed and applied to descriptions from drug users to improve rigour. Methods Data were collected in needle exchanges and methadone clinics across Glasgow, Scotland, from both current and former drug injectors using face-to-face interviews. Results Two hundred participants were recruited, of which 74% (n = 148) were males and 26% (n = 52) were females. The age range was 21–44 years (mean 35 years). Just under two thirds (64%, n = 127) were currently injecting or had injected within the last 6 months, and 36% (n = 73) had previously injected and had not injected for more than 6 months. Sixty per cent (n = 120) of the sample had experienced a skin problem, and the majority reported more than one problem. Most common were abscesses, lumps, track marks and leg ulcers. Fifteen per cent (n = 30) of all participants reported having had a leg ulcer. Conclusions This is an original empirical study which demonstrated unique findings of a high prevalence of skin disease (60%) and surprisingly high rates of leg ulceration (15%). Skin disease in injecting drug users is clearly widespread. Leg ulceration in particular is a chronic recurring

  6. Treatment of a venous leg ulcer with a honey alginate dressing.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Elizabeth A

    2005-06-01

    The management of chronic wounds such as venous ulcers is a common and long-term issue with the aging population. Non-standard treatment that is both medically and financially effective needs to be identified. Honey has been used for its healing properties for centuries and has been used to successfully heal wounds including pressure-ulcers in our care facility. However, there is not much evidence for its use in treating venous ulcers. To this end, I trialed the use of a honey-impregnated alginate dressing on a man who had a long-standing history of venous ulcers on his leg with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of honey as an alternative treatment to the current wound management therapies. The honey seemed to act as an effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and deodorizing dressing, with total healing of the ulcer achieved. This result, together with past successes with the use of honey alginate on ulcerated wounds, has led to this product becoming mainstream in the treatment of chronic wounds within our care facility. PMID:15944502

  7. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  8. [Iodine-induced hyperthyroidism after cadexomer iodine treatment of leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Michanek, A; Hansson, C; Berg, G; Månesköld-Claes, A

    1998-12-01

    The article consists in two case reports of eldery patients who developed hyperthyroidism after cadexomer iodine treatment of small leg ulcers. The first was an 87-year-old woman who developed anxiety, hoarseness and tachycardia after five months treatment of a 12 cm2 leg ulcer with 350 g cadexomer iodine. Her serum level of free thyroxine (FT4) was 23.1 pmol/l (normal range, 11.7-28.0), and that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) 0.01 mIU/l (normal range, 0.1-3.0). She had had a nodular goitre for thirty years. The second was an 86- year-old woman who developed depression and confusion after three months' treatment of an 8 cm2 leg ulcer with 170 g cadexomere iodine. Her serum level of FT4 was 30.0 pmol/l, and that of TSH 0.005 mIU/l. Both patients underwent Tc99m pertechnetate scanning and iodine uptake measurement with a view to treating the hyperthyroidism with radio-iodine. However, as iodine uptake was inhibited in both cases, radio-iodine treatment was impossible, and symptomatic treatment and antithyroid drugs had to be used. Thus, it is concluded that topical treatment with cadexomer iodine can induce hyperthyroidism difficult to manage clinically as the treatment options are limited, which should be borne in mind when cadexomer iodine treatment is considered. PMID:9889495

  9. Larval therapy for leg ulcers (VenUS II): randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Worthy, Gill; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dowson, Christopher; Iglesias, Cynthia; Mitchell, Joanne L; Nelson, E Andrea; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of larval therapy with a standard debridement technique (hydrogel) for sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers. Design Pragmatic, three armed randomised controlled trial. Setting Community nurse led services, hospital wards, and hospital outpatient leg ulcer clinics in urban and rural settings, United Kingdom. Participants 267 patients with at least one venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcer with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue, and an ankle brachial pressure index of 0.6 or more. Interventions Loose larvae, bagged larvae, and hydrogel. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was time to healing of the largest eligible ulcer. Secondary outcomes were time to debridement, health related quality of life (SF-12), bacterial load, presence of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, adverse events, and ulcer related pain (visual analogue scale, from 0 mm for no pain to 150 mm for worst pain imaginable). Results Time to healing was not significantly different between the loose or bagged larvae group and the hydrogel group (hazard ratio for healing using larvae v hydrogel 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 1.68; P=0.54). Larval therapy significantly reduced the time to debridement (2.31, 1.65 to 3.2; P<0.001). Health related quality of life and change in bacterial load over time were not significantly different between the groups. 6.7% of participants had MRSA at baseline. No difference was found between larval therapy and hydrogel in their ability to eradicate MRSA by the end of the debridement phase (75% (9/12) v 50% (3/6); P=0.34), although this comparison was underpowered. Mean ulcer related pain scores were higher in either larvae group compared with hydrogel (mean difference in pain score: loose larvae v hydrogel 46.74 (95% confidence interval 32.44 to 61.04), P<0.001; bagged larvae v hydrogel 38.58 (23.46 to 53.70), P<0.001). Conclusions Larval therapy did not improve the rate of healing of sloughy

  10. [Primary Sjögren's syndrome with cutaneous vasculitis manifested as leg ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Souza, Sonia Cristina de Magalhães; Kuruma, Katia Akemi Miyazato; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de; Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Figueiredo, Camille Pinto; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Gonçalves, Célio Rodrigues; Borges, Cláudia Teresa Lobato

    2004-04-01

    Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease with a large spectrum of clinical manifestations extending from an organ-specific involvement to a systemic process. The skin is affected quite commonly and the estimated frequency of inflammatory vascular lesions is from 20% to 30%. Two specific, clinically recognizable forms of cutaneous vasculitis predominate, palpable purpura and chronic urticaria, but erythema multiforme, erythema perstans, erythema nodosum, erithematous macules and subcutaneous nodules have also been described. The authors report the case of a 46-year-old female patient, diagnosed as primary SS, who presented ocular and oral symptoms, poliarthritis and laboratory alterations (with a positive ANA, anti-SSA, rheumatoid factor, and hypergammaglobulinemia). Ten years after the diagnosis, she presented leg ulcers. The biopsy confirmed the presence of vasculitic process, and the ulcers improved rapidly after the treatment with endovenous cyclophosphamide. There are only two reports of chronic ulceration of the legs as cutaneous manifestation of SS. The authors stress the importance of considering ulcers in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous involvement of primary SS. PMID:21503546

  11. [QUALITY OF LIFE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LEG ULCER].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja; Spoljar, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    Wound represents a disruption of anathomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. Regarding to the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. Quality of life is primarily concerned with the impact of chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within expected period of time regarding to its etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones which include ischaemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcer and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. An 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder is mostly neuropathic ulcer. Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Chronic wounds affect the elderly population and it is estimated that 1-2 percent of western population suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to an increasing population of the elderly and the diabetic and obesity epidemic. The WHO definition of health is "A state of complite physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity". Based on this definition, quality of life in relation to health may be defined as "the functional effect of an illness and it's consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient". The domains that contribute to this effect are physical, psychological and social functioning. The patient's own perceptions of an illness were found to play an important role in explainig quality of life. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life in a number of ways such as reduced mobility, pain, unpleasant odor, sleep disturbances, social isolation and frustration, and inability to perform everyday duties. Among the most common psychological reactions to chronic diseases

  12. Dressings for venous leg ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E Andrea; Michaels, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence of effectiveness of dressings applied to venous leg ulcers. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Hand searches of journals and searches of electronic databases, conference proceedings, and bibliographies up to April 2006; contacts with dressing manufacturers for unpublished studies. Studies reviewed All randomised controlled trials that evaluated dressings applied to venous leg ulcers were eligible for inclusion. Data from eligible studies were extracted and summarised independently by two reviewers using a data extraction sheet. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two reviewers. Results The search strategy identified 254 studies; 42 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Hydrocolloids were no more effective than simple low adherent dressings used beneath compression (eight trials; relative risk for healing with hydrocolloid 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.28). For other comparisons, insufficient evidence was available to allow firm conclusions to be drawn. None of the dressing comparisons showed evidence that a particular class of dressing healed more ulcers. Some differences existed between dressings in terms of subjective outcome measures and ulcer healing rates. The results were not affected by the size or quality of trials or the unit of randomisation. Insufficient data were available to allow conclusions to be drawn about the relative cost effectiveness of different dressings. Conclusions The type of dressing applied beneath compression was not shown to affect ulcer healing. The results of the meta-analysis showed that applying hydrocolloid dressings beneath compression produced no benefit in terms of ulcer healing compared with applying simple low adherent dressings. No conclusive recommendations can be made as to which type of dressing is most cost effective. Decisions on which dressing to apply should be based on the local costs of dressings and the preferences of the

  13. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  14. Quality of life profile and correlated factors in chronic leg ulcer patients in the mid-west of São Paulo State, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Wachholz, Patrick Alexander; Masuda, Paula Yoshiko; Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Taira, Cecilia Midori Higashi; Cleto, Norma Gondim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic leg ulcer may have an impact on patients' quality of life. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to identify the impact of leg ulcers on patient's quality of life using the Dermatology Life Quality Index and to define the main factors correlated with this perception. METHOD Cross-sectional, non-probabilistic sampling study. We included patients with chronic leg ulcers being treated for at least 3 months. A sociodemographic and clinical survey was conducted to assess the profile of the ulcers. We administered a screening for depressive symptoms and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis, chi-square test and Mann-Whitney test for categorical data, Pearson for numeric variables, and multiple regression for categorical data. RESULTS Forty-one patients were assessed. Their mean age was 61.78 years. Venous ulcers (48.8%) were the most prevalent. Seventy-three percent of the sample perceived no impact/low impact on quality of life in the past week, and 26.8% perceived moderate/high impact. A multiple regression analysis identified the causes of lesion, pain related to the ulcers, time of onset, and severity of the depressive symptoms as the variables that had an influence on quality of life. CONCLUSIONS The majority of the sample perceived low or no impact of the condition on the quality of the life. The variables etiology of the lesion (p<0.001), pain related to the ulcers (p=0.001), time of onset (p=0.006), and severity of the depressive symptoms (p<0.001) had an influence on the quality of life, suggesting the need for further studies with more robust designs to confirm the causal relationship between these characteristics and quality of life. PMID:24626651

  15. [Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: A rare cause of chronic ulcers].

    PubMed

    Jansen, T M; Hoff, N-Ph

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa, a special form of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) without systemic involvement, is classified as one of the ANCA-negative vasculitides of small and medium-sized vessels. It is a very rare disease with unknown etiology and occurs more commonly in women over the age of 40. Typical skin lesions are subcutaneous nodules, livedo racemosa, and ulcerations. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman presenting to our outpatient department who reported having very painful ulcerations of the lower legs with unknown origin for 6 months. PMID:26311032

  16. Adaptive compression therapy for venous leg ulcers: a clinically effective, patient-centred approach.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith G; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Partsch, Hugo; Caprini, Joseph A; Comerota, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    A prospective, randomised, 12-week study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of two compression methods for venous leg ulcers (VLUs); a new adaptive compression therapy (ACT) system, combining intermittent and sustained pneumatic compression (n = 38) and a conventional four-layer bandage system (n = 52). Primary outcomes were ulcer healing and safety. Secondary outcomes were comfort, compliance, ulcer pain, patient-perceived product performance and quality of life. Ulcer healing rate was similar (31·6% versus 42·3%, respectively, P = 0·30) between the treatments. Adverse events and patient-rated comfort were also similar. Average daily usage for the dual system was 10·5 and 1·8 hours in the sustained and intermittent modes, respectively, representing its use during 71% of waking hours. Predicted final ulcer pain was also similar (P = 0·68). Performance was subjectively better for adaptive compression and significantly higher for exudate management (P = 0·04), skin protection (P < 0·001), removal ease (P = 0·0007), bathing (P < 0·0001) and sleep comfort (P = 0·0405). The adjusted final quality-of-life score was 0·1025 higher for adaptive compression (P = 0·0375). Subjects with healed ulcers attained higher final scores than unhealed subjects (P = 0·0004). This study provides evidence that ACT is comparably efficacious to successfully heal VLUs compared with four-layer bandage management but is better accepted and achieves higher patient-reported quality-of-life scores in these challenging patients. PMID:24802769

  17. Corneal ulcer caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Siripanthong, S; Teerapantuwat, S; Prugsanusak, W; Suputtamongkol, Y; Viriyasithavat, P; Chaowagul, W; Dance, D A; White, N J

    1991-01-01

    We report three cases of corneal ulcer caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei. In all cases corneal trauma preceded the development of extensive ulcers, subconjunctival abscesses, and hypopyon. Treatment for a total of 8 weeks with topical and/or parenteral ceftazidime followed by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid produced resolution of infection in each case. PMID:2041966

  18. A prospective randomised trial of four-layer versus short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Scriven, J M; Taylor, L E; Wood, A J; Bell, P R; Naylor, A R; London, N J

    1998-05-01

    This trial was undertaken to examine the safety and efficacy of four-layer compared with short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers within the confines of a prospective, randomised, ethically approved trial. Fifty-three patients were recruited from a dedicated venous ulcer assessment clinic and their individual ulcerated limbs were randomised to receive either a four-layer bandage (FLB)(n = 32) or a short stretch bandage (SSB)(n = 32). The endpoint was a completely healed ulcer. However, if after 12 weeks of compression therapy no healing had been achieved, that limb was withdrawn from the study and deemed to have failed to heal with the prescribed bandage. Leg volume was measured using the multiple disc model at the first bandaging visit, 4 weeks later, and on ulcer healing. Complications arising during the study were recorded. Data from all limbs were analysed on an intention to treat basis; thus the three limbs not completing the protocol were included in the analysis. Of the 53 patients, 50 completed the protocol. At 1 year the healing rate was FLB 55% and SSB 57% (chi 2 = 0.0, df = 1, P = 1.0). Limbs in the FLB arm of the study sustained one minor complication, whereas SSB limbs sustained four significant complications. Leg volumes reduced significantly after 4 weeks of compression, but subsequent volume changes were insignificant. Ulcer healing rates were not influenced by the presence of deep venous reflux, post-thrombotic deep vein changes nor by ulcer duration. Although larger ulcers took longer to heal, the overall healing rates for large (> 10 cm2) and small (10 cm2 or less) ulcers were comparable. Four-layer and short stretch bandages were equally efficacious in healing venous ulcers independent of pattern of venous reflux, ulcer area or duration. FLB limbs sustained fewer complications than SSB. PMID:9682649

  19. EFFECTS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND ON MICROCIRCULATION IN VENOUS LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Naumann, Gunther; Scheibe, Armin; Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter; Neugebauer, Reimund

    2011-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic low-frequency ultrasound (US) has been used for many years to improve wound healing in chronic wounds like venous leg ulcers. No human data are available for the possible effects of single US applications on microcirculation and their frequency-dependency. Aims: To investigated the role of therapeutic low-frequency US on microcirculation of venous leg ulcers in vivo. Patients and Methods: This is a pilot study on an inpatient basis. We use a newly developed low-frequency continuous-wave US-equipment composed of a US transducer based on piezo-fiber composites that allow the change of frequency. In this study, we apply US of 34 kHz, 53.5 kHz, and 75 kHz respectively. Twelve patients with chronic venous leg ulcers are analyzed. As an adjunct to good ulcer care, therapeutic US is applied, non-contacting, once a day, in a subaqual position for 10 minutes. Microcirculation is assessed in the ulcers adjacent to skin before US-therapy, immediately after the treatment and 30 minutes later. We use a micro-light guide spectrophotometer (O2C, LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Gieίen, Germany) for calculation of blood flow velocity, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SCO2) and relative hemoglobin concentration (rHb) in 2 and 8 mm depth. Contact-free remission spectroscopy (SkinREM3, Color Control Chemnitz GmbH, Chemnitz, Germany) allows contact free measurements in the VIS-NIR range of the spectrum (400 ± 1600 nm). Results: It is seen that therapeutic US is well tolerated. One patient dropped out from a treatment series since he developed erysipelas responding to standard antibiotic. Effects were seen at 34 kHz only. The SO2 values increased after single US application. The values for rHb were higher in the superficial layer of the wound bed (depth 2 mm) compared to deeper parts (8 mm depth). US treatment did not result in significant changes of rHb and blood cell velocity. The data obtained by remission spectroscopy disclose an increase of oxygenized hemoglobin

  20. Well leg compartment syndrome after surgery for ulcerative colitis in the lithotomy position: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is an uncommon and severe complication that occurs after colorectal surgery in the lithotomy position. Presentation of case The current patient was a 28-year-old male suffering from ulcerative colitis. He was underwent elective proctectomy, including ileal J pouch formation and anal anastomosis with temporary loop ileostomy. The ileoanal pouch procedure was quite difficult, and during this procedure, the high lithotomy and head down tilt positions were continued for 255 min. After the operation, the patient complained of severe cramping pain, swelling and serious tenderness on palpation in both legs. On the first postoperative day, the patient's complaints gradually worsened. The intra-compartmental pressure was measured, and WLCS was diagnosed. Emergency bilateral fasciotomy was performed. Initially, the patient had a sensory deficit and analgesia, however, his sensory disturbance and pain had almost recovered two months after fasciotomy by rehabilitation. Discussion In the current case, the important factors associated with the development of WLCS are thought to be a prolonged operative time in which the patient is placed in the high lithotomy position during ileoanal pouch procedure. Conclusion We would thus like to emphasize that operations for the ileoanal pouch procedure to treat ulcerative colitis have a high potential for inducing WLCS, because it usually requires a prolonged operative time in which the patient remains in the high lithotomy position. PMID:27085103

  1. EMLA and Lidocaine Spray: A Comparison for Surgical Debridement in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Roberto; D'Aniello, Carlo; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe; Botteri, Gaia; Zerini, Irene; Brandi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study the author proposes to compare eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) and an odontoiatric spray solution of 10% Lidocaine (Ecocain) for surgical debridement in venous leg ulcers. Approach: Fifty patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups (A, B). All of them have venous leg ulcer in the medial and/or lateral malleolar region. Group A: topical anesthetic EMLA with film occlusion. Group B: topical anesthesia with Ecocain. The author proceeded to surgical debridement after local anesthesia. A questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to assess the amount of pain felt during the debridement and during the following 6 h. Results: The analysis of the VAS revealed no major significant differences statistically. The analysis of the questionnaires showed patients treated with Ecocain took more analgesic drugs. Analysis of the timing and quality of procedure showed that Ecocain reduced the timing of debridement and dressing change, improving the outpatient management and patient compliance. Innovations: For rapid debridement, the most appropriate is to use Ecocain. Conclusion: Methods of local anesthesia are multiple and must be identified according to the needs of the patient and the surgeon trying to get the best anesthesia with minimal use of time and resources. PMID:26029486

  2. Using horsechestnut seed extract in the treatment of venous leg ulcers: a cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Leach, Matthew J; Pincombe, Jan; Foster, Gigi

    2006-04-01

    Venous leg ulcers affect approximately 0.6% of the western population, consuming millions of healthcare dollars every year. To determine whether an alternative venous ulcer treatment using horsechestnut seed extract-- Aesculus hippocastanum-- and conventional therapy involving dressings and compression was more cost-effective than using conventional therapy alone, a 12-week cost-benefit analysis of horsechestnut seed extract therapy was conducted. The study, using data from a 12-week prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted in South Australia in 2002-2004, involved 54 patients with venous ulceration who received treatment through a large South Australian district nursing service. Taking into account the cost of horsechestnut seed extract, dressing materials, travel, staff salaries, and infrastructure for each patient, horsechestnut seed extract therapy combined with conventional therapy was found to be more cost-effective than conventional therapy alone with an average savings of AUD 95 in organizational costs and AUD 10 in dressing materials per patient. This study confirms that dressing change frequency has a significant impact on the total cost of wound care and suggests that district nursing service operation efficiency may be enhanced through the use of horsechestnut seed extract as a result of less frequent nursing visits. Further study of this treatment modality is warranted. PMID:16636364

  3. Therapeutic effectiveness of a Mimosa tenuiflora cortex extract in venous leg ulceration treatment.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Arce, Erika; Chávez-Soto, Marco Antonio; Herrera-Arellano, Armando; Arzate, Silvia; Agüero, Juan; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Cruz-Guzmán, Angélica; Lozoya, Xavier

    2007-02-12

    The cortex of Mimosa tenuiflora is a popular remedy utilized in Mexico for the treatment of skin lesions. Modern studies support the existence in this cortex of compounds with cicatrizing properties. In the present study the therapeutic effectiveness of an extract elaborated with this bark in the treatment of venous leg ulceration disease was explored. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted with ambulatory patients distributed into two groups, one receiving a hydrogel containing 5% of a crude extract standardized in its tannin concentration (1.8%), while the control group, was administered the same hydrogel but without addition of the extract. In both aseptic washings were performed initially followed by topical application of the corresponding hydrogel and dressing. Follow-up lasted 13 weeks and ulcer healing was determined through measurement of the lesion area by digital-photographic parameters. Therapeutic effectiveness occurred in all patients of the extract group; after the 8th treatment week, ulcer size was reduced by 92% as mean value in this group, whereas therapeutic effectiveness was observed only in one patient of the control group (chi(2), p=0.0001). No side effects were observed in any patient in either group. PMID:17088036

  4. Compression for the management of venous leg ulcers: which material do we have?

    PubMed

    Partsch, Hugo

    2014-05-19

    Compression therapy is the most important basic treatment modality in venous leg ulcers. The review focusses on the materials which are used: 1. Compression bandages, 2. Compression stockings, 3. Self-adjustable Velcro-devices, 4. Compression pumps, 5. Hybrid devices. Compression bandages, usually applied by trained staff, provide a wide spectrum of materials with different elastic properties. To make bandaging easier, safer and more effective, most modern bandages combine different material components. Self-management of venous ulcers has become feasible by introducing double compression stockings ("ulcer kits") and self-adjustable Velcro devices. Compression pumps can be used as adjunctive measures, especially for patients with restricted mobility. The combination of sustained and intermittent compression ("hybrid device") is a promising new tool. The interface pressure corresponding to the dosage of compression therapy determines the hemodynamic efficacy of each device. In order to reduce ambulatory venous hypertension compression pressures of more than 50 mm Hg in the upright position are desirable. At the same time pressure should be lower in the resting position in order to be tolerated. This prerequisite may be fulfilled by using inelastic, short stretch material including multicomponent bandages and cohesive surfaces, all characterized by high stiffness. Such materials do not give way when calf muscles contract during walking which leads to high peaks of interface pressure ("massaging effect"). PMID:24843100

  5. Safety and performance evaluation of a next-generation antimicrobial dressing in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith G; Szczepkowski, Marek; Mikosiński, Jacek; Twardowska-Saucha, Krystyna; Blair, Stephen; Ivins, Nicola M; Saucha, Wojciech; Cains, Jane; Peters, Kim; Parsons, David; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing, a wound dressing containing a combination of anti-biofilm and antimicrobial agents, in the management of chronic wounds. Patients (n = 42) with venous leg ulcers exhibiting signs of clinical infection were treated for 4 weeks with AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing, followed by management with AQUACEL™ wound dressings for 4 weeks. Wound progression, wound size, ulcer pain and clinical evolution of the wound were assessed for up to 8 weeks. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study. AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing had an acceptable safety profile, with only one patient discontinuing from the study, because of a non-treatment-related adverse event. After 8 weeks, substantial wound improvements were observed: 5 patients (11·9%) had healed ulcers and 32 patients (76·2%) showed improvement in ulcer condition. The mean ulcer size had reduced by 54·5%. Patients reported less pain as the study progressed. Notable improvements were observed in patients with ulcers that were considered to require treatment with systemic antibiotics or topical antimicrobials at baseline (n = 10), with a mean 70·2% reduction in wound area. These data indicate that AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing has an acceptable safety profile in the management of venous leg ulcers that may be impeded by biofilm. PMID:26095122

  6. Self-monitoring of lower leg skin temperature: accuracy of self-reported data and adherence to a cooling protocol for the prevention of venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Madisetti, Mohan; Mueller, Martina; Dooley, Mary; Prentice, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background For intervention studies that require the use of participant self-reports, the quality and accuracy of recorded data and variability in participant adherence rates to the treatment can cause significant outcome bias. Purpose To assess the quality and accuracy of participant documentation of daily self-monitoring of leg skin temperature, adherence to a graduated cooling treatment protocol to prevent venous leg ulcers, and the potential for bias in treatment effect in a randomized controlled trial that included a population with chronic venous disease. Methods Individuals were randomized to a leg cooling intervention or placebo treatment group to daily self-monitor and record lower leg skin temperature over a 9-month period on monthly paper study logs. Returned study logs for the first 100 completed participants (n=54 cooling intervention, n=46 control) were reviewed for quality and accuracy. Adherence was determined from evaluating the accuracy of participant documentation. To examine potential outcome bias in treatment effect, mean between group and within group comparisons of the before and after treatment differences were conducted using an intention-to-treat (ITT) versus a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) analysis approach with an 85% accuracy cut-off rate. Data were collected in 2011–2014. Results Of the expected 900 study logs, 91.8% (826/900) were returned and 8.2% (74/900) were not. Non-mutually exclusive main error types in returned documentation included: 59.2% (489/826) white-outs, cross-off and/or overwrites, 34.9% (288/826) entries omitted, 29.4% (243/826) no performance of daily self-monitoring, 28.7% (237/826) no performance of the treatment intervention per the prescribed protocol regime, 26.8% (221/826) extraneous data, 8.6% (71/826) suspected fabrication, and 7.6% (63/826) questionable validity. Under ITT analysis, 38.4% (346/900) of all returned logs were <85% accurate, 25.0% (225/900) were 85%–99% accurate, and 36.6% (329

  7. Non-medical prescribing in nurse-led community leg ulcer clinics.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Julia

    Over the past decade, nurse prescribing in the community has improved clinical care, providing timely access to many products required for patients to receive appropriate treatment. Until recently, nurses who have qualified as nurse prescribers have only been able to prescribe from a limited list of products. Within the leg ulcer clinic environment, the majority of prescriptions written have been related to wound care. This article describes the introduction of extended independent prescribing (now known as non-medical prescribing) and how this type of prescribing has scope for revolutionizing clinical practice in all healthcare settings. There are, however, many contentious issues for clinicians prescribing in this new role, including systems for communication, clinical governance, and attitudes of other professionals. PMID:16835510

  8. Influence of psychosocial factors on coping and living with a venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Peart, Joanna

    2015-06-01

    This clinical focus and literature review describe the effect of psychosocial factors on coping and living with a venous leg ulcer (VLU). The associated stressors of living with a VLU include: pain, loss of self-esteem, and social isolation, with subsequent negative emotions that could potentially lead to anxiety and depression. The ability to cope with a VLU depends upon the individual, with some patients employing negative coping strategies such as denial, depending on the stage of the illness and level of acceptance reached (Husband, 2001; Brown, 2014). Psychosocial interventions by health professionals have been shown to reduce the stress of living with a VLU, to improve a patient's coping ability, and subsequently enhance wound healing. This article highlights the importance of holistic assessment and joint treatment planning, to incorporate patients' psychosocial needs and individual coping methods in order to reduce the associated stress of living with a VLU. PMID:26052991

  9. Diagnosing and managing venous leg ulcers in patients in the community.

    PubMed

    Day, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are a chronic condition affecting between 0.1% and 0.3% of the population in the UK. Healing rates are variable and recurrence rates are high. The diagnosis, assessment, and management of this patient group is primarily carried out in the community. Assessment of this patient group requires skill and competence to ensure a correct diagnosis is made. When carrying out the assessment, it is important to consider the patient's past medical history, medication, and allergies, as well as to record the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), pain level, palpation of pulses, and ankle joint movement, among other aspects of the assessment. VLUs heal with compression therapy, and practitioners should be knowledgeable about the various compression systems available in order to offer patients the most suitable and informed choices. PMID:26639070

  10. Reducing infection in chronic leg ulcers with an activated carbon cloth dressing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nina

    2016-06-23

    Zorflex is a new type of antimicrobial dressing composed of 100% activated carbon cloth. It attracts and binds bacteria to its surface, enabling them to be safely removed at dressing change. It has no reported toxic effects and can be used on either a short-or long-term basis. This article describes 4 case studies in which patients with recalcitrant chronic venous leg ulcers that were prone to recurrent infection were treated with the activated carbon cloth dressing. All of the wounds had failed to respond to antimicrobial dressings containing silver, iodine or polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), and were heavily exuding and painful. In all cases, the signs of infection reduced significantly within 4 weeks, resulting in good patient outcomes. PMID:27345081

  11. Chronic leg ulceration associated with polycythemia vera responding to ruxolitinib (Jakafi(®)).

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; McNish, Sean; Shara, Nawar; Hubley, Katherine J; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Dunning, David M; Attinger, Christopher E; Steinberg, John S

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old white male with bilateral chronic leg ulcers due to polycythemia vera and hydroxyurea therapy who demonstrated dramatic healing of his wounds in response to ruxolitinib (Jakafi(®), Novartis), a novel Janus kinase-1 and -2 inhibitor. This patient's wound had previously been refractory to multiple surgical interventions and immunosuppression. After the initiation of ruxolitinib, the patient underwent successful split-thickness skin grafting, with resultant healing of his wounds. He was stable without prednisone and other immunosuppressant therapy and had healed at 6 months. Ruxolitinib therapy could represent a novel option for patients who develop persistent inflammatory wounds in the setting of polycythemia vera and hydroxyurea therapy. PMID:23953278

  12. Assessing quality of life in patients with chronic leg ulceration using the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter J; McCullagh, Lynn; Moffatt, Christine J

    2003-02-01

    Clinician awareness of the importance of recognizing, assessing, and ultimately addressing the negative impact of chronic wounds on patient quality of life is increasing. One hundred, eighteen (118) patients (average age 78 years) participated in a study to evaluate the use of the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 for assessing the health-related quality of life of patients with chronic leg ulceration. Most patients (104, 88%) were treated at home by community nurses. A medical history was obtained and patients completed the Short Form-36 questionnaire at baseline and after 12 weeks of receiving standard ulcer care. Published normative data were used to ascertain the effect of leg ulcers on health-related quality of life. Short Form-36 responsiveness was determined by comparing baseline and 12-week scores. Results suggest that the questionnaire is reliable for five of eight Short Form-36 domains (alpha > 0.8), with the remainder alpha > 0.7. Compared to age-sex adjusted published normative scores, patients with leg ulcers had significantly lower mean scores in the following domains: role-emotional (d = 28.6, P <0.001), social functioning (d = 22.8, P <0.001), role-functioning (d = 20.8, P <0.001), role-physical (d = 20.7, P <0.001), and bodily pain (d = 12.3, P <0.001). Short Form-36 scores barely changed between baseline and the 12-week assessment, but bodily pain improved in the 31 patients whose ulcers healed during that time (d = 14.6, P = 0.006; SRM = 0.60). Pain did not improve in patients whose ulcers remained open (d = -2.1, P = 0.45). Compared to patients whose ulcers did not heal, patients with healed ulcers experienced greater improvements in the following domains: body pain (d = 16.8, P = 0.003), mental health (d = 9.4, P = 0.013), role-physical (d = 19.7, P = 0.06), role-emotional (d = 17.2, P = 0.12), and vitality (d = 9.0, P = 0.052). The results of this study suggest that leg ulcers reduce patient quality of life and that the Short Form-36 can be used

  13. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee Bong; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26798622

  14. A randomized-controlled trial comparing cadexomer iodine and nanocrystalline silver on the healing of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charne N; Newall, Nelly; Kapp, Suzanne E; Lewin, Gill; Karimi, Leila; Carville, Keryln; Gliddon, Terry; Santamaria, Nick M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a debilitating, often painful, and costly condition. Leg ulcer healing may be impaired by bacterial colonization, which, unless effective intervention is instigated, can lead to infection. Although it is generally agreed that an antimicrobial dressing is clinically indicated when a wound becomes critically colonized, there is currently no agreement on what constitutes the best practice in the use of antimicrobials. This research compared the effectiveness of two commonly used antimicrobials: nanocrystalline silver and cadexomer iodine. A randomized-controlled trial was conducted in which 281 community nursing clients with leg ulcers compromised by bacterial burden were randomly assigned to have their wounds treated with either silver or iodine dressings. Sixty-four percent of ulcers healed within 12 weeks. The performance of each of the two antimicrobials was comparable in terms of overall healing rate and the number of wounds healed. However, use of silver compounds was associated with a quicker healing rate during the first 2 weeks of treatment and in wounds that were larger, older, and had more exudate. This trial provides some insights as to circumstances in which one product may be preferred over the other. PMID:20636550

  15. A Comparison of the Efficacy and Cost of Different Venous Leg Ulcer Dressings: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed M. Asim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of simple nonadherent dressings with other more expensive dressing types in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Study Design. Retrospective cohort study. Location. The leg ulcer clinic at the University Hospital of South Manchester. Subjects and Methods. The healing rates of twelve leg ulcer patients treated with simple nonadherent dressings (e.g., NA Ultra) were compared with an equal number of patients treated with modern dressings to determine differences in healing rates and cost. Main Outcome Measures. Rate of healing as determined by reduction in ulcer area over a specified period of time and total cost of dressing per patient. Results. Simple nonadherent dressings had a mean healing rate of 0.353 cm2/week (standard deviation ± 0.319) compared with a mean of 0.415 cm2/week (standard deviation ± 0.383) for more expensive dressings. This resulted in a one-tailed p value of 0.251 and a two-tailed p value of 0.508. Multiple regression analysis gave a significance F of 0.8134. Conclusion. The results indicate that the difference in healing rate between simple and modern dressings is not statistically significant. Therefore, the cost of dressing type should be an important factor influencing dressing selection. PMID:25954532

  16. A comparison of the efficacy and cost of different venous leg ulcer dressings: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Syed M Asim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of simple nonadherent dressings with other more expensive dressing types in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Study Design. Retrospective cohort study. Location. The leg ulcer clinic at the University Hospital of South Manchester. Subjects and Methods. The healing rates of twelve leg ulcer patients treated with simple nonadherent dressings (e.g., NA Ultra) were compared with an equal number of patients treated with modern dressings to determine differences in healing rates and cost. Main Outcome Measures. Rate of healing as determined by reduction in ulcer area over a specified period of time and total cost of dressing per patient. Results. Simple nonadherent dressings had a mean healing rate of 0.353 cm(2)/week (standard deviation ± 0.319) compared with a mean of 0.415 cm(2)/week (standard deviation ± 0.383) for more expensive dressings. This resulted in a one-tailed p value of 0.251 and a two-tailed p value of 0.508. Multiple regression analysis gave a significance F of 0.8134. Conclusion. The results indicate that the difference in healing rate between simple and modern dressings is not statistically significant. Therefore, the cost of dressing type should be an important factor influencing dressing selection. PMID:25954532

  17. Vascular pythiosis in a thalassemic patient presenting as bilateral leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Keoprasom, Nicha; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai; Ruangsetakit, Chanean

    2012-01-01

    Human pythiosis is an emerging disease caused by Pythium insidiosum, a fungus-like aquatic organism. Clinical presentations can be classified into four types: (i) cutaneous/subcutaneous, (ii) ocular, (iii) vascular, and (iv) disseminated pythiosis. Serological tests such as immunodiffusion and immunochromotographic test are useful to make rapid diagnosis in cutaneous and vascular pythiosis. We report a case of 35 year-old male with vascular pythiosis of both legs, diagnosed by serology and molecular techniques. PMID:24432209

  18. Vascular pythiosis in a thalassemic patient presenting as bilateral leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Keoprasom, Nicha; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai; Ruangsetakit, Chanean

    2012-12-01

    Human pythiosis is an emerging disease caused by Pythium insidiosum, a fungus-like aquatic organism. Clinical presentations can be classified into four types: (i) cutaneous/subcutaneous, (ii) ocular, (iii) vascular, and (iv) disseminated pythiosis. Serological tests such as immunodiffusion and immunochromotographic test are useful to make rapid diagnosis in cutaneous and vascular pythiosis. We report a case of 35 year-old male with vascular pythiosis of both legs, diagnosed by serology and molecular techniques. PMID:24432209

  19. [Duodenal ulcers caused by chloroquine-proguanil association].

    PubMed

    Roux, X; Imbert, P; Rivière, F; Méchaï, F; Rapp, C

    2010-12-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil association is recommended for prophylaxis against falciparum malaria in countries with a low prevalence of chloroquine resistance. It is usually well tolerated with mild side effects consisting mainly of transient digestive discomfort and buccal manifestations (mouth sores or ulcers). The purpose of this report is to describe a case of duodenal ulcers presenting as epigastric pain with 10-kg weight-loss in a 32-year-old man taking chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis during a stay in Haiti. No other causes of duodenal ulcers or weight-loss were found. Chloroquine-proguanil prophylaxis was discontinued and replaced by omeprazole for four weeks. Symptoms improved quickly and full recovery was observed within one month. To our knowledge, the occurrence of duodenal ulcers under chloroquine-proguanil association is quite rare, but possibly severe. Upper digestive endoscopy should be performed if a patient under chloroquine-proguanil develops abdominal pain especially in association with weight-loss. If endoscopy reveals duodenal ulcers, chloroquine-proguanil should be discontinued and replaced by another prophylactic regimen. PMID:21520638

  20. A chronic leg ulcer presenting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and type 2 diabetes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haitao; You, Chuangang; Han, Chunmao

    2013-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is characterized by hereditary sensorimotor polyneuropathy with foot deformity, sensorineural hearing loss, moderate developmental delay, and gait disturbance. CMT presenting with type 2 diabetes and an ulcer has not been reported. This article reports a man who presented with the symptoms mentioned above and also with a leg ulcer and type 2 diabetes. He was diagnosed with CMT disease based on family history and genetic testing. A skin defect in the left leg had manifested for more than 1 year, and results of initial fasting plasma glucose revealed type 2 diabetes. The evolution of these manifestations, coupled with a slowly progressive weakness, numbness, muscular wasting, and sensory impairment, strongly suggested the co-occurrence of 3 different diseases in the same individual. PMID:23446367

  1. Comparing the efficacies of alginate, foam, hydrocolloid, hydrofiber, and hydrogel dressings in the management of diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis examining how to dress for success.

    PubMed

    Saco, Michael; Howe, Nicole; Nathoo, Rajiv; Cherpelis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers are chronic wounds frequently encountered by dermatologists. Choosing appropriate wound dressings can effectively promote wound healing and potentially reduce morbidity and financial burden experienced by patients. The objective of our systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate wound healing efficacies of synthetic active dressings in diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer management. For data collection, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and clinicaltrials.gov online databases were searched from database inception to 10 May 2015. Fixed and random effects modeling were used to calculate pooled risk ratios for complete ulcer healing from pairwise dressing comparisons. The results of our review showed moderate-quality level evidence that hydrogels were more effective in healing diabetic foot ulcers than basic wound contact dressings (RR 1.80 [95% CI, 1.27-2.56]). The other dressing comparisons showed no statistically significant differences between the interventions examined in terms of achieving complete diabetic foot ulcer healing. Non-adherent dressings were more cost-effective than hydrofiber dressings for diabetic foot ulcers in terms of mean total cost per patient of the dressings themselves. All venous leg ulcer pairwise dressing comparisons showed equivalent dressing efficacies in terms of promoting complete ulcer healing. Overall, most synthetic active dressings and traditional wound dressings are equally efficacious in treating diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, hydrogels are more efficacious than basic wound contact dressings, and non-adherent dressings are more cost-effective than hydrofiber dressings. Ultimately, dressing choice should be tailored to the wound and the patient. PMID:27617934

  2. Nutritional profile of older adults with chronic venous leg ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jodi C; Kemmner, Kaitlyn G; Rusnak, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional descriptive pilot study was to describe daily intake of select nutrients important for efficient wound healing and general health in a sample of older adults (64.25 ± 9.49 years of age) with chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs; N = 12), compared to recommended dietary allowances (RDA). Anthropometric data were also collected. Compared to RDA, participants on average consumed lower vitamin C (60.03 ± 49.73 mg/d) and higher sodium (3197.07 ± 1455.04 mg/d), sugar (181.21 ± 115.45 g/d), and saturated fat (33.75 ± 1.06 g/d). They also demonstrated a relatively high plasma n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio, a biomarker of inflammation (11.25 ± 1.99). The mean body mass index indicated extreme obesity (41.48 ± 11.47). A multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes routine dietary assessments followed by tailored dietary interventions may improve wound healing and long-term health outcomes in this population. PMID:26141998

  3. The venous leg ulcer quality of life (VLU-QoL) questionnaire: development and psychometric validation.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Asha; Doll, Helen; Wild, Diane J; Moffatt, Christine J; Musgrove, Elaine; Wheatley, Carolyn; Franks, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    To develop and validate a disease-specific quality of life (QoL) measure, based on the conceptual model of the SKINDEX-29 for patients with a chronic venous leg ulcer (VLU), in-depth interviews, and focus groups of patients (n=36) with VLU were used to generate VLU-specific items. These items were added to selected SKINDEX-29 items that were adapted for use in VLU. Further samples of VLU patients were used for item reduction (n=124) and to assess the psychometric properties of the new tool (n=120). The final VLU-QoL contained 34 items: 17 items adapted from the SKINDEX-29 and 17 VLU-specific items. Factor analysis of the items confirmed the existence of three hypothesized domains: Activities (12 items), Psychological (12 items), and Symptom Distress (10 items). Reliability in terms of internal consistency and test-retest reliability was found to be good. The measure was also found to be valid and responsive to clinical change. The VLU-QoL has good psychometric properties. The instrument's sensitivity to differences in clinical outcome and responsiveness to change in clinical parameters makes it a useful tool to assess the outcomes of treatment from the patients' perspective. PMID:17650089

  4. Decreased Hematocrit-To-Viscosity Ratio and Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase Level in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia and Recurrent Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+) - but with no leg ulcers at the time of the study – were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role. PMID:24223994

  5. Blood Viscosity and the Expression of Inflammatory and Adhesion Markers in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease Subjects with Chronic Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andre S.; Reid, Harvey L.; Greenidge, Andre; Landis, Clive; Reid, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine differences in TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, sICAM-1 concentrations, leg hypoxia and whole blood viscosity (WBV) at shear rates of 46 sec-1 and 230 sec-1 in persons with homozygous S sickle cell disease (SCD) with and without chronic leg ulceration and in AA genotype controls. Design & Methods: fifty-five age-matched participants were recruited into the study: 31 SS subjects without leg ulcers (SSn), 24 SS subjects with leg ulcers (SSu) and 18 AA controls. Haematological indices were measured using an AC.Tron Coulter Counter. Quantification of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and adhesion molecules was performed by ELISA. Measurement of whole blood viscosity was done using a Wells Brookfield cone-plate viscometer. Quantification of microvascular tissue oxygenation was done by Visible Lightguide spectrophotometry. Results TNF-α and whole blood viscosity at 46 sec-1 and 230 sec-1 (1.75, 2.02 vs. 0.83, 1.26, p<0.05) were significantly greater in sickle cell disease subjects than in controls. There were no differences in plasma concentration of sICAM-1, IL-1β and IL-10 between SCD subjects and controls. IL-1β (median, IQR: 0.96, 1.7 vs. 0, 0.87; p<0.01) and sICAM-1 (226.5, 156.48 vs. 107.63, 121.5, p<0.005) were significantly greater in SSu group compared with SSn. However there were no differences in TNF-α (2, 3.98 vs. 0, 2.66) and IL-10 (13.34, 5.95 vs. 11.92, 2.99) concentrations between SSu and SSn. WBV in the SSu group at 46 sec-1 and at 230 Sec 1 were 1.9 (95%CI; 1.2, 3.1) and 2.3 (1.2, 4.4) times greater than in the SSn group. There were no differences in the degree of tissue hypoxia as determined by lightguide spectrophotometry. Conclusion Inflammatory, adhesion markers and WBV may be associated with leg ulceration in sickle cell disease by way of inflammation-mediated vasoocclusion/vasoconstriction. Impaired skin oxygenation does not appear to be associated with chronic ulcers in these subjects with sickle cell disease. PMID:23922670

  6. Treatment of intractable skin ulcers caused by vascular insufficiency with allogeneic cultured dermal substitute: a report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomonori; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kenichi; Katsuoka, Kensei; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chronic leg ulcers have various causes and can be difficult to treat, although topical treatments, including basic fibroblast growth factor and PGE1, have been used. We applied an allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) to eight patients with intractable ulcers. The patients had various underlying diseases, including diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, necrobiosis lipoidica, stasis dermatitis, livedo vasculopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. The CDS was prepared by seeding cultured human fibroblasts on a spongy matrix consisting of hyaluronic acid and atelocollagen. Good clinical results were achieved, as demonstrated by reepithelization, healthy granulation tissue formation, and a subsequent decrease in wound size. Daily dressing changes became unnecessary when the allogeneic CDS was used. Based on these results, we suggest that CDS may be useful for the treatment of intractable skin ulcers. PMID:21861088

  7. Association Between Microbial Bioburden and Healing Outcomes in Venous Leg Ulcers: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Marie S.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are susceptible to microbial invasion, and serious complications can result without the timely control of infection. Diagnosis of wound infection is primarily based on subjective clinical characteristics and patient-reported symptoms, and the treatment with antimicrobials has not consistently shown improvement in healing outcomes. This is a review of studies using bacterial cultures and/or new molecular-based methods associating microbial bioburden with healing outcomes in VLU patients, with the goal of guiding future studies to better determine significant patterns of microbial involvement in chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Studies reviewed here use cultivation-based identification of bacteria and next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to gain insight into microbial bioburden in VLUs. Further application of sophisticated DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analyses has the potential to revolutionize our ability to further discern, with high resolution, complex microbial communities in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Few previous studies of microbial bioburden in VLUs have incorporated the knowledge of clinical treatments, which includes close monitoring of patients' symptoms and responses to therapy. Thus, wound care practitioners are currently without evidence-based guidance for the diagnosis and treatment of wound infections. Future Directions: Clinically relevant breakthroughs are possible by combining advanced microbial detection techniques with improved study designs that reflect clinical practices. Well-designed longitudinal studies have great potential to lead to better evidence-based diagnosis of chronic wounds. A greater understanding of microbial bioburden in chronic wounds is likely to lead to better therapies that speed healing and prevent wound infection without risking the development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25566410

  8. Root Cause Analysis of Gastroduodenal Ulceration After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Banerjee, Subhas; Louie, John D.; Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H. K.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Ennen, Rebecca E.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionA root cause analysis was performed on the occurrence of gastroduodenal ulceration after hepatic radioembolization (RE). We aimed to identify the risk factors in the treated population and to determine the specific mechanism of nontarget RE in individual cases. Methods: The records of 247 consecutive patients treated with yttrium-90 RE for primary (n = 90) or metastatic (n = 157) liver cancer using either resin (n = 181) or glass (n = 66) microspheres were reviewed. All patients who developed a biopsy-proven microsphere-induced gastroduodenal ulcer were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on baseline parameters and procedural data to determine possible risk factors in the total population. Individual cases were analyzed to ascertain the specific cause, including identification of the culprit vessel(s) leading to extrahepatic deposition of the microspheres. Results: Eight patients (3.2 %) developed a gastroduodenal ulcer. Stasis during injection was the strongest independent risk factor (p = 0.004), followed by distal origin of the gastroduodenal artery (p = 0.004), young age (p = 0.040), and proximal injection of the microspheres (p = 0.043). Prolonged administrations, pain during administration, whole liver treatment, and use of resin microspheres also showed interrelated trends in multivariate analysis. Retrospective review of intraprocedural and postprocedural imaging showed a probable or possible culprit vessel, each a tiny complex collateral vessel, in seven patients. Conclusion: Proximal administrations and those resulting in stasis of flow presented increased risk for gastroduodenal ulceration. Patients who had undergone bevacizumab therapy were at high risk for developing stasis.

  9. Clinical efficacy of a silver-releasing foam dressing in venous leg ulcer healing: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Senet, Patricia; Bause, Renzo; Jørgensen, Bo; Fogh, Karsten

    2014-12-01

    Biatain and Biatain-Ag are two identical wound dressings except the fact that Biatain-Ag releases silver. In the present multinational double-blinded randomised controlled trial the effect of the two dressings were compared for treatment of venous leg ulcers. A total of 181 patients were treated for 6 weeks with either Biatain or Biatain-Ag followed by 4 weeks treatment with Biatain. Biatain-Ag showed superior performance in relative wound area reduction after 6 weeks treatment and the estimated treatment difference increased after 10 weeks indicating that the effect of silver continues at least for 4 weeks after treatment. A subgroup of the patients differed significantly from the others with respect to parameters associated with a poor healing prognosis; patients were older, had significant history of venous thrombosis, larger ulcers with longer duration and more often recurrent. For this subgroup of patients Biatain-Ag showed significant (P < 0·05) better performance in terms of relative ulcer area reduction and healing rate. In conclusion, this study suggests the superior performance of Biatain-Ag compared with the non silver-releasing dressing Biatain in particular for patients having ulcers associated with a poor healing prognosis. PMID:23374589

  10. Leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tsagaris, Katina C; Attinger, Christopher E

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a young man with type II diabetes, stage III chronic kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes who presented to the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing with refractory lower extremity ulcers. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed a genetic variant of Klinefelter's syndrome (48 XXYY). Lower extremity ulceration is a recognised complication of Klinefelter's syndrome. The pathogenesis of ulcers in this endocrinopathy is unclear, but associations with abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states are reported. This case emphasises the importance of considering Klinefelter's syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a sterile male patient with non healing lower extremity ulcers. PMID:21854549

  11. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, TAM tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands is upregulated in venous leg ulcer patients: a novel insight into chronic wound immunity.

    PubMed

    Filkor, Kata; Németh, Tibor; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva; Urbán, Edit; Kemény, Lajos; Szolnoky, Győző

    2016-08-01

    The systemic host defence mechanisms, especially innate immunity, in venous leg ulcer patients are poorly investigated. The aim of the current study was to measure Candida albicans killing activity and gene expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and innate immune response regulators, TAM receptors and ligands of peripheral blood mononuclear cells separated from 69 venous leg ulcer patients and 42 control probands. Leg ulcer patients were stratified into responder and non-responder groups on the basis of wound healing properties. No statistical differences were found in Candida killing among controls, responders and non-responders. Circulating blood mononuclear cells of patients overexpress pro-inflammatory (IL-1α, TNFα, CXCL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines as well as TAM receptors (Tyro, Axl, MerTK) and their ligands Gas6 and Protein S compared with those of control individuals. IL-1α is notably overexpressed in venous leg ulcer treatment non-responders; in contrast, Axl gene expression is robustly stronger among responders. These markers may be considered as candidates for the prediction of treatment response among venous leg ulcer patients. PMID:26192232

  12. Continuity through best practice: design and implementation of a nurse-led community leg-ulcer service.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Karen

    2004-06-01

    The design of the new service was intended to facilitate continuity. The results after the first year of the new service revealed that care was both more effective and more efficient for all types of leg ulcers (Harrison, Graham, Friedberg, & Lorimer, 2003). Healing rates had dramatically improved, the frequency of nursing visits decreased, and supply costs declined. With the new service, comprehensive standardized assessments are made at baseline on all new admissions for home leg-ulcer care, and reassessments are regularly scheduled if the condition does not improve. With the evidence-based protocol, all providers and sectors of care are "working from the same script." Specific information is obtained on the client's health history, leg-ulcer history, preferences, and social context. Continuity is further facilitated through implementation of the primary nurse model, whereby one provider is responsible for developing the care plan and for subsequent evaluation and revision. Management continuity is advanced through health-care reorganization, with the development of an expert, dedicated nursing team, a consistent approach to training and skill development, improved coordination, an interdisciplinary approach for referral and consultation, and continuous quality improvement measures for education and practice audit. A number of strategies tailored to the new service have been highly effective. Strategic alliances among the researchers, home-care authority, nursing agency, nurses, and physicians are essential to the success of both design and implementation. Ongoing interdisciplinary and intersectoral communication expedites the referral process and helps to resolve issues as they develop. The majority of physicians have been very supportive of the use of the protocol and the evidence-based service. Surveys of care recipients have been mostly positive. Nurses who have been surveyed concerning the supports to implementation of the evidence-based service have

  13. Vasculitic Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Papi, Massimo; Papi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic ulcers are an emerging problem in wound care that needs to be well defined and adequately approached by caregivers. Cutaneous vasculitis includes several inflammatory disorders that compromise microvessels and specifically the cutaneous vascular system: arterioles, capillaries, postcapillary venules. The pathogenetic role of circulating immunocomplexes and autoantibodies (antineutrophil antibodies) in these diseases has been widely demonstrated in animal models and in humans. Vasculitis can be limited to the skin or represent the cutaneous signs in case of systemic vasculitis with visceral involvement. The injury of cutaneous microvessels may result in impairment of blood flow and consequent focal ischemia and formation of skin ulcers. The ulcers are often multiple and localized on the lower leg and foot where the microcirculatory anatomy and rheologic dynamics are predisposing factors. Approximately 3% to 5% of skin ulcers may be caused by a vasculitic disorder. PMID:26657344

  14. Factors that influence healing of chronic venous leg ulcers: a retrospective cohort*

    PubMed Central

    Scotton, Marilia Formentini; Miot, Hélio Amante; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous ulcers have a significant impact on patient quality of life, and constitute a worldwide public health problem. Treatment is complex, with high failure rates. OBJECTIVES To identify clinical and therapeutic factors that influence healing of venous ulcers. METHODS Retrospective cohort study of patients with venous ulcers. Ulcer area was measured at the first visit (T0) and after 6 months (T6) and 1 year (T12). A reduction in ulcer area of 50% or more at T6 and T12 was the outcome of interest, weighted by clinical, demographic and treatment aspects. RESULTS Ninety-four patients were included (137 ulcers). A reduction in ulcer area of 50% or more was seen in 40.1% of patients (95%CI 31.9 to 48.4%) at T6 and 49.6% (95%CI 41.2 to 58.1%) at T12. Complete healing occurred in 16.8% (95%CI 10.5 to 23.1%) at T6 and 27% (95%CI 19.5 to 39.5%) at T12. The lowest ulcer area reductions at T6 were associated with longstanding ulcer (RR=0.95; 95%CI 0.91 to 0.98), poor adherence to compression therapy (RR=4.04; 95%CI 1.31 to 12.41), and infection episodes (RR= 0.42; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.76). At T12, lower reductions were associated with longstanding ulcer (RR=0.95; 95%CI 0.92 to 0.98), longer topical antibiotic use (RR=0.93; 95%CI 0.87 to 0.99), and systemic antibiotic use (RR=0.63; 95%CI 0.40 to 0.99). CONCLUSIONS Longstanding ulcer, infection, poor adherence to compression therapy, and longer topical and systemic antibiotic use were independently correlated with worse healing rates. PMID:24937814

  15. Cascade® Autologous System Platelet-Rich Fibrin Matrix in the Treatment of Chronic Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Sean M.; Hessler, Karen; Dardik, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Problem Lower extremity ulcers (venous, diabetic) are often unresponsive to standard treatment. Various systemic and local cellular, vascular, and anatomical factors can result in nonhealing wounds that are refractory to normal healing processes and standard care. Solution Several published wound care guidelines strongly suggest that if an ulcer does not respond to standard good wound care within 4 weeks, then advanced wound therapies should be considered. These advanced therapies include wound bed preparation agents (negative wound pressure therapy, hyperbaric oxygen), recombinant growth factors, or bioengineered cell therapies. New Technology The Cascade® system produces platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), a novel autologous sterile biologic, produced at the bedside from a small volume (18 mL) of the patient's own blood by using Vacutainer® separation technology optimized for fibrin and platelet isolation. Prepared as an easy to apply, suturable membrane, without the use of exogenous thrombin, PRFM consists of a dense cross-linked fibrin lattice containing intact, viable platelets with their full complement of platelet-derived growth factors. Indications for Use From the FDA 510(k) clearance: The Cascade system “is designed to be used for the safe and rapid preparation of autologous platelet-rich plasma from a small sample of blood at the patient point of care.” PRFM has been used to successfully treat severe venous leg ulcer (VLU), neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), mixed arterial and Charcot-deformity associated foot ulcers. Cautions When treating venous or DFUs, the Cascade system should be used together with standard wound care practice (therapeutic compression for VLU and weight off-loading, debridement, and infection control for DFU) in patients with an adequate blood supply to the lower limb. PMID:24527280

  16. Restless Legs

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) causes a powerful urge to move your legs. Your legs become uncomfortable when you are lying down or sitting. ... your legs feel better, but not for long. RLS can make it hard to fall asleep and ...

  17. A retrospective, quality improvement review of maggot debridement therapy outcomes in a foot and leg ulcer clinic.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Noreen; Campbell, Donna

    2014-07-01

    Maggot debridement is the deliberate use of larvae known to consume only necrotic tissue. A retrospective quality improvement analysis of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) was conducted among patients with devitalized tissue or gangrene attending a Canadian foot and leg ulcer clinic who received MDT between January 2001 and June 2006. MDT was applied every 48 hours until >90% of necrotic tissue was debrided. The authors identified MDT patients in the clinic database and reviewed their medical records for age, gender, presence of diabetes or peripheral arterial disease (PAD), type of wound, number of maggot applications required, wound outcomes, and nursing visit costs (week before, during, and after MDT) and noted patient experiences. Records of 68 patients (average age 71, range 22 to 95, years) were identified and abstracted. Of those, 44% had leg ulcers and 67% had both diabetes and PAD. The majority (39, 58%) of wounds required three debridement sessions. All but one patient achieved debridement of >90% of necrotic tissue in 2 to 10 days. Most wounds (56) healed with follow-up moist wound care. Only one patient withdrew from MDT. No other patient or safety concerns were documented. Total nursing visits for all patients the week before and then after MDT were 307 and 102, respectively. These findings confirm results of previous reports about the effectiveness of MDT for wound debridement. Randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MDT compared to other debridement modalities. PMID:25019246

  18. /sup 201/Tl perfusion study of ''ischemic'' ulcers of the leg: prognostic ability compared with Doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Kwong, P.; Sakimura, I.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium 201 perfusion analysis was compared with Doppler ultrasound as a means of determining the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer of the leg in 27 patients. The degree of hyperemia was determined by comparative point counting of the 201Tl distribution in and about the ulcer. Using established Doppler criteria and a hyperemia ratio greater than 1.5:1, ultrasound alone correctly predicted healing in 15 out of 23 cases and 201Tl in 20 out of 23. Ultrasound correctly predicted non-healing in 3 out of 6 cases, compared with 5 out of 6 for 201Tl. The positive predictive value of the 201Tl study was 63%, versus 27% for ultrasound, and the negative predictive value was 95% for 201Tl and 83% for ultrasound. The accuracy of 201Tl and ultrasound was 86% and 62%, respectively. This limited study suggests that 201Tl perfusion scanning is a useful noninvasive test of ulcer healing potential and may be more sensitive than Doppler ultrasound.

  19. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries. PMID:23170845

  20. US skin disease assessment: ulcer and wound care.

    PubMed

    Markova, Alina; Mostow, Eliot N

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ulcers are a growing cause of patient morbidity and contribute significantly to the cost of health care in the United States. The most common etiologies of chronic ulcers include venous leg ulcers (VLUs), pressure ulcers (PrUs), diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers (DFUs), and leg ulcers of arterial insufficiency. Chronic wounds account for an estimated $6 to $15 billion annually in US health care costs; however, it is difficult to get accurate measurements on this, because these patients are often seen in a variety of settings or simply fail to access the health care system. PMID:22117872

  1. [Treatment of venous leg ulcers is costly for the health care and the society. The value of preventive measures should be further investigated according to a study].

    PubMed

    Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Hjelmgren, Jonas

    Annual costs for the treatment of venous leg ulcers in Sweden have been estimated at between SEK 17,000 and SEK 26,500 per patient in 2002 prices. The calculation was based on a model simulation including data from a follow-up of patients in clinical practice, an expert panel, and published literature. The variation in costs depends on ulcer size and ulcer duration when treatment is initiated. The highest costs were estimated for a group of patients with ulcers 10 cm2 or larger and ulcer duration of 6 months or longer. About 50 per cent of the total annual costs were related to staff costs for dressing changes. PMID:16294525

  2. A case report of the eradication of pseudomonas aeruginosa from leg ulcer in a patient with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Catavitello, Chiara; Bianco, Azaira; Balbinot, Andrea; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2009-06-01

    A patient treated with hydroxyurea had a lower extremity ulcer that was found infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Drug discontinuation and ceftazidime treatment did not initially lead to resolution due to misidentification of inducible betalactamases expressed by the organism and subsequent clinical failure of the cephalosporin in eradicating infection. These class C enzymes may be strongly induced after betalactam exposure and confer resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, betalactamase inhibitors but not to carbapenems. Though hydroxyurea represents a major cause of essential thrombocythemia-related ulcers, lesion infections by difficult-to-treat organisms should be eradicated to promote wound healing. PMID:19443901

  3. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000744.htm Venous ulcers - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... slow to heal. Alternative names Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis leg ...

  4. Targeting Cx43 and N-Cadherin, Which Are Abnormally Upregulated in Venous Leg Ulcers, Influences Migration, Adhesion and Activation of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Naranjo, Ariadna; Cormie, Peter; Serrano, Antonio E.; Hu, Rebecca; O'Neill, Shay; Wang, Chiuhui Mary; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Power, Kieran T.; White, Alexis; Serena, Thomas; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; Becker, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Venous leg ulcers can be very hard to heal and represent a significant medical need with no effective therapeutic treatment currently available. Principal Findings In wound edge biopsies from human venous leg ulcers we found a striking upregulation of dermal N-cadherin, Zonula Occludens-1 and the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43) compared to intact skin, and in stark contrast to the down-regulation of Cx43 expression seen in acute, healing wounds. We targeted the expression of these proteins in 3T3 fibroblasts to evaluate their role in venous leg ulcers healing. Knockdown of Cx43 and N-cadherin, but not Zonula Occludens-1, accelerated cell migration in a scratch wound-healing assay. Reducing Cx43 increased Golgi reorientation, whilst decreasing cell adhesion and proliferation. Furthermore, Connexin43 and N-cadherin knockdown led to profound effects on fibroblast cytoskeletal dynamics after scratch-wounding. The cells exhibited longer lamelipodial protrusions lacking the F-actin belt seen at the leading edge in wounded control cells. This phenotype was accompanied by augmented activation of Rac-1 and RhoA GTPases, as revealed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and pull down experiments. Conclusions Cx43 and N-cadherin are potential therapeutic targets in the promotion of healing of venous leg ulcers, by acting at least in part through distinct contributions of cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:22615994

  5. Analysis of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of leg ulcer bacterial flora in patients hospitalized at Dermatology Department, Poznań University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmudzińska, Maria; Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Silny, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Effective treatment of frequently infected, poorly healing wounds such as leg ulcers due to chronic venous insufficiency poses a major clinical problem. Antibiotic resistance in dermatology patients, especially those with non-healing leg ulcers, is a widespread phenomenon. Various antibiotics, mainly broad-spectrum agents, are frequently and sometimes inappropriately prescribed, which often leads to the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains. The aim of this study was to analyze antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of bacterial isolates cultured from leg ulcers. Wound swabs were obtained from patients admitted to Dermatology Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, during the 1998-2002 period. Bacteriologic diagnosis of 175 wound swabs was performed in compliance with compulsory laboratory methods. The analysis yielded 173 positive results, predominated by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to commonly used antibiotics, taking into consideration the presence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Antibiotic resistance profiles were compared between the years 1998 and 2002, with detailed account of clinical characteristics and history of leg ulcers disease. The study pointed to an increasing tendency of antibiotic resistance in the study group of patients. PMID:16146620

  6. Case 10: venous leg ulcer that was significantly impairing quality of life.

    PubMed

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    This heavily exuding, sloughy ulcer was so painful that the patient had difficulty tolerating any physical contact with it. After treatment, pain levels subsided, so that she was better able to tolerate dressing changes, could sleep in her own bed instead of a chair, and started compression therapy. PMID:26949854

  7. The effects of a hydrocolloid dressing on bacterial growth and the healing process of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Annoni, F; Rosina, M; Chiurazzi, D; Ceva, M

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with lower extremity ulcers of different aetiologies, although mainly of venous origin, were treated with an occlusive hydrocolloid dressing twice a week for a maximum period of 12 weeks. No antibacterial chemotherapy was utilized. A culture was taken of the exudate of the ulcer before commencement of treatment and weekly or bi-weekly thereafter. The results showed a mixed flora with prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus. The average duration of the treatment period was 67 +/- 11 days with a total of 26 patients being healed by the end of this period. The average interval between dressing changes was 4.1 days. Subsequent bacterial cultures showed a persistence of the original flora, but there was no correlation between the type of flora present and clinical evidence of infection or between the type of flora present and the rate of healing of the ulcer. Clinical evaluation of the results obtained with the hydrocolloid dressing was favourable in respect to reduced risk of contamination of the ulcer, lower pain perception and less trauma to the granulation tissue during dressing changes. PMID:2634718

  8. Leg ulcer as a complication of a posttraumatic tibial arteriovenous fistula treated by endovascular approach with stent-graft placement.

    PubMed

    Rabellino, Martín; Shinzato, Sergio; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Peralta, Oscar; Marenchino, Ricardo; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Endovascular treatment of posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) in the lower extremities by means of covered stent-grafts is widely accepted, and many cases have been reported in the iliac-femoral region. However, few reports exist on the treatment of infrapopliteal AVFs, with or without a pseudoaneurysm, using this method. The authors present this case report dealing with a patient who had undergone a tibial and peroneal open fracture in his left limb 34 years ago. He developed a leg ulcer as a consequence of AVF between the tibialis posterior artery and vein, which resulted in venous insufficiency, which was treated by the endovascular approach with the placement of a stent-graft. Total healing was achieved over a period of 3 months. Angio-CT was performed, showing stent-graft patency 6 months after the endovascular procedure. PMID:22843636

  9. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for adults with venous leg ulcers: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise and adequate self-management capacity may be important strategies in the management of venous leg ulcers. However, it remains unclear if exercise improves the healing rates of venous leg ulcers and if a self-management exercise program based on self-efficacy theory is well adhered to. Method/design This is a randomised controlled in adults with venous leg ulcers to determine the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention. Participants with venous leg ulcers are recruited from 3 clinical sites in Australia. After collection of baseline data, participants are randomised to either an intervention group or control group. The control group receive usual care, as recommended by evidence based guidelines. The intervention group receive an individualised program of calf muscle exercises and walking. The twelve week exercise program integrates multiple elements, including up to six telephone delivered behavioural coaching and goal setting sessions, supported by written materials, a pedometer and two follow-up booster calls if required. Participants are encouraged to seek social support among their friends, self-monitor their weekly steps and lower limb exercises. The control group are supported by a generic information sheet that the intervention group also receive encouraging lower limb exercises, a pedometer for self-management and phone calls at the same time points as the intervention group. The primary outcome is the healing rates of venous leg ulcers which are assessed at fortnightly clinic appointments. Secondary outcomes, assessed at baseline and 12 weeks: functional ability (range of ankle motion and Tinetti gait and balance score), quality of life and self-management scores. Discussion This study seeks to address a significant gap in current wound management practice by providing evidence for the effectiveness of a home-based exercise program for adults with venous leg ulcers. Theory-driven, evidence-based strategies that can

  10. Cost-effectiveness of treating vascular leg ulcers with UrgoStart(®) and UrgoCell(®) Contact.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Matthias; Herberger, Katharina; Kroeger, Knut; Muenter, Karl C; Goepel, Lisa; Rychlik, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    Although chronic wounds have a high socio-economic impact, data on comparative effectiveness of treatments are rare. UrgoStart(®) is a hydroactive dressing containing a nano-oligosaccharide factor (NOSF). This study aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of this NOSF-containing wound dressing in vascular leg ulcers compared with a similar neutral foam dressing (UrgoCell(®) Contact) without NOSF. Cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the German statutory health care system was performed using a decision tree model for a period of 8 weeks. Cost and outcome data were derived from the clinical study 'Challenge' suggesting a response rate (≥40% wound size reduction) of UrgoStart(®) of 65·6% versus 39·4% for the comparator. In the treatment model, effect-adjusted costs of €849·86 were generated after 8 weeks for treatment with UrgoStart(®) versus €1335·51 for the comparator resulting in an effect-adjusted cost advantage of €485·64 for UrgoStart(®) . In linear sensitivity analyses, the outcomes were stable for varying assumptions on prices and response rates. In an 8-week period of treatment for vascular leg ulcers, UrgoStart(®) shows superior cost-effectiveness when compared with the similar neutral foam dressing without any active component (NOSF). As demonstrated within a randomised, double-blind clinical trial, UrgoStart(®) is also more effective in wound area reduction than the neutral foam dressing. Wound healing was not addressed in this clinical trial. Follow-up data of 12 months to allow for reulceration assessment were not generated. PMID:24618370

  11. Recruitment rates and reasons for community physicians' non-participation in an interdisciplinary intervention study on leg ulceration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This article describes the challenges a research team experienced recruiting physicians within a randomised controlled trial about leg ulcer care that seeks to foster the cooperation between the medical and nursing professions. Community-based physicians in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, were recruited for an interdisciplinary intervention designed to enhance leg ulcer patients' self-care agency. The aim of this article is to investigate the success of different recruitment strategies employed and reasons for physicians' non-participation. Methods The first recruitment phase stressed the recruitment of GPs, the second the recruitment of specialists. Throughout the recruitment process data were collected through phone conversations with GP practices who indicated reasons for non-participation. Results Despite great efforts to recruit physicians, the recruitment rate reached only 26 out of 1549 contacted practices (1.7%) and 12 out of 273 (4.4%) practices during the first and second recruitment phase respectively. The overall recruitment rate over the 16-month recruitment period was 2%. With a target recruitment rate of n = 300, only 45 patients were enrolled in the study, not meeting study projections. Various reasons for community physicians' non-participation are presented as stated spontaneously during phone conversations that might explain low recruitment rates. The recruitment strategy utilised is discussed against the background of factors associated with high participation rates from the international literature. Conclusion Time, money, and effort needed during the planning and recruitment phase of a study must not be underestimated to avoid higher than usual rates of refusal and lack of initial contact. Pilot studies prior to a study start-up may provide some evidence on whether the target recruitment rate is feasible. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN42122226. PMID:19682354

  12. Potential role of metalloproteinase inhibitors from radiation‑sterilized amnion dressings in the healing of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Litwiniuk, Małgorzata; Bikowska, Barbara; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Jóźwiak, Jarosław; Kamiński, Artur; Skopiński, Piotr; Grzela, Tomasz

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds are a significant socio-economic problem, thus, the improvement of the effectiveness of their treatment is an important objective for public health strategies. The predominant stage of the chronic wound is the inflammatory reaction which is associated with the damage of tissues, possibly due to the excessive secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Several reports have suggested that amnion dressing inhibits tissue destruction and accelerates wound healing. Our recent study revealed that sterilized amnion stimulates keratinocyte proliferation in vitro, while the present study focused on the clinical application of radiation-sterilized amnion in chronic venous leg ulcers and aimed to explain the possible mechanism of its in vivo action. The study involved 25 individuals suffering from venous leg ulceration with a surface area of 10-100 cm2 and a healing rate below 10% per week, as verified during a 2-week screening period. The effectiveness of the amnion dressing was estimated following 4 weeks of treatment. The wound assessment, based on a modified Bates-Jensen Questionnaire, revealed a good and satisfactory response to the treatment in 23 of the 25 patients. The measurement of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in wound exudates revealed a decrease in activity in response to amnion application. This effect resulted from the presence of the potent MMP inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in the amnion dressings, as shown by real-time fluorescence zymography and protein microarrays. Thus, unlike modern synthetic dressing materials, radiation-sterilized amnion dressings may have a multidirectional beneficial effect on chronic wounds. PMID:22798012

  13. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests were non-significant including cardiac troponins, an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a chest X-ray on her first visit. Upon her second visit, she underwent a computed tomography angiogram of chest with contrast which revealed a PAU with an intramural hematoma in descending aorta. The PAU was finally diagnosed with an exclusion of other chest pain causes. She was treated non-surgically with a blood pressure control strategy and pain management. After a 2-month period of smoking cessation and following the achievement of a controlled blood pressure, she felt well without chest pain. PMID:27406453

  14. Aetiology, comorbidities and cofactors of chronic leg ulcers: retrospective evaluation of 1 000 patients from 10 specialised dermatological wound care centers in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jockenhöfer, Finja; Gollnick, Harald; Herberger, Katharina; Isbary, Georg; Renner, Regina; Stücker, Markus; Valesky, Eva; Wollina, Uwe; Weichenthal, Michael; Karrer, Sigrid; Kuepper, Bernhard; Roesch, Alexander; Dissemond, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Numerous comorbidities and cofactors have been known to influence wound healing processes. In this multicentre study, clinical data of 1 000 patients with chronic leg ulcers from ten specialised dermatological wound care centers were analysed. The patient cohort comprised 567 females and 433 males with an average age of 69·9 years. The wounds persisted on average for 40·8 months and had a mean size of 43·7 cm(2) . Venous leg ulcers represented the most common entity accounting for 51·3% of all chronic wounds, followed by mixed-type ulcers in 12·9% and arterial ulcerations in 11·0% of the patients. Vasculitis was diagnosed in 4·5%, trauma in 3·2%, pyoderma gangrenosum in 2·8%, lymphoedema in 1·7%, neoplasia in 1·0% and delayed post-surgical wound healing in 0·6% of the included patients. In total, 70·5% of patients suffered from arterial hypertension, 45·2% were obese, 27·2% had non-insulin dependent diabetes, and 24·4% dyslipidaemia. Altogether 18·4% suffered from metabolic syndrome. Cofactors and comorbidities of patients with chronic leg ulcers have previously been studied but not in detail. Here, we were able to demonstrate the existence of several potentially relevant cofactors, comorbidities of their associations and geographical distributions, which should be routinely examined in patients with chronic leg ulcers and - if possible - treated. PMID:25483380

  15. "Toothbrush" the Feet: A Periodic Mechanical Stimulus for Healing of a Severe Chronic Leg Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Vounotrypidis, Periklis; Pappas, Periklis; Vrangalas, Vasilios; Pehlivanidis, Anthimos

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wounds develop when the sequence of healing events are disrupted, usually in patients with underlying diseases such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, peripheral artery disease, and neuropathies and they affect most often the lower extremities. We present a 68-year-old woman with plantar ulceration, lasting for approximately 18 months, resistant to healing with conventional therapy and various modalities we used. The patient had a long history of seronegative enteropathic arthritis, Crohn's disease, secondary fibrillar amyloidosis, multiplex neuropathy, and small vessel vasculitis, the latter being the trigger event for the ulceration of her right foot. Before the decision for a final surgical intervention, we implemented a mechanical periodic stimulus using a soft toothbrush, which resulted in the gradual and complete healing of the ulcer within a period of 6 weeks. Patient's history and previous treatments are presented along with the procedures that led to the healing of the chronic wound. This report supports the idea that periodic mechanical stimulus is of great importance for the healing process and this could be the mechanism of action of some other methods that have been described in the medical literature. PMID:25845912

  16. A 40-Year-Old Man with Ulcerated Skin Lesions Caused by Bites of Safari Ants

    PubMed Central

    Chianura, Leonardo; Pozzi, Federica

    2010-01-01

    We report a 40-year old man in Uganda with ulcerated skins lesions, hypotension, and anaphylaxis caused by bites of safari ants. Treatment was successful. Physicians should be aware of anaphylaxis caused by ant bites. PMID:20595468

  17. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Treatment of Venous Leg Ulcers Using Mechanically Versus Electrically Powered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marston, William A.; Armstrong, David G.; Reyzelman, Alexander M.; Kirsner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compares two different negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) modalities in the treatment of venous leg ulcers (VLUs), the ultraportable mechanically powered (MP) Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP®) Wound Care System to the electrically powered (EP) Vacuum-Assisted Closure (V.A.C.®) System. Approach: Patients with VLUs from 13 centers participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Each subject was randomly assigned to treatment with either MP NPWT or EP NPWT and evaluated for 16 weeks or complete wound closure. Results: Forty patients (n=19 MP NPWT and n=21 EP NPWT) completed the study. Primary endpoint analysis of wound size reduction found wounds in the MP NPWT group had significantly greater wound size reduction than those in the EP NPWT group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks (p-value=0.0039, 0.0086, 0.0002, and 0.0005, respectively). Kaplan–Meier analyses showed greater acceleration in complete wound closure in the MP NPWT group. At 30 days, 50% wound closure was achieved in 52.6% (10/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 23.8% (5/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. At 90 days, complete wound closure was achieved in 57.9% (11/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 38.15% (8/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. Innovation: These data support the use of MP-NPWT for the treatment of VLUs. Conclusions: In this group of venous ulcers, wounds treated with MP NPWT demonstrated greater improvement and a higher likelihood of complete wound closure than those treated with EP NPWT. PMID:25713749

  18. A case of small bowel ulcer caused by NSAIDs and detected after capsule endoscope retention.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshiyuki; Gocho, Seiho; Ogasawara, Fusao; Tsukune, Yoko; Sawamoto, Kana; Numata, Makoto; Nagata, Naruhiko; Deguchi, Ryuzo; Mine, Tetsuya

    2012-04-01

    We recently detected an annular ulcer thought to have been caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when we performed small bowel capsule endoscopy on a patient with suspected small-bowel bleeding and a history of frequent use of oral NSAIDs. The patient was a 64-year-old woman who complained of bloody stools and abdominal pain. The annular ulcer showed concentric stenosis, which caused retention of the capsule endoscope. NSAIDs are some of the most frequently used anti-inflammatory analgesics, and even more frequent use can be expected with the aging of society. No reports to date appear to have described retention of a capsule endoscope due to annular ulceration caused by NSAIDs. We report herein our experience with a patient showing small-bowel ulcer caused by NSAIDs. PMID:22488558

  19. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers: An Evidence-and Consensus-Based Algorithm for Care Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  20. Treatment of chronic diabetic lower leg ulcers with activated protein C: a randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Whitmont, Kaley; McKelvey, Kelly J; Fulcher, Gregory; Reid, Ian; March, Lyn; Xue, Meilang; Cooper, Alan; Jackson, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Lower leg ulcers are a serious and long-term complication in patients with diabetes and pose a major health concern because of the increasing number of patients diagnosed with diabetes each year. This study sought to evaluate the clinical benefit of topical activated protein C (APC) on chronic lower leg ulcers in patients with diabetes. Twelve patients were randomly assigned to receive either APC (N = 6) or physiological saline (placebo; N = 6) in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot clinical trial. Treatment was administered topically, twice weekly for 6 weeks with final follow-up at 20 weeks. Wound area was significantly reduced to 34·8 ± 16·4% of week 0 levels at 20 weeks in APC-treated wounds (p = 0·01). At 20 weeks, three APC-treated wounds had completely healed, compared to one saline-treated wound. Full-thickness wound edge skin biopsies showed reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and increased vascular proliferation following APC treatment. Patient stress scores were also significantly reduced following APC treatment (p < 0·05), demonstrating improved patient quality of life as assessed by the Cardiff Wound Impact Questionnaire. This pilot trial suggests that APC is a safe topical agent for healing chronic lower leg ulcers in patients with diabetes and provides supporting evidence for a larger clinical trial. PMID:23848141

  1. Topical sodium nitrite for chronic leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell anaemia: a phase 1 dose-finding safety and tolerability trial

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Caterina P; Gorbach, Alexander M; Xu, Dihua; Hon, Yuen Yi; Delaney, Kara-Marie; Seidel, Miles; Malik, Nitin; Peters-Lawrence, Marlene; Cantilena, Carly; Nichols, James S; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Conrey, Anna; Grimes, George; Kato, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Well-tolerated and effective treatments are needed for chronic leg ulcers in sickle cell anaemia. Topical sodium nitrite, a known nitric oxide donor, enhances blood flow in ulcers and has known bacteriostatic effects. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of topical sodium nitrite in patients with sickle cell disease and chronic leg ulcers. Methods We enrolled adult patients from an ambulatory clinic at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD, USA) with sickle cell anaemia with leg ulcers (with a surface area of 2.5–100 cm2) persisting for at least 4 weeks into a safety and tolerability phase 1 dose-escalation trial of topical sodium nitrite. Increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite cream were applied twice weekly for 4 weeks to one ulcer per patient at five dose levels (0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 1.8%, and 2%). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability, with secondary endpoints of pharmacokinetics, blood flow, and wound healing. Pain relief was analysed post hoc. Endpoints were analysed over time for the whole study population and according to dose level. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01316796. Findings Between April 4, 2011, and March 19, 2013, we enrolled 18 adult patients with sickle cell anaemia and leg ulcers into our trial. We assigned three patients into each cohort, and each cohort was treated with a different concentration of sodium nitrite cream (cohort 1: 0.5%, cohort 2: 1.0%, cohort 3: 1.5%, and cohort 4: 2.0%). Patients were not enrolled into the next cohort dose until we were able to establish that no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. An additional six patients were enrolled to cohort 3a: 1.8%, after two patients in cohort 4 had asymptomatic drops in diastolic blood pressure. No grade 3–4 adverse events were observed, and there were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting side-effects. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that systemic absorption of sodium

  2. Successful treatment of ileal ulcers caused by immunosuppressants in two organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-Wei; Gu, Hua-Ying; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Lin, Xian-Yi; Wei, Xiu-Qing

    2016-06-28

    Although gastroduodenal ulcers are common in solid organ transplant patients, there are few reports on multiple giant ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve caused by immunosuppressants Herein, we report on a liver transplant recipient and a renal transplant recipient with multiple large ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve who rapidly achieved ulcer healing upon withdrawal of sirolimus or tacrolimus and administration of thalidomide. In case 1, a 56-year-old man with primary hepatocellular carcinoma had received a liver transplantation. Tacrolimus combined with sirolimus and prednisolone was used as the anti-rejection regimen. Colonoscopy was performed because of severe abdominal pain and diarrhea at post-operative month 10. Multiple giant ulcers were found at the ileocecal valve and distal ileum. The ulcers healed rapidly with withdrawal of sirolimus and treatment with thalidomide. There was no recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. In case 2, a 34-year-old man with end-stage kidney disease received kidney transplantation and was put on tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone as the anti-rejection regimen. Twelve weeks after the operation, the patient presented with hematochezia and severe anemia. Colonoscopy revealed multiple large ulcers in the ileocecal valve and distal ileum, with massive accumulation of fresh blood. The bleeding ceased after treatment with intravenous somatostatin and oral thalidomide. Tacrolimus was withdrawn at the same time. Colonoscopy at week 4 of follow-up revealed remarkable healing of the ulcers, and there was no recurrence of bleeding during 1 year of follow-up. No lymphoma, tuberculosis, or infection of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or fungus was found in either patient. In post-transplantation cases with ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve, sirolimus or tacrolimus should be considered a possible risk factor, and withdrawing them or switching to another immunosuppressant

  3. Successful treatment of ileal ulcers caused by immunosuppressants in two organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Wei; Gu, Hua-Ying; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Lin, Xian-Yi; Wei, Xiu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although gastroduodenal ulcers are common in solid organ transplant patients, there are few reports on multiple giant ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve caused by immunosuppressants Herein, we report on a liver transplant recipient and a renal transplant recipient with multiple large ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve who rapidly achieved ulcer healing upon withdrawal of sirolimus or tacrolimus and administration of thalidomide. In case 1, a 56-year-old man with primary hepatocellular carcinoma had received a liver transplantation. Tacrolimus combined with sirolimus and prednisolone was used as the anti-rejection regimen. Colonoscopy was performed because of severe abdominal pain and diarrhea at post-operative month 10. Multiple giant ulcers were found at the ileocecal valve and distal ileum. The ulcers healed rapidly with withdrawal of sirolimus and treatment with thalidomide. There was no recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. In case 2, a 34-year-old man with end-stage kidney disease received kidney transplantation and was put on tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone as the anti-rejection regimen. Twelve weeks after the operation, the patient presented with hematochezia and severe anemia. Colonoscopy revealed multiple large ulcers in the ileocecal valve and distal ileum, with massive accumulation of fresh blood. The bleeding ceased after treatment with intravenous somatostatin and oral thalidomide. Tacrolimus was withdrawn at the same time. Colonoscopy at week 4 of follow-up revealed remarkable healing of the ulcers, and there was no recurrence of bleeding during 1 year of follow-up. No lymphoma, tuberculosis, or infection of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or fungus was found in either patient. In post-transplantation cases with ulcers in the distal ileum and ileocecal valve, sirolimus or tacrolimus should be considered a possible risk factor, and withdrawing them or switching to another immunosuppressant

  4. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  5. ["Auriga-04" study on the use of a range of Allevyn hydro-cellular dressings in the treatment of bed sores and leg ulcers by primary health care professionals].

    PubMed

    Verdú Soriano, José; Nolasco Bonmatí, Andreu; López Casanova, Pablo; Torra i Bou, Joan-Enric

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the application and usefulness of a range of Allevyn trademark hydro-cellular dressings during cicatrisation and in the control of exudation and other various characteristics of chronic lesions in real clinical conditions where patients were treated by primary health care professionals. In this study, 441 patients having chronic wounds, either bed sores or leg ulcers, were studied, health care professionals applied a planned program of measures repeated during 20 dressing changes or until cicatrisation was completed if this happened during this interval. The sample population was comprised of elderly patients, the majority of whom were women whose general health could be classified from medium to poor. These patients suffered from these types of wounds: 63% had bed sores, 27.2% had varicose ulcers and 9.8% had leg ulcers caused by another etiology such as mixed ulcers, arterial ulcers or diabetic foot. On average, these lesions were characterized by an evolutionary period of 6.1 months and had a 30.43 square centimetre surface area at the start of the study. 126 lesions, or 28.8%, cicatrized on average of 47.3 days. Among the 315 lesions which had not cicatrized by the end of 20 dressing changes, 90.5% showed evidence of improvement. During the study these lesions showed a significant reduction in their surface area, as well as a significant improvement at the edges of these lesions and the peri-ulceral skin. The health personnel which carried out the treatment using these dressings gave a very favorable evaluation for their use. At the end of this study, in comparison with other dressings previous used, this study showed that in 43.43% of the cases an Allevyn dressing was deemed better in terms of ease in application, in 51.79% of the cases an Allevyn dressing was better in terms of absorption and in 43.23% of the cases an Allevyn dressing was better during removal. PMID:16724499

  6. Other Causes of Leg Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  7. Leg cramps in pregnancy caused by chronic compartment syndrome and relieved by fasciotomy after childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Orlin, Jan Roar; Øen, Jarle; Andersen, John Roger; Tjugum, Ivar Jostein; Westbye, Hans Jacob; Roska, Jomar; Aasved, Helene; Hjelmeland, Kjersti

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of intolerable leg pain in pregnancy, caused by Chronic Compartment Syndrome (CCS), is presented. Increasing amounts of opioids were given throughout the pregnancy. Anesthetical dilemmas and surgery are discussed. In conclusion, early surgery rather than opioids is recommended. PMID:25356260

  8. [Ulcerative contact dermitis caused by premixed concrete (cement burns)].

    PubMed

    Ancona Alayón; Aranda Martínez, J G

    1978-01-01

    Cement dermatitis manifests clinically as a chronic dermatitis of irritative character, due to its alkaline nature and as allergic contact dermatitis produced by sensitization to chromium and cobalt occurring as trace elements. the present report deals with a mason without previous dermatitis, presenting bullae, ulcers and necrosis in lower limbs, short time after incidental contact at work, with premixed concrete. The clinical manifestations, such as short evolution, clear limitation to sites in close contact with concrete, negativity to standard patch testing and good prognosis with early treatment, are mentioned. The acute irritant nature of the disease is clear, in opposition to the classical manifestations of cement dermatitis. The need of studies of the chemical properties of this material including pH, alkalinity and the possible roll of additives employed, is part of the strategy for prevention of occupational dermatitis in the building trade, which should include also, information of hazards and proper training in their trade. PMID:162070

  9. Martorell's ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, S. D.; Baragwanath, P.; Harding, K. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a rare form of ulceration of the lower leg and, as a result of subsequent investigations and literature review, readdresses a recent debate regarding the legitimate classification of these ulcers as a separate disease entity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8552533

  10. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  11. Compression and venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stücker, M; Link, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Altmeyer, P; Doerler, M

    2013-03-01

    Compression therapy is considered to be the most important conservative treatment of venous leg ulcers. Until a few years ago, compression bandages were regarded as first-line therapy of venous leg ulcers. However, to date medical compression stockings are the first choice of treatment. With respect to compression therapy of venous leg ulcers the following statements are widely accepted: 1. Compression improves the healing of ulcers when compared with no compression; 2. Multicomponent compression systems are more effective than single-component compression systems; 3. High compression is more effective than lower compression; 4. Medical compression stockings are more effective than compression with short stretch bandages. Healed venous leg ulcers show a high relapse rate without ongoing treatment. The use of medical stockings significantly reduces the amount of recurrent ulcers. Furthermore, the relapse rate of venous leg ulcers can be significantly reduced by a combination of compression therapy and surgery of varicose veins compared with compression therapy alone. PMID:23482538

  12. Supraduodenal Branch of the Left Hepatic Artery: A Rare Cause of Bleeding Duodenal Ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Baljendra S.; Berscheid, Bruce; Saddekni, Souheil

    2009-07-15

    This is a case report describing a rare cause of massive duodenal ulcer hemorrhage resulting from the erosion of the supraduodenal branch of the left hepatic artery. This arterial branch is not a well known variation and is rarely recognized as a source of duodenal bleeding.

  13. Combined use of fenestrated-type artificial dermis and topical negative pressure wound therapy for the venous leg ulcer of a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Kuro, Atsuyuki; Yamauchi, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ai; Kakudo, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Suzuki, Kenji; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of circumferential venous leg ulcer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Mesh skin grafting was performed in another hospital, but the graft failed and the patient was referred to our hospital. This ulcer was treated by the combination therapy of a fenestrated-type artificial dermis with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and secondary mesh grafting using our 'grip tape technique'. NPWT was started at -100 mmHg and continued until the formation of dermis-like tissue. A section stained using haematoxylin and eosin and an anti-αSMA (α smooth muscle actin) immunohistological section of the biopsy from dermis-like tissue showed an abundant infiltration of fibroblasts and capillary formation beneath the fenestration of the silicone sheet. Threefold mesh skin grafting was subsequently performed and it was taken up completely. The fenestrated-type artificial dermis in combination with NPWT produced good results without infection in the treatment of complex wounds. In addition, our 'grip tape technique' was useful to apply polyurethane foam to the entire surface of the lower leg. PMID:25650053

  14. Comparative effectiveness of a bilayered living cellular construct and a porcine collagen wound dressing in the treatment of venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Marston, William A; Sabolinski, Michael L; Parsons, Nathan B; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a national wound-specific electronic medical record (WoundExpert, Net Health, Pittsburgh, PA), we compared the effectiveness of a bilayered living cellular construct (BLCC) and an acellular porcine small intestine submucosa collagen dressing (SIS) for the treatment of venous leg ulcer. Data from 1,489 patients with 1,801 refractory venous leg ulcers (as defined by failure to have >40% reduction in size in the 4 weeks prior to treatment) with surface areas between 1 and 150 cm2 in size, treated between July 2009 and July 2012 at 158 wound care facilities across the US were analyzed. Patient baseline demographics and wound characteristics were comparable between groups. Kaplan-Meier–derived estimates of wound closure for BLCC (1,451 wounds) was significantly greater (p = 0.01, log-rank test) by weeks 12 (31% vs. 26%), 24 (50% vs. 41%), and 36 (61% vs. 46%), respectively, compared with SIS (350 wounds). BLCC treatment reduced the median time to wound closure by 44%, achieving healing 19 weeks sooner (24 vs. 43 weeks, p = 0.01, log-rank test). Treatment with BLCC increased the probability of healing by 29% compared with porcine SIS dressing (hazard ratio = 1.29 [95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.56], p = 0.01). PMID:24628712

  15. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of octenidine wound gel in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers in comparison to modern wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, Gilbert; Strohal, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of an octenidine-based wound gel in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers. For this purpose, 49 wounds were treated with either modern wound-phase-adapted dressings alone (treatment arm 1; n = 17), octenidine wound gel plus modern wound-phase-adapted dressings (treatment arm 2; n = 17) or octenidine wound gel alone (treatment arm 3; n = 15). During the study period of 42 days with dressing changes every 3-5 days, wound healing characteristics and treatment costs of different dressings were analysed. Wound size reduction was significantly better (P = 0·028) in both octenidine wound gel treatment arms compared to modern dressings alone with total reductions of 14·6%, 64·1% and 96·2% in treatment arms 1-3. Early wound healing was merely observed under octenidine wound gel treatment (n = 9), whereby lowest treatment costs were generated by octenidine wound gel alone (€20·34/dressing change). As a result, the octenidine wound gel is cost-effective and well suitable for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers, considering both safety and promotion of wound healing. PMID:24589044

  16. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome: a common cause of a rare clinical entity--critical leg ischemia in the young.

    PubMed

    Tsilogianni, Zoi; Grapatsas, Konstantinos; Papanikolaou, Zisis; Kokkini-Paschou, Aggeliki; Tsantilas, Apostolos; Tsiligiris, Vasileios; Vourliotakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is a rare but important cause of leg ischemia and even disability in young athletes. Entrapment occurs because of an abnormal relationship between the popliteal artery and the surrounding muscular structures in the popliteal fossa. These anomalies lead to decreased blood flow to the affected leg with signs of claudication, coldness, and symptoms of exercise-induced leg pain. In this article, we present a case of a young soldier who presented with the above signs and symptoms in his left foot after exercise. On questioning, he admitted to having chronic lower leg pain. He was diagnosed with PAES in both legs and he was emergently treated with an arterial bypass procedure in the left one. He had no postoperative complications. PAES should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic or acute lower leg pain in any young patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent limb loss and lead to a good operative outcome. PMID:24402998

  17. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kate, Vikram; Ananthakrishnan, N; Tovey, Frank I

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor. PMID:23606834

  18. Health Behavior Theory for Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Root-Cause Analysis Project in Critical Care Nursing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristen R; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Bickmann, Jonathan D; Saarinen, Hannah A; Gosselin, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a behavioral theory to examine pressure ulcer prevention by nurses in a critical care setting. A root-cause analysis approach was used, including an integrative literature review, operationalization of behavioral constructs into a survey, and root-cause analysis application in a cardiovascular intensive care unit. This article highlights an innovative approach to quality improvement in critical care. PMID:26111143

  19. Treatment of venous leg ulcers with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy: Healing, long-term recurrence and quality of life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Pedro; Redondo, Pedro; Cabrera, Juan; Sierra, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) generally have slow healing rates (HR) and frequent recurrence rates (RR). The underlying etiology is venous hypertension. The present observational cohort study was to determine healing and RR in VLU treated with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS). One hundred and eighty VLU were treated with polidocanol microfoam monthly under ultrasound control. Median follow-up was 30 months (range: 17-40). One hundred seventy-two (95.6%) ulcers healed during the study. The overall twenty-four week HR was 79.4% and was significantly higher (95.1%) in patients with isolated great saphenous vein incompetence than in those with great saphenous vein plus perforator (91.7%) or exclusive perforator incompetence (78.9%) (p < 0.01). Patients without deep vein incompetence had a significantly higher 6-month HR (89.8%) than those with (67.4%) (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified the following independent risk factors: chronicity > 12 months (OR 7.69), area > 6 cm(2) (OR 4.24), lipodermatoesclerosis (OR 12.22), history of > 3 previous ulcers (OR 5.57) and history of deep vein thrombosis (OR 6.18). One, two and three year ulcer RR were 8.1%, 14.9%, and 20.8%, respectively. Isolated perforator incompetence and previous history of venous surgery were significantly (p = 0.03) associated with a higher RR. VLU treated with microfoam sclerotherapy are associated with high HR and low mid-term RR. PMID:25816893

  20. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at ...

  1. A budget impact analysis comparing a Hydrofiber® ; dressing to an alginate dressing in managing exuding venous leg ulcers in France.

    PubMed

    Yan, Songkai; Colin, Xavier; Coudray-Omnès, Carole; Guido-Morin, Pascale; Kommala, Dheerendra R

    2014-06-01

    An Excel model was developed to compare total costs (including primary and secondary dressings only) of Hydrofiber(®) ; dressing (2010 branded price) versus an alginate dressing (generic or branded price) in managing exuding venous leg ulcers considering mean wear time and mean duration of exudate management phase, from the French Social Security perspective over 5 years (2011-2015). Budget impact (based on prevalence of venous leg ulcers in France) was estimated as the difference between scenario 1 (Hydrofiber(®) ; versus alginate dressing usage proportion increasing slightly per year) and Scenario2 (proportion remaining at 2010 levels). Annual costs and net savings per patient for the dressings were calculated in analyses 1 and 2. Analysis 1 (28-day mean exudate management phase for both Hydrofiber(®) ; and alginate dressing groups): total costs 66·82€ Hydrofiber(®) ;, 70·08€ generic alginate, 77·0€ branded alginate; net savings 3·26€ and 10·18€ for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus generic and branded alginate. Analysis 2 (mean exudate management phase of 22·2 versus 28 days for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus alginate): total costs 52·92€, 70·08€ and 77·0€, and net savings 17·10€ and 24·02€, accordingly. Total cost savings (budget impact scenario 1 minus scenario 2): Analysis 1 - 223 107€ and 696 304€ for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus generic and branded alginate dressings, respectively; Analysis 2 - 1 169 845€ and 1 643 042€ accordingly. Sensitivity analyses indicated that results are reliable. This conservative analysis shows that effective exudate management using Hydrofiber(®) ; dressing can produce sizeable cost savings. PMID:23020759

  2. Effects of silver-based wound dressings on the bacterial flora in chronic leg ulcers and its susceptibility in vitro to silver.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Susanne; Tano, Eva; Bergsten, Agneta; Tallberg, Anna-Britta; Melhus, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Silver-based dressings have been used extensively in wound management in recent years, but data on their antimicrobial activity in the clinical setting are limited. In order to explore their effects on chronic leg ulcer flora, 14 ulcers were cultured after at least 3 weeks treatment with Aquacel Ag(®) or Acticoat(®). Phenotypic and genetic silver resistance were investigated in a total of 56 isolates. Silver-based dressings had a limited effect on primary wound pathogens, which were present in 79% of the cultures before, and 71% after, treatment. One silver-resistant Enterobacter cloacae strain was identified (silver nitrate minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 512 mg/l, positive for silE, silS and silP). Further studies in vitro showed that inducible silver-resistance was more frequent in Enterobacteriaceae with cephalosporin-resistance and that silver nitrate had mainly a bacteriostatic effect on Staphylococcus aureus. Monitoring of silver resistance should be considered in areas where silver is used extensively. PMID:22215013

  3. Wireless micro current stimulation--an innovative electrical stimulation method for the treatment of patients with leg and diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wirsing, Peter G; Habrom, Alexander D; Zehnder, Thomas M; Friedli, Sandra; Blatti, Marlise

    2015-12-01

    Clinical experience with a new electrical stimulation (ES) technique, the wireless micro current stimulation (WMCS), for the treatment of chronic wounds is described. WMCS transfers the current to any surface wound from a distance, by using oxygen's and nitrogen's ability to exchange electrons. We studied 47 patients with hard-to-heal wounds. Patients with venous, arterial and mixed leg ulcers were predominant; other aetiologies such as diabetic foot lesions, pressure ulcers, vasculitis and pyoderma were also included. WMCS treatment protocol specified treatment twice or thrice per week, for 45-60 minutes per session, with 1·5 μA current intensity. Standard wound care was applied to all patients, including compression bandages, if necessary. Clear progress of wound healing, even after 2 weeks, was observed in all cases. The mean reduction of the wound surface after WMCS treatment was 95% in 8 weeks. Complete healing was achieved within 3 months for the majority of the cases. No clinical side effects were observed. WMCS technology significantly accelerated wound healing for patients with hard-to-heal wounds of different aetiologies. This new therapy offers multiple advantages compared with the previous methods of ES, as it is contactless, free of pain and very easy to use. PMID:24373098

  4. Necrotizing cellulitis with multiple abscesses on the leg caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Hau, Estelle; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Saussine, Anne; Masson, Vincent; Rausky, Jonathan; Bagot, Martine; Guibal, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is an unusual cause of severe skin infection initially described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of necrotizing cellulitis of the leg caused by S marcescens in a 68-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus and a history of chronic lymphoedema of the leg. We reviewed the literature and found 49 cases of severe skin infections from S marcescens that included 20 cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) as well as 29 cases of severe skin infections without NF (non-NF cases). Patients were immunocompromised in 59% to 70% of cases. The mortality rate was high in NF cases (60%) versus non-NF cases (3%). Surgery was required in 95% of NF cases and in 24% of non-NF cases. The other clinical manifestations of S marcescens skin infection reported in the literature included disseminated papular eruptions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with folliculitis on the trunk. Serratia marcescens is naturally resistant to amoxicillin alone and amoxicillin associated with clavulanic acid. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are indicated to treat S marcescens skin infections, and surgery should be promptly considered in cases of severe skin infections if appropriate antibiotic therapy does not lead to rapid improvement. PMID:27023094

  5. Abiotrophia defectiva causing infectious crystalline keratopathy and corneal ulcer after penetrating keratoplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious crystalline keratopathy is commonly caused by Streptococcus viridans and other gram positive organisms. We present the first case of infectious crystalline keratopathy that developed into a corneal ulcer and grew Abiotrophia defectiva which responded well to topical and systemic antimicrobial therapy and did not require re-grafting. A 78-year-old man underwent penetrating keratoplasty for pseudophakic bullous keratopathy. He presented 1.5 years later with infectious crystalline keratopathy which progressed to a corneal ulcer. The patient received topical fortified vancomycin and moxifloxacin, as well as oral moxifloxacin. Findings The corneal ulcer base was cultured and grew A. defectiva, or nutritionally deficient streptococcus. Complete resolution of the corneal infiltrates was obtained within three months. Conclusions Nutritionally deficient streptococcus has been implicated in numerous human diseases, including endocarditis, and is increasingly being recognized as an important pathogen. This represents the second reported case of A. defectiva causing infectious crystalline keratopathy in humans and the first case of A. defectiva successfully treated with antibiotics. This case shows that aggressive antibiotic therapy can be effective in A. defectiva-associated infectious crystalline keratopathy. PMID:23514629

  6. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a medical device in various forms containing Triticum vulgare for the treatment of venous leg ulcers - a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Marco; Macchia, Michela; Panduri, Salvatore; Paggi, Battistino; Saponati, Giorgio; Dini, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the topical application of an aqueous extract of Triticum vulgare (TV) in different vehicles (cream, impregnated gauzes, foam, hydrogel, and dressing gel) for the treatment of venous lower leg ulcers. Fifty patients were randomized to receive one of the five investigational vehicles. Treatment was performed up to complete healing or to a maximum of 29 days. The wound size reduction from baseline was the primary efficacy variable, which was measured by means of a noninvasive laser scanner instrument for wound assessment. In all groups, apart from the foam group, a similar trend toward the reduction of the surface area was observed. The cream showed the greatest effect on the mean reduction of the lesion size. At last visit, six ulcers were healed: two in the cream group, three in the gauze group, and one in the dressing gel group. In the patients treated with the cream, the gauzes, the hydrogel, and the dressing gel, the reduction of lesion size was 40%-50%; the reduction was smaller in the foam group. No impact in terms of age on the healing process was found. The Total Symptoms Score decreased in all groups during the study; a greater efficacy in terms of signs/symptoms was observed in the patients treated with the gauzes. In the dressing gel group, one patient had an infection of the wound after 3 weeks of treatment and 2 of colonization, leading to a systemic antibiotic treatment. The events were judged as nonrelated to the device used. On the basis of the results, it could be argued that the medical device may be useful in the treatment of chronic venous ulcers. PMID:26060395

  7. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  8. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing the effects of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound to standard care in healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Gary W; Orgill, Dennis P; Serena, Thomas E; Novoung, Aksone; O'Connell, Jessica B; Li, William W; Driver, Vickie R

    2015-01-01

    Current scientific evidence suggests venous leg ulcers (VLUs) that do not respond to guideline-defined care may have a wound microenvironment that is out of physiological balance. A prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was conducted to compare percent wound size reduction, proportions healed, pain, and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in patients randomized to standard care (SC) alone or SC and 40 kHz noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) treatments 3 times per week for 4 weeks. One hundred, twelve (112) eligible participants with documented venous stasis, a VLU >30 days' duration, measuring 4 cm2 to 50 cm2, and demonstrated arterial flow were enrolled. Of these, 81 reduced <30% in size during the 2-week run-in study phase and were randomized (SC, n = 40; NLFU+SC, n = 41). Median age of participants was 59 years; 83% had multiple complex comorbidities. Index ulcers were 56% recurrent, with a median duration of 10.3 months (range 1 month to 204.5 months) and median ulcer area of 11.0 cm2 (range 3.7 cm2-41.3 cm2). All participants received protocol-defined SC compression (30-40 mm Hg), dressings to promote a moist wound environment, and sharp debridement at the bedside for a minimum of 1 time per week. Ulcer measurements were obtained weekly using digital planimetry. Pain and QOL scores were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment using the Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form-36 Health Survey. After 4 weeks of treatment, average wound size reduction was 61.6% ± 28.9 in the NLFU+SC compared to 45% ± 32.5 in the SC group (P = 0.02). Reductions in median (65.7% versus 44.4%, P = 0.02) and absolute wound area (9.0 cm2 versus 4.1 cm2, P = 0.003) as well as pain scores (from 3.0 to 0.6 versus 3.0 to 2.4, P = 0.01) were also significant. NLFU therapy with guideline-defined standard VLU care should be considered for healing VLUs not responding to SC alone. The results of this study warrant further research on barriers to healing and the

  9. Estimating the Clinical Outcomes and Cost Differences Between Standard Care With and Without Cadexomer Iodine in the Management of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers Using a Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Nherera, Leo M; Woodmansey, Emma; Trueman, Paul; Gibbons, Garry W

    2016-06-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect up to 1% of the adult population in the developed world and present a significant financial and resource burden to health care systems. Cadexomer iodine (CI) is an antimicrobial dressing indicated for use in chronic exuding wounds. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost utility of using CI + standard care (SC) - ie, high compression multicomponent bandaging including debridement - compared with SC alone in the management of chronic (>6 months' duration) VLUs from a payer's perspective. A Markov model was constructed to evaluate the cost and clinical benefits (healing and decreased infection rates) of the 2 treatment modalities over a 1-year period using data from 4 randomized, controlled clinical studies (RCTs) included in a recent Cochrane review and cost data from a recently published economic evaluation of VLUs. Costs were calculated using 2014 United States dollars; wound outcomes in- cluded complete healing in 212 patients reported in the Cochrane meta-analysis and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), with utility values obtained from 200 patients with VLUs calculated using standard gamble. Treatment with CI over 1 year was $7,259 compared to $7,901 for SC. This resulted in a cost savings of $643/patient in favor of CI compared with SC. More patients treated with CI (61%) had their wounds healed compared to 54% treated with SC. Furthermore, patients treated with CI+SC experienced 6 additional ulcer-free weeks compared to persons treated with SC alone (ie, 25 ulcer- free weeks compared to 19 ulcer-free weeks, respectively). Overall, CI resulted in 0.03 more QALYs (ie, 0.86 QALYs compared to 0.83 for SC). The use of CI in addition to SC compared to SC alone over 52 weeks resulted in more wounds healed and more QALYs along with a decrease of overall costs The results of this study suggest CI is cost effective com- pared to SC alone in the management of patients with chronic VLUs. Prospective, controlled clinical

  10. Mutations in DARS Cause Hypomyelination with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Leg Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Ryan J.; Vanderver, Adeline; Leventer, Richard J.; Damiani, Stephen A.; Simons, Cas; Grimmond, Sean M.; Miller, David; Schmidt, Johanna; Lockhart, Paul J.; Pope, Kate; Ru, Kelin; Crawford, Joanna; Rosser, Tena; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Juneja, Monica; Verma, Ishwar C.; Prabhakar, Prab; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Pouwels, Petra J.W.; Bevova, Marianna R.; Abbink, Truus E.M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Wolf, Nicole I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited white-matter disorders are a broad class of diseases for which treatment and classification are both challenging. Indeed, nearly half of the children presenting with a leukoencephalopathy remain without a specific diagnosis. Here, we report on the application of high-throughput genome and exome sequencing to a cohort of ten individuals with a leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology and clinically characterized by hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity (HBSL), as well as the identification of compound-heterozygous and homozygous mutations in cytoplasmic aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (DARS). These mutations cause nonsynonymous changes to seven highly conserved amino acids, five of which are unchanged between yeast and man, in the DARS C-terminal lobe adjacent to, or within, the active-site pocket. Intriguingly, HBSL bears a striking resemblance to leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate (LBSL), which is caused by mutations in the mitochondria-specific DARS2, suggesting that these two diseases might share a common underlying molecular pathology. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that mutations in tRNA synthetases can cause a broad range of neurologic disorders. PMID:23643384

  11. Palatal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Bansal, Shuchi

    2014-01-01

    Palatal ulcers are a common presentation and can be conveniently divided into developmental and acquired causes, the latter of which is subdivided into acute and chronic causes. Most commonly seen dermatologic causes have associated skin manifestations. Acute and multiple ulcers are usually infectious or drug induced in origin. Recurrent ulcers are largely dominated by aphthosis, while chronic ulcers are seen in immunocompromised patients and can occasionally be malignant. It is essential to involve the oral and maxillofacial surgeons early in the therapeutic management to tackle the inevitable complications that may ensue in the chronic cases. PMID:25441477

  12. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  13. Unusual cause of a facial pressure ulcer: the helmet securing the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Ju, R K; Lee, J H; Jun, Y J; Kim, Y J

    2015-06-01

    Many medical devices, such as pulse oximetry, ventilation masks and other splints are put on critically ill patients. Although these devices are designed to deliver relatively low physical pressure to the skin of the patient, they can still cause pressure ulcers (PUs) in critically ill patients. There are reports of medical device-related PUs on the face. Here we describe forehead skin necrosis caused by the securing helmet for the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. It is difficult to detect this kind of PU early, because most of the patients have decreased mental status or delirium due to varix bleeding. For this reason, medical staff should be aware of the risk of developing a PU by the device and take preventive measures accordingly. PMID:26075510

  14. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR to correlate venous leg ulcer bacterial bioburden dynamics with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing

    PubMed Central

    Sprockett, Daniel D.; Ammons, Christine G.; Tuttle, Marie S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infection in chronic wounds is currently limited to subjective clinical signs and culture-based methods that underestimate the complexity of wound microbial bioburden as revealed by DNA-based microbial identification methods. Here, we use 16S rRNA next generation sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to characterize weekly changes in bacterial load, community structure, and diversity associated with a chronic venous leg ulcer over the 15-week course of treatment and healing. Our DNA-based methods and detailed sampling scheme reveal that the bacterial bioburden of the wound is unexpectedly dynamic, including changes in the bacterial load and community structure that correlate with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing. We demonstrate that these multidimensional changes in bacterial bioburden can be summarized using swabs taken prior to debridement, and therefore, can be more easily collected serially than debridement or biopsy samples. Overall, this case illustrates the importance of detailed clinical indicators and longitudinal sampling to determine the pathogenic significance of chronic wound microbial dynamics and guide best use of antimicrobials for improvement of healing outcomes. PMID:25902876

  15. Aberrant Mucin Assembly in Mice Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Spontaneous Inflammation Resembling Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Gareth R; Tauro, Sharyn B; Taupin, Douglas; Thornton, David J; Png, Chin Wen; Crockford, Tanya L; Cornall, Richard J; Adams, Rachel; Kato, Masato; Nelms, Keats A; Hong, Nancy A; Florin, Timothy H. J; Goodnow, Christopher C; McGuckin, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background MUC2 mucin produced by intestinal goblet cells is the major component of the intestinal mucus barrier. The inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis is characterized by depleted goblet cells and a reduced mucus layer, but the aetiology remains obscure. In this study we used random mutagenesis to produce two murine models of inflammatory bowel disease, characterised the basis and nature of the inflammation in these mice, and compared the pathology with human ulcerative colitis. Methods and Findings By murine N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified two distinct noncomplementing missense mutations in Muc2 causing an ulcerative colitis-like phenotype. 100% of mice of both strains developed mild spontaneous distal intestinal inflammation by 6 wk (histological colitis scores versus wild-type mice, p < 0.01) and chronic diarrhoea. Monitoring over 300 mice of each strain demonstrated that 25% and 40% of each strain, respectively, developed severe clinical signs of colitis by age 1 y. Mutant mice showed aberrant Muc2 biosynthesis, less stored mucin in goblet cells, a diminished mucus barrier, and increased susceptibility to colitis induced by a luminal toxin. Enhanced local production of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was seen in the distal colon, and intestinal permeability increased 2-fold. The number of leukocytes within mesenteric lymph nodes increased 5-fold and leukocytes cultured in vitro produced more Th1 and Th2 cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-13). This pathology was accompanied by accumulation of the Muc2 precursor and ultrastructural and biochemical evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in goblet cells, activation of the unfolded protein response, and altered intestinal expression of genes involved in ER stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and wound repair. Expression of mutated Muc2 oligomerisation domains in vitro demonstrated that aberrant Muc2 oligomerisation underlies the ER stress. In human ulcerative colitis we demonstrate similar

  16. Trunk orientation causes asymmetries in leg function in small bird terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Rode, Christian; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the upright trunk in humans, trunk orientation in most birds is almost horizontal (pronograde). It is conceivable that the orientation of the heavy trunk strongly influences the dynamics of bipedal terrestrial locomotion. Here, we analyse for the first time the effects of a pronograde trunk orientation on leg function and stability during bipedal locomotion. For this, we first inferred the leg function and trunk control strategy applied by a generalized small bird during terrestrial locomotion by analysing synchronously recorded kinematic (three-dimensional X-ray videography) and kinetic (three-dimensional force measurement) quail locomotion data. Then, by simulating quail gaits using a simplistic bioinspired numerical model which made use of parameters obtained in in vivo experiments with real quail, we show that the observed asymmetric leg function (left-skewed ground reaction force and longer leg at touchdown than at lift-off) is necessary for pronograde steady-state locomotion. In addition, steady-state locomotion becomes stable for specific morphological parameters. For quail-like parameters, the most common stable solution is grounded running, a gait preferred by quail and most of the other small birds. We hypothesize that stability of bipedal locomotion is a functional demand that, depending on trunk orientation and centre of mass location, constrains basic hind limb morphology and function, such as leg length, leg stiffness and leg damping. PMID:25377449

  17. Trunk orientation causes asymmetries in leg function in small bird terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Rode, Christian; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-12-22

    In contrast to the upright trunk in humans, trunk orientation in most birds is almost horizontal (pronograde). It is conceivable that the orientation of the heavy trunk strongly influences the dynamics of bipedal terrestrial locomotion. Here, we analyse for the first time the effects of a pronograde trunk orientation on leg function and stability during bipedal locomotion. For this, we first inferred the leg function and trunk control strategy applied by a generalized small bird during terrestrial locomotion by analysing synchronously recorded kinematic (three-dimensional X-ray videography) and kinetic (three-dimensional force measurement) quail locomotion data. Then, by simulating quail gaits using a simplistic bioinspired numerical model which made use of parameters obtained in in vivo experiments with real quail, we show that the observed asymmetric leg function (left-skewed ground reaction force and longer leg at touchdown than at lift-off) is necessary for pronograde steady-state locomotion. In addition, steady-state locomotion becomes stable for specific morphological parameters. For quail-like parameters, the most common stable solution is grounded running, a gait preferred by quail and most of the other small birds. We hypothesize that stability of bipedal locomotion is a functional demand that, depending on trunk orientation and centre of mass location, constrains basic hind limb morphology and function, such as leg length, leg stiffness and leg damping. PMID:25377449

  18. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  19. Other Causes of Leg Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone (osteomyelitis) or skin and soft tissue (cellulitis) Inflammation of the leg joints by arthritis or gout Nerve damage —common in diabetics, smokers, and alcoholics (symptoms include numbness, tingling, or ...

  20. A randomised comparative trial on the use of a hydrogel with tepescohuite extract (Mimosa tenuiflora cortex extract-2G) in the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lammoglia-Ordiales, Lorena; Vega-Memije, Maria Elisa; Herrera-Arellano, Armando; Rivera-Arce, Erika; Agüero, Juan; Vargas-Martinez, Felipe; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2012-08-01

    Tepescohuite is an extract obtained from the bark of the Mimosa tenuiflora tree and is used as an empirical treatment in wounds for its healing and antiseptic properties. Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are a common health care problem in most countries with a high rate of morbidity. The standard of care is moist interactive healing and compression; however, the ideal topical treatment is yet to be established. This study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of M. tenuiflora cortex extract (MTC-2G) in the treatment of VLUs in an Interdisciplinary Wound and Ostomy Care Center (IWOCC). A randomised, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial was conducted to compare the use of a hydrogel containing MTC-2G with the hydrogel alone in VLUs. The study included all patients with venous ulcers referred to the IWOCC. Laboratory tests and tissue biopsies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. The patients were instructed to daily cleansing followed by topical application of the hydrogel and compression. Forty-one patients were included, 22 patients received the MTC-2G and 19 patients received the hydrogel only. Of the 41 patients, 32 completed the study, 18 in the experimental arm and 14 in the control group, 19 were women and 13 men. The mean age of the subjects was 60 years. The mean time from presentation was 38 months. The mean surface reduction was 6·29 cm(2) [confidence interval (IC) 95%: 3·28-9·29] (P = 0·0001) in the MTC-2G group and 5·85 cm(2) (95% CI: 3·58-8·12) (P = 0·001) in the hydrogel group. There was no significant difference between the groups (P = 0·815). No changes in the laboratory parameters were noted. In the histology, there were not any differences between groups either. A hydrogel containing MTC-2G was not superior to a hydrogel alone in the treatment of VLUs. PMID:22128789

  1. Ulcers caused by bullous morphea: successful therapy with N-acetylcysteine and topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Rosato, E; Veneziano, M L; Di Mario, A; Molinaro, I; Pisarri, S; Salsano, F

    2013-01-01

    Bullous morphea is an uncommon form of localized scleroderma. The pathogenesis is unknown and treatment of coexistent ulcers is difficult. The pathogenesis of bullae formation in morphea is multifactorial, but reactive oxygen species production appears to play a key role. We report a patient with bullous morphea with long-standing ulcers whom we successfully treated with N-acetylcysteine and topical wound care. N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant sulfhydryl substance, promotes the healing of ulcers in patients with bullous morphea. PMID:23527731

  2. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  3. [A Case of Peristomal Cutaneous Ulcer Following Amebic Colitis Caused by Entamoeba histolytica].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Jun; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sato, Tomotaka

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese male with a history of a rectal ulcer and rectovesical fistula following brachytherapy and radiotherapy for prostate cancer, who had undergone colostomy and vesicotomy presented with a painful peristomal ulcer of approximately 5 x 2.5cm adjacent to the direction of 6 o'clock of the stoma in his left lower abdomen. Although he was admitted to be treated with intravenous antibiotics and topical debridement, the ulcer was rapidly increasing. In the laboratory findings, WBC was 12,400/μL, CRP was 16.9 mg/dL, ESR was 105mm in the first hour. Contrast enhanced CT images showed a wide high density area of skin and subcutaneous tissue around the stoma and dillitation of the transverse and descending colon. Colonoscopy showed furred profound ulcers in the rectum. A biopsy from the ulcer floor submitted to histopathology showed necrotic tissue with a mixed inflammatory infiltrates mainly composed of neutrophils and lymphocytes in the dermis. We suspected pyoderma gangrenosum with an inflammatory bowel disease in the beginning. Although he was started on oral prednisolone 60 mg daily, the ulcer did not respond to treatment. Additional methylprednisolone pulse therapy, intravenous cyclosporine and granulocytapheresis were also ineffective. A biopsy specimen from the skin ulcer margin showed erythrophagocytosis by trophozoites of amebae which were identified on PAS stained slides. The PCR method and stool examination showed positive for Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), but serum antibodies were negative. Within two weeks of treatment with oral metronidazole 2,250 mg/day and topical metronidazole ointment, resolution of the ulcer was observed, then the prednisolone dosage was tapered. A split-thickness skin graft was used to cover the ulcer with a successful result. Even though we originally misdiagnosed this case, we finally reached a diagnosis of amebiasis. It is important to take account of amebiasis in the differential diagnosis of intractable

  4. An uncommon cause of chest pain – penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests were non-significant including cardiac troponins, an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a chest X-ray on her first visit. Upon her second visit, she underwent a computed tomography angiogram of chest with contrast which revealed a PAU with an intramural hematoma in descending aorta. The PAU was finally diagnosed with an exclusion of other chest pain causes. She was treated non-surgically with a blood pressure control strategy and pain management. After a 2-month period of smoking cessation and following the achievement of a controlled blood pressure, she felt well without chest pain. PMID:27406453

  5. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  6. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries. PMID:26939278

  7. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by many disorders. These include: Canker sores Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may also appear as a mouth ulcer.

  8. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into simple substances. The ... the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are caused when ...

  9. Diffusional kurtosis MRI of the lower leg: changes caused by passive muscle elongation and shortening.

    PubMed

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C; Boss, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis MRI (DKI) quantifies the deviation of water diffusion from a Gaussian distribution. We investigated the influence of passive elongation and shortening of the lower leg muscles on the DKI parameters D (diffusion coefficient) and K (kurtosis). After approval by the local ethics committee, eight healthy volunteers (age, 29.1 ± 2.9 years) underwent MRI of the lower leg at 3 T. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with 10 different b values at three ankle positions (passive dorsiflexion 10°, neutral position 0°, passive plantar flexion 40°). Parametrical maps of D and K were obtained by voxel-wise fitting of the signal intensities using a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. D and K were measured in the tibialis anterior, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. In the neutral position, D and K values were in the range between 1.66-1.79 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s and 0.21-0.39, respectively. D and K increased with passive shortening, and decreased with passive elongation, which could also be illustrated on the parametrical maps. In dorsiflexion, D (p < 0.01) and K (p = 0.036) were higher in the tibialis anterior than in the medial gastrocnemius. In plantar flexion, the opposite was found for K (p = 0.035). DKI parameters in the lower leg muscles are significantly influenced by the ankle joint position, indicating that the diffusion of water molecules in skeletal muscle deviates from a Gaussian distribution depending on muscle tonus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061811

  10. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  11. [Hemodynamic basis for the development of varicose ulcers and their therapy].

    PubMed

    Recek, C

    2003-09-01

    The prevalence of leg ulcers is about 1%, approximately 75% of them are of venous origin. The precondition for the development of venous ulcers is ambulatory venous hypertension. It is assumed than a linear correlation exists between the severity of ambulatory venous hypertension and the incidence of venous ulcers. Venous ulcers caused by superficial vein reflux are called varicose ulcers and are more frequent than postthrombotic ones. Crossectomy removes the hemodynamic disorder responsible for the development of varicose ulcers and creates conditions for a quick and mostly definitive ulcer healing. In cases with simultaneous reflux in the saphenous and femoral veins the saphenous reflux is responsible for the severity of venous disorder, whereas femoral reflux is hemodynamically unimportant. Selective abolition of saphenous reflux restores normal hemodynamic conditions in such cases. Compressive therapy continues to be the most frequently used therapeutic procedure in the treatment of venous ulcers; it must be considered as a symptomatic measure, because it is not able to substantially affect the underlying venous disorder in spite of the fact that the correctly lying bandage positively influences venous hemodynamics. The diagnostic procedure in patients with leg ulcers should screen out cases with varicose ulcers; abolition of superficial vein reflux can deliver these patients from their annoying disease. PMID:14658257

  12. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a nervous system problem that causes you to feel an unstoppable urge to get ... DA, Bista SR, et al. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an ...

  13. Causes of Ring-Related Leg Injuries in Birds – Evidence and Recommendations from Four Field Studies

    PubMed Central

    Griesser, Michael; Schneider, Nicole A.; Collis, Mary-Anne; Overs, Anthony; Guppy, Michael; Guppy, Sarah; Takeuchi, Naoko; Collins, Pete; Peters, Anne; Hall, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main techniques for recognizing individuals in avian field research is marking birds with plastic and metal leg rings. However, in some species individuals may react negatively to rings, causing leg injuries and, in extreme cases, the loss of a foot or limb. Here, we report problems that arise from ringing and illustrate solutions based on field data from Brown Thornbills (Acanthiza pusilla) (2 populations), Siberian Jays (Perisoreus infaustus) and Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens (Malurus coronatus). We encountered three problems caused by plastic rings: inflammations triggered by material accumulating under the ring (Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens), contact inflammations as a consequence of plastic rings touching the foot or tibio-tarsal joint (Brown Thornbills), and toes or the foot getting trapped in partly unwrapped flat-band colour rings (Siberian Jays). Metal rings caused two problems: the edges of aluminium rings bent inwards if mounted on top of each other (Brown Thornbills), and too small a ring size led to inflammation (Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens). We overcame these problems by changing the ringing technique (using different ring types or larger rings), or using different adhesive. Additionally, we developed and tested a novel, simple technique of gluing plastic rings onto metal rings in Brown Thornbills. A review of studies reporting ring injuries (N = 23) showed that small birds (<55 g body weight) are more prone to leg infections while larger birds (>35 g) tend to get rings stuck over their feet. We give methodological advice on how these problems can be avoided, and suggest a ringing hazard index to compare the impact of ringing in terms of injury on different bird species. Finally, to facilitate improvements in ringing techniques, we encourage online deposition of information regarding ringing injuries of birds at a website hosted by the European Union for Bird Ringing (EURING). PMID:23300574

  14. [Effects of mono-, poly- and composite probiotics on the ulceration caused by restraint stress].

    PubMed

    Virchenko, O V; Falalyeyeva, T M; Beregova, T V; Spivak, M Y; Lazarenko, L M; Demchenko, O M

    2015-01-01

    It was studied the effect of probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, Bifidobacterium animalis VKB and Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, and their mixtures on erosive and ulcerative lesions of the gastric mucosa (GM) of rats. GM was induced by water-immersion restraint stress. It was found that investigated probiotics did not have gastroprotective properties under a single and seven-day prophylactic administration. However, multiprobiotics (polyprobiotic Bifidobacterium animalis VKL and Bifidobacterium animalis VKB and composite probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, Bifidobacterium animalis VKB and Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280) reduced the erosive and ulcerative lesions and the intensity of bleeding in rat GM when given within 14 days. It was shown that one of the mechanisms of antiulcer preventive effect of the multistrain probiotics is the restoration of pro/antioxidant balance in the GM under the stress action. The obtained results show the effectiveness of poly- and composite probiotics in the gastric ulcer prevention. PMID:26040033

  15. Systemic candidiasis in farm-reared red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) caused by Leucosporidium spp

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This report describes the results of radiological, histological and molecular examination of three farm-reared red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) affected by candidiasis. Case presentation Three juvenile farm-reared red-legged partridges in a batch of 100 of the same species were sent for clinical and pathological investigations. The owner referred of a sudden isolation of the sick animals, with apathy, diarrhea, ruffled plumage and respiratory rattles. Post mortem total body lateral projection radiograph showed an increased perihilar interstitial pattern and air bronchogram signs due to lung edema. At necropsy, carcasses showed cachexia; the pericloacal region was soiled by diarrheic fecal material. From the mouth to the intestine, a mucous yellowish fluid was present on a slightly reddish mucosa. Histopathology showed slight edema and congestion with different free fungal elements, referable to blastospores, hyphae and pseudohyphae. Biomolecular exam identified the most similar sequences as belonging to Leucosporidium scottii. Conclusion To our knowledge, this case report describes for the first time this fungal species as a causative agent of candidiasis in birds. PMID:22709925

  16. Persistence of secondary restless legs syndrome in a phantom limb caused by end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Shingo; Hitsumoto, Akiko; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Usui, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Our patient had secondary restless legs syndrome (RLS) in the left lower limb caused by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Severe RLS symptoms persisted even after amputation of the affected limb. Considering that oral administration of a dopamine receptor agonist was effective in treating the RLS in the phantom limb in this case, dysfunction of the central dopaminergic system was thought to be involved in the phantom limb-RLS mechanism. The persistence of RLS symptoms even after amputation of the affected limb suggests that the area responsible for ESRD-related RLS symptoms exists at the spinal level or in the higher central nervous system. PMID:23545682

  17. A Rare Cause of Chronic Life Threatening Bleeding in a Girl: The Ulcerated Blind Loops

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rasik; Shah, Nitin; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Ulceration in a blind loop can lead to massive gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding. A 13-year old girl presented with symptomatic melena requiring repeated blood transfusion since childhood. She was an operated case of small bowel atresia in neonatal life. Her upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Operation showed presence of multiple ulcers in two blind loops (parts of previous side to side anastomosis) and at the anastomotic site. She underwent resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the small bowel leading to complete resolution of melena and anemia. PMID:27170918

  18. A Rare Cause of Chronic Life Threatening Bleeding in a Girl: The Ulcerated Blind Loops.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Abhijeet D; Shah, Rasik; Shah, Nitin; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Ulceration in a blind loop can lead to massive gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding. A 13-year old girl presented with symptomatic melena requiring repeated blood transfusion since childhood. She was an operated case of small bowel atresia in neonatal life. Her upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Operation showed presence of multiple ulcers in two blind loops (parts of previous side to side anastomosis) and at the anastomotic site. She underwent resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the small bowel leading to complete resolution of melena and anemia. PMID:27170918

  19. Gastrointestinal symptoms resembling ulcerative proctitis caused by larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax

    PubMed Central

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Gaillard, Julien; Borée-Moreau, Diane; Bailly, Éric; Andres, Christian R; Chandenier, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of facultative intestinal myiasis due to larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax, also named the rat-tailed maggots. The development of larvae in the lower bowel was responsible for non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms that resembled ulcerative proctitis. The diagnosis was established upon the observation of four spontaneously excreted mobile larvae. The definite identification of the E. tenax species was made possible by scanning electron microscopy. The clinical outcome was satisfactory. PMID:24766340

  20. Gastrointestinal symptoms resembling ulcerative proctitis caused by larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax.

    PubMed

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Gaillard, Julien; Borée-Moreau, Diane; Bailly, Éric; Andres, Christian R; Chandenier, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of facultative intestinal myiasis due to larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax, also named the rat-tailed maggots. The development of larvae in the lower bowel was responsible for non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms that resembled ulcerative proctitis. The diagnosis was established upon the observation of four spontaneously excreted mobile larvae. The definite identification of the E. tenax species was made possible by scanning electron microscopy. The clinical outcome was satisfactory. PMID:24766340

  1. Hypostatic ulcers in 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verp, Marion S; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Martin, Alice O

    1983-01-01

    Hypostatic leg ulcers, probably secondary to vascular insufficiency, were observed in two adult men with 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome. The association between leg ulcers and 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome deserves increased attention because knowledge of the association may alert clinicians to an otherwise unsuspected chromosome abnormality. PMID:6842542

  2. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, Ryan; Miller, Debra; Vandersea, Mark; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela; Bennett, Wayne

    2010-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  3. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saylor, Ryan K.; Miller, Debra L.; Vandersea, Mark W.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Bennett, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  4. Oral Mucosal Ulceration Caused by the Topical Application of a Concentrated Propolis Extract

    PubMed Central

    Wimardhani, Yuniardini Septorini

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a resinous mixture that is collected by honey bees from tree buds, sap flow, and other botanical sources. Propolis has been extensively used in medicine, dentistry, and cosmetics; however, unwanted effects have been reported. This paper reports a case of oral mucosal burn in a 50-year-old patient, who used an overnight application of concentrated propolis to overcome a throbbing pain in the right upper posterior mucosa. The patient was otherwise healthy and was not receiving any medication. She presented with painful shallow multiple irregular ulcers measuring 0.3–1 cm in diameter that were located on the right buccal mucosa and hard palate mucosa, in addition to the gingival mucosa surrounding tooth 17. Propolis-induced oral mucosal burn was diagnosed. The ulcer cleared after the prescription of tetracycline mouthwash, accompanied with Doloneurobion. The patient was further treated with carbamazepine to address the persistent throbbing pain in the affected area, which was suspected to be trigeminal neuralgia. This report provides another alert to clinicians about the potential adverse effects of propolis use for the treatment of oral diseases, despite its natural origin. PMID:25276439

  5. Infection with fully mature Corynosoma cf. validum causes ulcers in the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Ito, Takahiro; Sato, Tomonobu; Goto, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshinori; Nakao, Minoru; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-06-01

    Corynosoma is a parasite that can normally be found in the intestinal tract of fish-eating mammals, particularly in seals and birds. The present case proposed that Corynosoma could attain full maturity in the human intestine. A 70-year-old female complained of abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a swelling of the intraperitoneal lymph nodes with no responsible lesion. Video capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy detected several ulcerations and one parasite in the ileum, which was tightly attached at the bottom of the ulcerations. The parasite was cylindrical and measured approximately 10 mm (long) x 3 mm (wide). Pathologically, the worm had a four-layered body wall and contained embryonated eggs. The sequences of the parasite-derived nuclear ribosomal DNA fragment and mitochondrial DNA fragment of cox1 were almost identical to those of Corynosoma validum. The patient's abdominal pain immediately improved after the administration of pyrantel pamoate (1,500 mg). Corynosoma was possibly the responsible disease in a patient who complained of abdominal pain and in whom no responsible lesion was detected by CT, gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Examinations of the small intestines should be aggressively performed in such cases. PMID:27098251

  6. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a medical device in various forms containing Triticum vulgare for the treatment of venous leg ulcers – a randomized pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Marco; Macchia, Michela; Panduri, Salvatore; Paggi, Battistino; Saponati, Giorgio; Dini, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the topical application of an aqueous extract of Triticum vulgare (TV) in different vehicles (cream, impregnated gauzes, foam, hydrogel, and dressing gel) for the treatment of venous lower leg ulcers. Fifty patients were randomized to receive one of the five investigational vehicles. Treatment was performed up to complete healing or to a maximum of 29 days. The wound size reduction from baseline was the primary efficacy variable, which was measured by means of a noninvasive laser scanner instrument for wound assessment. In all groups, apart from the foam group, a similar trend toward the reduction of the surface area was observed. The cream showed the greatest effect on the mean reduction of the lesion size. At last visit, six ulcers were healed: two in the cream group, three in the gauze group, and one in the dressing gel group. In the patients treated with the cream, the gauzes, the hydrogel, and the dressing gel, the reduction of lesion size was 40%–50%; the reduction was smaller in the foam group. No impact in terms of age on the healing process was found. The Total Symptoms Score decreased in all groups during the study; a greater efficacy in terms of signs/symptoms was observed in the patients treated with the gauzes. In the dressing gel group, one patient had an infection of the wound after 3 weeks of treatment and 2 of colonization, leading to a systemic antibiotic treatment. The events were judged as nonrelated to the device used. On the basis of the results, it could be argued that the medical device may be useful in the treatment of chronic venous ulcers. PMID:26060395

  7. [Gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigenaga; Kashida, Hiroshi; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the acid secretion amount is increased by westernization of foods and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected patient's decrease in Japanese. Therefore, the recent tendencies are decrease of peptic ulcer diseases by H. pylori infection and increase of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) ulcers. The endoscopic hemostasis should be performed for upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcers in the first choice. A surgery or interventional radiology (IVR) should be performed in the unsuccessfulness of endoscopic hemostasis. H. pylori eradication therapy is effective for healing and prevention of recurrence from peptic ulcers. For prevention of recurrence of NSAIDs ulcers, therapy with proton pump inhibitor is effective. PMID:26165067

  8. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  9. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soldera, Jonathan; Nedel, Wagner Luis; Cardoso, Paulo Ricardo Cerveira; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Coagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections. CASE REPORT The case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin. CONCLUSIONS The reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections. PMID:23538597

  10. [Pyoderma gangrenosum, an etiology of chronic ulcer disregarded?].

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Patrice; Koch, Nathalie; Erba, Paolo; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-02-10

    We report the case of a 65years old patient followed for more than 4 years for a leg ulcer in whom a rare combination of pyoderma gangrenosum with breast cancer was diagnosed. This is a rare skin disease, usually associated with systemic disease: digestive, rheumatological or malignant. The diagnosis is mainly clinical. Taking patient diagnostic management has two objectives: to eliminate other causes of skin ulcer and determine whether there is a concomitant illness that can be treated. Bacteriological swab and a biopsy should always be performed. The treatment consists of topical corticosteroids and systemic therapy with corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27039446

  11. Use of wound dressings to enhance prevention of pressure ulcers caused by medical devices.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, Christopher Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Medical device related pressure ulcers (MDR PUs) are defined as pressure injuries associated with the use of devices applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes wherein the PU that develops has the same configuration as the device. Many institutions have reduced the incidence of traditional PUs (sacral, buttock and heel) and therefore the significance of MDR PU has become more apparent. The highest risk of MDR PU has been reported to be patients with impaired sensory perception, such as neuropathy, and an impaired ability for the patient to communicate discomfort, for example, oral intubation, language barriers, unconsciousness or non-verbal state. Patients in critical care units typify the high-risk patient and they often require more devices for monitoring and therapeutic purposes. An expert panel met to review the evidence on the prevention of MDR PUs and arrived at these conclusions: (i) consider applying dressings that demonstrate pressure redistribution and absorb moisture from body areas in contact with medical devices, tubing and fixators, (ii) in addition to dressings applied beneath medical devices, continue to lift and/or move the medical device to examine the skin beneath it and reposition for pressure relief and (iii) when simple repositioning does not relieve pressure, it is important not to create more pressure by placing dressings beneath tight devices. PMID:23809279

  12. A giant phyllodes tumor causing ulceration and severe breast disfigurement: case report and review of giant phyllodes

    PubMed Central

    Sbeih, Mohammed A.; Engdahl, Ryan; Landa, Marina; Ojutiku, Oreoluwa; Morrison, Norman; Depaz, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial tumors that account for <1% of the breast tumors in women. These tumors are often benign unilateral lesions of the female breast (70%). Less common are malignant phyllodes, which have the potential for hematogenous spread. Phyllodes tumors can be seen in all age groups, and the median age of presentation is 45 years. Surgery is the main form of treatment. Wide excisions with margins of 1cm are suggested. While smaller and moderate size phyllodes may typically be seen, gigantic ones are very rare. These may be seen in neglected tumors. By definition, a giant phyllodes tumor is one larger than 10 cm in diameter. We report a gigantic phyllodes tumor that grew over 7 years period causing significant ulceration and disfigurement and review features of these tumors and management. PMID:26703928

  13. A giant phyllodes tumor causing ulceration and severe breast disfigurement: case report and review of giant phyllodes.

    PubMed

    Sbeih, Mohammed A; Engdahl, Ryan; Landa, Marina; Ojutiku, Oreoluwa; Morrison, Norman; Depaz, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial tumors that account for <1% of the breast tumors in women. These tumors are often benign unilateral lesions of the female breast (70%). Less common are malignant phyllodes, which have the potential for hematogenous spread. Phyllodes tumors can be seen in all age groups, and the median age of presentation is 45 years. Surgery is the main form of treatment. Wide excisions with margins of 1cm are suggested. While smaller and moderate size phyllodes may typically be seen, gigantic ones are very rare. These may be seen in neglected tumors. By definition, a giant phyllodes tumor is one larger than 10 cm in diameter. We report a gigantic phyllodes tumor that grew over 7 years period causing significant ulceration and disfigurement and review features of these tumors and management. PMID:26703928

  14. Echo-Guided Differential Popliteal Block in an Obese Patient With Intractable Painful Leg Ulcer for Early Discharge in Day Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zampi, Maddalena; Iacovazzo, Carmine; Pagano, Tommaso; Buonanno, Pasquale; Carlomagno, Mariella; Cianciulli, Flavia; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Pain management is extremely important in day surgery, and it is one of the limiting factors for this type of procedures. Locoregional anesthesia is strongly recommended for day surgery; nevertheless, it could be very difficult to localize nerve position especially in obese patients. Furthermore, a complete nerve blockade could result in a delayed discharge. We present a case of analgesic ultrasound-guided block of tibial and common peroneal nerves in the popliteal fossa without any motor function involvement in an obese patient undergoing debridement of an infected lower limb ulcer; all previous attempts of surgical debridement in day surgery with topical anesthetics had failed because of discomfort due to pain. Our aim was to ensure an optimal degree of analgesia and, at the same time, to save motor function in order to make early discharge possible. We used 15 mL ropivacaine 0.375% to obtain a differential block, taking advantage of sensitive fibers selectivity of ropivacaine. Surgical debridement was performed successfully. Our peripheral blockade was able to provide significantly prolonged analgesia without motor block that guaranteed a safe and early discharge according to the Post Anesthetic Discharge Scoring System. The satisfaction expressed by the patient and her comfort during the procedure support the choice of this approach for intractable painful ulcers of lower limb. PMID:27179044

  15. Epidemiology of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kurata, J H; Haile, B M

    1984-05-01

    In the United States about four million people have active peptic ulcers and about 350,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Four times as many duodenal ulcers as gastric ulcers are diagnosed. Approximately 3000 deaths per year in the United States are due to duodenal ulcer and 3000 to gastric ulcer. There has been a marked decrease in reported hospitalization and mortality rates for peptic ulcer in the United States. Changes in criteria for selecting the underlying cause of death might account for some of the apparent decrease in ulcer mortality rates. Hospitalization rates for duodenal ulcers decreased nearly 50 per cent from 1970 to 1978, but hospitalization rates for gastric ulcers did not decrease. Although this decrease in hospitalization rates may reflect a decrease in duodenal ulcer disease incidence, it appears that changes in coding practices, hospitalization criteria, and diagnostic procedures have contributed to the reported declines in peptic ulcer hospitalization and mortality rates. There is no good evidence to support the popular belief that peptic ulcer is most common in the spring and autumn. The most consistent pattern appears to be low ulcer rates in the summer. There is strong evidence that cigarette smoking, regular use of aspirin, and prolonged use of steroids are associated with the development of peptic ulcer. There is some evidence that coffee and aspirin substitutes may affect ulcers, but most studies do not implicate alcohol, food, or psychological stress as causes of ulcer disease. Genetic factors play a role in both duodenal and gastric ulcer. The first-degree relatives of patients with duodenal ulcer have a two- to threefold increase in risk of getting duodenal ulcer and relatives of gastric ulcer patients have a similarly increased risk of getting a gastric ulcer. About half of the patients with duodenal ulcer have elevated plasma pepsinogen I. A small increase in risk of duodenal ulcer is found in persons with blood group O and in

  16. A novel, non-invasive diagnostic clinical procedure for the determination of an oxygenation status of chronic lower leg ulcers using peri-ulceral transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements: Results of its application in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)

    PubMed Central

    Barnikol, Wolfgang K. R.; Pötzschke, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The basis for the new procedure is the simultaneous transcutaneous measurement of the peri-ulceral oxygen partial pressure (tcPO2), using a minimum of 4 electrodes which are placed as close to the wound margin as possible, additionally, as a challenge the patient inhales pure oxygen for approximately 15 minutes. In order to evaluate the measurement data and to characterise the wounds, two new oxygen parameters were defined: (1) the oxygen characteristic (K-PO2), and (2) the oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO2) of a chronic wound. The first of these is the arithmetic mean of the two lowest tcPO2 measurement values, and the second is the variation coefficient of the four measurement values. Using the K-PO2 parameter, a grading of wound hypoxia can be obtained. To begin with, the physiologically regulated (and still compensated) hypoxia with K-PO2 values of between 35 and 40 mmHg is distinguished from the pathological decompensated hypoxia with K-PO2 values of between 0 and 35 mmHg; the first of these still stimulates self-healing (within the limits of the oxygen balance). The decompensated hypoxia can be (arbitrarily) divided into “simple” hypoxia (Grade I), intense hypoxia (Grade II) and extreme hypoxia (Grade III), with the possibility of intermediate grades (I/II and II/III). Measurements were carried out using the new procedure on the skin of the right inner ankle of 21 healthy volunteers of various ages, and in 17 CVI (chronic venous insufficiency) wounds. Sixteen of the 17 CVI wounds (i.e., 94%) were found to be pathologically hypoxic, a state which was not found in any of the healthy volunteers. The oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO2) of the individual chronic wounds increased exponentially as a function of the hypoxia grading (K-PO2), with a 10-fold increase with extreme hypoxia in contrast to a constant value of approximately 14% in the healthy volunteers. This pronounced oxygen inhomogeneity explains inhomogeneous wound healings, resulting in the so-called mosaic

  17. First report of myiasis caused by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a diabetic foot ulcer patient in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Olea, María Sofía; Centeno, Néstor; Aybar, Cecilia Adriana Veggiani; Ortega, Eugenia Silvana; Galante, Guillermina Begoña; Olea, Luis; Juri, María Julia Dantur

    2014-02-01

    Myiasis is usually caused by flies of the Calliphoridae family, and Cochliomyia hominivorax is the etiological agent most frequently found in myiasis. The first case of myiasis in a diabetic foot of a 54-year-old male patient in Argentina is reported. The patient attended the hospital of the capital city of Tucumán Province for a consultation concerning an ulcer in his right foot, where the larval specimens were found. The identification of the immature larvae was based on their morphological characters, such as the cylindrical, segmented, white yellow-coloured body and tracheas with strong pigmentation. The larvae were removed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics. The larvae were reared until the adults were obtained. The adults were identified by the setose basal vein in the upper surface of the wing, denuded lower surface of the wing, short and reduced palps, and parafrontalia with black hairs outside the front row of setae. The main factor that favoured the development of myiasis is due to diabetes, which caused a loss of sensibility in the limb that resulted in late consultation. Moreover, the poor personal hygiene attracted the flies, and the foul-smelling discharge from the wound favoured the female's oviposition. There is a need to implement a program for prevention of myiasis, in which the population is made aware not only of the importance of good personal hygiene and home sanitation but also of the degree of implication of flies in the occurrence and development of this disease. PMID:24623889

  18. First Report of Myiasis Caused by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patient in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Olea, María Sofía; Centeno, Néstor; Aybar, Cecilia Adriana Veggiani; Ortega, Eugenia Silvana; Galante, Guillermina Begoña; Olea, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Myiasis is usually caused by flies of the Calliphoridae family, and Cochliomyia hominivorax is the etiological agent most frequently found in myiasis. The first case of myiasis in a diabetic foot of a 54-year-old male patient in Argentina is reported. The patient attended the hospital of the capital city of Tucumán Province for a consultation concerning an ulcer in his right foot, where the larval specimens were found. The identification of the immature larvae was based on their morphological characters, such as the cylindrical, segmented, white yellow-coloured body and tracheas with strong pigmentation. The larvae were removed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics. The larvae were reared until the adults were obtained. The adults were identified by the setose basal vein in the upper surface of the wing, denuded lower surface of the wing, short and reduced palps, and parafrontalia with black hairs outside the front row of setae. The main factor that favoured the development of myiasis is due to diabetes, which caused a loss of sensibility in the limb that resulted in late consultation. Moreover, the poor personal hygiene attracted the flies, and the foul-smelling discharge from the wound favoured the female's oviposition. There is a need to implement a program for prevention of myiasis, in which the population is made aware not only of the importance of good personal hygiene and home sanitation but also of the degree of implication of flies in the occurrence and development of this disease. PMID:24623889

  19. A case of HIV ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated ulcers must be distinguished from idiopathic anal fissures in HIV-positive patients and from other sexually transmitted diseases that cause anogenital ulcers as the treatments differ. PMID:26266040

  20. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  1. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer –A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Jyotsna; Huria, Anju; Gupta, Pratiksha; Dalal, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Acute abdomen during pregnancy is a medico-surgical emergency demanding concerted, synchronized specialties approach of obstetrician, surgeon and gastroenterologist. Duodenal perforation is one of the rarer causes of acute abdomen in pregnancy. Here, we report a case of duodenal perforation with peritonitis in third trimester of pregnancy requiring surgical management. Our aim of reporting this case is to stress the physicians to keep the differential of duodenal perforation also in mind while dealing with cases of acute abdomen in pregnancy and to proceed with multidisciplinary approach for better feto-maternal outcome. PMID:25386494

  2. [Carpal tunnel syndrome revealed by digital ulcerations caused by arterial vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Léger, O; Lavallé, F

    2005-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome presenting as a trophic disorder in the hand is unusual. We report the case of a 66 year old man in whom nerve conduction tests confirmed compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and vasospasm in the corresponding area was demonstrated by arteriography for, we believe, the first time. Simple decompression of the carpal tunnel brought about total recovery. The mechanism of the autonomic disorders found in carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The clinical case that we report objectively demonstrates the vasospasm caused by the compression of the autonomic fibres of the median nerve. PMID:15754710

  3. Extensive oral mucosal ulcerations caused by misuse of a commercial mouthwash.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, B K; Gier, R; Thurlow, T

    1999-08-01

    This case report describes severe mucosal injuries following misuse of an undiluted over-the-counter mouthwash with a high alcohol content (70%), oil of peppermint and arnica. The mouthwash was to be diluted 5:1 with water. The patient used undiluted solution to better treat her self-diagnosed "contagious gum infection." She experienced burning sensation with each rinse and developed severe mucosal injuries subsequently. Her oral condition improved within 48 hours following discontinuation of use of the mouthwash and application of a mixture of Benadryl Elixir, Maalox Plain, and 2% viscous Lidocaine. A detailed history and review of a patient's medical condition will help to differentiate self-induced mucosal injuries from those caused by an allergic reaction or skin diseases. PMID:10467509

  4. Effect of psychotropic drugs on gastric ulcers induced by immobilization: Increased protective effect of amitriptyline caused by chlordiazepoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, J. E.; Huerlimann, A.

    1980-01-01

    Amitriptyline, but not chlordiazepoxide, protects rats from the occurrence of gastric erosions and ulcers following immobilization. When, however, chlordiazepoxide is given together with amitriptyline the protective effect of the latter is markedly increased.

  5. Myxoma of the upper leg originating from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHANG, XUE-YAN; WANG, BIN; CAO, QING-YONG

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma is rare in the upper leg. The current study presents the case of a large tumor in the right upper leg. The tumor extended to pelvic cavity and was found to be connected with a cystic and solid neoplasm that was adjacent to the ascending colon in the right lower quadrant. The large tumor of the upper leg had existed for 15 years and had ulcerated through the skin 4 days prior to admittance. Palliative surgery was performed, with histological findings of a myxoma. Since appendiceal mucinous neoplasms may invade organizations outside of the mucous layer of the appendix and cause secondary peritoneal myxoma, this myxoma of the upper leg probably originated from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. PMID:26622844

  6. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  7. A rare cause of severe periorbital edema and dermonecrotic ulcer of the eyelid in a child: brown recluse spider bite.

    PubMed

    Taşkesen, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Sedat; Taş, Taşkin; Keklikçi, Uğur; Taş, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    Spider bites are a worldwide problem. Brown recluse spider bites can lead to severe local or systemic clinical effects, such as edema, necrotic ulcer, rashes, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, malaise, arthralgia, myalgia, hemolysis, leukocytosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal failure, and death. Eyelid bites from brown recluse spiders are rare. We report a child with severe facial edema and a dermonecrotic ulcer on the eyelid. Upon laboratory examination, leukocytosis with a significant left shift was detected. The patient was treated with antibiotics, systemic corticosteroid and conservative therapy that included saline compresses and ocular lubrication. No surgical excision was required. Vision was not impaired. A dermonecrotic ulcer is a severe complication of brown recluse spider bites. Since the diagnosis is difficult, clinical and epidemiological findings and a detailed history are important for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21534346

  8. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  9. In vitro studies on medicinal plants used against bacterial diabetic foot ulcer (BDFU) and urinary tract infected (UTI) causing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Subbu Lakshmi, S; Chelladurai, G; Suresh, B

    2016-09-01

    The pus samples from diabetic foot ulcer patients and urine samples from urinary tract infected patients were collected and inoculated in nutrient agar plates. The colonies showing different morphologies were streaked on selective agar plates. The antibacterial assay of selected commercial antibiotics was tested against the foot ulcer and urinary tract isolates. The result revealed that most of the organisms were found to be resistant against the antibiotics. Screening of antibacterial activity of selected plants, methanol extracts of plants were prepared and tested against foot ulcer pathogens. Among the plants used, the methanolic extract Tragia involucrata was very effective against the foot ulcer pathogens and to separate the compounds present in the methanolic extract of T. involucrata, when it was subjected to column chromatography. The fractions obtained were further checked for their antibacterial property and fraction 1 which inhibited the pathogens, were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the structure of the particular phytochemical compound was elucidated by NMR study. The spices were tested for their antibacterial property against the urinary tract pathogens. Among the spices tested; Allium sativum inhibited the growth of the pathogens isolated from urinary tract infection. It can be concluded that the plants extract can be used to discover natural products that may serve as lead for the development of new pharmaceuticals addressing the major therapeutic needs. PMID:27605764

  10. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients with ulcer bleeding. Am J Gastroenterol . 2012 Mar;107(3):345-60. PMID: 22310222 www.ncbi. ... NSAID-related ulcer complications. Am J Gastroenterol . 2009 Mar;104(3):728-38. McColl KEL. Helicobacter pylori ...