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1

The early phase of psoriatic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of the preclinical phases of the classic autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis has been facilitated by the availability of autoantibody and genetic markers that point firmly towards the early dysregulation of the adaptive immune responses. The association of psoriatic disease with the human leucocyte antigen—Cw0602 (HLA-Cw0602) gene has likewise led to the perception that autoimmunity has a pivotal role

Dennis McGonagle; Zoe Ash; Laura Dickie; Michael McDermott; Sibel Zehra Aydin

2011-01-01

2

New autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease causing articular cartilage and bone destruction. Since irreversible joint destruction can be prevented by intervention at the early stages of disease, early diagnosis of RA is important. In this study, we identified new autoantibodies in the sera of patients with early (less than one year) RA. Methods We screened the sera of 20 RA patients with disease duration less than one year, 19 RA patients with disease duration more than five years and 23 controls on 8,268 human protein arrays. We confirmed the validity of protein array detection by ELISA assays. We then performed epitope mapping with overlapping 15-mers to analyze RA sera reactivity. Results WIBG (within BGCN homolog (Drosophila)), GABARAPL2 (GABA(A) receptor associated protein like 2) and ZNF706 (zinc finger protein 706) proteins are preferentially recognized by autoantibodies from early RA patients. Of interest, autoantibodies to WIBG are very specific for early RA. Indeed, 33% of early RA patients' sera recognize WIBG versus 5% of RA patients with disease duration more than 5 years and 2% of controls. We identified three linear peptides on WIBG GABARAPL2 and ZNF706 that are preferentially recognized by sera of early RA patients. Conclusions We identified new autoantibodies associated with RA with disease duration less than one year. These autoantibodies could be used as diagnosis markers in RA patients. PMID:23886014

2013-01-01

3

Early onset sarcoidosis masquerading as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Symptoms of early onset sarcoidosis characterized by skin eruptions, arthritis, and uveitis mimic those of systemic type juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). We report 2 Japanese patients with early onset sarcoidosis, both of whom were initially diagnosed and treated as having JRA. Intermittent fever and synovial swelling may mask sarcoidosis in children less than 4 years old. PMID:11044836

Yotsumoto, S; Takahashi, Y; Takei, S; Shimada, S; Miyata, K; Kanzaki, T

2000-11-01

4

Early onset sarcoidosis masquerading as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Symptoms of early onset sarcoidosis characterized by skin eruptions, arthritis, and uveitis mimic those of systemic type juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). We report 2 Japanese patients with early onset sarcoidosis, both of whom were initially diagnosed and treated as having JRA. Intermittent fever and synovial swelling may mask sarcoidosis in children less than 4 years old. (J Am Acad Dermatol

Shinichi Yotsumoto; Yoshihiro Takahashi; Shuji Takei; Shoko Shimada; Koichiro Miyata; Tamotsu Kanzaki

2000-01-01

5

Diagnosis and course of early-onset arthritis: results of a special early arthritis clinic compared to routine patient care  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Objective. Early arthritis patients referred to an Early Arthritis Clinic (EAC ) (n= 233) were compared to 241 patients from the routine out-patient clinic with respect to lag time between the onset of symptoms and the visit to the rheumatologist, clinical presentation and the consistency of the diagnosis after 1 yr. Results. The reduction in median lag time for

I. E. VAN DER HORST-BRUINSMA; I. SPEYER; H. VISSER; F. C. BREEDVELD; J. M. W. HAZES

1998-01-01

6

Biomarkers to Diagnose Early Arthritis in Patients With Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Background Psoriatic arthritis is a potentially destructive, inflammatory joint disease that affects 20% to 30% of patients with psoriasis. Psoriasis precedes the onset of joint inflammation by approximately 10 years, providing a unique opportunity to intervene and prevent or delay onset of musculoskeletal manifestations. The emergence of sensitive imaging modalities and cellular biomarkers may facilitate early identification of patients with psoriasis who have subclinical joint disease and might help stratify patients with an early onset of arthritis. Methods The translational studies described herein are focused on the development of cellular biomarkers identified with flow cytometry and cell culture techniques in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Results and Conclusion The combination of power Doppler ultrasound imaging and cellular biomarkers (ie, CD16 and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein) to diagnose early psoriatic arthritis and to stratify patients with established psoriatic arthritis provides a new opportunity to optimize treatment outcomes in this potentially disabling disease.

Chiu, Ya-Hui Grace; Ritchlin, Christopher T.

2014-01-01

7

Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/157338208X362714 Early Science and Medicine 13 (2008) 665-709 www.brill.nl/esm  

E-print Network

� Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/157338208X362714 Early Science and Medicine 13 divisions among historians of science and medicine. I focus on Steno's Myology, showing how his and Medicine 13 (2008) 665-709 I wish to document and reflect on the collaboration between anat- omists

Bertoloni Meli, Domenico

8

New autoantibodies associated with early rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and objectivesRheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoantibody mediated disease. Among the various autoantibodies known in RA, autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA) are highly specific. ACPAs are detected by an ELISA using synthetic cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP). Anti-CCP antibodies identify 60% of RA patients. A negative result in anti-CCP antibody testing does not exclude RA. Therefore, there is a great

C Charpin; M Martin; N Balandraud; E Toussirot; D Wendling; J Roudier; I Auger

2011-01-01

9

The Significance of Temminck’s Work on Biogeography: Early Nineteenth Century Natural History in Leiden, The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

C.J. Temminck, director of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie (now the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden) and a renowned ornithologist, gained his contemporary’s respect thanks\\u000a to the description of many new species and to his detailed monographs on birds. He also published a small number of works\\u000a on biogeography describing the fauna of the Dutch colonies in South

M. Eulàlia Gassó Miracle

2008-01-01

10

Natuurlijk groenbeheer in Leiden  

Microsoft Academic Search

De gemeente Leiden wil zich meer op natuurontwikkling gaan richten. Dit rapport bevat richtlijnen voor een natuurvriendelijk beheer van grasland, oevers, water, ruigte, bosachtige beplantingen en stenige milieus.

A. Koster

2003-01-01

11

Managing early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Systematic overview.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To describe evidence-based management of patients presenting to family physicians with typical signs and symptoms of recent onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). STUDY SELECTION: Articles for critical review were included if relevant to primary care management of early RA (less than 1 year duration). Sources included MEDLINE from 1966 to December 1995, the reference library of the Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, and conference abstracts. FINDINGS: Evidence from randomized, controlled trials supports the short-term benefit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying agents for rheumatic diseases, intravenous pulse corticosteroid therapy, intra-articular therapy, aerobic exercise, patient education, psychologic intervention, home physiotherapy, home occupational therapy, and rehabilitation programs. Some evidence favours acetaminophen for analgesia, low-dose oral corticosteroids for symptom control, and referral to a rheumatologist. Evidence for rest, ice, and heat for symptom control is conflicting and based on low-quality studies. CONCLUSION: Family physicians play an important role in establishing early and accurate diagnosis of RA, coordinating therapy, and providing ongoing support, education, and monitoring to patients and their families. PMID:8688694

Glazier, R.

1996-01-01

12

Universiteit Leiden Opleiding Informatica  

E-print Network

Universiteit Leiden Opleiding Informatica Theory and Applications of Deep Learning Networks Name 2333 CA Leiden The Netherlands #12;Theory and Applications of Deep Learning Networks Leon Helwerda July 2, 2014 Abstract We analyze the capabilities of various deep learning algorithms which employ

Emmerich, Michael

13

Leiden University Leiden University Centre for the  

E-print Network

afgelopen eeuw in materiële zin gemarginaliseerd zijn, terwijl verwijzingen naar `de sharia' in het weerspreken de stelling dat `de sharia' aan een wereldwijde opmars bezig is. #12;Leiden University LUCIS moslims leven conform Sharia, mits dat gebeurt binnen de grenzen van de rechtsstaat en haar wetten. Nico

van den Brink, Jeroen

14

Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... to treat arthritis. These include various types of steroids. Steroids are very helpful medications but they have numerous possible side effects. Steroids should be taken as prescribed, and should never ...

15

A CD4 T cell gene signature for early rheumatoid arthritis implicates interleukin 6-mediated STAT3 signalling, particularly in anti-citrullinated peptide antibody-negative disease  

PubMed Central

Objective We sought clinically relevant predictive biomarkers present in CD4 T-cells, or in serum, that identified those patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) who subsequently develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Total RNA was isolated from highly purified peripheral blood CD4 T cells of 173 early arthritis clinic patients. Paired serum samples were also stored. Microarray analysis of RNA samples was performed and differential transcript expression among 111 ‘training cohort’ patients confirmed using real-time quantitative PCR. Machine learning approaches tested the utility of a classification model among an independent validation cohort presenting with UA (62 patients). Cytokine measurements were performed using a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence detection system. Results A 12-gene transcriptional ‘signature’ identified RA patients in the training cohort and predicted the subsequent development of RA among UA patients in the validation cohort (sensitivity 68%, specificity 70%). STAT3-inducible genes were over-represented in the signature, particularly in anti-citrullinated peptide antibody-negative disease, providing a risk metric of similar predictive value to the Leiden score in seronegative UA (sensitivity 85%, specificity 75%). Baseline levels of serum interleukin 6 (IL-6) (which signals via STAT3) were highest in anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies-negative RA and distinguished this subgroup from non-RA inflammatory synovitis (corrected p<0.05).Paired serum IL-6 measurements correlated strongly with STAT3-inducible gene expression. Conclusion The authors have identified IL-6-mediated STAT-3 signalling in CD4 T cells during the earliest clinical phase of RA, which is most prominent in seronegative disease. While highlighting potential biomarker(s) for early RA, the role of this pathway in disease pathogenesis awaits clarification. PMID:22532634

Pratt, Arthur G; Swan, Daniel C; Richardson, Sarah; Wilson, Gillian; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Young, David A; Isaacs, John D

2012-01-01

16

Psoriatic Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... of arthritis with similar symptoms. If you have psoriasis and start to develop joint pain, it’s important to see your doctor. Early diagnosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis can help prevent irreparable joint ...

17

Uitnodiging Debat over de marketing van Leiden  

E-print Network

Uitnodiging Debat over de marketing van Leiden De werkgroep Leiden. Stad van ontdekkingen organiseert op woensdag 19 april een debat over de marketing van de stad Leiden. Een debatavond over de stad:00 ­ 22:00, inloop vanaf 19:00 Waar: Scheltemacomplex (Marktsteeg 1) Leiden Aanmelden: bureaucommunicatie@leiden

Galis, Frietson

18

Candidate autoantigens identified by mass spectrometry in early rheumatoid arthritis are chaperones and citrullinated glycolytic enzymes  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of our study was to identify new early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) autoantibodies. METHODS: Sera obtained from 110 early untreated RA patients (<6 months) were analyzed by western blot using HL-60 cell extract, separated on one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE, 2-DE). Sera from 50 healthy blood donors and 20 patients with non-RA rheumatisms were used as

Vincent Goëb; Marlène Thomas-L'Otellier; Romain Daveau; Roland Charlionet; Patrice Fardellone; Xavier Le Loët; François Tron; Danièle Gilbert; Olivier Vittecoq

2009-01-01

19

Sterrewacht Leiden De alumni van  

E-print Network

Sterrewacht Leiden De alumni van Sterrenkunde vertellen #12;Sterrenkunde is een all-round opleiding aan de Sterrewacht Leiden. Na de promotie gaan velen door met sterrenkundig onderzoek aan een gemeente Den Haag Michiel van Haarlem Managing Director van LOFAR Jelle Ritzerveld Manager Risk Management

van der Marel, Roeland

20

Clinical significance of rheumatoid factors in early rheumatoid arthritis: results of a follow up study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum rheumatoid factors (RF) were measured yearly in 135 women with rheumatoid arthritis by the Waaler-Rose and latex fixation tests and IgM, IgA, and IgG RF were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The patients were followed up from an early phase of the disease for a mean duration of six years. Patients with a persistently positive RF test,

D van Zeben; J M Hazes; A H Zwinderman; A Cats; E A van der Voort; F C Breedveld

1992-01-01

21

Management of the early and late presentations of rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of Ontario primary care physicians.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine primary care physicians' management of rheumatoid arthritis, ascertain the determinants of management and compare management with that recommended by a current practice panel. DESIGN: Mail survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified computer-generated random sample of 798 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents who chose various items in the management of two hypothetical patients, one with early rheumatoid arthritis and one with late rheumatoid arthritis. Scores for investigations, interventions and referrals for each scenario were generated by summing the recommended items chosen by respondents and then dividing by the total number of items recommended in that category. The scores were examined for their association with physician and practice characteristics and physician attitudes. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.3% (529/775 eligible physicians). Recommended investigations were chosen by more than two thirds of the respondents for both scenarios. Referrals to physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rheumatology, all recommended by the panel, were chosen by 206 (38.9%), 72 (13.6%) and 309 (58.4%) physicians respectively for early rheumatoid arthritis. These proportions were significantly higher for late rheumatoid arthritis (p < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, for early rheumatoid arthritis, internship or residency training in rheumatology was associated with higher investigation and intervention scores, for late rheumatoid arthritis, older physicians had higher intervention scores and female physicians had higher referral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians' investigation of rheumatoid arthritis was in accord with panel recommendations. However, rates of referral to rheumatologists and other health care professionals were very low, especially for the early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. More exposure to rheumatology and to the role of physiotherapy, occupational therapy and social work during primary care training is strongly recommended. PMID:8823213

Glazier, R H; Dalby, D M; Badley, E M; Hawker, G A; Bell, M J; Buchbinder, R; Lineker, S C

1996-01-01

22

Medical, physical and psychological status related to early rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary As part of an international European research project, a longitudinal study was started by the end of 1990 in the northern part of The Netherlands. The study concentrated on recently diagnosed RA patients (N=292), i.e., incident cases up to four years. According to the duration of the disease, five groups of patients had been formed. The early influence of

B. Krol; R. Sanderman; T. Suurmeijer; D. Doeglas; M. VAN RIJSWIJK; M. VAN LEEUWEN

1995-01-01

23

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access New autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis  

E-print Network

(ACPA) [1]. ACPA identify 65% of RA patients. Negative ACPA testing does not exclude RA. To identify new dis- ease affecting 0.5% of the world population. It is character- ized by inflammation of joints of the disease, early diagnosis of RA is important. However, diagnosis of RA can be difficult. Immunologic tests

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Low prevalence of work disability in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) and early rheumatoid arthritis at enrollment into a multi-site registry: results from the catch cohort.  

PubMed

We determined the prevalence of work disability in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) and undifferentiated early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) patients at first enrollment into the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) who met the 2010 ACR criteria versus those not meeting criteria, to determine the impact of meeting new criteria on work disability status. Data at first visit into the cohort were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association of other variables in our database with work disability. 1,487 patients were enrolled in the CATCH study, a multi-site observational, prospective cohort of patients with EIA. 934 patients were excluded (505 based on missing criteria for ACR 2010 classification, as anti-CCP was absent, and 429 were not working for other reasons). Of the 553 patients included, 71 % were female with mean disease duration of 6.4 months. 524 (94.8 %) were employed while 29 (5.2 %) reported work disability at first visit. There were no differences between those meeting 2010 ACR criteria versus those who did not. Baseline characteristics associated with work disability were male gender, age, education, income, HAQ, and positive RF status. The mean HAQ score in work disabled patients was 1.4 versus 0.9 in those who were working (p < 0.001). Disease activity score (DAS28) was not associated with work disability (p = 0.069), nor was tender joint count, swollen joint count, anti-CCP, patient global assessment, or SF-12v2. In the regression model, work disability was associated with lower income levels (p = 0.01) and worse HAQ scores (OR 2.33; p = 0.001), but not significantly associated with male gender (p = 0.08), older age (>50 years; p = 0.3), lower education (p = 0.3) or RF positivity (p = 0.6). We found rates of work disability to be low at entry into this EIA cohort compared to previous studies. There may be potential for intervention in ERA to prevent the development of work disability. PMID:22461187

Mussen, Lauren; Boyd, Tristan; Bykerk, Vivian; de Leon, Faye; Li, Lihua; Boire, Gilles; Hitchon, Carol; Haraoui, Boulos; Thorne, J Carter; Pope, Janet

2013-02-01

25

Universiteit Leiden ICT in Business  

E-print Network

i Universiteit Leiden ICT in Business Living Labs Engaging the end user with Social Media Name be various and this thesis focuses on the potential of Social Media for Living Lab projects. The study will present a model how Social Media could be used in projects, based on literature studies, in depth

Emmerich, Michael

26

Predictors of Change in Bodily Pain in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Inception Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate possible predictors for lack of pain improvement after 1 year of treatment for early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (ERAN) database was used for analysis of baseline and 1-year pain data. The ERAN is a hospital-based inception cohort of 1,189 people. Short Form 36 questionnaire bodily pain scores were used to calculate change in pain at 1 year as the outcome. The proportion of the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) attributable to patient-reported components (joint tenderness and visual analog scale score; DAS28-P) at baseline was derived as a predictor. Predictors of less improvement in pain were investigated using adjusted odds ratios (ORadj) generated by logistic regression, adjusting for 14 additional clinical and demographic covariates. Results Greater pain at baseline was associated with sex, high DAS28, worse mental health, and smoking. Most patients with early RA reported incomplete improvement in bodily pain after 1 year. The DAS28-P index did not significantly change in the patients whose disease remained active. Less improvement in pain was predicted by female sex (ORadj 3.41, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.35–8.64) and a high DAS28-P index at baseline (ORadj for tertiles 2.09, 95% CI 1.24–3.55). Other conventional RA risk factors did not predict pain changes. Conclusion The factors most likely to predict less improvement in pain in early RA are female sex and a high DAS28-P index. A high DAS28-P index may reflect greater contributions of noninflammatory factors, such as central sensitization, to pain. Strategies in addition to inflammatory disease suppression may be required to adequately treat pain. PMID:22556121

McWilliams, Daniel F; Zhang, Weiya; Mansell, Josephine S; Kiely, Patrick D W; Young, Adam; Walsh, David A

2012-01-01

27

Arthritis severity locus Cia4 is an early regulator of IL-6, IL-1?, and NF-?B activators' expression in pristane-induced arthritis  

PubMed Central

Cia4 is a locus on rat chromosome 7 that regulates disease severity and joint damage in models of rheumatoid arthritis, including pristane-induced arthritis (PIA). To identify molecular processes regulated by Cia4, synovial tissues from MHC-identical DA (severe erosive) and DA.F344(Cia4) congenics (mild nonerosive) rats were collected at preclinical and recent onset stages following the induction of PIA and analyzed for gene expression levels. Il6 levels were significantly higher in DA compared with congenics on day 10 (135-fold) after PIA induction (preclinical stage) and remained increased on days 14 (47.7-fold) and 18 (29.41-fold). Il6 increased before Il1b suggesting that Il6 could be driving Il1b expression and early synovial inflammation; 187 genes had significantly different expression levels and included inflammatory mediators increased in DA such Slpi (10.94-fold), Ccl7 (5.17-fold), and Litaf (2.09-fold). Syk or NF-?B activating and interacting genes, including Cd74 Ccl21, were increased in DA; 59 genes implicated in cancer-related phenotypes were increased in DA. Genes involved in cell metabolism, transport across membranes, and tissue protection such as Dgat1, Dhcr7, and Slc1a1 were increased in DA.F344(Cia4) congenics; 21 genes differentially expressed or expressed in only one of the strains were located within the Cia4 interval and could be the gene accounting for the arthritis effect. In conclusion, the Cia4 interval contains at least one new arthritis gene that regulates early Il6, Il1b expression, and other inflammatory mediators. This gene regulates the expression of cancer genes that could mediate the development of synovial hyperplasia and invasion, and cartilage and bone destruction. PMID:23695883

Brenner, Max; Laragione, Teresina

2013-01-01

28

Leiden University/ Leiden Institute of Advance Computer Science (LIACS) "Sponsorships for Businesses"  

E-print Network

, electronics, logistics, astronomic research, construction and engineering: Smart Computing for Science in computer science that your company is facing or a detailed presentation by one of the researchers. o Leiden University/ Leiden Institute of Advance Computer Science (LIACS) "Sponsorships

Emmerich, Michael

29

Peer-to-peer mentoring for individuals with early inflammatory arthritis: feasibility pilot  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of early peer support to improve the health and quality of life of individuals with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Design Feasibility study using the 2008 Medical Research Council framework as a theoretical basis. A literature review, environmental scan, and interviews with patients, families and healthcare providers guided the development of peer mentor training sessions and a peer-to-peer mentoring programme. Peer mentors were trained and paired with a mentee to receive (face-to-face or telephone) support over 12?weeks. Setting Two academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants Nine pairs consisting of one peer mentor and one mentee were matched based on factors such as age and work status. Primary outcome measure Mentee outcomes of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/biological treatment use, self-efficacy, self-management, health-related quality of life, anxiety, coping efficacy, social support and disease activity were measured using validated tools. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes. Peer mentor self-efficacy was assessed using a self-efficacy scale. Interviews conducted with participants examined acceptability and feasibility of procedures and outcome measures, as well as perspectives on the value of peer support for individuals with EIA. Themes were identified through constant comparison. Results Mentees experienced improvements in the overall arthritis impact on life, coping efficacy and social support (effect size >0.3). Mentees also perceived emotional, informational, appraisal and instrumental support. Mentors also reported benefits and learnt from mentees’ fortitude and self-management skills. The training was well received by mentors. Their self-efficacy increased significantly after training completion. Participants’ experience of peer support was informed by the unique relationship with their peer. All participants were unequivocal about the need for peer support for individuals with EIA. Conclusions The intervention was well received. Training, peer support programme and outcome measures were demonstrated to be feasible with modifications. Early peer support may augment current rheumatological care. Trial registration number NCT01054963, NCT01054131. PMID:23457326

Sandhu, Sharron; Veinot, Paula; Embuldeniya, Gayathri; Brooks, Sydney; Sale, Joanna; Huang, Sicong; Zhao, Alex; Richards, Dawn; Bell, Mary J

2013-01-01

30

Internal Report 20106 June 2010 Universiteit Leiden  

E-print Network

checking, pushdown systems, push- down automata 1 Introduction From the 1960s onwards imperative Science (LIACS) Leiden University Niels Bohrweg 1 2333 CA Leiden The Netherlands #12;A Pushdown System@liacs.nl,frb@cwi.nl,marcello@liacs.nl Abstract. We introduce a block-structured programming language which supports object creation, global

Emmerich, Michael

31

Circulating surfactant protein -D is low and correlates negatively with systemic inflammation in early, untreated rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collectin with immuno-regulatory functions, which may depend on oligomerization. Anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties have been attributed to multimeric SP-D variants, while trimeric subunits per se have been suggested to enhance inflammation. Previously, we reported low circulating SP-D in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the present investigation aims to extend these data by serial

Anne Friesgaard Christensen; Grith Lykke Sørensen; Kim Hørslev-Petersen; Uffe Holmskov; Hanne Merete Lindegaard; Kirsten Junker; Merete Lund Hetland; Kristian Stengaard-Pedersen; Søren Jacobsen; Tine Lottenburger; Torkell Ellingsen; Lis Smedegaard Andersen; Ib Hansen; Henrik Skjødt; Jens Kristian Pedersen; Ulrik Birk Lauridsen; Anders Svendsen; Ulrik Tarp; Jan Pødenphant; Aage Vestergaard; Anne Grethe Jurik; Mikkel Østergaard; Peter Junker

2010-01-01

32

Factor V Leiden and Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Factor V Leiden, is a variant of human factor V (FV), also known as proaccelerin, which leads to a hypercoagulable state. Along these years, factor V Leiden (FVL) has been studied from the pathophysiologic point of view, and research has been focused on finding clinical approaches for the management of the FVL associated to a trombophilic state. Less attention has been paid about the possible role of FVL in inflammatory conditions known to be present in different disorders such as uremia, cirrhosis, liver transplantation, depression as well as sepsis, infection or, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Whether platelet FVL will increase the activation of coagulation and/or in which proportion is able to determine the final outcome in the previously mentioned inflammatory conditions is a subject that remains uncertain. This paper will review the association of FVL with inflammation. Specifically, it will analyze the important role of the endothelium and the contribution of other inflammatory components involved at both the immune and vascular levels. This paper will also try to emphasize the importance of being a FVL carrier in associations to diseases where a chronic inflammation occurs, and how this condition may be determinant in the progression and outcome of a specific clinic situation. PMID:22666576

Perez-Pujol, Silvia; Aras, Omer; Escolar, Gines

2012-01-01

33

Clinical correlations with Porphyromonas gingivalis antibody responses in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Prior studies have demonstrated an increased frequency of antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a leading agent of periodontal disease, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. However, these patients generally had long-standing disease, and clinical associations with these antibodies were inconsistent. Our goal was to examine Pg antibody responses and their clinical associations in patients with early RA prior to and after disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy. Methods Serum samples from 50 DMARD-naïve RA patients were tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with whole-Pg sonicate. For comparison, serum samples were tested from patients with late RA, patients with other connective tissue diseases (CTDs), age-similar healthy hospital personnel and blood bank donors. Pg antibody responses in early RA patients were correlated with standard RA biomarkers, measures of disease activity and function. Results At the time of enrollment, 17 (34%) of the 50 patients with early RA had positive immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses to Pg, as did 13 (30%) of the 43 patients with late RA. RA patients had significantly higher Pg antibody responses than healthy hospital personnel and blood bank donors (P < 0.0001). Additionally, RA patients tended to have higher Pg antibody reactivity than patients with other CTDs (P = 0.1), and CTD patients tended to have higher Pg responses than healthy participants (P = 0.07). Compared with Pg antibody-negative patients, early RA patients with positive Pg responses more often had anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody reactivity, their anti-CCP levels were significantly higher (P = 0.03) and the levels of anti-Pg antibodies correlated directly with anti-CCP levels (P < 0.01). Furthermore, at the time of study entry, the Pg-positive antibody group had greater rheumatoid factor values (P = 0.04) and higher inflammatory markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or ESR) (P = 0.05), and they tended to have higher disease activity scores (Disease Activity Score based on 28-joint count (DAS28)-ESR and Clinical Disease Activity Index) and more functional impairment (Health Assessment Questionnaire). In Pg-positive patients, greater disease activity was still apparent after 12 months of DMARD therapy. Conclusions A subset of early RA patients had positive Pg antibody responses. The responses correlated with anti-CCP antibody reactivity and to a lesser degree with ESR values. There was a trend toward greater disease activity in Pg-positive patients, and this trend remained after 12 months of DMARD therapy. These findings are consistent with a role for Pg in disease pathogenesis in a subset of RA patients. PMID:24017968

2013-01-01

34

Work disability in early rheumatoid arthritis: higher rates but better clinical status in Finland compared with the US  

PubMed Central

Objective To analyse and compare work disability attributed to rheumatoid arthritis in two cohorts of patients with early disease: one in the US and the other in Finland. Patients and methods Two cohorts of patients who were working and aged <65?years at the time of their first symptom of rheumatoid arthritis were studied: 269 patients in Nashville, TN, USA (median age 46?years, 72.5% females), and 364 patients from Jyväskylä, Finland, (median age 47.1?years, 70.9% females). The cohorts were analysed and compared for measures of clinical status and work disability status over a median (interquartile range) of 38.9?months in Nashville and 48.4?months in Jyväskylä. Results The probability of working at 36?months was 0.89 (0.84–0.92) for patients from Nashville and 0.84 (0.80–0.88) for patients from Jyväskylä (p?=?0.02). These rates were lower than in earlier decades. Patients from Jyväskylä had significantly higher rates of work disability (p?=?0.02) than those from Nashville, but better scores for self?report physical function (p<0.001), pain (p<0.001) and global status (p<0.001) at last observation. The likelihood of being disabled from work was 2.6?fold higher in Jyväskylä compared to Nashville (95% confidence interval 1.44 to 4.59, p?=?0.001), after adjustment for demographic and disease?specific variables. Conclusion Rates of work disability in both early rheumatoid arthritis cohorts were improved from earlier decades, but differed significantly in two different social systems. Higher work disability rates with better clinical status was seen in the Finnish early rheumatoid arthritis cohort than in the US cohort. PMID:16740683

Chung, C P; Sokka, T; Arbogast, P G; Pincus, T

2006-01-01

35

Relationship between inflammation and joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis: a mathematical description  

PubMed Central

Background: The relationship between inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been unequivocally characterised. Joint destruction may result from the cumulative inflammatory burden over time, modified by an individual constant factor. Objective: To test the hypothesis that the relationship between radiological progression and inflammation can mathematically be expressed as: ? where ? is a factor that varies from person to person. Methods: Clinical data and radiographs of 76 patients with early RA receiving different disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were analysed. Radiographs were quantified using the modified Larsen score and the "X-Ray RheumaCoach" software. The cumulative inflammatory burden was estimated by the time integrated 28 joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), calculated as the area under the curve. Results: 76 patients with early RA who started treatment with methotrexate (n = 20), sulfasalazine (n = 37), or oral gold (n = 19) monotherapy were evaluated. The mean (SEM) DAS28 decreased from 4.6 (0.1) at baseline to 2.3 (0.1) after 2 years. The mean (SEM) ?Larsen score from baseline to year 2 was 10.3 (1.5). Correlation between cumulative inflammation and radiographic change was poor. In contrast, when calculating a person's factor ? in year 1 (?1) and year 2 (?2), a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.58, p<0.000001) was seen between ?1 and ?2. Conclusions: Joint destruction is the result of the cumulative burden of inflammation over time, modified by an individual factor ? that remains relatively constant over the first 2 years of observation. The data support a mathematical model that expresses the interrelationship between inflammation and joint destruction. PMID:15194582

Wick, M; Lindblad, S; Klareskog, L; van Vollenhoven, R F

2004-01-01

36

Synovial membrane protein expression differs between juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes in early disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood with a prevalence of around 1 in 1,000. Without appropriate treatment it can have devastating consequences including permanent disability from joint destruction and growth deformities. Disease aetiology remains unknown. Investigation of disease pathology at the level of the synovial membrane is required if we want to begin to understand the disease at the molecular and biochemical level. The synovial membrane proteome from early disease-stage, treatment naive JIA patients was compared between polyarticular and oligoarticular subgroups. Methods Protein was extracted from 15 newly diagnosed, treatment naive JIA synovial membrane biopsies and separated by two dimensional fluorescent difference in-gel electrophoresis. Proteins displaying a two-fold or greater change in expression levels between the two subgroups were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with expression further verified by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Analysis of variance analysis (P???0.05) revealed 25 protein spots with a two-fold or greater difference in expression levels between polyarticular and oligoarticular patients. Hierarchical cluster analysis with Pearson ranked correlation revealed two distinctive clusters of proteins. Some of the proteins that were differentially expressed included: integrin alpha 2b (P?=?0.04); fibrinogen D fragment (P = 0.005); collagen type VI (P?=?0.03); fibrinogen gamma chain (P?=?0.05) and peroxiredoxin 2 (P?=?0.02). The identified proteins are involved in a number of different processes including platelet activation and the coagulation system. Conclusions The data indicate distinct synovial membrane proteome profiles between JIA subgroups at an early stage in the disease process. The identified proteins also provide insight into differentially perturbed pathways which could influence pathological events at the joint level. PMID:24410838

2014-01-01

37

Synovial mast cell responses during clinical improvement in early rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To determine the synovial mast cell response in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during clinical improvement, and to examine for relations with clinical and histological parameters of disease activity.?METHODS—Twenty two synovial samples were obtained from six patients with RA using needle arthroscopy. The mean disease duration at baseline was eight months, and two to three further samples were obtained over a mean follow up period of 15 months during which treatment initiated clinical improvement occurred. Sections were immunostained to detect MCT and MCTC mast cells and correlations were sought between clinical and histological data.?RESULTS—The overall mean synovial mast cell density was 40.3 cells/mm2, with regional densities of 60.6 and 34.2 mast cells/mm2 in the superficial and deeper synovial layers respectively. The MCT subset predominated, outnumbering MCTC by 3:1. There was a significant correlation between the histological inflammation index and the MCT density, (r = 0.4, p < 0.05) but not the MCTC subset. The regional distribution and predominant subset of mast cells varied in individual patient's synovia over time, with a trend towards restriction of the mast cell response to the superficial synovium during clinical improvement.?CONCLUSIONS—The mast cell response in early RA is characterised by substantial expansion of predominantly MCT mast cells that correlates with histological indices of inflammation. During clinical improvement, this expansion tended to become more superficial. Taken together with previous studies of long duration RA, which implicate MCTC cells in synovial damage and disease progression, these results suggest that MCT and MCTC mast cells may possess distinct functions in the spectrum of inflammatory events occurring during RA.?? PMID:9924208

Gotis-Graham, I.; Smith, M.; Parker, A.; McNeil, H

1998-01-01

38

Brain Cluster Leiden -InventoryBrain Cluster Leiden -Inventory Inventory of organizations working inInventory of organizations working in  

E-print Network

Brain Cluster Leiden - InventoryBrain Cluster Leiden - Inventory Inventory of organizations working brain Annelieke Hoenderkamp Leiden Bio Science Park foundation in assignment of Municipality of Leiden November 2011 #12;IntroductionIntroduction · The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Its

Galis, Frietson

39

Testing differences statistically with the Leiden ranking.  

PubMed

The Leiden ranking 2011/2012 provides the Proportion top-10% publications (PP(top-10%)) as a new indicator. This indicator allows for testing performance differences between two universities for statistical significance. PMID:22904580

Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz

2012-09-01

40

Do Carotid Artery Diameters Manifest Early Evidence of Atherosclerosis in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Given the high incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined the associations between RA diagnosis and characteristics and evidence of carotid atherosclerosis. We take a unique approach by evaluating lumen and interadventitial diameters in addition to intima-media thickness and plaque. Methods Ninety-three women with RA were matched with 93 healthy women by age, race, and menopause status. In cross-sectional analyses, we compared common carotid artery measures between groups and examined their relationships with measures of RA severity and activity. Results Mean age was 53.3 years, and median RA duration was 14 years. Lumen diameter in patients was significantly greater than in healthy women (5.50 vs. 5.19?mm, p?early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:19105681

Kao, Amy H.; Cunningham, Amy; Wildman, Rachel P.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Wasko, Mary Chester M.

2009-01-01

41

Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals a high prevalence of erosions at four months after symptom onset  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist in detecting early joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).METHODSMRI was performed on 42 patients with early RA (median symptom duration of four months). Scans were scored separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists using a newly devised scoring system, which was validated. MRI findings were compared with plain

Fiona M McQueen; Neal Stewart; Jeff Crabbe; Elizabeth Robinson; Sue Yeoman; Paul L J Tan; Lachy McLean

1998-01-01

42

Initial High-Dose Prednisolone Combination Therapy Using COBRA and COBRA-Light in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.  

PubMed

Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very effective in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). COBRA combination therapy is superior to initial monotherapy of SSZ and MTX, is also associated with a good long-term outcome, is as safe as other treatment regimes, and performs as well as the combination of high-dose MTX and the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab. A pilot study with an intensified version of the COBRA combination therapy showed that strict monitoring and aggressive treatment intensification based on the Disease Activity Score can result in a remission rate of 90% in patients with active early RA. Also, the first results indicate that an attenuated variation on COBRA combination therapy, called 'COBRA-light', is effective in decreasing disease activity and is generally well tolerated. Based on these results, we conclude that initial high-dose prednisolone in combination with MTX and SSZ could or should be the first choice in early active RA since it is effective and safe, and the cost price of the drugs is low. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25227967

Rasch, Linda A; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

2015-01-01

43

Prediction of erosiveness and rate of development of new erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty eight patients suffering from a recent onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were studied. Fifty six patients were followed up for 24 months and two for 18 months. Erosions were detected in 17 patients at the onset and at the end of the follow up period the number of patients with erosions was 44. The erosiveness in the joint groups

T T Möttönen

1988-01-01

44

Adalimumab therapy reduces hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis: explorative analyses from the PREMIER study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The effect of adalimumab on hand osteo- porosis was examined and related to radiographic joint damage in the three treatment arms of the PREMIER study: adalimumab plus methotrexate, adalimumab and methotrexate monotherapy. Predictors of hand bone loss were also searched for. Methods: 768 patients (537 fulfilled 2 years) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for less than 3 years, never treated

M Hoff; T K Kvien; J Kalvesten; A Elden; G Haugeberg

2009-01-01

45

Early referral, diagnosis, and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for changing medical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo study the delay in starting disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and any changes in medical practice between 1980 and 1997.METHODS198 consecutive RA patients attending the rheumatology clinics at a teaching hospital, for routine review, had their case sheet reviewed. The dates of symptom onset, general practitioner (GP) referral, first clinic appointment and first

S Irvine; R Munro; D Porter

1999-01-01

46

Internal Report 2012-19 Universiteit Leiden  

E-print Network

: Health Informatics applies the advancements of computer science into the medical domain. A requirement informatics: towards semantic interoperability in dermatology L.I. van der Meer BACHELOR THESIS Leiden The Netherlands #12;BACHELOR THESIS LUCAS VAN DER MEER "Ready for the future in health informatics: towards

Emmerich, Michael

47

Infliximab therapy increases body fat mass in early rheumatoid arthritis independently of changes in disease activity and levels of leptin and adiponectin: a randomised study over 21 months  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with changes in body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF treatment in early RA has an impact on body composition and BMD besides that which could be achieved by intensive disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) combination therapy. METHODS: Forty patients with early RA who

Inga-Lill Engvall; Birgitta Tengstrand; Kerstin Brismar; Ingiäld Hafström

2010-01-01

48

Plasma adrenomedullin and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide in patients diagnosed as having early rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate plasma adrenomedullin (AM) and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) level in patients diagnosed with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, several inflammatory cytokines were measured in those patients to clarify the roles of AM and PAMP. Forty patients diagnosed with early RA (women 46 +/- 8.5 years old) and 10 healthy controls (women 57 +/- 5 years old) were studied. Plasma levels of AM, PAMP, matrix metalloprotease 3 (MMP-3), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured using an immunoradiometric assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent asay (ELISA) methods. The plasma levels of AM (17.5 +/- 8.4 fmol/ml) and PAMP (2.01 +/- 0.57 fmol/ml) in patients exceeded those in healthy controls (AM 8.6 +/- 1.7, PAMP 1.17 +/- 0.34 fmol/ml). Moreover, plasma AM and PAMP levels demonstrated a significantly positive correlation with plasma MMP-3 and IL-6 levels. Nevertheless, CRP and TNF-alpha levels in these patients showed no significant correlation with plasma AM and PAMP levels. These data support the possible role for AM and PAMP in the pathophysiology of early RA. PMID:20467777

Hamada, Hiroaki; Saisyo, Koichiro; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Chosa, Etsuo

2010-08-01

49

Treating to the target of remission in early rheumatoid arthritis is cost-effective: results of the DREAM registry  

PubMed Central

Background Where health economic studies are frequently performed using modelling, with input from randomized controlled trials and best guesses, we used real-life data to analyse the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a treatment strategy aiming to the target of remission compared to usual care in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We used real-life data from comparable cohorts in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry: the DREAM remission induction cohort (treat-to-target, T2T) and the Nijmegen early RA inception cohort (usual care, UC). Both cohorts were followed prospectively using the DREAM registry methodology. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA and were included in the cohort at the time of diagnosis. The T2T cohort was treated according to a protocolised strategy aiming at remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28)?early RA is cost-effective compared with UC. The data suggest that in the third year, T2T becomes cost-saving. PMID:24330489

2013-01-01

50

21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280...Packages § 864.7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification... Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are...

2013-04-01

51

21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280...Packages § 864.7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification... Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are...

2011-04-01

52

21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280...Packages § 864.7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification... Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are...

2012-04-01

53

21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280...Packages § 864.7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification... Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are...

2014-04-01

54

21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280...Packages § 864.7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification... Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are...

2010-04-01

55

[A case of severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis introduced tocilizumab in early phase of the disease].  

PubMed

A 14-year-old boy was admitted in the former hospital with remittent fever, erythematous rash, joint pain, and muscle pain. Antibiotics were ineffectively administered and then, methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy with methotrexate was introduced under the diagnosis of suspected systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). However, he still had clinical symptoms and signs, and was transferred to our hospital. Re-examination revealed no malignancies including acute leukemia by bone marrow aspiration, no infectious agents by septic work, and no significant increases of antibodies against several viruses including CMV, EBV, HSV, Parvovirus B19, adenovirus, and so forth. FDG-PET demonstrated the accumulation of (18)F-FDG in bone marrows suggesting systemic JIA. Laboratory findings were leukocytosis and granulocytosis, elevated levels of C-reactive protein, D-dimer, ferritin, and interleukin-6. He was finally diagnosed as having severe systemic JIA. Thus, soon after the additional mPSL pulse therapy, tocilizumab (TCZ) was successfully introduced. In conclusion, for systemic JIA patients with severe systemic inflammation, it will be reasonable to introduce tocilizumab earlier than the guideline suggested to reduce side effects of long-term and large amounts of steroids and to protect the transition to macrophage activation syndrome. Further studies will be needed to recommend appropriate timing of tocilizumab introduction. PMID:24974931

Ikegawa, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishimura, Kenichi; Kanetaka, Taichi; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Hara, Ryouki; Sato, Tomomi; Sakurai, Nodoka; Yokota, Shumpei

2014-01-01

56

The effectiveness of a traditional therapeutical approach in early psoriatic arthritis: results of a pilot randomised 6-month trial with methotrexate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-five patients with Early Psoriatic Arthritis (EPA) (17 female and 18 male; mean age 25.6 years) entered this randomised\\u000a 6-month study. At the enrolment, all patients were on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy on demand and were\\u000a divided in two matched groups (A and B). Group A continued NSAID therapy at full dosage in the following 3 months and then\\u000a added methotrexate

Raffaele Scarpa; Rosario Peluso; Mariangela Atteno; Francesco Manguso; Angelo Spanò; Salvatore Iervolino; Matteo Nicola Dario Di Minno; Luisa Costa; Antonio Del Puente

2008-01-01

57

Aggressive Combination Drug Therapy in Very Early Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (ACUTE–JIA): a multicentre randomised open-label clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesIn juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the efficacy of very early disease-modifying drug therapy, synthetic or biological, is not well known. Three alternative strategies were compared for treating recent?onset polyarticular JIA.MethodsIn a 54-week multicentre open-label clinical trial, 60 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naive patients aged 4–15 years were randomly assigned into three treatment arms. The efficacy of infliximab plus methotrexate (TNF) was

Pirjo Tynjälä; Paula Vähäsalo; Maarit Tarkiainen; Liisa Kröger; Kristiina Aalto; Merja Malin; Anne Putto-Laurila; Visa Honkanen; Pekka Lahdenne

2011-01-01

58

ACPA fine-specificity profiles in early rheumatoid arthritis patients do not correlate with clinical features at baseline or with disease progression  

PubMed Central

Introduction Autoantibodies against citrullinated peptides/proteins (ACPA) are found in approximately 75% of the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The RA-specific ACPA are frequently present prior to disease onset and their presence associates with a more erosive disease course. ACPA can therefore be used to aid the diagnosis and prognosis of RA. Recently, it became clear that ACPA are very heterogeneous, both in an individual patient and among different patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether clinically meaningful ACPA profiles exist in early RA patients. Methods Twenty citrullinated peptides and the corresponding non-citrullinated control peptides were immobilized on microarray sensor chips. Sera from 374 early arthritis patients were analyzed by surface plasmon resonance imaging (iSPR) of biomolecular interactions on the sensor chip. Results Cluster analysis of the reactivities with the citrullinated peptides, after subtraction of the reactivities with the corresponding control peptides confirmed the heterogeneity of the ACPA response in RA and revealed 12 distinct ACPA profiles. The association of the 5 most frequent profiles with clinical features at diagnosis and during the disease course was examined, showing no statistically significant associations. Conclusions Compared to the detection of ACPA in RA sera by CCP-based assays, ACPA profiling in early arthritis patients did not reveal associations with disease activity and progression scores. PMID:24286543

2013-01-01

59

Early, Middle, or Late Administration of Zoledronate Alleviates Spontaneous Nociceptive Behavior and Restores Functional Outcomes in a Mouse Model of CFA-Induced Arthritis.  

PubMed

Preclinical Research This study was performed to evaluate whether early, middle, or late treatment of zoledronate, an approved bisphosphonate that blocks bone resorption, can reduce nociceptive behaviors in a mouse arthritis model. Arthritis was produced by repeated intra-articular knee injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). A dose-response curve with zoledronate (3, 30, 100, and 300??g/kg, i.p., day 4 to day 25, twice weekly for 3 weeks) was performed, and the most effective dose of zoledronate (100??g/kg, i.p.) was initially administered at different times of disease progression: day 4 (early), day 15 (middle), or day 21 (late) and continued until day 25 after the first CFA injection. Flinching of the injected extremity (spontaneous nociceptive behavior), vertical rearings and horizontal activity (functional outcomes), and knee edema were assessed. Zoledronate improved both functional outcomes and reduced flinching behavior. At day 25, the effect of zoledronate on flinching behavior and vertical rearings was greater in magnitude when it was given early or middle rather than late in the treatment regimen. Chronic zoledronate did not reduce knee edema in CFA-injected mice nor functional outcomes in naïve mice by itself. These results suggest that zoledronate may have a positive effect on arthritis-induced nociception and functional disabilities. PMID:25043808

Morado-Urbina, Carlos Eduardo; Alvarado-Vázquez, Perla Abigail; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Acosta-González, Rosa Issel; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel

2014-11-01

60

Juvenile Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... Juvenile Arthritis? Most forms of juvenile arthritis are autoimmune disorders, which means that the body’s immune system—which ... the self, these proteins are called autoantibodies. Like autoimmune disorders, autoinflammatory conditions also cause inflammation. And like autoimmune ...

61

Regeling tegemoetkoming reiskosten woon-werkverkeer en tegemoetkoming kosten van verhuizing Universiteit Leiden  

E-print Network

CAO Nederlandse Universiteiten die in dienst is van de Universiteit Leiden; d. woonplaats: de gemeente Universiteit Leiden Regeling van de Universiteit Leiden houdende regels ten aanzien van de tegemoetkoming in de Universiteit Leiden; b. werkgever: het College van Bestuur dan wel degene die krachtens mandaat of submandaat

Galis, Frietson

62

Closing the Gap Between Bench and Bedside Research for Early Arthritis Therapies (EARTH)  

PubMed Central

This report summarizes the 2010 AOSSM/NIH (American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine/National Institutes of Health) U13 Post–Joint Injury Osteoarthritis II Conference to include the discussion concerning potential study cohorts, assessment considerations, and research priorities. There was strong consensus and enthusiasm for approaching the development of disease-modifying treatments for osteoarthritis through study of “pre-osteoarthritic” cohorts, particularly human subjects under 30 years of age following acute anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Clinical study of acute treatment strategies initiated within a few days after injury will need development of recruitment pathways and short-term proof-of-concept outcome measures that are specific to the intervention being studied. For example, measures of joint inflammation can be used in short-term prospective randomized controlled trials to determine whether an anti-inflammatory intervention was effective in decreasing early inflammation. These short-term clinical trials will need to be followed by longer-term evaluation of the clinical cohorts for joint and cartilage degeneration to determine if the acute intervention affected later development of osteoarthritis. Research priorities were identified in several disciplines, particularly regarding development and validation of quantitative imaging, biomechanics, and biomarker measures of joint structure, composition, and function that predict the accelerated development of osteoarthritis. Systematic study of posttraumatic osteoarthritis is anticipated to advance understanding and treatment of all forms of osteoarthritis. PMID:21730208

Chu, Constance R.; Beynnon, Bruce D.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Garrett, William E.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Stanton, Robert A.

2011-01-01

63

Further Optimization of the Reliability of the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) combines scores on a 28-tender and swollen joint count (TJC28 and SJC28), a patient-reported measure for general health (GH), and an inflammatory marker (either the erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] or the C-reactive protein [CRP]) into a composite measure of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined the reliability of the DAS28 in patients with early RA using principles from generalizability theory and evaluated whether it could be increased by adjusting individual DAS28 component weights. Methods Patients were drawn from the DREAM registry and classified into a “fast response” group (N?=?466) and “slow response” group (N?=?80), depending on their pace of reaching remission. Composite reliabilities of the DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP were determined with the individual components' reliability, weights, variances, error variances, correlations and covariances. Weight optimization was performed by minimizing the error variance of the index. Results Composite reliabilities of 0.85 and 0.86 were found for the DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP, respectively, and were approximately equal across patients groups. Component reliabilities, however, varied widely both within and between sub-groups, ranging from 0.614 for GH (“slow response” group) to 0.912 for ESR (“fast response” group). Weight optimization increased composite reliability even further. In the total and “fast response” groups, this was achieved mostly by decreasing the weight of the TJC28 and GH. In the “slow response” group, though, the weights of the TJC28 and SJC28 were increased, while those of the inflammatory markers and GH were substantially decreased. Conclusions The DAS28-ESR and the DAS28-CRP are reliable instruments for assessing disease activity in early RA and reliability can be increased even further by adjusting component weights. Given the low reliability and weightings of the general health component across subgroups it is recommended to explore alternative patient-reported outcome measures for inclusion in the DAS28. PMID:24955759

Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald E.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

2014-01-01

64

Matrix to predict rapid radiographic progression of early rheumatoid arthritis patients from the community treated with methotrexate or leflunomide: results from the ESPOIR cohort  

PubMed Central

Introduction Early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients may show rapid radiographic progression (RRP) despite rapid initiation of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The present study aimed to develop a matrix to predict risk of RRP despite early DMARD initiation in real life settings. Methods The ESPOIR cohort included 813 patients from the community with early arthritis for < 6 months; 370 patients had early RA and had received methotrexate or leflunomide during the first year of follow-up. RRP was defined as an increase in the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score (vSHS) ? 5 points at 1 year. Determinants of RRP were examined first by bivariate analysis, then multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. A visual matrix model was then developed to predict RRP in terms of patient baseline characteristics. Results We analyzed data for 370 patients. The mean Disease Activity Score in 28 joints was 5.4 ± 1.2, 18.1% of patients had typical RA erosion on radiographs and 86.4% satisfied the 2010 criteria of the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism. During the first year, mean change in vSHS was 1.6 ± 5.5, and 41 patients (11.1%) showed RRP. A multivariate logistic regression model enabled the development of a matrix predicting RRP in terms of baseline swollen joint count, C-reactive protein level, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies status, and erosions seen on radiography for patients with early RA who received DMARDs. Conclusions The ESPOIR matrix may be a useful clinical practice tool to identify patients with early RA at high risk of RRP despite early DMARD initiation. PMID:23164197

2012-01-01

65

Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias  

PubMed Central

Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.?? PMID:11053062

Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

2000-01-01

66

Activated protein C resistance assay and factor V Leiden.  

PubMed

The authors suggest that functional testing for activated protein C resistance is cheaper and more clinically relevant than genetic testing to detect a factor V Leiden mutation in identifying persons who are at risk for thromboembolism. PMID:25119624

Prüller, Florian; Weiss, Eva-Christine; Raggam, Reinhard B; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Renner, Wilfried; Wagner, Jasmin; Michaelis, Simon; März, Winfried; Mangge, Harald

2014-08-14

67

Long-term outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis following a placebo-controlled trial: sustained benefits of early sulfasalazine treatment  

PubMed Central

Objectives A previous 24?week randomised trial demonstrated that sulfasalazine (SSZ) treatment was superior to placebo (PLAC) in suppressing disease activity in patients with oligo? and polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The current study determines the long?term outcome of the trial participants and evaluates whether the benefits of SSZ allocation are sustained over time. Methods Between 2001 and 2003, 32 SSZ and 29 PLAC patients (90% of all patients) were prospectively examined clinically and by chart review, median 9?years (range 7 to 10) after trial inclusion. In the follow?up assessment, variables of the American College of Rheumatology Pediatric 30 (ACR Pedi 30) criteria were collected. The assessor was blinded to trial treatment allocation. Results After the trial, patients had been routinely followed in rheumatology referral centres, and treated at the discretion of the attending physician. Almost all patients continued or started disease?modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (SSZ 91%, PLAC 93%; SSZ treatment in about 80%). DMARD treatment appeared less intensive in the SSZ group as evidenced by a significantly shorter duration of SSZ use (median 2.5 vs 5.2?years; p?=?0.02) and a trend towards less use of methotrexate and other DMARDs. More than one?third of the patients reported long periods of non?compliance with DMARD treatment in both groups. At follow?up, 74% of the patients had active joints, and 30% showed active polyarthritis. Almost all outcome scores were better for SSZ compared with PLAC patients. Differences (often exceeding 50%) were significant for the number of active joints, patients' overall well?being, number of patients with episodes of clinical remission off medication (CROM) and duration of these episodes, patients in CROM and ACR Pedi 30 response at follow?up. Additional exploratory analyses performed to detect potential confounders related to patient characteristics or follow?up treatment showed that DMARD treatment compliance was positively correlated with an ACR Pedi 30 response (odds ratio 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 13.4; p?=?0.03). Adjusted for compliance, an SSZ patient was 4.2 times as likely as a PLAC patient to be an ACR Pedi 30 responder at follow?up (95% CI 1.3 to 14.3; p?=?0.02). Conclusions This follow?up study shows that effective suppression of disease activity by SSZ treatment early in active disease in JIA patients has beneficial effects that persist for many years. Given these results, compliance with DMARD treatment deserves serious attention. PMID:17491099

van Rossum, Marion A J; van Soesbergen, Renee M; Boers, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Fiselier, Theo J W; Franssen, Marcel J A M; Cate, Rebecca ten; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W A; Wulffraat, Nico M; van Luijk, Wilma H J; Oostveen, Johanna C M; Kuis, Wietse; Dijkmans, Ben A C

2007-01-01

68

[Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and factor V Leiden mutation].  

PubMed

Activated proteinC resistance is a frequent prothrombotic abnormality. In most cases it is due to factorV Leiden mutation by nucleotide G1691A substitution. This recently described thrombophilic defect of activated proteinC resistance has been postulated to be implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). We report a case of factorV Leiden mutation in association with IIH and their likely link and implication in the management of IIH. PMID:24908418

Younes, S; Aissi, M; Chérif, Y; Daoussi, N; Boughammoura, A; Frih Ayed, M; Sfar, M H; Jerbi, S

2014-07-01

69

COBRA combination therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: Long-term structural benefits of a brief intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The Combinatietherapie Bij Reuma- toide Artritis (COBRA) trial demonstrated that step- down combination therapy with prednisolone, metho- trexate, and sulfasalazine (SSZ) was superior to SSZ monotherapy for suppressing disease activity and radio- logic progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study was conducted to investigate whether the benefits of COBRA therapy were sustained over time, and to determine which

Maarten Boers; Arco C. Verhoeven; Rene Westhovens; Mart A. F. J. van de Laar; Harry M. Markusse; J. Christiaan van Denderen; Marie Louise Westedt; Andre J. Peeters; Ben A. C. Dijkmans; Piet Jacobs; Annelies Boonen; Sjef van der Linden

2002-01-01

70

Han F. Vermeulen, Early History of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment: Anthropological Discourse in Europe and Asia, 1710-1808. PhD thesis University of Leiden /  

E-print Network

Han F. Vermeulen, Early History of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment-cultural guise, originated as ethnography and ethnology in the work of German-speaking scholars connected the eighteenth century. The formation of ethnology (Völker-Beschreibung and Völkerkunde) took place in two stages

van den Brink, Jeroen

71

Capillaroscopic pattern in inflammatory arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background There are limited data about the role of nailfold capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis. Objectives To study the role of capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis — rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and early arthritis. Methods Patients from the following groups were included in the study: 62 patients with RA; 34 patients with PsA with involvement of the joints of the hands; 9 women with early arthritis. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with videocapillaroscope. Results Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) was found in 30.6% (19/62) of RA patients, in 32.4% (11/34) of PsA patients and 44.4%, (4/9) of cases with early arthritis. The most frequent found capillaroscopic changes in RA patients were presence of elongated capillaries in 58% of cases (36/62) and prominent subpapillary plexus in 69% (43/62). Dilated capillaries were found in 78.9% (15/19) of patients with secondary RP and in 62.8% (27/43) of those without RP. “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was observed with low frequency in RA patients (14.5%/9/62). “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was also found in 11.1% (1/9) in the group of patients with early arthritis. The low frequency of the last type of capillaroscopic pattern in RA requires patients with such changes to be observed during regular follow-up for the development of systemic rheumatic disease different from inflammatory arthritis. In patients with PsA capillaries with specific morphology (tight terminal convolutions) were found in 58.8% (20/34) of cases. Conclusions Results from the present study confirm the necessity for inclusion of the nailfold capillaroscopy in the diagnostic algorithm in patients with inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22426123

Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Muller-Ladner, Ulf

2012-01-01

72

Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals a high prevalence of erosions at four months after symptom onset  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist in detecting early joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—MRI was performed on 42 patients with early RA (median symptom duration of four months). Scans were scored separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists using a newly devised scoring system, which was validated. MRI findings were compared with plain radiography, clinical measures, and HLA-DRB*01/04 genotyping.?RESULTS—Interobserver reliability for the overall MRI score was high (r = 0.81) as was intraobserver reliability (r = 0.94 for observer 1 and 0.81 for observer 2). There was more variation in scoring synovitis (interobserver reliability: r = 0.74). Erosions were detected in 45% of scans (19 of 42), compared with 15% of plain radiographs. The most common site for erosions was the capitate (39%), for synovitis the ulnar aspect of the radiocarpal joint, and for tendonitis, the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. The total MRI score and MRI synovitis score correlated most significantly with C reactive protein (r = 0.40 and 0.42 respectively, p<0.01). The MRI erosion score was highly correlated with MRI bone marrow oedema (r = 0.83) as well as the Ritchie score and disease activity score (r = 0.32, p<0.05). HLA-DRB1*04 or *01 (shared epitope +ve) was found in 76% of patients; 84% of those with MRI erosions and 69% of those without (NS, p = 0.3).?CONCLUSIONS—A high proportion of RA patients develop MRI erosions very early in their disease, when plain radiography is frequently normal. MRI of the dominant wrist may identify those requiring early aggressive treatment.?? Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; carpus; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9771209

McQueen, F.; Stewart, N.; Crabbe, J.; Robinson, E.; Yeoman, S.; Tan, P.; McLean, L.

1998-01-01

73

Masked early symptoms of pneumonia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis during tocilizumab treatment: a report of two cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although reports of serious infections in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with tocilizumab, anti-interleukin6\\u000a (IL-6) receptor antibody, have been relatively few, there is still some concern about infections. We report here two cases\\u000a of patients who developed severe pneumonia during tocilizumab treatment for RA. Both patients initially presented with only\\u000a minimal clinical symptoms and modest elevations in serum C-reactive

Hiroshi Fujiwara; Norihiro Nishimoto; Yoshimasa Hamano; Nobuyuki Asanuma; Shunji Miki; Soji Kasayama; Masaki Suemura

2009-01-01

74

Assessment of the utility of visual feedback in the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis patients: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Earlier studies revealed that visual feedback has contributed in the management of neuromuscular as well as psychiatric disorders; however, it has not yet been applied in rheumatology. Visual feedback is a relatively new tool that enables the patient to visualize as well as monitor a real-time change of their disease activity parameters as well as the patient's reported outcome measures. Integrating electronic data recording in the standard rheumatology clinical practice made visual feedback possible. To evaluate the feasibility of using the visual feedback in patients with early inflammatory arthritis (EA) and how ubiquitous computing technology can improve the patients' compliance and adherence to therapy, this was a double-blind randomized controlled study, which included 111 patients diagnosed to have EA according to the new ACR/EULAR criteria. All patients received disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) therapy and monitored regularly over the period of 1 year. By the 6th month of treatment, the patients were randomly allocated to an active group (55 patients) to whom the visual feedback (visualization of charts showing the progression of disease activity parameters) was added to their management protocol, and a control group (56 patients) who continued their standard management protocols. The patients were monitored for another 6-months period. All the patient's disease activity parameters, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), medications, scores of falls, and cardiovascular risks were recorded electronically. Primary outcome was the change in the patients' adherence to their medications, disease activity score (DAS-28), and PROMs: pain score, patient global assessment, functional disability, and quality of life. Secondary outcome was the answers to a questionnaire completed by every patient in both the active group and control group (using Visual Analogue Scale) by the end of 1 year of management, to rate from the patient's perspective the impact of the management protocol, whether using the standard or visual feedback approach, on them and their disease. The visual feedback provided a significant greater reduction in disease activity parameters as well as improvement of the patients' adherence to antirheumatic therapy (P < 0.01). Also stopping the DMARDs therapy because of intolerance was significantly less in the active group. Concerns about the future was significantly less in the active group whereas inability to coup with daily life and disease stress were significantly more among the control group. The improvement of disease activity parameters was associated with improvement in functional disability and quality of life scores. Mean changes in disease parameters showed no significant differences at 3-6 months of therapy but differences were statistically significant at 12-months follow-up (P < 0.01). Medication compliance was significantly correlated with changes in all measured disease parameters. By recording and monitoring disease activity parameters electronically and incorporating the visual feedback approach into clinical practice, a new experience can be created. Visual feedback enabled the patients to see how they are doing regarding their disease activity and helps to optimize their adherence to their treatment. Visual feedback had a positive and significant impact on the disease activity control. PMID:21909946

El Miedany, Y; El Gaafary, M; Palmer, D

2012-10-01

75

Clinical and radiological dissociation of anti-TNF plus methotrexate treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis in routine care: Results from the ABRAB study  

PubMed Central

Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoinflammatory joint disease which leads to the destruction of joints and disability of the patients. Anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs can halt radiological progression better than conventional DMARDs even in clinical non-responders. Methods The efficacy of anti-TNF plus methotrexate (MTX) treatment versus MTX monotherapy on clinical and radiological outcomes were compared in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice by retrospective analysis of an observational cohort. 49 early RA patients (group A) on first-line MTX monotherapy and 35 early RA patients (group B) on anti-TNF plus MTX treatment were selected from an observational cohort and evaluated retrospectively focusing on their first twelve months of treatment. Data on disease activity (DAS28) and functional status (HAQ-DI) were collected three monthly. One-yearly radiological progression was calculated according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp method (vdHS). Clinical non-responder patients in both groups were selectively investigated from a radiological point of view. Results Disease activity was decreased and functional status was improved significantly in both groups. One-yearly radiological progression was significantly lower in group B than in group A. The percentage of patients showing radiological non-progression or rapid radiological progression demonstrated a significant advantage for group B patients. In addition non-responder patients in group B showed similar radiological results as responders, while a similar phenomenon was not observed in patients in group A. Conclusions Clinical efficacy within our study was similar for tight-controlled MTX monotherapy as well as for combination treatment with anti-TNF and MTX. However MTX monotherapy was accompanied by more rapid radiological progression and less radiological non-progression. Anti-TNF plus MTX decreased radiological progression even in clinical non-responders supporting the advantage of anti-TNF plus MTX combination in dissociating clinical and radiological effects. PMID:25059769

2014-01-01

76

Are there more than cross-sectional relationships of social support and support networks with functional limitations and psychological distress in early rheumatoid arthritis? The European Research on Incapacitating Diseases and Social Support Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To investigate whether greater social support and support network are cross-sectionally associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA); whether this associ- ation is constant over time; and whether increases in social support or support network are associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress. Methods. Subjects were from the European Research

V. Demange; F. Guillemin; M. Baumann; T. P. B. M. Suurmeijer; T. Moum; D. Doeglas

2004-01-01

77

[Early results of proximal interphalangeal joint replacement with pyrolytic carbon prosthesis (Ascension) in idiopathic and post-traumatic arthritis].  

PubMed

Surgical treatment of painful idiopathic and post-traumatic arthritis with joint replacement of the proximal interphalangeal joint has become increasingly important. Due to shortcomings of former constrained and partially constrained prostheses with regard to abrasion and durability we have been using an unconstrained prosthesis since April 2002. This model is an almost abrasion free, biocompatible 2-component prosthesis. The surface is shaped like the condyles and the position is secured in a press-fit technique. During October 2004 we reviewed the results of 20 out of 29 patients with idiopathic or post-traumatic arthritis who had been treated with a pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal joint prosthesis from April 2002 to April 2004 retrospectively. Clinical, subjective and radiological parameters were studied. On follow-up after 0.5 to 2.5 years the patients were satisfied with the pain relief. The range of motion varied. However, with an average ROM of 50 degree it was equivalent to the results in literature. Signs of periprosthetic cysts, osteophytes and loosening of the proximal as well as of the distal component could be seen in the radiograms of some patients. There was no correlation between these radiological observations and range of motion, pain or grip strength. In three cases the joint prosthesis had to be converted to an arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Bearing in mind the correct indications (intact collateral ligaments, stable bone stock and sufficient extensor and flexor tendons), pyrocarbon prosthesis are a treatment option for idiopathic and posttraumatic arthritis preserving motion and reducing pain. Radiological results seem to indicate an absence of osteointegration and tension forces at the prosthesis/bone interface. Further investigation will be necessary to improve surface and design to increase radiological results in long-term follow-up. Additional surveys are required to improve indications, surgical approach and intraoperative control of correct component positioning. PMID:15744654

Schulz, M; Müller-Zimmermann, A; Behrend, M; Krimmer, H

2005-02-01

78

Plasma and Liver Lipidomics Response to an Intervention of Rimonabant in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP Transgenic Mice  

PubMed Central

Background Lipids are known to play crucial roles in the development of life-style related risk factors such as obesity, dyslipoproteinemia, hypertension and diabetes. The first selective cannabinoid-1 receptor blocker rimonabant, an anorectic anti-obesity drug, was frequently used in conjunction with diet and exercise for patients with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m2 with associated risk factors such as type II diabetes and dyslipidaemia in the past. Less is known about the impact of this drug on the regulation of lipid metabolism in plasma and liver in the early stage of obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a four-week parallel controlled intervention on apolipoprotein E3 Leiden cholesteryl ester transfer protein (ApoE*3Leiden.CETP) transgenic mice with mild overweight and hypercholesterolemia. A liquid chromatography–linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometric approach was employed to investigate plasma and liver lipid responses to the rimonabant intervention. Rimonabant was found to induce a significant body weight loss (9.4%, p<0.05) and a significant plasma total cholesterol reduction (24%, p<0.05). Six plasma and three liver lipids in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice were detected to most significantly respond to rimonabant treatment. Distinct lipid patterns between the mice were observed for both plasma and liver samples in rimonabant treatment vs. non-treated controls. This study successfully applied, for the first time, systems biology based lipidomics approaches to evaluate treatment effects of rimonabant in the early stage of obesity. Conclusion The effects of rimonabant on lipid metabolism and body weight reduction in the early stage obesity were shown to be moderate in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP mice on high-fat diet. PMID:21611179

van den Hoek, Anita M.; Wang, Mei; van der Heijden, Rob; Spijksma, Gerwin; Reijmers, Theo H.; Bouwman, Jildau; Wopereis, Suzan; Havekes, Louis M.; Verheij, Elwin; Hankemeier, Thomas; Xu, Guowang; van der Greef, Jan

2011-01-01

79

The association and predictive value of the complex immunoglobulin A-alpha 1-antitrypsin in the development of erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Immunoglobulin A-alpha 1 antitrypsin complex (IgA-AT), its constituent components and nine other clinical or laboratory variables were measured in thirty-three patients with early, non-erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in order to assess their value in predicting the subsequent development of erosions. After 12 months, eighteen patients had developed erosions. Comparison of variables measured at outset between the group of patients subsequently developing erosions and those not, showed only the complex IgA-AT level to be significantly different, the mean being higher in the erosive group. In the subgroup of patients with high IgA-AT levels (greater than 3.0 arbitary units) all developed erosions. The possible therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:2011713

Davis, M J; Dawes, P T; Fowler, P D; Shadforth, M F; Lewin, I; Stanworth, D R

1991-01-01

80

KLODIANA (DAPHNE) TONA Current Office Address: Cognitive Psychology Unit, Leiden University, FSW, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK,  

E-print Network

KLODIANA (DAPHNE) TONA Current Office Address: Cognitive Psychology Unit, Leiden University, FSW.tona@fsw.leidenuniv.nl EDUCATION January 2013- present PhD Candidate, Cognitive Psychology and Leiden Center for Brain and cognition, Leiden University, The Netherlands 2009 - 2012 Research Master's Programme in Cognitive

Nieuwenhuis, Sander

81

Internal Report CS Bioinformatics Track 14-01 February 2014 Leiden University  

E-print Network

Lao Grueso2 1 Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science, Leiden University, Leiden 2 Department selection. So far, several genomic regions have been suggested to show the fingerprint of strong selective a novel statistical analysis pipeline called Geographic Allelic Association among Populations (GAAP

Emmerich, Michael

82

Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).  

PubMed

Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge. PMID:24838364

Östlund, Gunnel; Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

2014-10-01

83

Association of circulating miR-223 and miR-16 with disease activity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Identification of parameters for early diagnosis and treatment response would be beneficial for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) to prevent ongoing joint damage. miRNAs have features of potential biomarkers, and an altered expression of miRNAs was shown in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective To analyse RA associated miRNAs in the sera of patients with ERA to find markers of early disease, clinical activity or predictors of disease outcome. Methods Total RNA was isolated from whole sera in ERA patients (prior to and after 3 and 12?months of therapy with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs), in patients with established RA and in healthy controls (HC) using phenol–chloroform extraction. Expression of miR-146a, miR-155, miR-223, miR-16, miR-203, miR-132 and miR-124a was analysed by TaqMan Real Time PCR. Results From all analysed miRNAs, levels of miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-16 were decreased in the sera of ERA patients in comparison with established RA. A change in circulating miR-16 in the first 3?months of therapy was associated with a decrease in DAS28 in long term follow-up in ERA (p=0.002). Levels of circulating miR-223 in treatment naïve ERA correlated with C reactive protein (p=0.008), DAS28 (p=0.031) and change in DAS28 after 3?months (p=0.003) and 12?months (p=0.011) of follow-up. However, neither miR-16 nor miR-223 could distinguish ERA from HC. Conclusions Differential expression of circulating miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-16 in the sera of ERA patients may characterise an early stage of the disease. We suggest miR-223 as a marker of disease activity and miR-16 and miR-223 as possible predictors for disease outcome in ERA. PMID:23897768

Filkova, Maria; Aradi, Borbala; Senolt, Ladislav; Ospelt, Caroline; Vettori, Serena; Mann, Herman; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D; Snow, Martyn; Vencovsky, Jiri; Pavelka, Karel; Michel, Beat A; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen; Jungel, Astrid

2014-01-01

84

Internal Report 2012-03 March 2012 Universiteit Leiden  

E-print Network

of the applications for evolutionary algorithms is the design of an un- manned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV. INTRODUCTION Figure 1.1: An example of an unmanned aerial vehicle, the vehicle type for which an airfoilInternal Report 2012-03 March 2012 Universiteit Leiden Opleiding Informatica Designing

Emmerich, Michael

85

Reminiscences of the relief of Leiden: a total ritual event  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the Third of October festivities in the city of Leiden, The Netherlands, held in commemoration of its relief from the Spanish siege in 1574. These festivities are defined as a total urban ritual event and put in a historical perspective. They include all sorts of activities such as the handing out of herring and white bread, the

Peter J. M. Nas; Anja Roymans

1998-01-01

86

VN Movie Recommender Kerem Denizmen (0364452), University of Leiden  

E-print Network

VN Movie Recommender Kerem Denizmen (0364452), University of Leiden September 30, 2009 #12;Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3.4 Movie attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3.5 Determining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.5.2 Selection of weight values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.6 Determining similar movies

Emmerich, Michael

87

Books for the Computational Dynamics course Vincent Icke Sterrewacht Leiden  

E-print Network

Books for the Computational Dynamics course Vincent Icke ­ Sterrewacht Leiden Binney, J. Adventures in celestial me- chanics Wiley, New York, 2E1D, 1998 0-471-13317-5 14 ­ Books for Computational-521-77486-1 Hockney, R.W., & Eastwood, J.W. Computer simulation using particles Hilger, Bristol, 1E1D, 1988 0

Icke, Vincent

88

Neonatal septic arthritis.  

PubMed

Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management. PMID:9185277

Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

1996-09-01

89

Glucocorticoids in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are the Benefits of Joint-Sparing Effects Offset by the Adverse Effect of Osteoporosis? The Effects on Bone in the Utrecht Study and the CAMERA-II Study.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the clinical effects on bone of 10 mg of prednisone daily in early rheumatoid arthritis, given for 2 years in the Utrecht Study and in the second CAMERA (Computer- Assisted Management in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis) Study, and addresses the question whether there were joint-sparing effects and whether these were offset by adverse effects, especially osteoporosis. We conclude that a 2-year adjunct treatment with 10 mg of prednisone daily increases the benefits of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy and has joint-sparing properties, even if added to the tight control methotrexate-based strategy aiming for remission. Importantly, with good control of inflammation and adequate use of calcium, vitamin D and bisphosphonates - according to national or international guidelines - steroid-induced osteoporosis is rare over 2 years. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25228126

Jacobs, Johannes W G; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; van Laar, Jacob M

2015-01-01

90

Combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised, controlled, double blind 52 week clinical trial of sulphasalazine and methotrexate compared with the single components  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To investigate the potential clinical benefit of a combination therapy.?METHODS—205 patients fulfilling the ACR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), not treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs previously, with an early (?1 year duration), active (Disease Activity Score (DAS) > 3.0), rheumatoid factor and/or HLA DR 1/4 positive disease were randomised between sulphasalazine (SASP) 2000 (maximum 3000) mg daily (n = 68), or methotrexate (MTX) 7.5 (maximum 15) mg weekly (n = 69) or the combination (SASP + MTX) of both (n = 68).?RESULTS—The mean changes in the DAS during the one year follow up of the study was ?1.15, ?0.87, ?1.26 in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX group respectively (p = 0.019). However, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of either EULAR good responders 34%, 38%, 38% or ACR criteria responders 59%, 59%, 65% in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX group respectively. Radiological progression evaluated by the modified Sharp score was very modest in the three groups: mean changes in erosion score: +2.4, +2.4, +1.9, in narrowing score: +2.3, +2.1, +1.6 and in total damage score: +4.6, +4.5, +3.5, in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX groups respectively. Adverse events occurred more frequently in the SASP + MTX group 91% versus 75% in the SASP and MTX group (p = 0.025). Nausea was the most frequent side effect: 32%, 23%, 49% in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX groups respectively (p = 0.007).?CONCLUSION—This study suggests that an early initiation therapy of disease modifying drug seems to be of benefit. However, this study was unable to demonstrate a clinically relevant superiority of the combination therapy although several outcomes were in favour of this observation. The tolerability of the three treatment modalities seems acceptable.?? Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; combination therapy; sulphasalazine; methotrexate PMID:10364900

Dougados, M.; Combe, B.; Cantagrel, A.; Goupille, P.; Olive, P.; Schattenkirchner, M.; Meusser, S; Paimela, L; Rau, R.; Zeidler, H.; Leirisalo-Repo, M.; Peldan, K.

1999-01-01

91

Is caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) transmitted vertically to early embryo development stages (morulae or blastocyst) via in vitro infected frozen semen?  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine, in vivo, whether in vitro infected cryopreserved caprine sperm is capable of transmitting caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) vertically to early embryo development stages via artificial insemination with in vitro infected semen. Sperm was collected from CAEV-free bucks by electroejaculation. Half of each ejaculate was inoculated with CAEV-pBSCA at a viral concentration of 10(4) TCID(50)/mL. The second half of each ejaculate was used as a negative control. The semen was then frozen. On Day 13 of superovulation treatment, 14 CAEV-free does were inseminated directly into the uterus under endoscopic control with thawed infected semen. Six CAEV-free does, used as a negative control, were inseminated intrauterine with thawed CAEV-free sperm, and eight CAEV-free does were mated with naturally infected bucks. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect CAEV proviral-DNA in the embryos at the D7 stage, in the embryo washing media, and in the uterine secretions of recipient does. At Day 7, all the harvested embryos were PCR-negative for CAEV proviral-DNA; however, CAEV proviral-DNA was detected in 8/14 uterine smears, and 9/14 flushing media taken from does inseminated with infected sperm, and in 1/8 uterine swabs taken from the does mated with infected bucks. The results of this study confirm that (i) artificial insemination with infected semen or mating with infected bucks may result in the transmission of CAEV to the does genital tack seven days after insemination, and (ii) irrespective of the medical status of the semen or the recipient doe, it is possible to obtain CAEV-free early embryos usable for embryo transfer. PMID:22341707

Al Ahmad, M Z Ali; Chebloune, Y; Chatagnon, G; Pellerin, J L; Fieni, F

2012-05-01

92

Adalimumab, a human anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, outcome study for the prevention of joint damage in Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the HOPEFUL 1 study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab+methotrexate (MTX) in Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had not previously received MTX or biologics. Methods This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study evaluated adalimumab 40?mg every other week+MTX 6–8?mg every week versus MTX 6–8?mg every week alone for 26?weeks in patients with RA (?2-year duration). The primary endpoint was inhibition of radiographic progression (change (?) from baseline in modified total Sharp score (mTSS)) at week 26. Results A total of 171 patients received adalimumab+MTX (mean dose, 6.2±0.8?mg/week) and 163 patients received MTX alone (mean dose, 6.6±0.6?mg/week, p<0.001). The mean RA duration was 0.3?years and 315 (94.3%) had high disease activity (DAS28>5.1). Adalimumab+MTX significantly inhibited radiographic progression at week 26 versus MTX alone (?mTSS, 1.5±6.1 vs 2.4±3.2, respectively; p<0.001). Significantly more patients in the adalimumab+MTX group (62.0%) did not show radiographic progression (?mTSS?0.5) versus the MTX alone group (35.4%; p<0.001). Patients treated with adalimumab+MTX were significantly more likely to achieve American College of Rheumatology responses and achieve clinical remission, using various definitions, at 26?weeks versus MTX alone. Combination therapy was well tolerated, and no new safety signals were observed. Conclusions Adalimumab in combination with low-dose MTX was well tolerated and efficacious in suppressing radiographic progression and improving clinical outcomes in Japanese patients with early RA and high disease activity. PMID:23316080

Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Masaya; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Uchida, Shoji; Akama, Hideto; Kupper, Hartmut; Arora, Vipin; Tanaka, Yoshiya

2014-01-01

93

Epitope spreading of the anti-citrullinated protein antibody response occurs before disease onset and is associated with the disease course of early arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAnti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are the most predictive factor for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).ObjectiveTo investigate whether the recognition of citrullinated epitopes changes during disease onset or progression, by studying the fine specificity of ACPA in serum samples collected throughout the disease course, from before the onset of arthritis to longstanding RA.MethodsAntibodies recognising five distinct citrullinated antigens were determined

Diane van der Woude; Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist; Andreea Ioan-Facsinay; Carla Onnekink; Carla M Schwarte; Kirsten N Verpoort; Jan W Drijfhout; Tom W J Huizinga; Rene E M Toes; Ger J M Pruijn

2010-01-01

94

Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP do not predict progressive joint damage in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisolone: a randomised study  

PubMed Central

Objective To analyse if predictors of radiographic progression differ between patients treated with or without prednisolone in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Radiographs of hands and feet were assessed using the modified Sharp/van der Heijde score and radiographic progression was defined as an increase in the total Sharp score above 5.8 (the smallest detectable change). Design Prospective, randomised study of patients with early RA. Setting Secondary level of care; six participating centres from southern Sweden; both urban and rural populations. Participants In all, 225 patients, 64% women, with a diagnosis of RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria, were included if they were between 18 and 80?years of age and had a disease duration of less than 1?year. Intervention The patients were randomised to 7.5?mg prednisolone daily for 2?years (P-group; n=108) or no prednisolone (NoP-group; n=117) when they started with their first disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug and were prospectively followed for 2?years. Results The frequency of patients with radiographic progression after 2?years was 26% in the P-group and 39% in the NoP-group (p=0.033). Relevant interactions between treatment and rheumatoid factor (RF) (p=0.061) and between treatment and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (anti-CCP) (p=0.096) were found. RF and anti-CCP independently predicted radiographic progression only in the NoP-group, OR (95% CI) 9.4 (2.5 to 35.2), p=0.001 and OR (95% CI) 8.7 (2.5 to 31.3), p=0.001, respectively. Conclusions The presence of RF and anti-CCP predicted radiographic progression in patients not treated with prednisolone but failed to predict progression in patients treated with this drug. The data suggest that early treatment with prednisolone may modulate not only inflammation but also autoimmunity-associated pathogenetic mechanisms. Trial registration number ISRCTN20612367. PMID:25079933

Hafstrom, Ingiald; Engvall, Inga-Lill; Ronnelid, Johan; Boonen, Annelies; van der Heijde, Desiree; Svensson, Bjorn

2014-01-01

95

Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

1969-01-01

96

The Effect of Socioeconomic Class and Immigrant Status on Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Data from BARFOT, a Multi-Centre Study of Early RA  

PubMed Central

Background: There have been no reports on the effect of immigrant status and socioeconomic status on outcome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden. Methods: Between 1992 and 2006, 2,800 patients were included in the BARFOT study on early RA in Sweden. Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), treatment and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria were registered. In 2010, 1,430 patients completed a questionnaire enquiring about demographics and lifestyle factors. Results: One hundred and thirty-nine of the 1,430 patients (9.7%) were immigrants. At baseline immigrants had higher mean HAQ (1.2 vs 0.97 for non-immigrants, p=0.001), DAS28 (5.6 vs 5.2, p=0.000), visual analog scale (VAS) pain (56 mm vs 45 mm, p=0.000), VAS global health (53 mm vs 44 mm, p=0.000) and tender joint count (TJC) (10 vs 8, p=0.000). These differences persisted for up to 2 years of follow-up (for HAQ, for up to 8 years of follow-up). Immigrant status did not have any effect on swollen joint count (SJC), ESR, CRP or EULAR response. Socioeconomic class did not have any effect on treatment or outcome. Conclusions: Immigrants scored worse in pain, function and TJC for up to 2 years of follow-up, but they did not differ from non-immigrants in objective measures of inflammation or EULAR outcome. This could be due to different perceptions of health and pain and/or the stress of immigration. Socioeconomic class had no effect on treatment or outcome, and this could be due to the relatively egalitarian society in Sweden. PMID:24358069

Andersson, Maria L.E.; Bergman, Stefan; Soderlin, Maria K.

2013-01-01

97

Maternal undernutrition programmes atherosclerosis in the ApoE*3-Leiden mouse.  

PubMed

Poor quality of nutrition during fetal development is associated with adverse health outcomes in adult life. Epidemiological studies suggest that markers of fetal undernutrition are predictive of risk of the metabolic syndrome and CHD. Here we show that feeding a low-protein diet during pregnancy programmed the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE*3-Leiden mice. ApoE*3-Leiden mice carry a mutation of human ApoE*3 rendering them prone to atherosclerosis when fed a diet rich in cholesterol. It was noted that fetal exposure to protein restriction led to a greater degree of dyslipidaemia in mice when fed an atherogenic diet, with low-protein-exposed ApoE*3 mice having elevated total plasma cholesterol (34 % higher; P < 0.001) and TAG (39 % higher; P < 0.001) relative to offspring exposed to a control diet in utero. The low-protein group developed more severe atherosclerotic lesions within the aortic arch (2.61-fold greater lesion area; P < 0.001). Analysis of a targeted gene array suggested a potential role for members of the LDL receptor superfamily, along with similar programmed suppression of the mRNA expression of hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c. This indicates that disordered lipid metabolism may play a role in the fetal programming of atherosclerosis in this model. Whereas earlier studies have shown early programming of cardiovascular risk factors, these results demonstrate for the first time that the interaction of prenatal undernutrition with a postnatal atherogenic diet increases the extent of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:18782462

Yates, Zoe; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Langley-Evans, Simon C; Salter, Andrew M

2009-04-01

98

Revision of the Amathusiidae in the Museums at Leiden and at Amsterdam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Besides the Amathusiidae in the general collection the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden possesses a considerable number of representatives of the group, in excellently preserved specimens, in the collection of the late Mr. J. H. Jurriaanse. Moreover I could study the Amathusiidae in the collection of the Zoological Laboratory at Groningen, at present in the custody of the Leiden

D. Bakker

1942-01-01

99

Activated protein C resistance testing for factor V Leiden.  

PubMed

Activated protein C resistance assays can detect factor V Leiden with high accuracy, depending on the method used. Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and direct thrombin inhibitors including dabigatran, argatroban, and bivalirudin can cause falsely normal results. Lupus anticoagulants can cause incorrect results in most current assays. Assays that include dilution into factor V-deficient plasma are needed to avoid interference from factor deficiencies or elevations, which can arise from a wide variety of conditions such as warfarin, liver dysfunction, or pregnancy. The pros and cons of the currently available assays are discussed. Am. J. Hematol. 89:1147-1150, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25293789

Kadauke, Stephan; Khor, Bernard; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

2014-12-01

100

Looking through the 'window of opportunity': is there a new paradigm of podiatry care on the horizon in early rheumatoid arthritis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the clinical understanding and care of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Major paradigm changes include earlier disease detection and introduction of therapy, and 'tight control' of follow-up driven by regular measurement of disease activity parameters. The advent of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and other biologic therapies have further revolutionised care. Low

James Woodburn; Kym Hennessy; Martijn PM Steultjens; Iain B McInnes; Deborah E Turner

2010-01-01

101

Relationship among nitric oxide, leptin, ACTH, corticosterone, and IL1?, in the early and late phases of adjuvant arthritis in male Long Evans rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leptin, a hormone regulating body weight, food intake, and metabolism, is associated with activation of immune cells and inflammation. In this study we analyzed levels of leptin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone, interleukin 1? (IL-1?), and nitric oxide (NO) production on days 10 and 22 of adjuvant arthritis (AA) in male Long Evans rats to ascertain possible relationship of leptin with

Andrea Stofkova; Martina Skurlova; Katarina Tybitanclova; Leopold Veselsky; Blanka Zelezna; Jana Jurcovicova

2006-01-01

102

Pain and microcrystalline arthritis.  

PubMed

Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU), responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA) is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention. PMID:24938197

Ramonda, R; Frallonardo, P; Oliviero, F; Lorenzin, M G; Ortolan, A; Scanu, A; Punzi, L

2014-01-01

103

Reactive Arthritis Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

Reactive Arthritis (ReA): Quick Links Overview >>> Symptoms >>> Diagnosis >>> Treatment >>> Medication >>> Doctor Q&A From Spondylitis Plus >>> REACTIVE ARTHRITIS Overview Seeing a rheumatologist is essential to beginning ...

104

Selective involvement of ERK and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in early rheumatoid arthritis (1987 ACR criteria compared to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria): a prospective study aimed at identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate the expression and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in patients with early arthritis who are disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naïve. Methods A total of 50 patients with early arthritis who were DMARD naïve (disease duration <1 year) were prospectively followed and diagnosed at baseline and after 2 years for undifferentiated arthritis (UA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria), or spondyloarthritis (SpA). Synovial biopsies obtained at baseline were examined for expression and phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by immunohistochemistry and digital analysis. Synovial tissue mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results ERK and JNK activation was enhanced at inclusion in patients meeting RA criteria compared to other diagnoses. JNK activation was enhanced in patients diagnosed as having UA at baseline who eventually fulfilled 1987 ACR RA criteria compared to those who remained UA, and in patients with RA fulfilling 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria at baseline. ERK and JNK activation was enhanced in patients with RA developing progressive joint destruction. JNK activation in UA predicted 1987 ACR RA classification criteria fulfilment (R2=0.59, p=0.02) after follow-up, and disease progression in early arthritis (R2=0.16, p<0.05). Enhanced JNK activation in patients with persistent disease was associated with altered synovial expression of extracellular matrix components and CD44. Conclusions JNK activation is elevated in RA before 1987 ACR RA classification criteria are met and predicts development of erosive disease in early arthritis, suggesting JNK may represent an attractive target in treating RA early in the disease process. PMID:21953337

de Launay, Daphne; van de Sande, Marleen GH; de Hair, Maria JH; Grabiec, Aleksander M; van de Sande, Gijs PM; Lehmann, K Aad; Wijbrandts, Carla A; van Baarsen, Lisa GM; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

2012-01-01

105

Differences in MRI findings between subgroups of recent-onset childhood arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  MRI is sensitive for joint inflammation, but its ability to separate subgroups of arthritis in children has been questioned.\\u000a Infectious arthritis (IA), postinfectious arthritis (PA), transient arthritis (TA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)\\u000a are subgroups that may need early, different treatment.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To determine whether MRI findings differ in IA, PA\\/TA and JIA in recent-onset childhood arthritis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Fifty-nine children

Eva Kirkhus; Berit Flatø; Øystein Riise; Tor Reiseter; Hans-Jørgen Smith

2011-01-01

106

Accelerated atherosclerosis by placement of a perivascular cuff and a cholesterol-rich diet in ApoE*3Leiden transgenic mice.  

PubMed

Intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury is usually studied in animal models with healthy, normocholesterolemic animals. Here, we assess the effect of diet-induced hypercholesterolemia on the induction of intimal hyperplasia in ApoE*3Leiden mice. A nonconstrictive polyethylene cuff was placed around the femoral artery of ApoE3*Leiden mice fed a highly cholesterol-rich diet, a mildly cholesterol-rich diet, or a chow diet for 4 weeks. Diets were continued after cuff placement until euthanization. At several time points (1 to 14 days), mice were euthanized and the intimal hyperplasia in the cuffed arteries was analyzed. In mice fed a chow diet, a 2- to 4-cell-layer-thick intima, predominantly consisting of alpha smooth muscle cell actin-positive cells, was observed after 14 days. A mildly cholesterol-rich diet (mean plasma-cholesterol level, 10.5 mmol/L) resulted in a 2.7-fold increase of total intimal area, and a highly cholesterol-rich diet (mean plasma cholesterol level 28. 6 mmol/L), in a 7.8-fold increase. In the high-cholesterol group, the intima consisted predominantly of lipid-loaded foam cells and alpha smooth muscle cell actin-positive cells. Foam cell accumulation could be observed by as early as 3 days, resulting in a near-total occlusion of the lumen after 14 days. Hypercholesterolemia resulted in a rapid, cholesterol-dependent induction of foam cell-rich intimal hyperplasia in cuffed femoral arteries of ApoE*3Leiden mice. In conclusion, the present data show that the combination of a local (cuff placement) and a systemic (hypercholesterolemic) risk factor of atherosclerosis results in a rapid induction (within 14 days) of atherosclerotic-like lesions in ApoE*3Leiden mice. PMID:10926877

Lardenoye, J H; Delsing, D J; de Vries, M R; Deckers, M M; Princen, H M; Havekes, L M; van Hinsbergh, V W; van Bockel, J H; Quax, P H

2000-08-01

107

Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... developing osteoarthritis. Top of Page How many people in the United States have arthritis? Currently, an estimated 52.5 million Americans reported that their doctor told them they had arthritis. As our nation’s ... children under age 18 (or 1 in 250 children) have been diagnosed with arthritis or ...

108

A Premature Infant with Fetal Myocardial and Abdominal Calcifications and Factor V Leiden Homozygosity  

PubMed Central

We present a premature male neonate with confirmed Factor V Leiden deficiency diagnosed prenatally with cardiac and abdominal calcifications. Our patient’s findings suggest that clinicians consider thromboembolic conditions when multiple fetal calcifications are visualized. PMID:19861970

Parker, Margaret G.K.; Webster, Gregory; Insoft, Robert M.

2014-01-01

109

Familial dysbetalipoproteinemia associated with apolipoprotein E3-Leiden in an extended multigeneration pedigree.  

PubMed Central

By the careful screening of familial dysbetalipoproteinemic (FD) patients, five probands showing heterozygosity for the APOE*3-Leiden allele were found. Genealogical studies revealed that these probands share common ancestry in the 17th century. In a group of 128 family members, spanning three generations, 37 additional heterozygous APOE*3-Leiden gene carriers were detected. Although with a variable degree of severity, all carriers exhibited characteristics of FD such as (a) elevated levels of cholesterol in the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) fractions, (b) elevated ratios of cholesterol levels in these density fractions over total plasma levels of triglycerides, and (c) strongly increased plasma levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that most of the variability in expression of FD in APOE*3-Leiden allele carriers can be explained by age. Body mass index showed a less significant influence on the expression of FD. Gender had no effect on the expression in E*3-Leiden allele carriers, nor did it influence the age of onset of FD. In the group of APOE*3-Leiden allele carriers, we found that the E*2 allele enhances the expression of FD, whereas the E*4 allele had the opposite effect. Isoelectric focusing of plasma and of isolated VLDL, IDL, and high density lipoprotein density fractions showed that in E*3-Leiden allele carriers the apoE3-Leiden variant largely predominates over its normal apoE counterpart, especially in the VLDL and IDL density fractions. We conclude that in APOE*3-Leiden allele carriers FD is dominantly inherited with a high rate of penetrance, i.e., the presence of normally functioning apoE molecules in the plasma does not prevent the age-related expression of this disease. Images PMID:1864973

de Knijff, P; van den Maagdenberg, A M; Stalenhoef, A F; Leuven, J A; Demacker, P N; Kuyt, L P; Frants, R R; Havekes, L M

1991-01-01

110

What is the fate of erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis? Tracking individual lesions using x rays and magnetic resonance imaging over the first two years of disease  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To investigate the progression of erosions at sites within the carpus, in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain radiology over a two year period.?METHODS—Gadolinium enhanced MRI scans of the dominant wrist were performed in 42 patients with RA at baseline (within six months of symptom onset) and one year. Plain wrist radiographs (x rays) and clinical data were obtained at baseline, one year, and two years. Erosions were scored by two musculoskeletal radiologists on MRI and x ray at 15 sites in the wrist. A patient centred analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic value of a baseline MRI scan. A lesion centred analysis was used to track the progression of individual erosions over two years.?RESULTS—The baseline MRI erosion score was predictive of x ray erosion score at two years (p=0.004). Patients with a "total MRI score" (erosion, bone oedema, synovitis, and tendonitis) ?13 at baseline were significantly more likely to develop erosions on x ray at two years (odds ratio 13.4, 95% CI 2.65 to 60.5, p=0.002). Baseline wrist MRI has a sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 76%, a positive predictive value of 67%, and a high negative predictive value of 86% for the prediction of wrist x ray erosions at two years. A lesion centred analysis, which included erosions scored by one or both radiologists, showed that 84% of baseline MRI erosions were still present at one year. When a more stringent analysis was used which required complete concordance between radiologists, all baseline lesions persisted at one year. The number of MRI erosion sites in each patient increased from 2.1 (SD 2.7) to 5.0 (4.6) (p<0.0001) over the first year of disease. When MRI erosion sites were tracked, 21% and 26% were observed on x ray, one and two years later. A high baseline MRI synovitis score, Ritchie score, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were predictive of progression of MRI erosions to x ray erosions over one year (p=0.005, 0.01, and 0.03 respectively), but there was no association with the shared epitope. Progression of MRI erosions to x ray erosions was not seen in those with transient polyarthritis.?CONCLUSIONS—MRI scans of the wrist, taken when patients first present with RA, can predict radiographic erosions at two years. MRI may have a role in the assessment of disease prognosis and selection of patients for more or less aggressive treatment. However, only one in four MRI erosions progresses to an x ray erosion over one year, possibly owing to healing, observer error, or technical limitations of radiography at the carpus. Progression of MRI erosions to x ray erosions is greatest in those with high baseline disease activity.?? PMID:11502613

McQueen, F; Benton, N; Crabbe, J; Robinson, E; Yeoman, S; McLean, L; Stewart, N

2001-01-01

111

Optical imaging of rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Optical Imaging (OI) for rheumatoid arthritis is a novel imaging modality. With the high number of people affected by this disease, especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this article we describe the current techniques of OI and discuss potential future applications of this promising technology. Overall, we demonstrate that OI is a fast, inexpensive, noninvasive, nonionizing and accurate imaging modality. Furthermore, OI is a clinically applicable tool allowing for the early detection of inflammation and potentially facilitating the monitoring of therapy. PMID:21826190

Golovko, Daniel; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Daldrup-Link, Heike

2011-01-01

112

Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis  

PubMed Central

A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or block culpable molecules and so promote or inhibit cellular activity or proliferation. Of these agents, cytokine antagonists have shown greatest promise, and early clinical studies of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockade have identified dramatic clinical benefit in many children with JIA. However, as will also be discussed, overlap of pathways within a complex immune system makes clinical response unpredictable and raises additional ethical and administrative concerns. PMID:12598373

Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G; Gardner-Medwin, J

2003-01-01

113

The Vagus Nerve and Nicotinic Receptors Involve Inhibition of HMGB1 Release and Early Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Function in Collagen-Induced Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a vagus nerve-dependent mechanism, inhibits cytokine releases in models of acute\\u000a inflammatory disease. We investigated the efficacy and elucidated the possible mechanism of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory\\u000a pathway on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Fifty-six male DBA\\/1 mice were divided into four groups: control mice (sham vagotomy + phosphate-buffered saline; shamVGX+PBS),\\u000a model mice (shamVGX+PBS+CIA), vagotomy mice (VGX+PBS+CIA),

Tong Li; Xiaoxia Zuo; Yaou Zhou; Yanping Wang; Hanping Zhuang; Lingli Zhang; Huali Zhang; Xianzhong Xiao

2010-01-01

114

Homocysteine and Familial Longevity: The Leiden Longevity Study  

PubMed Central

Homocysteine concentrations are a read-out of methionine metabolism and have been related to changes in lifespan in animal models. In humans, high homocysteine concentrations are an important predictor of age related disease. We aimed to explore the association of homocysteine with familial longevity by testing whether homocysteine is lower in individuals that are genetically enriched for longevity. We measured concentrations of total homocysteine in 1907 subjects from the Leiden Longevity Study consisting of 1309 offspring of nonagenarian siblings, who are enriched with familial factors promoting longevity, and 598 partners thereof as population controls. We found that homocysteine was related to age, creatinine, folate, vitamin B levels and medical history of hypertension and stroke in both groups (all p<0.001). However, levels of homocysteine did not differ between offspring enriched for longevity and their partners, and no differences in the age-related rise in homocysteine levels were found between groups (p for interaction 0.63). The results suggest that homocysteine metabolism is not likely to predict familial longevity. PMID:21408159

Wijsman, Carolien A.; van Heemst, Diana; Rozing, Maarten P.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Maier, Andrea B.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Blom, Henk J.; Mooijaart, Simon P.

2011-01-01

115

Genome-Wide Investigation of DNA Methylation Marks Associated with FV Leiden Mutation  

PubMed Central

In order to investigate whether DNA methylation marks could contribute to the incomplete penetrance of the FV Leiden mutation, a major genetic risk factor for venous thrombosis (VT), we measured genome-wide DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood samples of 98 VT patients carrying the mutation and 251 VT patients without the mutation using the dedicated Illumina HumanMethylation450 array. The genome-wide analysis of 388,120 CpG probes identified three sites mapping to the SLC19A2 locus whose DNA methylation levels differed significantly (p<3 10?8) between carriers and non-carriers. The three sites replicated (p<2 10?7) in an independent sample of 214 individuals from five large families ascertained on VT and FV Leiden mutation among which 53 were carriers and 161 were non-carriers of the mutation. In both studies, these three CpG sites were also associated (2.33 10?11Leiden mutation. A comprehensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of the whole locus revealed that the original associations were due to LD between the FV Leiden mutation and a block of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located in SLC19A2. After adjusting for this block of SNPs, the FV Leiden mutation was no longer associated with any CpG site (p>0.05). In conclusion, our work clearly illustrates some promises and pitfalls of DNA methylation investigations on peripheral blood DNA in large epidemiological cohorts. DNA methylation levels at SLC19A2 are influenced by SNPs in LD with FV Leiden, but these DNA methylation marks do not explain the incomplete penetrance of the FV Leiden mutation. PMID:25265411

Aissi, Dylan; Dennis, Jessica; Ladouceur, Martin; Truong, Vinh; Zwingerman, Nora; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Germain, Marine; Paton, Tara A.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gagnon, France; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

2014-01-01

116

Diet-induced hyperlipoproteinemia and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E3-Leiden transgenic mice.  

PubMed Central

Apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE*3-Leiden) transgenic mice have been used to study the effect of different cholesterol-containing diets on the remnant lipoprotein levels and composition and on the possible concurrent development of atherosclerotic plaques. On high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet, the high expressing lines 2 and 181 developed severe hypercholesterolemia (up to 40 and 60 mmol/liter, respectively), whereas triglyceride levels remained almost normal when compared with regular mouse diet. The addition of cholate increased the hypercholesterolemic effect of this diet. In lines 2 and 181, serum levels of apo E3-Leiden also increased dramatically upon cholesterol feeding (up to 107 and 300 mg/dl, respectively). In these high expressing APOE*3-Leiden transgenic mice, the increase in both serum cholesterol and apo E3-Leiden occurred mainly in the VLDL/LDL-sized fractions, whereas a considerable increase in large, apo E-rich HDL particles also occurred. In contrast to the high expressing lines, the low expressing line 195 reacted only mildly upon HFC diet. On HFC diets, the high expresser APOE*3-Leiden mice developed atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic arch, the descending aorta, and the carotid arteries, varying from fatty streaks containing foam cells to severe atherosclerotic plaques containing cholesterol crystals, fibrosis, and necrotic calcified tissue. Quantitative evaluation revealed that the atherogenesis is positively correlated with the serum level of cholesterol-rich VLDL/LDL particles. In conclusion, with APOE*3-Leiden transgenic mice, factors can be studied that influence the metabolism of remnant VLDL and the development of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:8163645

van Vlijmen, B J; van den Maagdenberg, A M; Gijbels, M J; van der Boom, H; HogenEsch, H; Frants, R R; Hofker, M H; Havekes, L M

1994-01-01

117

Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series  

MedlinePLUS

Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

118

[Early and late responses to oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts of healthy donors and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Relationship between the cell death rate and the genomic dosage of active ribosomal genes].  

PubMed

A study was made of the effect of the oxidizing agent potassium chromate (K2CrO4, PC) on cultured dermal fibroblasts of a healthy donor and three patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Characteristics of the rRNA gene (RG) complex-RG copy number, active RG (ARG) dosage, and 18S rRNA content--were determined for each cell line. In cells of the healthy donor, oxidative stress caused by low doses of PC (2-4 microM, 1-4 h) induced an early response, including a 50-80% increase in total RNA and rRNA. An appreciable activation of the nucleolus was observed cytochemically, by silver staining and morphometry. The early response grew considerably lower with the increasing passage number and/or PC concentration. Exposure to 6-12 microM PC for 24 h led to a progressive cell death (late response). The existence and intensity of the early response correlated positively with the cell survival during further culturing. Cells of the RA patients displayed almost no early response even at early passages: total RNA did not increase, and rRNA increased by no more than 10%. Cell disruption (apoptosis) during further culturing was more intense than in the line originating from the healthy donor. The apoptosis intensity characterized by the increase in the content of DNA fragments in the culture medium and in the caspase 3 activity, was inversely proportional to the ARG dosage in the genome. The results provide the first quantitative characterization of the early and late responses of cells to PC-induced oxidative stress and suggest a role of the ARG dosage in cell survival in stress. PMID:15856950

Be?ko, N N; Terekhov, S M; Shubaeva, N O; Simirnova, T D; Ivanova, S M; Egolina, N A; Tsvetkova, T G; Spitkovski?, D M; Liapunova, N A

2005-01-01

119

Genetic Determinants of Psoriatic Arthritis.  

E-print Network

??Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis that leads to progressive joint damage. Genetic variants in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region… (more)

Chandran, Vinod

2014-01-01

120

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

1995-03-01

121

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

1994-10-01

122

The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular

Walter Grassi; Rossella De Angelis; Gianni Lamanna; Claudio Cervini

1998-01-01

123

Remodeling a rheumatology practice to facilitate early referral.  

PubMed

In the next 12 months, 7500 Canadians and 75,000 Americans will be afflicted with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. Little is known about the health care use of patients with early RA. Nonetheless, rheumatologists and outcomes researchers strongly endorse the need for early diagnosis and treatment of this population. This article reviews trends and impediments to early referral of new-onset arthritis patients. The slow growth of early arthritis clinics is summarized in a survey that characterizes 23 early arthritis programs in North America. Also, several screening tools and models to capture these early-onset arthritis patients are presented. PMID:16287586

Cush, John J

2005-11-01

124

Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.  

PubMed

Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

2006-06-01

125

[Published in K. Jacobsen, H. Basu, Malinar A. & V. Narayan (eds.), Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism. Volume Five, Leiden, Brill  

E-print Network

of Hinduism. Volume Five, Leiden, Brill] To cite this article: Trouillet, Pierre-Yves, 2013, "France", in K. Jacobsen, H. Basu, Malinar A. & V. Narayan (eds.), Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism. Volume Five, Leiden the issue of the globalization of Hinduism through two topics: the worldwide migrations of Hindu populations

Boyer, Edmond

126

Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient  

PubMed Central

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet ?-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting. PMID:24653990

Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

2014-01-01

127

Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient.  

PubMed

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet ?-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting. PMID:24653990

Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

2014-03-16

128

Virus-associated arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of arthritis in patients who were infected by a virus has been widely observed. In some cases, the clinical appearance seems to resemble that of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism by which the viral infection proceeds to the arthritic manifestation is, however, still to be investigated. Several biological and immunological pathways are suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis.

Kusuki Nishioka

2003-01-01

129

Quick Stats on Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... of symptomatic osteoarthritis Prevalence 52.5 million adults in the United States have doctor-diagnosed arthritis (just over 1 in ... Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States. Read more . View graph . Number of U. S. Adults ...

130

Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein accepted a 'special' visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation involves a case of mistaken identity with Carl Einstein, Dadaist art, and a particular Dutch fear of revolutions. But what revolution was one afraid of? The story of Einstein's Leiden chair throws new light on the reception of relativity and its creator in the Netherlands and in Germany.

van Dongen, Jeroen

2012-01-01

131

Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein accepted a 'special' visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation involves a case of mistaken identity with Carl Einstein, Dadaist art, and a particular Dutch fear of revolutions. But what revolution was one afraid of? The story of Einstein's Leiden chair throws new light on the reception of relativity and its creator in the Netherlands and in Germany.

Jeroen van Dongen

2012-11-14

132

Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Albert Einstein accepted a 'special' visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation involves a case of mistaken identity with Carl Einstein, Dadaist art, and a particular Dutch fear of revolutions. But what revolution was one afraid of? The story of Einstein's Leiden chair throws new light on the reception of relativity and its creator in the Netherlands and in Germany.

Dongen, Jeroen

2012-06-01

133

How citrullination invaded rheumatoid arthritis research  

PubMed Central

Citrullination and the immune response to citrullinated proteins have been fundamental for the early recognition of rheumatoid arthritis by serological tests and a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In the first years after the initial publications, the focus was on the antibodies directed to citrullinated proteins. It is now realized that citrullinating enzymes and citrullinated proteins may have important roles in the maintenance of the inflammatory processes in the joints. There is also accumulating evidence for a direct role of citrullination in tissue destruction in the rheumatoid synovium. Here we will discuss the development and importance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis as well as recent findings implicating citrullination in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24472574

2014-01-01

134

Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging Monique Frizea,b  

E-print Network

Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging Monique Frizea,b , Cynthia Adéaa , Pierre Rheumatology, Ottawa Hospital, Riverside Dr., Ottawa, ON, Canada. ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability

Payeur, Pierre

135

Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, including interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China) [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China)] [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)] [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

2013-11-29

136

Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

2013-01-01

137

Salmonella enteridis Septic Arthritis: A Report of Two Cases  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Nontyphoidal salmonellosis causes significant morbidity, is transmitted via fecal-oral route, and is a worldwide cause of gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and local infections. Salmonella is a less common etiologic factor for septic arthritis compared with other gram-negative bacteria. Cases. We present two septic arthritis cases with Salmonella enteridis as a confirmed pathogen and also discuss the predisposing factors and treatment. Discussion. Septic arthritis is an orthopedic emergency. The gold standard treatment of septic arthritis is joint debridement, antibiotic therapy according to the culture results, and physiotherapy, which should start in the early postoperative period to prevent limitation of motion. Salmonella is an atypical agent for septic arthritis. It must be particularly kept in mind as an etiologic factor for the acute arthritis of a patient with sickle cell anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should be cautious that the white blood cell count in synovial fluid can be under 50.000/mm3 in immune compromised individuals with septic arthritis. The inflammatory response can be deficient, or the microorganism may be atypical. Conclusion. Atypical bacteria such as Salmonella species in immune compromised patients can cause joint infections. Therefore, Salmonella species must always be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in a clinically relevant setting. PMID:24251049

Uygur, Esat; Reddy, Krishna; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Soylemez, Salih; Aydin, Ozlem; Senol, Serkan

2013-01-01

138

Lessons from Lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

Lyme arthritis is the late manifestation of a multi-systemic infectious disease designated Lyme borreliosis (LB) which is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burdorferi. Its arthritic manifestations were first recognized in the small New England villages, "Lyme" and "Old Lyme", for which the disorder is named. While this illness was initially regarded as a rather random clustering of several cases of juvenile chronic arthritis, it now serves as the best example of a chronic arthritis with a recognized infectious origin. Even though the agent has clearly been identified, many riddles concerning Lyme arthritis still exist which demonstrate that even the identification of the causative agent does not solve the problems of an arthritis which so far frequently cannot be properly diagnosed and treated. The intensive study of this disorder, however, has taught important lessons which may also be true for other forms of chronic arthritis in which an infectious cause has not been elucidated. Rather than just adding another review on Lyme arthritis to the many good ones that already exist, this paper will focus on these messages. PMID:8324947

Burmester, G R

1993-01-01

139

Gene therapy for arthritis  

PubMed Central

Arthritis is among the leading causes of disability in the developed world. There remains no cure for this disease and the current treatments are only modestly effective at slowing the disease's progression and providing symptomatic relief. The clinical effectiveness of current treatment regimens has been limited by short half-lives of the drugs and the requirement for repeated systemic administration. Utilizing gene transfer approaches for the treatment of arthritis may overcome some of the obstacles associated with current treatment strategies. The present review examines recent developments in gene therapy for arthritis. Delivery strategies, gene transfer vectors, candidate genes, and safety are also discussed. PMID:18176779

Traister, Russell S.

2008-01-01

140

Osteomalacia in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

Fifty-four patients with rheumatoid arthritis and severe osteomalacia were found to have considerable bone and general deficiency problems. In 46 of them 14 stress fractures occurred and 32 minimal trauma fractures necessitating admission to hospital. Radiological abnormalities of absorption were found in nearly 25% of the total, implying that dietary factors alone are not always responsible for osteomalacia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A high index of suspicion is necessary in the diagnosis of osteomalacia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, so they may benefit from treatment. Images PMID:7377853

O'Driscoll, S; O'Driscoll, M

1980-01-01

141

The Reconstructions of Beirut The City in the Islamic World, Brill, Leiden  

E-print Network

The Reconstructions of Beirut The City in the Islamic World, Brill, Leiden Joe Nasr, independent-torn city is an extreme case, considered from the point of view of urban violence as well as from that of urban planning. Urban violence and planning must then be analyzed as conscious tools for reshaping urban

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Lightning Engine -Ray tracing with KD-trees Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS)  

E-print Network

Lightning Engine - Ray tracing with KD-trees Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS an overview of the architectural design of our Lightning project. The goal of this project was to design 1 Introduction 4 2 The Lightning Engine 5 2.1 Physics Engine

Emmerich, Michael

143

Activities in History of Mathematics in Utrecht and Leiden in the year 2005  

E-print Network

at the Department of Mathematics of Leiden University. 1 #12;· Kim Plofker (KP): 1.0 Postdoctoral position, financed with Islamic mathematics (750 - 1800 CE)." (MATHINDI, 613.000.430) KP was affiliated with the Department Book of the Year award for Is- lamic Studies, of the Islamic Republic of Iran, in a meeting

Hogendijk, Jan P.

144

Animal Biology, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 147-158 (2003) Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2003.  

E-print Network

Animal Biology, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 147-158 (2003) Ã? Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2003. Also at the individual, population and species level, focusing on birds and primates. Innovation, new or modi ed learned behaviour not previously found in the population,is the rst stage in many instances of cultural transmission

Reader, Simon

145

Orthopterological notes I : On the Lesini of the Leiden Museum (Tettigoniidae, Copiphorinae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

When rearranging a part of the collections of Orthoptera in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden I found a number of specimens belonging to this tribus, which by former authors is considered as a separate subfamily with the name Eumegalodontinae (Kirby, 1906, p. 289; Caudell, 1927, p. 30). With Karny I think it justified to let it retain its

Jong de C

1942-01-01

146

Selection pressure for the factor-V-Leiden mutation and embryo implantation.  

PubMed

The factor-V-Leiden mutation is seen in high frequencies in white people, despite its contribution to second-trimester abortion, preterm birth, and deep-vein thrombosis. The reason for its high frequency is not known. We investigated 102 mother-child pairs who had had successful in-vitro fertilisation by intracytoplasmic sperm injection as a model for human implantation. In 90% (9 of 10) of mother-child pairs who carried factor-V-Leiden mutation, the first embryo transfer was successful, compared with 49% (45 of 92) in factor-V-Leiden negative pairs (p=0.018, Fisher's exact test). Furthermore, the median number of unsuccessful transfers was lower in pairs who were positive for the mutation (0, range 0-2) than those who were negative (1, 0-8) (p=0.02, Mann Whitney U test) suggesting that improved implantation rate is an important genetic advantage of the factor-V-Leiden mutation. PMID:11675065

Göpel, W; Ludwig, M; Junge, A K; Kohlmann, T; Diedrich, K; Möller, J

2001-10-13

147

Activated Protein C Resistance, Factor V Leiden, and Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To confirm the relationship between resistance to activated protein C (APC), factor V Leiden, and central retinal vein occlusion in young adults as reported in a recent study of patients younger than 50 years. Patients and Methods: Patients younger than 50 years with central retinal vein occlusion were identified from the medical records of the Wills Eye Hospital Retina

Justin L. Gottlieb; Jeffrey P. Blice; Bernadette Mestichelli; Barbara A. Konkle; William E. Benson

148

Die Scyphomedusen-Sammlung des naturhistorischen Reichsmuseums in Leiden : I. Die Carybdeiden (Cubomedusen)  

Microsoft Academic Search

EINLEITUNG. Die in der vorliegenden Mitteilung besprochenen Cubomedusen bilden einen kleinen gut abgegrenzten Teil der grossen Scyphomedusen-Sammlung des Rijksmuseums van Natuurlijke Historie in Leiden, über welche zu einem späteren Zeitpunkte ausführlich berichtet werden wird. Von diesen aberranten und seltenen Formen liegt eine relativ ganz ansehnliche Anzahl (25 Exemplare) vor, die verschiedenen Genera und vielleicht auch verschiedenen Species angehören. Bei der

G. Stiasny

1919-01-01

149

Collagen-induced arthritis in common marmosets: a new nonhuman primate model for chronic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: There is an ever-increasing need for animal models to evaluate efficacy and safety of new therapeutics in the field of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly for the early preclinical evaluation of human-specific biologicals targeting the progressive phase of the disease, there is a need for relevant animal models. In response to this requirement we set out to develop a model

Michel PM Vierboom; Elia Breedveld; Ivanela Kondova; Bert A't Hart

2010-01-01

150

Exercise and Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... made up of daily tasks, both occupational and leisure activities that are usually affected by arthritis. Exercise ... of exercise are 1) therapeutic/rehabilitative; 2) recreational/leisure; and 3) competitive/elite. Finding the right balance ...

151

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... Us My Cart Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Orthopedic > Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Health Issues Listen Juvenile Idiopathic ... Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & Emergencies ...

152

What Is Psoriatic Arthritis?  

MedlinePLUS

About psoriasis Treating psoriasis Psoriatic arthritis Pso what? Bullying Info for parents Childhood psoriasis Treatments Diet Support your child Get involved At school Bullying Resources Parent's forum Find a pediatric derm Further ...

153

Alcohol consumption is associated with lower self-reported disease activity and better health-related quality of life in female rheumatoid arthritis patients in Sweden: data from BARFOT, a multicenter study on early RA  

PubMed Central

Background Earlier studies have found a positive effect of alcohol consumption, with a reduced disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to assess alcohol consumption and its association with disease activity and health related quality of life (HRQL) in Swedish RA patients. Methods Between 1992 and 2005, 2,800 adult patients were included in the BARFOT study of early RA in Sweden. In 2010 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to all 2,102 prevalent patients in the BARFOT study enquiring about disease severity, HRQL, and lifestyle factors. Alcohol consumption was assessed using the validated AUDIT-C questionnaire. Results A total of 1,238 out of 1,460 patients answering the questionnaire had data on alcohol consumption: 11% were non-drinkers, 67% had a non-hazardous drinking, and 21% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Women who drank alcohol reported lower disease activity and better HRQL, but there were no association between alcohol consumption and disease activity in men. For current smokers, alcohol use was only associated with fewer patient-reported swollen joints. The outcome was not affected by kind of alcohol consumed. Conclusions There was an association between alcohol consumption and both lower self-reported disease activity and higher HRQL in female, but not in male, RA patients. PMID:23879655

2013-01-01

154

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) describes a heterogeneous group of several disease subtypes characterized by\\u000a arthritis beginning before the age of 16 years and where symptoms persist for more than 6 weeks. All subtypes of JIA are of\\u000a unknown cause. Although the pathogenesis for each subtype is likely to be different, JIA is generally regarded to be an autoimmune

Günther E. Dannecker; Martin N. Arbogast; Carol B. Lindsley; H. Schacherl; H. J. Girschick; C. Huemer; A. Heiligenhaus; U. Neudorf

155

Physiopathological aspect of Glynn's type of experimental arthritis.  

PubMed

Knee joint arthritis is induced among rabbits previously immunized by intradermal injection with egg albumin (EA) emulsified in adjuvant containing either M. tuberculosis or M. butyricum, then by intra-articular injection with EA. Arthritis evolution involves two phases, an early one during the first 2 months and a late one from 3 months to 1 year. During the early phase, arthritis intensities are similar no matter which Mycobacterium is used. However, during the late phase, only rabbits immunized with M. tuberculosis develop self-perpetuating arthritis. Among more than 50% of arthritic rabbits, immunological lesions of aortic artery and cardiac valvules are found. Among the rabbits immunized with M. tuberculosis, the humoral anti-EA antibody level remains constant during the whole arthritis evolution; but, among the rabbits immunized with M. butyricum, the arthritis intensity decreases from 3 months of evolution. The correlation between arthritis index (AI) and humoral antibody level is only significant among the rabbits with early arthritis. The intradermally immunized rabbits show a positive skin test with EA and tuberculin. The more intense the cutaneous reactions, the greater the chances of developing self-perpetuating arthritis after the EA intra-articular injection. The fluorescent anit-EA antibodies in the synovia and spleen are found only among the early arthritis. After 2 months of evolution, fluorescent antibodies disappear whatever the immunization may be. Among the immunized rabbits, it is probable that antigenic EA does not persist in the synovia. Indeed, the autologous inflamed synovia transplantation, from the donor-challenged knee joint, does not develop an inflammatory reaction in the non-challenged knee joint. The fluorescent immunoglobulins IgG and IgM in the synovium of arthritic rabbits are found with the same percentages as fluorescent anti-EA antibodies. The lymphocyte response to EA, PHA and PWM are positive whatever the immunization and arthritis evolution may be. There is no correlation between AIs and lymphocyte responses to specific and nonspecific mitogens. It is probable that self-perpetuation depends closely on M. tuberculosis whose adjuvant power is much superior than M. butyricum and not on antigenic EA whose essential role would be to trigger the inflammatory process. PMID:128112

Brouilhet, H; Kahan, A; Piatier, D; Jouanneau, M

1975-01-01

156

Current and future management approaches for rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the introduction of new disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and other therapeutic agents, the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has shifted toward earlier, more aggressive therapy. The ultimate goal is to prevent structural joint damage that leads to pain and functional disability. Early diagnosis of RA is therefore essential, and early DMARD treatment combined with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is recommended.

Ferdinand C Breedveld; Leids Universitair

2002-01-01

157

Distinct synovial immunopathology in Behçet disease and psoriatic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to investigate synovial immunopathology differences between early Behçet disease (BD) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Needle arthroscopy of an inflamed knee joint was performed in patients with early untreated BD (n = 8) and PsA (n = 9). Synovial fluid (SF) was collected for cytokines, perforin, and granzyme analysis. Eight synovial biopsies per

Juan D Cañete; Raquel Celis; Troy Noordenbos; Conchita Moll; Jose A Gómez-Puerta; Pilar Pizcueta; Antonio Palacin; Paul P Tak; Raimon Sanmartí; Dominique Baeten

2009-01-01

158

Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP): A Biomarker of Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Arthritis is a chronic disease with a significant impact on the population. It damages the cartilage, synovium, and bone of the joints causing pain, impairment, and disability in patients. Current methods for diagnosis of and monitoring the disease are only able to detect clinical manifestations of arthritis late in the process. However, with the recent onset of successful treatments for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, it becomes important to identify prognostic factors that can predict the evolution of arthritis. This is especially critical in the early phases of disease so that these treatments can be started as soon as possible to slow down progression of the disease. A valuable approach to monitor arthritis would be by measuring biological markers of cartilage degradation and repair to reflect variations in joint remodeling. One such potential biological marker of arthritis is cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). In various studies, COMP has shown promise as a diagnostic and prognostic indicator and as a marker of the disease severity and the effect of treatment. This review highlights the progress in the utilization of COMP as a biomarker of arthritis. PMID:19652761

Tseng, Susan; Reddi, A. Hari; Di Cesare, Paul E.

2009-01-01

159

Temporomandibular Joint Bone Tissue Resorption in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Predicted by Joint Crepitus and Plasma Glutamate Level  

PubMed Central

The aim was to investigate whether bone tissue resorption in early RA is related to crepitus of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and systemic levels of inflammatory mediators and markers and sex steroid hormones. Twentynine women and 18 men with recently diagnosed RA were examined for TMJ bone erosions with computerized tomography and TMJ crepitus was assessed. Blood samples were analyzed for glutamate, 5-HT, TNF, IL-1?, IL-6, VEGF, inflammatory markers, and estradiol, progesterone and testosterone. The TMJ erosion score was positively correlated to glutamate, and TMJ crepitus where crepitus, glutamate and ESR explained 40% of the variation in the bone erosion score. In the patients without crepitus, bone erosion score was positively correlated to glutamate, which was not the case in the patients with crepitus. In conclusion, the results of this study show that TMJ bone tissue resorption can be predicted by TMJ crepitus and glutamate in early RA. PMID:20671920

Hajati, Anna-Kari; Nasstrom, Karin; Alstergren, Per; Bratt, Johan; Kopp, Sigvard

2010-01-01

160

Profiling of rheumatoid arthritis associated autoantibodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated autoantibodies (AAB) are available for AAB profiling that may improve the early diagnosis of RA and provide prognostic and, probably theranostic information. To select AAB specificities for optimal AAB combinations, known AAB should be evaluated with standardized methods by means of standardized study designs and subjected to statistical analysis. Profiling of anti-citrullinated peptide\\/protein

Karsten Conrad; Dirk Roggenbuck; Dirk Reinhold; Thomas Dörner

2010-01-01

161

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.  

PubMed

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon disorder. In its original description, the presence of linear inflammatory indurations on the lateral aspects of the trunk (the rope sign) in association with arthritis were considered the pathognomonic clinical features. Later cases presenting with plaques and papules have been reported. Herein we describe a case of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis without the rope sign. The present case supports the idea that interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis may have variable clinical appearances. PMID:15257555

Altaykan, Asli; Erkin, Gül; Boztepe, Gonca; Gököz, Aytaç

2004-07-01

162

Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

2007-01-01

163

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon disorder. In its original description, the presence of linear inflammatory indurations on the lateral aspects of the trunk (the rope sign) in association with arthritis were considered the pathognomonic clinical features. Later cases presenting with plaques and papules have been reported. Herein we describe a case of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis

Asli Altaykan; Gül Erkin; Gonca Boztepe; Aytaç Gököz

2004-01-01

164

Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients

E. M. J. Steultjens; J. Dekker; L. M. Bouter; D. J. van Schaardenburg; M. A. H. van Kuyk; C. H. M. van den Ende

2004-01-01

165

Acute Septic Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

2002-01-01

166

Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion  

PubMed Central

Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations. PMID:22915885

Erkalp, Kerem; Comlekci, Mevlut; Inan, Bekir; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozdemir, Haluk; Saidoglu, Leyla

2011-01-01

167

Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:14573963

Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

2003-10-01

168

Laryngeal Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive autoimmune disease that affects 3% of the adult population. It is characterized by the formation of both articular and extra-articular lesions with predilection for small joints. There are ubiquitous reports on the head and neck manifestations of RA with emphasis on the larynx. The laryngeal presenting features of this systemic disease may mimic a plethora of medical conditions, inflammatory and neoplastic. The main phonatory and respiratory symptoms are often subtle and misleading. This paper represents a literature review of the laryngeal manifestations of RA with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, laryngeal findings, diagnosis, and treatment. An early diagnosis of laryngeal involvement may prevent drastic complications. PMID:23864939

Hamdan, A. L.; Sarieddine, D.

2013-01-01

169

Endogenous glutamate in association with inflammatory and hormonal factors modulates bone tissue resorption of the temporomandibular joint in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Purposes The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between plasma level of glutamate and extent of radiographic bone erosion of the TMJ in patients with early RA in relation to inflammatory disease activity as well as estradiol and testosterone. Patients and Methods 47 patients (29 women and 18 men) of whom 24 were seropositive were included shortly after being diagnosed with RA. Radiographic signs of bone tissue resorption (erosions) in the TMJ was recorded by cone-beam CT images and an erosion score (0 – 24) was calculated for each patient. Venous blood was analyzed for rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukocyte particle count, glutamate, estradiol and testosterone. Nonparametric and parametric statistical methods were used in the analysis when applicable. Results Resorptive changes of the TMJ were found in a major part of the patients. There was a significant positive correlation between plasma level of glutamate and extension of radiographic erosions that was strongest in the patients with low levels of C-reactive protein, estradiol or testosterone. On the other hand erosions were correlated with C-reactive protein in patients with high levels of estradiol. The highest levels of glutamate were found in patients with low levels of C-reactive protein and estradiol. Conclusion This study shows that a majority of patients with early RA presents radiographic signs of bone tissue resorption of the TMJ and that circulating glutamate is associated with the extent of these changes. The relationship between glutamate and bone resorption seems to be influenced by systemic inflammatory activity as well as estradiol and testosterone levels. PMID:19686927

Hajati, Anna-Kari; Alstergren, Per; Nasstrom, Karin; Bratt, Johan; Kopp, Sigvard

2009-01-01

170

Neonatal Candida arthritis  

PubMed Central

Fungal arthritis is an uncommon yet serious disorder in the newborn. Delay in diagnosis and management can lead to significant morbidity. We report our experience with management of two such cases. Two preterm neonates with multifocal arthritis caused by Candida were studied. Diagnosis was made by clinical examination, laboratory investigations, radiological investigations and culture. Both were treated by aspiration, arthrotomy and antifungal therapy. One patient recovered fully from the infection while the other had growth disturbances resulting in limb length inequality at recent followup. Prompt and expeditious evacuation of pus from joints and antifungal therapy is imperative for treatment. Associated osteomyelitis leads to further difficulty in treatment. PMID:24932046

Sharma, Saurabh; Gangwal, Kapil

2014-01-01

171

Organizing Pneumonia Preceding Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are susceptible to interstitial lung disease, and joint manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis usually precede lung involvements by several years. Organizing pneumonia, as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis, is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain currently unknown. We present a case and a literature review of patients who were pathologically diagnosed with organizing pneumonia first and met the diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis later. In this review, we observed the following: (1) patients with organizing pneumonia preceding rheumatoid arthritis have a high prevalence of rheumatoid factor or anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies; (2) almost all patients developed rheumatoid arthritis within one year after the diagnosis of organizing pneumonia. We suggest that patients with organizing pneumonia and positive for either rheumatoid factor or anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody should be cautiously followed up regarding the development of rheumatoid arthritis, particularly during the first year after the diagnosis of organizing pneumonia. PMID:24600522

Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Atsuhiko; Hidaka, Kouko

2014-01-01

172

Pseudophakia in children with juvenile arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

  \\u000a \\u000a Background: Cataract secondary to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is a severe, vision-threatening complication in early childhood. Intraocular\\u000a lens implantation is controversial. The follow-up of four pseudophakic eyes of three patients and their perioperative therapeutic\\u000a regimen were retrospectively analyzed. Early and late postoperative complications are reported.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods: Both girls had lens aspiration and posterior lens implantation at the ages

Heike Häberle; Karl-Heinrich Velhagen; Uwe Pleyer

1998-01-01

173

The Effect of Stopping Smoking on Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Data from BARFOT, a Multicenter Study of Early RA  

PubMed Central

Objective: We studied the effect of stopping smoking on disease activity in patients with RA. Methods: Between 1992 and 2005, 2,800 adult patients were included in the BARFOT early RA study in Sweden. Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-CCP, general health and pain visual analog scales (VAS), EULAR response and treatment were registered at inclusion and at follow-up 2, 5 and 8 years. In 2010, a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to 2,102 patients, enquiring about lifestyle factors, including cessation of smoking. Results: A total of 1,460 adult RA patients with disease duration ?2 years were included in this study. Seventeen percent smoked in 2010. In total, 127 patients stopped smoking after inclusion in the study. Smoking cessation after inclusion in the study was negatively associated with EULAR good outcome at 8 years (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22–0.86, p=0.02), controlled for age, disease duration, sex, socioeconomic class, smoking status, RF, and DAS28 at inclusion. Conclusion: Seventeen percent of the RA patients smoked in 2010 in this large Swedish RA cohort. Stopping smoking after onset of RA did not change the poor prognosis of smokers with RA, but all RA patients need to stop smoking because of the high risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and the association of smoking with vasculitis and noduli in RA. PMID:23115602

Andersson, Maria LE; Bergman, Stefan; Soderlin, Maria K

2012-01-01

174

Both lipolysis and hepatic uptake of VLDL are impaired in transgenic mice coexpressing human apolipoprotein E*3Leiden and human apolipoprotein C1.  

PubMed

Transgenic mice overexpressing human APOE*3Leiden are highly susceptible to diet-induced hyperlipoproteinemia and atherosclerosis due to a defect in hepatic uptake of remnant lipoproteins. In addition to the human APOE*3Leiden gene, these mice carry the human APOC1 gene (APOE*3Leiden-C1). To investigate the possible effect of simultaneous expression of the human APOC1 gene, we examined the phenotypic expression in these APOE*3Leiden-C1 mice in relation to transgenic mice expressing the APOE*3Leiden gene without the APOC1 gene (APOE*3Leiden-HCR). APOE*3Leiden-C1 and APOE*3Leiden-HCR mice had comparable liver expression for the APOE*3Leiden transgene and high total cholesterol levels on a sucrose-based diet compared with control mice (4.3 and 4.3 versus 2.1 mmol/L). In addition, on this diet APOE*3Leiden-C1 mice displayed significantly higher serum triglyceride levels than APOE*3Leiden-HCR mice and control mice (4.4 versus 0.6 and 0.2 mmol/L). Elevated triglyceride and cholesterol levels were mainly in the VLDL-sized lipoproteins. In vivo turnover studies with endogenously triglyceride-labeled VLDL showed a reduced VLDL triglyceride fractional catabolic rate for APOE*3Leiden-C1 and APOE*3Leiden-HCR mice compared with control mice (3.5 and 11.0 versus 20.4 pools per hour). To study whether the difference in fractional catabolic rates between the two transgenic strains was due to an inhibiting effect of apoC1 on the extrahepatic lipolysis or hepatic-mediated uptake of VLDL, turnover experiments were performed in functionally hepatectomized mice. Strikingly, both APOE*3Leiden-C1 and APOE*3Leiden-HCR mice showed a decreased lipolytic rate of VLDL triglyceride in the extrahepatic circulation compared with control mice (1.5 and 1.8 versus 6.3 pools per hour). We conclude that next to an impaired hepatic uptake, overexpression of the APOE*3Leiden gene influences the extrahepatic lipolysis of VLDL triglycerides, whereas simultaneous overexpression of the APOC1 gene leads to a further decrease in hepatic clearance of VLDL. PMID:8696956

Jong, M C; Dahlmans, V E; van Gorp, P J; Breuer, M L; Mol, M J; van der Zee, A; Frants, R R; Hofker, M H; Havekes, L M

1996-08-01

175

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most enigmatic problems in rheumatology has been juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Firstly, the classification has often depended on clinical features that have variations between patients. Secondly, there are different classification schemes in usage and there are few objective serologic tests that help to resolve the differences between the criteria sets. Thirdly, only recently have significant advances been

Andrea T. Borchers; Carlo Selmi; Gurtej Cheema; Carl L. Keen; Yehuda Shoenfeld; M. Eric Gershwin

2006-01-01

176

Psoriasis and arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a population survey of 3659 persons aged 20 years or older, no association was found between psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Inflammatory, degenerative and soft tissue rheumatic diseases occurred in 59% of the psoriatics and 46% of the controls. However, the mean number of rheumatological diagnoses in the psoriatics was 1.1 and in the controls 1.3. Features of psoriasis were

H. A. Valkenburg; W. Swart-Bruinsma; A. Cats; J. Hermans

1984-01-01

177

Arthritis of the Base of the Thumb  

MedlinePLUS

... other aspects of aging, we adapt to thumb arthritis and treatment is often unnecessary. Options for treatment include non- ... zag deformity Figure 3 - Grind Test Figure 4 - Treatment Diagram PDF Arthritis - Base of the Thumb Related Conditions Psoriatic Arthritis ...

178

Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?  

PubMed Central

The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

Deane, Kevin

2013-01-01

179

Lack of association between polymorphisms of thrombogenic genes and disease susceptibility in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Abnormalities in coagulation have been linked with CVD in general and RA population. The aim of our study is to determine whether particular single nucleotide polymorphisms thought to be involved in the regulation of coagulation are over-represented in patients with RA compared to controls. We compared the frequency of atherothrombotic polymorphisms (Factor V Leiden, fibrinogen G455A, prothrombin G20210A and plasminogen activator inhibitor 4G5G) in 322 RA patients [231 females, mean age 61.5 ± 12, median disease duration 10 years (IQR = 14)] with 441 local controls. No significant differences were observed in genotype or allele frequencies either between RA and controls or between the disease subgroups studied. Whereas these polymorphisms may be of importance at the level of individual patients, they are unlikely to be clinically important on a population basis. PMID:22466403

Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Douglas, Karen M J; Smith, Jacqueline; Panoulas, Vasilis F; Kitas, George D

2013-09-01

180

Childhood psychosocial stressors and adult onset arthritis: broad spectrum risk factors and allostatic load.  

PubMed

Neural, endocrine, and immune stress mediators are hypothesized to increase risks of diverse chronic diseases, including arthritis. Retrospective data from the World Mental Health Surveys (N=18,309) were employed to assess whether adult onset of arthritis was associated with childhood adversities and early onset psychological disorder. Cox proportional hazard models assessed the association of number of childhood adversities and the presence of early onset psychological disorder with arthritis age of onset. Controlling for age, sex, and early onset mental disorder, relative to persons with no childhood adversities, persons with two adversities had an increased risk of adult onset arthritis (hazard ratio=1.27, 95% CI=1.08, 1.50), while persons with three or more adversities had a higher risk (HR=1.44, CI=1.24, 1.67). Early onset depressive and/or anxiety disorder was associated with an increased risk of adult onset arthritis after controlling for childhood adversities (HR=1.43, CI=1.28, 1.61). Since psychosocial stressors may be broad spectrum risk factors that increase risks of diverse chronic conditions in later life (e.g. arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, and chronic pain), prospective studies of childhood psychosocial stressors may be most productive if multiple disease outcomes are assessed in the same study. Results from this study provide methodological guidance for future prospective studies of the relationship between childhood psychosocial stressors and subsequent risk of adult onset arthritis. PMID:19251363

Von Korff, Michael; Alonso, Jordi; Ormel, Johan; Angermeyer, Matthais; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fleiz, Clara; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Kessler, Ronald C; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Posada-Villa, José; Scott, Kate M; Uda, Hidenori

2009-05-01

181

Th17 cytokines and arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Th17 cells are implicated in human autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although it has not been established\\u000a whether this persistent destructive arthritis is driven by Th1 and\\/or Th17 cells. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) contributes to\\u000a the pathogenesis of arthritis as has been shown in several experimental arthritis models. Importantly, recent data from first\\u000a clinical trials with anti-IL-17A antibody treatment in

Erik Lubberts

2010-01-01

182

Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

Carette, Simon

1984-01-01

183

[Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis].  

PubMed

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have one or more comorbid conditions. The prevalence of comorbidities increases with age and disease duration. Comorbidities influence the outcome of RA and limit therapeutic options. Besides suppressing disease activity of RA, screening and tight control of existing comorbidities is essential to avoid further damage. A close cooperation between general practitioners, rheumatologists and attending specialists is important for a successful treatment, taking into account the complex interaction of RA and its comorbidities. PMID:25181002

Albrecht, K

2014-09-01

184

Gene therapy for arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Gene therapy has a potential for effective therapeutic intervention in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Proof of concept has been\\u000a demonstrated in animal models, either through local gene delivery to the joint space or through systemic gene delivery for\\u000a immune intervention. This chapter reviews how certain clinical applications of gene therapy would be beneficial for RA patients\\u000a and discusses the roadblocks that

Florence Apparailly; Paul Peter Tak; Christian Jorgensen

185

Nosocomial neonatal septic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between August 1993 and August 1994, 17 cases of neonatal septic arthritis occurred at the intensive care baby unit of Princess\\u000a Badia' Teaching Hospital in Northern Jordan.Klebsiella species was the causative pathogen in 10 patients (59%), which indicates a nosocomial acquired infection. The hip was the\\u000a main joint involved in 94% of cases. An epidemiological survey showed that the spread

F. Abuekteish; A. S. Daoud; M. Mesmar; A. Obeidat

1996-01-01

186

Plasma hepcidin levels and anemia in old age. The Leiden 85-Plus Study  

PubMed Central

Hepcidin, an important regulator of iron homeostasis, is suggested to be causally related to anemia of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the role of plasma hepcidin in anemia among older persons from the general population. The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a population-based study of 85-year olds in Leiden, the Netherlands. Eighty-five-year old inhabitants of Leiden were enrolled between September 1997 and September 1999. At the age of 86, plasma hepcidin was determined with time of flight mass spectrometry in 490 participants [160 (32.7%) male, 114 (23.3%) with anemia]. Anemia was defined according to criteria of the World Health Organization (hemoglobin level <13 g/dL for men and hemoglobin <12 g/dL for women). The median plasma hepcidin level was 3.0 nM [interquartile range (IQR) 1.8–4.9]. We found strong correlations between plasma hepcidin and body iron status, C-reactive protein and erythropoietin levels. Significantly higher hepcidin levels were found in participants with anemia of inflammation (P<0.01), in participants with anemia of kidney disease (P=0.01), and in participants with unexplained anemia (P=0.01) than in participants without anemia. Participants with iron-deficiency anemia had significantly lower plasma hepcidin levels than participants without anemia (P<0.01). In conclusion, older persons with anemia of inflammation have higher hepcidin levels than their counterparts without anemia. The potential clinical value of hepcidin in future diagnostic algorithms for anemia has to be explored. PMID:23065507

den Elzen, Wendy P.J.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

2013-01-01

187

Plasma hepcidin levels and anemia in old age. The Leiden 85-Plus Study.  

PubMed

Hepcidin, an important regulator of iron homeostasis, is suggested to be causally related to anemia of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the role of plasma hepcidin in anemia among older persons from the general population. The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a population-based study of 85-year olds in Leiden, the Netherlands. Eighty-five-year old inhabitants of Leiden were enrolled between September 1997 and September 1999. At the age of 86, plasma hepcidin was determined with time of flight mass spectrometry in 490 participants [160 (32.7%) male, 114 (23.3%) with anemia]. Anemia was defined according to criteria of the World Health Organization (hemoglobin level <13 g/dL for men and hemoglobin <12 g/dL for women). The median plasma hepcidin level was 3.0 nM [interquartile range (IQR) 1.8-4.9]. We found strong correlations between plasma hepcidin and body iron status, C-reactive protein and erythropoietin levels. Significantly higher hepcidin levels were found in participants with anemia of inflammation (P<0.01), in participants with anemia of kidney disease (P=0.01), and in participants with unexplained anemia (P=0.01) than in participants without anemia. Participants with iron-deficiency anemia had significantly lower plasma hepcidin levels than participants without anemia (P<0.01). In conclusion, older persons with anemia of inflammation have higher hepcidin levels than their counterparts without anemia. The potential clinical value of hepcidin in future diagnostic algorithms for anemia has to be explored. PMID:23065507

den Elzen, Wendy P J; de Craen, Anton J M; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Swinkels, Dorine W; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

2013-03-01

188

HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Factor 5 leiden (FVL) is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy. PMID:25317347

Dag, Zeynep Ozcan; Isik, Yuksel; Simsek, Yavuz; Tulmac, Ozlem Banu; Demiray, Demet

2014-01-01

189

Postoperative pulmonary embolism in a young female accompanying with Factor V Leiden mutation and hereditary sypherocytosis.  

PubMed

A 20 year-old female, heterozygous for Factor V Leiden mutation (FVLM) is presented. Her personal history was prominent for severe anaemia during her gestation. Aetiology of anaemia was found to be hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Intrauterine foetal death had occurred at 20 weeks of gestational age. Two days after curettage, she developed pulmonary embolism (PE). This is an unusual case of pulmonary embolism and intrauterine foetal death coexisting with FVLM and/or HS. We present the case so that a general practitioner or haematologist can hardly see such cases in daily practice. Hence, a young female with PE should be screened for hypercoagulable states including FVLM or HS. PMID:15353920

Karnak, Demet; Beder, Sumru; Kayacan, Oya; Berk, Ozlem

2004-06-01

190

Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617-1740*  

PubMed Central

The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice. PMID:23908853

Collins, Kenneth

2013-01-01

191

Collagen-induced arthritis in common marmosets: a new nonhuman primate model for chronic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction There is an ever-increasing need for animal models to evaluate efficacy and safety of new therapeutics in the field of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly for the early preclinical evaluation of human-specific biologicals targeting the progressive phase of the disease, there is a need for relevant animal models. In response to this requirement we set out to develop a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in a small-sized nonhuman primate species (300 to 400 g at adult age); that is, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Methods Twenty-two animals divided into three experiments were immunized with collagen type II (CII) of either bovine or chicken origin with different immunization strategies. The animals were analyzed for clinical manifestation of arthritis, hematology and clinical chemistry, immunological responses against CII and histopathological features of the arthritis. Results Clinically manifest arthritis was observed in almost 100% (21 out of 22) of the animals. Fifty percent of the animals developed semi-acute CIA while the other 50% displayed a more chronic disease. Both cellular (CD3/CD4 and CD3/CD8) and humoral responses (IgM and IgG) against CII were involved in the development of the disease. Besides mild histopathological changes in bone and cartilage, severe inflammation in extraarticular tissues like periosteum and subcutaneous tissues was observed. Conclusions This new model in marmosets more closely resembles chronic RA with respect to the chronic disease course and pathomorphological presentation than the more acute monophasic and destructive CIA model in macaques. This model can therefore fill a niche in preclinical testing of new human specific therapeutics. PMID:20977720

2010-01-01

192

Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an

P. A Cohen; C. H Job-Deslandre; G Lalande; C Adamsbaum

2000-01-01

193

Rubella and juvenile chronic arthritis.  

PubMed Central

A 9-year-old boy with a clinical illness similar to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis was found to have rubella virus in the synovial fluid. There was complete remission of symptoms after 3 months. The role of rubella virus as a possible possible aetiological agent in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. PMID:7247445

Smith, M F; Haycock, G B; Grahame, R

1981-01-01

194

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: an update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most com- mon chronic arthropathy of childhood. Previous ter- minology identified this entity as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The 7 subsets of JIA identified under the new classification system are discussed, as are current treatments. A differential diagnosis of JIA is included as this condition continues to be diagnosed by exclu- sion. Recent studies, which

S Singh; KR Jat

2008-01-01

195

Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

1977-12-01

196

The Immunoglobulin (IgG) Antibody Response to OspA and OspB Correlates with Severe and Prolonged Lyme Arthritis and the IgG Response to P35 Correlates with Mild and Brief Arthritis  

PubMed Central

In an effort to implicate immune responses to specific Borrelia burgdorferi proteins that may have a role in chronic Lyme arthritis, we studied the natural history of the antibody response to B. burgdorferi in serial serum samples from 25 patients monitored throughout the course of Lyme disease. In these patients, the immunoglobulin G (IgM) and IgG antibody responses to 10 recombinant B. burgdorferi proteins, determined during early infection, early arthritis, and maximal arthritis, were correlated with the severity and duration of maximal arthritis. The earliest responses were usually to outer surface protein C (OspC), P35, P37, and P41; reactivity with OspE, OspF, P39, and P93 often developed weeks later; and months to years later, 64% of patients had responses to OspA and OspB. During early infection and early arthritis, the levels of IgG antibody to P35 correlated inversely with the subsequent severity or duration of maximal arthritis. In contrast, during periods of maximal arthritis, the levels of IgG antibody to OspA and OspB, especially to a C-terminal epitope of OspA, correlated directly with the severity and duration of arthritis. Thus, the higher the IgG antibody response to P35 earlier in the infection, the milder and briefer the subsequent arthritis, whereas during maximal arthritis, the higher the IgG response to OspA and OspB, the more severe and prolonged the arthritis. PMID:9864212

Akin, Evren; McHugh, Gail L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Fikrig, Erol; Steere, Allen C.

1999-01-01

197

The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.  

PubMed

Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis. PMID:24474190

Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

2014-03-01

198

Deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care for patients with inflammatory arthritis: A UK district general hospital experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundFoot problems are highly prevalent in inflammatory arthritis (IA), especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Chronic inflammation can lead to permanent structural changes, deformity and disability. Early podiatry intervention in RA improves long term outcomes. National guidelines recommend that patients should be treated by a multidisciplinary team with dedicated podiatry services. In clinical practice funding constraints limit availability of these services.

M. Juarez; E. Price; D. Collins; L. Williamson

2010-01-01

199

Clotrimazole in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

Forty-seven patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in an 8-week controlled study in which clotrimazole was compared with a standard nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, ketoprofen. Although clotrimazole was shown to be effective in the treatment of the disease and superior to ketoprofen in certain measurements, if was also responsible for a high incidence of adverse effects. Improvement with clotrimazole took place more slowly but was more sustained than with ketoprofen. A significant rise in plasma cortisol and a fall in white cell count was observed in the clotrimazole treated patients. PMID:7002065

Wojtulewski, J A; Gow, P J; Walter, J; Grahame, R; Gibson, T; Panayi, G S; Mason, J

1980-01-01

200

What is MRI bone oedema in rheumatoid arthritis and why does it matter?  

PubMed Central

MRI bone oedema occurs in various forms of inflammatory and non-inflammatory arthritis and probably represents a cellular infiltrate within bone. It is common in early rheumatoid arthritis and is associated with erosive progression and poor functional outcome. Histopathological studies suggest that a cellular infiltrate comprising lymphocytes and osteoclasts may be detected in subchondral bone and could mediate the development of erosions from the marrow towards the joint surface. There is emerging evidence from animal models that such an infiltrate corresponds with MRI bone oedema, pointing towards the bone marrow as a site for important pathology driving joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17169137

McQueen, Fiona M; Ostendorf, Benedikt

2006-01-01

201

Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... many other rheumatic diseases, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease ( auto means self), so-called because a person’s ... risk; it may also help explain why different autoimmune diseases tend to run in families. Other studies have ...

202

An automated search for high-velocity clouds in the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey  

E-print Network

We describe an automated search through the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI Survey (LDS) for high-velocity clouds north of Dec=-28 deg. From the general catalog we extract a sample of isolated high-velocity clouds, CHVCs: anomalous-velocity HI clouds which are sharply bounded in angular extent with no kinematic or spatial connection to other HI features down to a limiting column density of 1.5*10^18cm^-2. This column density is an order of magnitude lower than the critical HI column density, about 2*10^19cm^-2, where the ionized fraction is thought to increase dramatically due to the extragalactic radiation field. As such, these objects are likely to provide their own shielding to ionizing radiation. Their small median angular size, of about 1 deg. FWHM, might then imply substantial distances, since the partially ionized HI skin in a power-law ionizing photon field has a typical exponential scale-length of 1 kpc. The automated search algorithm has been applied to the HIPASS and to the Leiden/Dwingeloo data sets. The results from the LDS are described here; Putman et al. (2002) describe application of this algorithm to the HIPASS material. We identify 67 CHVCs in the LDS which satisfy stringent requirements on isolation, and an additional 49 objects which satisfy somewhat less stringent requirements. Independent confirmation is available for all of these objects, either from earlier data in the literature or from new observations made with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and reported here. The catalog includes 54 of the 65 CHVCs listed by Braun and Burton (1999) on the basis of a visual search of the LDS data.

V. de Heij; R. Braun; W. B. Burton

2002-01-15

203

Samuel Goudsmit - Early Influences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samuel Goudsmit, born in 1902 in The Hague, Netherlands, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Leiden in 1926 with Paul Ehrenfest. The present talk will describe some aspects of his background and early formative years in order to provide context for the broad range of his professional life. Sam belonged to a large tribe of paternal and maternal uncles, aunts and first cousins; including his parents, grandparents and sister Ro, they numbered forty. Sam was the first of the tribe to be educated beyond high school. Early interests as a child and later as a university student in the Netherlands prefigured his significant and diverse contributions in several realms including not only physics but also teaching, Egyptology and scientific Intelligence. Bibliographic sources will include: The American Institute of Physics' Oral History Transcripts and photographs from the Emilio Segre visual archives, memoirs and conversations of those who knew Sam and also letters to his daughter, Esther.

Goudsmit, Esther

2010-03-01

204

[Dutch midwives: image and occupation. Developments in midwifery in Leiden, Arnhem, 's-Hertogenbosch and Leeuwarden, 1650-1865].  

PubMed

My study on the social position of Dutch midwives in early modern Europe was induced by the consistently negative image in the literature at the time. Medical doctors and accoucheurs (obstetricians) expressed critical opinions on both the occupation of midwifery and the midwives themselves. They disparaged the behaviour, activities, training, income, additional jobs and social background of midwives. Later, medical doctors and historians reproduced and promulgated this negative image of midwives. At issue is the extent to which the attitudes of medical doctors and accoucheurs corresponded to those of the broader population, and how these attitudes were related to the actual place in society. The question is if midwives took a marginal position in urban society. My work focusses on four Dutch cities: Arnhem, Leeuwarden, Leiden and 's-Hertogenbosch. It deals with the period 1650-1685. The criticism of medical practitioners and of a accoucheurs on midwives are described. The occupation itself is discussed: the activities of midwives and the development of the profession (regulation, training and rivalry). At the end of the seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth century, the medical profession began to show an interest in childbirth. Rivalry between accoucheurs and midwives, competition between legal and illegal practitioners of midwifery, and in-fighting within the profession tell us something about the development of the profession. From the eighteenth century on, attending problematic births was claimed as a privilege of accoucheurs. Data from municipal archives were used to find out if and to what extent midwives were marginalised. Their geographical mobility, social background (occupations of parents), occupations of husbands, income and domicile are discussed. Analysis of this material indicates that midwives belonged to the common urban labouring class (consisting of artisans and workers), and were not very different from other members of this class. Certainly they were not marginalised, instead they had a relatively privileged position within the common labouring class. Five motives can be distinguished for the negative image expressed by medical doctors and accoucheurs in their publications: 1) professional rivalry, 2) division of theoretical and practical knowledge, 3) class differences, 4) gender, and 5) 'polluting' activities. Studies on ideas of pollution and 'infamous' occupations might lead one to conclude that midwives in the Dutch Republic were stigmatised. I found no evidence, however, that the opinions of medical doctors and accoucheurs were shared by the broader public. Official recognition of midwives - the regulation of their practice and education - protected tham. This has contributed to their position as independent practitioners in the Netherlands up to today. PMID:11640278

Van der Borg, E

1994-01-01

205

Managed care implications in managing rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory form of arthritis characterized by joint inflammation, pain, swelling, and stiffness. While contemporary treatment strategies based on early diagnosis, aggressive treatment, and regular monitoring have helped a significant number of patients achieve evidence-based treatment goals, RA still presents substantial management challenges to both clinicians and patients, and has the potential to lead to severe disability over time. In addition to its significant clinical consequences, RA has important economic implications. Both direct and indirect medical costs associated with RA are significant, including costs of medications, ambulatory and office-based care, and quality-of-life and productivity costs. In addition, a significant proportion of patients with prevalent RA have associated cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities, further compounding healthcare costs and complicating management of this disorder. Clinically favorable and cost-effective management must focus on prevention of disease progression and the improved patient health status and productivity than can result from optimal disease control. With the myriad of treatment options both available and emerging, managed care organizations are faced with difficult decisions surrounding the most clinically and cost-effective allocation of treatments designed to improve disease outcomes for patients with RA. It is vital that managed care clinicians and providers analyze both the overall burden and the specific costs of RA. This will allow a better understanding of how costs and issues relating to healthcare utilization affect the treatment of patients with RA and impact individualized therapy, care coordination, and outcomes. PMID:25180623

Owens, Gary M

2014-05-01

206

REVIEW Adalimumab in the treatment of arthritis  

E-print Network

Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in a number of arthritic disease states, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Adalimumab is the first fully human, high-affinity, recombinant immunoglobulin G 1 (IgG

unknown authors

207

The safety profile of biologic therapies for juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been revolutionized by the use of novel biologic agents that have much improved patients' short-term and, according to early evidence, long-term outcomes. Currently available biologic agents used to treat patients with JIA include tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, various agents that target interleukin (IL)-1 and the IL-6 receptor, T-cell co-stimulation inhibitors and

Yosef Uziel; Ronald M. Laxer; Philip J. Hashkes

2010-01-01

208

Glucosamine and adjuvant arthritis: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study.  

PubMed

We investigated (i) the effectiveness of glucosamine (GlcN) in treating adjuvant arthritis (AA) and its cardiac abnormalities (down regulation of cardiac calcium channel and beta-adrenergic proteins) (ii) the effect of AA on pharmacokinetics of GlcN and the cardiac ryanodine-2 target protein. Six groups (n=6/group) of male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with Mycobacterium butyricum (Inflamed) or saline (Control). One group received GlcN hydrochloride (300mg/kg/day, p.o. commenced on day one); others received GlcN upon developing the early sign of AA; after amelioration of the disease, the GlcN administration continued for one group while discontinued for another. Subsequently, a 25mg/kg verapamil administered, electrocardiographs were recorded and pharmacokinetic delineated. Serum nitrite concentration, body weight, paw thickness and arthritis index were assessed. Cardiac contents of L-type calcium channel, ?1-adrenoreceptors and ryanodine-2 receptor were measured. All rats that received M. butyricum, but not GlcN, developed arthritis. GlcN prevented arthritis and improved the signs and symptoms after their emergence. It also restores the down-regulating effect of AA on the cardiac target proteins, pharmacokinetics and response to verapamil. Inflammation did not influence pharmacokinetics of GlcN and the density of ryanodine-2 protein. GlcN has controlling effect on AA and restores the down-regulating effect of AA on cardiac proteins and response to verapamil, perhaps, through its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22722009

Gilzad-Kohan, Mohammad H; Jamali, Fakhreddin

2012-09-29

209

Effects of amlodipine, atorvastatin and combination of both on advanced atherosclerotic plaque in APOE*3Leiden transgenic mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined treatment of statins and calcium channel blockers has been suggested to be superior to statin therapy alone. We quantified the anti-atherosclerotic potential of amlodipine, atorvastatin and their combination on existing atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta of APOE*3-Leiden transgenic mice. Sixty-two mice were fed a high cholesterol containing diet for 18 weeks. A subgroup of 10 mice was then killed. All

2003-01-01

210

Raman spectroscopic investigation of atorvastatin, amlodipine, and both on atherosclerotic plaque development in APOE*3 Leiden transgenic mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Raman spectroscopy allows quantitative, non-destructive evaluation of entire, intact atherosclerotic plaques. We quantified the anti-atherosclerotic effects of atorvastatin and amlodipine on progression of atherosclerosis using post-mortem Raman spectroscopic plaque imaging in 28 APOE*3 Leiden transgenic mice who were fed a high fat\\/high cholesterol diet for 28 weeks. Mice were assigned to a control group receiving the diet alone or to

Sweder W. E van de Poll; Dianne J. M Delsing; J. Wouter Jukema; Hans M. G Princen; Louis M Havekes; Gerwin J Puppels; Arnoud van der Laarse

2002-01-01

211

Ocular Vascular Thrombotic Events: A Diagnostic Window to Familial Thrombophilia (Compound Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin Gene Heterozygosity) and Thrombosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 12-member, 3-generation kindred with conjoint inheritance of G1691A factor V Leiden (FVL) and G20210A prothrombin gene (PTG) mutations, identified through a proband with amaurosis fugax and his father with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), the authors' hypothesis was that ocular thrombosis was a diagnostic window to familial thrombophilia—thrombosis. The authors used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measures for thrombophilia

Charles J. Glueck; Ping Wang

2009-01-01

212

C677T MTHFR Mutation and Factor V Leiden Mutation in Patients with TIA\\/Minor Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

A common C677T mutation in the gene for the enzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (5,10-MTHFR) has been linked to elevated levels of homocysteine and was therefore suspected to be a candidate genetic risk factor for arterial occlusive disease. Another mutation, factor V Leiden, has been established as a common hereditary risk factor for venous thrombosis, but its role in arterial disease remains

Wolfgang Lalouschek; Susanne Aull; Wolfgang Serles; Peter Schnider; Christine Mannhalter; Ingrid Pabinger-Fasching; Lüder Deecke; Karl Zeiler

1999-01-01

213

Coexistence of factor V Leiden and primary antiphospholipid syndrome: a patient with recurrent myocardial infarctions and thrombocytopenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Zusammenfassung   Eine verminderte Inhibitorwirkung des aktivierten Protein C und die daraus resultierende übermäßige Entstehung von Thrombin\\u000a könnte zu einem erhöhten Risiko für akute koronare Ereignisse führen. Eine angeborene Resistenz gegen aktiviertes Protein\\u000a C (Faktor-V-Leiden) allein scheint jedoch keinen Risikofaktor für Myokardinfarkte darzustellen. Wir berichten über einen Patienten\\u000a mit chronischer Thrombozytopenie und rezidivierenden Myokardinfarkten infolge koronarer Thrombosen, bei dem eine Koexistenz

M. Schütt; H. Klüter; G. J. Wiedemann; G. Richardt

2000-01-01

214

Identification of initial severity determinants to predict arthritis after chikungunya infection in a cohort of French gendarmes  

PubMed Central

Background The objective was to identify severity characteristics of initial chikungunya infection (CHIKV) stages associated with post-CHIKV arthritis and arthralgia. Methods French gendarmes exposed to the 2005–2006 CHIKV epidemic in Reunion Island who completed the 2006 (self-reporting acute and early chronic [median: 6 months] symptoms) and 2008 (Endpoint [median: 30 months]: self-perceived recovery and rheumatic disorders (RDs)) surveys were included. Multinomial logistic regression and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) were used. Arthralgia was defined by joint pain and/or stiffness and arthritis by joint swelling in addition to pain and/or stiffness. Results In 2008, 124 (31.3%)/403 participants (101 CHIKV+/302 CHIKV-) reported arthralgia and 57 (14.1%) arthritis. The multivariate model kept CHIKV infection, comorbidity and acute stage depressed mood as independent prognostic factors for both arthralgia and arthritis, but found early chronic stage RD as the main determinant of the same RD two years later. The MCA performed with the 85 CHIKV?+?patients who answered the question on self-perceived recovery enabled the calculation of severity scores based on initial symptoms that were strongly associated with persistent arthritis and, to a lesser extent, to arthralgia in bivariate analyses. The MCA graph clearly distinguished arthritis as the only RD associated with early severity indicators represented by sick leave, joint swelling and depressed mood during the acute stage, and early chronification of arthritis and depressed mood. Conclusion Initial CHIKV severity predicted recovery, with higher severity associated with arthritis and lower severity with arthralgia. More interestingly, specific markers of post-CHIKV arthritis, which can easily be used by clinicians for case management, were identified. PMID:25059583

2014-01-01

215

ACPA (anti-citrullinated protein antibodies) and rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

It has recently been discovered that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are present in 50% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Assays for detecting ACPA have been shown to have very good diagnostic and predictive characteristics, and they may facilitate the identification of patients with early arthritis who need aggressive treatment. In addition to their diagnostic and predictive properties, ACPA have also provided new insights into the pathophysiology of RA. The specific association of certain genetic and environmental risk factors with ACPA-positive but not with ACPA-negative RA, has led to new concepts of the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. The fact that ACPA-positive patients have a more severe disease course with greater joint destruction has also fueled the hypothesis that ACPA themselves may be pathogenic. Although there is no direct proof for this intriguing theory so far, it is clear that ACPA allow the classification of RA patients into two different disease subsets that are associated with distinct pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical outcomes. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, potentially destructive, arthritis which has a large impact on patients' quality of life(1). It has become clear that in order to be able to prevent disease progression and joint destruction, RA needs to be diagnosed early, which requires diagnostic markers which can reliably predict disease development and progression(2). Some of the most attractive diagnostic markers are autoantibodies. Rheumatoid factor (RF) has long been known to be a marker of future RA development(3), but more recently, a better diagnostic and predictive marker has emerged in the form of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). PMID:22113596

Toes, Rene E; van der Woude, Diane

2011-01-01

216

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.  

PubMed

A 54-year-old woman with a history of arthritis presented for a long-standing history of symmetric, indurated plaques on her thighs and lateral aspects of the trunk. Histopathologic examination of skin biopsy specimens was consistent with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, and a diagnosis of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis was made. Administration of topical potent glucocorticoids, intralesional glucocorticoids, and narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, in addition to continuation of systemic glucocorticoids and methotrexate, resulted in improvement of her cutaneous and musculoskeletal disease. PMID:19891930

Jabbari, Ali; Cheung, Wang; Kamino, Hideko; Soter, Nicholas A

2009-01-01

217

Factor V-Leiden Mutation: A Common Risk Factor for Venous Thrombosis among Lebanese Patients.  

PubMed

Aim. Lebanon exhibits one of the highest prevalences of factor V-Leiden (FVL) in the world (14.4%). The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of FVL mutation among Lebanese patients with lower extremity venous thrombosis. Material and Methods. From January 2003 to January 2011, 283 consecutive Lebanese patients, diagnosed with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by duplex scan, were retrospectively reviewed. FVL mutation was tested among patients with conditions highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states (65 patients). Results. FVL mutation was detected among 56.9% of patients, 68.6% of patients younger than 50 years, and 43.4% of patients older than 50 years (P = 0.041). FVL mutation was commonly reported in young adults, in patients with pregnancy, estrogen drugs, recurrent DVT, and resistance to anticoagulation. Conclusion. The high rate of FVL mutation observed among Lebanese patients with venous thrombosis is related to the high prevalence of this mutation in the Lebanese population. Thrombophilia screening should be tailored to accommodate a population's risk factor. In countries with high prevalence of FVL, this mutation should be screened among patients younger than 50 years and patients with situations highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states. PMID:22737581

Kreidy, Raghid

2012-01-01

218

Leprosy and rheumatoid arthritis: consequence or association?  

PubMed

Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae with a high prevalence in some developing countries however, it is rarely seen in non-endemic regions. Arthritis has been described in all types of Hansen's disease. Chronic arthritis is known to exist even in paucibacillary forms, resolved or treated disease and in patients without reaction, suggesting a perpetuated inflammatory process. In these cases leprosy can mimic some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. When a patient with a history of leprosy presents with a symmetric, distal, polyarthritis the diagnosis may not be linear. Possibly it is a rheumatoid-like leprous arthritis with M leprae acting as the trigger element for the chronic process or it is an overlap condition, with a concomitant rheumatoid arthritis? A case report of a patient with a chronic inflammatory arthritis with 10 years of evolution is presented. The differential diagnosis between leprous and rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. PMID:22891014

Henriques, Celia Coelho; Lopéz, Begoña; Mestre, Tiago; Grima, Bruno; Panarra, António; Riso, Nuno

2012-01-01

219

[Other rheumatic diseases with uveitis besides juvenile idiopathic arthritis].  

PubMed

In childhood and adolescence, uveitis is part of the clinical spectrum of many inflammatory-rheumatic diseases. Besides juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile, ankylosing spondylitis, infection-associated arthritides, infantile sarcoidosis, systemic vasculitides, inflammatory bowel diseases, hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes and the TINU syndrome have to be excluded. These inflammatory diseases can be differentiated clinically in connection with immunogenetic and molecular genetic investigations. Early diagnosis of uveitis as well as the underlying diseases is mandatory for an early treatment and therefore for a good prognosis. PMID:17594615

Michels, H; Greiner, K; Heinz, C; Horneff, G; Ganser, G

2007-06-01

220

Therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have seen considerable advances in our understanding of both the clinical and basic-research aspects of rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical progress has come from a better recognition of the natural history of the disease, the development and validation of outcome measures for clinical trials and, consequently, innovative trial designs. In parallel, basic research has provided clues to the pathogenic events

Günter Steiner; Josef S. Smolen

2003-01-01

221

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon systemic disorder involving the cutaneous and musculoskeletal systems. The eruption may mimic other dermatoses including granuloma annulare, erythema chronicum migrans, and the inflammatory stage of morphea. Key histopathologic characteristics, along with clinical correlation, allow accurate diagnosis.Objective: We describe the clinical, serologic, and histologic features in three patients with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis

David Long; Diane M Thiboutot; Joseph T Majeski; David B Vasily; Klaus F Helm

1996-01-01

222

Somatostatin Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Somatostatin (somatotropin release inhibitory factor; SRIF) peptides are widely distributed in the mammalian body and, acting through a family of genetically homologous cell surface receptors (sst1-5), regulate cellular secretion and proliferation. Compelling evidence implicates SRIF peptides and peptidyl analogues in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). SRIF membrane receptors exist on immune and synovial cells, thereby providing mo-

Allan D. Blake; Frances Mae West; Sadia Ghafoor; Petros Efthimiou

2007-01-01

223

Novel Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Murine Lyme Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected “neutrophil-recruiting” chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis. PMID:23303811

Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F.; Pal, Utpal

2013-01-01

224

Factor V Leiden 1691G/A and prothrombin gene 20210G/A polymorphisms as prothrombotic markers in adult Egyptian acute leukemia patients.  

PubMed

Factor V Leiden 1691G/A and prothrombin gene 20210G/A mutations are the most common genetic defects leading to thrombosis. This work aimed to study the FV Leiden and the prothrombin gene polymorphism in adult Egyptian patients with acute leukemia and their importance in thrombophilia screening. The study included 76 patients with acute leukemia and 100 healthy controls. Genotyping was done by real-time polymerase chain reaction technique. For factor V Leiden, the frequency of G/A mutation conferred more than 2.5-fold of increased risk of (OR 2.639 95 % CI 1.045-6.669). The frequency of factor V Leiden combined (G/A + A/A) genotypes conferred 2.83-fold of increased risk (OR 2.828, CI 1.13-7.075), The A allele conferred almost threefold increased risk (OR 2.824, 95 % CI 1.175-6.785). Despite higher frequency in patients compared to controls, there was no risk of association between prothrombin gene mutation and acute leukemia in adult Egyptians nor was there between combined genotypes of prothrombin gene mutation and factor V Leiden. PMID:25260809

El Sissy, Azza Hamdy; El Sissy, Maha H; Elmoamly, Shereef

2014-11-01

225

Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.  

PubMed

Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

2014-09-01

226

Low mitochondrial DNA content associates with familial longevity: the Leiden Longevity Study.  

PubMed

Long-lived individuals delay aging and age-related diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. The exact underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and preservation of mitochondrial function have been suggested to explain healthy ageing. We investigated whether individuals belonging to long-lived families have altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, as a biomarker of mitochondrial biogenesis and measured expression of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) levels were measured in blood samples from 2,734 participants from the Leiden Longevity Study: 704 nonagenarian siblings, 1,388 of their middle-aged offspring and 642 controls. We confirmed a negative correlation of mtDNA content in blood with age and a higher content in females. The middle-aged offspring had, on average, lower levels of mtDNA than controls and the nonagenarian siblings had an even lower mtDNA content (mtDNA/nDNA ratio?=?0.744?±?0.065, 0.767?±?0.058 and 0.698?±?0.074, respectively; p controls-offspring?=?3.4?×?10(-12), p controls-nonagenarians?=?6.5?×?10(-6)), which was independent of the confounding effects of age and gender. Subsequently, we examined in a subset of the study the expression in blood of two genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, YY1 and PGC-1?. We found a positive association of YY1 expression and mtDNA content in controls. The observed absence of such an association in the offspring suggests an altered regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the members of long-lived families. In conclusion, in this study, we show that mtDNA content decreases with age and that low mtDNA content is associated with familial longevity. Our data suggest that preservation of mitochondrial function rather than enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis is a characteristic of long-lived families. PMID:24554339

van Leeuwen, N; Beekman, M; Deelen, J; van den Akker, E B; de Craen, A J M; Slagboom, P E; 't Hart, L M

2014-06-01

227

Disability transitions in the oldest old in the general population. The Leiden 85-plus study.  

PubMed

Transitions between disability states in older people occur frequently. This study investigated predictors of disability transitions in the oldest old and was performed in the Leiden 85-plus study, a population-based prospective cohort study among 597 participants aged 85 years. At baseline (age 85 years), data on sociodemographic characteristics and chronic diseases were obtained. Disabilities in basic activities of daily living (BADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) were measured annually for 5 years with the Groningen Activities Restriction Scale (GARS). Mortality data were obtained. A statistical multi-state model was used to assess the risks of transitions between no disabilities, IADL disability, BADL disability, and death. At baseline, 299 participants (50.0 %) were disabled in IADL only, and 155 participants (26.0 %) were disabled in both BADL and IADL. During 5-year follow-up, 374 participants (62.6 %) made >1 transition between disability states, mostly deterioration in disability. Males had a lower risk of deterioration [hazard ratio (HR), 0.75 (95 % CI, 0.58-0.96)] compared to females. No gender differences were observed for improvement [HR, 0.64 (95 % CI, 0.37-1.11)]. Participants with depressive symptoms were less likely to improve [HR, 0.50 (95 % CI, 0.28-0.87)]. Participants with depressive symptoms [HR, 1.46 (95 % CI, 1.12-1.91)], >1 chronic disease [HR, 1.60 (95 % CI, 1.27-2.01)], and with cognitive impairment [HR, 1.60 (95 % CI, 1.20-2.13)] had the highest risk of deteriorating. Disability is a dynamic process in the oldest old. Deterioration is more common than improvement. Older men are less likely to deteriorate than women. The presence of depressive symptoms, chronic disease, and cognitive impairment predicts deterioration. PMID:23990275

van Houwelingen, Anne H; Cameron, Ian D; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Putter, Hein; Kurrle, Susan; de Craen, Anton J M; Maier, Andrea B; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Blom, Jeanet W

2014-02-01

228

Association of Factor V Leiden Gene Polymorphism With Arteriovenous Graft Failure  

PubMed Central

Background Dialysis grafts fail due to recurrent stenosis and thrombosis. Vasoactive and pro-thrombotic substances affecting intimal hyperplasia or thrombosis may modify graft outcomes. Study design Genetic polymorphisms association study of patients enrolled in a multi-center, randomized clinical trial. Setting and participants 354 Dialysis Access Consortium (DAC) Study patients receiving a new graft with DNA samples obtained. Subjects were randomized to treatment with aspirin+dipyridamole vs placebo. Predictor DNA sequence polymorphisms for the following candidate genes and their interaction with the study intervention: methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), Factor V (F5), transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1), Klotho, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Outcome Graft failure (>50% stenosis, angioplasty, thrombosis, surgical intervention or permanent loss of function). Results During a median patient follow-up of 34.3 months, 304 grafts failed. After adjusting for clinical factors (patient age, gender, access location, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, baseline aspirin use, body mass index, timing of graft placement, and study treatment) and genetic ancestral background, SNP rs6019 of the Factor V gene was significantly associated with graft failure in a dominant model (HR of 1.70 [95% CI, 1.32–2.19; p<0.001] for G/C and G/G genotypes vs C/C genotypes). There was no significant association between graft failure and polymorphisms of MTHFR, HO-1, TGF-?1, Klotho, NOS, or ACE. Limitations Small sample size Conclusion Factor V Leiden is associated with an increased risk of graft failure. Anticoagulation may reduce graft failure in patients with the G/C or G/G genotypes. PMID:22281051

Allon, Michael; Zhang, Li; Maya, Ivan D.; Bray, Molly S.; Fernandez, Jose R.

2011-01-01

229

Endogenous thrombin potential for predicting risk of venous thromboembolism in carriers of factor V Leiden.  

PubMed

Measurement of endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) detects hypercoagulability and can be used to identify activated protein C resistance due to factor V Leiden (FVL). However, not all carriers of FVL suffer thrombosis and therefore we sought to determine if the test for ETP could be modified in such a way as to enable detection of FVL patients who were at increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Protac, an activator of both protein C and factor V, was incorporated into the traditional thrombin generation reaction and ratios (reaction with Protac:reaction without Protac) were calculated. Plasma samples from 42 FVL heterozygotes (12 with a history of thrombosis and 30 with no prior thrombosis) and 38 controls (non-FVL with no history of thrombosis) were analysed. The mean ETP ratio was significantly higher in FVL heterozygotes (0.90 +/- 0.06) compared to normal controls (0.41 +/- 0.10; p = 0.00004). Multivariate analysis indicated that the average ETP ratio was significantly and inversely correlated with factor V levels in FVL heterozygotes (p = 0.002) but not controls. Within the FVL group, patients with a history of thrombosis had higher ETP ratios (0.92 +/- 0.06) compared to those without (0.89 +/- 0.05), however, this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.09). Further investigation into the use of ETP for detecting risk of thrombosis in people who are genetically predisposed is warranted. The recent introduction of diagnostic ETP measurements in the form of the calibrated automated thrombin generation from Thrombinoscope and the TechnoThrombin from Baxter should facilitate such studies. PMID:17565236

Lincz, Lisa F; Lonergan, Amy; Scorgie, Fiona E; Rowlings, Phillip; Gibson, Richard; Lawrie, Andrew; Seldon, Michael

2006-01-01

230

Health Tip: Cooking Can Be Challenging with Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript. Health Tip: Cooking Can Be Challenging With Arthritis Meal planning can help ease the strain (*this ... Kohnle Tuesday, October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Page Arthritis (HealthDay News) -- Arthritis can make cooking difficult, but ...

231

Circulating Immune Complexes in Lyme Arthritis  

PubMed Central

We have found immunoglobulin (Ig) G-containing material consistent with immune complexes in the sera of patients with Lyme arthritis. It was detected in 29 of 55 sera (55%) from 31 patients by at least one of three assays: 125I-C1q binding, C1q solid phase, or Raji cell. The presence of reactive material correlated with clinical aspects of disease activity; it was found early in the illness, was most prominent in sera from the sickest patients, was infrequent during remissions, and often fluctuated in parallel with changes in clinical status. The results in the two C1q assays showed a strong positive correlation (P<0.001). They were each elevated in 45% of the sera and were usually concordant (85%). In contrast, the Raji cell assay was less frequently positive and often discordant with the C1q assays. In sucrose density gradients, putative circulating immune complexes sedimented near 19S; they, too, were detected best by the two assays based on C1q binding. An additional 7S component was found in some sera by the 125I-C1q binding assay. Serum complement was often above the range of normal in patients with mild disease and normal in patients with severe disease but did not correlate significantly with levels of circulating immune complexes. IgM and IgG rheumatoid factors were not detectable. These findings support a role for immune complexes in the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis. Their measurement, by either the 125I-C1q binding assay or by the C1q solid phase assay, often provides a sensitive index of disease activity. Moreover, the complexes are likely sources of disease-related antigens for further study of this new disorder. PMID:429566

Hardin, John A.; Walker, Lesley C.; Steere, Allen C.; Trumble, Thomas C.; Tung, Kenneth S. K.; Williams, Ralph C.; Ruddy, Shaun; Malawista, Stephen E.

1979-01-01

232

Portal vein thrombosis in a patient with HCV cirrhosis and combined hemophilia A and thrombophilia V Leiden  

PubMed Central

The relation of hemophilia A with thrombophilia V Leiden is extremely rare in the literature. Furthermore, hemophiliac patients have an increased risk of severe life-threatening hemorrhage, blood transfusions, and therefore hepatitis transmission, mainly hepatitis C (HCV). Aims and methods We present a 54-year-old male with a 5-year history of decompensated liver cirrhosis on the grounds of HCV hepatitis, hemophilia A, and thrombophilia V Leiden. He was admitted to our department because of severe abdominal distension, resembling ‘tense ascites’ despite the use of diuretics. Clinical examination showed shifting dullness and a protuberant abdomen, while hematological and blood chemistry results revealed thrombopenia (platelets: 77000/mL) and hypoalbuminemia. Repeated abdominal paracentesis (under factor VIII administration) failed to remove ascitic fluid, while abdominal echosonography and computed tomography revealed severe edema of mesenterium and intraabdominal viscus and the absence of free ascitic fluid, atrophic cirrhotic liver, and splenomegaly. Moreover, abdominal doppler echosonography revealed signs of portal hypertension, previous portal vein thrombosis, and revascularization of the portal vein. Gastroscopy showed esophageal varices grade II, without signs of bleeding. A-FP and all other laboratory examinations were normal. Results Our patient was intravenously treated with albumine and diuretics (furosemide) with mild improvement of his abdominal distension. During his hospitalization he presented an episode of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatic encephalopathy, which were successfully treated with lactulose clysmas and ciprofloxacine. He was discharged in a good general condition. Conclusion According to our case we consider the false clinical picture of ‘tense ascites’ of our patient as a rare clinical presentation of decompensated liver cirrhosis, with severe edema of mesenterium and viscus, on the grounds of preexisting portal vein thrombosis, in a patient with combined hemophilia A and thrombophilia V Leiden. PMID:21127694

Eleftheriadis, Nikos; Makris, Pantelis

2010-01-01

233

Epigenetics in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

An increasing number of studies show that besides the inherited genetic architecture (that is, genomic DNA), various environmental factors significantly contribute to the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis. Epigenetic factors react to external stimuli and form bridges between the environment and the genetic information-harboring DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the final interpretation of the encoded genetic information by regulating gene expression, and alterations in their profile influence the activity of the immune system. Overall, epigenetic mechanisms further increase the well-known complexity of rheumatoid arthritis by providing additional subtle contributions to rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility. Although there are controversies regarding the involvement of epigenetic and genetic factors in rheumatoid arthritis etiology, it is becoming obvious that the two systems (genetic and epigenetic) interact with each other and are ultimately responsible for rheumatoid arthritis development. Here, epigenetic factors and mechanisms involved in rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed and new, potential therapeutic targets are discussed. PMID:24568138

2014-01-01

234

Congenital anomaly of the inferior vena cava and factor V Leiden mutation predisposing to deep vein thrombosis  

PubMed Central

A previously healthy 21-year-old man presented with back pain, bilateral extremity pain, and right lower extremity weakness, paresthesias, and swelling. Sonographic examination revealed diffuse deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the femoral and popliteal venous system. CT imaging revealed hypoplasia of the hepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) segment with formation of multiple varices and collateral veins around the kidneys. Hematologic workup also discovered a factor V Leiden mutation, further predisposing the patient to DVT. The rare, often overlooked occurrence of attenuated IVC, especially in the setting of hypercoagulable state, can predispose patients to significant thrombosis.

Lamparello, Brooke M; Erickson, Cameron R; Kulthia, Arun; Virparia, Vasudev; Thet, Zeyar

2014-01-01

235

SV-IV Peptide1-16 reduces coagulant power in normal Factor V and Factor V Leiden  

PubMed Central

Native Factor V is an anticoagulant, but when activated by thrombin, Factor X or platelet proteases, it becomes a procoagulant. Due to these double properties, Factor V plays a crucial role in the regulation of coagulation/anticoagulation balance. Factor V Leiden (FVL) disorder may lead to thrombophilia. Whether a reduction in the activation of Factor V or Factor V Leiden may correct the disposition to thrombophilia is unknown. Therefore we tested SV-IV Peptide 1–16 (i.e. a peptide derived by seminal protein vescicle number IV, SV-IV) to assess its capacity to inhibit the procoagulant activity of normal clotting factor V or Factor V Leiden (FVL). We found that SV-IV protein has potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and also exerts procoagulant activity. In the present work we show that the SV-IV Peptide 1–16, incubated with plasma containing normal Factor V or FVL plasma for 5 minutes reduces the procoagulant capacity of both substances. This is an anticoagulant effect whereas SV-IV protein is a procoagulant. This activity is effective both in terms of the coagulation tests, where coagulation times are increased, and in terms of biochemical tests conducted with purified molecules, where Factor X activation is reduced. Peptide 1–16 was, in the pure molecule system, first incubated for 5 minutes with purified Factor V then it was added to the mix of phosphatidylserine, Ca2+, Factor X and its chromogenic molecule Chromozym X. We observed a more than 50% reduction in lysis of chromogenic molecule Chromozym X by Factor Xa, compared to the sample without Peptide 1–16. Such reduction in Chromozym X lysis, is explained with the reduced activation of Factor X by partial inactivation of Factor V by Peptide 1–16. Thus our study demonstrates that Peptide 1–16 reduces the coagulation capacity of Factor V and Factor V Leiden in vitro, and, in turn, causes factor X reduced activation. PMID:18154667

Di Micco, Biagio; Lepretti, Marilena; Rota, Lidia; Quaglia, Ilaria; Ferrazzi, Paola; Di Micco, Gianluca; Di Micco, Pierpaolo

2007-01-01

236

Which Psoriasis Patients Develop Psoriatic Arthritis?  

PubMed Central

Psoriatic arthritis is a major comorbidity of psoriasis that significantly impairs quality of life and physical function. Because skin lesions classically precede joint symptoms, dermatologists are in a unique position to identify patients at risk for psoriatic arthritis before irreversible joint damage occurs. Here we review the literature to identify the clinical and genetic factors most highly associated with development of psoriatic arthritis, with the goal of assisting dermatologists in risk-stratifying their psoriasis patients.

Busse, Kristine; Liao, Wilson

2013-01-01

237

Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Multiple Languages Arabic (???????) Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian ( ... Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) Arthritis Arthrite - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

238

[Antibiotic treatment in Lyme arthritis].  

PubMed

Primary cause of Lyme arthritis (LA) is an invasion and survival of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. spirochetes within joint tissues. Elimination of the pathogen is an effective treatment method in a great majority of patients and can be achieved by a number of antibiotic regimens of confirmed efficacy. Antibiotic therapy lasting for 2 to 4 weeks enables eradication of the infection, followed by resolution of arthritis within weeks to months. If insufficient, the course of therapy may be repeated up to 3 times in a few months' intervals, although effectiveness of repeated treatment is not so well confirmed and probably small. Further symptoms, persisting in spite of proper antibiotherapy, typically are not caused by ongoing infection, but rather by autoimmune phenomena or persistent damage to the joint, so further administration of antibiotics in such patients seems of no benefit. PMID:22320035

Grygorczuk, Sambor; Zajkowska, Joanna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Moniuszko, Anna; Pancewicz, S?awomir

2008-01-01

239

Two forms of reactive arthritis?  

PubMed Central

Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.?? PMID:10577958

Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

1999-01-01

240

Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

2014-01-01

241

Where do T cells stand in rheumatoid arthritis?  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by destruction of cartilage and bone. The destructive lesions result from both immune responses and non-antigen-specific inflammatory processes. Little is known about the primary cause of RA. Although the primacy of T-cell-related events early in the disease remains debated, strong evidence indicates that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. We will discuss evolving concepts about T-cell involvement in RA and the roles for various T cell subsets in the development of joint abnormalities. The hypothesis that RA is a T-cell driven disease was put forward when studies of RA synovium showed numerous T cells carrying activation markers. These T cells were found to participate in the complex network of cell- and mediator-driven events leading to joint destruction. Conceivably, these T cells may be stimulated by an autoantigen (whether specific to the joints or ubiquitous), a highly conserved foreign protein cross-reacting with its human homolog, or a neo-antigen expressed as a result of posttranslational events. For many years, animal models have provided valuable evidence supporting a role for T cells in RA. We will review three murine models of arthritis caused by different mechanisms. In collagen-induced arthritis, the immune response to a joint antigen is mediated by pathogenic Th1 cells that elicit severe inflammatory synovitis. Spontaneous arthritis in K/BxN T-cell-receptor transgenic mice is related to an adaptive immune response against a ubiquitous protein whose end-stage effector mechanisms are heavily dependent on the innate immune system. In the SKG model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis, a point mutation in the gene encoding a key signal-transduction molecule in T cells causes defective T cell selection in the thymus, which releases polyclonal autoreactive T cells. Studies in these and other animal models have established that a variety of T-cell subsets whose roles vary with cell location and disease stage can contribute to synovitis. Finally, in addition to direct autoimmune attack by effector T cells, arthritis may result from defective homeostatic control of immunity by regulatory T cells. PMID:16087382

Fournier, Catherine

2005-12-01

242

Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. Methods: Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. Results: Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. Conclusions: Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available. PMID:18952643

Ritchlin, C T; Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D D; Mease, P J; Helliwell, P; Boehncke, W-H; de Vlam, K; Fiorentino, D; FitzGerald, O; Gottlieb, A B; McHugh, N J; Nash, P; Qureshi, A A; Soriano, E R; Taylor, W J

2009-01-01

243

The Management of Psoriatic Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) begins with education. Each consultation provides an opportunity for the physician\\u000a to counsel the patient and family about the disease and its clinical course that is unique to that individual. It is a chance\\u000a for the patient and family to learn and adapt. There are also a variety of further ways for instruction to

Philip J. Mease

244

Cause and age at death in a prospective study of 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), first seen in the early months of their disease, have now been followed up for 18 years, and 43 have died. Rheumatoid disease directly caused death in 9, and the disease or its treatment contributed to death in 7. These 16 patients were younger at onset and younger at death than

J J Rasker; J A Cosh

1981-01-01

245

Acute non-infectious arthritis of the hip in rheumatoid arthritis: synovial membrane findings.  

PubMed

A case of acute hip pain in rheumatoid arthritis is presented, with synovial membrane findings. A patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis suffered three unusual bouts of sudden, severe but transient hip pain. The hips were clinically normal between these episodes. The clinical picture on two of these occasions strongly suggested septic arthritis. Although the synovial fluid was highly inflammatory, cultures were negative. The synovial membrane showed mild lining cell hyperplasia, vascular congestion, and scattered inflammatory cells, predominantly lymphocytes. These findings were not compatible with either pyogenic infection or longstanding rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical and pathological features of acute non-infectious arthritis of the hip appear to delineate a distinct syndrome. PMID:2930281

Wohlgethan, J R; Stilmant, M M; Harris, J M; Smith, H R

1989-03-01

246

The personal and national costs of lost labour force participation due to arthritis: an economic study  

PubMed Central

Background The costs of arthritis to the individuals and the state are considerable. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of the base population of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model of 45 to 64 year old Australians built on data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers and STINMOD, an income and savings microsimulation model. Results Individuals aged 45 to 64 years who had retired early due to arthritis had a median value of AU$260 in total weekly income whereas those who were employed full time were likely to average more than five times this. The large national aggregate impact of early retirement due to arthritis includes AU$9.4 billion in lost GDP, attributable to arthritis through its impact on labour force participation. When looking at the ongoing impact of being out of the labour force those who retired from the labour force early due to arthritis were estimated to have a median value of total savings by the time they are 65 of as little as $300 (for males aged 45–54). This is far lower than the median value of savings for those males aged 45–54 who remained in the labour force full time, who would have an estimated $339 100 of savings at age 65. Conclusions The costs of arthritis to the individuals and the state are considerable. The impacts on the state include loss of productivity from reduced workforce participation, lost income taxation revenue, and increased government support payments – in addition to direct health care costs. Individuals bear the economic costs of lost income and the reduction of their savings over the long term. PMID:23452565

2013-01-01

247

Rheumatoid arthritis in paintings: a tale of two origins.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is thought to be a 'recent' disease in that descriptions of it were only noted in the 17th century. However, a study of paintings would suggest that RA could have been present as early as the 15th century, when artists started to paint the human body accurately rather than figuratively. Thus, it was possible to deduce from their paintings the occurrence of various medical conditions. If present, RA with its typical finger deformities should be apparent. This review discusses the known occurrences of RA-type deformities in paintings and places this in the context of the origins of the disease. PMID:20374373

Yeap, Swan Sim

2009-12-01

248

Autoimmune correlation of rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, both, chronic inflammatory diseases share certain common diagnostic, pathological, immunogenetic and therapeutic features. A recently discovered enzymatic mimicry between human and bacterial species is novel and it opens up a new terrain for therapeutic blockade in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore

2014-01-01

249

Schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis and natural resistance genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The strong negative correlation between schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis might provide clues as to the aetiology of these two diseases. An immunological explanation has been sought in the HLA sector of the major histocompatibility complex, which has been shown to have a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. The search for an association between schizophrenia and HLA haplotypes, however,

Gertrude Rubinstein

1997-01-01

250

Septic arthritis caused by noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with ?-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne

2013-06-01

251

Drug foundto reduce pain from arthritis  

E-print Network

Drug foundto reduce pain from arthritis BY CONNIE FILLETTI A team of Canadian medical researchers receiving thedrug after six months of treatment, the researchers report. Previously, cyclosporine hasoffered from an experi- mental procedureto a practical therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic, recumng

Farrell, Anthony P.

252

Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint successfully treated with arthroscopic lysis and lavage: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is infrequently reported. We present a case of septic arthritis of the TMJ following the extraction of the left upper second molar that occurred 1 week before beginning of symptoms. No evident predisposing factors were detected. Arthroscopic diagnosis of septic arthritis, lysis and lavage, and capsular stretch were performed. Cultures taken from the TMJ space grew Streptococcus sp. After 1 month of antimicrobial therapy the patient was asymptomatic and mandibular function was normal. Literature related to septic arthritis of TMJ and its treatment was reviewed. Different surgical procedures are available to treat this condition. Arthroscopy should be preferred as initial treatment on account of the possibility of drainage and accurate lavage under direct visualization of joint space, at the same time allowing confirmation of diagnostic hypotheses. Improving joint mobility with lysis of adhesions and capsular stretch in an early stage of disease may be helpful in stopping the fibrosis process. PMID:17095265

Sembronio, Salvatore; Albiero, Alberto Maria; Robiony, Massimo; Costa, Fabio; Toro, Corrado; Politi, Massimo

2007-02-01

253

Review for disease of the year: epidemiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its associated uveitis: the probable risk factors.  

PubMed

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common systemic disease associated with uveitis in childhood. The frequency of JIA-associated uveitis (JIAU) varies geographically, and between ethnicities. Uveitis risk is high in JIA associated with oligoarthritis, young age at arthritis onset and ANA positivity. Gender alters risk for the incidence of JIA and the severity of JIAU. Familial cases support the possible role of genetic influences in the pathogenesis. Arthritis typically precedes the uveitis, but uveitis may occur up to seven years following the arthritis onset. Although complications still occur, the frequency of bilateral blindness has dropped, probably by both improved screening of high-risk patients with JIA, and the increased use of early immunosuppression. However, there is still continuing persistence of JIAU into adulthood. For improvement of epidemiological knowledge of this complicated disease, large, well-defined, long-term population-based registries are needed with the application of universally agreed case definitions and outcome measures. PMID:23713827

Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Heinz, Carsten; Edelsten, Clive; Kotaniemi, Kaisu; Minden, Kirsten

2013-06-01

254

Judicious use of biologicals in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that may cause joint destruction. Biological treatments targeting specific cytokines and cell interactions have transformed the outcomes of JIA. This review focuses on the selection of patients for and the timing and selection of biological treatment in JIA. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors remain the first choice for polyarticular JIA, followed by abatacept and tocilizumab. Monoclonal-antibody TNF inhibitors and abatacept are usually chosen for methotrexate-resistant uveitis. Recent clinical trials of canakinumab, rilonacept, and tocilizumab have obtained great improvement in both systemic and arthritic features in chronic systemic JIA patients. Current guidelines support the early use of a short-acting IL-1 antagonist for macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication. TREAT and ACUTE studies suggest that a therapeutic window of opportunity during early disease may exist in JIA. Early initiation of biological therapy may be associated with slower progression of joint damage and longer remission. PMID:25218736

Zhao, Yongdong; Wallace, Carol

2014-11-01

255

Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI 10.1163/157075610X523314 Animal Biology 60 (2010) 449465 brill.nl/ab  

E-print Network

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI 10.1163/157075610X523314 Animal Biology 60 (2010) 449 Naifa2, * 1 School of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330031, China 2 methods to investigate the genetic structure and population history of the endangered Himalayan snowcock

Edwards, Scott

256

Enhancement by factor V Leiden mutation of risk of deep-vein thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives containing a third-generation progestagen  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryRecent concern about the safety of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) with third-generation progestagens prompted an examination of data from a population-based case-control study (Leiden Thrombophilia Study). We compared the risk of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) during use of the newest OCs, containing a third-generation progestagen, with the risk of \\

K. W. M. Bloemenkamp; F. M. Helmerhorst; F. R. Rosendaal; J. P. Vandenbroucke; H. R. Büller

1995-01-01

257

Ana Fernndez Garay, 2004. Diccionario TehuelcheEspaol/Indice EspaolTehuelche (TehuelcheSpanish Dictionary/ Spanish Tehuelche Index) Leiden: CNWS. [Indigenous  

E-print Network

1 Ana Fernández Garay, 2004. Diccionario Tehuelche­Español/Indice Español­Tehuelche (Tehuelche­Spanish Dictionary/ Spanish­ Tehuelche Index) Leiden: CNWS. [Indigenous Languages of Latin America 4]. ISBN 90 close to extinction (cf. Adelaar & Muysken 2004: 555). The Indians that survived the violent "Conquest

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Forthcoming in: Rint Sybesma, Wolfgang Behr, Zev Handel & C.T. James Huang (eds.), Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics. Leiden: Brill.  

E-print Network

of Chinese Language and Linguistics. Leiden: Brill. Authors: Alexis Michaud & Guillaume Jacques. André scientifique, in the Botany department; he switched to the Linguistics department in 1945. His special interest little-documented languages within their cultural environment, combining ethnological and linguistic work

259

HIGH PREVALENCE OF ANTITHROMBIN III, PROTEIN C AND PROTEIN S DEFICIENCY, BUT NO FACTOR V LEIDEN MUTATION IN VENOUS THROMBOPHILIC CHINESE PATIENTS IN TAIWAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the prevalence of antithrombin III (AT III), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS) deficiencies and factor V Leiden mutation in thrombophilia in Taiwan. Eighty-five consecutive and unrelated patients with otherwise unexplained venous thrombophilia were studied. Both antigen and activity of inhibitors were determined using commercial kits (Stago), activated PC sensitivity ratio (APC SR) by Coatest (Chromogenix), and

Ming-Ching Shen; Jen-Shiou Lin; Woei Tsay

1997-01-01

260

Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2013 DOI 10.1163/18749836-06021056 Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 6 (2013) 2751 brill.com/tar  

E-print Network

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2013 DOI 10.1163/18749836-06021056 Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 6 in "Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 6 (2013) 27-51" DOI : 10.1163/18749836-06021056 #12;28 Y. Nohra et al. / Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 6 (2013) 27­51 novel of the same name by Michael Crichton, played a noticeable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

261

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a young man with a factor v leiden gene mutation: a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare but increasingly recognized cause of acute myocardial ischemia in young adults, especially in women. We report a case of spontaneous coronary dissection in a young healthy man who was also a carrier of the factor V Leiden gene mutation. PMID:24436622

Khan, Tahir; Danyi, Peter; Topaz, On; Ali, Asghar; Jovin, Ion S

2013-12-01

262

Arthritis: An Overview Michael McKee, MD,  

E-print Network

treatments ­ Medications are to reduce immune response that causes damage to body ­ Treat pain ­ Medications.cedars-sinai.edu/Patients/Health-Conditions/Arthritis---Rheumatoid-Arthritis- Osteoarthritis-and-Spinal-Arthritis.aspx #12;Lupus Inflammatory arthritis due to autoimmune disorder Affects many If you have gout, you should eat a low purine diet which helps ­ Limit meat, poultry and fish. Animal

Goldman, Steven A.

263

Statistical reappraisal of the clinical significance of nail beading in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

Nail beading has previously been reported as an accompaniment of rheumatoid arthritis. In order to assess the clinical significance of this form of nychodystrophy the fingernails and toenails of 119 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an equal number of control subjects were studied. Analysis of data based on 4642 nails indicates that the presence of a global pattern of beading (i.e. greater than or equal to 50% involvement of the nail area) on the surface of at least six fingernails or four toenails is highly suggestive of underlying rheumatoid disease. The positive predictive value of these configurations is in the order of 95%. Nail beading, however, is infrequent in early disease and therefore its diagnostic value is limited. Although there is a strong association between nail beading and rheumatoid arthritis, the aetiology and prognostic implications of this clinical sign remain obscure. Images PMID:4051588

Grant, E N; Bellamy, N; Buchanan, W W; Grace, E M; O'Leary, S

1985-01-01

264

Arthritis and mortality in the epidemiological follow-up to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I.  

PubMed Central

Subsets were analyzed of respondents from the Epidemiological Follow-up to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (NHANES I) who (1) answered a general arthritis question reflecting whether a doctor told the respondent that she or he had arthritis, (2) answered seven pain, swelling, and stiffness questions, and (3) had radiographs of knees and hips assessed for osteoarthritis at the time of the initial survey during the early 1970s. Data for the follow-up were collected between 1982 and 1984 and included 1,491 fatalities in the largest subsample analyzed here. The dependent variable was months of survival after the initial interview. No distinction was drawn between rheumatoid arthritis versus osteoarthritis. The NHANES I contained only limited information on rheumatoid arthritis versus osteoarthritis. Additional covariates included age, age squared, education, race, marital status, diastolic blood pressure, and body mass. After adjusting for age, no statistically significant associations emerged between answers to the general arthritis questions or any of the seven pain questions on the one hand, and mortality on the other. Similar statistically insignificant results were found when the association between radiographic diagnoses of osteoarthritis in the hips and months of survival was considered after adjusting for age. These statistically insignificant results persisted in repeated testing, which alternately included and excluded a number of covariates, and in separate subsamples of women, men, and persons older and younger than age 50. Some evidence was found, however, for a negative, statistically significant association between radiographic knee diagnoses of osteoarthritis and survival, especially among women, even after adjusting for covariates. These mixed results (1) do not discredit findings elsewhere suggesting that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with early death, since it is likely that the great majority of respondents answering in the affirmative to the general arthritis or seven pain questions in the NHANES I had osteoarthritis, and (2) suggest that future surveys should make greater attempts to distinguish between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. PMID:8069278

Leigh, J. P.; Fries, J. F.

1994-01-01

265

Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Glucocorticoid (GC) drugs are a potent and rapidly effective therapeutic option for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These medications are mainly used for the management of the extra-articular features of systemic-onset disease. A course of low-dose prednisone may be considered for achieving a rapid disease control in patients with severe polyarthritis refractory to other therapies or while awaiting the full therapeutic effect of a recently initiated disease-modifying antirheumatic drug or biologic agent. Short-term systemic GC administration may also be indicated for chronic iridocyclitis unresponsive to topical therapy. The general objective of GC therapy is to limit the maximum dose and exposure to the highest doses to what is needed to achieve disease control, and then to gradually taper the dose until the minimum level sufficient to maintain disease quiescence over time is reached. High-dose intravenous 'pulse' methylprednisolone administration is sometimes chosen to treat the most severe or acute disease manifestations of systemic JIA, particularly macrophage activation syndrome. Intra-articular GC injection is a safe and rapidly effective treatment for synovitis in children with chronic arthritis. Triamcinolone hexacetonide is the optimal GC preparation for pediatric patients. Local injection therapy is used most frequently to treat oligoarthritis, but the strategy of performing multiple injections to induce disease remission, while simultaneously initiating therapy with second-line or biologic agents, has also been proposed for children with polyarticular JIA. Administration of GCs is associated with potentially deleterious adverse effects, some of which can be irreversible. This highlights the need of a judicious use of these medications and careful monitoring of their toxicity. The recently published recommendations for the management of JIA provide useful guidance to the clinicians for the administration of GCs in children with chronic arthritis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25227183

Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Varnier, Giulia; Rosina, Silvia; Consolaro, Alessandro; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo

2015-01-01

266

Septic arthiritis due to Prevotella bivia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Prevotella bivia is a gram-negative anaerobic bacteria traditionally classified in the genus Bacteroides, and usually reported in obstetric and gynecologic infections. To date, there has been only one description of infectious arthritis secondary to this germ. We report the first case of septic arthritis due to Prevotella bivia in a patient with severe, long-lasting rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with low doses of corticosteroids. RA is a well-known predisposing factor to septic arthritis, whose causes are multifactorial (general immunosuppression induced by the disease and its therapy, presence of prosthetic joints, etc.). However, infectious arthritis due to anaerobic bacteria is rarely observed. In general, clinical presentation varies widely: insidious onset, apyrexia, and lack of inflammatory signs or systemic disturbance are frequent features. Joint infection is generally secondary to hematogenous spread, the Bacteroides fragilis group being the most commonly isolated pathogens. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment, with drainage and debridement of the affected joint and specific antimicrobial treatment with Metronidazole are essential for a successful outcome. PMID:10875323

Alegre-Sancho, J J; Juanola, X; Narvaez, F J; Roig-Escofet, D

2000-01-01

267

Duration of rheumatoid arthritis influences the degree of functional improvement in clinical trials  

PubMed Central

Background Functional capacity is an important outcome in rheumatoid arthritis and is generally measured using the Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ). Functional limitation incorporates both activity and damage. Because irreversible damage increases over time, the HAQ may be less likely to show improvement in late than in early rheumatoid arthritis. Objective To determine the relation between sensitivity to change of the HAQ and duration of rheumatoid arthritis in reports of clinical trials. Methods Data were pooled from clinical trials that measured responses of HAQ scores at three or six months. The effect size of the HAQ was calculated and linear regression used to predict the effect size by duration of rheumatoid arthritis at group level. Treatment effect was adjusted for by including the effect sizes of pain scores and of tender joint counts as additional independent variables in separate models. Subgroup analysis employed contemporary regimens (methotrexate, leflunomide, combination therapies, and TNF inhibitors) only. Results 36 studies with 64 active treatment arms and 7628 patients (disease duration 2.5 months to 12.2 years) were included. The effect sizes of the HAQ decreased by 0.02 for each additional year of mean disease duration using all trials, and by 0.04/year in the subgroup analysis (p?0.01 for both analyses, except for pain adjusted models at three months). Conclusions In individual trials, less improvement in the HAQ might be expected in late than in early rheumatoid arthritis. Comparison of changes in HAQ among rheumatoid arthritis trials should take into consideration the disease stage of the treated groups. PMID:15975967

Aletaha, D

2006-01-01

268

The electroneurophysiological evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients.  

PubMed

In Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), one clinical hallmark of the vasculitis is the appearance of neurological findings. However, it is often difficult to diagnose these slight or early neuropathies and the study of the peripheral neuromuscular system is often made difficult by symptoms resulting from pain in the joints, and limitations of movement. It is nevertheless often possible, by means of electroneuromyography to show objectively the existence and distribution of even subclinical neuropathies. In order to evaluate the neurophysiological functions of RA patients by means of the peripheral nerve conduction and somatosensory evoked potential studies, 33 RA patients and 20 healthy controls were included in this study. Two (6%) patients were found to have carpal tunnel syndrome, while 6 (18%) patients had mononeuritis multiplex. Delayed N12, N13, N1 and P1 latencies were detected in 6 (18%) of 33 RA patients suggesting central nervous system involvement with intact peripheral nervous system. Our results confirm earlier observations that symptoms of neuropathy are fairly common in cases of RA without there being any clear correlation with any clinical variable. Therefore, the inclusion of an electroneurophysiologic examination of the RA patients is recommended in routine diagnostic procedure. PMID:9805193

Sivri, A; Güler-Uysal, F

1998-01-01

269

The electroneurophysiological findings in rheumatoid arthritis patients.  

PubMed

In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), vasculitis is a serious complication usually found in patients with long-standing erosive nodular seropositive disease. One clinical hallmark of this systemic arteritis is the appearance of neurological findings. However, it is often difficult to diagnose these slight or early neuropathies and the study of the peripheral neuromuscular system is often made difficult by symptoms resulting from pain in the joints and limitations of movement. It is nevertheless often possible by means of electroneuromyography to show objectively the existence and distribution of even subclinical neuropathies. In order to evaluate the neurophysiological functions of RA patients by means of the peripheral nerve conduction and somatosensorial evoked potential studies, 33 RA patients and 20 healthy controls were included in this study. Two (6%) patients were found to have carpal tunnel syndrome, while 6 (18%) patients had mononeuritis multiplex. Delayed N12, N13, N1 and P1 latencies were detected in 6 (18%) of 33 RA patients suggesting central nervous system involvement with intact peripheral nervous system. Our results confirm earlier observations that symptoms of neuropathy are fairly common in cases of RA without there being any clear correlation with any clinical variable. By means of electroneurophysiological studies, it is to evaluate the integrity of the peripheral nerve, the spine and the central pathways. Besides enabling to detect early subclinical involvement of the peripheral nervous system in RA, SEPs should also be used for the evaluation of subclinical myelopathy due to atlantoaxial subluxation or vasculitis. The inclusion of an electroneurophysiologic examination of the RA patients is recommended in routine diagnostic procedure. PMID:10546073

Sivri, A; Güler-Uysal, F

1999-01-01

270

Mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient heterozygous for factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin genotypes  

PubMed Central

Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a rare but life threatening form of bowel ischemia. It is implicated in 6%-9% of all cases of acute mesenteric ischemia. The proportion of patients with primary (or idiopathic) MVT varies from 0% to 49%, with a decrease in frequency secondary to more recent availability of newer investigations for hypercoagulability. The presence of factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin G20210A mutations (PGM) have been well documented in these cases. However, there have been scarce case reports describing MVT in heterozygotes of both these mutations occurring simultaneously and its implications on long term management. Our case describes acute MVT in a previously asymptomatic young patient with no prior history of venous thromboembolism. The patient was found to be heterozygous for FVL and PGM and treated with lifelong anticoagulation with warfarin (goal international normalized ratio: 2-3) and avoidance of hormonal contraceptives. PMID:24282370

Karmacharya, Paras; Aryal, Madan Raj; Donato, Anthony

2013-01-01

271

[Neonatal renal vein thrombosis in a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the MTHFR gene mutation].  

PubMed

Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare but potentially serious neonatal disease. Its epidemiology and its clinical and biological expression are currently well known, but its etiological exploration, like that of venous thromboembolism, is increasingly complex. Perinatal risk factors such as prematurity, dehydration, and birth asphyxia have lost their direct accountability at the expense of their interaction with constitutional disorders of hemostasis. We report a case of RVT in a newborn who was a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation. We recall the clinical and epidemiological characteristics. A search for inborn blood coagulation disorders should be systematic in the newborn infant with venous thrombosis because of the risk of recurrence, taking into account perinatal factors and maternal thrombophilia (especially if RVT is established during the prenatal period). PMID:22361411

Wannes, S; Soua, H; Ghanmi, S; Braham, H; Hassine, M; Hamza, H A; Ben Hamouda, H; Sfar, M-T

2012-04-01

272

[The early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis].  

PubMed

The most frequent early symptoms of spondyloarthritides are inflammatory back pain and asymetric peripheral arthritis. Currently the mean delay between the onset of first symptoms and diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis which is the frequent type of spondyloarthritis is over 5 years. The availability of effective therapies makes an early diagnosis mandatory. The clinical symptoms of inflammatory back pain, active inflamation on MR, and positivity for HLA-B27 are the most important parameters for an early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis, especially in combination. Moreover, the combination of clinical and laboratory parameters is necessary for the early diagnosis. PMID:22232947

Novak, Srdan

2011-01-01

273

Electrochemical genosensor based on colloidal gold nanoparticles for the detection of Factor V Leiden mutation using disposable pencil graphite electrodes.  

PubMed

Electrochemical genosensors for the detection of the Factor V Leiden mutation from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons using the oxidation signal of colloidal gold (Au) is described. A pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with target DNA, when hybridized with complementary probes conjugated to Au nanoparticles, responded with the appearance of a Au oxide wave at approximately +1.20 V. Specific probes were immobilized onto the Au nanoparticles in two different modes: (a) Inosine-substituted probes were covalently attached from their amino groups at the 5' end using N-(3-dimethylamino)propyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) as a coupling agent onto a carboxylate-terminated l-cysteine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) preformed on the Au nanoparticles, and (b) probes with a hexanethiol group at their 5' phosphate end formed a SAM on Au nanoparticles. The genosensor relies on the hybridization of the probes with their complementary targets, which are covalently immobilized at the PGE surface. Au-tagged 23-mer capture probes were challenged with the synthetic 23-mer target, 131-base single-stranded DNA or denatured 256-base polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon. The appearance of the Au oxidation signal shortened the assay time and simplified the detection of the Factor V Leiden mutation from PCR amplified real samples. The discrimination between the homozygous and heterozygous mutations was also established by comparing the peak currents of the Au signals. Numerous factors affecting the hybridization and nonspecific binding events were optimized. The detection limit for the PCR amplicons was found to be as low as 0.78 fmol; thus, it is suitable for point-of-care applications. PMID:12720360

Ozsoz, Mehmet; Erdem, Arzum; Kerman, Kagan; Ozkan, Dilsat; Tugrul, Berrin; Topcuoglu, Nejat; Ekren, Hayati; Taylan, Muzaffer

2003-05-01

274

Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

2010-01-01

275

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with plaques and arthritis.  

PubMed

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis (IGD) is a histopathological disorder characterised by an infiltration of the reticular dermis with a predominance of interstitial and palisadic histiocytes with a few areas of degenerating collagen bundles associated with a variable number of polynuclear neutrophils and eosinophils. There are several clinical conditions with a pattern of IGD. The linear form associated with arthritis was the first variety described. There is also a second form, which presents with plaques. This variety may be associated with arthritis, use of certain drugs or the presence of different systemic disorders. We report a case of IGD with plaques and arthritis. We discuss the differential clinical and histological diagnosis with other inflammatory skin lesions, which may be associated with joint disorders and collagen degeneration. We believe that it should be considered in patients presenting with arthritis and skin lesions. PMID:12804998

Bañuls, José; Betlloch, Isabel; Botella, Rafael; Jiménez, Maria José; Blanes, Mar; Pascual, José Carlos; Belinchón, Isabel; Silvestre, Juan Francisco

2003-01-01

276

T cells in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade and a half, advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have translated directly into benefit for patients. Much of this benefit has arisen through the introduction of targeted biological therapies. At the same time, technological advances have made it possible to define, at the cellular and molecular levels, the key pathways that influence the initiation and persistence of chronic inflammatory autoimmune reactions. As our understanding grows, it is likely that this knowledge will be translated into a second generation of biological therapies that are tailor-made for the patient. This review summarizes current perspectives on RA disease pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on what RA T cells look like, what they are likely to see, and how they contribute to persistence of the chronic inflammatory response. PMID:19007421

Cope, Andrew P

2008-01-01

277

Synovial cyst in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small synovial cysts are a common manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis; large brachial cysts, however, are a rare\\u000a sign of the disease and they must be differentiated from other soft tissue swelling which are not related to articular involvement.\\u000a We describe the case of three children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who came to our attention with large synovial cysts.\\u000a Ultrasonographic

L. Dell’Era; P. Vercellesi; L. V. Forzenigo; V. Carnelli; F. Corona

2008-01-01

278

Molecular Analysis of Factor V Leiden, Factor V Hong Kong, Factor II G20210A, Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T, and A1298C Mutations Related to Turkish Thrombosis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inherited gene disorders related to the hemostatic system have been documented as risk factors for thrombosis. The roles of factor V Hong Kong (FV Hong Kong), factor V Leiden (FV Leiden), factor II G20210A (FII G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations in Turkish patients with thrombosis (270 patients) compared with healthy controls (114 subjects) were evaluated. Polymerase

Bilgen Dölek; Serpil Eraslan; Sevim Ero?lu; Belgin Eroglu Kesim; Turgut Ulutin; Altan Yalç?ner; Yahya R. Laleli; Nermin Gözükirm?z?

2007-01-01

279

Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... tai chi. Eat a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables, which contain important vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin E. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as cold water fish (salmon, mackerel, and ...

280

Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Summary Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted PMID:23493495

Sudol-Szopinska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maslinski, Wlodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczynska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

2013-01-01

281

The national database of the German Collaborative Arthritis Centres: II. Treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo describe current treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in German rheumatology.METHODSData from the German rheumatological database of 1998, comprising clinical and patient questionnaire data of 12 992 outpatients with RA seen at 24 collaborative arthritis centres in Germany, were analysed.RESULTSAt the time of documentation, 88% of the patients with RA were undergoing disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment.

A Zink; J Listing; M Niewerth; H Zeidler

2001-01-01

282

Acute non-infectious arthritis of the hip in rheumatoid arthritis: synovial membrane findings.  

PubMed Central

A case of acute hip pain in rheumatoid arthritis is presented, with synovial membrane findings. A patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis suffered three unusual bouts of sudden, severe but transient hip pain. The hips were clinically normal between these episodes. The clinical picture on two of these occasions strongly suggested septic arthritis. Although the synovial fluid was highly inflammatory, cultures were negative. The synovial membrane showed mild lining cell hyperplasia, vascular congestion, and scattered inflammatory cells, predominantly lymphocytes. These findings were not compatible with either pyogenic infection or longstanding rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical and pathological features of acute non-infectious arthritis of the hip appear to delineate a distinct syndrome. Images PMID:2930281

Wohlgethan, J R; Stilmant, M M; Harris, J M; Smith, H R

1989-01-01

283

Peripheral corneal ulceration associated with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Corneal ulceration Symptoms: Blurred vision Medication: Abatacept Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Ophthalmology Objective: Management of emergency care Background: To report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associated peripheral corneal ulceration. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with RA diagnosed 15 years ago, under immunosuppressive therapy (IV abatacept 250 mg/month), demonstrated blurring of vision in her RE (right eye). Visual acuity was 6/10 in the RE and 10/10 in the LE. Slit lamp examination revealed a paracentral superior corneal melt in the RE. Anterior chamber reaction was 2+. Laboratory investigations revealed positive anti-Ro and anti-La, anti-Extractable Nuclear Antigens (anti-ENA, ELISA), while anti-Sm, anti-Rnp, anti-Jo1 and anti-Scl70 were found negative. IgG and IgA serum immunoglobulins were found elevated, but IgE and IgM were within normal levels. Further evaluation for the underlying disease revealed highly elevated rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. The patient, who had been receiving anti-TNF during the last 6 months, underwent treatment with topical tobramycin and lubricants and oral prednisone 60 mg/day with tapering doses, to which methotrexate p.os. 15 mg/week was added. The condition improved within a few days after the initiation of prednisone treatment. Re-epithelization occurred 1 week after the onset of the immunosuppressive treatment. Only punctate fluorescein dye uptake was detected in the margins of the lesion. Conclusions: The effective control of the underlying disease and early diagnosis of the dry eye syndrome in RA patients may prevent serious corneal complications such as corneal ulceration. The initiation of treatment with steroids and immunosuppresants was found to halt the progression of keratolysis, and assisted re-epithelization. PMID:23986797

Karampatakis, Vasileios; Konidaris, Vasileios; Michailidou, Maria; Gerofotis, Antonios; Daniilidis, Michail

2013-01-01

284

Circadian use of glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

A clear temporal relationship exists in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between increased nocturnal levels of pro-in?ammatory cytokines, such as TNF-? and interleukin (IL)-6, pro-inflammatory hormones (i.e. melatonin, prolactin) and insufficient night production of the anti-in?ammatory cortisol (circadian rhythm). Under long-standing chronic stress of disease, insufficient cortisol is available to inhibit an ongoing nocturnal immune/inflammatory reaction. Clinical RA symptoms follow the same circadian rhythm with highest morning severity. Chronotherapy with nighttime glucocorticoid (GC) availability optimizes the treatment of RA patients with low-dose GCs through more efficient targeting of mediators of the immune/inflammatory reaction during the night to be available on arising. Circadian use of low-dose, long-term prednisone, by using night-release formulations (ingested at 10 to 11 p.m.) especially in early RA patients, appears characterized by a significantly superior efficacy on decreasing morning stiffness and IL-6 serum levels, compared to conventional daytime immediate-release prednisone. Shift from medium-dose, immediate-release prednisone (over 7.5-10 mg/day) to night-release formulations GC low-dose, long-term chronotherapy requires a gradual passage, since the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the treated RA patients, potentially altered by a negative feedback induced by the medium/high daily exogenous GC administration, needs time to re-synchronize control of endogenous GC production into a circadian and more physiological nocturnal hormone availability/optimized efficacy. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25227591

Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pincus, Theodore

2015-01-01

285

Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies 7 novel rheumatoid arthritis risk loci  

E-print Network

* these authors contributed equally 1. Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands. 17. The Feinstein Institute. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Solna

de Bakker, Paul

286

Quality of Life Profiles in the First Years of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the EURIDISS Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life (QoL) profiles of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to relate these to disease and impairment variables as indicated, respectively, by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and by tender joint count (Ritchie Articular Index), fatigue, and pain. Methods. The present study uses part of the European Research

Th. P. B. M. Suurmeijer; M. Waltz; T. Moum; F. Guillemin; F. L. P. van Sonderen; S. Briancon; R. Sanderman

2001-01-01

287

Association between apolipoprotein ?4 allele, factor V Leiden, and plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels with sickle cell disease in southern Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate whether there is any association between various APOE alleles and factor V Leiden (FVL) with lipid profiles\\u000a and sickle cell disease (SCD) in Southern Iran. 65 SCD patients consisting of 35 sickle cell anemia homozygous (SS), 15 sickle\\u000a cell heterozygous (AS) and 15 sickle cell\\/?Thalassemia (S\\/?thal) patients and 68 healthy individuals with normal hematological\\u000a indices were studied. APOE

Zohreh Rahimi; Asad Vaisi-Raygani; Tayebeh Pourmotabbed

2011-01-01

288

Dietary vegetable oil and wood derived plant stanol esters reduce atherosclerotic lesion size and severity in apoE*3Leiden transgenic mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects of vegetable oil- and wood-based dietary plant stanol esters were compared in female apoE*3-Leiden transgenic mice at relevant plasma cholesterol levels. The plant stanol esters derived from vegetable oil (sitostanol 65.7%, campestanol 30.1%) had different contents of sitostanol and campestanol than the plant stanol esters derived from wood (sitostanol 87.6%, campestanol 9.5%) or from a

O. L. Volger; R. P. Mensink; J. Plat; G. Hornstra; L. M. Havekes; H. M. G. Princen

2001-01-01

289

Cerebral sinus thrombosis in a patient with active ulcerative colitis and double heterozygosity for Factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations.  

PubMed

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with increased risk for thrombotic complications, In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is an extremely rare complication. We report a patient with active UC and CSVT. The patient was heterozygous for Factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin gene mutations without other identifiable precipitating factors. This patient highlights the need for investigating the patients with UC with thrombotic complications for other thrombophilic states. PMID:19439852

Yakaryilmaz, Fahri; Guliter, Sefa; Degertekin, Bulent; Tuncer, Candan; Unal, Selahattin

2009-01-01

290

Blau syndrome and related genetic disorders causing childhood arthritis.  

PubMed

Blau Syndrome (BS) is an inheritable disorder characterized by granulomatous polyarthritis, panuveitis, and exanthema. It was described by Edward Blau in 1985, the same year in which Douglas Jabs reported a very similar family. Clinically indistinguishable from early onset sarcoidosis (EOS), both are now known to share a mutated form of caspase recruitment domain-15 (CARD 15), a protein involved in activation of nuclear factor kappa B which is in turn an up-regulator of pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription. An association between BS and EOS was suspected for years given the striking similarities of the core triad (arthritis-uveitis-dermatitis) and a common emerging pattern of systemic involvement. Hence, the familial form (BS) and the sporadic form (EOS) are almost certainly the same illness/defect, inherited in the first and acquired in the second as a result in most cases of a de novo mutation. Another form of granulomatous arthritis with uveitis, Crohn's disease, has also been associated with mutations in CARD 15 (albeit at a different domain) and despite similar phenotypes there are obvious differences including gut inflammation and pyoderma gangrenosum in Crohn's disease. This paper will review the clinical characteristics of these three disorders and their association with mutations in the CARD 15 gene. PMID:16303101

Becker, Mara L; Rose, Carlos D

2005-12-01

291

Diagnostic properties of metabolic perturbations in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of diagnosing early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by measuring selected metabolic biomarkers. Methods We compared the metabolic profile of patients with RA with that of healthy controls and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsoA). The metabolites were measured using two different chromatography-mass spectrometry platforms, thereby giving a broad overview of serum metabolites. The metabolic profiles of patient and control groups were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. The findings were validated in a follow-up study of RA patients and healthy volunteers. Results RA patients were diagnosed with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 70% in a validation study using detection of 52 metabolites. Patients with RA or PsoA could be distinguished with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 94%. Glyceric acid, D-ribofuranose and hypoxanthine were increased in RA patients, whereas histidine, threonic acid, methionine, cholesterol, asparagine and threonine were all decreased compared with healthy controls. Conclusions Metabolite profiling (metabolomics) is a potentially useful technique for diagnosing RA. The predictive value was without regard to the presence of antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides. PMID:21303541

2011-01-01

292

Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques  

PubMed Central

Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, ?V?3 integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein. PMID:25099015

2014-01-01

293

Current view of glucocorticoid co-therapy with DMARDs in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glucocorticoids are widely used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The disease-modifying potential of low to medium doses of glucocorticoids has been reconfirmed in the past decade, and co-administration of DMARDs and glucocorticoids has become standard in many treatment protocols, especially those for early disease stages but also for long-standing RA. The glucocorticoid regimens used range from continuous

Johannes W. G. Jacobs; Frank Buttgereit; Johannes W. J. Bijlsma; Jos N. Hoes

2010-01-01

294

Comparative clinical utility of once-weekly subcutaneous abatacept in the management of rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Biologic therapies in rheumatoid arthritis are now part of standard practice for disease that proves difficult to control with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. While anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies have been commonly used, other targeted biologic therapies with different mechanisms of action are becoming increasingly available. Abatacept is a recombinant fusion protein that inhibits the T-cell costimulatory molecules required for T-cell activation. Intravenous abatacept has good clinical efficacy with an acceptably low toxicity profile in rheumatoid arthritis, but the subcutaneous mode of delivery has only recently become available. In this article, we examine key efficacy and safety data for subcutaneous abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis, incorporating evidence from five large Phase III studies that included people with an inadequate response to methotrexate and an inadequate response to biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. The results demonstrate that subcutaneous abatacept has efficacy and safety comparable with that of intravenous abatacept and adalimumab. In addition, inhibition of radiographic progression at year 1 in relatively early rheumatoid arthritis is consistent with that of adalimumab. Subcutaneous abatacept is well tolerated, with very low rates of discontinuation in both short-term and long-term follow-up. PMID:24812514

Rakieh, Chadi; Conaghan, Philip G

2014-01-01

295

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 46, No. 4, April 2002, pp 11091120  

E-print Network

and that single administration of PLGA-CII may hold promise as a new treatment strategy in rheumatoid arthritisARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 46, No. 4, April 2002, pp 1109­1120 DOI 10.1002/art.10198 © 2002, American College of Rheumatology Suppression of Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Single Administration of Poly

Park, Jong-Sang

296

Remission-inducing drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

The administration of certain drugs to patients with established rheumatoid arthritis frequently results in improvement that is slow to appear but persists for long periods, even after the drug is discontinued. The three main drugs with this effect, whose efficacy and toxicity are reviewed in this paper, are gold salts, D-penicillamine and chloroquine. The cytotoxic agents used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, which likely have nonspecific anti-inflammatory actions and have serious long-term side effects, are also briefly reviewed. A new drug, levamisole, is currently being tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is suggested that the time for considering the introduction of a remission-inducing drug in patients with progressive rheumatoid arthritis is after an adequate trial of therapy with salicylates or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or both, and before the oral administration of steroids. It is difficult, however, on the basis of rigorous clinical comparisons, to recommend which of the three main remission-inducing drugs should be tried first, although gold salts have been used the most. Patients who have improved with 6 months of chrysotherapy may continue treatment for at least 3 years, during which time the frequency of mucocutaneous and renal toxic effects will steadily decrease. Some aspects of the medical economics of therapy with remission-inducing drugs for rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. PMID:6768438

Anastassiades, T. P.

1980-01-01

297

Apoptosis in rheumatoid arthritis synovium.  

PubMed Central

RA synovial tissue (ST) was studied to determine if and where apoptosis occurs in situ. Genomic DNA was extracted from 5 RA and 1 osteoarthritis ST samples. Agarose gel electrophoresis demonstrated DNA ladders characteristic for apoptosis from each tissue. In situ and labeling (ISEL) was used to identify DNA strand breaks consistent with apoptosis in frozen sections. 12 RA and 4 osteoarthritis ST were studied by ISEL and all were positive, but only 2 of 4 normal tissues were positive. The primary location of apopotic cells was the synovial lining. Some sublining cells were also positive, but lymphoid aggregate staining was conspicuously absent. Immunohistochemistry and ISEL were combined and showed that the lining cells with DNA strand breaks were mainly macrophages, although some fibroblastlike cells were also labeled. Sublining cells with fragmented DNA included macrophages and fibroblasts, but T cells in lymphoid aggregates, which expressed large amounts of bcl-2, were spared. DNA strand breaks in cultured fibroblastlike synoviocytes was assessed using ISEL. Apoptosis could be induced by actinomycin D, anti-fas antibody, IL-1, and TNF-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Fas expression was also detected on fibroblast-like synoviocytes using flow cytometry. Therefore, DNA strand breaks occur in synovium of patients with arthritis. Cytokines regulate this process, and the cytokine profile in RA (high IL-1/TNF; low IFN-gamma) along with local oxidant injury might favor induction of apoptosis. Images PMID:7657832

Firestein, G S; Yeo, M; Zvaifler, N J

1995-01-01

298

HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the susceptibility allele frequency as 2.16%, and estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-half of familial RA, although it accounts for only approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. PMID:7942852

Hasstedt, S. J.; Clegg, D. O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R. H.

1994-01-01

299

Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNF? antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque. PMID:24880190

Soubrier, Martin; Chamoux, Nicolas Barber; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

2014-07-01

300

Cricoarytenoid arthritis: a cause of acute upper airway obstruction in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To report acute upper airway obstruction due to cricoarytenoid arthritis, a well known but uncommon complication of rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Clinical features  We report the case of a 70-yr-old female scheduled for a colostomy who had been suffering from rheumatoid arthritis for 17\\u000a years. Preoperative history and physical examination revealed no cardiopulmonary compromise. Anesthesia was induced while\\u000a an assistant immobilized the cervical

Jacelyn Kolman; Ian Morris

2002-01-01

301

Effects of Telephone Intervention on Arthritis Self-Efficacy, Depression, Pain, and Fatigue in Older Adults with Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose :A rthritis self-efficacy (ASE) characterizes individ- uals' confidence in managing their arthritis. This study's pur- pose was to examine the effects of a telephone intervention on ASE, depression, pain, and fatigue in older adults with arthritis. Methods: Eighty-five elders with arthritis were ran- domly assigned to the intervention or control group. Participants in both groups: (a) completed baseline assess-

Ann O'Hanlon; Luis Espinoza

302

[Failures of antibiotic treatment in Lyme arthritis].  

PubMed

Antibiotic treatment has been proven to be effective in about 90% of patients with Lyme arthritis in controlled studies. Overt arthritis persisting in spite of antibiotic therapy is rare and most likely has an autoimmune background. More frequently, patients with history of Lyme borreliosis present with non-specific articular and musculosceletal symptoms, which seem to be permanent sequelae of arthritis or constitute part of so called post-Lyme disease syndrome, of unclear pathogenesis. As persistence of active infection after proper antibiotic therapy is unlikely, repeated treatment seems of no benefit in most of the patients. No more than 2-3 attempts of antibiotic therapy should be undertaken; if symptoms persist, symptomatic and anti-inflammatory treatment should be introduced. Lack of response to antibiotics should also point to co-existing musculoskeletal morbidity or to improper diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, which is frequent due to common occurrence of false-positive serologic tests results. PMID:19108522

Grygorczuk, Sambor; Zajkowska, Joanna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Moniuszko, Anna; Pancewicz, S?awomir; Pawlak-Zalewska, Wioletta

2008-01-01

303

Induction of adjuvant arthritis in mice.  

PubMed Central

Adjuvant arthritis, induced by injections of Freund's complete adjuvant into the footpads of some rat strains, has been recognized as a useful animal model for many years. There has, however, been notable lack of success in reproducing this model in other species. We now describe the development of adjuvant arthritis in healthy strain mice approximately 2 months after injection of Freund's complete adjuvant. Although the clinical appearance of the mice and the joint histopathology closely resemble the adjuvant arthritis reported in the rat, we were unable to detect rheumatoid factor in sera from the affected animals. In parallel studies of T cell proliferation, affected animals responded to some mycobacterial antigens but not to the 65-kD heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting that some other epitope is important in the development of the disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 2 PMID:1458683

Knight, B; Katz, D R; Isenberg, D A; Ibrahim, M A; Le Page, S; Hutchings, P; Schwartz, R S; Cooke, A

1992-01-01

304

Chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritis  

PubMed Central

Chemokines are involved in leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, such as the synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a structural and a functional classification of chemokines. The former includes four groups: CXC, CC, C and CX3C chemokines. Chemokines may also be either inflammatory or homeostatic, however, these functions often overlap. Anti-chemokine and anti-chemokine receptor targeting may be therapeutically used in the future biological therapy of arthritis. Most data in this field have been obtained from animal models of arthritis as only very few human RA trials have been completed. However, it is very likely that various specific chemokine and chemokine receptor antagonists will be developed and administered to RA patients. PMID:20036936

Szekanecz, Zoltan; Vegvari, Aniko; Szabo, Zoltan; Koch, Alisa E.

2010-01-01

305

Economics of stratified medicine in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Clinically relevant examples of stratified medicine are available for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to understand the current economic evidence for stratified medicine in RA. Two systematic reviews were conducted to identify: (1) all economic evaluations of stratified treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, or those which have used a subgroup analysis, and (2) all stated preference studies of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Ten economic evaluations of stratified treatments for RA, 38 economic evaluations including with a subgroup analysis and eight stated preference studies were identified. There was some evidence to support that stratified approaches to treating a patient with RA may be cost-effective. However, there remain key gaps in the economic evidence base needed to support the introduction of stratified medicine in RA into healthcare systems and considerable uncertainty about how proposed stratified approaches will impact future patient preferences, outcomes and costs when used in routine practice. PMID:25366935

Gavan, Sean; Harrison, Mark; Iglesias, Cynthia; Barton, Anne; Manca, Andrea; Payne, Katherine

2014-12-01

306

Methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: towards tailor-made treatment.  

PubMed

Methotrexate (MTX) is the key treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Nevertheless, MTX is not always sufficiently efficacious and can lead to adverse effects, which compromises complete disease control. In such cases, combination therapies with biologicals are given, even at MTX start, before knowing the patients' MTX response. Ideally, clinicians should be able to practice precision medicine by knowing before or early after MTX start, which patients will benefit from MTX only and which patients will not, thus requiring addition of biologicals. To make such tailor-made treatment decisions, clinicians require tools to optimize MTX treatment. In this review, we focus on tools for tailor-made MTX treatment in JIA. PMID:24857620

?alasan, Maja Bulatovi?; Wulffraat, Nico M

2014-07-01

307

Treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Chronic anterior uveitis affects 10-30 % of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and is still a cause of blindness in childhood. In most patients it is asymptomatic, bilateral, and recurrent, so careful screening and early diagnosis are important to obtain the best long-term prognosis. The treatment of chronic uveitis associated with JIA is challenging. Initial treatment is based on topical steroids and mydriatic drops. Methotrexate is the most common first-line immunomodulatory drug used. For refractory patients, biologicals, mainly the anti-tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF) drugs adalimumab and infliximab, have been revealed to be effective and have changed the outcome for these patients. Collaboration between pediatric rheumatologists and ophthalmologists is important for the successful diagnosis and treatment of patients with uveitis associated with JIA. PMID:24938442

Bou, Rosa; Iglesias, Estíbaliz; Antón, Jordi

2014-08-01

308

Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and arthritis progression: contrasting roles in systemic and monoarticular arthritis models  

PubMed Central

Introduction Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) has been implicated in tissue destruction/remodeling. The absence of u-PA results in resistance of mice to systemic immune complex-driven arthritis models; monoarticular arthritis models involving an intra-articular (i.a.) antigen injection, on the other hand, develop more severe arthritis in its absence. The aims of the current study are to investigate further these contrasting roles that u-PA can play in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis and to determine whether u-PA is required for the cartilage and bone destruction associated with disease progression. Methods To determine how the different pathogenic mechanisms leading to arthritis development in the different models may explain the contrasting requirement for u-PA, the systemic, polyarticular, immune complex-driven K/BxN arthritis model was modified to include an i.a. injection of saline as a local trauma in u-PA-/- mice. This modified model and the antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) model were also used in u-PA-/- mice to determine the requirement for u-PA in joint destruction. Disease severity was determined by clinical and histologic scoring. Fibrin(ogen) staining and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-generated neoepitope DIPEN staining were performed by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory and destructive mediators was measured in joint tissue by quantitative PCR. Results In our modified arthritis model, u-PA-/- mice went from being resistant to arthritis development following K/BxN serum transfer to being susceptible following the addition of an i.a. injection of saline. u-PA-/- mice also developed more sustained AIA compared with C57BL/6 mice, including reduced proteoglycan levels and increased bone erosions, fibrin(ogen) deposition and DIPEN expression. Synovial gene expression of the proinflammatory mediators (TNF and IL-1?), aggrecanases (ADAMTS-4 and -5) and MMPs (MMP3 and MMP13) were all sustained over time following AIA induction in u-PA-/- mice compared with C57BL/6 mice. Conclusions We propose that u-PA has a protective role in arthritis models with 'wound healing-like' processes following local trauma, possibly through u-PA/plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis, but a deleterious role in systemic models that are critically dependent on immune complex formation and complement activation. Given that cartilage proteoglycan loss and bone erosions were present and sustained in u-PA-/- mice with monoarticular arthritis, it is unlikely that u-PA/plasmin-mediated proteolysis is contributing directly to this tissue destruction/remodeling. PMID:20973954

2010-01-01

309

Acute non-infectious arthritis of the hip in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

Five patients with rheumatoid arthritis and no previous hip joint disease developed an acute disabling arthritis in one hip joint. Roentgenograms were negative and synovial fluid from the hip joint was inflammatory, but no crystals were seen and cultures were negative. Four of the five patients responded rapidly to intra-articular corticosteroids, and none of the five has had further hip joint symptoms during a mean follow up period of two years. PMID:3632068

Halla, J T; Hardin, J G

1987-01-01

310

Glucocorticosteroids in pregnant patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zusammenfassung Der günstige Einfluss einer Schwangerschaft auf die rheumatoide Arthritis (RA) ist seit 1938 bekannt und wurde mehrfach für 75% der RA-Schwangerschaften bestätigt. Eine Besserung der Symptome macht sich in der Regel schon im ersten Trimester bemerkbar und nimmt im Verlauf der Schwangerschaft zu. Eine Verschlechterung der RA wird bei den meisten Patienten innerhalb von 6 Monaten nach der Entbindung

M. Østensen

2000-01-01

311

Mud pack therapy in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Twenty-eight patients with classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis were randomly divided into two groups of fourteen patients each. All patients were treated once a day with mud packs derived from the Dead Sea heated to 40°C and applied over the four extremities, neck and back for 20 minutes. Group 1 was treated with the true mud packs and Group

S. Sukenik; D. Buskila; L. Neumann; A. Kleiner-Baumgarten

1992-01-01

312

Neurofibromatosis induced hip arthritis. An unusual presentation  

PubMed Central

Patient: Male, 43 Final Diagnosis: Neurofibromatosis Symptoms: Hip pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a disease known for orthopedic manifestations such as spine deformities, congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia and other bony dysplasias; joint dislocations are rare. Joint arthritis caused by neurofibromatosis, with a stable hip, has never been reported in the English literature before. Case Report: A 43-year-old man diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) presented with hip pain of 5 years duration, with no history of trauma and no clinical or radiological signs of dislocation. He had classical clinical and radiological signs of hip arthritis, with acetabular erosions and femoral head arthritis. The patient was treated with total hip arthroplasty metal-on-metal (MoM). Conclusions: Hip arthritis alone without subluxation or dislocation due to NF-1 is an extremely rare presentation. This is the first reported presentation and provisional treatment with total hip arthroplasty. PMID:24587854

Alrumaih, Husam; Ilyas, Imran; Kashif, Syed

2014-01-01

313

Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD) is an entity that has not been clearly defined either clinically or histopathologically. It is seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases. In the past, many cases of PNGD have been described under several different names including palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis, linear subcutaneous bands, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with cutaneous cords and arthritis, rheumatoid papules, and Churg-Strauss granuloma. We report 7 additional cases of PNGD. Clinically, 6 patients presented with erythematous to violaceous plaques, papules, and nodules on multiple body sites; one presented with subcutaneous linear bands on the shoulder. Five had rheumatoid arthritis; one had adult-onset Still's disease; and one showed clinical signs of rheumatoid arthritis, although serologically the rheumatoid factor was negative. On histologic examination, a spectrum of changes was observed ranging from urticaria-like infiltrates to leukocytoclastic vasculitis and granuloma annulare with neutrophils. We report these cases to expand the histologic spectrum of this entity and to further delineate the different forms of clinical presentation. PMID:12140472

Sangueza, Omar P; Caudell, Misty D; Mengesha, Yebabe M; Davis, Loretta S; Barnes, Cheryl J; Griffin, Julia E; Fleischer, Alan B; Jorizzo, Joseph L

2002-08-01

314

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with plaques and arthritis.  

PubMed

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis and arthritis (IGDA) is a rare disease entity with female predominance. The case of a 53-year-old woman with erythemas, plaques and nodules associated with polyarthritis is presented. She was treated with cyclosporin A, with improvement of the joint affliction and complete clearance of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis of IGDA is discussed briefly. PMID:14579165

Wollina, U; Schönlebe, J; Unger, L; Weigel, K; Köstler, E; Nüsslein, H

2003-10-01

315

Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD) is an entity that has not been clearly defined either clinically or histopathologically. It is seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases. In the past, many cases of PNGD have been described under several different names including palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis, linear subcutaneous bands, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with cutaneous cords

Omar P. Sangueza; Misty D. Caudell; Yebabe M. Mengesha; Loretta S. Davis; Cheryl J. Barnes; Julia E. Griffin; Alan B. Fleischer; Joseph L. Jorizzo

2002-01-01

316

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with plaques and arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis and arthritis (IGDA) is a rare disease entity with female predominance. The case of a 53-year-old woman with erythemas, plaques and nodules associated with polyarthritis is presented. She was treated with cyclosporin A, with improvement of the joint affliction and complete clearance of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis of IGDA is discussed briefly.

U. Wollina; J. Schönlebe; L. Unger; K. Weigel; E. Köstler; H. Nüsslein

2003-01-01

317

[Cystic Rheumatoid Arthritis--case report].  

PubMed

Among the many radiological findings seen in Rheumatoid Arthritis RA small subchondral geodes and erosions are typical. Large geodes are far less common abnormalities and their presence may indicate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case report of a 55-year old woman with seronegative RA that developed a large geode in the knee with extensive joint destruction. PMID:18159206

Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Fernando Pimentel; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Barros, Rita; de Matos, António Alves; Branco, Jaime Cunha

2007-01-01

318

Upper gastrointestinal disease in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upper gastrointestinal series were done in 140 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis, irrespective of the presence or absence of symptoms suggesting upper gastrointestinal disease. In addition, intraluminal pH and manometric studies of the esophagus and esophagoscopy were done in 66 of these 140 patients. Gastric ulcers were found in 12 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 27, an incidence of peptic

David C. H. Sun; Sanford H. Roth; Charles S. Mitchell; DeWitt W. Englund

1974-01-01

319

[The post-traumatic arthritis - a challenge?].  

PubMed

Total knee replacement in patients with post-traumatic arthritis is not fundamentally different from total knee replacement in patients with primary arthritis. Because of a 10-times higher infection rate, ordinary surgical planning should be implemented by the best possible exclusion of site infection based on actual information. Extra-articular deformities have to be preoperatively identified and individually treated with either an incomplete or a complete intra-articular correction or a single or double correction osteotomy. The commonly found combination of a contracted knee joint and an insufficient ligament balancing can mask instabilities of the knee joint. Consequently the definitive grade of a constrained knee prosthesis can only be determined intraoperatively. Existing osseous defects can be addressed with autologous bone grafts left from the total knee arthroplasty. Depending on the osseous defective site and the grade of constraints, prosthesis stems may be necessary but so far no clear recommendation can be given for either a cemented or a cementless fixation of the stem. The approach to the knee joint should be guided according to existing scars in order to prevent wound healing disorders. Even given optimal surgical planning and an optimum procedure of total knee arthroplasty postoperative results of post-traumatic arthritis are significantly inferior to results of primary arthritis. Therefore it is important to induce the commonly younger patients to form realistic expectations. PMID:25313706

Matziolis, G; Windisch, C

2014-10-01

320

A New Era in Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily manifests as a chronic symmetric polyarthritis. Treatment in the past was aimed at symp- tomatic pain relief. The initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) was historically started only after significant disease activity was pres- ent in order to reduce side effects from drug toxicities. Unfortunately, irreversible joint damage may

Jill C. Costello; Paul B. Halverson

2003-01-01

321

Ocular vascular thrombotic events: a diagnostic window to familial thrombophilia (compound factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene heterozygosity) and thrombosis.  

PubMed

In a 12-member, 3-generation kindred with conjoint inheritance of G1691A factor V Leiden (FVL) and G20210A prothrombin gene (PTG) mutations, identified through a proband with amaurosis fugax and his father with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), the authors' hypothesis was that ocular thrombosis was a diagnostic window to familial thrombophilia-thrombosis. The authors used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measures for thrombophilia (FVL, PTG, C677T-A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR], platelet glycoprotein PLA1A2) and hypofibrinolysis (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G4G). The 39-year-old white male proband, with amaurosis fugax and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), was found to be a compound heterozygote for FVL and PTG mutations. His symptoms resolved only after coumadin. His 44-year-old brother (deep venous thrombosis [DVT]) and 46-year-old sister (DVT, pulmonary embolus [PE]) were compound FVL-PTG gene heterozygotes. Of 4 asymptomatic children born to these 3 siblings, 2 were FVL heterozygotes and 2 PTG heterozygotes. The proband's 69-year-old father, with NAION and ischemic stroke, had PTG heterozygosity, familial high factor VIII, and compound MTHFR C677T-A1298C mutation with homocysteinemia. The proband's 61-year-old aunt had PTG heterozygosity, recurrent DVT, and mesenteric artery thrombosis. The proband's 67-year-old mother, free of thrombotic events, was a FVL heterozygote, had high factor VIII, and PAI-1 4G4G homozygosity. In this extended kindred, ocular thrombotic events (amaurosis fugax, NAION) were associated with variegated thrombotic events, including TIA, ischemic stroke, DVT, PE, and mesenteric artery thrombosis, and opened a diagnostic window to family screening and treatment for complex thrombophilias, which had previously been undiagnosed. PMID:18796459

Glueck, Charles J; Wang, Ping

2009-02-01

322

The dual PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar blocks progression of pre-existing atherosclerosis in APOE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose: We have evaluated the effects of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?/? agonist on the progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in APOE*3Leiden.cholesteryl ester transfer protein (E3L.CETP) transgenic mice. Experimental approach E3L.CETP mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 11 weeks to induce atherosclerosis, followed by a low-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks to obtain a lower plasma total cholesterol level of ?10 mmol·L?1. Mice were divided into three groups, which were either killed before (baseline) or after an 8 week treatment period with low-cholesterol diet without (control) or with the PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar (10 µg·kg?1·day?1). Atherosclerosis was assessed in the aortic root. Key results: Treatment with tesaglitazar significantly reduced plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, CETP mass and CETP activity, and increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. At baseline, substantial atherosclerosis had developed. During the 8 week low-cholesterol diet, atherosclerosis progressed in the control group with respect to lesion area and severity, whereas tesaglitazar inhibited lesion progression during this period. Tesaglitazar reduced vessel wall inflammation, as reflected by decreased monocyte adhesion and macrophage area, and modified lesions to a more stabilized phenotype, with increased smooth muscle cell content in the cap and collagen content. Conclusions and implications: Dual PPAR?/? agonism with tesaglitazar markedly improved the atherogenic triad by reducing triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and increasing high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and additionally reduced cholesterol-induced vessel wall activation. These actions resulted in complete inhibition of progression and stabilization of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in E3L.CETP mice. PMID:19220285

van der Hoorn, JWA; Jukema, JW; Havekes, LM; Lundholm, E; Camejo, G; Rensen, PCN; Princen, HMG

2009-01-01

323

Methotrexate in the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other pediatric rheumatoid and nonrheumatic disorders.  

PubMed

The goal of treatment for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and other pediatric rheumatic disorders is to minimize joint destruction, pain, and deformity and to maximize all aspects of growth and development. Oral and injectable methotrexate are now often given early in the treatment of JRA, childhood dermatomyositis, difficult-to-control arthritis in the pediatric spondyloarthropathies, SLE, sarcoidosis, several of the vasculopathies, and idiopathic iritis. Weekly low-dose MTX has become a mainstay of long-term improved control of these disorders, and is associated with strikingly few documented long-term side effects. Dosages, pharmacology, side effects, efficacy, and treatment strategies are discussed. Although formal studies are lacking, MTX for the pediatric rheumatic disorders seems to be associated with less frequent physician visits, lower total costs, improved function, and fewer late reconstructive surgeries. PMID:9361157

Singsen, B H; Goldbach-Mansky, R

1997-11-01

324

Niacin Increases HDL by Reducing Hepatic Expression and Plasma Levels of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein in APOE*3Leiden.CETP Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

HDL-cholesterol-increasing drug used in the clinic. In the present study, we aimed at elucidation of the mechanism underlying its HDL-raising effect. Methods and Results—In APOE*3Leiden transgenic mice expressing the human CETP transgene, niacin dose-dependently decreased plasma triglycerides (up to 77%, P0.001) and total cholesterol (up to -66%, P0.001). Concomitantly, niacin dose-dependently increased HDL-cholesterol (up to 87%, P0.001), plasma apoAI (up

Jose W. A. van der Hoorn; Jimmy F. P. Berbee; Louis M. Havekes; J. Wouter Jukema; Patrick C. N. Rensen; Hans M. G. Princen

2009-01-01

325

Lipidomics Reveals Multiple Pathway Effects of a Multi-Components Preparation on Lipid Biochemistry in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP Mice  

PubMed Central

Background Causes and consequences of the complex changes in lipids occurring in the metabolic syndrome are only partly understood. Several interconnected processes are deteriorating, which implies that multi-target approaches might be more successful than strategies based on a limited number of surrogate markers. Preparations from Chinese Medicine (CM) systems have been handed down with documented clinical features similar as metabolic syndrome, which might help developing new intervention for metabolic syndrome. The progress in systems biology and specific animal models created possibilities to assess the effects of such preparations. Here we report the plasma and liver lipidomics results of the intervention effects of a preparation SUB885C in apolipoprotein E3 Leiden cholesteryl ester transfer protein (ApoE*3Leiden.CETP) mice. SUB885C was developed according to the principles of CM for treatment of metabolic syndrome. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 blocker rimonabant was included as a general control for the evaluation of weight and metabolic responses. Methodology/Principal Findings ApoE*3Leiden.CETP mice with mild hypercholesterolemia were divided into SUB885C-, rimonabant- and non-treated control groups. SUB885C caused no weight loss, but significantly reduced plasma cholesterol (?49%, p<0.001), CETP levels (?31%, p<0.001), CETP activity (?74%, p<0.001) and increased HDL-C (39%, p<0.05). It influenced lipidomics classes of cholesterol esters and triglycerides the most. Rimonabant induced a weight loss (?9%, p<0.05), but only a moderate improvement of lipid profiles. In vitro, SUB885C extract caused adipolysis stimulation and adipogenesis inhibition in 3T3-L1 cells. Conclusions SUB885C, a multi-components preparation, is able to produce anti-atherogenic changes in lipids of the ApoE*3Leiden.CETP mice, which are comparable to those obtained with compounds belonging to known drugs (e.g. rimonabant, atorvastatin, niacin). This study successfully illustrated the power of lipidomics in unraveling intervention effects and to help finding new targets or ingredients for lifestyle-related metabolic abnormality. PMID:22291936

van den Hoek, Anita M.; Reijmers, Theo H.; Wopereis, Suzan; Bouwman, Jildau; Ramaker, Raymond; Korthout, Henrie A. A. J.; Vennik, Marco; Hankemeier, Thomas; Havekes, Louis M.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Verheij, Elwin R.; Xu, Guowang; van der Greef, Jan

2012-01-01

326

Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

327

Davignon et al. Arthritis Research & Therapy 2010, 12:R142 http://arthritis-research.com/content/12/4/R142  

E-print Network

-cell response in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor treatments Jean-Luc Davignon the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, serious infections are a major concern in patientsDavignon et al. Arthritis Research & Therapy 2010, 12:R142 http://arthritis-research.com/content/12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: frequently used and frequently arthritic  

PubMed Central

Recent recognition of the markedly high prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) coupled with the significant morbidity associated with TMJ damage has prompted increased interest in both the clinical and pathological aspects of TMJ arthritis. This review focuses on the prevalence of TMJ arthritis in JIA, the imaging modalities used to detect TMJ arthritis, and the treatment of TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. PMID:19480670

Ringold, Sarah; Cron, Randy Q

2009-01-01

329

Pattern of Lyme arthritis in Europe: report of 14 cases.  

PubMed Central

Fourteen cases of Lyme arthritis are reported. The most frequent picture was that of oligoarthritis appearing in that part of the leg where the cutaneous or neurological complications, or both, of Lyme disease had developed before the arthritis. In most cases recovery followed a single 10 day course of intravenous (IV) penicillin therapy. Arthritis was the presenting feature of Lyme disease in three cases. PMID:3355251

Huaux, J P; Bigaignon, G; Stadtsbaeder, S; Zangerle, P F; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

1988-01-01

330

A child with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

We describe a case of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis (IGD) with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in an 11-year-old girl. She complained of erythematous plaques on her thighs and polyarthritis for 1 year. Histopathologic examination revealed the features of IGD. This case indicates that IGD with arthritis can occur in children and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions associated with arthritis in children. PMID:23735003

Moon, Hye-Rim; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

2013-01-01

331

Arthritis Critically Dependent on Innate Immune System Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

K\\/BxN T cell receptor transgenic mice are a model of inflammatory arthritis, similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Disease in these animals is focused specifically on the joints but stems from autoreactivity to a ubiquitously expressed antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI). T and B cells are both required for disease initiation, but anti-GPI immunoglobulins (Igs), alone, can induce arthritis in lymphocyte-deficient recipients. Here,

Hong Ji; Koichiro Ohmura; Umar Mahmood; David M Lee; Frans M. A Hofhuis; Susan A Boackle; Kazue Takahashi; V. Michael Holers; Mark Walport; Craig Gerard; Alan Ezekowitz; Michael C Carroll; Michael Brenner; Ralph Weissleder; J. Sjef Verbeek; Veronique Duchatelle; Claude Degott; Christophe Benoist; Diane Mathis

2002-01-01

332

HLA-DR antigens and disease patterns of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

HLA-DR antigens were determined in 111 patients with classic or definite rheumatoid arthritis. HLA-DR4 was significantly (P corr. -6) increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (54%) compared with controls (23.2%). HLA-DR 5 was decreased in rheumatoid arthritis (12.6% vs 26.4% of controls); however, the corrected P value was not significant. There were no significant differences with regard to various clinical,

O. Scherak; J. S. Smolen; W. R. Mayr

1983-01-01

333

Septic arthritis of the knee joint secondary to Prevotella bivia.  

PubMed

Prevotella bivia is an obligatory anaerobic, gram-negative rod, which often produces a detectable beta-lactamase. To date, there has been only 3 descriptions of septic arthritis secondary to this microorganism in a patients pre-existing sever joint disease like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis or after joint prosthesis. We are reporting the first case of septic arthritis due to Prevotella bivia in a patient with no pre-existing joint symptoms. PMID:19271076

Salman, Salman A; Baharoon, Salim A

2009-03-01

334

Niacin Reduces Atherosclerosis Development in APOE*3Leiden.CETP Mice Mainly by Reducing NonHDL-Cholesterol  

PubMed Central

Objective Niacin potently lowers triglycerides, mildly decreases LDL-cholesterol, and largely increases HDL-cholesterol. Despite evidence for an atheroprotective effect of niacin from previous small clinical studies, the large outcome trials, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE did not reveal additional beneficial effects of niacin (alone or in combination with laropiprant) on top of statin treatment. We aimed to address this apparent discrepancy by investigating the effects of niacin without and with simvastatin on atherosclerosis development and determine the underlying mechanisms, in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice, a model for familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Approach and Results Mice were fed a western-type diet containing cholesterol without or with niacin (120 mg/kg/day), simvastatin (36 mg/kg/day) or their combination for 18 weeks. Similarly as in FD patients, niacin reduced total cholesterol by -39% and triglycerides by ?50%, (both P<0.001). Simvastatin and the combination reduced total cholesterol (?30%; ?55%, P<0.001) where the combination revealed a greater reduction compared to simvastatin (?36%, P<0.001). Niacin decreased total cholesterol and triglycerides primarily by increasing VLDL clearance. Niacin increased HDL-cholesterol (+28%, P<0.01) and mildly increased reverse cholesterol transport. All treatments reduced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium (?46%; ?47%, P<0.01; ?53%, P<0.001), atherosclerotic lesion area (?78%; ?49%, P<0.01; ?87%, P<0.001) and severity. Compared to simvastatin, the combination increased plaque stability index [(SMC+collagen)/macrophages] (3-fold, P<0.01). Niacin and the combination reduced T cells in the aortic root (?71%, P<0.01; ?81%, P<0.001). Lesion area was strongly predicted by nonHDL-cholesterol (R2?=?0.69, P<0.001) and to a much lesser extent by HDL-cholesterol (R2?=?0.20, P<0.001). Conclusion Niacin decreases atherosclerosis development mainly by reducing nonHDL-cholesterol with modest HDL-cholesterol-raising and additional anti-inflammatory effects. The additive effect of niacin on top of simvastatin is mostly dependent on its nonHDL-cholesterol-lowering capacities. These data suggest that clinical beneficial effects of niacin are largely dependent on its ability to lower LDL-cholesterol on top of concomitant lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:23840481

Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van Klinken, Jan B.; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van der Hoorn, Jose W. A.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Jukema, J. Wouter

2013-01-01

335

Naproxen in rheumatoid arthritis. Extended trial.  

PubMed Central

121 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, 91 of whom had proved intolerant of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, were treated for a mean of 10 months with naproxen. A dosage of 250 mg twice daily produced sustained improvement in most of the standard clinical measurements. 28 patients complained of side effects, with a lower than expected incidence of gastrointestinal complaints and no drug-induced rash being recorded. 19 patients withdrew from the trial because of side effects, while a further 22 withdrew because the drug was ineffective. Naproxen is a useful drug for long-term use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including those who have proved intolerant of or experienced inadequate symptomatic relief from other nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:795386

Mowat, A G; Ansell, B M; Gumpel, J M; Hill, H F; Hill, A G; Stoppard, M

1976-01-01

336

Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.  

PubMed Central

Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

2004-01-01

337

Correlation analyses of clinical and molecular findings identify candidate biological pathways in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Clinicians have long appreciated the distinct phenotype of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) compared to polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (POLY). We hypothesized that gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from children with each disease would reveal distinct biological pathways when analyzed for significant associations with elevations in two markers of JIA activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and number of affected joints (joint count, JC). Methods PBMC RNA from SJIA and POLY patients was profiled by kinetic PCR to analyze expression of 181 genes, selected for relevance to immune response pathways. Pearson correlation and Student's t-test analyses were performed to identify transcripts significantly associated with clinical parameters (ESR and JC) in SJIA or POLY samples. These transcripts were used to find related biological pathways. Results Combining Pearson and t-test analyses, we found 91 ESR-related and 92 JC-related genes in SJIA. For POLY, 20 ESR-related and 0 JC-related genes were found. Using Ingenuity Systems Pathways Analysis, we identified SJIA ESR-related and JC-related pathways. The two sets of pathways are strongly correlated. In contrast, there is a weaker correlation between SJIA and POLY ESR-related pathways. Notably, distinct biological processes were found to correlate with JC in samples from the earlier systemic plus arthritic phase (SAF) of SJIA compared to samples from the later arthritis-predominant phase (AF). Within the SJIA SAF group, IL-10 expression was related to JC, whereas lack of IL-4 appeared to characterize the chronic arthritis (AF) subgroup. Conclusions The strong correlation between pathways implicated in elevations of both ESR and JC in SJIA argues that the systemic and arthritic components of the disease are related mechanistically. Inflammatory pathways in SJIA are distinct from those in POLY course JIA, consistent with differences in clinically appreciated target organs. The limited number of ESR-related SJIA genes that also are associated with elevations of ESR in POLY implies that the SJIA associations are specific for SJIA, at least to some degree. The distinct pathways associated with arthritis in early and late SJIA raise the possibility that different immunobiology underlies arthritis over the course of SJIA. PMID:23092393

2012-01-01

338

Tuberculous arthritis revisited as a forgotten cause of monoarticular arthritis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major concern for health care workers. The number of reported cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, particularly osteoarticular tuberculosis, is increasing. This fact is attributed to different factors such as underestimating the disease and difficulty in diagnosis, which requires tissue sampling and can lead to a delay in the diagnosis, and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to highlight the difficulties and delay in diagnosis of articular tuberculosis, raising the need to create awareness about the importance of early diagnosis to avoid major complications of joint destruction. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective review of patients presenting to a tertiary care center between 2003 and 2009. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed cases who presented with monoarticular joint pain and swelling that failed to respond to treatment elsewhere and were eventually diagnosed as having articular tuberculosis. We collected the demographic data, history, data on clinical examination and the relevant laboratory investigations, in addition to the data on radiological studies. All patients were treated medically with antituberculosis chemotherapy and surgically according to the severity of joint destruction. RESULTS: Thirteen patients had a mean age was 40 years (range, 17-70 years). The average delay in diagnosis was 2 years. Only 1 patient had pulmonary TB. The hip, knee and elbow were the most common joints involved. Bacteriology was positive in 69% of the cases; and histopathology, in 92%. Fifteen percent of the patients had arthrodesis. None showed recurrence after follow-up of 4 years. CONCLUSION: A high level of clinical suspicion is essential for early diagnosis and treatment of osteoarticular TB to reduce its significant morbidity. PMID:21808118

Al-Sayyad, Mohammed J.; Abumunaser, Lutf A.

2011-01-01

339

508 VOLUME 42 | NUMBER 6 | JUNE 2010 NATURE GENETICS To identify new genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis,  

E-print Network

,34, Peter K Gregersen21,34, Lars Klareskog22,34 & Robert M Plenge1,2 1Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, Alameda, California, USA. 8Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden. 11University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. 12Department of Rheumatology

Raychaudhuri, Soumya

340

The burden of illness of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is necessary to understand the full burden of illness of a disease before the value of interventions can be assessed. Rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis (RA) has an impact on a variety of stakeholders, including patients, healthcare systems, and society as a whole.\\u000a This overview discusses the societal and patient perspectives, distinguishing several domains of impact. Epidemiology is important from a societal

Annelies Boonen; Johan L. Severens

2011-01-01

341

Arthritis associated with pityriasis rubra pilaris  

PubMed Central

Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare papulosquamous disease of unknown aetiology, with an estimated prevalence of 2.5 per million.1 It is clinically characterised by the presence of follicular hyperkeratotic papules, but the histopathology is usually non-specific. An interesting case of asymmetric, inflammatory arthritis of the hand in a patient who also presented with PRP is presented, along with a review of the few previously reported cases the literature. PMID:22766575

Liu, Paul Y; Prete, Pamela E

2010-01-01

342

Arthritis associated with pityriasis rubra pilaris.  

PubMed

Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare papulosquamous disease of unknown aetiology, with an estimated prevalence of 2.5 per million.1 It is clinically characterised by the presence of follicular hyperkeratotic papules, but the histopathology is usually non-specific. An interesting case of asymmetric, inflammatory arthritis of the hand in a patient who also presented with PRP is presented, along with a review of the few previously reported cases the literature. PMID:22766575

Liu, Paul Y; Prete, Pamela E

2010-01-01

343

Chitotriosidase activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an inflammatory joint disease of unknown etiology. The pathogenesis is driven by T\\u000a and B cells. The role of macrophages remains unclear. Chitotriosidase belongs to the chitinase protein family and is secreted\\u000a by activated macrophages. The chitinases are able to catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin or chitin-like substrates such as 4-methylumbelliferyl\\u000a chitotrioside. Chitotriosidase activity was

Jürgen K. H. Brunner; Sabine Scholl-Bürgi; David Hössinger; Petra Wondrak; Martina Prelog; Lothar-Bernd Zimmerhackl

2008-01-01

344

Update on autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of rheumatoid factor (RF) in the serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was one of the first indications\\u000a of autoimmunity in RA. The role of RF in the diagnosis of RA has been well-documented, but it has suboptimal sensitivity and\\u000a specificity. Although patients with RF-positive RA generally have more severe disease than those with RF-negative RA, RF is

S. Louis Bridges

2004-01-01

345

Cutaneous manifestations associated with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheumatoid arthritis presents various cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific skin features, which are induced\\u000a by the activation of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages), vasculopathy, vasculitis, acral deformity,\\u000a drugs, and so on. These include (1) specific findings, (2) findings due to vascular impairment, (3) findings due to immune\\u000a dysfunction, (4) characteristic neutrophilic conditions, and (5) miscellaneous conditions. On the other

T. Yamamoto

2009-01-01

346

B cell targets in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

B cells are critical to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is substantial evidence of the efficacy of depletion\\u000a of B cells in many patients with RA using the first licensed agent, rituximab. Recent research has focused on enhancing efficacy\\u000a using other targets to inhibit B cell function, including other B cell-depleting antibodies and cytokines critical to B cell

Edward M. Vital; Shouvik Dass; Paul Emery

347

Cell-mediated immunity in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell-mediated immunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed by skin testing with six antigens in 107 patients, 94 of whom were age, sex, and race-matched with healthy individuals or patients with diseases unrelated to immunological abnormalities. 20% of RA patients were anergic. Impaired cell-mediated immunity in the RA patients was manifested by a decrease in the magnitude of skin reactivity

A A Andrianakos; J T Sharp; D A Person; M D Lidsky; J Duffy

1977-01-01

348

Sternoclavicular septic arthritis: review of 180 cases.  

PubMed

We review 170 previously reported cases of sternoclavicular septic arthritis, and report 10 new cases. The mean age of patients was 45 years; 73% were male. Patients presented with chest pain (78%) and shoulder pain (24%) after a median duration of symptoms of 14 days. Only 65% were febrile. Bacteremia was present in 62%. Common risk factors included intravenous drug use (21%), distant site of infection (15%), diabetes mellitus (13%), trauma (12%), and infected central venous line (9%). No risk factor was found in 23%. Serious complications such as osteomyelitis (55%), chest wall abscess or phlegmon (25%), and mediastinitis (13%) were common. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible for 49% of cases, and is now the major cause of sternoclavicular septic arthritis in intravenous drug users. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in injection drug users declined dramatically with the end of an epidemic of pentazocine abuse in the 1980s. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis accounts for 1% of septic arthritis in the general population, but 17% in intravenous drug users, for unclear reasons. Bacteria may enter the sternoclavicular joint from the adjacent valves of the subclavian vein after injection of contaminated drugs into the upper extremity, or the joint may become infected after attempted drug injection between the heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be obtained routinely to assess for the presence of chest wall phlegmon, retrosternal abscess, or mediastinitis. If present, en-bloc resection of the sternoclavicular joint is indicated, possibly with ipsilateral pectoralis major muscle flap. Empiric antibiotic therapy may need to cover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). PMID:15118542

Ross, John J; Shamsuddin, Hala

2004-05-01

349

Development of autoimmunity in Lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

Treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis (TRLA) develops in 10% of Lyme arthritis patients and is characterized by continuous joint inflammation that does not resolve with antibiotic therapy. TRLA is associated with HLA-DRB1*0401 and related alleles, as well as with an immune response to the Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) outer surface protein A (OspA). The immunodominant epitope of OspA in the context of HLA-DRB1*0401 corresponds to amino acids 165-173 (OspA165-173). The human Lymphocyte Function Antigen-1 (hLFA1alpha) contains a peptide with homology to OspA165-173. Treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis patients' T cells, cloned based on their ability to bind OspA165-173-loaded HLA-DRB1*0401 tetramers, respond to OspA and hLFA1alpha with a different cytokine profile, suggesting that hLFA1alpha acts as a partial agonist with a potential role in the perpetuation of joint inflammation. PMID:12118172

Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T

2002-07-01

350

Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities. PMID:21234398

Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

2011-01-01

351

Angiogenesis and its targeting in rheumatoid arthritis?  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis, the development of new capillaries, is involved in leukocyte ingress into the synovium during the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Several soluble and cell surface-bound mediators including growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, proteolytic matrix-degrading enzymes, cell adhesion molecules and others may promote synovial neovascularization. On the other hand, endogenous angiostatic factors, such as angiostatin, endostatin, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, interferons and some angiostatic chemokines are also produced within the rheumatoid synovium, however, their effects are insufficient to control synovial angiogenesis and inflammation. Several specific and non-specific strategies have been developed to block the action of angiogenic mediators. The first line of angiostatic agents include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin, ?V?3 integrin antagonist, as well as non-specific angiogenesis inhibitors including traditional disease-modifying agents (DMARDs), anti-tumor necrosis factor biologics, angiostatin, endostatin, fumagillin analogues or thalidomide. Potentially any angiostatic compound could be introduced to studies using animal models of arthritis or even to human rheumatoid arthritis trials. PMID:19217946

Szekanecz, Zoltan; Koch, Alisa E.

2010-01-01

352

Psoriatic arthritis assessment tools in clinical trials  

PubMed Central

In order to measure disease activity, progression, and change with therapy in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), it is important to use accurate, reliable, and feasible outcome measures that can ideally be employed in longitudinal cohorts, clinical trials, and clinical practice. Until recently, there has been little focus on this methodology in PsA. Clinical trials and long term clinical registries have used disparate outcome measures. With emerging therapies, the focus on the methodology of outcome assessment has increased to ensure that discriminant and responsive instruments are used. The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), in conjunction with the society, Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT), is focused on refining and developing outcome measures for a variety of disease domains reviewed in this report. Key domains to assess include joints, skin, enthesitis, dactylitis, spine, joint damage as assessed radiologically, quality of life, and function. These domains can be assessed by individual and composite measures. A number of measures have been "borrowed" from the fields of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis and adapted to PsA. Others are being developed specifically for PsA. Few are validated but most have been shown to perform well in distinguishing placebo from treatment response. This report reviews the current state of the art of assessment in PsA and points toward future directions of development of this field. PMID:15708937

Mease, P; Antoni, C; Gladman, D; Taylor, W

2005-01-01

353

Clinical and radiological damage in psoriatic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Psoriatic arthritis may progress to joint damage. Joint damage may be assessed clinically, by identifying deformed, fused, or flail joints, or radiologically, by recording erosions, joint space narrowing, ankylosis, lysis, or surgery. The relation between clinical and radiological damage is unclear. Objective To study the ordering of clinical and radiological damage detection, and the clinical features associated with the type of damage detected first. Methods The University of Toronto psoriatic arthritis database was used to relate clinical and radiological damage in the hand joints in 655 patients followed prospectively between 1978 and 2003. Generalised estimating equations were used to fit logistic regression models to identify factors that predict classification of damage by radiographic assessment first. Results The majority of the joints were not informative, as they either had evidence of damage by both methods at entry, or remained undamaged. Of the remainder, 81% of the joints showed radiological damage first and 19% had clinical damage first. Development of radiological damage first was related to previous detection of swollen joints, and was inversely related to duration of arthritis. Conclusions Radiological damage is often detected before clinical damage is observed. Clinical inflammation often precedes the detection of radiological damage. PMID:16126794

Siannis, F; Farewell, V T; Cook, R J; Schentag, C T; Gladman, D D

2006-01-01

354

Blau syndrome (familial granulomatous arthritis, iritis, and rash) in an african-american family.  

PubMed

Blau syndrome (familial granulomatous arthritis, iritis, and rash) was originally described in 1985, in 11 members of a family of Dutch ancestry. Inheritance is autosomal dominant. Several more Caucasian families have been described since. Skin and synovial biopsy specimens show noncaseating sarcoid like granulomas, but the lung is not involved as in classic sarcoidosis. This report describes 3 members of an African American family with Blau syndrome. It is important to differentiate this genetic disorder from other childhood arthritides, such as, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile spondyloarthropathies, and early-onset sarcoidosis, because of the need for genetic counseling, treatment and differing potential for selective involvement of other organs (eye, skin, and tendons/joints). All children of an affected individual have a 50% chance of inheriting the disease. Unaffected children do not have to be concerned about subsequent generations being affected. The response to conventional treatments used in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and to etanercept in our patients has not been satisfactory. Joint disease responds to corticosteroids, but these agents are not suitable for a disease that is lifelong. The eye involvement is aggressive and can lead to blindness. These patients need close follow-up by an ophthalmologist. PMID:19078446

Cuesta, I A; Moore, E C; Rabah, R; Bawle, E V

2000-02-01

355

Evaluation of human serum of severe rheumatoid arthritis by confocal Raman spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease, recurrent and systemic, initiated by autoantibodies and maintained by inflammatory mechanisms cellular applicants. The evaluation of this disease to promote early diagnosis, need an associations of many tools, such as clinical, physical examination and thorough medical history. However, there is no satisfactory consensus due to its complexity. In the present work, confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the biochemical composition of human serum of 40 volunteers, 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis presenting clinical signs and symptoms, and 16 healthy donors. The technique of latex agglutination for the polystyrene covered with human immunoglobulin G and PCR (protein c-reactive) was performed for confirmation of possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique. This study aimed to verify the changes for the characteristics Raman peaks of biomolecules such as immunoglobulins amides and protein. The results were highly significant with a good separation between groups mentioned. The discriminant analysis was performed through the principal components and correctly identified 92% of the donors. Based on these results, we observed the behavior of arthritis autoimmune, evident in certain spectral regions that characterize the serological differences between the groups.

Carvalho, C. S.; Raniero, L.; Santo, A. M. E.; Pinheiro, M. M.; Andrade, L. E. C.; Cardoso, M. A. G.; Junior, J. S.; Martin, A. A.

2010-02-01

356

2010 Rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: an American College of Rheumatology\\/European League Against Rheumatism collaborative initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR; formerly the American Rheumatism Association) classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been criticised for their lack of sensitivity in early disease. This work was undertaken to develop new classification criteria for RA.MethodsA joint working group from the ACR and the European League Against Rheumatism developed, in three phases, a new approach to

Daniel Aletaha; Tuhina Neogi; Alan J. Silman; Julia Funovits; David T. Felson; Clifton O Bingham III; Neal S. Birnbaum; Gerd R. Burmester; Vivian P. Bykerk; Marc D. Cohen; Bernard Combe; Karen H. Costenbader; Maxime Dougados; Paul Emery; Gianfranco Ferraccioli; Johanna M. W. Hazes; Kathryn Hobbs; Tom W. J. Huizinga; Arthur Kavanaugh; Jonathan Kay; Tore K Kvien; Timothy Laing; Philip Mease; Henri A Ménard; Larry W. Moreland; Raymond L. Naden; Theodore Pincus; Josef S Smolen; Ewa Stanislawska-Biernat; Deborah Symmons; Paul P. Tak; Katherine S. Upchurch; Ji?í Vencovský; Frederick Wolfe; Gillian Hawker

2010-01-01

357

Panel discussion on B cells and rituximab: mechanistic aspects, efficacy and safety in rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical potential of rituximab (MabThera\\/Rituxan), a selective B-cell-depleting agent, in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is rapidly becoming apparent. The data presented at an official satellite symposium of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Congress (2003, Lisbon, Portugal), reinforce the rationale for the use of this novel agent in RA and have provided an early indication

G. S. Panayi; J. D. Hainsworth; R. J. Looney; E. C. Keystone

2005-01-01

358

Effects of rheumatoid arthritis on employment and social participation during the first years of disease in The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Objective. To study the eVect of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on working capabilities and social participation, including non- paying jobs, during the first 6 yr of disease. Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. In April 1996, a self-reporting questionnaire was sent to 424 participants of a population-based clinical trial of therapeutic strategies for early RA initiated in 1990. Results. A total of

C. H. M. VAN JAARSVELD; J. W. G. JACOBS; A. J. P. SCHRIJVERS; G. A. VAN ALBADA-KUIPERS; D. M. HOFMAN; J. W. J. BIJLSMA

1998-01-01

359

Correlation of rheumatoid arthritis severity with the genetic functional variants and circulating levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To study whether genetic variants of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), the MIF -173G>C and CATT(5-8) alleles, are associated with disease severity and levels of circulating MIF in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Genotyping was performed in patients with early RA and in healthy controls. Demographic data, disease activity, and outcome measurements were compared between patients with and

Timothy R. D. J. Radstake; C. G. J. Sweep; Paco Welsing; Barbara Franke; Sita H. H. M. Vermeulen; Anneke Geurts-Moespot; Thierry Calandra; Rachelle Donn

2005-01-01

360

Septic arthritis caused by Brucella melitensis in urban Shenzhen, China: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Brucellosis is a systemic infectious disease which is still a challenging medical problem in rural areas such as northern China. It rarely occurs in urban areas such as Shenzhen in southern China. Osteoarticular involvements are frequently seen in brucellosis, and rarely is arthritis the only clinical presentation. We report a case of hip septic arthritis caused by Brucella melitensis in an urban area of Shenzhen, China. Case presentation A 29-year-old Chinese woman, Han ethnical group presented to our hospital with left hip pain persisting for one month. She had a history of contact with goats one month before admission. Her clinical examination showed marked tenderness and limited movement of her left hip. Further imaging showed effusion of her left hip joint. Inflammatory markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and c-reactive protein (CRP) were raised. Our clinical diagnosis was septic arthritis of the left hip. A left hip arthroscopy was performed and the culture was positive for Brucella melitensis. She returned to normal activity after completing a standard antibiotic regimen, including gentamicin at 120mg daily for 2 weeks, doxycycline at 100mg daily and rifampicin at 450mg for a total of 12 weeks. Conclusions Brucellosis is endemic in some rural areas of China, but rare in urban areas such as Shenzhen in southern China. However, more cases will be expected in urban areas due to increasing migration within China. Physicians should consider brucellosis as one of the differential diagnosis of arthritis. Early surgical intervention is recommended to prevent further joint destruction. PMID:25394500

2014-01-01

361

Investigating the Value of Abatacept in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Studies  

PubMed Central

Background. Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive inflammatory disease that affects greatly patients' quality of life and demands for aggressive management early on during the course of the disease. The discovery of biologics has equipped rheumatologists with evolutionary treatment tools but has also impacted greatly management costs. Objectives. To conduct a systematic review in order to evaluate the cost effectiveness of abatacept in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. Pubmed, the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Outcomes Research Digest, the National Health System Economic Evaluation Database, and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were searched. Results. In total 301 studies were identified and 42?met the inclusion criteria. Half of the selected studies evaluated abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, after failure of or intolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. Of those, 82% were in favor of abatacept as a cost-effective or dominant strategy versus varying alternatives, whereas 18% favored other treatments. Conclusion. The majority of evidence from the published literature supports that abatacept can be a cost-effective alternative in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, especially in patients that have demonstrated inadequate response or intolerance to anti-TNF agents or conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. PMID:23819062

Petrakis, Ioannis; Kyriopoulos, John

2013-01-01

362

Universiteit Leiden Computer Science  

E-print Network

. -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION anoramic Image Stitching commonly refers to com- bining a set of pictures can be applied in various areas, includ- ing medical image analysis, video stabilization [2], video of a common com- pact camera is only 50*35. Therefore, we need connect a number of images that indicate

Emmerich, Michael

363

Universiteit Leiden Opleiding Informatica  

E-print Network

recommendation is used all over the world. Websites like Netflix and IMDb use this to recommend movies 14 3 #12;1 Introduction Video recommendation is used a lot nowadays. Websites like Netflix and You This document is based on the Netflix method for video recommendation as found in [7], [11] and [16]. From 2006

Emmerich, Michael

364

Richard Gill Universiteit Leiden  

E-print Network

!] #12;This talk: Inleiding Altman (1981): 50% of published medical statistics is wrong Today: about 15 voor futiliteit http://www.math.leidenuniv.nl/~gill/CCMO.pdf #12;Errors of 1st and 2nd kind (1- or 2% 80% of doctors ignore evidence based medicine 90% of all statistics are just made up · Theory

Gill, Richard D.

365

Did Philippe Pinel frame the concept of the disease rheumatoid arthritis in the year 1800?  

PubMed

The dissertation from 1800 by Landré-Beauvais (LB) is quoted as an early description of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with the implication that the disease was new at that time. However, physicians of the past may not have been able to perceive an already existing disease due to a lacking concept of it. The dissertation has been studied in the context of contemporary medical literature, modern historical and biographical texts. LB's dissertation seems to have been influenced by LB's mentor Philippe Pinel. The present study does not permit to conclude whether RA was a new disease. PMID:19922026

Hansen, S E

2009-01-01

366

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 60, No. 8, August 2009, pp 22422247  

E-print Network

years). The rate of joint destruction between genotype groups was compared using a linear mixed model01-AR-44422). Dr. Toes' work was supported by the Dutch Arthritis Foundation, the European Commission of Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Michael P. M. van der Linden,1 Anouk L. Feitsma,1 Saskia le

Raychaudhuri, Soumya

367

The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a

Naomi Schlesinger; Ralf G Thiele

2010-01-01

368

MIF: a new cytokine link between rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is well established as a key cytokine in immuno-inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Inflammation is now also recognized as having a crucial role in atherosclerosis, and recent evidence indicates that MIF could also be important in this disease. Here, we review the role of MIF in rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis, discuss the ways in

Michelle Leech; Jürgen Bernhagen; Eric F. Morand

2006-01-01

369

Cells of the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis. B cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is significant evidence arising from experimental models that autoantibodies play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to autoantibody production, B cells efficiently present antigen to T cells, produce soluble factors, including cytokines and chemokines, and form B cell aggregates in the target organ of rheumatoid arthritis. In this review we analyze the multifaceted role

Claudia Mauri; Michael R Ehrenstein

2007-01-01

370

Lysosomal ?-glucuronidase regulates Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis severity.  

PubMed

Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most prevalent arthropod-borne illness in the United States and remains a clinical and social challenge. The spectrum of disease severity among infected patients suggests that host genetics contribute to pathogenic outcomes, particularly in patients who develop arthritis. Using a forward genetics approach, we identified the lysosomal enzyme ?-glucuronidase (GUSB), a member of a large family of coregulated lysosomal enzymes, as a key regulator of Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Severely arthritic C3H mice possessed a naturally occurring hypomorphic allele, Gusbh. C57BL/6 mice congenic for the C3H Gusb allele were prone to increased Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Radiation chimera experiments revealed that resident joint cells drive arthritis susceptibility. C3H mice expressing WT Gusb as a transgene were protected from severe Lyme arthritis. Importantly, the Gusbh allele also exacerbated disease in a serum transfer model of rheumatoid arthritis. A known GUSB function is the prevention of lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Development of Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis in Gusbh-expressing mice was associated with heightened accumulation of GAGs in joint tissue. We propose that GUSB modulates arthritis pathogenesis by preventing accumulation of proinflammatory GAGs within inflamed joint tissue, a trait that may be shared by other lysosomal exoglycosidases. PMID:24334460

Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H; Chen, Xinjian; Zachary, James F; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

2014-01-01

371

Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

372

Alpha-interferon-induced arthritis: clinical presentation, treatment, and prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:The therapeutic applications of alpha-interferon (IFN) have expandedgreatly to include chronic viral hepatitis and malignant disorders. Autoimmune phenomena occur frequently with IFN therapy, but arthritis is uncommon. We describe the clinical features and treatment of IFN-induced arthritis.

Gideon Nesher; Rosa Ruchlemer

1998-01-01

373

Optimizing Long-Term Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis  

E-print Network

Optimizing Long-Term Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Systematic Documentation K. M. Simonic- toid arthritis. They not only experience pain, but during the course of the disease their mobility for treatment optimization and as a measure for the quality of patient outcome. Graphical data acquisition

Hammerton, James

374

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 56, No. 11, November 2007, pp 37263737  

E-print Network

prescribed for the treatment of many noninfectious inflammatory conditions, including arthritis, pulmonaryARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 56, No. 11, November 2007, pp 3726­3737 DOI 10.1002/art.22976 © 2007 of fragility-related fractures. The purpose of this study was to assess whether concurrent treatment with GCs

Ritchie, Robert

375

Auranofin. New oral gold compound for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated with SK & F D-39162 (auranofin), a new oral gold compound which was effective in suppressing adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Clinical and humoral parameters were studied during a 3-month period of drug administration followed by a 3-month period under placebo. The drug was absorbed, well tolerated, and its action was manifested by a

A E Finkelstein; D T Walz; V Batista; M Mizraji; F Roisman; A Misher

1976-01-01

376

A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment tested a cognitive-behavioral rheumatoid arthritis treatment designed to confer skills in managing stress, pain, and other symptoms of the disease. We hypothesized that a mediator of the magnitude of treatment effects might be enhancement of perceived self-efficacy to manage the disease. It was predicted that the treatment would reduce arthritis symptoms and possibly would improve both immunologic competence

Ann O’Leary; Stanford Shoor; Kate Lorig; Halsted R. Holman

1988-01-01

377

A genetic variant in osteoprotegerin is associated with progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is partly heritably; 45 to 58% of the variance in joint destruction is estimated to be explained by genetic factors. The binding of RANKL (Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor ? B Ligand) to RANK results in the activation of TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor associated factor-6), and osteoclast formation ultimately leading to enhanced bone resorption. This bone resorption is inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG) which prevents RANKL-RANK interactions. The OPG/RANK/RANKL/TRAF6 pathway plays an important role in bone remodeling. Therefore, we investigated whether genetic variants in OPG, RANK, RANKL and TRAF6 are associated with the rate of joint destruction in RA. Methods 1,418 patients with 4,885 X-rays of hands and feet derived from four independent data-sets were studied. In each data-set the relative increase of the progression rate per year in the presence of a genotype was assessed. First, explorative analyses were performed on 600 RA-patients from Leiden. 109 SNPs, tagging OPG, RANK, RANKL and TRAF6, were tested. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated in phase-1 were genotyped in data-sets from Groningen (Netherlands), Sheffield (United Kingdom) and Lund (Switzerland). Data were summarized in an inverse weighted variance meta-analysis. Bonferonni correction for multiple testing was applied. Results We found that 33 SNPs were significantly associated with the rate of joint destruction in phase-1. In phase-2, six SNPs in OPG and four SNPs in RANK were associated with progression of joint destruction with P-value <0.05. In the meta-analyses of all four data-sets, RA-patients with the minor allele of OPG-rs1485305 expressed higher rates of joint destruction compared to patients without these risk variants (P?=?2.35x10?4). This variant was also significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions These results indicate that a genetic variant in OPG is associated with a more severe rate of joint destruction in RA. PMID:24886600

2014-01-01

378

Jointly managing arthritis: Information needs of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article is to explore information needs of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their parents in order to develop a web-based psychoeducational program aimed at improving their quality of life. A qualitative study design was used. A purposive sample of children (n = 41; 8–11 years) with JIA and parents (n = 48) participated in

Jennifer N Stinson; Brian M Feldman; Ciaran M Duffy; Adam M Huber; Lori B Tucker; Patrick J McGrath; Shirley ML Tse; Ross Hetherington; Lynn R Spiegel; Sarah Campillo; Susanne Benseler; Navreet Gill; Meghan E White; Natalie Baker; Abi Vijenthira

2012-01-01

379

Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort  

PubMed Central

Objective A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA. Methods 56 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to 41 genes previously reported as RA susceptibility loci were selected for investigation. PsA was defined as an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis and subjects were recruited from the UK and Ireland. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassArray platform and frequencies compared with data derived from large UK control collections. Results Significant evidence for association with susceptibility to PsA was found toa SNP mapping to the REL (rs13017599, ptrend=5.2×104) gene, while nominal evidence for association (ptrend<0.05) was found to seven other loci including PLCL2 (rs4535211, p=1.7×10?3); STAT4 (rs10181656, p=3.0×10?3) and the AFF3, CD28, CCL21, IL2 and KIF5A loci. Interestingly, three SNPs demonstrated opposite effects to those reported for RA. Conclusions The REL gene, a key modulator of the NF?B pathway, is associated with PsA but the allele conferring risk to RA is protective in PsA suggesting that there are fundamental differences in the aetiological mechanisms underlying these two types of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22328738

Bowes, John; Ho, Pauline; Flynn, Edw; Ali, Faisal; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Coates, Laura C; Warren, Rich B; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Anthony W; Kane, David; Korendowych, Eleanor; McHugh, Neil; FitzGerald, Oliver; Packham, Jonathon; Morgan, Ann W; Bruce, Ian N; Barton, Anne

2012-01-01

380

Current concepts in psoriatic arthritis: pathogenesis and management.  

PubMed

Psoriatic arthritis occurs in a subset of psoriasis patients and is therefore commonly encountered in dermatology practice. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, psoriatic arthritis is thought to share common mechanisms with psoriatic skin symptoms. Innate and adaptive immune responses are abnormally activated in psoriasis and may acquire the ability to attack peripheral joints and other sites following an environmental trigger (e.g. mechanical stress, trauma, infection) in genetically susceptible patients. The increased cardiovascular risk inherent in psoriasis appears further enhanced in psoriatic arthritis, likely reflecting the overall burden of systemic inflammation contributing to atherogenic processes. Basic research and clinical trials have suggested that tumour necrosis factor is important in psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology, and accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and interleukin-17A may also be important. Basic research and clinical trials inform our understanding of psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology and, in turn, help dermatologists to make better treatment decisions. PMID:24573106

de Vlam, Kurt; Gottlieb, Alice B; Mease, Philip J

2014-10-23

381

Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. PMID:25156704

Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

2014-09-01

382

Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation --- United States, 2007-2009.  

PubMed

Arthritis is a large and growing public health problem in the United States, resulting in costs of $128 billion annually, and continues to be the most common cause of disability. With the aging of the U.S. population, even assuming that the prevalence of obesity and other risk factors remain unchanged, the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL) is expected to increase significantly by 2030. To update previous U.S. estimates of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and AAAL, CDC analyzed National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 2007--2009. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that 22.2% (49.9 million) of adults aged ?18 years had self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and 9.4% (21.1 million or 42.4% of those with arthritis) had AAAL. Among persons who are obese, an age-adjusted 33.8% of women and 25.2% of men reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. Arthritis and AAAL represent a major public health problem in the United States that can be addressed, at least in part, by implementing proven obesity prevention strategies and increasing availability of effective physical activity programs and self-management education courses in local communities. PMID:20930703

2010-10-01

383

Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation--United States, 2010-2012.  

PubMed

Arthritis is the most common cause of disability among U.S. adults and is particularly common among persons with multiple chronic conditions. In 2003, arthritis in the United States resulted in an estimated $128 billion in medical-care costs and lost earnings. To update previous U.S. estimates of the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL), CDC analyzed 2010-2012 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that 52.5 million (22.7%) of adults aged ?18 years had self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and 22.7 million (9.8%, or 43.2% of those with arthritis) reported AAAL, matching and exceeding previous projected increases, respectively. Among persons with heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, the prevalences of doctor-diagnosed arthritis were 49.0%, 47.3%, and 31.2%, respectively; the prevalences of AAAL among persons with these specific conditions were 26.8%, 25.7%, and 15.2%, respectively. Greater use of evidence-based interventions, such as chronic disease self-management education and physical activity interventions that have been proven to reduce pain and improve quality-of-life among adults with chronic diseases might help reduce the personal and societal burden of arthritis. PMID:24196662

2013-11-01

384

Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

2005-01-01

385

Genetics of Rheumatoid Arthritis -- A Comprehensive Review  

PubMed Central

The “Bermuda triangle” of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11–37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci — Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively — have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

Kurko, Julia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

2013-01-01

386

Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

2013-10-01

387

Association between low density lipoprotein and rheumatoid arthritis genetic factors with low density lipoprotein levels in rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis controls  

E-print Network

Objectives: While genetic determinants of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are well characterised in the general population, they are understudied in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to determine ...

Liao, K. P.

388

[Budd-Chiari syndrome induced by hormonal oral contraception in the patient with congenital thrombophilia-factor V Leiden mutation--a case report].  

PubMed

The Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare pathology resulting from various etiological factors which often contribute to its late diagnosis. Liver cirrhosis, malignant tumors and haematological disorders resulting in hypercoagulability, are the most common reasons of Budd-Chiari syndrome. The syndrome is characterized by portal hypertension and splanchnic congestion due to obstruction of hepatic venous outflow. The first symptoms include pain, ascites and hepatosplenomegaly. The diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome can be achieved by Doppler ultrasonography, Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography. In the following article, a case report of a patient with diagnosed Budd-Chiari syndrome as a result of congenital thrombophilia-factor V Leiden gene mutation is presented. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic process, as well as treatment options, were shown in the article. PMID:19058526

Samborek, Ma?gorzata; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Stojko, Rafa?; Wilk, Krzysztof; Witek, Andrzej

2008-10-01

389

Unilateral Renal Vein Thrombosis and Adrenal Hemorrhage in A Newborn with Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Heterozygous Of MTHFR-677T, MTHFR-1298C Gene Mutations.  

PubMed

Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) occurs as an acute and life-threatening event in neonates. RVT is the most common non-catheter-related thrombosis in infancy and occurs primarily in the newborn period. Non-catheter-related abdominal thrombosis on neonates has a higher incidence of genetic prothrombotic risk factors. RVT and adrenal hemorrhage can both be encountered in the neonatal period and they may occur at the same time (Bokenkamp et al., Eur J Pediatr 159:44-8, 2000; Lau et al. Pediatrics 120:1278-84, 2007). We report a case of unilateral RVT and adrenal hemorrhage in a newborn with homozygous factor V Leiden mutation and heterozygous of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations. PMID:25332602

Sandal, Gonca; Ar?kan, Elvan; Kuybulu, Ayça Esra; Ormec?, Ahmet Rifat

2014-09-01

390

[Arg506 --> Gln mutation of coagulation factor V (factor V Leiden) and transient cerebral ischemia at a young age in 3 members of the same family].  

PubMed

The Arg506 --> Gln coagulation factor V mutation (factor V Leiden) is the most frequent inherited abnormality of blood coagulation which predisposes to venous thromboembolism. Its association with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis is uncertain. We describe 3 members of the same family (a woman and her 2 children) who were heterozygous for the Arg506 --> Gln mutation and who presented cerebral transient ischemic attacks (TIA) at a young age. The patients (with the exception of one smoker) had no risk factors for TIA and no abnormality of the coagulation system other than the Arg506 --> Gln mutation. The observation of the mutation and TIA in 3 members of the same family may suggest the hypothesis of an association between the mutation and arterial thrombosis. This hypothesis must be interpreted with caution, due to the absence of objective instrumental findings in patients with TIA and to the high prevalence of the Arg506 --> Gln mutation in the general population. PMID:8645525

Moia, M; La Spina, I; Padalino, R; Carpenedo, M

1996-01-01

391

Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.  

PubMed

The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3). PMID:17982455

Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

2007-12-01

392

Septic arthritis due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans.  

PubMed

Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

2011-12-01

393

Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans?  

PubMed Central

Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

Magro-Checa, Cesar; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Pena-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, Jose Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

2011-01-01

394

Laser treatment of experimentally induced chronic arthritis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we investigated the effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on the inflammatory process induced in the articular cartilage of the right knee of guinea pigs. Through electron microscopy analysis it was possible to identify the induced arthritis in the articular cartilage and its modification after the laser treatment. The laser radiation promoted a reduction in the proliferation of the inflammatory cells in the damaged tissue and also induced the formation of cartilage bridges that tied the destroyed parts favoring the formation of a repaired tissue in the injured cartilage.

Guerino, M. R.; Baranauskas, V.; Guerino, A. C.; Parizotto, N.

2000-02-01

395

Low free testosterone levels in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

The androgen status of 25 male patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed and compared with that of age matched controls with osteoarthritis (OA). Significantly reduced levels of serum free testosterone were found in the RA group. Within that group free testosterone was unrelated to all indices of disease activity measured, though it was strongly related to latex positivity. These results support the hypothesis that male sex hormones may have a protective role in RA, though prospective studies would be necessary to determine whether the relation was one of cause or effect. PMID:3345107

Spector, T D; Perry, L A; Tubb, G; Silman, A J; Huskisson, E C

1988-01-01

396

Growth abnormalities in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

In patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) growth impairment and variance in body composition are well-known long-term complications. In the active phases of the disease, particular patients with systemic and polyarticular JIA reveal growth impairment. Some experience "catch-up" growth following reduction in disease activity and lower glucocorticoid doses. Although new therapeutic options are available, there are still 10-20 % of patients with severe forms of the disease who show continuous growth disturbance. Only few studies have specifically addressed body composition in JIA. Bone mass deficits in part could be related to the deficits of muscle mass. Study data on growth hormone treatment in short children with JIA are promising in respect of growth development, final height and body composition. The major goal for physicians is optimal disease control while maintaining normal growth and body composition. Early recognition of patients who develop prolonged growth and body composition disturbances is important as these abnormalities contribute to long-term morbidity and need to be addressed both diagnostically and therapeutically. PMID:24760485

Bechtold, Susanne; Simon, Dominique

2014-11-01

397

Application of hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging to tissue autofluorescence: arthritis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tissue contains many natural fluorophores and therefore by exploiting autofluorescence, we can obtain information from tissue with less interference than conventional histological techniques. However, conventional intensity imaging is prone to artifacts since it is an absolute measurement. Fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements are relative measurements and therefore allow for better measurements. We have applied FLIM and hyperspectral FLIM to the study of articular cartilage and its disease arthritis. We have analyzed normal human articular cartilage and cartilage which was in the early stages of disease. In this case, it was found that FLIM was able to detect changes in the diseased tissue that were not detectable with the conventional diagnosis. Specifically, the fluorescence lifetimes (FL) of the cells were different between the two samples. We have also applied hyperspectral FLIM to degraded cartilage through treatment with interleukin-1. In this case, it was found that there was a shift in the emission spectrum with treatment and that the lifetime had also increased. We also showed that there was greater contrast between the cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) at longer wavelengths.

Talbot, C. B.; Benninger, R. K. P.; de Beule, P.; Requejo-Isidro, J.; Elson, D. S.; Dunsby, C.; Munro, I.; Neil, M. A.; Sandison, A.; Sofat, N.; Nagase, H.; French, P. M. W.; Lever, M. J.

2005-08-01

398

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Other than Factor V Leiden Are Associated with Coagulopathy and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Chinese Patients  

PubMed Central

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of factor V Leiden have been associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in Caucasians but remains controversial in Asians. We used an SNP microarray to screen 55 loci of factor V gene in patients with ONFH of Chinese. Significantly different candidate SNPs at 14 loci were analyzed in 146 patients and 116 healthy controls using MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and gene sequencing. The factor V Leiden (rs6025) was not found in all participants. Six SNP loci (rs9332595, rs6020, rs9332647, rs3766110, rs10919186, and rs12040141) were confirmed with significant differences in patients but not in controls. The rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism was found in 88.9% of the patients. In addition, a high percentage (87.6%) of the patients had an abnormal coagulation profile that included hyperfibrinogen, elevated fibrinogen degradation products, elevated D-dimer, abnormal protein S, abnormal protein C, or a decrease in anti-thrombin III. Patients with the rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism (mutation) had a higher risk (odds ratio: 4.62; 95% confidence interval: 1.44–14.8) of having coagulation abnormalities than did those without the mutation (wild-type) (?2 p ?=? 0.006). Our findings suggested that the rs6020 polymorphism might be the genetic trait that accounts for the higher prevalence of ONFH in the Chinese population than in Westerners. Exposure to risk factors such as alcohol and steroids in patients with the rs6020 polymorphism causes coagulation abnormalities and, subsequently, thromboembolisms in the femoral head. PMID:25119470

Peng, Kou-Ti; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Tsan-Wen; Lee, Yun-Shien; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Hsu, Robert W. W.; Ueng, Steve W. N.; Lee, Mel S.

2014-01-01

399

Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-?-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

2012-01-01

400

Autoimmunity to collagen in adjuvant arthritis of rats.  

PubMed Central

Arthritis can be induced in rats by intradermal injection of oil containing bacterial derivatives (adjuvant-induced arthritis) or cartilage collagen (type II collagen-induced arthritis). It was of interest, therefore, to determine whether collagen functions as an autoantigen in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Blood mononuclear cells from the majority of rats with adjuvant arthritis exhibited enhanced thymidine incorporation to homologous types I and II collagens, as well as to purified protein derivative of tuberculin. In contrast, cells from rats remaining nonarthritic after injection of adjuvant did not respond to collagen, although they did react to tuberculin. Similar results were obtained with a radiometric ear assay used to quantify intradermal delayed-type hypersensitivity in vivo. Using passive hemagglutination, autoantibodies to these collagens and their denatured alpha-chains were frequently detected in the sera of rats late in the course of adjuvant arthritis. Rats with inflammation of a hindlimb induced by turpentine did not acquire sensitivity to collagen. These data indicate that autoimmunity to collagen is a common feature of adjuvant- and collagen-induced arthritis, both of which are considered to be mediated by immunologic mechanisms. PMID:7430345

Trentham, D E; McCune, W J; Susman, P; David, J R

1980-01-01

401

Biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis: recent progress.  

PubMed

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. About a quarter of patients with psoriasis of the skin will develop PsA, although it is currently challenging-if not impossible-to determine a priori which individuals will progress. Identification of biomarkers for screening, disease activity, joint damage, treatment response and comorbidities are therefore perceived as important clinical needs in the field. Over the last few years, several lines of investigation have advanced our knowledge of new markers for PsA and its outcomes, including genomic, proteomic, cellular and tissue studies. Imaging studies utilizing ultrasonography have been applied to better understand the natural history of the disease. Novel biomarkers, such as soluble proteins and microbiomics, are also being described. Although no biomarker has yet been validated for use in clinical practice, discovery studies are in progress and validation cohorts are being designed. In this report, we review the latest progress in biomarker research in PsA and its potential implications in pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25218735

Chandran, Vinod; Scher, Jose U

2014-11-01

402

Prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan: a review.  

PubMed

Recent studies of rheumatoid arthritis worldwide suggest that prevalence of arthritis is higher in Europe and North America than in developing countries. Prevalence data for major arthritis disorders have been compiled in West for several decades, but figures from the third world are just emerging. A coordinated effort by WHO and ILAR (International League Against Rheumatism) has resulted in collecting data for countries like Philippines, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, and rural South Africa but the information about prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan is scarce. Since both countries, i.e., India and Pakistan, share some ethnic identity, we reviewed published literature to examine the prevalence of arthritis in these countries. Medline and Pubmed were searched for suitable articles about arthritis from 1980 and onwards. Findings from these articles were reviewed and summarized. The prevalence, clinical features, and laboratory findings of rheumatoid arthritis are compiled for both India and Pakistan. Data collected from these two countries were compared with each other, and some of the characteristics of the disease were compared with Europe and North America. It is found to be quite similar to developed countries. Additionally, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is of different variety than reported in West. It is more of polyarticular onset type while in West pauciarticular predominates. Additionally, in systemic onset, JRA uveitis and ANA are common finding in developed countries; on the other hand, they are hardly seen in this region. Although the prevalence of arthritis in Pakistan and India is similar to Western countries, there are inherent differences (clinical features, laboratory findings) in the presentation of disease. The major strength of the study is that it is the first to pool reports to provide an estimate of the disease in the Indian subcontinent. Scarcity of data is one of the major limitations. This study helps to understand the pattern of disease in this part of country that can be stepping-stone for policy makers to draft policies that can affect target population more appropriately. PMID:21331574

Akhter, Ehtisham; Bilal, Saira; Kiani, Adnan; Haque, Uzma

2011-07-01

403

Arthritis among veterans - United States, 2011-2013.  

PubMed

Arthritis is among the most common chronic conditions among veterans and is more prevalent among veterans than nonveterans. Contemporary population-based estimates of arthritis prevalence among veterans are needed because previous population-based studies predate the Persian Gulf War, were small, or studied men only despite the fact that women comprise an increasing proportion of military personnel and typically have a higher prevalence of arthritis than men. To address this knowledge gap, CDC analyzed combined 2011, 2012, and 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data among all adults aged ?18 years, by veteran status, to estimate the total and sex-specific prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis overall and by sociodemographic categories, and the state-specific prevalence (overall and sex-specific) of doctor-diagnosed arthritis. This report summarizes the results of these analyses, which found that one in four veterans reported that they had arthritis (25.6%) and that prevalence was higher among veterans than nonveterans across most sociodemographic categories, including sex (prevalence among male and female veterans was 25.0% and 31.3%, respectively). State-specific, age-standardized arthritis prevalence among veterans ranged from 18.8% in Hawaii to 32.7% in West Virginia. Veterans comprise a large and important target group for reducing the growing burden of arthritis. Those interested in veterans' health can help to improve the quality of life of veterans by ensuring that they have access to affordable, evidence-based, physical activity and self-management education classes that reduce the adverse effects of arthritis (e.g., pain and depression) and its common comorbidities (e.g., heart disease and diabetes). PMID:25375071

Murphy, Louise B; Helmick, Charles G; Allen, Kelli D; Theis, Kristina A; Baker, Nancy A; Murray, Glen R; Qin, Jin; Hootman, Jennifer M; Brady, Teresa J; Barbour, Kamil E

2014-11-01

404

Psychological Interventions and Lifestyle Modifications for Arthritis Pain Management  

PubMed Central

This article provides an overview of self-management interventions used to manage pain in patients with arthritis. The article is divided in two major sections. In the first section, we review psychological interventions used to manage arthritis pain including pain coping skills training/cognitive behavioral therapy for pain management, emotional disclosure interventions, and partner-assisted interventions. In the second section, we address lifestyle behavioral weight loss interventions used to reduce arthritis pain. In each section we briefly describe the rationale and nature of the interventions, present data on their efficacy, and highlight potential future research directions. PMID:18638681

Keefe, Francis J.; Somers, Tamara J.; Martire, Lynn M.

2008-01-01

405

A 17 year old with isolated proximal tibiofibular joint arthritis  

PubMed Central

The proximal tibiofibular joint (TFJ) is rarely affected in rheumatic diseases, and we frequently interpret pain of the lateral knee as the result of overuse or trauma. Nonetheless, the TFJ is a synovial joint that communicates with the tibiofemoral joint in a proportion of patients. While proximal TFJ arthritis has been rarely associated with existing spondyloarthritis, isolated TFJ arthritis as the presenting manifestation of spondyloarthritis has not yet been described. Here, we report the clinical and radiographic presentation of an adolescent with chronic proximal TFJ arthritis heralding spondyloarthritis highly suggestive of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:23302539

2013-01-01

406

Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotheraphy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks).

Lecomte, R.; Paradis, P.; Monaro, S.; Barrette, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Menard, H.-A.

1981-03-01

407

Hip septic arthritis and other pediatric musculoskeletal infections in the era of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Pediatric musculoskeletal infections can cause devastating complications (including death) in this era of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other virulent bacterial strains. The complexity and severity of these infections require timely diagnosis and treatment. A thorough emergency department evaluation, diagnostic workup, and early surgical intervention can influence outcomes. Septic arthritis of the hip is best treated with open drainage and antibiotic therapy to avoid osteonecrosis of the hip and joint damage. Because of genetic changes and inducible resistance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causes more complex infections than in the past. Deep, soft-tissue abscesses; pyomyositis; osteomyelitis; and septic arthritis often occur concurrently, causing destruction of musculoskeletal tissue. Severe and life-threatening complications, such as septic emboli, deep venous thrombosis, and multiorgan system failure may result from these infections. PMID:23395045

Morrison, Martin J; Herman, Martin J

2013-01-01

408

Readiness to manage arthritis: a pilot study using a stages-of-change measure for arthritis rehabilitation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the Readiness to Manage Arthritis Questionnaire (RMAQ), a new multibehavior measure of readiness for change in arthritis management. Data were obtained from 46 patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis admitted for intensive treatment. Test-retest reliability, correlations with clinical variables and theoretically related constructs, and responsiveness to change were assessed. Test-retest reliability indicated reasonable stability, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.30 to 0.75. A significant association was observed between psychological well-being and readiness status. Clinical variables of disease duration, disease severity, pain, and function were not related to readiness status. Correlations between stages-of-change scores and self-efficacy for managing arthritis symptoms were mostly nonsignificant, with the exception of modest agreement between readiness to engage in physical activity and exercise self-efficacy (0.43). Significant changes were observed in mean RMAQ scores from initial assessment to 12 weeks posttreatment for the behaviors of using joint protection, dealing with frustration, learning about arthritis, engaging in physical activity, and stress management. Findings from this pilot study suggest that the RMAQ has adequate psychometric properties in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and can be used to assess an individual's readiness to adopt important arthritis self-management behaviors. PMID:19271660

Arthur, A Barbara; Kopec, Jacek A; Klinkhoff, Alice V; Adam, Paul M; Carr, Susan L; Prince, Jane M; Dumont, Kelly E; Nigg, Claudio R

2009-01-01

409

Heat shock protein 60 and adjuvant arthritis: a model for T cell regulation in human arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heat shock proteins (hsp) are highly conserved, immune-dominant microbial proteins, whose expression is increased at sites of inflammation. In the experimental model of adjuvant arthritis (AA) immune responses to hsp determine the outcome of disease. AA can be transferred with a single T cell clone specific for a sequence of mycobacterial hsp65 (Mhsp65). Immunization with whole Mhsp65 on the other

Berent J. Prakken; Sarah Roord; Arash Ronaghy; Marca Wauben; Salvatore Albani; Willem van Eden

2003-01-01

410

Inflammatory lesions in the bone marrow of rheumatoid arthritis patients: a morphological perspective  

PubMed Central

The synovial tissue stands at the epicenter of joint pathology in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As a primary target of the disease, studies on the synovium have provided invaluable insights into the mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis. Recent work has, however, revealed the importance of a previously unseen anatomic compartment in direct contact with the joint space, namely the subchondral bone marrow. Bone marrow edema (BME) visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is clinically meaningful in both early and late RA as it associates with future development of bone erosions and poor functional outcomes. Although the histopathologic correlates of MRI-based BME in early RA remain obscure, studies in advanced disease are consistent in describing lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrates within the subchondral marrow cavity of affected joints. In this review, we discuss the nature of bone marrow lesions in patients with RA, analyze their relationship with synovitis, and explore their potential contribution to the pathological processes of the disease. PMID:23270711

2012-01-01

411

The role of Chlamydia and Chlamydophila infections in reactive arthritis.  

PubMed

Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila pneumoniae are human pathogens; the former being the etiologic agent for trachoma as well as a prevalent sexually transmitted bacterium, while C. pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Patients with reactive arthritis show evidence of present or past Chlamydial infection. Chlamydia spp., has been strongly implicated as a triggering factor for reactive arthritis. We describe the simultaneous occurrence of C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis infections in a subject with reactive arthritis. We suggest treatment for a patient with Chlamydia-associated arthritis to define a means by which persistent organisms can be induced to return to the active developmental cycle, thereby making them more accessible to antibiotic activity. PMID:22214635

Rizzo, Antonietta; Domenico, Marina Di; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Paolillo, Rossella

2012-01-01

412

Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis: systemic, periarticular, and focal.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that results in generalized bone loss and increased fracture risk. Characteristic radiologic features of rheumatoid arthritis include periarticular osteopenia and marginal erosions. An emerging literature highlights the importance of osteoclasts as mediators of the erosive process, with an impairment of bone formation by inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway as a cause of lack of repair of erosions. MRI has demonstrated the importance of inflammation in the bone marrow compartment as a cause of periarticular osteopenia. The term osteoimmunology has evolved to highlight the association between cells and cytokines of the immune system and their relationship to bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of chronic inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22527950

Deal, Chad

2012-06-01

413

Adalimumab reduces hand bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis independent of clinical response: Subanalysis of the PREMIER study  

E-print Network

in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-Tumorprevious methotrexate treatment. Arthritis Rheum 2006, 54:treatment with adalimumab (a human anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

Hoff, Mari; Kvien, Tore K; Kälvesten, Johan; Elden, Aake; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Haugeberg, Glenn

2011-01-01

414

Moving towards personalized medicine in rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

To develop personalized medicine strategies for improvement of patient management in rheumatoid arthritis, the clinical and molecular properties of the individual patients need to be well characterized. A crucial step in this approach is to discover subgroups of patients that are characterized by a good or poor treatment outcome. Dennis and colleagues have identified distinct pretreatment gene expression profiles in affected synovial tissue specimens and a tissue type-related systemic protein pattern which are associated with a positive or negative clinical outcome to monotherapy with adalumimab (anti-TNF?) and tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor). These observations assign biological pathways associated with response outcome and provide evidence for the existence of systemic, easy-to-measure predictive biomarkers for clinical benefit of these biologics. PMID:25166016

2014-01-01

415

Galectins in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex and common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia. Multiple proteins, cells, and pathways have been identified to contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. Galectins are a group of lectins that bind to ?-galactoside carbohydrates on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. They are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and organs with the highest expression in the immune system. Galectins are potent immune regulators and modulate a range of pathological processes, such as inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Accumulated evidence shows that several family members of galectins play positive or negative roles in the disease development of RA, through their effects on T and B lymphocytes, myeloid lineage cells, and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In this review, we will summarize the function of different galectins in immune modulation and their distinct roles in RA pathogenesis. PMID:24416634

Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Koehn, Christopher D; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

2013-01-01

416

Methotrexate chronotherapy is effective against rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Methotrexate (MTX) is the most important drug for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been stated that cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, and that cytokine levels increase and show 24-h rhythms in RA patients. Previously, we found that arthritis was relieved after the administration of MTX at specific times in synchronization with the 24-h rhythm of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animals. Based on our findings in an earlier study of the dosing time-dependent effects of MTX in MRL/lpr mice, which develop autoimmune disorders that share similarities with human RA, we examined here the utility of MTX chronotherapy in Japanese RA patients. In an initial animal modeling study, we collected blood from MRL/lpr mice at different times (2, 6, 10, 14, 18, or 22 hours after the light was turned on [HALO]), and we measured TNF-? mRNA expression in leukocytes. MTX was administered to the mice at two different dosing times (6 or 18 HALO), and various blood parameters were measured to estimate arthritis activity. TNF-? mRNA levels showed a clear 24-h rhythm with a peak at 22 HALO and a trough at 18 HALO after RA had developed. In these MRL/lpr mice, inflammation and TNF-? were markedly reduced when the MTX dosing time was matched to the time (18 HALO) when the TNF-? level began to increase. We then applied these findings to Japanese RA patients by switching them from the standard MTX three times/wk (day 1: after breakfast and supper; day 2: after breakfast schedule), to chronotherapy, in which the dose and number of doses/wk were not changed but MTX was administered once-a-day at bedtime. Disease Activity Score (DAS)28, modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ), and adverse effects were assessed. With MTX chronotherapy, DAS28, which is commonly used to quantitatively assess RA symptoms, was significantly improved at all follow-up clinical visit times compared with the baseline (vs. 1 mo: p?=?.0197, 2 mos: p?=?.0107, 3 mos: p?=?.0087). Significant symptom recovery was observed in 41.2% of patients, and 23.5% of patients achieved clinical remission during the 3 mos of follow-up. Functional capacity of RA patients, as indicated by the MHAQ, was markedly improved by chronotherapy. There were no severe adverse effects. Thus, we demonstrated (i) inflammation and plasma TNF-? concentrations were significantly reduced in MRL/lpr mice treated with MTX at 18 HALO, the time when TNF-? mRNA level began to increase; and (ii) MTX bedtime chronotherapy was safe, markedly reduced disease activity, and improved the functional capacity of RA patients. The findings on RA patients show that bedtime MTX chronotherapy can improve RA symptoms compared to the current standard dosing methods. PMID:21452922

To, Hideto; Yoshimatsu, Hiromichi; Tomonari, Mari; Ida, Hiroaki; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Sonemoto, Emi; Shimasaki, Noriko; Koyanagi, Satoru; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ueki, Yukitaka; Eguchi, Katsumi

2011-04-01

417

Adipokines as Potential Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by severe joint injury. Recently, research has been focusing on the possible identification of predictor markers of disease onset and/or progression, of joint damage, and of therapeutic response. Recent findings have uncovered the role of white adipose tissue as a pleiotropic organ not only specialized in endocrine functions but also able to control multiple physiopathological processes, including inflammation. Adipokines are a family of soluble mediators secreted by white adipose tissue endowed with a wide spectrum of actions. This review will focus on the recent advances on the role of the adipokine network in the pathogenesis of RA. A particular attention will be devoted to the action of these proteins on RA effector cells, and on the possibility to use circulating levels of adipokines as potential biomarkers of disease activity and therapeutic response. PMID:24799765

Del Prete, Annalisa; Salvi, Valentina; Sozzani, Silvano

2014-01-01

418

Impact of rheumatoid arthritis on sexual function  

PubMed Central

Sexuality is a complex aspect of the human being’s life and is more than just the sexual act. Normal sexual functioning consists of sexual activity with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problems, and with a feeling of pleasure, fulfillment and satisfaction. Rheumatic diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning are multifactorial and comprise disease-related factors as well as therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by progressive joint destruction resulting from chronic synovial inflammation. It leads to various degrees of disability, and ultimately has a profound impact on the social, economic, psychological, and sexual aspects of the patient’s life. This is a systemic review about the impact of RA on sexual functioning. PMID:24829873

Tristano, Antonio G

2014-01-01

419

[Anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis].  

PubMed

Thanks to the better understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms in action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), new therapeutic weapons have appeared, which have dramatically modified our approach of the disease. These so-called "biological" therapies antagonize the action of the cytokine at the top of the cascade which maintains the synovial inflammation, and leads to the joint destruction, i.e. the Tissue Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF alpha). Several controlled clinical studies have clearly demonstrated their short and middle term efficacy and safety profile, and they will soon become at the Belgian clinicians disposal. They have a rapid and dramatic effect on the signs and symptoms of RA and they slow down the radiologic progression. Some questions remain unresolved concerning their place in the general therapeutic strategy against RA, due to the uncertainties of their use in the long run, and to their cost. PMID:11488086

Schreiber, S; Sternon, J

2001-06-01

420

Hypereosinophilia and seroconversion of rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

At the intersection of atopy and autoimmunity, we present a patient with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed hypereosinophilia, without evidence of other etiologies, as she became rheumatoid factor (RF) positive. Although the magnitude of eosinophilia in patients with RA has been thought to reflect the severity or activity of the RA, in our patient, eosinophilia developed at a time when the patient's synovitis was well controlled. Although eosinophilia may reflect associated drug hypersensitivity, discontinuation of the medications utilized to control our patient's disease, adalimumab and methotrexate, did not promote clinical improvement. Probably the most curious aspect of our patient was the concomitant development of rheumatoid factor seropositivity in the setting of previously seronegative RA. The temporal relationship between the development of peripheral eosinophilia and seroconversion suggests a possible connection between these events. We speculate that the T cell cytokine production that can induce eosinophilia may simultaneously activate RF production. PMID:24609760

Rosenstein, Rachel K; Panush, Richard S; Kramer, Neil; Rosenstein, Elliot D

2014-11-01

421

DNA methylation: roles in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease of unknown cause that primarily affects the joints and ultimately leads to joint destruction. In recent years, the potential role of DNA methylation in the development of RA is raising great expectations among clinicians and researchers. DNA methylation influences diverse aspects of the disease and regulates epigenetic silencing of genes and behavior of several cell types, especially fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), the most resident cells in joints. The activation of FLS is generally regarded as a key process in the development of RA that actively results in the promotion of ongoing inflammation and joint damage. It has also been shown that aberrant DNA methylation occurs in the pathogenesis of RA and contributes to the development of the disease. Recently, there has been an impressive increase in studies involving DNA methylation in RA. In this paper, we consider the role of DNA methylation in the development of RA. PMID:24652004

Yuan, Feng-Lai; Li, Xia; Xu, Rui-Sheng; Jiang, Dong-Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Gang

2014-09-01

422

Comprehensive treatment of dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis.  

PubMed

Dactylitis, a hallmark clinical feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and other spondyloarthropathies, may also be a severity marker for PsA and psoriasis. Traditionally, clinicians have used nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and local corticosteroid injections to treat dactylitis, although conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are also used. We performed a systematic literature review to determine the most efficacious current treatment options for dactylitis in PsA. Effect sizes were greatest for the biologic agents ustekinumab, certolizumab, and infliximab, suggesting that therapy with one of these agents should be initiated in patients with dactylitis. However, the limited data highlight the need for randomized, placebo-controlled trials, with dactylitis as a primary outcome, to determine a valid, reliable, and responsive clinical outcome measure for PsA patients with dactylitis. PMID:25362714

Rose, Shawn; Toloza, Sergio; Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Helliwell, Philip S

2014-11-01

423

[Knee arthroplasty in patients with posttraumatic arthritis].  

PubMed

Arthroplasty in patients with posttraumatic arthritis can be challenging due to joint instability, malalignment, osseous defects, non-union, contracture, scarring, low-grade infections and pathologies of the patellofemoral joint. Detailed preoperative planning is recommended concerning incisions, soft tissue management, osseous reconstruction, hardware removal, potential infections and type of prosthesis (e.g. type of constraint, stems and augments). Severe difficulties can occur with exposure of the knee with respect to the extensor mechanism so that quadriceps snip or osteotomy of the tibial tuberosity may be necessary. Postoperative functional results are inferior to arthroplasty for atraumatic gonarthritis. Patients are at increased risk for intraoperative and postoperative complications (e.g. infections, instability, loosening and patellofemoral problems). Reconstructive alternatives (e.g. osteotomy, ligament reconstruction and cartilage repair) should always be considered especially in younger patients; however, most patients show a significant improvement in function and relief of pain after arthroplasty for posttraumatic gonarthritis. PMID:23604339

Hankemeier, S

2013-05-01

424

Searching for autoimmunity in "antibiotic-refractory" Lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

In two recent articles published in Molecular Immunology, Steere and colleagues continue their search for an autoimmune mechanism of arthritis in patients who have failed short-course antibiotic therapy for Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease. As in previous attempts, the authors fail to elucidate a molecular mimicry mechanism for the putative autoimmune process, leading to the conclusion that there is no credible scientific evidence for a post-infectious autoimmune mechanism of arthritis in chronic Lyme disease. PMID:18395260

Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

2008-06-01

425

Diclofenac and Ibuprofen in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty patients with arthritis (26 rheumatoid and 14 osteoarthrosis) entered a five-week double-blind crossover trial of diclofenac and ibuprofen. Four patients failed to complete the 10-week trial. There was no statistically significant difference in parameters of disease activity for the rheumatoid arthritis patients, but patients with osteoarthrosis fared significantly better on diclofenac. There was a low incidence of side effects

P. M. BROOKS; W. HILL; R. GEDDES

426

Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever  

PubMed Central

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

2014-01-01

427

Acute arthritis in crimean-congo hemorrhagic Fever.  

PubMed

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

2014-04-01

428

HMGB1 is a potent trigger of arthritis.  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and structural damage of joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unknown, the excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by intra-articular macrophages occupies a critical pathogenic role in the development and progression of the disease. High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) is a recently identified mediator of interest in human and experimental arthritides. HMGB1 can either be actively secreted from macrophages or passively released from necrotic cells of all kinds. Activated macrophages and unprogrammed cell death caused by ischaemia or activated complement are all prominent features of chronic arthritis, contributing to the persistent synovial inflammation. HMGB1 is cytoplasmically and extracellularly overexpressed in inflammatory synovial tissue in human RA as well as experimental collagen-induced arthritis. Elevated levels of HMGB1 are also present in synovial fluid samples from RA patients. Synovial tissue from rats with experimental arthritis exhibits aberrant deposition of HMGB1 preceding the onset of clinical signs of arthritis, and the expression becomes prominent after the onset of clinical disease. The synovial levels of HMGB1 are comparable with those of TNF and IL-1beta at the peak of manifest disease. HMGB1-targeted intervention with either neutralizing antibodies or the antagonistic A box domain of HMGB1 ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis both in mice and rats, and inhibits the local overexpression of IL-1beta in the joints. It is thus conceivable that therapeutic HMGB1 blockade may contribute to future treatment of human chronic arthritis. PMID:14871458

Andersson, U; Erlandsson-Harris, H

2004-03-01

429

Peptides targeting inflamed synovial vasculature attenuate autoimmune arthritis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, frequently target one major tissue/organ despite the systemic nature of the immune response. This is particularly perplexing in the case of ubiquitously distributed antigens invoked in arthritis induction. We reasoned that selective targeting of the synovial joints in autoimmune arthritis might be due in part to the unique attributes of the joint vasculature. We examined this proposition using the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human rheumatoid arthritis, and profiled the synovial vasculature using ex vivo and in vivo screening of a defined phage peptide-display library. We identified phage that preferentially homed to the inflamed joints. The corresponding synthetic peptides showed binding to the joint-derived endothelial cells, as well as specificity in inhibiting binding of the respective phage to the synovial vasculature. Intriguingly, the treatment of arthritic rats with one such peptide resulted in efficient inhibition of the progression of arthritis. The suppression of arthritis was attributable in part to the peptide-induced reduction of T-cell trafficking into the joints and the inhibition of angiogenesis. This peptide differed in sequence, in receptor binding specificity, and in angiogenesis/inflammation-related cell signaling from the previously characterized arginine-glycine-aspartic acid–containing peptide. Thus, our study reveals joint-homing peptides that can be further exploited for the selective delivery of antiarthritic agents into the inflamed joints to enhance their efficacy while reducing systemic toxicity, and also for examining intricacies of the pathogenesis of arthritis. This approach can be customized for application to other organ-specific autoimmune diseases as well. PMID:21768392

Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Moudgil, Kamal D.

2011-01-01

430

Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247) in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. METHODS: One

Mikhail M Kostik; Alexandra A Klyushina; Mikhail V Moskalenko; Larisa A Scheplyagina; Valentina I Larionova

2011-01-01

431

The effect of drugs in established rabbit monoarticular arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Established antigen-induced arthritis was produced in 264 out of 339 sensitied Old English rabbits 4–6 weeks after a single intra-articular injection of ovalbumin into one knee joint. Positive arthritis was diagnosed when the joint swelling at this time was ?2 mm. A positive correlation between established joint swelling and delayed hypersensitivity to ovalbumin injected intradermally 24 h prior to joint

Alan Blackham; Henryk Radziwonik

1977-01-01

432

Pantoea agglomerans foreign body-induced septic arthritis.  

PubMed

A 4-year-old boy was admitted because of left knee arthritis. Synovial fluid culture yielded Pantoea agglomerans identified by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction. Ultrasound examination revealed a foreign body in the synovial fluid. The patient underwent arthroscopy with removal of a thorn. This article highlights the need to search for a foreign body in Pantoea septic arthritis. PMID:22926215

Rave, Omer; Assous, Marc Victor; Hashkes, Philip J; Lebel, Ehud; Hadas-Halpern, Irit; Megged, Orli

2012-12-01

433

A Case Control Study on the Contribution of Factor V-Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T Mutations to the Genetic Susceptibility of Deep Venous Thrombosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Insofar as the inherited prothrombotic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) factor V G1691A (FV-Leiden), prothrombin (PRT) G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), C677T are inherited risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of single and combined SNPs in 198 patients with documented deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and 697 control subjects, and to

Wassim Y. Almawi; Hala Tamim; Raghid Kreidy; Georgina Timson; Elias Rahal; Malak Nabulsi; Ramzi R. Finan; Noha Irani-Hakime

2005-01-01

434

Matched Case-Control Study on Factor V Leiden and the Prothrombin G20210A Mutation in Patients With Ischemic Stroke\\/Transient Ischemic Attack Up to the Age of 60 Years  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose—The role of the factor V Leiden mutation (FVL) and the G20210A mutation of the prothrombin (factor II (FII)) gene for arterial thrombosis is not clear. Methods—We investigated the prevalence of these mutations in 468 patients with an acute stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) before the age of 60 years and in a healthy control population individually

Wolfgang Lalouschek; Martin Schillinger; Kety Hsieh; Georg Endler; Susanne Tentschert; Wilfried Lang; Suzanne Cheng; Christine Mannhalter

2010-01-01

435

Autoimmune mechanisms in antibiotic treatment-resistant lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

In about 10% of patients with Lyme arthritis in the United States, joint inflammation persists for months or even several years after the apparent eradication of the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, from the joint with antibiotic treatment. We propose a model of molecular mimicry affecting genetically susceptible individuals to explain this treatment-resistant course. The majority of patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis have HLA-DRB1*0401 or related alleles, and the severity and duration of their arthritis correlate with cellular and humoral immune responses to outer-surface protein A OspA) of the spirochete. Using an algorithm, the immunodominant epitope of OspA presented by the DRB1*0401 molecule was predicted to be located at aa 165-173. In a search of the Genetics Computer Group gene bank, only one human protein was identified, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (hLFA-1), that had sequence homology with OspA(165-173)and predicted binding in the DRB1*0401 molecule. Synovial fluid T cells from most patients with treatment-resistant arthritis responded to both OspA and hLFA-1, whereas those from patients with other forms of chronic inflammatory arthritis did not. Molecular mimicry between a dominant T cell epitope of OspA and hLFA-1 may be an important factor in the persistence of joint inflammation in genetically susceptible patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. PMID:11334491

Steere, A C; Gross, D; Meyer, A L; Huber, B T

2001-05-01

436

Subtype-specific peripheral blood gene expression profiles in recent onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective A multi-center study of recent onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) subjects prior to treatment with DMARDS or biologics was undertaken to identify peripheral blood gene expression differences between JIA subclasses and controls. Methods PBMC from 59 healthy children and 136 JIA subjects (28 enthesitis-related arthritis [ERA], 42 persistent oligoarthritis, 45 RF- polyarthritis, and 21 systemic) were isolated over Ficoll. Poly-A RNA was labeled using NuGEN Ovation and gene expression profiles were obtained using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 Arrays. Results 9,501 differentially expressed probe sets were identified among JIA subtypes and controls (ANOVA, FDR 5%). Specifically, 193, 1036, 873 and 7595 probe sets were different between controls and ERA, persistent oligoarthritis, RF- polyarthritis and systemic JIA samples respectively. In persistent oligoarthritis, RF- polyarthritis and systemic JIA subtypes, up-regulation of genes associated with IL-10 signaling was prominent. A hemoglobin cluster was identified that was under-expressed in ERA patients but over-expressed in systemic JIA. The influence of JAK/STAT, ERK/MAPK, IL-2 and B cell receptor signaling pathways was evident in persistent oligoarthritis. In systemic JIA, up-regulation of innate immune pathways, including IL-6, TLR/IL1R, and PPAR signaling were noted, along with down-regulation of gene networks related to NK and T cells. Complement and coagulation pathways were up-regulated in systemic JIA with a subset of these genes differentially-expressed in other subtypes as well. Conclusions Expression analysis identified differentially expressed genes in PBMCs between subtypes of JIA early in disease and controls, thus providing evidence for immunobiologic differences between these forms of childhood arthritis. PMID:19565513

Barnes, MG; Grom, AA; Thompson, SD; Griffin, TA; Pavlidis, P; Itert, L; Fall, N; Sowders, DP; Hinze, CH; Aronow, BJ; Luyrink, LK; Srivastava, S; Ilowite, N; Gottlieb, B; Olson, J; Sherry, D; Glass, DN; Colbert, RA

2009-01-01

437

Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

1987-07-01

438

Sustained T cell Rap1 signaling is protective in the collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Defective activation of T cell receptor-proximal signaling proteins, such as the small GTPase Rap1, is thought to contribute to the pathologic behavior of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial T cells. This study was undertaken to determine whether maintaining Rap1 signaling in murine T cells modifies disease onset or severity in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA experiments were conducted using wild-type and RapV12-transgenic

Joana R. F. Abreu; Sarah Krausz; Wendy Dontje; Aleksander M. Grabiec; Launay de D; Martijn A. Nolte; Paul P. Tak; Kris A. Reedquist

2010-01-01

439

Heat shock proteins in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Keys for understanding remitting arthritis and candidate antigens for immune therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is in a majority of the cases of self-limiting, and sometimes even a self-remitting, disease.\\u000a A growing amount of data suggests that active T cell regulation determines, at least partly, the clinical outcome of JIA.\\u000a In experimental models of arthritis, a group of highly conserved microbial proteins, heat shock proteins (hsps), can be used\\u000a to effectively

Berent Prakken; Wietse Kuis; Willem van Eden; Salvatore Albani

2002-01-01