Sample records for leisure reading habits

  1. The Leisure Reading Habits of Urban Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Rodge, Pradnya

    2007-01-01

    Research indicates that there is a strong relationship between leisure reading and school achievement, but the leisure reading habits of urban adolescents have rarely been studied. From their investigation of the leisure reading habits of 584 urban minority middle school students, the authors identify these key findings: (1) More than two-thirds…

  2. Reading Habits and Attitudes of Parks, Recreation, and Leisure Services Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hong Suk; Liang, Yating; Jordan, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This study examined recent reading practices and beliefs of parks, recreation, and leisure services professionals. For many years, faculty members have engaged in informal discussions at professional meetings and in journals about the need to bridge the gap between academicians and practitioners in terms of moving research findings into practice.…

  3. Computer Technology and College Students' Reading Habits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li-Bi Shen

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine if computer technology had an impact on EFL college students' reading habits and if students' online reading habits and their demographic variables, such as gender, age, CJEE scores, employment status, and online hours were related. 124 valid survey questionnaires were collected from college students in a university in southern Taiwan. The results

  4. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school.

    PubMed

    Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071). Results showed that the prevalence of leisure reading was low in both the lower, pre-vocational track (19.5%) and the higher, pre-academic track (32.5%). Boys read even less than girls. Almost all leisure readers enjoyed reading and engaged in mental imagery, i.e., the propensity "to see images" of a written story in the mind's eye. Overall, boys who did not like to read for leisure had the poorest school performance. Non-leisure readers who reported that they enjoyed reading got higher school grades in the higher educational track. In the lower track, this was the case for girls. Our study findings imply that reading promotion programs should take into account individual differences in sex, achievement level, and reading enjoyment when aiming to decrease the academic achievement gap. PMID:25386154

  5. Reading enjoyment amongst non-leisure readers can affect achievement in secondary school

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Suzanne E.; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate determinants of differences in leisure reading behavior and school achievement. We specifically examined reading enjoyment, mental imagery, and sex as predictors in a large, age-homogeneous sample of Dutch secondary school students (N = 1,071). Results showed that the prevalence of leisure reading was low in both the lower, pre-vocational track (19.5%) and the higher, pre-academic track (32.5%). Boys read even less than girls. Almost all leisure readers enjoyed reading and engaged in mental imagery, i.e., the propensity “to see images” of a written story in the mind’s eye. Overall, boys who did not like to read for leisure had the poorest school performance. Non-leisure readers who reported that they enjoyed reading got higher school grades in the higher educational track. In the lower track, this was the case for girls. Our study findings imply that reading promotion programs should take into account individual differences in sex, achievement level, and reading enjoyment when aiming to decrease the academic achievement gap. PMID:25386154

  6. Self-Contained to Departmentalized: How Reading Habits Changed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamme, Linda Leonard

    1976-01-01

    Examined the reading habits of four 4th grade classes before and after a changeover from self-contained to departmentalized instruction. Results indicated a slightly lower mean number of books read and far less variation among classes in the number of books read after departmentalization. (JMB)

  7. Champagne Wishes, Caviar Dreams: Incorporating E?readers into Leisure Reading While on a Beer Budget

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Craft; Elisabeth Leonard; Katy Ginanni

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, staff at Western Carolina University’s Hunter Library began investigating how to use end of year funds. One of the chosen ideas was to experiment with circulating Kindles loaded with leisure reading titles. The pilot program was initiated as a result of the convergence of the Dean of Library Services’ enduring interest in the positive impact

  8. Younger Americans' Reading and Library Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zickuhr, Kathryn; Rainie, Lee; Purcell, Kristen; Madden, Mary; Brenner, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    More than eight in ten Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 read a book in the past year, and six in ten used their local public library. At the youngest end of the spectrum, high schoolers in their late teens (ages 16-17) and college-aged young adults (ages 18-24) are especially likely to have read a book or used the library in the past 12…

  9. Reading Habits of College Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, SuHua; Capps, Matthew; Blacklock, Jeff; Garza, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This study employed a convergent mixed-method research design to investigate reading habits of American college students. A total of 1,265 (466 male and 799 female) college students voluntarily participated in the study by completing a self-reported survey. Twelve students participated in semi-structured interviews and classroom observations.…

  10. Do Reading Habits Influence Aesthetic Preferences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Allaith, Zainab

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that the directionality of a person's primary writing system has influences outside the domain of reading and writing, specifically influences on aesthetic preferences. The results of several previous studies suggest that people whose primary writing system goes from left to right prefer pictures of moving and static…

  11. Young Adult Reading Habits in Ukraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sochocky, Christine M.

    This discussion of factors influencing youth literacy in Ukraine highlights information on availability and content of reading material in the Soviet Union and Ukraine. The population of Ukraine is 100% literate. Regional children's libraries and separate libraries for youth are located in the cities and larger towns, are funded by the Ministry of…

  12. Does reading keep you thin? Leisure activities, cultural tastes, and body weight in comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    While sedentary leisure-time activities such as reading, going to movies, attending cultural events, attending sporting events, watching TV, listening to music, and socializing with friends would seem to contribute to excess weight, a perspective focusing on SES differences in cultural tastes suggests the opposite, that some sedentary activities are associated with lower rather than higher body weight. This study aims to test theories of cultural distinction by examining relationships between leisure-time activities and body weight. Using 2007 data on 17 nations from the International Social Survey Program, the analysis estimates relationships between the body mass index and varied leisure-time activities while controlling for SES, physical activities, and sociodemographic variables. Net of controls for SES and physical activities, participation time in cultural activities is associated with lower rather than higher body weight, particularly in high-income nations. The results suggest that both cultural activities and body weight reflect forms of distinction that separate SES-based lifestyles. PMID:21707664

  13. Print exposure, reading habits, and reading achievement among deaf and hearing college students.

    PubMed

    Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M; Borgna, Georgianna; Morrison, Carolyn; Remelt, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study explored relations of print exposure, academic achievement, and reading habits among 100 deaf and 100 hearing college students. As in earlier studies, recognition tests for book titles and magazine titles were used as measures of print exposure, college entrance test scores were used as measures of academic achievement, and students provided self-reports of reading habits. Deaf students recognized fewer magazine titles and fewer book titles appropriate for reading levels from kindergarten through Grade 12 while reporting more weekly hours of reading. As in previous studies with hearing college students, the title recognition test proved a better predictor of deaf and hearing students' English achievement than how many hours they reported reading. The finding that the recognition tests were relatively more potent predictors of achievement for deaf students than hearing students may reflect the fact that deaf students often obtain less information through incidental learning and classroom presentations. PMID:22025672

  14. Print Exposure, Reading Habits, and Reading Achievement among Deaf and Hearing College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M.; Borgna, Georgianna; Morrison, Carolyn; Remelt, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study explored relations of print exposure, academic achievement, and reading habits among 100 deaf and 100 hearing college students. As in earlier studies, recognition tests for book titles and magazine titles were used as measures of print exposure, college entrance test scores were used as measures of academic achievement, and students…

  15. Sedentary versus active leisure activities and their relationship with sleeping habits and body mass index in children of 9 and 10?years of age.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Isaac; Peña, Elsa; Errasti, José Manuel; Busto, Raquel

    2014-11-18

    A random sample of 291 9- and 10-year-old schoolchildren from Asturias (Spain) was taken. Using path analysis, a model was tested in which bedtime, the number of hours spent sleeping and leisure activities were the independent variables and the body mass index was the dependent variable. The results show that sedentary and active leisure time and hours spent sleeping are predictors of the body mass index in children. Those children who go to bed late and who use that extra time to watch the television or play with the computer tend to have a greater body mass index, while those children who go to bed earlier and have spent more time reading or playing in the park or at home have a lower body mass index. Encouraging active leisure activities can have an extremely positive effect on their body mass index. PMID:25411196

  16. Building Reading Comprehension Habits in Grades 6?12: A Toolkit of Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwiers, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Help struggling readers understand content area texts with research-based, innovative classroom tools that foster lifelong reading comprehension habits. This book presents easy-to-use activities organized around six habits of reading comprehension: (1) Organizing text information by sculpting the main idea and summarizing; (2) Connecting to…

  17. Motivating the Lifelong Reading Habit Through a Balanced Use of Children's Information Books

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ray Doiron

    2003-01-01

    As literacy educators, we have a tendency to use mostly fiction books as our chief source of materials for motivating the reading habits of our students. When we examine children's reading interests and the books they choose for their independent reading, we discover that many children enjoy, and even prefer, to read information books. Coupled with students' strong interests in

  18. The Relation Between Caregivers' Multiliterate Reading Habits and Their Children's Oral Health Status

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Caregivers’ oral health literacy (OHL) assessment results have been found to be related to their children’s oral health status. A further aspect of this relationship may be the role of caregivers’ reading habits. Objective Our goal was to describe the relationship between caregivers’ multimodal (digital and print) and multilingual (English and Chinese) reading habits, their OHL, and their child’s oral health status in Hong Kong. Methods A random sample of 301 child-caregiver dyads was recruited from kindergartens in Hong Kong. Data included sociodemographic information and caregivers’ self-reported digital print and reading habits across two languages (Chinese and English). Caregivers’ OHL levels were assessed by two locally developed and validated oral health literacy assessment tasks: Hong Kong Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry-30 (HKREALD-30) and the Hong Kong Oral Health Literacy Assessment Task for Pediatric Dentistry (HKOHLAT-P). Children’s oral health status was assessed using two measures: dental caries experience (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth) and oral hygiene status (Visible Plaque Index). Results Bivariate variations revealed significant differences in mean OHL scores between caregivers with different reading habits (P<.01). Correlations revealed significant associations between caregivers’ practices of reading multimodal (print/digital) and multilingual (English/Chinese) texts, their literacy levels, and their children’s oral health status (P<.01). Adjusting for sociodemographics and all other reading habits in the regression analysis, the caregivers' habit of reading digital and print texts was significantly retained in the final model. Regression analysis revealed significant associations between caregivers’ reading habits (digital Chinese) and their OHL word recognition scores: OR 5.00, 95% CI 1.10-3.65, P=.027. Significant associations were also evident for their OHL comprehension scores (digital Chinese: OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.30-4.20, P=.004; print Chinese: OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.40-4.30, P=.001). However, no significant associations were found between caregivers' reading habits and child’s oral health status (P>.05). Conclusions Caregivers’ habits of reading print and digital Chinese texts are significantly associated with their OHL scores. Their reading habits, however, do not affect their children’s oral health status. PMID:25236188

  19. Reading Habits, Perceptual Learning, and Recognition of Printed Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazir, Tatjana A.; Ben-Boutayab, Nadia; Decoppet, Nathalie; Deutsch, Avital; Frost, Ram

    2004-01-01

    The present work aims at demonstrating that visual training associated with the act of reading modifies the way we perceive printed words. As reading does not train all parts of the retina in the same way but favors regions on the side in the direction of scanning, visual word recognition should be better at retinal locations that are frequently…

  20. Teenage Boys' Leisure Reading Dispositions: Juggling Male Youth Culture and Family Cultural Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Kristina; Hamston, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with three teenage boys and their parents in a middle-class community explored why the boys self-identify as reluctant readers, resisting approved forms of literacy. They pursue types of reading that contribute to their construction of masculine identities; their parents' attempts to influence reading are conditioned by traditional…

  1. The book reading habits of teacher and families to their hearing and hearing impaired kindergarten children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mübeccel Gönen; Serap Aydan Yilmaz

    1999-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the book reading habits of families and teachers to hearing impaired and normal hearing kindergarten children. The sample of research was taken from 2 kindergartens. Eleven kindergarten teachers and 36 hearing impaired children and families formed one of the groups. The other group consisted of 11 kindergarten teachers and 40 normal hearing children

  2. No horizontal numerical mapping in a culture with mixed-reading habits.

    PubMed

    Rashidi-Ranjbar, Neda; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Jahangiri, Sorour; Brugger, Peter; Loetscher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Reading habits are thought to play an important role in the emergence of cultural differences in visuo-spatial and numerical tasks. Left-to-right readers show a slight visuo-spatial bias to the left side of space, and automatically associate small numbers to the left and larger numbers to the right side of space, respectively. A paradigm that demonstrated an automatic spatial-numerical association involved the generation of random numbers while participants performed lateral head turns. That is, Westerners have been shown to produce more small numbers when the head was turned to the left compared to the right side. We here employed the head turning/random number generation (RNG) paradigm and a line bisection (LB) task with a group of 34 Iranians in their home country. In the participants' native language (Farsi) text is read from right-to-left, but numbers are read from left-to-right. If the reading direction for text determines the layout of spatial-numerical mappings we expected to find more small numbers after right than left head turns. Yet, the generation of small or large numbers was not modulated by lateral head turns and the Iranians showed therefore no association of numbers with space. There was, however, a significant rightward shift in the LB task. Thus, while the current results are congruent with the idea that text reading habits play an important role in the cultural differences observed in visuo-spatial tasks, our data also imply that these habits on their own are not strong enough to induce significant horizontal spatial-numerical associations. In agreement with previous suggestions, we assume that for the emergence of horizontal numerical mappings a congruency between reading habits for words and numbers is required. PMID:24605093

  3. No horizontal numerical mapping in a culture with mixed-reading habits

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi-Ranjbar, Neda; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Jahangiri, Sorour; Brugger, Peter; Loetscher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Reading habits are thought to play an important role in the emergence of cultural differences in visuo-spatial and numerical tasks. Left-to-right readers show a slight visuo-spatial bias to the left side of space, and automatically associate small numbers to the left and larger numbers to the right side of space, respectively. A paradigm that demonstrated an automatic spatial-numerical association involved the generation of random numbers while participants performed lateral head turns. That is, Westerners have been shown to produce more small numbers when the head was turned to the left compared to the right side. We here employed the head turning/random number generation (RNG) paradigm and a line bisection (LB) task with a group of 34 Iranians in their home country. In the participants’ native language (Farsi) text is read from right-to-left, but numbers are read from left-to-right. If the reading direction for text determines the layout of spatial-numerical mappings we expected to find more small numbers after right than left head turns. Yet, the generation of small or large numbers was not modulated by lateral head turns and the Iranians showed therefore no association of numbers with space. There was, however, a significant rightward shift in the LB task. Thus, while the current results are congruent with the idea that text reading habits play an important role in the cultural differences observed in visuo-spatial tasks, our data also imply that these habits on their own are not strong enough to induce significant horizontal spatial-numerical associations. In agreement with previous suggestions, we assume that for the emergence of horizontal numerical mappings a congruency between reading habits for words and numbers is required. PMID:24605093

  4. Teacher Prediction of Students' Reading Attitudes: An Examination of Teacher Judgment Compared to Student-Peer Judgment in Assessing Student Reading Attitude and Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikulecky, Larry J.

    Fifteen high school English teachers and 544 students in their classes participated in a study to determine how well teachers assess student reading habits and attitudes and to compare the accuracy of their judgments with those of student-peers. Each student was administered a measure of reading ability and of reading attitude; additional data…

  5. Leisure, Contemplation and Leisure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    I argue in defense of Aristotle's position that contemplation ("theoria") is the proper use of at least some of one's leisure and that, consequently, leisure education must consist in teaching the inclination and capacity for contemplation. However, my position is somewhat more flexible than Aristotle's, in that I allow that there are other…

  6. The Professional Reading Habits of Senior Housing Officers at ACUHO-I Member Institutions in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the professional reading habits of Senior Housing Officers (SHOs) at ACUHO-I member institutions in the Great Lakes region, which encompasses the states of Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana. The findings were based on data from the survey responses of SHOs at 71 colleges and universities across the Great Lakes region of the…

  7. The Influence of Reading and Writing Habits Associated with Education on the Neuropsychological Performance of Brazilian Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlowski, Josiane; Remor, Eduardo; de Mattos Pimenta Parente, Maria Alice; de Salles, Jerusa Fumagalli; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Bandeira, Denise Ruschel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the frequency of reading and writing habits (RWH) associated with education on the performance of adults in brief neuropsychological tasks. A sample of 489 Brazilian subjects, composed of 71% women, aged 21-80 years, with 2-23 years of formal education, was evaluated by the Brazilian Brief Neuropsychological…

  8. The Non-Fiction Reading Habits of Young Successful Boy Readers: Forming Connections between Masculinity and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susannah

    2004-01-01

    The reading experiences of six young successful boy readers were studied over a two-year period. In this article, their non-fiction reading is analysed and ways in which the boys make positive connections between masculinity and reading are identified. The boys' non-fiction reading centres on typical boy interest areas and hobbies (for example,…

  9. Adolescent Leisure across European Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, August; Schaffner, Brigitta

    2003-01-01

    Examined variations in adolescent time use within Europe and their relation to culture, focusing on organization of free time, most frequent leisure activities, and resulting emotional states. Found that European adolescents spent free time in a range of activities, including electronic media, computer games, playing musical instruments, reading,…

  10. Promoting English language development and the reading habit among students in rural schools through the Guided Extensive Reading program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ratnawati Mohd Asraf; Ismail Sheikh Ahmad

    This paper describes an extensive reading program conducted in three rural secondary or middle schools in Malaysia, aimed at motivating the students to read extensively in English and helping them overcome their problems in understanding English texts as a means towards increasing their proficiency in the language. The paper begins by discussing the rationale for extensive reading for students in

  11. AUSES AND GRATIFICTIONS RESEARCH ON READING MOTIVATIONSE AND GRATIFICATIONS OFNEWSPAPER READERS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fatih Bayram

    2008-01-01

    Giving information is one of the main function of mass communication tools. Newspaper readers are using newspaper for different motivations. Gaining information, entertainment, leisure time activities, social integration is some motivations of media. Uses and gratifications theory asserts that reader is active part of communication process and reading habits figure on social and psychological needs. Items from readers’gratifications are categorized

  12. Leisure Today: Equity Issues in Leisure Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dustin, Daniel L., Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Seven articles on equity issues in leisure services focus on conservation for the future, resource allocation inequities in wildland recreation, leisure services for people of color and people with disabilities, serving all children in community recreation, women and leisure services, and equity in public sector resource allocations. (JD)

  13. The Impact of Internet and Television Use on the Reading Habits and Practices of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Reichard, Carla A.; Gardner, Anne

    2009-01-01

    How much time do college students spend reading for recreational and academic purposes? Do Internet and television use displace or interfere with reading time? In this study, we used an innovative time-diary survey method to explore whether the time students spend on the Internet or watching television displaces time that would be spent reading

  14. Recreation and Leisure Service for the Disadvantaged: Guidelines to Program Development and Related Readings. Health Education, Physical Education, and Recreation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, John A., Ed.; And Others

    This book proposes the approach that, regardless of the present turmoil, regardless of technology and other social considerations, there is a fundamental inequity in the availability of cultural, recreational, and leisure experience that men of goodwill abhor. Seeing beyond hostile rhetoric, the book seeks to search out the foundations within the…

  15. Cognitive and Affective Contributions of the Literature Circles Method on the Acquisition of Reading Habits and Comprehension Skills in Primary Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Suleyman; Yuksel, Arzu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of literature circles on fourth grade primary students' reading habits and comprehension skills and collected the opinions of students and teachers about the method. In this study, quantitative (pre-test and post-test designs) and qualitative (case study) methods were employed together. The study was…

  16. Understanding Physical Inactivity: Prediction of Four Sedentary Leisure Behaviors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan E. Rhodes; Rachel N. Dean

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the motives underlying sedentary leisure behavior may guide interventions to decrease these behaviors. The purpose of this study was to apply the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to understand the motives underlying four common sedentary leisure activities: television viewing, computer use, reading\\/music, and socializing. A cross-sectional community sample of 206 adults and 174 undergraduate students completed measures

  17. Integrated Leisure and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart, Ed.; Rynders, John, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on integrated leisure and recreation for developmentally disabled persons and includes descriptions of innovative leisure/recreation programs which allow the realization of the concepts of normalization and least restrictive environment. Brief articles include the following titles and authors: "Challenging the…

  18. Relationships among Adolescents' Leisure Motivation, Leisure Involvement, and Leisure Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Li, Ren-Hau; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test a cause-and-effect model of factors affecting leisure satisfaction among Taiwanese adolescents. A structural equation model was proposed in which the relationships among leisure motivation, leisure involvement, and leisure satisfaction were explored. The study collected data from 701 adolescent…

  19. Promoting Leisure. Leisure Management Module. Operational Management Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anthony; And Others

    This module on promoting leisure is intended to give an understanding of the methods that can be used to market leisure products and services and how to plan the marketing of leisure. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in seven sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved…

  20. Bringing Identity Theory into Leisure

    E-print Network

    Jun, Jinhee

    2010-01-14

    , 1988; Shamir, 1988, 1993). People?s commitment to a leisure identity drives engagement in specific leisure behaviors. According to Haggard and Williams (1992), knowledge of the self and desire for expressing the true (or ideal) self can predict... people?s leisure behavior. In the investigation of the relationship between self-image and leisure activities, Haggard and Williams (1992) found that respondents expressed themselves by participating in recreational activities which reflect specific...

  1. Health and Leisure: Inextricably Linked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankel, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    What individuals do during leisure time significantly affects illness, disease, and longevity. Leisure studies and services can offer much to the understanding of health and the provision of health services. The article notes that the tendency to separate leisure and health within the physical education and recreation curricula is dysfunctional.…

  2. Comics or Stories? Differences in the Reading Attitudes and Habits of Girls and Boys in years 2, 4 and 6

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Davies; Ivy Brember

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of six schools within the primary schools of one local education authority (LEA) was chosen comprising 216 Year 2 children (109 boys, 107 girls), 189 Year 4 children (99 boys, 90 girls) and 206 Year 6 children (104 boys, 102 girls). A self?report questionnaire was administered to explore each cohort's attitudes to reading, the source and type

  3. ’Women's Leisure? What Leisure?’: Has it always been like this?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carmel Foley

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer some historical context to research that documents the sense of a lack of entitlement to leisure that middle?class white women have and to the many studies that have identified a lack of leisure opportunity in the lives of women burdened with domestic responsibilities. The data for this research was collected from letters,

  4. Leisure as Marketing: The Nature and Experience of “Business Leisure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawn M. Dobni

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the results of a qualitative investigation, this article introduces the concept of “business leisure” and proposes a framework that illuminates it. Building on the idea that nonbusiness interactions can have significant business effects, and in an effort to reveal the nature of experiences that commingle business goals and leisure pursuits, this framework: identifies the conditions that shape the use

  5. Complete List of Leisure Reading Author Title

    E-print Network

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    , Katherine Behind the Beautiful Forevers Booth, Stephen DEAD PLACE Born, James O. ESCAPE CLAUSE Bova, Ben and the Real Downton Abbey: The Lost Legacy Carson, Susannah A TRUTH UNIVERSALLY ACKNOWLEDGED Cathcart, Thomas

  6. Leisure Activities for Dementia Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Steven B.; Rappaport, Meryl B.

    Research has shown that being a caregiver is often very stressful, particularly for individuals acting as caregivers for a demented elder. Caregivers might gain needed time to relax if there were leisure time activities available for demented individuals. A study was undertaken which involved development of the leisure activities; selection and…

  7. Work and Leisure in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is commonly described as offering combinations of work and leisure, but the implied relationship is often limited. Different conceptions of leisure, especially leisure as pleasurable experience, raise new possibilities for seeing academic activity itself as leisure in several important senses. The importance of identifying…

  8. Work, Leisure and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, John; Lewis, Suzan

    2005-01-01

    Both work and leisure are essential for well-being. Yet the ways in which we conceptualise work, leisure and well-being are in flux, reflecting, in part, the changing societal, economic and community contexts in which work and leisure take place. This paper first discusses the contested nature of work and leisure in relation to well-being, and…

  9. Leisure and Consumption in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jukka Gronow; Dale Southerton

    \\u000a Household expenditure and time diary data are used to explore the changing socio-geographical patterns of leisure-related\\u000a consumption in Europe. Robust comparative data restricted the analysis to change since the late 1970 s. The chapter begins\\u000a with an outline of the key theoretical debates regarding changing European practices of leisure and consumption. This is followed\\u000a by two sections detailing geographical patterns, differences

  10. The Psychology of Reading Behavior; Eighteenth Yearbook of the National Reading Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, George B., Ed.; May, Merrill M., Ed.

    Focusing on the psychology of reading behavior, the 36 articles in this volume were drawn from the eighteenth annual meeting of the National Reading Conference held in 1968. Among the topics discussed in the articles are the following: eye movement, the psychology of reading behavior, reading improvement, reading tests, reading research, leisure

  11. Quantitative habitability.

    PubMed

    Shock, Everett L; Holland, Melanie E

    2007-12-01

    A framework is proposed for a quantitative approach to studying habitability. Considerations of environmental supply and organismal demand of energy lead to the conclusions that power units are most appropriate and that the units for habitability become watts per organism. Extreme and plush environments are revealed to be on a habitability continuum, and extreme environments can be quantified as those where power supply only barely exceeds demand. Strategies for laboratory and field experiments are outlined that would quantify power supplies, power demands, and habitability. An example involving a comparison of various metabolisms pursued by halophiles is shown to be well on the way to a quantitative habitability analysis. PMID:18163866

  12. Typology of Leisure of Rural People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapilina, Vera Sergeevna

    Utilizing data from a 1972 sociological survey of rural inhabitants working in the public economy of the province of Novosibirsk, this study examined leisure as an element of the residents' life style. Rural residents with common leisure behaviors were identified through the classification of the behavior's function and quality. Leisure functions…

  13. The Leisure-Time Activity of Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedova, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    Survey data show that Russians relegate free time and leisure activity to secondary status compared to work, and free time faces the threat of becoming devalued and losing its importance as a life value. At the same time, in the structure of Russians' leisure activities there is an ongoing tendency for leisure to become simpler, for active types…

  14. The Future of Work and Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Denis F.

    Earlier projections of labor supply and speculations about the impact on values and lifestyles on work, leisure, and work-leisure relationships are reassessed in light of current events. Previous projections were the basis for three alternative scenarios of possible work-leisure relationships. The first examined some of the implications of…

  15. Leisure Role of Public Libraries: User Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Emma; Morris, Anne

    2005-01-01

    This is the second of two articles examining the leisure role of public libraries. The first article examined the leisure role of public libraries in the UK from a historical perspective. This examines the value of the public library service in providing leisure opportunities from a user point of view. The results demonstrate that public libraries…

  16. Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Sports, Recreation, & Leisure Sample Occupations Academic Advisor/Athletes Agent, Business/Aerobics Instructor Gaming/Sports Book Writer Golf Course Superintendent Guide Gymnastics/Tumbling Director Health Recreation Leader Recreation Manager Scout Soccer Player Special Education Teacher Sports Agent Sports

  17. Leisure Resources. Its Comprehensive Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Joseph J.

    Intended for professional planners and recreation and park administrators as well as for classroom use, this comprehensive planning guide for leisure resources includes: (1) a planning process overview with emphasis on the necessity of both citizen and professional involvement; (2) practical administrative and organizational needs for undertaking…

  18. Energy Crisis: The Leisurely Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobily, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Because of their automotive lifestyles, Americans account for the greatest portion of fossil fuel consumption in the world. The desirable leisure lifestyle traits of the past should be incorporated into contemporary American culture. Americans need to wean themselves away from the automobile if the energy crisis is to be solved. (JN)

  19. Leisure. No Enemy but Ignorance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L., Ed.

    The five lectures reprinted in this monograph were presented at the past five national conventions of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. They offer messages concerning future needs and goals to leisure professionals and students seeking entry into the field. Part I contains: (1) "The Mild Blue…

  20. Habitable Trinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Maruyama, S.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a new concept of a habitable environment in the search for life beyond Earth that goes beyond the follow-the-water paradigm, newly named Habitable Trinity. Habitable Trinity is the coexistence of an atmosphere (consisting largely of C and N), an ocean (H and O), and a landmass (supplier of nutrients). It is the minimum requirement for the beginning of life to satisfy (1) formation of membrane, (2) metabolism, and (3) self-replication as we know it. A habitable planet, which has largely been defined as having an adequate climate, a sufficient atmosphere, and the presence of liquid water on its surface, is insufficient to meet the requirements to bear life. Also, material circulation driven by the Sun must be maintained with Habitable Trinity to continue the supply of elements necessary to sustain organic radical reactions that is the basis of life. The Sun is the major engine that links the three components primarily through hydrological cycling, including weathering, erosion, and transport of nutrient-enriched landmass materials to the ocean via far-reaching river systems. Habitable Trinity can be applied to other planets and moons to discuss the presence of extraterrestrial life. Mars is considered to be the best target to test the hypothesis of whether life exists elsewhere in our solar system, as it records an ancient Habitable Trinity (i.e., lakes and oceans which interacted with a landmass (cratered southern highlands) and an atmosphere). Other terrestrial planets, as well as satellites of the gaseous giants such as Europa and Titan, have little chance to harbor life as we know it because they lack Habitable Trinity. Going beyond 'the-follow-the-water-approach', the Habitable-Trinity concept provides an index in the quest for life-containing planetary bodies beyond our solar system as the reconnaissance systems become increasingly autonomous and at higher resolution, affording greater perspective during this golden age of international and interdisciplinary exploration and discovery.

  1. The leisure society I: myths and misconceptions, 1960–1979

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Veal

    2011-01-01

    Recent discussion in the World Leisure Journal has raised the issue of the place of the “leisure society thesis” in the development of leisure studies. Some have argued that the thesis was a key, but misconceived, “project” of the early phase of leisure studies which has done lasting damage to the leisure studies brand. Others argue that the thesis was

  2. Auto-ethnography in leisure studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leon Anderson; Mathew Austin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore auto-ethnography, one recent genre of qualitative inquiry that we believe is particularly well-suited for the field of leisure studies. We begin by defining auto-ethnography and describing its key features. We then examine its use in leisure research to date, based on an analysis of auto-ethnographical studies of leisure published in three major qualitative methods journals

  3. Auto-ethnography in leisure studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leon Anderson; Mathew Austin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore auto-ethnography, one recent genre of qualitative inquiry that we believe is particularly well-suited for the field of leisure studies. We begin by defining auto-ethnography and describing its key features. We then examine its use in leisure research to date, based on an analysis of auto-ethnographical studies of leisure published in three major qualitative methods journals

  4. Books for Summer Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Recommends leisurely reading for teachers: biographies on St. Augustine and Charles Lindbergh; novels by Edwidge Danticat, Kate Chopin, and Velma Allis; Edward Tufte's three volumes on the visual presentation of information; Jean Vanier's "Becoming Human;" the Harry Potter series, and Michael Tolkin's novel "The Player." (MLH)

  5. Leisure Activity Patterns and Their Associations with Overweight: A Prospective Study among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajunen, Hanna-Reetta; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2009-01-01

    We examined longitudinal associations between individual leisure activities (television viewing, video viewing, computer games, listening to music, board games, musical instrument playing, reading, arts, crafts, socializing, clubs or scouts, sports, outdoor activities) and being overweight using logistic regression and latent class analysis in a…

  6. Italian Adolescents and Leisure: The Role of Engagement and Optimal Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delle Fave, Antonella; Bassi, Marta

    2003-01-01

    Used the experience sampling method to examine the psychological experiences of Italian adolescents in different leisure activities and their relationship to adolescent development. Found that structured activities, such as sports, hobbies, and reading related to high involvement, challenge, and experience of skills. Unstructured or relaxed…

  7. Reading Interests of Gifted Secondary School Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Emilie P.; Donoho, Grace E.

    A study investigated the relationship between reading and the writings of gifted secondary school writers, especially their developmental reading interests, leisure reading selections, and the influence of others on their literary choices. Subjects, 79 students from rural and urban Arkansas schools were participating in a gifted writers'…

  8. Egyptian Moslem Mothers and their Leisure Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nirvana M. Saad

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the relationship between Egyptian Moslem mothers' perceived social position (gender, religion and social class) and their leisure activities. It discusses these women's experiences of leisure constraints and their negotiation strategies to overcome these obstacles. The study is based on semi-structured qualitative interviews with 20 Moslem mothers who were stratified into upper, middle and lower social classes.

  9. Leisure and Aging: An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Max, Ed.

    This document contains an international collection of national position papers on leisure and aging. The following papers are included in the first section: "'Active' and 'Passive' Constructs of Elderly" (Max Kaplan); "Recreation and the Aged: A Review" (Helen J. Threlfall); "The Elderly in Bolivia"; "The Elderly and Leisure in Brazilian Society";…

  10. Perspectives on Analyzing Gender, Women, and Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how research has been conducted about gender, women, and leisure and how the research has changed over the course of the contemporary women's movement, and offers considerations for future leisure scholarship. The paper suggests five stages of scholarship: invisible, contemporary, dichotomous differences, feminist, and gender research.…

  11. Science Learning in a Leisure Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.; Storksdieck, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Most people visit a science center in order to satisfy specific leisure-related needs; needs which may or may not actually include science learning. Falk proposed that an individual's identity-related motivations provide a useful lens through which to understand adult free-choice science learning in leisure settings. Over a 3-year period the…

  12. Gambling and leisure: the case of racing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Saunders; D. E. Turner

    1987-01-01

    While betting on races of one kind or another has been extensively discussed by theorists who are interested in aspects of compulsive gambling and social policy, little attention has been paid to leisure perspectives in the study of betting populations. The present paper addresses the enjoyable and commonplace pastime of gambling as a leisurely pursuit, and focuses on the off-track

  13. Lifestyle Segmentation in Tourism and Leisure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noel Scott; Nick Parfitt

    2005-01-01

    This article examines three different approaches to lifestyle segmentation in improving the quality of tourism and leisure marketing decisions in three separate cases. Tourism and leisure products are prototypical lifestyle purchase yet in many tourism research studies visitors are described by demographics or tourism behaviour only. These cases illustrate different approaches to lifestyle segmentation. Firstly, there are segmentation schemes based

  14. Relationship between participation in leisure activities and constraints on Taiwanese breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Participation in leisure activities strongly associates with health and well-being. Little research has explored the relationship between participation in leisure activities and constraints on breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities. The purposes of this study are: 1) to investigate constraints on breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities and participation in leisure activities; 2) to investigate the differences between preferences for leisure activities and actual participation by breastfeeding mothers; 3) to segment breastfeeding mothers with similar patterns, using a cluster analysis based on the delineated participation in leisure activities and leisure preferences; 4) to explore any differences between clusters of breastfeeding mothers with respect to socio-demographic characteristics, breastfeeding behaviours and leisure constraints. Methods This study has a cross-sectional design using an online survey conducted among mothers having breastfeeding experiences of more than four months. The questionnaire includes demographic variables, breastfeeding behaviours, preferences for leisure activities participation, and constraints on leisure activities. Collection of data occurred between March and July 2011, producing 415 valid responses for analysis. Results For breastfeeding mothers, this study identifies constraints on breastfeeding related to leisure activities in addition to the three traditional factors for constraints in the model. This study demonstrates that reports of constraints related to children, family, and nursing environments are the most frequent. Breastfeeding mothers in Taiwan participate regularly in family activities or activities related to their children. Cluster analysis classified breastfeeding mothers into Action and Contemplation groups, and found that mothers within the latter group participate less in leisure activities and experienced more constraints related to breastfeeding. Conclusions Implications provide a developmental design for public health policies for nursing-friendly environments to increase opportunities for breastfeeding mothers to engage in leisure activities and suggest various types of activities to increase participation of that population. PMID:23627993

  15. Popular Reading Collections in Public University Libraries: A Survey of Three Southeastern States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Offering a separate, popular reading collection can be a valuable public service in academic libraries. Popular reading is also known as leisure reading, recreational reading, and reading for pleasure. These phrases are synonyms for an interest in reading bestsellers, mysteries, romance novels, biographies, graphic novels, humor, self-help, or…

  16. Adolescent Leisure Dimensions, Psychosocial Adjustment, and Gender Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Graham L.; Inglis, Brad C.

    2012-01-01

    Leisure provides the context for much of adolescent behaviour and development. While both theory and research point to the benefits of participation in leisure activities that are highly structured, the association between structured leisure and psychosocial adjustment is not uniformly high. This paper presents a model of adolescent leisure

  17. Leisure Activities and the Risk of Dementia in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joe Verghese; Richard B. Lipton; Mindy J. Katz; Charles B. Hall; Carol A. Derby; Gail Kuslansky; Anne F. Ambrose; Martin Sliwinski; Herman Buschke

    2003-01-01

    background Participation in leisure activities has been associated with a lower risk of dementia. It is unclear whether increased participation in leisure activities lowers the risk of dementia or participation in leisure activities declines during the preclinical phase of dementia. methods We examined the relation between leisure activities and the risk of dementia in a pro- spective cohort of 469

  18. Lifestyle Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, Hashem; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa; Waly, Mostafa I.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the lifestyle habits—physical activity (PA), eating habits (EH), and sleep duration (SD)—of Omani adolescents, and to examine gender differences in such variables. Methods: 802 Omani adolescents (442 females and 360 males), aged 15–18 years were randomly recruited. Anthropometric indices, PA level, and EH and SD were evaluated by the Arab Teenage Lifestyle questionnaire. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire for dietary assessment was also administered. Results: The results showed that although the study subjects had a sedentary lifestyle (lack of PA, average of 6.7 hours sleep, and consumption of high calorie foods), they maintained a normal body mass (less than 25 Kg/m2). Males were more than twice as active as females. With respect to EH, there were few gender differences, except in dairy and meat consumption where 62.5% and 55.5% of males consumed more than 3 servings, respectively, compared to 18.78 % and 35.2% of females, respectively. In addition, waist/height ratio, height, reasons for being active, energy drinks, potato consumption, eating sweets, vigorous PA and breakfast EHs were statistically significant independent predictors for BMI, P <0.05 for both males and females. Conclusion: This study revealed a high prevalence of sedentary behaviors and a low level of physical activity, especially among females. Unhealthy dietary habits were also widely found among both genders. There is an urgent need for more research as well as a national policy promoting active living and healthy eating and discouraging sedentary behaviour among Omani adolescents. PMID:24273660

  19. Exoplanet habitability.

    PubMed

    Seager, Sara

    2013-05-01

    The search for exoplanets includes the promise to eventually find and identify habitable worlds. The thousands of known exoplanets and planet candidates are extremely diverse in terms of their masses or sizes, orbits, and host star type. The diversity extends to new kinds of planets, which are very common yet have no solar system counterparts. Even with the requirement that a planet's surface temperature must be compatible with liquid water (because all life on Earth requires liquid water), a new emerging view is that planets very different from Earth may have the right conditions for life. The broadened possibilities will increase the future chances of discovering an inhabited world. PMID:23641111

  20. Promoting habit formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillippa Lally; Benjamin Gardner

    2011-01-01

    Habits are automatic behavioural responses to environmental cues, thought to develop through repetition of behaviour in consistent contexts. When habit is strong, deliberate intentions have been shown to have a reduced influence on behaviour. The habit concept may provide a mechanism for establishing new behaviours, and so healthy habit formation is a desired outcome for many interventions. Habits also however

  1. Quality of Life and Leisure Activities: How Do Leisure Activities Contribute to Subjective Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brajsa-Zganec, Andreja; Merkas, Marina; Sverko, Iva

    2011-01-01

    The quality of life is determined with objective factors and also with subjective perception of factors which influence human life. Leisure activities play a very important role in subjective well-being because they provide opportunities to meet life values and needs. Through participation in leisure activities people build social relationships,…

  2. Rekindle the Love of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isero, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This author describes a reading project using Kindles that was designed to increase the reading habits of 9th graders. With a selection of 500 titles for classroom usage, students were encouraged to read any book they chose--in addition to those required for their school term. Isero states that, in the past, many of his students would not risk…

  3. Motivation, Satisfaction, and Perceived Freedom: A Tri-Dimensional Model of Leisure among Young Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munchua, Michelle M.; Lesage, Deanna M.; Reddon, John R.; Badham, Tania D.

    2003-01-01

    A sample of 84 male young offenders, admitted for inpatient treatment in a psychiatric hospital, was used to examine the relationship between leisure motivation, leisure satisfaction, and perceived freedom in leisure using the Leisure Motivation Scale (LMS), the Leisure Satisfaction Scale (LSS), and the Perceived Freedom in Leisure Scale-Short…

  4. Reading Alone Together: Enhancing Extensive Reading via Student-Student Cooperation in Second Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, George M.

    Extensive reading (ER) programs involve students in silently reading large quantities of material. Research suggests that extensive reading is associated with gains in first and second language proficiency. Further, extensive reading can help learners develop a reading habit and increase their level of autonomy. This paper begins with a discussion…

  5. Community (Dis)connection Through Leisure for Women in Prison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felice Yuen; Susan Arai; Darla Fortune

    2012-01-01

    This article examines incarcerated women's leisure and re-entry into community. Framed in creative analytic practice, two poems reflect two major themes: (1) women's experiences of disconnection from community prior to and deepened by experiences in prison and (2) leisure and community re-entry, which describes complex meanings of leisure for women in prison and implications for return to community. These poems

  6. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-01-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical…

  7. Teaching a Cooperative Leisure Skill to Severely Handicapped Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nietupski, John; Svoboda, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Six formerly institutionalized severely handicapped adults living in a nursing home were taught a cooperative leisure skill. All six participants acquired the leisure skill. Informal followup observations indicated that participants continued to self initiate, sustain, and terminate the leisure activity as much as 2 weeks beyond the program's…

  8. The Changing Cultural Patterns of Work and Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    There exists today a series of discrepant ideas about the problem of work and leisure. Society in general feels that the wrong people will have the new leisure, that the professional persons of the country are going to work hard while those on the technical level will be less and less committed to their jobs. The new leisure will go to the…

  9. Deviant Leisure: Rethinking “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Williams

    2009-01-01

    This article calls for a more thorough exploration of the concept of deviant leisure. Although deviant leisure often relies on psychiatric discourse as a primary explanation for participation, many forms of deviant leisure cannot be explained convincingly through accounts that focus on psychopathological motivations. Examples discussed herein include consensual sexual sadomasochism, self-identified human vampires, and radical body modification. Such forms

  10. Career Education: The Leisure Occupations Cluster. Information Series No. 86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guide is intended to supplement career education curricula with information about leisure occupations (recreation, hospitality, and tourism). It traces the growth and significance of leisure occupations with regard to the scientific, economic, and social advances which have motivated more Americans than ever before to seek leisure

  11. Activating & Engaging Habits of Mind. A Developmental Series, Book 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Arthur L., Ed.; Kallick, Bena, Ed.

    This book is the second in a four-book series on habits of mind. It translates a habits of mind approach to education into action using classroom-tested advice. Contributions come from practitioners in literature, math, music, foreign language, reading, character education, and social science. After "Series Foreword: Thinking on the Road of Life"…

  12. Shipscape influence on the leisure cruise experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Kwortnik

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the leisure cruise service environment – the shipscape – and its effects on cruisers' emotions, meaning-making, and onboard behavior. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper uses qualitative data from 260 cruise customers that were mined from archived online discussion boards. Data were analyzed based on grounded theory and interpretive methods to derive

  13. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  14. Sonic Sport: Sound Art in Leisure Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phil Durrant; Eileen Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the premise that sound is an important aspect of leisure experience neglected within existing research, this article presents a discussion of a creative project to explore ways of encouraging sensitivity to sound in televised sport. We discuss a short film, Super cfc, in which sound and image samples of televised soccer were electronically manipulated and recombined resulting in

  15. Working Vacations: Jobs in Tourism and Leisure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vacation jobs often mix work and play. For some, the job is their ticket to career happiness. The article's first section describes four jobs specific to entertainment and leisure: (1) cruise ship musician; (2) destination marketing manager; (3) resort activities director; and (4) river rafting guide. The second section helps a person decide if a…

  16. Ten Minutes a Day for Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Sustained silent reading programs have many names, but share similar guidelines. Students read for enjoyment for an uninterrupted time daily, choose their own books and whether to finish them, observe teachers modeling good reading habits, and are not required to take tests or write book reports on their reading. (9 references) (MLH)

  17. Introduction to a Good Reading Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Times Co., NY.

    The purpose of the project outlined in this booklet is to enable upper elementary students to become familiar with the various departments of "The New York Times," to cope with headlines and lead paragraphs, and to develop a genuine interest in an adult newspaper. A general outline of the project by the teacher is provided, followed by 20 lesson…

  18. Readers and Reading: The National Report for England 2006 (PIRLS: Progress in International Reading Literacy Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twist, Liz; Schagen, Ian; Hodgson, Claire

    2007-01-01

    PIRLS is the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study. This rigorous international survey compares the reading attainment and attitudes to reading of over 200,000 9- and 10-year-old children in 41 countries. It is the only international study to provide information on the reading habits of primary-aged children: the survey collects…

  19. Reading Fluency as an Indicator of Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basaran, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between fourth grade primary school students' reading habits/conditions/ situations and their comprehension regarding what they read. For this purpose, a correlational survey method was used in the study. 90 fourth-grade students who were attending a state primary school in the center of Ku¨tahya…

  20. Ways of seeing degrees of leisure: from practice to pedagogy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sam Elkington

    2012-01-01

    In the context of higher education (HE), Leisure Studies has become an increasingly diverse, segmented and disjointed collection of curricula, driven by a fast-changing politico-economic landscape and the growing market potential of emergent sub-specialisms such as sport, tourism and event management. A decline in interest in, and perceived relevance of, the idea of leisure has seen Leisure Studies as a

  1. Reading Interest Patterns of Adults at Three Educational Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Ann Marie Bernazza; And Others

    A study was conducted to analyze and compare the reading interests of adults from three educational levels. Fourteen adults in a community college reading center, 20 adults from various professional occupations, and 23 adults from a reading education class were given a reading interest inventory concerned with their reading habits and preferences…

  2. Book Reading Motivation Scale: Reliability and Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katranci, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Book reading enhances the intellectual world of people. It is very important to know the factors that motivate children to read books as it will help to instill book reading habit in them. As such, the present study aims to develop a "Book Reading Motivation Scale" to determine elementary and secondary school students' reading

  3. Creating a Love of Reading = Susciter le Gout de la Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, John Daniel

    To develop good reading habits, children must be surrounded with books, stories and reading not only in the classroom but in the home and the community. Children who read and are read to outside of school do better than those who do not read and are not read to outside of school. Parents and other family members should make books and reading aloud…

  4. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time Among College Students.

    PubMed

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-05-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical inactivity, stress, and short and long-term health concerns. We contend that using the classroom context to help college students understand why it is beneficial to engage in positive leisure pursuits and how that engagement will promote personal growth is of critical importance to healthy development. PMID:24198896

  5. An interaction effect of leisure self-determination and leisure competence on older adults' self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang-Chih

    2012-04-01

    This study examined whether there was an interaction effect of leisure self-determination and leisure competence on older adults' self-rated health (SRH), controlling for self-efficacy. Three hundred eighty-nine older adults living in Keelung City, Taiwan were systematically selected as participants. Data were collected by a face-to-face questionnaire survey which included measures of self-efficacy, leisure self-determination, leisure competence, and SRH scales. The data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. The results showed a significant reinforcement interaction effect of leisure self-determination and leisure competence on SRH among the participants after controlling for self-efficacy. Implications of the results are further discussed. PMID:21799079

  6. Acquiring a leisure identity: juvenile jazz bands and the moral universe of ‘healthy’ leisure time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Grieves

    1989-01-01

    The ways in which juvenile jazz bands cater for the leisure time of young girls in a working class neighbourhood of Newcastle upon Tyne are illustrated. In addition to ethnographic material, statements made by the Jazz Band Federation of the UK which indicate the objectives of the organization, as well as its views on the ‘problem of youth’ in modern

  7. Picturing Leisure: Using Photovoice to Understand the Experience of Leisure and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genoe, M. Rebecca; Dupuis, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Interviews and participant observation are commonly used to explore the experience of dementia, yet may not adequately capture perspectives of persons with dementia as communication changes. We used photovoice (i.e., using cameras in qualitative research) along with interviews and participant observation to explore meanings of leisure for persons…

  8. An Analysis of Selected Characteristics, Leisure Attitudes, and Recreation Participation of Women Employed in Leisure Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    Questionnaires were sent to 100 women employed in leisure service positions in Wisconsin. Areas of services included therapeutic recreation, community/school and voluntary/youth agencies, outdoor recreation and parks, and a variety of other miscellaneous fields such as combinations of the above, industrial recreation, college unions, etc.…

  9. Deciphering spectral fingerprints of habitable exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Kaltenegger, Lisa; Selsis, Frank; Fridlund, Malcolm; Lammer, Helmut; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    We discuss how to read a planet's spectrum to assess its habitability and search for the signatures of a biosphere. After a decade rich in giant exoplanet detections, observation techniques have advanced to a level where we now have the capability to find planets of less than 10 Earth masses (M(Earth)) (so-called "super Earths"), which may be habitable. How can we characterize those planets and assess whether they are habitable? This new field of exoplanet search has shown an extraordinary capacity to combine research in astrophysics, chemistry, biology, and geophysics into a new and exciting interdisciplinary approach to understanding our place in the Universe. The results of a first-generation mission will most likely generate an amazing scope of diverse planets that will set planet formation, evolution, and our planet into an overall context. PMID:20307185

  10. Rescuing Reading at the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Thomas Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Two national studies of Americans' changing reading habits, published by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), quantified the grounds for concerns that college and university educators have expressed in recent years based on their own anecdotal evidence from observing students. "Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America" (2004)…

  11. Reading in Class & out of Class: An Experience Sampling Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumow, Lee; Schmidt, Jennifer A.; Kackar, Hayal

    2008-01-01

    This study described and compared the reading of sixth and eighth grade students both in and out of school using a unique data set collected with the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). On average, students read forty minutes a day out of class and seventeen minutes a day in class indicating that reading is a common leisure practice for…

  12. Leisure, science, and religion in 17th?century England

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Sylvester

    1994-01-01

    The transvaluation whereby work replaced leisure as the center of living emerged principally from the Protestant Reformation. Besides religion, the experimental science of Francis Bacon also played an integral role in the changing relationship between work and leisure. The Puritan Rebellion and England's scientific revolution, both of which occurred together in the middle of the 17th century, stressed themes that

  13. A Motivational Model of Leisure Participation in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaëtan F. Losier; Paul E. Bourque; Robert J. Vallerand

    1993-01-01

    We developed a motivational model of leisure participation to examine the factors that may encourage involvement by the elderly in leisure activities. This model posits that opportunities and constraints determine motivation to participate, which in turn predicts satisfaction. Satisfaction is expected to lead to participation. In a study testing the proposed model, 102 elderly Canadians answered a questionnaire assessing the

  14. Leisure Patterns among Retired Workers: Spillover or Compensatory Trends?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer, Yael; Harpaz, Itzhak

    1982-01-01

    Compared leisure behavior patterns after retirement with those of preretirement. Examined data within the context of the spillover and compensatory hypotheses, with retirement representing a nonwork sphere. Findings revealed a spillover effect, characterized by a high degree of passive, solitary leisure behavior both before and after retirement.…

  15. A Qualitative Look at Leisure Benefits for Taiwanese Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Shwu-Ching; Spaulding, Angela; Riney, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine attitudes of first year nursing students toward leisure participation at the Jen-Te Junior College of Medicine Nursing and Management in Miao-Li, Taiwan. The three research questions used for this study were: What types of leisure activities do first year nursing students at Jen-Te Junior College…

  16. The Meaning of Leisure for Residents in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nga Ling Chan; Honggen Xiao; Cho Yuk Chau; Hiu Tan Ma

    2012-01-01

    This article reports an inductive analysis of the meanings of leisure and the meaningfulness of its pursuit withheld by residents in Hong Kong; the study probes into the constraints, experiences, and impacts of leisure participation. In-depth interviews and grounded theory methodology were adopted for this inquiry. It was found that freedom, happiness, enjoyment, and health are shared elements in participants'

  17. Intermountain Leisure Symposium (8th, Ogden, Utah, November 19, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dennis A., Ed.

    Contained in this conference report are 22 selected papers presented at a symposium of leisure and recreation professionals. Titles and authors are: (1) "Ethics in Recreation and Leisure Services" (S. Harold Smith); (2) "Growing Opportunities: The Aging Population Market" (Nila M. Ipson); (3) "The Myth of Comfort" (Daniel L. Dustin); (4) "Golf as…

  18. Linking Leisure Interests to the RIASEC World of Work Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    The present study presents an interpretive framework for linking leisure interests, measured by the Leisure Interest Questionnaire (LIQ), to J. L. Holland's (1997) circumplex model of the world of work. Published data representing correlations between the LIQ and Holland's RIASEC interest types were obtained from Hansen and Scullard (2002).…

  19. Perceptions of Work and Leisure among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roadburg, Alan

    1981-01-01

    Interviews with elderly respondents (N=245) indicated that perceptions of work were influenced by type of job held before retirement. Perceptions of leisure were influenced by forced or voluntary retirement. Generally as people age or retire, their perception of leisure tends to shift away from "freedom" and toward "pleasure." (Author)

  20. Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.

    2005-01-01

    This third edition of "Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services" is unique from many different perspectives.The current effort of this book is focused on bringing together a number of interrelated elements that influence leadership in recreation, parks, and leisure service organizations. Thus, the authors have focused the effort on…

  1. Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.; Lauzon, Lara

    2011-01-01

    "Leadership for Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services" presents new perspectives on the importance of leadership in the profession. Integrating theory with practice, the book provides foundational perspectives in the study of leadership at all levels--direct service, supervisory, managerial and community/civic--in recreation, parks and leisure

  2. Leisure and Liberal Education: A Plea for Uselessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, John E.

    2009-01-01

    One cannot promote liberal education and ignore the fundamental tension that exists between leisure and utility. "To aim at utility everywhere," Aristotle writes, "is utterly unbecoming to high-minded and liberal spirits." Thus, the author's plea for leisure, for "uselessness," is a plea for the revitalization of liberal education. The purpose of…

  3. Political ideology and leisure policy in the United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bramham; I. P. Henry

    1985-01-01

    There is no well-developed literature on the relationship between leisure policy and political ideology. Three political ideologies — liberalism, conservatism and socialism — are examined for their core values and social policy implications. An attempt is made to construct liberal, conservative and socialist leisure policies, deduced from their ideological positions and current writings and policy statements of key thinkers. It

  4. A Study of the Leisure Experience of Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gokturk, Soheyda

    2009-01-01

    The shortened Leisure Experience Battery, developed by Caldwell, Smith, and Weissinger (1992), was applied to a sample of Turkish university students. The Leisure Experience Battery was developed and tested for US (American) adolescents and university students (Barnett, 2005). In the present study the Battery was used to examine a sample of 207…

  5. Importance of Green Hotel Attributes to Business and Leisure Travelers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Millar; Karl J. Mayer; Seyhmus Baloglu

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the environmental attitudes of business and leisure travelers, their green behavior at home, and the level of importance they place on having different green attributes in a hotel. A sample of 571 business and leisure travelers completed an online survey. Correlation analysis and t-tests were used to test for differences between the two groups. Results indicated that

  6. Location, location, location: women’s leisure in rural Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Campbell

    2011-01-01

    For many women living in rural Australia the location of both leisure and work is the family farm, a location that defines their identity as a ‘women of the land’. This paper investigates the impact of geographical location in shaping the leisure activities of rural women living in the Yass Valley Region of Australia. Using an interpretive research perspective and

  7. Leisure participation for individuals living with acquired spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Aron; Renwick, Rebecca; Yoshida, Karen

    2008-09-01

    Traditionally, rehabilitation professionals have viewed and studied leisure participation in terms of quantifiable activities. Advances in leisure studies have, however, led to recognition of the need for and value of examining leisure as a subjective experience too. Accordingly, this study used a qualitative approach to explore postinjury leisure participation for individuals living with acquired spinal cord injury. A secondary analysis was performed for data from a primary study that examined social adaptation needs related to community living after rehabilitation. Participants who had completed their initial rehabilitation at least 3 years earlier took part in in-depth, personal interviews. The analysis identified specific leisure activities participants had done and/or are doing after spinal cord injury. It also provided insight into how and why these activities are being done and/or not being done. Major findings are illustrated by participants' personal verbatim quotes. Implications and recommendations for further research and professional practice in rehabilitation are outlined. PMID:18708845

  8. Why should I read? - A cross-cultural investigation into adolescents' reading socialisation and reading attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeder, Peter; Stokmans, Mia

    2013-06-01

    While reading behaviour of adolescents is a frequent object of research, most studies in this field are restricted to a single country. This study investigates reading as a leisure-time activity across social groups from three regions differing in reading tradition as well as in the facilities available for reading. The authors analyse the reading behaviour of a total of 2,173 adolescents in the Netherlands, in Beijing (China), and in Cape Town (South Africa). Taking Icek Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour as a starting point, the authors adjusted it to model the three most important determinants of reading behaviour, namely (1) reading attitude; (2) subjective norms (implicit and explicit social pressure to read); and (3) perceived behavioural control, which includes reading proficiency and appropriateness of the available books (book supply). While they found the adjusted model to fit the Dutch and Beijing situation quite well, it appeared to be inappropriate for the Cape Town situation. Despite considerable cultural and situational differences between the Netherlands and Beijing, the results show a similar pattern for these two environments. The most important determinants turn out to be: the hedonic reading attitude, the implicit norm of family and friends, the attractiveness of the available choice of books, and the perceived reading proficiency.

  9. Effects of Type A Personality and Leisure Ethic on Chinese College Students' Leisure Activities and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping

    In an earlier laboratory experiment using university students in the United States, Tang and Baumeister (1984) examined the effects of the Leisure Ethic, Type A personality, and task labels on subjects' task performance. The results showed that the interaction between Leisure Ethic endorsement and task label was significant among Type A…

  10. Self-reported reading as a predictor of vocabulary knowledge.

    PubMed

    Pratheeba, N; Krashen, S

    2013-10-01

    25 engineering students in India, who were highly motivated to improve their English, filled out a questionnaire about their reading habits in English and took a demanding vocabulary test based on words taken from preparation books for the Graduate Records Examination. The correlation between reading habits and vocabulary was substantial (r = .78). PMID:24611248

  11. Time trends in leisure time physical activity and physical fitness in elderly people: 20 year follow-up of the Spanish population national health survey (1987-2006)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To estimate trends in leisure time physical activity and physical fitness between 1987-2006 in older Spanish people. Methods We analyzed data collected from the Spanish National Health Surveys conducted in 1987 (n = 29,647), 1993 (n = 20,707), 1995-1997 (n = 12,800), 2001 (n = 21,058), 2003 (n = 21,650), and 2006 (n = 29,478). The number of subjects aged ? 65 years included in the current study was 29,263 (1987: n = 4,958-16.7%; 1993: n = 3,751-17.8%; 1995-97: n = 2,229-17.4%; 2001: n = 4,356-20.7%; 2003: 6,134-28.3%; 2006: 7,835-26.5%). Main variables included leisure-time physical activity and physical fitness. We analyzed socio-demographic characteristics, self-rated health status, lifestyle habit and co-morbid conditions using multivariate logistic regression models. Results Women exhibited lower prevalence of leisure time physical activity and physical fitness compared to men (P < 0.05). The multivariate analysis for time trends found that practising leisure time physical activity increased from 1987 to 2006 (P < 0.001). Variables associated with a lower likelihood of practicing leisure time physical activity were: age ? 80 years old, ? 2 co-morbid chronic conditions, and obesity. Variables associated with lower physical fitness included: age ? 80 years, worse self rated health; ? 2 medications (only for walking), and obesity. Conclusions We found an increase in leisure time physical activity in the older Spanish population. Older age, married status, co-morbid conditions, obesity, and worse self-perceived health status were associated with lower activity. Identification of these factors can help to identify individuals at risk for physical inactivity. PMID:21995560

  12. Your Child's Habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... don't scold or lecture. Punishment, ridicule, or criticism could cause the behavior to increase. Involve your ... good behavior, it will disappear over time. The new, positive habit must be firmly established before the ...

  13. The Habitable Zone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    This illustration is an approximate representation of the planets in our solar system and their relation to what scientists call The Habitable Zone. The planet distances from the sun are measured in Astronomical Units (AU) and are not to scale.

  14. Changing your sleep habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these patterns over many years, they become habits. Insomnia is difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. In many cases, you can relieve insomnia by making a few simple lifestyle changes. However, ...

  15. Habitability design for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    Habitability is understood to mean those spacecraft design elements that involve a degree of comfort, quality or necessities to support man in space. These elements are environment, architecture, mobility, clothing, housekeeping, food and drink, personal hygiene, off-duty activities, each of which plays a substantial part in the success of a mission. Habitability design for past space flights is discussed relative to the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab spacecraft, with special emphasis on an examination of the Shuttle Orbiter cabin design from a habitability standpoint. Future projects must consider the duration and mission objectives to meet their habitability requirements. Larger ward rooms, improved sleeping quarters and more complete hygiene facilities must be provided for future prolonged space flights

  16. Habitability: CAMELOT 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alequin, W.; Barragan, A.; Carro, M.; Garcia, F.; Gonzalez, I.; Mercado, J. A.; Negron, N.; Lopez, D.; Rivera, L. A.; Rivera, M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1988 to 1989 the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program sponsored research and design efforts aimed at developing habitability criteria and at defining a habitability concept as a useful tool in understanding and evaluating dwellings for prolonged stays in extraterrestrial space. The Circulating Auto sufficient Mars-Earth Luxurious Orbital Transport (CAMELOT) was studied as a case in which the students would try to enhance the quality of life of the inhabitants by applying architectural design methodology. The study proposed 14 habitability criteria considered necessary to fulfill the defined habitability concept, which is that state of equilibrium that results from the interaction between components of the Individual Architecture Mission Complex, which allows a person to sustain physiological homeostatis, adequate performance, and acceptable social relationships. Architecture, design development, refinements and revisions to improve the quality of life, new insights on artificial gravity, form and constitution problems, and the final design concept are covered.

  17. Habitability study shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Studies of the habitability of the space shuttle orbiter are briefly summarized. Selected illustrations and descriptions are presented for: crew compartment, hygiene facilities, food system and galley, and storage systems.

  18. Reading Preferences and Expectations of Multilingual Israeli University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensoussan, Marsha

    2009-01-01

    Israeli students need to be multilingually literate to read academic texts, mainly in Hebrew, Arabic, Russian and English. In fact, little is known about students' reading habits despite a variety of university reading comprehension courses in different languages. The present study examines students' reading preferences and textual expectations,…

  19. NASA: Habitable Worlds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA's Habitable Worlds website encourages visitors to "search the solar system for signs of life," by selecting a "World to Explore." This creatively designed website smartly displays our solar system's colorful planets or worlds amidst the dark background of space. In order to gain in-depth information specific to each planet, users simply click on the world of their choosing. Each planet page provides beautiful images and information about habitability, moons, and more.

  20. Predicting Substance Use Behavior among South African Adolescents: The Role of Leisure Experiences across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Erin Hiley; Coffman, Donna L.; Caldwell, Linda L.; Smith, Edward A.; Wegner, Lisa; Vergnani, Tania; Mathews, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Using seven waves of data, collected twice a year from the 8th through the 11th grades in a low-resource community in Cape Town, South Africa, we aimed to describe the developmental trends in three specific leisure experiences (leisure boredom, new leisure interests, and healthy leisure) and substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana)…

  1. The leisure society II: the era of critique, 1980–2011

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Veal

    2012-01-01

    The “leisure society thesis” was developed primarily in the 1960s and 1970s and a recent paper in the World Leisure Journal summarised the relevant literature from that period and analysed contemporary recollections of it (Veal, 2011). This paper follows the story of the leisure society thesis since 1980. Set against the background of discussions of work and leisure in periods

  2. State Efforts to Promote Reading and Literary Activities in Communities. NGA Center for Best Practices Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Rates of reading in the United States have been declining for at least two decades, with the steepest decline occurring among young adults. Fewer than half of adults read literature--poetry, plays, short stories or novels--in their leisure time. At the current rate of decline, literary reading will virtually disappear in the next half-century. Few…

  3. LIBRARIES AND CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN THE SCHOOL READING PROGRAM. PROCEEDINGS OF THE HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY READING CONFERENCES, FOUR AND FIVE, VOLUME 2, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHLEICH, MIRIAM; SHEPHERD, DAVID L.

    SIXTEEN ARTICLES PRESENT DISCUSSIONS OF THE ROLE OF THE LIBRARY AND CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN THE TOTAL SCHOOL READING PROGRAM. THE ARTICLES OFFER SUGGESTIONS FOR BUILDING POSITIVE ATTITUDES IN READING, PLANNING THE LITERATURE PROGRAM, USING BASAL READERS TO FOSTER READING, STIMULATING READING HABITS, AND DEVELOPING THE LIBRARY SKILLS AND READING

  4. Gender and leisure-time physical activit y

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guilherme Loureiro Werneck; Eduardo Faerstein; Claudia S. Lopes

    This article discusses the relationship between gender and the social construction o f the body, specifically focusing on physical exercise during leisure time. The Pró-Saúde Project i s a prospective study consisting of 4,030 employees of a university in Rio de Janeiro, in which w e analyzed the answers on leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) by 3,740 participants. The result s

  5. Leisure constraints which affect continued nonresident hunter participation

    E-print Network

    Cook, Kathrine Helen

    1994-01-01

    LEISURE CONSTRAINTS WHICH AFFECT CONTINUED NONRESIDENT HUNTER PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KATHRINE HELEN COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences LEISURE CONSTRAINTS WHICH AFFECT CONTINUED NONRESIDENT HUNTER PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KATHRINE HELEN COOK Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. Leisure Activities, Caregiving Demands, and Catecholamine Levels in Dementia Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Chattillion, Elizabeth A.; Mausbach, Brent T.; Roepke, Susan K.; von Känel, Roland; Mills, Paul J.; Dimsdale, Joel E.; Allison, Matthew; Ziegler, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether satisfaction from leisure activities moderates the relationship between caregiving demands (i.e., hours per day spent caring for a spouse with dementia) and resting levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Spousal caregivers (N=107; mean age 73.95±8.12 years) were assessed in home for plasma levels of NE and EPI, amount of care provided, and leisure satisfaction. Regression was used to determine whether leisure satisfaction moderated the relationship between hours providing care per day and catecholamine levels. A significant interaction was found between hours caregiving and leisure satisfaction for NE, but not for EPI. Post hoc regressions were conducted for both NE and EPI. At low leisure satisfaction, time spent caring for a spouse was positively associated with plasma NE (? = .41; p = .005) and EPI (? = .44; p = .003). In contrast, at high levels of satisfaction, time caregiving was not significantly associated with plasma NE (? = ?.08; p = .57) or EPI (? = .23; p = .12). These findings suggest that leisure satisfaction may protect caregivers from increases in catecholamines, which have been implicated in cardiovascular risk. Further support for these findings may impact psychological treatments for distressed caregivers. PMID:22149759

  7. Trajectories of Martian Habitability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Beginning from two plausible starting points—an uninhabited or inhabited Mars—this paper discusses the possible trajectories of martian habitability over time. On an uninhabited Mars, the trajectories follow paths determined by the abundance of uninhabitable environments and uninhabited habitats. On an inhabited Mars, the addition of a third environment type, inhabited habitats, results in other trajectories, including ones where the planet remains inhabited today or others where planetary-scale life extinction occurs. By identifying different trajectories of habitability, corresponding hypotheses can be described that allow for the various trajectories to be disentangled and ultimately a determination of which trajectory Mars has taken and the changing relative abundance of its constituent environments. Key Words: Mars—Habitability—Liquid water—Planetary science. Astrobiology 14, 182–203. PMID:24506485

  8. CHARACTERIZING HABITABLE EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, L. [Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, 02138 MA, Cambridge (United States)], E-mail: lkaltene@cfa.harvard.edu

    2010-04-01

    We discuss the possibility of screening the atmosphere of exomoons for habitability. We concentrate on Earth-like satellites of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) that orbit in the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. The detectability of exomoons for EGPs in the HZ has recently been shown to be feasible with the Kepler Mission or equivalent photometry using transit duration observations. Transmission spectroscopy of exomoons is a unique potential tool to screen them for habitability in the near future, especially around low mass stars. Using the Earth itself as a proxy we show the potential and limits of spectroscopy to detect biomarkers on an Earth-like exomoon and discuss effects of tidal locking for such potential habitats.

  9. The Rise of E-Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainie, Lee; Zickuhr, Kathryn; Purcell, Kristen; Madden, Mary; Brenner, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of e-books and the adoption of specialized e-book reading devices are documented in a series of new nationally representative surveys by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project that look at the public's general reading habits, their consumption of print books, e-books and audiobooks, and their attitudes…

  10. The Habitability of Mars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Percival Lowell

    1908-01-01

    INASMUCH as Dr. Wallace has sent me his book through his publishers, as I gather from the wrapper-though it is not so expressed-I suppose it is incumbent on me to acknowledge it, since he clearly expects some sort of reply. The effect of its perusal is to show me again how cogent is the argument for the habitability of Mars,

  11. Temperature Variations and Habitability

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These are the student pages for a two part lesson plan that will teach students about observing, describing, and adapting to temperature variations and relating factors that influence planetary temperature and habitability. The class will decide upon a plan for describing indoor and outdoor environments and compare them with the data on environmental conditions at other Earth locales and planets in our solar system. These will be used to discuss temperature ranges, their relation to habitability, and ways to adapt to these conditions. In the second activity, students will give three examples of how humans modify the environment to improve livability, identify three factors that may determine the average temperature of a planet, identify a minimum of five factors that may determine the habitability of a planet, state the importance of maintaining habitable temperature on a planet, and briefly describe the links between two sets of factors of their choosing. The site provides a list of materials, objectives, and worksheets. Teachers' notes are also included.

  12. Learning How to Change Habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to get ready. Then write the steps here. ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Learning How to Change Habits American Diabetes Association? ? 1– ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 10/13 Toolkit No. 4: Learning How to Change Habits continued Things to Do ...

  13. Non-at-Risk Adolescents' Attitudes towards Reading in a Singapore Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokhorst-Heng, Wendy; Pereira, Delfin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the various nuanced dimensions of adolescents' dispositions towards reading in one secondary school in Singapore, where a high-stakes examination culture often threatens to colonise the practices of leisure reading. Our focus is on the better and more avid readers as they were the ones that developed the more negative…

  14. Reading(s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Geoffrey; Summerfield, Judith

    Developed for college English courses, this book presents selections of poetry, short stories, and commentary intended to invite different ways of reading and interpreting literature. An introduction provides an overview of the book's content, as well as a discussion of how to read. The first section, "Entering a Language," considers the…

  15. Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 01/12 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G.J., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011. RL 01/12. Cefas

  16. Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 11/11 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly, P. Rumney and J. Elliott Peer: Clyne, F.C., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E., Rumney, P., and Elliott, J., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey

  17. Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 02/12 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G, C.J., Clyne, F.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011. RL 02

  18. Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 04/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod and J. Elliott Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt.C., Garrod, C.J. and Elliott, J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009. RL 04/10. Cefas

  19. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 03/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Cefas Document Control Radiological Habits blank #12;Environment Report RL 03/14 Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 C.J. Garrod

  20. Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 05/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 J. Elliott, F.J. Clyne and C.J. Garrod Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt., Clyne, F.C. and Garrod, C.J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009. RL 05/10. Cefas, Lowestoft

  1. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 03/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, J. Elliott and J.R. Tipple Peer reviewed by G, C. J., Clyne, F. C., Elliott, J., and Tipple, J.R., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009

  2. Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 12/11 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, P. Rumney, J. Elliott, C.A. Smedley and V, J., Smedley, C., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010. RL 12/11. Cefas

  3. A labor/leisure tradeoff in cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Kool, Wouter; Botvinick, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    Daily life frequently offers a choice between activities that are profitable but mentally demanding (cognitive labor) and activities that are undemanding but also unproductive (cognitive leisure). Although such decisions are often implicit, they help determine academic performance, career trajectories, and even health outcomes. Previous research has shed light both on the executive control functions that ultimately define cognitive labor and on a "default mode" of brain function that accompanies cognitive leisure. However, little is known about how labor/leisure decisions are actually made. Here, we identify a central principle guiding such decisions. Results from 3 economic-choice experiments indicate that the motivation underlying cognitive labor/leisure decision making is to strike an optimal balance between income and leisure, as given by a joint utility function. The results reported establish a new connection between microeconomics and research on executive function. They also suggest a new interpretation of so-called ego-depletion effects and a potential new approach to such phenomena as mind wandering and self-control failure. PMID:23230991

  4. A labor/leisure tradeoff in cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Wouter; Botvinick, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Daily life frequently offers a choice between activities that are profitable but mentally demanding (cognitive labor) and activities that are undemanding but also unproductive (cognitive leisure). Although such decisions are often implicit, they help determine academic performance, career trajectories, and even health outcomes. Previous research has shed light both on the executive control functions that ultimately define cognitive labor and a ‘default mode’ of brain function that accompanies cognitive leisure. However, little is known about how labor/leisure decisions are actually made. Here, we identify a central principle guiding such decisions. Results from three economic-choice experiments indicate that the motivation underlying cognitive labor/leisure decision-making is to strike an optimal balance between income and leisure, as given by a joint utility function. The results reported establish a new connection between microeconomics and research on executive function. They also suggest a new interpretation of so-called ego-depletion effects, and a potential new approach to such phenomena as mind-wandering and self-control failure. PMID:23230991

  5. Leisure noise exposure in adolescents and young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, A.

    1991-12-01

    Many efforts have been made in recent times to combat occupational noise exposure, and noise preventive measures in many industries seem promising. Less positive, however, are noise exposure situations during leisure time activities. New noisy leisure activities are cropping up, and sound levels appear to have increased over the years. There is thus reason for concern over such noisy activities as listening to "walkman" devices, pop/rock concerts and car stereos, and being present at motor sports and shooting activities. Luckily, however, there seem not to be many reported cases of noise-induced hearing loss which can be clearly related to such leisure activities. In addition, recent animal experiments have shown that there is a possibility that the ear can be trained toward increased noise resistance. Nevertheless, general attitudes should be in favor of lowering the sound levels now found in connection with these activities.

  6. Optimal indolence: a normative microscopic approach to work and leisure

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Ritwik K.; Breton, Yannick-Andre; Solomon, Rebecca B.; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter; Dayan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dividing limited time between work and leisure when both have their attractions is a common everyday decision. We provide a normative control-theoretic treatment of this decision that bridges economic and psychological accounts. We show how our framework applies to free-operant behavioural experiments in which subjects are required to work (depressing a lever) for sufficient total time (called the price) to receive a reward. When the microscopic benefit-of-leisure increases nonlinearly with duration, the model generates behaviour that qualitatively matches various microfeatures of subjects’ choices, including the distribution of leisure bout durations as a function of the pay-off. We relate our model to traditional accounts by deriving macroscopic, molar, quantities from microscopic choices. PMID:24284898

  7. Trajectories of martian habitability.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S

    2014-02-01

    Beginning from two plausible starting points-an uninhabited or inhabited Mars-this paper discusses the possible trajectories of martian habitability over time. On an uninhabited Mars, the trajectories follow paths determined by the abundance of uninhabitable environments and uninhabited habitats. On an inhabited Mars, the addition of a third environment type, inhabited habitats, results in other trajectories, including ones where the planet remains inhabited today or others where planetary-scale life extinction occurs. By identifying different trajectories of habitability, corresponding hypotheses can be described that allow for the various trajectories to be disentangled and ultimately a determination of which trajectory Mars has taken and the changing relative abundance of its constituent environments. PMID:24506485

  8. Personality and health habits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. J. M. Vingerhoets; M. Croon; A. J. Jeninga; L. J. Menges

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred and fifty-five males and 523 females from a community sample participated in a study on the relationship between seven health practices (sleeping; breakfasting; snacking; being at good weight; smoking; alcohol consumption and physical activity) and seven personality factors (Neuroticism; Social Inadequacy; Rigidity; Hostility; Self-sufficiency; Dominance and Self-esteem).It was found that the seven health habits did not constitute a

  9. Relationships between leisure factors and health-related stress among older adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liang-Chih Chang; Ping Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between leisure autonomy, leisure competence, and leisure social support and health-related stress among older adults. It also examined whether an increase in age moderated the relationships between these three leisure factors and health-related stress. Two hundred fifty-six older adults living in Keelung City, Taiwan were randomly selected as participants at the first year. At the

  10. Leisure engagement and subjective well-being: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, Lauren; Tay, Louis; Ng, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Numerous studies show a link between leisure engagement and subjective well-being (SWB). Drawing on common experiential features of leisure, psychological need theories, and bottom-up models of SWB, we suggest that leisure engagement influences SWB via leisure satisfaction. We examine the proposed cross-sectional relations and mediation model using random-effects meta-analyses that include all available populations. To provide a stronger test of causal influence, we also examine longitudinal relations between leisure satisfaction and SWB and effects of experimental leisure interventions on SWB using random effects meta-analyses of all available populations. Findings based on 37 effect sizes and 11,834 individuals reveal that leisure engagement and SWB are moderately associated (inverse-variance weighted r = .26) and mediated by leisure satisfaction. Cross-lagged regression analyses of longitudinal studies, controlling for prior SWB, reveal bottom-up effects of leisure satisfaction on SWB (? = .15) and top-down effects of SWB on leisure satisfaction (? = .16). Experimental studies reveal that leisure interventions enhance SWB (d = 1.02). Compared with working samples, retired samples exhibit a stronger relation between leisure engagement and SWB, and between leisure satisfaction and SWB. Measures of the frequency and diversity of leisure engagement are more strongly associated with SWB than measures of time spent in leisure. Overall, although not minimizing top-down influences, results are consistent with bottom-up models of SWB and suggest that the leisure domain is a potentially important target for enhancing SWB. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25602273

  11. More to Women's Lives than Work? A Model for a Course Addressing Women and Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah; Henderson, Karla A.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a college course on women and leisure to be taught from a feminist perspective. Justifies the course and analyzes its content, assignments, and evaluation. Stresses the need to make women's leisure less invisible and to promote social change that ensures opportunities for women's leisure. Includes course syllabus. (CH)

  12. Sex-Typing of Leisure Activities: A Test of Two Theories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George M. Zinkhan; Penelope J. Prenshaw; Angeline Grace

    2004-01-01

    Leisure activities are considered here as a suhset of consump- tion, and we are interested in the relationship hetween gender schema and leisure activities. In order to test rival predictions about gender schema, sex-typing of leisure activities is related to two individual difference measures: gender personality (Bem 1981) and gender-role attitudes (Spence 1984). 271 subjects were given a list of

  13. Changes in Leisure Styles and Satisfaction of Older People: A Five Years Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Cristina; Spazzafumo, Liana; Papa, Roberta; Marcellini, Fiorella

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the leisure style and leisure satisfaction of a sample of older people at baseline and after a period of 5 years. Three groups were identified by factorial and cluster analyses and labelled under the headings of: Organised Style, Surrounding Style and Indoor Style. Each group represented a different typology of leisure,…

  14. Media images of women and leisure: an analysis of magazine advertisements, 1964–87

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia A. Bolla

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the media portrayal of women's leisure in order to understand influences on women's access to, and experience of, leisure. Leisure advertisements in two women's magazines were examined over a 24-year period using content analysis. One magazine aimed at adult women, and its partner publication aimed at young women, were selected. Over the 24-year period, socializing was strongly

  15. 77 FR 63801 - Aqua-Leisure Industries, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...signed in counterparts. AQUA-LEISURE INDUSTRIES, INC. Dated: 8/21/12 By...Steven Berenson, CEO Aqua-Leisure Industries, Inc. Dated: 8/21/12 By...Gigounas, Esq. Counsel to Aqua-Leisure Industries, Inc. DLA Piper San Francisco,...

  16. Patterns and Determinants of Leisure Participation of Youth and Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badia, M.; Orgaz, M. B.; Verdugo, M. A.; Ullan, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with developmental disabilities are at high risk for a limited participation in leisure activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the participation in, preference for and interest in leisure activities of young and adults with developmental disabilities, and to examine the factors associated with leisure activity.…

  17. Parent and Child Perspectives of Family Leisure Involvement and Satisfaction with Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabriskie, Ramon B.; McCormick, Bryan P.

    2003-01-01

    Examined relationships between family leisure involvement and satisfaction with family life. Data on families recruited through middle schools indicated that parents, but not children, considered family leisure involvement the strongest predictor of satisfaction. At the family level, only the block including core and balance family leisure

  18. Role Overload, Job Satisfaction, Leisure Satisfaction, and Psychological Health among Employed Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Quinn M.

    2008-01-01

    Role overload, job satisfaction, leisure satisfaction, and psychological health were measured for 155 women who were employed full time. Role overload was negatively correlated with psychological health, job satisfaction, and leisure satisfaction. Job satisfaction and leisure satisfaction were positively correlated with psychological health.…

  19. Incentives: The Effects on Reading Attitude and Reading Behaviors of Third-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Gayle M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether third grade literacy students who receive incentive rewards as part of their instruction will exhibit significantly higher reading habits and attitudes toward recreational reading than they did before the incentives were introduced. The study examined 19 third grade students with fairly high…

  20. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A. Compton); "Reading Recovery in Arizona--A…

  1. Reading Faster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the visual nature of the reading process as it relates to reading speed. It points out that there is a physical limit on normal reading speed and beyond this limit the reading process will be different from normal reading where almost every word is attended to. The article describes a range of activities for developing…

  2. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Stage, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  3. Leisure Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J., Ed.; Thompson, Donna, Ed.

    This volume explores legal issues that serve as foundations for quality active leisure participation by persons with disabilities. In addition to documenting details of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), playground and equipment standards and guidelines, and American Camping Assoication standards, it presents specific information on risk…

  4. Factors Related to Physically Active Leisure among College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Sylvia-Bobiak; Linda L. Caldwell

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide additional information about the complex relation of social cognitive constructs, gender, and active leisure among university students. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test the hypothesized relations in a sample of 874 undergraduate students. Peer and family support had a moderate direct effect on self-efficacy while self-efficacy had a large direct

  5. INFO RELEASE. National Information Network for Recreation, Leisure and Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Vidya S.

    A study by the Northern Territories Department of Community Development systematically and specifically identified information needs and categories of clients through a set of intellectual concepts in the fields of sport, recreation, and leisure. A survey of Australia's serials holdings was conducted to assess the country's existing information…

  6. Leisure, Digital Games and Learning: Perspectives for School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arruda, Eucidio Pimenta; Arruda, Durcelina Pimenta

    2014-01-01

    This text discusses the relationship between leisure and education in contemporary society from the perspective of day-to-day use of videogames by young people and its relationship to learning, and specifically school learning. We intend to analyze, in the light of current academic production, the following question: what possible relations are…

  7. Training and development in British hospitality, tourism and leisure SMEs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivia Kyriakidou; Leonidas Maroudas

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses upon positive examples of hospitality, tourism and leisure small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the area of training and development. The research reports part of the most detailed study of hospitality-related SMEs ever undertaken in the UK. A total of 89 case studies were completed. Our results indicate that successful organizations adopt an informal approach which is

  8. Sequence Dance for Lifelong Leisure Activity: An International Experience!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John P.

    This paper provides the outline of a session in dance at the annual meeting of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance. The purpose of the session was to provide an opportunity to celebrate individual differences while learning new skills for lifelong leisure activity through an English dance form known as…

  9. The Future of Leisure Studies in Research Universities: Administrators' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dustin, Daniel; Collins, Rachel; Schultz, Jeremy; Browne, Laurie; Schwab, Keri; Rose, Jeff; Timmerman, Danielle; Altschuler, Ben; Jostad, Jeremy; Spencer, Callie; Newman, Jackie; Bricker, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the content of a three-day administrative summit held at Zion Ponderosa Resort in southern Utah in late September 2010. Department chairs, heads, and deans representing 13 universities across North America offering leisure studies doctoral degrees, master's degrees, and undergraduate professional preparation degrees…

  10. Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

    2012-01-01

    Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

  11. Leisure in the Natural Environment--Past, Prologue and Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan; Priest, Simon

    1990-01-01

    This discussion of outdoor leisure includes the following topics: adventure sports; risk taking; program liability for adventure-related injuries; trends in outdoor recreation; outdoor recreation's contribution to environmental attitudes; outdoor/environmental education; the role of cognition, ethics, and direct experience in shaping an…

  12. Leisure Today. Recreation Development in the American Countryside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patrick R., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This special feature, an introduction and nine articles, highlights the continued impact of rural America on recreational lifestyles of both rural and urban residents. Topics include change, the role of leisure, local park and recreation departments, corporate cooperation, recreation development, health/wellness, festivals/special events, and…

  13. he Southern Nevada economy is very dependent on its leisure

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    T he Southern Nevada economy is very dependent on its leisure and hospitality industry. After of Las Vegas tourism have not yet reached their prerecession peaks. Strength in the U.S. economy, particularly Arizona's and California's, and in the Asia Pacific economies will be essential for a full

  14. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  15. Helping Individuals with Severe Disabilities Find Leisure Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchak, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting leisure activities for individuals with severe disabilities include integration with nondisabled peers, age appropriateness, choice/preference, adaptations and partial participation, and feasibility. A form is presented for systematically evaluating potential recreational activities to determine the level to which they…

  16. Adventure recreation reconceived: Positive forms of deviant leisure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shayne Galloway

    2006-01-01

    The concept of adventure remains deeply rooted in the domain of recreation and leisure. Adventure recreation defined is “a variety of self?initiated activities utilizing an interaction with the natural environment, that contains elements of real or apparent danger in which the outcome, while uncertain, can be influenced by the participant and circumstance” (Ewert, 1989). Miriam?Webster defines adventure as: an undertaking

  17. Income Inequality, Leisure-Labor Choices and Public Debt's Neutrality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerasimos T. Soldatos

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a variant of the traditional Diamond modeling of public debt and economic growth; a variant leading to debt's neutrality even in the absence of the assumptions under which the neutrality result usually holds. The model incorporates explicitly the impact of socioeconomic classes and leisure-labor choices. The issue of neutrality is then approached in a Kaleckian fashion. The

  18. Leisure, Recreation, and Play from a Developmental Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Linda L.; Witt, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The terms "play, recreation, and leisure" can evoke thoughts of frivolity, fun, sociability, competition, slothfulness, or idleness. However, there is substantial evidence that what people do in their discretionary or free time has important developmental and health implications. In this article, the authors examine how play, recreation, and…

  19. Evaluating a distributed physical leisure game for three players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian'Floyd' Mueller; Martin R. Gibbs

    2007-01-01

    Physical leisure activities such as table tennis provide healthy exercise and can offer a means to connect with others socially; however, players have to be in the same physical location to play. We have developed a networked table tennis-like game that is played with a real paddle and ball, augmented with a large-scale videoconference. Unlike existing commercial console games that

  20. Youth Unemployement, Leisure and Life-Styles: Some Educational Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Leo; Raymond, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the research on unemployed adolescents, noting a lack of evidence about the schools' role in preparing adolescents for an uncertain future and about unemployment from the adolescents' perspective. Discusses a Scottish study showing the effects of unemployment on adolescent lifestyle and leisure and the schools' emphasis on work. (SB)

  1. Betting, billiards and smoking: leisure in public libraries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Snape

    1992-01-01

    Rate-supported public libraries were established in Great Britain in the mid-nineteenth century with mixed objectives of educational progress and recreational reform. Although librarians upheld the concept of public libraries as educational establishments and normally deprecated the recreational uses of libraries, the public demand upon libraries was principally of a leisure nature. This article traces the origins of public libraries in

  2. Youth Development in After-School Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Denise M.; Gottfredson, Denise C.; Cross, Amanda B.; Rorie, Melissa; Connell, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Leisure activities that occur outside of the school hours may facilitate positive youth development.The experiences of youth in three categories of activities (basketball and football, other sports, and nonsports) are examined in this study. Based on prior research, it is hypothesized that students participating in basketball and football will…

  3. Reading epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mesri, J C; Pagano, M A

    1987-01-01

    This is a report of a 21-year-old woman with reading epilepsy. Clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) observations are presented while the patient read a news magazine in Spanish, read a magazine in English, read an announcement repetitively, viewed comic strips without legends, made a mathematical calculation. Only reading in Spanish produced clinical and EEG paroxysms. This case report supports the "communication" hypothesis as opposed to hypotheses that emphasize proprioceptive and other "lower order" stimuli in evoking seizures while reading. PMID:3582294

  4. The Relationship between Degree of Influence of Agents of Leisure Socialization and Generalized Leisure Self-Efficacy Among University Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Hoff

    Although a few studies have been conducted that provide insight into factors that influence generalized leisure self-efficacy, no previous studies have taken a life cycle orientation to examine influences of such important agents of socialization as parents, peers, teachers, and television during childhood and adolescence. Existing theoretical and empirical evidence, however, would suggest that these agents of socialization may play

  5. Review of Research in Secondary Reading in Nigeria (1959-1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etim, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews secondary school reading research in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading interests and habits, textbooks, teaching procedures, and reading in content areas published between 1959 and 1988 in Nigeria. Looks at Nigerian research results from a global perspective. Suggests areas for future research. (RS)

  6. Relationships between Sixth-Graders' Reading Comprehension and Two Different Measures of Print Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear-Swerling, Louise; Brucker, Pamela O.; Alfano, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined sixth-graders' reading comprehension and component reading abilities in relation to two measures of print exposure: an author recognition test (ART) involving fiction authors and a reading habits questionnaire (RHQ) about children's voluntary reading for enjoyment across various genres. The ART correlated only with children's…

  7. Habits of Chameleons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Alex. Blakiston

    1896-01-01

    I HAVE just read Mr. Ridsdale's letter about the Chameleon, and write to say that I have one here which has lived in England since May 23, 1891, when it was brought from the Cape by my nephew. I imagine it must be somewhat different to Mr. Ridsdale's specimen, judging from the variations of colour. This one has green as

  8. How Common are Habitable Planets?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth is teeming with life, which, occupies a diverse array of environments; other bodies in our Solar System offer fewer, if any, niches which are habitable by life as we know it. Nonetheless, astronomical studies suggest that a large number of habitable planets-are likely to be present within our Galaxy.

  9. What makes a planet habitable ?

    E-print Network

    Guyon, Olivier

    edge of the habitable zone, probably with a Venus-like greenhouse effect. 581 d is a super-Earth (~10 decades, we will finally be able to probe for life on exoplanets not too different from Earth #12;What makes a planet habitable ? #12;#12;How to detect planets ? #12;Radial velocity #12;Transits

  10. What Makes a Habitable Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2013-04-01

    Space missions help answer one of humanity's most profound questions: Are we alone in the universe? To begin to understand what makes a planet habitable, and thus where to look for life both within and outside of Earth's solar system, scientists need to understand what in planetary formation and what in its subsequent evolution combine to produce a habitable planet.

  11. Language Habits of the Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinosita, Koreo

    1988-01-01

    Contrasts Japanese language habits with Western language habits, asserting that Japanese need to speak more concisely, express themselves clearly and frankly, and eliminate superfluous polite language and preliminaries in order to be successful in the efficiency-oriented civilization that is a product of Western culture. (RAE)

  12. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 02/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12; Cefas Document Control Radiological #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Environment Report RL 02/14 Radiological Habits

  13. Reading Aloud

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Emily Morgan

    2007-01-01

    This chapter addresses some of the research supporting the importance of reading aloud, tips to make your read-aloud time more valuable, descriptions of Harvey and Goudvis's six key reading strategies (2000), and tools you can use to enhance students' comprehension during read-aloud time.

  14. Reading Comics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Many adults, even librarians who willingly add comics to their collections, often dismiss the importance of comics. Compared to reading "real" books, reading comics appears to be a simple task and compared to reading no books, reading comics might be preferable. After all, comics do have words, but the plentiful pictures seem to carry most of the…

  15. Leisure and Quality of Life in an International and Multicultural Context: What Are Major Pathways Linking Leisure to Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at advancing the conceptualization of leisure as a contributor to quality of life (QOL) in an international and multicultural context, based on an extensive and critical review of literature on leisure and QOL from a global, international perspective. Given the central role of culture in conceptualizing this notion, this paper…

  16. Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2005

    E-print Network

    exposure 39 4.9 Water based activities 42 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 44 5.1 Terrestrial survey area.1 Direct radiation survey area 50 6.2 Residential activities 51 6.3 Leisure activities 51 6.4 Commercial 12 2. THE SURVEY 14 2.1 Site activity 14 2.2 Survey objectives 15 2.3 Survey areas 16 2.4 Conduct

  17. Places for Leisure as Interactive Space of the City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvia Serreli

    The spatialities of contemporary social life derive from the systematic movement of people for their work and everyday life,\\u000a leisure and pleasure (Sheller and Urry 2006). Urban behaviours are affected by continuous dematerialisation practices and\\u000a by a large number of link-ups that are constantly being redefined. In universal mobility and interchange, subjects operate\\u000a in networks interacting on different scales within

  18. Reading Aloud

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lynda Delo

    2008-07-01

    Many resources are available to elementary teachers who wish to support science learning with literature. Unfortunately, somewhere between middle school and high school, the emphasis on using literature to teach science content--particularly the exercise of reading aloud--has all but disappeared. However, the practice of reading aloud is helpful because most students have higher listening comprehension than reading comprehension (Trelease 2006)--low-reading level students, English language learners, and auditory learners in particular, tend to understand what they hear better than what they read. This article provides suggestions for including the practice of reading aloud in the high school science classroom.

  19. No Fun Anymore: Leisure and Marital Quality Across the Transition to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Claxton, Amy; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    This study examines changes in leisure patterns across the transition to parenthood for dual-earner, working-class couples, as well as the relationship between leisure and marital quality. To this end, 147 heterosexual couples were interviewed across the transition to parenthood. Findings indicate that during the transition to parenthood, husbands and wives experience an initial decline in leisure, followed by a gradual incline after the wife’s return to work. Overall, wives who reported more shared leisure prenatally also reported more marital love and less conflict 1 year later. Husbands with more independent leisure prenatally reported less love and more conflict 1 year later. Conclusions suggest leisure time is integral to well-functioning marriages, with effects lasting throughout the first year of parenthood. PMID:20224746

  20. Obesity and Smoking Habits

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, T.; Lowe, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    A large-scale survey of steel workers in South Wales has shown a considerable difference between the body weights of smokers and of non-smokers. The difference increases with age so that men over 40 years who have never smoked are on average 13 lb (5·9 kg) heavier than smokers. Even so, smokers are about 15 lb (6·8 kg) heavier than the weight standard considered desirable by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, while non-smokers are nearly 30 lb (13·6 kg) heavier. About 20% of the men are attempting to give up the smoking habit. Ex-smokers who have given up smoking for more than eight years approach the body weight of men of the same age who have never smoked. Many reports have been published on the health consequences of smoking and of obesity. Because smoking and obesity are inversely related studies of the interrelation of these two health hazards and of their relative importance are needed. PMID:5096876

  1. Endolithic microniches support habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Rodríguez, N.; Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Fernández-Sampedro, M.; Amils, R.

    2013-09-01

    Particular micro-niches on extreme environments give us some clues about the habitability potential under protected environments with important connotations from an astrobiological point of view [1]. The salts precipitation patters in extreme environments can contribute to biomineralization processes which could be of special interest for organics but also life preservation on environmental harsh conditions. These "oasys" for organics and/or life forms are of special as trobiological interest and should attract our attention in other planets and we should be looking for it during rover exploration missions. Endolithic micro niches in Rio Tinto salts precipitates determine controlled scenarios where phototrops develop under controlled conditions. Rio Tinto, 100 km river located at South West of Spain, is being taken as a well reported Mars analog due to the similarities in the mineralogy of the system which that reported by MER Opportunity Rover missions which landed in Meridiani Planum where sedimentary deposits have been identified in different craters [2]. Interesting multi layered salty deposits were identified in Rio Tinto source area where endolithic micro niches were settled [3]. Green layers appear included in brown stratified salt precipitates. The crust deposit was between 5 mm and 1 cm width. The layered structure is deposited over rocks or over man made structures as dam or mining tunnels walls but always in places with specific environmental characteristics. It appears in not direct Sun light exposed places (shadow side of walls) with thermal and pH stability.

  2. Healthy habits for weight loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... habits if your shelves are lined with sugary snacks. Rearrange the kitchen to make diet-boosting foods ... you feel hungry, you'll have a healthy snack close at hand. Reduce temptation. If you know ...

  3. Habitability: from stars to cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuelle J. Javaux; Véronique Dehant

    2010-01-01

    To determine where to search for life in our solar system or in other extrasolar systems, the concept of habitability has\\u000a been developed, based on the only sample we have of a biological planet—the Earth. Habitability can be defined as the set\\u000a of the necessary conditions for an active life to exist, even if it does not exist. In astronomy,

  4. Leisure in Children and Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Sabrina; April, Karine Toupin; Grandpierre, Viviane; Majnemer, Annette; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe participation in social and physical leisure activities among children and adolescents with JIA, as well as identify potential determinants of leisure participation. Methods Electronic databases were systematically searched for articles published up until June 2013 pertaining to participation in leisure activities among youth with JIA and other rheumatic diseases. Studies were included if they measured involvement in either social or physical leisure activities. Selection and quality appraisal of articles were completed independently by two authors. Results Eight hundred and ninety-three articles were found through electronic and reference search. One hundred and nine full articles were reviewed to assess for eligibility. Twelve articles met inclusion criteria and findings were reviewed. Most focused on describing participation in physical rather than social activities. Results suggest that youth with JIA participated less in both social and physical leisure activities as compared to healthy peers, and those with JIA did not meet national recommendations for physical activity. Potential determinants of leisure participation were socio-demographic (age, sex), anthropometric (height, weight) and disease-related (JIA subtype, disease duration, pain, number of swollen or painful joints, stiffness, fatigue, well-being) factors. Conclusion Characterization of leisure activity remains limited and mostly focused on physical activity in JIA. Assessment of more comprehensive outcome measures is warranted to obtain a better description of leisure in this population. Evidence of the influence of contextual factors as potential determinants of involvement in leisure among children with pediatric rheumatologic diseases is needed. PMID:25329390

  5. Leisure activity participation as predictor of quality of life in Korean urban-dwelling elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Park, Soo Hyun

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated participation in leisure activities in urban-dwelling elderly persons in Korea and its role in predicting quality of life. The participated activities over a 48-hour period were recorded by each participant, and amount of participated time for each activity was calculated. Correlational analysis examined the relationship between the degree of participation in domains of leisure activity and quality of life. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine which leisure activity participation predicted quality of life. The results indicated that the participants spent the most time in "use of media". Quality of life showed a positive correlation with "use of media", "sports and outdoor leisure activity" and "hobby and other leisure activity". The results of hierarchical multiple regression analysis found that use of media, "religious activity", sports and outdoor leisure activity and hobby and other leisure activity significantly predicted quality of life after controlling for the effects of demographic variables. Of these variables, hobby and other leisure activity was the strongest predictor of quality of life. The results will augment treatment planning and activity management in enhancing quality of life by allied health professionals, especially occupational therapists. The findings are limited in that the sample consisted of urban-dwelling elderly primarily with a religious affiliation. It is recommended that a cross-cultural investigation using standard assessment measures be conducted to validate whether there is indeed similarities in time use and leisure activity participation in the elderly in different cultures. PMID:24840602

  6. Just Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, James W.

    1998-01-01

    In "Operation Just Read," a teacher leadership team used action-research procedures to identify a problem (low independent reading levels), obtain baseline data, analyze results, formulate a rationale, implement a program, collect data, analyze results, and arrive at conclusions. Schools can increase at-home independent reading for the average…

  7. Forgetting How to Read, or Just Re-Locating It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    A study conducted by the National Endowment for the Arts found that the percentage of American adults who read literature has declined rapidly over the past two decades, indicating an imminent cultural crisis. Digital revolution, which has had a tremendous impact on young people's reading habits, is considered as the major culprit of this decline…

  8. Matthew Effects and the Reading-Writing Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, David James

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between fifth-grade students' out-ofschool reading habits and measures of their reading comprehension and writing abilities. The sample was composed of forty-two students attending an urban school in Northeastern Massachusetts. Each morning, for fifteen consecutive weeks, students recorded an approximation…

  9. Archimedes, Reading, and the Sustenance of Academic Research Culture in Library Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of academic research, library instruction, and the role of leisure, reflection, and creativity. Suggests that these cultural elements should be introduced to undergraduates and contends that deep reading, rather than information literacy competency, cultivates these elements. Examines productivity and the faculty research…

  10. Archimedes, reading, and the sustenance of academic research culture in library instruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Cain

    2002-01-01

    Leisure, reflection, and creativity have sustained a culture of research and scholarship throughout much of academia’s history. This article argues that these cultural elements should be introduced to the present generation of undergraduates and contends that “deep” reading, rather than information literacy competency, cultivates these elements.

  11. Delegation: developing the habit.

    PubMed

    Duehring, G L

    2001-01-01

    Often, individuals take personal delegation skills for granted and assume the presence of expertise with the practice of delegation, which may not be the case. Those assumptions can be found at both ends of the process, with the manager and the employee. Every time a manager places an employee in a job and gives him or her a job description or a set of instructions, the manager has delegated. The manager has placed someone in a position to perform operations for which ultimately the manager is responsible. Delegation is both a process and a condition. The process is the act of assigning work to an employee; the condition of delegating a job is a thorough and mutual understanding between the supervisor and the employee of specific results and methods by which these results can be achieved. The condition goes far beyond the simple process of assigning a job. The point at which many managers fail in delegating is in neglecting to move past the process and take the required steps to establish a true condition of delegation. Failure to delegate is the leading cause of managers retarding their professional growth. In the case of a workaholic--someone who fails to learn the value of delegation--the job soon becomes too much, and the effectiveness of the department may suffer. By reducing the burden of technical duties and busy work, managers will find that it is possible to be more effective and actually spend more time managing. A number of the reasons why managers fail to delegate are complex and subconscious, such as insecurity, fear of competition and even fear of not being recognized for accomplishments achieved. Other reasons for failing to delegate are habit and shortages of staff members or time. Delegation is an investment in time. The eventual gain from such an investment, which may temporarily cause the department to fall further behind during a training period, outweighs the costs. The manager is the final authority in such duties as approval, recommendations and implementations. Remember that to delegate authority does not mean to delegate ultimate responsibility. Only the manager should bear the burden of responsibilities that directly affect his or her career. One of the most common mistakes in the process of delegating is to turn an employee loose on a job with inadequate instruction. Too often this is caused by lack of time. Strictly speaking, when managers assign tasks to employees, they are delegating the authority to perform the task. However, all responsibility for the completion of the task remains with the manager. In most instances, responsibility for the failure of a delegated project lies with the manager, not the employee. While some failure is to be expected, it can be minimized by proper evaluation of the situation and proper communication. Delegation is a calculated risk. The manager should be willing to take a risk to see if an employee does have the skills and ability to perform the specific task. How else will the manager ever know? Developing a strong habit of delegation will lead to development of an effective and efficient staff and department. Delegation will serve not only the organization well, but also managers throughout their careers. PMID:11499078

  12. Managing away bad habits.

    PubMed

    Waldroop, J; Butler, T

    2000-01-01

    We've all worked with highly competent people who are held back by a seemingly fatal personality flaw. One person takes on too much work; another sees the downside in every proposed change; a third pushes people out of the way. At best, people with these "bad habits" create their own glass ceilings, which limit their success and their contributions to the company. At worst, they destroy their own careers. Although the psychological flaws of such individuals run deep, their managers are not helpless. In this article, James Waldroop and Timothy Butler--both psychologists--examine the root causes of these flaws and suggest concrete tactics they have used to help people recognize and correct the following six behavior patterns: The hero, who always pushes himself--and subordinates--too hard to do too much for too long. The meritocrat, who believes that the best ideas can and will be determined objectively and ignores the politics inherent in most situations. The bulldozer, who runs roughshod over others in a quest for power. The pessimist, who always worries about what could go wrong. The rebel, who automatically fights against authority and convention. And the home run hitter, who tries to do too much too soon--he swings for the fences before he's learned to hit singles. Helping people break through their self-created glass ceilings is the ultimate win-win scenario: both the individual and the organization are rewarded. Using the tactics introduced in this article, managers can help their brilliantly flawed performers become spectacular achievers. PMID:11143157

  13. Interrupted Reading

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cathy Edwins

    2012-09-01

    Interrupted reading is a close reading technique that consists of dividing a passage of text into short chunks and pausing the reading after each section in order for the student to consider possible responses. This type of reading helps students connect with the text by requiring that they summarize, look for devices, make predictions, etc., as they are reading. This technique helps students to build confidence as they are forced to slow down and notice detail, and it is a tool to help build analysis and commentary skills. Passages from Annie Dillard, The Things They Carried and Cold Mountain are utilized in this lesson.

  14. Internet Use and Its Impact on Engagement in Leisure Activities in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ronggang; Fong, Patrick S. W.; Tan, Peking

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Internet use has become an increasingly common leisure time activity among Chinese citizens. The association between Internet use and engagement in leisure activities is especially unclear among China population. This study aims to investigate Internet usage and to determine whether active Internet use is a marker for low or high levels of leisure time activities. Methods/Principal Findings With the use of a face-to-face structured questionnaire interview, a total of 2,400 respondents who met all screening requirements were surveyed to answer the questions in eight major cities in China. 66.2% (n?=?1,589) of all respondents were identified as Internet users. Of these Internet users, 30.0%, 24.1%, 26.4%, and 19.6% were clustered as “informative or instrumental users,” “entertainment users,” “communication users,” and “advanced users,” respectively. Regarding time spent on Internet use in leisure time, more than 96% reported going online in non-work situations, and 26.2% (n?=?416) were classified as “heavy Internet users.” A logistic regression analysis revealed that there were significant differences in some leisure activities between non-Internet users and Internet users, with an observed one-unit increase in the leisure time dependence category increasing the probability of engaging in mental or social activities. In contrast, Internet users were less engaged in physical exercise-related activities. In addition, advanced Internet users were generally more active in leisure time activities than non-Internet users and other types of users. Conclusion/Significance Internet use is one of very common leisure activities in Chinese citizens, and age, gender, income, and education are the key factors affecting Internet access. According to different types of leisure activities, Internet usage has different impacts on leisure activity engagement. High Internet dependence has no significant negative influence on engagement in mental or social leisure activities, but this group respondent tended to be less engaged in physical activities. PMID:24586902

  15. Close Reading Exemplar: Tom Sawyer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Student Achievement Partners for Just Read, Florida!

    2012-09-09

    The goal of this one day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to discover the rich humor and moral lesson embedded in Twain’s text. By reading and rereading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will explore the problem Tom Sawyer faced and how he “solved” his conundrum. When combined with writing about the passage, students will learn to appreciate how Twain’s humor contains a deeper message and derive satisfaction from the struggle to master complex text. At the end of the lesson, students are provided two writing prompts to constructive a narrative inspired by Twain's text.

  16. Unbending the mind: or, commercialized leisure and the rhetoric of eighteenth-century diversion.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Darryl P

    2012-01-01

    This essay opens by asking why the formative period in the “commercialization of leisure” in England (c. 1690–1760) happens also to be the period during which intrusion, obstruction, and interruption first began to thrive as conspicuous rhetorical techniques in commercial literature. The essay answers this question through a series of close readings that reveal the complex reciprocity between what I call “cultural diversion” and “discursive diversion,” between those social amusements which provide relief from the serious concerns of daily life and those linguistic and textual devices which characteristically disrupt so much of the discourse of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century—devices such as extravagant metaphors, rows of asterisked ellipses, and, most pervasively, digressions. Where modern discussion of such devices has tended to rely on the critical touch-stone of “self-consciousness,” this essay restores disruptive rhetoric to what I see as its original cultural context by demonstrating how frequently self-conscious authors associate the form and function of devices like digression with London’s “Reigning Diversions.” PMID:22400157

  17. Close Reading Exemplar: Living Like Weasels

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Student Achievement Partners for Just Read, Florida!

    2012-11-16

    The goal of this four-day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to discover the rich language and life lesson embedded in Dillard’s text. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will be equipped to unpack Dillard’s essay. When combined with writing about the passage, students will learn to appreciate how Dillard’s writing contains a deeper message and derive satisfaction from the struggle to master complex text.

  18. Close Reading Exemplar: "Because of Winn-Dixie"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Student Achievement Partners for Just Read, Florida!

    2012-09-09

    The goal of this one day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to absorb deep lessons from Kate DiCamillo’s story. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify how and why the three main characters became friends.

  19. Who Reads Literature? The Future of the United States as a Nation of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zill, Nicholas; Winglee, Marianne

    This book draws on extensive demographic information to present a portrait of the nation's reading habits. Research offers the following observations and facts: reading of serious contemporary literature is the pastime of a distinct minority; the proportion of Americans who read serious literature is between 7 and 12% and contemporary fiction,…

  20. Childhood traumas, mental health and physical health in adulthood: testing physically active leisure as a buffer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Arai; Steven E. Mock; Karen A. Gallant

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, we examine the potential role of physically active leisure as a moderator of the typically negative health outcomes that follow experiences of childhood trauma. In our analyses, experiences of childhood trauma were associated with lower self-rated mental and physical health. Participation in physically active leisure was associated with higher levels of

  1. Childhood traumas, mental health and physical health in adulthood: testing physically active leisure as a buffer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Arai; Steven E. Mock; Karen A. Gallant

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, we examine the potential role of physically active leisure as a moderator of the typically negative health outcomes that follow experiences of childhood trauma. In our analyses, experiences of childhood trauma were associated with lower self-rated mental and physical health. Participation in physically active leisure was associated with higher levels of

  2. Leisure Worlds: Situations, Motivations and Young People's Encounters with Offending and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Julian; Asbridge, Mark; Wortley, Scot

    2015-01-01

    With information supplied by a large (n = 3393) sample of high school students from Toronto, this paper tests the assumption that three forms of leisure activity--peer, risky, and self-improving leisure--have a relatively independent impact upon patterns of offending and victimization. Although we find significant support for this proposition, we…

  3. Relationships between Leisure Participation and Quality of Life of People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badia, Marta; Orgaz, María Begoña; Verdugo, Miguel Á.; Ullán, Ana M.; Martínez, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies of people with developmental disabilities suggest that participation in leisure activities might be a key factor for good quality of life. This study explores the relationships between objective and subjective quality of life and leisure participation of adults with developmental disabilities. Materials and Methods: A…

  4. Racism, indifference, and the leisure experiences of South Asian Canadian teens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Tirone

    1999-01-01

    Canadians tend to understand leisure in terms of research that is typically conducted with white, dominant majority groups. Dominant groups are characterized by their ready access to structural power and consequently, they have the ability to ensure that their needs are met. This paper explores leisure in the lives of South Asian teens and young adults in Canada, one of

  5. Gendered cities: women and public leisure space in the ‘postmodern city’

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila Scraton; Beccy Watson

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on women's leisure in city urban space. It draws on feminist discourses around ‘difference’ and cultural geography that explores public space as a gendered, sexualized and racialized arena. Empirically the paper discusses two case studies of women's leisure in the city: older women and ‘young’ mothers including a specific sample of South Asian mothers. The research suggests

  6. Street Corner Society: Leisure Careers, Youth (Sub)culture and Social Exclusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert MacDonald; Tracy Shildrick

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws upon qualitative research with ‘socially excluded’ young people in the North East of England. It proposes that the concept and study of ‘leisure careers’ is useful in understanding the transitions, (sub)cultural experiences and identities of social groups like this. The empirical focus is upon the significance of leisure careers in the neighbourhood?based, social networks of some criminally

  7. No Fun Anymore: Leisure and Marital Quality across the Transition to Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, Amy; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This study examines changes in leisure patterns across the transition to parenthood for dual-earner, working-class couples, as well as the relationship between leisure and marital quality. To this end, 147 heterosexual couples were interviewed across the transition to parenthood. Findings indicate that during the transition to parenthood, husbands…

  8. Adaptation and Validation of the Spanish Version of the Leisure Assessment Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badia, Marta; Orgaz-Baz, M. Begona; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel; Martinez-Aguirre, M. Magdalena; Longo-Araujo-de-Melo, Egmar; Ullan-de-la-Fuente, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    "Participation"--defined as engagement in life situations, including leisure and recreational activities--is associated with the improvement of people with disabilities' quality of life. Several specific instruments assess leisure, but none of them has been adapted to the Spanish context. The goal of this study is to adapt and validate the Spanish…

  9. The Meaning of Leisure for Residents in Hong Kong: An Inductive Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nga Ling chan; Honggen xiao; Cho Yuk Chau; Hiu Tan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an inductive analysis of the meanings of leisure and the meaningfulness of its pursuit withheld by residents in Hong Kong; the study probes into the constraints, experiences and impacts of leisure participation. In-depth interviews and grounded theory methodology were adopted for this inquiry. It is found that freedom, happiness, enjoyment, and health are shared elements in participants'

  10. Motivational Interference in Learning: The Impact of Leisure Alternatives on Subsequent Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fries, Stefan; Dietz, Franziska; Schmid, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    Students are often obliged to fulfill home assignments for school. While being engaged into such compulsory schooling, learners may be tempted to switch to a leisure alternative. Whenever students pursue the learning task although attractive leisure alternatives are present, thoughts about the missed activity can lead to motivational interference.…

  11. Leisure Activity Preferences for 6- To 12-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Chokron, Nathalie; Law, Mary; Shevell, Michael; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Poulin, Chantal; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective was to describe leisure activity preferences of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their relationship to participation. Factors associated with greater interest in leisure activities were identified. Method: Fifty-five school-aged children (36 males, 19 females; mean age 9y 11mo; range 6y 1mo-12y 11mo) with CP (Gross Motor…

  12. Value Orientations and Motivational Interference in School-Leisure Conflict: The Case of Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan; Helmke, Andreas; Kilian, Britta; Kuhnle, Claudia; Zivkovic, Ilija; Goellner, Richard; Helmke, Tuyet

    2010-01-01

    The experience of motivational interference during studying and leisure in a school-leisure conflict and its relationship to pupils' value orientations were investigated in a self-report study of Vietnamese pupils (N = 346, mean age = 15 years). The results were compared with a combined sample consisting of pupils from nine other countries (N =…

  13. “But it's not that easy”: negotiating (trans)gender expressions in leisure spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen T. Lewis; Corey W. Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Leisure research has a long history of exploring relationships between leisure and gender, typically using feminist approaches. However, the vast majority of this literature depends on dichotomous distinctions of male and female with little regard to more diverse expressions and embodiments of gender. In this article, authors blend narratives of self to situate their subjectivities with those created with “Amy,”

  14. Research Summary Leisure landscapes: exploring the role of forestry in tourism

    E-print Network

    ), socio-economic structures and stage/ nature of woodland tourism development. m In each study area, inResearch Summary Leisure landscapes: exploring the role of forestry in tourism Using woodlands for tourism includes a wide range of leisure activities, such as mountain biking, walking and nature watching

  15. Celebrity fandom and its relationship to tourism and leisure behaviors: the case of Korean wave

    E-print Network

    Lee, Soojin

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation research was conducted to help understand this under-researched area particularly in the field of leisure and tourism. It is argued in this study that the celebrity fandom is a novel form of leisure/tourism activity, which should...

  16. Leisure travel in a historical perspective - Changes in the structures of time and space use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Schlich; Stefan Schönfelder; Kay W. Axhausen; IVT ETH; Susan Hanson

    2002-01-01

    Leisure activities play a more and more dominant role in our daily lives and their importance has increased steadily over the last 40 years compared to other activities. Considering leisure travel, one would expect to discover this trend in recent empirical work. Unfortunately, this has not been possible in Germany or other countries due to lack of suitable data. The

  17. Leisure, Stress, and Coping: The Sport Participation of Collegiate Student-Athletes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aimee Kimball; Valeria J. Freysinger

    2003-01-01

    Research has indicated that there is a relationship between stress and participation in leisure (Caltabiano, 1995; Chalip, Thomas, & Voyle, 1992; Reich & Zautra, 1981; Strauss-Blasche, Ekmekcioglu, & Marktl, 2002; Warner-Smith & Brown, 2002; Wheeler & Frank, 1988). It has been suggested that leisure buffers or mediates stress, thereby enhancing individual health and well-being, because of the self-determination and social

  18. Effects of a Leisure Programme on Quality of Life and Stress of Individuals with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Villamisar, D. A.; Dattilo, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Even though there is research demonstrating a positive relationship between leisure participation and the two constructs of quality of life and stress reduction, current conceptualisation of leisure as a contributor to quality of life is limited. In addition, in spite of improvements in accurate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder…

  19. Time Use Patterns between Maintenance, Subsistence and Leisure Activities: A Case Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui-fen, Zhou; Zhen-shan, Li; Dong-qian, Xue; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese government conducted its first time use survey of the activities of Chinese individuals in 2008. Activities were classified into three broad types, maintenance activities, subsistence activities and leisure activities. Time use patterns were defined by an individuals' time spent on maintenance, subsistence and leisure activities each…

  20. Leisure Time in Modern Societies: A New Source of Boredom and Stress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Max; Hadler, Markus; Kaup, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The increase in leisure time over the last century is well documented. We know much less, however, about the quality of the use of leisure time. Quite divergent predictions exist in this regard: Some authors have argued that the new, extensive free time will lead to new forms of time pressure and stress; others have foreseen an expansion of…

  1. Negotiating the policy imperative to be healthy: Australian family repertoires of risk, leisure, and healthy lifestyles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone P. Fullagar; Maureen A. Harrington

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a sociological analysis of how different lowermiddle income families engage with Australian government health policies and promotion campaigns aimed at reducing the risk of lifestyle disease (eat well, be active). Bringing together sociological literature across the domains of leisure, family, health, and risk we identify tensions between the purposes of health promotion and purposive family leisure. Findings

  2. The Relationship between Social Leisure and Life Satisfaction: Causality and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Giachin Ricca, Elena; Pelloni, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Social leisure is generally found to be positively correlated with life satisfaction in the empirical literature. We ask if this association captures a genuine causal effect by using panel data from the GSOEP. Our identification strategy exploits the change in social leisure brought about by retirement, since the latter is an event after which the…

  3. Playing in the woods: youth, leisure and the performance of gender relations in rural Newfoundland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moss E. Norman; Nicole Gerarda Power; Kathryne Dupré

    2011-01-01

    Based on qualitative interviews and focus groups with youth (12–24 years) living in rural, coastal Newfoundland, Canada, we examine how leisure practices within this context served to reproduce and naturalize localized gender relations. More specifically, we argue that the participants drew upon dominant discursive constructions of rural leisure to reiteratively enact a binary distinction between the ‘town’ as a space

  4. "It's More Than a Class": Leisure Education's Influence on College Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Kate E.; Hartman, Cindy L.; Anderson, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    As universities and colleges continue to seek out ways to improve student engagement on their campuses, attention has been given to the role that on-campus leisure opportunities can play in developing this engagement. Yet, little research has analyzed the influence of leisure education on student engagement in the higher education setting. The…

  5. Leadership Behaviour of College Students in Relation to Their Leisure Time Activities in College Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sethi, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the Leadership behaviour of college students in relation to their Leisure time activities in college life. In this study, the researcher wants to see the contribution of leisure time activities in developing the qualities of leadership of college students. The main objective of the study was to find out the relationship…

  6. Leisure and quality of life in an international and multicultural context: what are major pathways linking leisure to quality of life?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshitaka Iwasaki

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at advancing the conceptualization of leisure as a contributor to quality of life (QOL) in an international\\u000a and multicultural context, based on an extensive and critical review of literature on leisure and QOL from a global, international\\u000a perspective. Given the central role of culture in conceptualizing this notion, this paper gives attention to various cultural\\u000a contexts world-wide.

  7. Prediction and selection of vocabulary for two leisure activities.

    PubMed

    Dark, Leigha; Balandin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    People who use augmentative or alternative communication (AAC) need access to a relevant, socially valid vocabulary if they are to communicate successfully in a variety of contexts. Many people with complex communication needs who utilize some form of high technology or low technology AAC rely on others to predict and select vocabulary for them. In this study the ability of one speech pathologist, nine leisure support workers, and six people with cerebral palsy to accurately predict context-specific vocabulary was explored. Participants predicted vocabulary for two leisure activities - sailing session and Internet café - using the blank page method of vocabulary selection to identify the vocabulary items they considered important for each activity. This predicted vocabulary was then compared with the actual vocabulary used in each of the activities. A total of 187 (68%) of the words predicted for the sailing session were used during recorded conversations, with 88 words (32%) not appearing in the recorded samples. During the visit to the Internet café only 104 (47%) of the words predicted occurred in the recorded samples, with 117 words (53%) not occurring at all. These results support the need to socially validate any vocabulary in order to ensure that it is relevant and useful for the person using the AAC system. PMID:17852052

  8. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, S.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus) shall be delved into. PMID:22073048

  9. Antioxidant vitamin intake and mortality: the Leisure World Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kawas, Claudia H; Corrada, María M

    2015-01-15

    To assess the relationship between antioxidant vitamin intake and all-cause mortality in older adults, we examined these associations using data from the Leisure World Cohort Study, a prospective study of residents of the Leisure World retirement community in Laguna Hills, California. In the early 1980s, participants (who were aged 44-101 years) completed a postal survey, which included details on use of vitamin supplements and dietary intake of foods containing vitamins A and C. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted (for factors related to mortality in this cohort—smoking, alcohol intake, caffeine consumption, exercise, body mass index, and histories of hypertension, angina, heart attack, stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer) hazard ratios for death were calculated using Cox regression for 8,640 women and 4,983 men (median age at entry, 74 years). During follow-up (1981-2013), 13,104 participants died (median age at death, 88 years). Neither dietary nor supplemental intake of vitamin A or vitamin C nor supplemental intake of vitamin E was significantly associated with mortality after multivariate adjustment. A compendium that summarizes previous findings of cohort studies evaluating vitamin intake and mortality is provided. Attenuation in the observed associations between mortality and antioxidant vitamin use after adjustment for confounders in our study and in previous studies suggests that such consumption identifies persons with other mortality-associated lifestyle and health risk factors. PMID:25550360

  10. Reading Reflections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Karl Wirth

    Reading reflections are designed to encourage students to complete readings before coming to class, to reflect more deeply on the content of the reading, to make personal meaning from the meaning, and to develop their metacognitive skills for lifelong learning. The reflections consist of three questions: (1) What is the main point of the reading?, (2) What information did you find surprising? Why?, and (3) What did you find confusing? Why? Students submit short responses to two of three questions prior to coming to class. Metacognitive components of the activity Reading reflections address many elements of metacognition, including knowledge, control, and reflection. Reading reflections are designed to help students develop knowledge about themselves as learners, learning tasks (reading), prior knowledge, content, self-monitoring, self-assessment, and reflection. Metacognitive goals The primary goals of this activity are to help students develop their skills of self-assessment, and to reflect more deeply on the content of their reading assignments. Reflective thinking is an essential element of expert learners, so this activity helps students develop skills as intentional learners for lifelong learning. Assessing students' metacognition Reading reflections (n = 35 in a typical semester) count for approximately 10% of the course grade. I do not grade these reflections, but give students credit if they are turned in on time (before class) and if they clearly demonstrate significant reflection.

  11. Parent-adolescent joint projects involving leisure time and activities during the transition to high school.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sheila K; Young, Richard A; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Lollis, Susan; Tilton-Weaver, Lauree; Nelson, Margo; Goessling, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Leisure research to date has generally overlooked planning and organizing of leisure time and activities between parents and adolescents. This investigation examined how a sample of Canadian adolescents and their parents jointly constructed and acted on goals related to adolescents' leisure time during the move from elementary to high school. Using the Qualitative Action-Project Method, data were collected over an 8-10 month period from 26 parent-adolescent dyads located in two urban sites, through video-taped conversations about leisure time, video recall interviews, and telephone monitoring interviews. Analysis of the data revealed that the joint projects of the 26 dyads could be grouped into three clusters: a) governance transfer or attempts to shift, from parent to adolescent, responsibility over academic demands, organizing leisure time, and safety with peers, b) balancing extra-curricular activities with family life, academics, and social activities, and c) relationship adjustment or maintenance. PMID:25134071

  12. Physical Leisure Participation and the Well-Being of Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Role of Sense of Belonging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven E. Mock; Cory Fraser; Shannon Knutson; Andrea Prier

    2010-01-01

    Participation in physical leisure activities was tested as a coping resource among adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Drawing on sociological theory of social integration, sense of belonging was tested as a potential mediator to help explain any significant association found between physical leisure activity and well-being among a population-based sample of adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Greater frequency of physical leisure participation

  13. Leisure corporations, beer brand culture, and the crisis of masculinity: the Speight’s ‘Southern Man’ advertising campaign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Gee; Steve J. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Leisure corporations and their brands are becoming increasingly signified to represent certain values and attitudes towards leisure and particular aspects of identity. One popular leisure product and practice is beer and its consumption, which also plays a role in constructing identity and, more specifically, masculinity. Within the context of contemporary promotional culture, beer advertising serves to reproduce the cultural links

  14. Leisure corporations, beer brand culture, and the crisis of masculinity: the Speight’s ‘Southern Man’ advertising campaign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Gee; Steve J. Jackson

    2011-01-01

    Leisure corporations and their brands are becoming increasingly signified to represent certain values and attitudes towards leisure and particular aspects of identity. One popular leisure product and practice is beer and its consumption, which also plays a role in constructing identity and, more specifically, masculinity. Within the context of contemporary promotional culture, beer advertising serves to reproduce the cultural links

  15. The Use of an iPad2 as a Leisure Activity for a Student with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helps, Dawn H.; Herzberg, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    Participation in preferred leisure activities is intrinsically motivating and satisfying. Many individuals with and without disabilities enjoy informal leisure activities, such as watching movies, listening to music, shopping, and going out to eat (Dattilo, Estrella, Light, McNaughton, & Seabury, 2008). Sometimes leisure activities are provided to…

  16. On Reading and Not Reading Today: A Commentary on L. Borusiak's Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Boris

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary, the author stresses that reading habits in Russia have changed since the Soviet era, and the more intellectual journals and magazines in particular have lost their importance. Audiences for books and magazines have fragmented, and there are fewer sources of commonly shared information and ideas than was true a few decades ago.…

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Habitable zone code (Valle+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2014-06-01

    A C computation code that provide in output the distance dm (i for which the duration of habitability is longest, the corresponding duration tm (in Gyr), the width W (in AU) of the zone for which the habitability lasts tm/2, the inner (Ri) and outer (Ro) boundaries of the 4Gyr continuously habitable zone. The code read the input file HZ-input.dat, containing in each row the mass of the host star (range: 0.70-1.10M?), its metallicity (either Z (range: 0.005-0.004) or [Fe/H]), the helium-to-metal enrichment ratio (range: 1-3, standard value = 2), the equilibrium temperature for habitable zone outer boundary computation (range: 169-203K) and the planet Bond Albedo (range: 0.0-1.0, Earth = 0.3). The output is printed on-screen. Compilation: just use your favorite C compiler: gcc hz.c -lm -o HZ (2 data files).

  18. Reading Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Hedden

    2005-06-23

    Here are some ideas for promoting reading at home. These ideas are geared mostly for teachers of K-2 students. Engage the family during a family trip. Have them keep a journal using the following lesson plan: family journal Remember to match the book to the journal prompt. Each family will have the opportunity to read the same book. Be ...

  19. Read Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This manual, designed to help public libraries in Arizona to plan their summer reading programs for children, celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Arizona Reading Program. The material in the manual is prepared for libraries to adapt for their own uses. Chapters of the manual include: (1) Introductory Materials; (2) Goals, Objectives and…

  20. Against Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Edmundson states that if he could make one wish for the members of his profession, college and university professors of literature, he would wish that for one year, two, three, or five, they would give up readings. By "a reading," he means the application of an analytical vocabulary to describe and (usually) to judge a work of literary art.…

  1. Reading Remixed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman; Stephens, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Critics claim that digital technologies are killing reading, but these teacher-librarians have observed that teens are as excited about reading as they ever were. Online communities give these readers opportunities to get to know authors, communicate with other fans, and learn more about books of interest. Publishers and authors are responding to…

  2. Reading Aloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delo, Lynda

    2008-01-01

    Many resources are available to elementary teachers who wish to support science learning with literature. Unfortunately, somewhere between middle school and high school, the emphasis on using literature to teach science content--particularly the exercise of reading aloud--has all but disappeared. However, the practice of reading aloud is helpful…

  3. Reading Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Canadian Institute for Research in Behavioral and Social Sciences of Calgary was awarded a contract by the Provincial Government of Alberta to assess student skills and knowledge in reading and written composition. Here evaluation is defined and the use of standardized and criterion referenced tests for evaluating reading performance are…

  4. Practicing Good Habits, Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen Van Quan; And Others

    This illustrated primer, designed for second grade students in Vietnam, consists of stories depicting rural family life in Vietnam. The book is divided into the following six chapters: (1) Practicing Good Habits (health, play, helpfulness); (2) Duties at Home (grandparents, father and mother, servants, the extended family; (3) Duties in School…

  5. Teaching Your Child Healthy Hair Care Habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... healthy hair care Teaching your child healthy hair care habits Many common hair care practices can lead ... a conditioner. Teaching your child other healthy hair care habits Many things that we do to style ...

  6. Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Flu Pregnancy Precautions Checkups: What to Expect Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits KidsHealth > Parents > Growth & Development > Feeding & Eating > Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits Print A ...

  7. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes. PMID:25372946

  8. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 13/11 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F, P., Smedley, C.A., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010. RL 13

  9. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 05/12 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011. RL 05/12. Cefas, Lowestoft A copy can

  10. University Students' Media Habits: A Lithuanian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamalipour, Yahya R.; And Others

    A study replicated a 1994 study, "College Students' Media Habits: A National Study." In the present study, Lithuanian university students' media habits relative to American students' media habits were gauged. A total of 1500 survey questionnaires were distributed to 7 of the 16 Lithuanian universities. Background biographical questions were asked,…

  11. Dynamical Habitability of Known Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen Menou; Serge Tabachnik

    2003-01-01

    Habitability is usually defined as the requirement for a terrestrial planet's atmosphere to sustain liquid water. This definition can be complemented by the dynamical requirement that other planets in the system do not gravitationally perturb terrestrial planets outside of their habitable zone, the orbital region allowing the existence of liquid water. We quantify the dynamical habitability of 85 known extrasolar

  12. Research Articles Exomoon Habitability Constrained by Illumination

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Rory

    , specifically designed to detect Earth-sized planets in the circumstellar irradiation habitable zones (IHZs become feasible. Once they are discovered in the circumstellar habitable zone, questions about a runaway greenhouse. By analogy with the circumstellar habitable zone, these constraints define

  13. Leisure repertoire among persons with a spinal cord injury: Interests, performance, and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Ulrica; Lilja, Margareta; Petersson, Ingela; Lexell, Jan; Isaksson, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore and describe the leisure repertoire of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and how the repertoire is related to interest, performance, and well-being. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A total of 97 persons with traumatic SCI were recruited from the non-profit national organization, RG Active Rehabilitation in Sweden. Outcome measure Data were collected through a two-part postal survey. The first comprised of questions investigating socio-demographic variables and injury characteristics; the second part included an interest checklist with 20 areas of leisure activities. Results The participants were mostly interested in, performed, and experienced well-being from social and culture activities and TV/DVD/movies. The areas of leisure activities in which they had most likely experienced changes after the SCI were outdoor activities, exercise, and gardening. Sex, age, and to some extent, time since injury were related to interest, performance, well-being, and changed performance. Conclusions The results provided an explanation and limited description of a changed leisure repertoire among persons after a traumatic SCI. The study showed that sex, age, and time since injury were more closely related to the choice of leisure activities to include in the leisure repertoire than the level of injury. This knowledge can be of importance when professionals in the field of rehabilitation are planning and implementing interventions concerning leisure activities for persons with SCI. PMID:24090284

  14. Reading Comprehension

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Devitry

    2010-03-02

    This is an exercise in reading comprehension and following directions. Please make sure you read and re-read before asking for help. See how much work you can do all on your own and do your very best. Good luck, have fun and learn something new! 1. Click Here Be a Critical Reader : answer all 10 questions.Do not go on until you have answered all 10 correctly. At this time please stand and silently wave both your arms around as if you are trying to swat a fly for 5 seconds. Thank you :) 2. Click "CONTINUE" to go ...

  15. The Dynamic Association between Healthy Leisure and Substance Use in South African Adolescents: A State and Trait Perspective.

    PubMed

    Weybright, Elizabeth H; Caldwell, Linda L; Ram, Nilam; Smith, Edward; Jacobs, Joachim

    2014-04-01

    South Africa has an increasing adolescent substance use problem, lack of leisure opportunities and resources, and high adolescent discretionary time. How aspects of leisure relate to adolescent substance use is not well understood. Little research has been conducted on the leisure behaviors and experiences of South African adolescents, if and how those behaviors are associated with substance use, and ecological influences on those associations. By applying multi-level models to longitudinal data obtained from youth living in high-risk contexts, this research examines the association between state and trait healthy leisure and adolescent substance use and how perceived parental over-control moderates those associations. Results indicate healthy leisure protects against substance use at state and trait levels, provides empirical support that risk behavior can be addressed through leisure-based interventions, and emphasizes the importance of both short- and long-term processes when considering the context-dependent nature of adolescents' leisure experiences. PMID:24948905

  16. To be or to refuse to be? Exploring the concept of leisure as resistance for young people who are visually impaired

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glenda Madeleine Jessup; Anita C. Bundy; Elaine Cornell

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the concept of leisure as resistance to social constraints of blindness. Leisure, because of its relative freedoms, has been conceptualised as a forum in which dominant cultural discourses and stereotypes can be challenged or resisted. A post-structural analysis of the leisure narratives of five young people who are blind revealed that they intentionally used aspects of leisure

  17. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  18. Habitable exoplanets statistics in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnos, Th.

    2013-09-01

    We present an exoplanet statistical analysis into the Milky Way. We use the Becanson galactic synthetic model to simulate the Milky Way and the galactic and stellar habitable zones to calculate habitable planets. To assess habitability on the Galactic scale, we model supernova rates and planet formation. Our study, models the SNII and SNIa sterilizations by selecting them from within this preexisting stellar population. Furthermore, we consider habitability on tidally locked and non-tidally locked planets separately, and study habitability as a function of height above and below the Galactic mid-plane. The number of total habitable planets makes Milky Way practically empty of habitable planets. Our results, from these simulations, agree very well with Kepler's discoveries. Finally, we apply our results to the PLATO future space mission.

  19. The feeding habits of Glossina*

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, Bernard

    1963-01-01

    The feeding habits of 15 species of Glossina have been studied by the identification of their blood meals. Representative samples of the blood meals from each of these species of tsetse fly and from different habitats were collected and 22 640 blood meals were identified. The feeding patterns are characteristic for each species of tsetse fly and do not appear to depend entirely on the availability of different hosts, suggesting that the feeding habits of Glossina are genetically determined. However, a broad grouping can be made into five categories: species feeding mainly on suids, those feeding on suids and bovids, those feeding mainly on bovids, those feeding mainly on mammals other than suids and bovids, and those feeding on most available hosts and on man. The possibility of control by selective elimination of the main hosts of these groups is discussed. PMID:13999790

  20. Development of a Habitable Planet

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    In this lesson, students investigate the origin of the elements, the process of planet formation, the evolution of life on Earth, and the conditions necessary for life as we know it. Using multimedia resources and a classroom activity, students identify and sequence the major events that caused Earth to develop into the planet we know, understand where the ingredients for Earth originated, including the conditions necessary for life, and consider the likelihood of other habitable worlds.

  1. Using Optogenetics to Study Habits

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well documented that optogenetics brings to neuroscience a long sought-after foothold to study the causal role of millisecond-scale activity of genetically or anatomically defined populations of neurons. Progress is rapid, and, as evidenced by the work collected in this Special Issue, the possibilities of what can now be done are almost dizzying. Even for those concerned with complex phenomena, such as behavioral habits and flexibility, signs are that we could be on the threshold of a leap in scientific understanding. In this article, we note this special time in neuroscience by the example of our use of optogenetics to study habitual behavior. We present a basic sketch of the neural circuitry of habitual behavior built mainly on findings from experiments in which lesion and drug microinjection techniques were employed in combination with sophisticated behavioral analysis. We then outline the types of questions that now can be approached through the use of optogenetic approaches, and, as an example, we summarize the results of a recent study of ours in which we took this approach to probe the neural basis of habit formation. With optogenetic methods, we were able to demonstrate that a small site in the medial prefrontal cortex can control habits on-line during their execution, and we were able to control new habits when they competed with prior ones. The nearly immediate effect of disabling this site optogenetically suggests the existence of a mechanism for moment-to-moment monitoring of behaviors that long have been thought to be almost automatic and reflexive. This example highlights the kind of new knowledge that can be gained by the carefully timed use of optogenetic tools. PMID:23313580

  2. Tides, Planetary Companions, and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laerhoven, Christa L.; Barnes, Rory; Greenberg, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Earth-scale planets in the classical habitable zone (HZ) are more likely to be habitable if they possess active geophysics to drive processes that regulate their atmosphere. Without a constant internal energy source, planets cool as they age, eventually terminating tectonic activity. Planets orbiting low-mass stars can be very old, due to the longevity of such stars, so they may be rendered sterile to life in this way. However, the presence of an outer companion could generate enough tidal heat in the HZ planet to prevent such cooling. The range of mass and orbital parameters for the companion that give adequate long-term heating of the inner HZ planet, while avoiding very early total desiccation, is substantial. We locate the ideal location for the outer of a pair of planets, under the assumption that the inner planet has the same incident flux as Earth, orbiting example stars: a generic late M dwarf and the M9V/L0 dwarf DEN1048. We also analyze the extent to which systems with ideal parameters for heating will evolve over time. Thus discoveries of Earth-scale planets in the HZ zone of old small stars should be followed by searches for outer companion planets that might be essential for current habitability.

  3. Habitability of Planets in Binaries

    E-print Network

    Nader Haghighipour

    2007-10-03

    A survey of currently known extrasolar planets indicates that close to 20% of their hosting stars are members of binary systems. While the majority of these binaries are wide (i.e., with separations between 250 and 6500 AU), the detection of Jovian-type planets in the three binaries of Gamma Cephei (separation of 18.5 AU), GL 86 (separation of 21 AU), and HD 41004 (separation of 23 AU) have brought to the forefront questions on the formation of giant planets and the possibility of the existence of smaller bodies in moderately close binary star systems. This paper discusses the late stage of the formation of habitable planets in binary systems that host Jovian-type bodies, and reviews the effects of the binary companion on the formation of Earth-like planets in the system's habitable zone. The results of a large survey of the parameter-space of binary-planetary systems in search of regions where habitable planets can form and have long-term stable orbits are also presented.

  4. Widen the belt of habitability!

    PubMed

    Möhlmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Among the key-parameters to characterize habitability are presence or availability of liquid water, an appropriate temperature range, and the time scale of reference. These criteria for habitability are discussed and described from the point of view of water- and ice-physics, and it is shown that liquid water may exist in the sub-surfaces of planetary bodies like Mars, and possibly of inner asteroids and internally heated ice-moons. Water can remain fluid there also at temperatures far below the "canonical" 0 °C. This behaviour is made possible as a consequence of the freezing point depression due to salty solutes in water or "brines", as they can be expected to exist in nature more frequently than pure liquid water. On the other hand, low temperatures cause a slowing down of chemical processes, as can be described by Arrhenius's relation. The resulting smaller reaction rates probably will have the consequence to complicate the detection of low-temperature life processes, if they exist. Furthermore, the adaptation potential of life is to be mentioned in this context as a yet partially unknown process. Resulting recommendations are given to improve the use of criteria to characterize habitable conditions. PMID:22638839

  5. From Substitution to Coping: Developing and Testing a Leisure Constraints-Based Coping Model

    E-print Network

    Tseng, Yung-Ping

    2010-01-14

    that the leisure constraints should not be necessarily viewed as insurmountable obstacles. Individuals can negotiate constraints by applying an array of coping mechanisms. Recently, Iwasaki and Schneider (2003) and Schneider and Stanis (2007) proposed...

  6. Was Bob Seger Right? Relation Between Boredom in Leisure and [Risky] Sex

    PubMed Central

    MILLER, JACQUELINE A.; CALDWELL, LINDA L.; WEYBRIGHT, ELIZABETH H.; SMITH, EDWARD A.; VERGNANI, TANIA; WEGNER, LISA

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the association between boredom in leisure and risky sexual behaviors among South African youth (N = 1695) using longitudinal data. We hypothesized that youth who were higher on boredom in leisure at the end of ninth grade would be more likely to report engaging in risky sexual behaviors at the beginning of tenth grade. Chi-square results indicate youth, especially male youth who experience high levels of leisure boredom in ninth grade, are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors in tenth grade. These findings have implications for prevention programs that aim to delay sexual initiation, reduce sexual risk behaviors, and decrease the transmission of HIV and AIDS. The findings support the need for additional research on how the reduction of leisure boredom may be a potential target for reducing sexual risk among youth. PMID:25684832

  7. Perspectives on Leisure of LDS Women Who Are Stay-at-Home Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patti A. Freeman; Alexis A. Palmer; Birgitta L. Baker

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the meanings of leisure for women who belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, lived in Utah, and were stay-at-home mothers. Particular attention was given to the religious, cultural, and role-determined forces that shaped their lives and leisure. A phenomenological approach was used. Thirteen women were identified through a

  8. Leisure-time physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and feelings of hopelessness in men

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maarit Valtonen; David E Laaksonen; Jari Laukkanen; Tommi Tolmunen; Rainer Rauramaa; Heimo Viinamäki; Jussi Kauhanen; Timo Lakka; Leo Niskanen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness contribute to mental health. Hopelessness has been linked to impaired mental health, cardiovascular events and mortality. Previous studies have focused on physical exercise and depression. We examined the associations of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness with feelings of hopelessness. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study leisure-time physical activity, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), hopelessness and

  9. The Relationship Between Social Leisure and Life Satisfaction: Causality and Policy Implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo BecchettiElena; Elena Giachin Ricca; Alessandra Pelloni

    Social leisure is generally found to be positively correlated with life satisfaction in the empirical literature. We ask if\\u000a this association captures a genuine causal effect by using panel data from the GSOEP. Our identification strategy exploits\\u000a the change in social leisure brought about by retirement, since the latter is an event after which the time investable in\\u000a (the outside

  10. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of leisure therapy and conventional occupational therapy after stroke

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Parker; J. R. F. Gladman; A. E. R. Drummond; M. E. Dewey; N. B. Lincoln; D. Barer; P. A. Logan; K. A. Radford

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of leisure therapy and conventional occupational therapy (OT) on the mood, leisure participation and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) of stroke patients 6 and 12 months after hospital discharge.Design: Multicentre randomized controlled trial.Setting and participants: Four hundred and sixty-six stroke patients from five UK centres.Main outcome measures: The General Health Questionnaire (12 item),

  11. The relationship between leisure and life satisfaction: application of activity and need theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariel Rodríguez; Pavlína Látková; Ya-Yen Sun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the complex relationship between leisure and life satisfaction. Components\\u000a of two distinct, but potentially integrative, theoretical frameworks (i.e., activity theory and need theory) predicting the\\u000a relationship between leisure and life satisfaction were tested with a sample of residents from a Midwestern community (n = 633). Findings provided support for both theoretical perspectives, but

  12. Tides, planetary companions, and habitability: habitability in the habitable zone of low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laerhoven, C.; Barnes, R.; Greenberg, R.

    2014-07-01

    Earth-scale planets in the classical habitable zone (HZ) are more likely to be habitable if they possess active geophysics. Without a constant internal energy source, planets cool as they age, eventually terminating tectonic activity. Planets orbiting low-mass stars can be very old, due to the longevity of such stars, so they may be rendered sterile to life in this way. However, the presence of an outer companion could generate enough tidal heat in the HZ planet to prevent such cooling. The range of mass and orbital parameters for the companion that give adequate long-term heating of the inner HZ planet, while avoiding very early total desiccation, is probably substantial. We locate the ideal location for the outer of a pair of planets, under the assumption that the inner planet has the same incident flux as Earth, orbiting example stars: a generic late M dwarf (Teff = 2670 K) and the M9V/L0 dwarf DEN1048. Thus discoveries of Earth-scale planets in the HZ zone of old small stars should be followed by searches for outer companion planets that might be essential for current habitability.

  13. Association between Sleep Disturbances and Leisure Activities in the Elderly: A Comparison between Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, Amanda; Hellström, Patrik; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that physical or social activity is associated with fewer sleep disturbances among elderly people. Women report more sleep disturbances than men, which could indicate a variation in activity patterns between the genders. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between sleep disturbances and leisure activities in men and women (n = 945) aged ?60 years in a Swedish population. Sleep disturbances were measured using eight dichotomous questions and seventeen variables, covering a wide range of leisure activities. Few leisure activities were found to be associated with sleep disturbances and their importance decreased when the models were adjusted for confounders and gender interactions. After clustering the leisure activities and investigating individual activities, sociointellectual activities were shown to be significant for sleep. However, following adjustment for confounders and gender interactions, home maintenance was the only activity significant for sleep. Being a female increased the effect of home maintenance. Besides those leisure activities, poor/fair self-rated health (OR 7.50, CI: 4.27–11.81) and being female (OR 4.86, CI: 2.75–8.61) were found to have the highest association with poor sleep. Leisure activities pursued by elderly people should focus on activities of a sociointellectual nature, especially among women, to promote sleep. PMID:24575303

  14. College Students' Media Habits: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamalipour, Yahya R.; Robinson, William L.; Nortman, Michael L.

    A study investigated the level of undergraduate college students' involvement with the electronic media (radio, television, movies, music) and print media (books, newspapers, magazines) as it relates to both study and leisure activities. During the 1992-94 academic years, 5100 questionnaires were distributed to college students across the United…

  15. Tektite 2 habitability research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlis, D. P.; Wortz, E. C.; Watters, H.

    1972-01-01

    Multi-level parameters relating to perceived life quality in an isolated research and residence quarters were measured using a variety of tests. The habitat under study, emplaced beneath the sea off the coast of St. John's Island as a part of the Tektite II program, was being used for marine research. The crew for each of the 10 missions consisted of one engineer and 4 scientists. One mission had an all-female crew. Mission length was either 14 or 20 days, and 4 engineers, in covering 6 missions, stayed in the habitat for periods of 30 days each. A personality test was taken before confinement in the habitat. Two attitude tests were filled out by the aquanauts while they were still in the habitat. Daily moods were monitored during all missions. Special observations were made of leisure time use. Standardized private debriefings were administered at the end of each mission to each aquanaut. Other behavioral observations made by another research team were intercorrelated with the other measures described above.

  16. Habitable worlds with no signs of life

    E-print Network

    Cockell, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    'Most habitable worlds in the cosmos will have no remotely detectable signs of life' is proposed as a biological hypothesis to be tested in studies of exoplanets. Habitable planets could be discovered elsewhere in the Universe, yet there are many hypothetical scenarios whereby the search for life on them could yield negative results. Scenarios for habitable worlds with no remotely detectable signatures of life include: planets that are habitable, but have no biosphere (Uninhabited Habitable Worlds); planets with life, but lacking any detectable surface signatures of that life (laboratory examples are provided) and planets with life, where the concentration of atmospheric gases produced or removed by biota are impossible to disentangle from abiotic processes because of the lack of detailed knowledge of planetary conditions (the 'problem of exoplanet thermodynamic uncertainty'). A rejection of the hypothesis would require that the origin of life usually occurs on habitable planets, that spectrally detectable pi...

  17. Radiological Habits Survey: Hinkley Point, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Hinkley Point, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 01/11 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Hinkley Point, 2010 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, P. Rumney, L.M. Hughes and V.E. Ly be cited as: Clyne, F.C., Garrod, C.J., Rumney, P., Hughes, L.M., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits

  18. Reading Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGuise, Richard A.

    Success in the study of literature depends on the student's ability to establish connections between word and object, between words and phrases, and between memorable experiences in all fields of learning and the reading of literature, which is interdisciplinary by nature. In understanding a literary work, a reader must make affective memory…

  19. Read Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    This manual is designed to help public libraries in Arizona to plan their summer reading programs. The theme of the 1991 program is Arizona and its characteristics. The material in the manual is prepared for libraries to adapt for their own uses. Topics covered include: goals, objectives, and evaluation; procedures for getting started; common…

  20. Reading performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Neuman

    1984-01-01

    Television's potential effect on children's reading performance has become an issue of concern among educators. The estimate that by the end of the high school years, children will have spent more time watching television than attending school is frequently quoted and has both alarmed and intrigued researchers. Such a ubiquitous phenomenon as television is presumed to have effects on the

  1. Does Extensive Reading Promote Reading Speed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Mu

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a wide range of learning benefits accruing from extensive reading. Not only is there improvement in reading, but also in a wide range of language uses and areas of language knowledge. However, few research studies have examined reading speed. The existing literature on reading speed focused on students' reading speed…

  2. The habitable zone and extreme planetary orbits.

    PubMed

    Kane, Stephen R; Gelino, Dawn M

    2012-10-01

    The habitable zone for a given star describes the range of circumstellar distances from the star within which a planet could have liquid water on its surface, which depends upon the stellar properties. Here we describe the development of the habitable zone concept, its application to our own solar system, and its subsequent application to exoplanetary systems. We further apply this to planets in extreme eccentric orbits and show how they may still retain life-bearing properties depending upon the percentage of the total orbit which is spent within the habitable zone. Key Words: Extrasolar planets-Habitable zone-Astrobiology. PMID:23035897

  3. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  4. A specific survey on mortality by home and leisure injuries among children under 15 years in France: a feasibility survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Lasbeur; F Laurent; B Thelot

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundIn France, fatal home and leisure injuries represent the first cause of death of people under 15 years of age: 266 deaths in 2006, according to the national data of mortality.ObjectiveTo determinate the risks factors of fatal home and leisure injuries and increase the knowledge conditions of these deaths.MethodA specific survey mortality by home and leisure injuries among children under

  5. TIDAL LIMITS TO PLANETARY HABITABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Rory [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Jackson, Brian; Greenberg, Richard [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Raymond, Sean N. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States)

    2009-07-20

    The habitable zones (HZs) of main-sequence stars have traditionally been defined as the range of orbits that intercept the appropriate amount of stellar flux to permit surface water on a planet. Terrestrial exoplanets discovered to orbit M stars in these zones, which are close-in due to decreased stellar luminosity, may also undergo significant tidal heating. Tidal heating may span a wide range for terrestrial exoplanets and may significantly affect conditions near the surface. For example, if heating rates on an exoplanet are near or greater than that on Io (where tides drive volcanism that resurfaces the planet at least every 1 Myr) and produce similar surface conditions, then the development of life seems unlikely. On the other hand, if the tidal heating rate is less than the minimum to initiate plate tectonics, then CO{sub 2} may not be recycled through subduction, leading to a runaway greenhouse that sterilizes the planet. These two cases represent potential boundaries to habitability and are presented along with the range of the traditional HZ for main-sequence, low-mass stars. We propose a revised HZ that incorporates both stellar insolation and tidal heating. We apply these criteria to GJ 581 d and find that it is in the traditional HZ, but its tidal heating alone may be insufficient for plate tectonics.

  6. Dynamical habitability of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bois, Eric; Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lammer, Helmut; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the stability of planetary systems, a question that concerns only multiplanetary systems that host at least two planets, is discussed. The problem of mean motion resonances is addressed prior to discussion of the dynamical structure of the more than 350 known planets. The difference with regard to our own Solar System with eight planets on low eccentricity is evident in that 60% of the known extrasolar planets have orbits with eccentricity e > 0.2. We theoretically highlight the studies concerning possible terrestrial planets in systems with a Jupiter-like planet. We emphasize that an orbit of a particular nature only will keep a planet within the habitable zone around a host star with respect to the semimajor axis and its eccentricity. In addition, some results are given for individual systems (e.g., Gl777A) with regard to the stability of orbits within habitable zones. We also review what is known about the orbits of planets in double-star systems around only one component (e.g., gamma Cephei) and around both stars (e.g., eclipsing binaries). PMID:20307181

  7. Dynamical Habitability of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bois, Eric; Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lammer, Helmut; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J.

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the stability of planetary systems, a question that concerns only multiplanetary systems that host at least two planets, is discussed. The problem of mean motion resonances is addressed prior to discussion of the dynamical structure of the more than 350 known planets. The difference with regard to our own Solar System with eight planets on low eccentricity is evident in that 60% of the known extrasolar planets have orbits with eccentricity e > 0.2. We theoretically highlight the studies concerning possible terrestrial planets in systems with a Jupiter-like planet. We emphasize that an orbit of a particular nature only will keep a planet within the habitable zone around a host star with respect to the semimajor axis and its eccentricity. In addition, some results are given for individual systems (e.g., Gl777A) with regard to the stability of orbits within habitable zones. We also review what is known about the orbits of planets in double-star systems around only one component (e.g., gamma Cephei) and around both stars (e.g., eclipsing binaries).

  8. Tidal Limits to Planetary Habitability

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Rory; Greenberg, Richard; Raymond, Sean N

    2009-01-01

    The habitable zones of main sequence stars have traditionally been defined as the range of orbits that intercept the appropriate amount of stellar flux to permit surface water on a planet. Terrestrial exoplanets discovered to orbit M stars in these zones, which are close-in due to decreased stellar luminosity, may also undergo significant tidal heating. Tidal heating may span a wide range for terrestrial exoplanets and may significantly affect conditions near the surface. For example, if heating rates on an exoplanet are near or greater than that on Io (where tides drive volcanism that resurface the planet at least every 1 Myr) and produce similar surface conditions, then the development of life seems unlikely. On the other hand, if the tidal heating rate is less than the minimum to initiate plate tectonics, then CO_2 may not be recycled through subduction, leading to a runaway greenhouse that sterilizes the planet. These two cases represent potential boundaries to habitability and are presented along with th...

  9. iREAP: Improving Reading, Writing, and Thinking in the Wired Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony; Manzo, Ula; Albee, Julie Jackson

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the REAP system (Read, Encode, Annotate, Ponder) improves reading, writing, and thinking. Describes how the "i" in iREAP represents its currency and connection to Internet community building. Presents applications to help students internalize REAP "spectrum thinking," or thinking from different perspectives, so that it becomes a habit

  10. Evaluation of Reading Attitudes of 8th Grade Students in Primary Education According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahbaz, Namik Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Reading skill is a cognitive process in which the words are perceived, given a meaning, comprehended and then interpreted. The last year in primary education is a critical period when this skill is changed into a habit. As reading attitudes are important for an individual throughout the life, it is necessary to determine according to which…

  11. Reading Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Reading the average science textbook, one is struck with a question: Why would people devote their lives to the study of a subject as dry as the Sahara Desert? Students in science classes only need to be let in on the great secret of science. It is fun and full of the stuff in page-turner novels--intrigue, mystery, romance, and sometimes just dumb…

  12. Reading Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Peake

    2010-11-29

    On this website, you will practice reading with some super fun games! Fly a dragon to pick the right words in Blending dragon Make words with shadow faces in Say What?! Can you follow a recipe? Find out by Cooking with Abuela Fly through the air to save the day in Sentence Flying! Help Binky get his story straight in Story Scramble Go fishing for sightwords on Fishing with Kirima Try matching prefixes and suffixes in Balloon popping fun! Write a new ...

  13. Reading Chess

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry S. Baird; Ken Thompson

    1990-01-01

    By applying semantic analysis to images of extended passages of text, several volumes of a chess encyclopedia have been read with high accuracy. Although carefully proofread, the books were poorly printed and posed a severe challenge to conventional page-layout analysis and character-recognition methods. An experimental page-reader system performed strictly top-down layout analysis for identification of columns, lines, words, and characters.

  14. Searching for HabitableSearching for Habitable Worlds and Life in theWorlds and Life in the

    E-print Network

    Guyon, Olivier

    Earth #12;What makes planets habitable ? The planet must be in the habitable zone of its star need to take spectra of habitable planets Spectra of Earth (taken by looking at Earthshine) shows1 Searching for HabitableSearching for Habitable Worlds and Life in theWorlds and Life

  15. Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

  16. Tides and the Evolution of Planetary Habitability

    E-print Network

    Rory Barnes; Sean N. Raymond; Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg

    2008-07-04

    Tides raised on a planet by its host star's gravity can reduce a planet's orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity. This effect is only relevant for planets orbiting very close to their host stars. The habitable zones of low-mass stars are also close-in and tides can alter the orbits of planets in these locations. We calculate the tidal evolution of hypothetical terrestrial planets around low-mass stars and show that tides can evolve planets past the inner edge of the habitable zone, sometimes in less than 1 billion years. This migration requires large eccentricities (>0.5) and low-mass stars (<0.35 M_Sun). Such migration may have important implications for the evolution of the atmosphere, internal heating and the Gaia hypothesis. Similarly, a planet detected interior to the habitable zone could have been habitable in the past. We consider the past habitability of the recently-discovered, ~5 M_Earth planet, Gliese 581 c. We find that it could have been habitable for reasonable choices of orbital and physical properties as recently as 2 Gyr ago. However, when we include constraints derived from the additional companions, we see that most parameter choices that predict past habitability require the two inner planets of the system to have crossed their mutual 3:1 mean motion resonance. As this crossing would likely have resulted in resonance capture, which is not observed, we conclude that Gl 581 c was probably never habitable.

  17. Genetic Influences on Adolescent Eating Habits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin M. Beaver; Tori Flores; Brian B. Boutwell; Chris L. Gibson

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research shows that variation in eating habits and food consumption is due to genetic and environmental factors. The current study extends this line of research by examining the genetic contribution to adolescent eating habits. Analysis of sibling pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) revealed significant genetic influences on variance in an unhealthy

  18. Genetic Influences on Adolescent Eating Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Flores, Tori; Boutwell, Brian B.; Gibson, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research shows that variation in eating habits and food consumption is due to genetic and environmental factors. The current study extends this line of research by examining the genetic contribution to adolescent eating habits. Analysis of sibling pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health)…

  19. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Allocation of Adolescent Leisure Time Activities

    PubMed Central

    Haberstick, Brett C.; Zeiger, Joanna S.; Corley, Robin P.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of the out-of-school activities in which adolescents choose to participate. Youth activities vary widely in terms of specific activities and in time devoted to them but can generally be grouped by the type and total duration spent per type. We collected leisure time information using a 17-item leisure time questionnaire in a large sample of same- and opposite-sex adolescent twin pairs (N = 2847). Using both univariate and multivariate genetic models, we sought to determine the type and magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on the allocation of time toward different leisure times. Results indicated that both genetic and shared and nonshared environmental influences were important contributors to individual differences in physical, social, intellectual, family, and passive activities such as watching television. The magnitude of these influences differed between males and females. Environmental influences were the primary factors contributing to the covariation of different leisure time activities. Our results suggest the importance of heritable influences on the allocation of leisure time activity by adolescents and highlight the importance of environmental experiences in these choices. PMID:24967407

  20. Physical activity in the older adults related to commuting and leisure, Maceió, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Ana Raquel de Carvalho; Novais, Francini Vilela; Andreoni, Solange; Ramos, Luiz Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the level of physical activity of older adults by commuting and leisure time and associated factors. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study carried out with a population-based sample of 319 older individuals in Maceió, AL, Northeastern Brazil, in 2009. The level of physical activity in leisure and commuting was measured by applying the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, long version. The variables analyzed were: age, schooling, sex, per capita income and perceived health. We used descriptive analysis, Fisher's exact test and multiple regression analysis of prevalence rates. RESULTS We classified 87.5% as insufficiently active in commuting, being significantly higher among those individuals with older ages, with more education and who feel dissatisfied with their physical health. The prevalence of older people who are insufficiently active in leisure time activity was 76.2%, being more frequent in women, in men with advanced age; older adults with lower per capita income, and dissatisfaction with comparative physical health and self-perceived mental health. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of insufficiently active was high in commuting and leisure time activities. Factors such as age, gender and income should be considered, especially with regards leisure, in order to ensure fairness in the development of policies to promote health and physical activity in this population. PMID:24626549

  1. The Habitable Planet: Ecology Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Annenberg Media project continues to bring interesting and engaging educational materials to teachers and students, and the ball keeps on rolling with this particular feature. The ecology lab feature here is designed to be used in conjunction with "The Habitable Planet" series, which is also available on the site. Teachers and others will note that the site includes an ecology simulator, and visitors can toggle the various settings to learn how the addition or removal of different species will affect their self-designed ecosystem. The simulator is fairly easy to understand, and there's a "HELP" section designed to provide assistance. Additionally, the site also includes a glossary of relevant ecosystem terms, videos, and an online textbook.

  2. Possible Habitability of Ocean Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Höning, Dennis; Bredehöft, Jan H.; Lammer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, the number of detected exoplanets has increased to over thousand confirmed planets and more as yet unconfirmed planet candidates. The scientific community mainly concentrates on terrestrial planets (up to 10 Earth masses) in the habitable zone, which describes the distance from the host star where liquid water can exist at the surface (Kasting et al., 1993). Another target group of interest are ocean worlds, where a terrestrial-like body (i.e. with an iron core and a silicate mantle) is covered by a thick water-ice layer - similar to the icy moons of our solar system but with several Earth masses (e.g. Grasset et al., 2009). When an exoplanet is detected and confirmed as a planet, typically the radius and the mass of it are known, leading to the mean density of the planet that gives hints to possible interior structures. A planet with a large relative iron core and a thick ocean on top of the silicate mantle for example would have the same average planet density as a planet with a more Earth-like appearance (where the main contributor to the mass is the silicate mantle). In this study we investigate how the radius and mass of a planet depend on the amount of water, silicates and iron present (after Wagner et al., 2011) the occurence of high-pressure-ice in the water-ice layer (note: we only consider surface temperatures at which liquid water exists at the surface) if the ocean layer influences the initiation of plate tectonics We assume that ocean worlds with a liquid ocean layer (and without the occurence of high-pressure ice anywhere in the water layer) and plate tectonics (especially the occurence of subduction zones, hydrothermal vents and continental formation) may be called habitable (Class III/IV habitats after Lammer et al., 2009). References: Kasting, J.F., Whitmire, D.P., and Reynolds, R.T. (1993). Habitable Zones around Main Sequence Stars. Icarus 101, 108-128. Grasset, O., Schneider, J., and Sotin, C. (2009). A study of the accuracy of mass-radius relationships for silicate-rich and ice-rich planets up to 100 Earth masses. The Astrophysical Journal 693, 722-733. Wagner, F.W., Sohl, F., Hussmann, H., Grott, M., and Rauer, H. (2011). Interior structure models of solid exoplanets using material laws in the infinite pressure limit. Icarus 214, 366-376. Lammer, H., Bredehöft, J.H., Coustenis, A., Khodachenko, M.L., Kaltenegger, L., Grasset, O., Prieur, D., Raulin, F., Ehrenfreund, P., Yamauchi, M., Wahlund, J.-E., Grießmeier, J.-M., Stangl, G., Cockell, C.S., Kulikov, Yu.N., Grenfell, J.L., and Rauer, H. (2009). What makes a planet habitable? Astron Astrophys Rev 17, 181-249.

  3. Habitable planets with high obliquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kasting, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    Earth's obliquity would vary chaotically from 0 degrees to 85 degrees were it not for the presence of the Moon (J. Laskar, F. Joutel, and P. Robutel, 1993, Nature 361, 615-617). The Moon itself is thought to be an accident of accretion, formed by a glancing blow from a Mars-sized planetesimal. Hence, planets with similar moons and stable obliquities may be extremely rare. This has lead Laskar and colleagues to suggest that the number of Earth-like planets with high obliquities and temperate, life-supporting climates may be small. To test this proposition, we have used an energy-balance climate model to simulate Earth's climate at obliquities up to 90 degrees. We show that Earth's climate would become regionally severe in such circumstances, with large seasonal cycles and accompanying temperature extremes on middle- and high-latitude continents which might be damaging to many forms of life. The response of other, hypothetical, Earth-like planets to large obliquity fluctuations depends on their land-sea distribution and on their position within the habitable zone (HZ) around their star. Planets with several modest-sized continents or equatorial supercontinents are more climatically stable than those with polar supercontinents. Planets farther out in the HZ are less affected by high obliquities because their atmospheres should accumulate CO2 in response to the carbonate-silicate cycle. Dense, CO2-rich atmospheres transport heat very effectively and therefore limit the magnitude of both seasonal cycles and latitudinal temperature gradients. We conclude that a significant fraction of extrasolar Earth-like planets may still be habitable, even if they are subject to large obliquity fluctuations.

  4. Habitable planets with high obliquities.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Kasting, J F

    1997-01-01

    Earth's obliquity would vary chaotically from 0 degrees to 85 degrees were it not for the presence of the Moon (J. Laskar, F. Joutel, and P. Robutel, 1993, Nature 361, 615-617). The Moon itself is thought to be an accident of accretion, formed by a glancing blow from a Mars-sized planetesimal. Hence, planets with similar moons and stable obliquities may be extremely rare. This has lead Laskar and colleagues to suggest that the number of Earth-like planets with high obliquities and temperate, life-supporting climates may be small. To test this proposition, we have used an energy-balance climate model to simulate Earth's climate at obliquities up to 90 degrees. We show that Earth's climate would become regionally severe in such circumstances, with large seasonal cycles and accompanying temperature extremes on middle- and high-latitude continents which might be damaging to many forms of life. The response of other, hypothetical, Earth-like planets to large obliquity fluctuations depends on their land-sea distribution and on their position within the habitable zone (HZ) around their star. Planets with several modest-sized continents or equatorial supercontinents are more climatically stable than those with polar supercontinents. Planets farther out in the HZ are less affected by high obliquities because their atmospheres should accumulate CO2 in response to the carbonate-silicate cycle. Dense, CO2-rich atmospheres transport heat very effectively and therefore limit the magnitude of both seasonal cycles and latitudinal temperature gradients. We conclude that a significant fraction of extrasolar Earth-like planets may still be habitable, even if they are subject to large obliquity fluctuations. PMID:11541242

  5. Handbook for Reading Consultants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry B., Comp.

    This handbook discusses various topics of interest to reading consultants for the elementary level: beginning reading, word recognition, phonics, vocabulary development, comprehension, reading skills in the content area, individualized approaches to instruction, creative reading, the disadvantaged child, audiovisual aids, reading speed, reading

  6. Designing leisure products for people with dementia: developing ''the Chitchatters'' game.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Helma; van Hoof, Joost; Stappers, Pieter Jan

    2010-02-01

    Providing leisure to people with dementia is a serious challenge, for health care professionals and designers and engineers of products used for activity sessions. This article describes the design process of ''the Chitchatters,'' a leisure game for a group of people with dementia in day care centers. The game aims to stimulate social interaction among people with dementia. Different stakeholders, such as older adults with dementia, their relatives and care professionals were involved in the design process via qualitative research methods as participant observation and the use of probes. These methods were applied to give the design team insight into the experiential world of people with dementia. This article presents how design insights from practice and literature can be translated into a real design for a leisure product for group use by older people with dementia, and shows designers how to work with, and design for, special groups. PMID:19346500

  7. Close Reading Exemplar: "The Great Fire"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Student Achievement Partners for Just Read, Florida!

    2012-09-08

    The goal of this three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to explore the historic Great Fire of Chicago. By reading and rereading the passage closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will explore the historical truths related to poverty, city construction, and city services that led to the disaster. In this reading, students learn about historical disasters, but they may not fully comprehend causes or how human actions, nature, or even luck contributed to them, rendering history a flat subject to be memorized rather than explored. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will better understand the dangers inherent in cities and the government role in mitigating that danger.

  8. Using a Reading Material for Interactive Reading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hemamalini; D. K. Devadoss; M. Phil

    2010-01-01

    Reading is essentially an active as well as a communicative process. It is an important language skill required for academic and professional purposes. Quick, efficient and imaginative reading techniques are essential to achieve academic success. One's professional performance also definitely depends on the quantity and quality of reading. In the learning process, reading comprehension follows the listening comprehension. It is

  9. Reading Together: A Successful Reading Fluency Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.; Rasinski, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a reading fluency intervention called Reading Together that combines the method of repeated readings (Samuels, 1979) and the Neurological Impress Method (Heckelman, 1969). Sixteen volunteers from various backgrounds were recruited and trained to deliver the Reading Together intervention to struggling readers in third through…

  10. Close Reading Exemplar: "The Making of a Scientist"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Student Achievement Partners for Just Read, Florida!

    2012-09-09

    The goal of this two to three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to absorb deep lessons from Richard Feynman’s recollections of interactions with his father. By reading and rereading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify how and why Feynman started to look at the world through the eyes of a scientist. When combined with writing about the passage, students will discover how much they can learn from a memoir.

  11. Determinants of participation in leisure activities among adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Schmitz, Norbert; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Poulin, Chantal; Majnemer, Annette

    2013-09-01

    Studies have identified restrictions in engagement in leisure activities for adolescents with disabilities. Participation is a complex construct and likely influenced by a variety of factors. These potential determinants have not yet been sufficiently explored in the population of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). The objective of this study is to estimate the potential influence of adolescent characteristics and environmental factors as determinants of participation in leisure activities for adolescents with CP. A cross-sectional design was used. Participants were adolescents (12-19 years old) with cerebral palsy. Participants were assessed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale - II, Gross Motor Function Measure, Gross Motor Function Classification System, Manual Ability Classification System and completed the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, Family Environment Scale, the European Child Environment Questionnaire and the Preferences for Activities of Children. The main outcome measure was the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment. 187 adolescents (age M=15.4; SD=2.2) completed the study. Multivariate models of participation in leisure revealed associations with factors related to the adolescents' functional characteristics and attitudes, the family environment, socioeconomic status, and contextual factors such as school type, and collectively explained from 28% (diversity of skill-based activities) up to 48% (intensity and diversity of self-improvement activities) of the variance in intensity and diversity in five leisure participation domains (diversity: r(2)=.33 recreational; r(2)=.39 active-physical; r(2)=.33 social activities). Adolescent's mastery motivation, self-perception and behavior were individually associated with participation in different activity domains, but did not strongly predict participation within multivariate models, while preferences for activities were strong predictors of participation in all domains, except for skill-based activities. Engagement in different types of leisure activities is important for adolescents' development and well-being. Health care professionals should consider adolescents' and families' characteristics to promote participation in leisure activities. PMID:23751302

  12. Leisure Policy in the New EuropeThe Uk Department of National Heritage as a Model of Development and Integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Ravenscroft

    1994-01-01

    Leisure is in the vanguard of a social and cultural revolution which is replacing the former east\\/west political bipolarity with a globalized economic system in which the new Europe has a central role. Within this revolution, leisure, including recreation, culture and tourism, is constructed as the epitome of success ful capitalist development, the very legitimation of the global transmogrification from

  13. Picture Me Playing--A Portrait of Participation and Enjoyment of Leisure Activities in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert; Poulin, Chantal; Majnemer, Annette

    2013-01-01

    In recent years attention has been paid to the participation levels of children and youth with Cerebral Palsy (CP), particularly the extent to which they have the opportunity to be involved in and enjoy leisure activities. The objective of this study is to describe the level of participation and enjoyment in leisure activities among adolescents…

  14. Emerging economic sectors in the third millennium: leisure time era begins to dominate US economy by 2015

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grahm T. T. Molitor

    2000-01-01

    This second article in a series of six focuses on leisure as one of the impending waves of economic activity projected to dominate the advanced economies over the course of the new millennium. Leisure will begin to dominate jobs and economic activity in the USA around 2015, the date when “free time” will occupy over half of total individual lifetime

  15. Leisure, Work, and the Use of Time. A Study of Adult Style of Time Utilization, Childhood Determinants and Vocational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Natalie Cohan

    This was a two part investigation of leisure, work, and time use. A preliminary study replaced work and leisure as separate entities with the concept of "meaningful activity." Significant differences in views of "meaningful activity" were found for persons in two widely separated occupational levels. The second part investigated childhood…

  16. Estimation of leisure time physical activity and sedentary behaviour among school adolescents in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leisure-time physical activity is essential for healthy and physically active life; however, this domain of physical activity is less common in developing countries. Information on leisure time physical activity and sedentary behaviour among Nepalese population is not available. The study was carried out to assess leisure time physical activity and sedentary behaviour among high school adolescents and identify the associated factors in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in Banke district, Nepal in 2013 among higher secondary school students using self-administered questionnaire based on International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A sample of 405 students, 178 females and 227 males, of the age–group 15 to 20 years from seven schools were included in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify factors associated with participation in leisure time physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Results Engagement of female in leisure time physical activity was lower but mean time spent on sitting per day was higher. Students who walked to school and have playground/parks near home, younger females (OR?=?3.09, 95% CI: 1.18-8.08), females living in nuclear families (OR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.01-4.62) and males who cycled to school (OR: 8.09, 95% CI: 2.35-27.80) and have provision of extra-curricular activities (OR: 2.49, 95% CI: 1.04-5.97) were more likely to be engaged in leisure time physical activity. On the other hand, students who did not have playground in school and lived in rural areas were more likely to sit for more than 6 hours a day. Likewise, male students of private school (OR: 6.41, 95% CI: 2.89-14.21), who used vehicle to reach school (OR: 5.90, 95% CI: 1.26-27.75) and have no provision of extra-curricular activities (OR: 2.98, 95% CI: 1.09-8.07) had longer sitting time. Conclusion Difference in leisure time physical activity and sedentary behaviour was found among male and female school adolescents. Interventions are needed not only to promote leisure time physical activity but also to reduce sedentary behaviour among this group. PMID:24953522

  17. Breaking the constraints of women's leisure: designing recreational facilities for use by women

    E-print Network

    Kiker, Dena L

    1995-01-01

    but finds that she cannot do so as a result of her many obligations at home, (3) In contrast, men have socialized with their friends at the end of the work-day throughout much of history. Most women, particularly married women with children, are still... the 1980's, women's leisure was not considered to be a formal topic of study, (5) Since most of the leisure research before the 1980's was done by men, women were simply grouped together with men under the assumption that both shared the same recreation...

  18. HABEBEE: habitability of eyeball-exo-Earths.

    PubMed

    Angerhausen, Daniel; Sapers, Haley; Citron, Robert; Bergantini, Alexandre; Lutz, Stefanie; Queiroz, Luciano Lopes; da Rosa Alexandre, Marcelo; Araujo, Ana Carolina Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Extrasolar Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting within the habitable zone of M dwarf host stars may play a significant role in the discovery of habitable environments beyond Earth. Spectroscopic characterization of these exoplanets with respect to habitability requires the determination of habitability parameters with respect to remote sensing. The habitable zone of dwarf stars is located in close proximity to the host star, such that exoplanets orbiting within this zone will likely be tidally locked. On terrestrial planets with an icy shell, this may produce a liquid water ocean at the substellar point, one particular "Eyeball Earth" state. In this research proposal, HABEBEE: exploring the HABitability of Eyeball-Exo-Earths, we define the parameters necessary to achieve a stable icy Eyeball Earth capable of supporting life. Astronomical and geochemical research will define parameters needed to simulate potentially habitable environments on an icy Eyeball Earth planet. Biological requirements will be based on detailed studies of microbial communities within Earth analog environments. Using the interdisciplinary results of both the physical and biological teams, we will set up a simulation chamber to expose a cold- and UV-tolerant microbial community to the theoretically derived Eyeball Earth climate states, simulating the composition, atmosphere, physical parameters, and stellar irradiation. Combining the results of both studies will enable us to derive observable parameters as well as target decision guidance and feasibility analysis for upcoming astronomical platforms. PMID:23510083

  19. Habitability design elements for a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Habitability in space refers to the components, characteristics, conditions, and design parameters that go beyond but include the basic life sustaining requirements. Elements of habitability covered include internal environment, architecture, mobility and restraint, food, clothing, personal hygiene, housekeeping, communications, and crew activities. All elements are interrelated and need to be treated as an overall discipline. Designing for a space station is similar to designing on earth but with 'space rules' instead of ground rules. It is concluded that some habitability problems require behavioral science solutions.

  20. Diapering habits: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Thaman, Lauren A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2014-11-01

    There are tremendous variations in diapering practices, reflecting varying cultural practices and regional difference. Around the world, more than 134 million babies are born each year, a rate of 255 births per minute or 4.3 births each second. While global population growth has been steadily declining from its peak in 1963, several regions, including the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa, continue to maintain high birth rates. Though the essential needs of infants are largely similar, family habits and practices during early years of life vary dramatically. This article surveys data documenting variations in diaper frequency, types, and duration of use internationally, including age of toilet training. These factors may influence diaper rash and skin health of infants and young children. Much of this data was collected as part of analysis of the international commercial diaper market, evaluated and organized as part of an international initiative on Global Infant Skin Care, and presented to a panel of experts for critique and commentary in a symposium held in December, 2013. PMID:25403934

  1. Setting the stage for habitable planets.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the processes that are relevant to the formation and maintenance of habitable planetary systems is advancing at a rapid pace, both from observation and theory. The present review focuses on recent research that bears on this topic and includes discussions of processes occurring in astrophysical, geophysical and climatic contexts, as well as the temporal evolution of planetary habitability. Special attention is given to recent observations of exoplanets and their host stars and the theories proposed to explain the observed trends. Recent theories about the early evolution of the Solar System and how they relate to its habitability are also summarized. Unresolved issues requiring additional research are pointed out, and a framework is provided for estimating the number of habitable planets in the Universe. PMID:25370028

  2. Investigating habits: strategies, technologies and models

    E-print Network

    Smith, Kyle S.

    Understanding habits at a biological level requires a combination of behavioral observations and measures of ongoing neural activity. Theoretical frameworks as well as definitions of habitual behaviors emerging from classic ...

  3. Setting the Stage for Habitable Planets

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the processes that are relevant to the formation and maintenance of habitable planetary systems is advancing at a rapid pace, both from observation and theory. The present review focuses on recent research that bears on this topic and includes discussions of processes occurring in astrophysical, geophysical and climatic contexts, as well as the temporal evolution of planetary habitability. Special attention is given to recent observations of exoplanets and their host stars and the theories proposed to explain the observed trends. Recent theories about the early evolution of the Solar System and how they relate to its habitability are also summarized. Unresolved issues requiring additional research are pointed out, and a framework is provided for estimating the number of habitable planets in the Universe. PMID:25370028

  4. The Galactic Habitable Zone: Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guillermo Gonzalez; Donald Brownlee; Peter Ward

    2001-01-01

    We propose the concept of a “Galactic Habitable Zone” (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution.

  5. Habitable Zones around Main Sequence Stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James F. Kasting; Daniel P. Whitmire; Ray T. Reynolds

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional climate model is used to estimate the width of the habitable zone (HZ) around our Sun and around other main sequence stars. Our basic premise is that we are dealing with Earth-like planets with CO2\\/H2O\\/N2 atmospheres and that habitability requires the presence of liquid water on the planet's surface. The inner edge of the HZ is determined in

  6. The Ace TM Bandage approach to digit-sucking habits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven M. Adair

    1999-01-01

    This article describes an at-home program to assist children with nocturnal digit-sucking habits. Children with such habits are can- didates for this program if they wish to discontinue their habits and have no psychological contraindications for habit cessation. The program involves nightly use of an elastic bandage wrapped across the elbow. Pressure exerted by the bandage removes the digit from

  7. Non-Formal Education in Free Time: Leisure- or Work-Orientated Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoidis, Ioannis; Pnevmatikos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the relationship between adults' free time and further education. More specifically, the paper addresses the question of whether there are similarities and analogies between the leisure time that adults dedicate to non-formal educational activities and free time per se. A structured questionnaire was used to examine…

  8. Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Elementary Schools: Analysis of Contextual Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Crespo, Noe C.; Baquero, Barbara; Elder, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about children's leisure-time physical activity (PA) at school and how it is associated with contextual variables. The purpose of this study was to objectively assess children's voluntary PA during 3 daily periods and examine modifiable contextual factors. Methods: We conducted SOPLAY (System for Observing Play and…

  9. Credentialing in the Health, Leisure, and Movement Professions. Trends and Issues Paper No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Liane M.

    This trends and issues paper considers the emerging presence of credentialing programs in the health, leisure, and movement professions in which such diverse occupations as health education teachers, aerobics instructors, exercise physiologists, dance therapists, community park managers, intramural directors, and military fitness instructors are…

  10. How socio-economic status contributes to participation in leisure-time physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify individual, social, and environmental contributors (mediators) to individual- and area-level differences in leisure-time physical activity across socio-economic groups. A two-stage stratified sampling design was used to recruit 20– to 65-year-old...

  11. Adolescent and adult leisure patterns: A 37?year follow?up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Scott; Fern K. Willits

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between adolescent and adult leisure activities was assessed by utilizing longitudinal data from 1298 subjects studied during their high school years and again when they were in their early fifties. For the sample members, the greater the involvement in a specific type of activity during adolescence, the more frequent the participation in the same type of activity at

  12. Serious Leisure, Health Perception, Dispositional Optimism, and Life Satisfaction among Senior Games Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Jinmoo; Lee, Youngkhill

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated factors that explain the life satisfaction of Senior Games participants. One 193 older adults from the 2005 Michigan State Senior Games and the 2005 New York State Senior Games participated in the study. The results of the study show that one of the indicators of serious leisure (affective attachment) was positively…

  13. Predicting the Relative Efficacy of Verbal, Pictorial, and Tangible Stimuli for Assessing Preferences of Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Cecile; Yu, C. T.; Sakko, Gina; Wirth, Kirsten M.; Walters, Kerri L.; Marion, Carole; Martin, Garry L.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the relationships between choice stimulus modalities and three basic discriminations (visual, visual matching-to-sample, and auditory-visual) using the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities test. Participants were 9 adults who had moderate to profound developmental disabilities. Their most and least preferred leisure activities,…

  14. Gender differences in social support and leisure-time physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aldair J; Lopes, Claudia S; Rostila, Mikael; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Griep, Rosane Härter; de Leon, Antônio Carlos Monteiro Ponce; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify gender differences in social support dimensions’ effect on adults’ leisure-time physical activity maintenance, type, and time. METHODS Longitudinal study of 1,278 non-faculty public employees at a university in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Southeastern Brazil. Physical activity was evaluated using a dichotomous question with a two-week reference period, and further questions concerning leisure-time physical activity type (individual or group) and time spent on the activity. Social support was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale. For the analysis, logistic regression models were adjusted separately by gender. RESULTS A multinomial logistic regression showed an association between material support and individual activities among women (OR = 2.76; 95%CI 1.2;6.5). Affective support was associated with time spent on leisure-time physical activity only among men (OR = 1.80; 95%CI 1.1;3.2). CONCLUSIONS All dimensions of social support that were examined influenced either the type of, or the time spent on, leisure-time physical activity. In some social support dimensions, the associations detected varied by gender. Future studies should attempt to elucidate the mechanisms involved in these gender differences. PMID:25210819

  15. Using Family Leisure Activities to Support Families Living with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Robin H.; Hendricks, C. Bret; Bradley, Loretta J.; Layton, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Support for families of children with autism spectrum disorders continues to be important, but formal support groups may not ft every need. The authors describe Family Fun Days, a program that paired leisure activities with opportunities for support. There was an increase in the number of participants over traditional support meetings,…

  16. Middle-Class Struggle? Identity-Work and Leisure among Sixth Formers in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehily, Mary Jane; Pattman, Rob

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the ways in which sixth-form students in Milton Keynes negotiate their identities and the symbolic significance they attach to leisure activities in the process of doing this. The paper draws upon qualitative, young-person-centred interviews with sixth formers in state and private schools. It addresses the investments of sixth…

  17. Can Gymnastic Teacher Predict Leisure Activity Preference among Children with Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel-Yeger, Batya; Hanna-Kassis, Amany; Rosenblum, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the study were to analyze: (1) whether significant differences exist between children with typical development and children with developmental coordination disorders (DCD) in their preference to participate in leisure activities (2) whether the teacher estimation of activity form (TEAF) evaluation predicts participation preference.…

  18. Leisure travel in Europe and airline business models: A study of regional airports in Great Britain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Papatheodorou; Zheng Lei

    2006-01-01

    Tourism and air transport are explicitly linked especially in the context of leisure traffic. This paper highlights this relationship by focusing on the impact of the three main airline business models (traditional scheduled, charter and low-cost) on regional airports using Britain as a case study. The panel data econometric results show that despite the current perception, low cost carriers are

  19. Young Adult Outcomes of Children with Hyperactivity: Leisure, Financial, and Social Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Mariellen; Barkley, Russell

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on the leisure time, financial, gambling, and social activities of a large sample of children with hyperactivity (H group, N = 149) and children who served as a control group (CC group, N = 72) from the Southeastern Wisconsin (Milwaukee) region tracked for 13-15 years to young adulthood (ages 19--25, M = 20 years). Participant…

  20. Leisure as a Resource for Successful Aging by Older Adults with Chronic Health Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Susan L.; Nimrod, Galit

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the model of Selective Optimization with Compensation (SOC) (Baltes & Baltes, 1990), the purpose of this article is to examine leisure-related goals of older adults with chronic conditions and the strategies they use to not only successfully manage their chronic health conditions but live well with them. Semi-structured in-person…

  1. Building on Strengths and Resilience: Leisure as a Stress Survival Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; MacTavish, Jennifer; MacKay, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    Exploring the ways in which leisure contributes to managing, relieving, or counteracting stress has become an increasingly popular area of study in recent years. Findings from a multi-year study of stress and coping among diverse residents of a western Canadian city are reported in this paper. In particular, the key findings presented are specific…

  2. Body Type, Body Esteem, School, and Leisure: A Study of Overweight, Average, and Underweight Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Leo B.; Gillies, Pamela

    1978-01-01

    The characteristics, sports and leisure involvement, and social relations of 15- to 16-year-old boys and girls categorized as "overweight,""underweight," or "average" were examined in terms of academic achievement, social class, and physical education teachers' perceptions. Overweight and underweight adolescents appeared at some disadvantage in…

  3. Career Education for Leisure Occupations: Curriculum Guidelines for Recreation, Hospitality, and Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guidelines suggested in this publication have been designed to assist educators in developing career education programs based on local needs and resources in the leisure career family for the occupational groups in recreation services, recreation resources, tourism, and amusement and entertainment. The basic approaches presented are applicable…

  4. Framework for the Analysis of Sport and Leisure Used in Television Commercials and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, David L.; Waggoner, Bernice

    1982-01-01

    Develops a framework for examining sport and leisure themes in television programs and commercials. The proposed model has two dimensions: (1) problem analysis (impacts, evolutionary cycle, and skill level); and (2) model development (methodological consideration). Until a more comprehensive approach incorporating these issues is operationalized,…

  5. Recreation and Leisure: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This bibliography presents 162 annotated references (including bibliographic materials, training and educational materials, and programs) about issues of recreation and leisure for adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Each reference usually contains a full bibliographic citation, a brief descriptive abstract, and…

  6. Participation and Enjoyment of Leisure Activities in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Birnbaum, Rena; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Rosenbaum, Peter; Poulin, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize participation in leisure activities in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and identify determinants of greater involvement. Ninety-five children of school age (9y 7mo [SD 2y 1mo]) with CP were recruited, and participation was evaluated with the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment in a…

  7. The relationship between leisure time and driving style in two groups of male drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mette Møller; Sigrún Birna Sigurðardóttir

    2009-01-01

    Despite overall improvements in traffic safety levels, young male drivers continue to be over represented in accidents. In this study the association between driving style and leisure time was examined in two groups of drivers. The sample consisted of 4000 male drivers of which 2000 were 18years old and 2000 were 28years old. A posted questionnaire was used. The overall

  8. The Journal of Recreation and Leisure. Spring 1990 Volume 10 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Craig, Ed.; Busser, James, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the following articles under the headings "Philosophical Ideas" (Articles 1-5), "Research Studies" (Articles 6-15), and "Practical Techniques" (Articles 16-22): (1) "Coming Home to a Change of Lifestyle" (Connie O'Connor); (2) "The New Age and Leisure" (Karla Henderson, Angela Whorton); (3) "A Backcountry Dichotomy" (Gary…

  9. Intermountain Leisure Symposium Proceedings (12th, Provo, Utah, November 21, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Doug, Ed.; Smith, S. Harold, Ed.

    This report includes papers submitted by 23 presenters at a conference on recreation and leisure programs, facilities, and management. Titles of the papers are as follows: (1) "Trends in Parks and Recreation Masterplan Development" (C. W. Kelsey); (2) "Play Therapy: Implications to Recreation" (G. Bader); (3) "Wilderness Therapy" (J. T. Banks and…

  10. What Influences Participation in Leisure Activities of Children and Youth with Physical Disabilities? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bult, M. K.; Verschuren, O.; Jongmans, M. J.; Lindeman, E.; Ketelaar, M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) defined participation as "someone's involvement in life situations". Participation in leisure activities contributes to the development of children and their quality of life. Children with physical disabilities are known to be at risk for participation in fewer activities. The group of…

  11. Recovering from crisis : Strategic alternatives for leisure and tourism providers based within a rural economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Williams; Maggie Ferguson

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – To provide a critique of the strategies that the UK Government employed at that time of the closure of the countryside during the foot and mouth disease (FMD) and their subsequent effects upon leisure and tourism providers. The work evaluates the sector's responses to the FMD crisis and considers their significance and influence in relation to the strategies

  12. Program Review: Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Studies: The State University System of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Tony A.

    This is the report of a 1990 review of Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Studies programs at the University of Florida (UF), Florida State University (FSU), and Florida International University (FIU). Among the conclusions are that these programs are essential to the lifestyle of Florida residents and the continued economic growth of the state.…

  13. Positive Youth Development within a Family Leisure Context: Youth Perspectives of Family Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Peter J.; Zabriskie, Ramon B.

    2011-01-01

    Family leisure involvement may provide the first and most essential context for positive youth development in today's society. Similar to the broader ecological perspective used in the youth development literature, family systems theory suggests that each individual in the family influences the whole, while the whole family also influences each…

  14. Surviving leisure time racism: the burden of racial harassment on Britain's black footballers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian L. Holland

    1997-01-01

    This paper explores the burden of racial harassment and abuse on Britain's black footballers and places this in the context of leisure time racism. It is based on research carried out between 1989 and 1994. It is suggested that the source of such racism has been a neglected issue and only gained significant recognition in 1993 when the Commission for

  15. Assessment of Preference for Edible and Leisure Items in Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Javier Virues; Iwata, Brian A.; Nogales-Gonzalez, Celia; Frades, Belen

    2012-01-01

    We conducted 2 studies on reinforcer preference in patients with dementia. Results of preference assessments yielded differential selections by 14 participants. Unlike prior studies with individuals with intellectual disabilities, all participants showed a noticeable preference for leisure items over edible items. Results of a subsequent analysis…

  16. College Student High-Risk Drinking as a Maladaptive Serious Leisure Hobby

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Margaret Maloney

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to examine the experiences of college students who defined themselves as high-risk drinkers in order to understand the meaning and purpose that engagement in such a leisure occupation held for them. Individual open-ended interviews were conducted with four male and four female participants (aged 21 to 27). The findings revealed an emergent

  17. Selfish leisure? Competing priorities and constraints in triathlon event travel careers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew James Lamont; Millicent Kennelly; Erica Wilson

    2011-01-01

    The term event travel career refers to a potentially lifelong desire to travel to events pertinent to an individual’s preferred leisure activity that is characterised by progression, evolving preferences, and modified behaviour. This paper applies the concept of an event travel career to non-elite triathletes. It is argued that for these serious sport tourists, ongoing pursuit of an event travel

  18. Caregivers, leisure and meanings of home: a case study of low income women in Dublin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernadette M Quinn

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to contribute to the literature on the meanings of domestic spaces by furthering understandings of the sorts of roles that space plays in shaping women's leisure experiences. The study researched a group of 15 women who live in disadvantaged areas of Dublin city and care for dependent children. Focus groups and structured conversations revealed the poverty of

  19. Back to the Future: The Potential Relationship between Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, David S.; Allen, Lawrence R.; Barcelona, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Leisure and education have been inextricably linked since the beginning of Greek civilization. However, the current view of and relationship among these notions has changed dramatically. The personnel, standards, vocational preparation, and contexts for each are largely separated. Given their central place in community life and the resources that…

  20. Adolescents' Experiences of the Right to Play and Leisure in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Under Article 31 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, every child under the age of 18 has the right to engage in age-appropriate play and leisure activities. Drawing on the qualitative findings of a wider review of children's rights in Northern Ireland, this article examines the degree to which adolescents in Northern…

  1. A model of serious leisure identification: the case of football fandom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Jones

    2000-01-01

    Stebbins (1992) has suggested that the ‘profit hypothesis’, whereby the perceived benefits of taking part in an activity exceed the perceived costs, can be used to explain continued engagement in serious leisure activities. This argument, however, fails to explain the continued participation in such activities where the costs to the individual seem to exceed the rewards. This paper adopts a

  2. Value Orientations and Studying in School-Leisure Conflict: A Study with Samples from Five Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Manfred; Schmid, Sebastian; Fries, Stefan; Zivkovic, Ilija; Dietz, Franziska

    2009-01-01

    The relations between students' value orientations and experiences of motivational interference during studying following conflicts between learning and leisure activities were investigated in a self-report study. Overall, 1075 adolescents, mostly from Catholic schools, in Bosnia-Herzegovina (n = 203), India (n = 200), Paraguay (n = 96), Spain (n…

  3. Sport and Social Inclusion: Evidence from the Performance of Public Leisure Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yi-De

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, sport is increasingly recognized as a means for promoting social inclusion. However, evaluation, to date, is limited with regard to the achievement of social inclusion through sport. Based on the database of Sport England's National Benchmarking Service, this paper aims to investigate the extent to which public leisure facilities were…

  4. The Power of Leisure: “I Was an Anorexic; I'm Now a Healthy Triathlete”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Megan Axelsen

    2009-01-01

    This autoethnographic account describes the ambiguities of the author's ongoing struggle with anorexia nervosa and how leisure was integral to her quasi-recovery from the illness. By showing the emotional and mental struggles of the illness, this paper offers an alternative to the traditional scientific studies of the illness that buries people's voices beneath layers of analysis. The purpose of the

  5. How Do Playful People Play? Gendered and Racial Leisure Perspectives, Motives, and Preferences of College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn A. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    Playfulness is an aspect of personality that predisposes individuals to reframe boring situations into more amusing ones for themselves. This study extends knowledge about the playfulness construct by contrasting college students who were high or low in playfulness relative to the activity preferences they make, the motives they have, and their perspectives on their leisure time. Significant differences were found

  6. Trends in No Leisure-Time Physical Activity--United States, 1988-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Latetia V.; Harris, Carmen D.; Carlson, Susan A.; Kruger, Judy; Fulton, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine trends in the prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from 1988 to 2010. Method: Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, 35 states and the District of Columbia reported information on no LTPA from 1988 to 1994; all states reported no LTPA from 1996 to 2010. Results: No…

  7. "We're Gators...Not Just Gator Fans": Serious Leisure and University of Florida Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Heather; Willming, Cynthia; Holdnak, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed University of Florida Gator football fans to examine meanings, rituals, and practices associated with being a fan. Emergent themes confirmed Stebbins' (1979; 1992) six characteristics of serious leisure (e.g., perseverance, unique ethos, and identification). Results suggest that being a Gator football fan provides both a source of…

  8. Becoming readers: our stories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Celine Kamhieh; Shaikha Al Hameli; Ayesha Al Hammadi; Nada Al Hammadi; Iman Nawfal; Athra Al Zaabi; Khulood Khalfan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The paper is part of a larger qualitative study of female Emirati university students' leisure reading habits and the purpose is to investigate the factors that have affected the reading habits of six respondents as they tell how they became avid readers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Six students, who are very keen readers, were asked to write their stories of

  9. Investigating habits: strategies, technologies and models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding habits at a biological level requires a combination of behavioral observations and measures of ongoing neural activity. Theoretical frameworks as well as definitions of habitual behaviors emerging from classic behavioral research have been enriched by new approaches taking account of the identification of brain regions and circuits related to habitual behavior. Together, this combination of experimental and theoretical work has provided key insights into how brain circuits underlying action-learning and action-selection are organized, and how a balance between behavioral flexibility and fixity is achieved. New methods to monitor and manipulate neural activity in real time are allowing us to have a first look “under the hood” of a habit as it is formed and expressed. Here we discuss ideas emerging from such approaches. We pay special attention to the unexpected findings that have arisen from our own experiments suggesting that habitual behaviors likely require the simultaneous activity of multiple distinct components, or operators, seen as responsible for the contrasting dynamics of neural activity in both cortico-limbic and sensorimotor circuits recorded concurrently during different stages of habit learning. The neural dynamics identified thus far do not fully meet expectations derived from traditional models of the structure of habits, and the behavioral measures of habits that we have made also are not fully aligned with these models. We explore these new clues as opportunities to refine an understanding of habits. PMID:24574988

  10. Habitable worlds with no signs of life.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S

    2014-04-28

    'Most habitable worlds in the cosmos will have no remotely detectable signs of life' is proposed as a biological hypothesis to be tested in the study of exoplanets. Habitable planets could be discovered elsewhere in the Universe, yet there are many hypothetical scenarios whereby the search for life on them could yield negative results. Scenarios for habitable worlds with no remotely detectable signatures of life include: planets that are habitable, but have no biosphere (Uninhabited Habitable Worlds); planets with life, but lacking any detectable surface signatures of that life (laboratory examples are provided); and planets with life, where the concentrations of atmospheric gases produced or removed by biota are impossible to disentangle from abiotic processes because of the lack of detailed knowledge of planetary conditions (the 'problem of exoplanet thermodynamic uncertainty'). A rejection of the hypothesis would require that the origin of life usually occurs on habitable planets, that spectrally detectable pigments and/or metabolisms that produce unequivocal biosignature gases (e.g. oxygenic photosynthesis) usually evolve and that the organisms that harbour them usually achieve a sufficient biomass to produce biosignatures detectable to alien astronomers. PMID:24664917

  11. Habitable planets around the star Gl 581?

    E-print Network

    Franck Selsis; J. F. Kasting; B. Levrard; J. Paillet; I. Ribas; X. Delfosse

    2007-11-21

    Radial velocity surveys are now able to detect terrestrial planets at habitable distance from M-type stars. Recently, two planets with minimum masses below 10 Earth masses were reported in a triple system around the M-type star Gliese 581. Using results from atmospheric models and constraints from the evolution of Venus and Mars, we assess the habitability of planets Gl 581c and Gl 581d and we discuss the uncertainties affecting the habitable zone (HZ) boundaries determination. We provide simplified formulae to estimate the HZ limits that may be used to evaluate the astrobiological potential of terrestrial exoplanets that will hopefully be discovered in the near future. Planets Gl 581c and 'd' are near, but outside, what can be considered as the conservative HZ. Planet 'c' receives 30% more energy from its star than Venus from the Sun, with an increased radiative forcing caused by the spectral energy distribution of Gl 581. Its habitability cannot however be positively ruled out by theoretical models due to uncertainties affecting cloud properties. Irradiation conditions of planet 'd' are comparable with those of early Mars. Thanks to the warming effect of CO2-ice clouds planet 'd' might be a better candidate for the first exoplanet known to be potentially habitable. A mixture of various greenhouse gases could also maintain habitable conditions on this planet.

  12. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Methods Randomly selected schools (n = 145) participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years). School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Results and Discussion Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5%) than males (6.5%). In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively), parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among M?ori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-M?ori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females and M?ori which demonstrated a strong dose response effect. Conclusions There were significant differences in the risk of daily smoking across leisure activities by gender and ethnicity. This reinforces the need to be alert for, and respond to, gender and ethnic differences in the pattern of risk and protective factors. However, given the consistently protective, dose response effect of parental monitoring, our findings confirm that assisting oversight of adolescent leisure activities may be a key component in public health policy and prevention programmes. PMID:21645407

  13. Intonation in Oral Reading and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Andrea

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a study that investigated the relationship between intonation in oral reading and reading comprehension of Black West Indies college students. Concludes that there were no significant relationships and outlines procedures for future research. (FL)

  14. High Interest--Easy Reading: A Booklist for Junior and Senior High School Students. Sixth Edition. NCTE Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, William G., Ed.

    Designed to encourage students in grades 7-12 to make reading a habit, this annotated booklist contains over 400 titles of fiction and nonfiction books published between 1987 and 1989. It is intended for students who are able to read but lack the motivation to do so because they have not encountered books that speak to their interests and…

  15. Promoting Reading Motivation by Reading Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monteiro, Vera

    2013-01-01

    In the present project we tested the hypothesis that tutorial situations with peers would benefit children's reading motivation. Participants were from elementary school--80 fourth-graders and 80 second-graders. We used a questionnaire to assess reading motivation. In the tutorial sessions we developed a Paired Reading Program. The children who…

  16. Teaching Adults to Read with Reading Apprenticeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesmeister, Michele Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Many adult students have basic reading skills, but they are inexperienced readers who need to learn skills beyond the basics to equip them for success in college and career. How do educators face such adults with optimism and an eagerness to help improve specific reading skills so that these students can read and understand a variety of materials?…

  17. Emergence of a Habitable Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Arndt, Nick; Cockell, Charles; Halliday, Alex; Nisbet, Euan; Selsis, Franck; Sleep, Norman H.

    2007-03-01

    We address the first several hundred million years of Earth’s history. The Moon-forming impact left Earth enveloped in a hot silicate atmosphere that cooled and condensed over ˜1,000 yrs. As it cooled the Earth degassed its volatiles into the atmosphere. It took another ˜2 Myrs for the magma ocean to freeze at the surface. The cooling rate was determined by atmospheric thermal blanketing. Tidal heating by the new Moon was a major energy source to the magma ocean. After the mantle solidified geothermal heat became climatologically insignificant, which allowed the steam atmosphere to condense, and left behind a ˜100 bar, ˜500 K CO2 atmosphere. Thereafter cooling was governed by how quickly CO2 was removed from the atmosphere. If subduction were efficient this could have taken as little as 10 million years. In this case the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth should have been cold and its oceans white with ice. But if carbonate subduction were inefficient the CO2 would have mostly stayed in the atmosphere, which would have kept the surface near ˜500 K for many tens of millions of years. Hydrous minerals are harder to subduct than carbonates and there is a good chance that the Hadean mantle was dry. Hadean heat flow was locally high enough to ensure that any ice cover would have been thin (<5 m) in places. Moreover hundreds or thousands of asteroid impacts would have been big enough to melt the ice triggering brief impact summers. We suggest that plate tectonics as it works now was inadequate to handle typical Hadean heat flows of 0.2-0.5 W/m2. In its place we hypothesize a convecting mantle capped by a ˜100 km deep basaltic mush that was relatively permeable to heat flow. Recycling and distillation of hydrous basalts produced granitic rocks very early, which is consistent with preserved >4 Ga detrital zircons. If carbonates in oceanic crust subducted as quickly as they formed, Earth could have been habitable as early as 10-20 Myrs after the Moon-forming impact.

  18. Emergence of a Habitable Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Arndt, Nick; Cockell, Charles; Halliday, Alex; Nisbet, Euan; Selsis, Franck; Sleep, Norman H.

    We address the first several hundred million years of Earth's history. The Moon-forming impact left Earth enveloped in a hot silicate atmosphere that cooled and condensed over ˜1,000 yrs. As it cooled the Earth degassed its volatiles into the atmosphere. It took another ˜2 Myrs for the magma ocean to freeze at the surface. The cooling rate was determined by atmospheric thermal blanketing. Tidal heating by the new Moon was a major energy source to the magma ocean. After the mantle solidified geothermal heat became climatologically insignificant, which allowed the steam atmosphere to condense, and left behind a ˜100 bar, ˜500 K CO2 atmosphere. Thereafter cooling was governed by how quickly CO2 was removed from the atmosphere. If subduction were efficient this could have taken as little as 10 million years. In this case the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth should have been cold and its oceans white with ice. But if carbonate subduction were inefficient the CO2 would have mostly stayed in the atmosphere, which would have kept the surface near ˜500 K for many tens of millions of years. Hydrous minerals are harder to subduct than carbonates and there is a good chance that the Hadean mantle was dry. Hadean heat flow was locally high enough to ensure that any ice cover would have been thin (<5 m) in places. Moreover hundreds or thousands of asteroid impacts would have been big enough to melt the ice triggering brief impact summers. We suggest that plate tectonics as it works now was inadequate to handle typical Hadean heat flows of 0.2-0.5 W/m2. In its place we hypothesize a convecting mantle capped by a ˜100 km deep basaltic mush that was relatively permeable to heat flow. Recycling and distillation of hydrous basalts produced granitic rocks very early, which is consistent with preserved >4 Ga detrital zircons. If carbonates in oceanic crust subducted as quickly as they formed, Earth could have been habitable as early as 10-20 Myrs after the Moon-forming impact.

  19. Leisure activity, mobility limitation and stress as modifiable risk factors for depressive symptoms in the elderly: results of a national longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Te; Yeh, Chih-Jung; Lee, Meng-Chih; Lin, Hui-Sheng; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung; Hsieh, Ming-Hong; Yen, Chi-Hua; Lai, Te-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Few national longitudinal studies have investigated the modifiable risk factors for depression in the elderly. This study investigated the risk factors and health-related behaviors associated with depressive symptoms using a national survey of Taiwanese elderly with a 4-year follow-up period. In this prospective cohort study, 1481 non-demented population-based elderly were interviewed at baseline in 2003 and at follow-up in 2007. The independent variables included demographics, chronic medical diseases and health-related behaviors assessed at baseline. The dependent variable was depressive symptoms assessed at follow-up. Reduced rank regression was applied to characterize independent factors related to depressive symptoms. The prevalence of depressive symptoms at follow-up was 21.1%. The results of multivariate analyses revealed three independent risk factors for depressive symptoms: fewer leisure activities (odds ratio, OR=0.56, 95% confidence interval, CI=0.38-0.83, p=0.0034), more mobility limitations (OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.30-2.86, p=0.0011) and higher stress levels (OR=2.43, 95% CI=1.68-3.50, p<0.0001). The leisure activities least associated with depression were reading newspapers/books and doing outdoor building projects; the two mobility limitations most associated with depression were difficulty in lifting things and in climbing stairs. The two stresses most associated with depression were perceived health stress and financial stress. These results indicated that interventions to prevent or reduce depression in older adults should include practical strategies aimed at these modifiable risk factors. PMID:21821296

  20. Environmental Signatures for Habitability: What to Measure and How to Rank the Habitability Potential of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Mahaffy, Paul M.; Steele, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The environmental signatures for habitability are not necessarily biosignatures, even though on Earth, they are definitive proof of habitability. It is the constant overprint of the chemical signatures of life that makes it difficult to recognize the chemical and physical properties of a potentially habitable environment as distinct from an inhabited one. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will soon embark on a mission to Mars to assess its past or present habitability, so it is useful to examine how we measure habitability on Earth and prepare for how that approach may differ for Mars. This exercise includes: (a) articulation of fundamental assumptions about habitability, (b) an inventory of factors that affect habitability, (c) development of metrics, measurement approach and implementation, and (d) a new classification scheme for planetary habitability that goes beyond the binary "yes" or "no." There may be dozens of factors that affect habitability and they can be weighted as a function of specific environment. However a robotic, in situ investigation even on Earth has constraints that prevent the measurement of every environmental factor, so metrics must be reduced to the most relevant subset, given available time, cost, technical feasibility and scientific importance. Many of the factors could be measured with a combination of orbital data and the MSL payload. We propose that, at a minimum, a designation of high habitability potential requires the following conditions be met: (a) thermally stable with respect to extremes and frequency of fluctuation, (b) has more than one energy source, (c) sufficient chemical diversity to make compounds with covalent and hydrogen bonding, (d) can moderate ionizing radiation enough to allow a stable or evolving pool of organic molecules, (e) must have water or other high quality polar solvent, (f) must be able to renew chemical resources (e.g., plate tectonics, volcanism or something else we haven't envisioned). A measurement approach we have taken to measure habitability on Earth is : 1. Study remote sensing data, maps, etc. 2. Decide how big an area to measure. 3. Determine the spatial sampling rate. 4. Determine the temporal sampling rate. 5. Determine the order of measurements 6. Decide where to begin measurements 7. Select locations at field site and proceed While science drives each of the steps, there are additional constraints, e.g., technical, time, cost, safety (risk). This approach is also executable on Mars. Measurement of past habitability is more challenging both for Earth and Mars where access to the past means subsurface access and confrontation with unknowns about preservation of the martian past. Some environments preserve evidence of past habitability better than others, and this is where selection of the landing site to maximize the preservation potential of habitability indicators will be key. Mars presents an opportunity to discover transitional states between habitable or not, and we offer a ranking scale for planetary habitability with Mars as the second test subject: CLASS ONE Uninhabitable and likely has never been so CLASS TWO Has a high potential but no confirmed observation of life (as defined above) CLASS THREE Inhabited (we find life) 3-A Globally inhabited 3-B Primitive life; early in its evolution, but not yet globally established 3-C Exists only in refugia -- planet heading toward class four CLASS FOUR Post-habitable (there once was life, but now it's gone) MSL provides an opportunity to carefully investigate the habitability of at least one site on Mars and it will reveal much about the possible states of planetary habitability

  1. Sequence in Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The numerous approaches in the teaching of reading can be summarized by discussing logical versus psychological approaches in teaching reading. The teacher is the dominant person in stressing a logical reading curriculum for pupils. The sequence comes from outside of the pupil but is arranged by the professional reading teacher to provide optimal…

  2. Big Read, Big ROI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Beth

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) released a grim report on the state of literary reading in America. "Reading at Risk" (www.nea.gov/pub/ReadingAtRisk.pdf) detailed a dramatic decline in recreational reading across all segments of the American population--young and old, black, brown, and white. It also included the projected…

  3. Reading to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Phillip; Wardrip, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers expect high school students to know how to read, understand, and learn from texts at the core of the curriculum. But though students learn to read in grade school, many do not know how to "read to learn" science. And science teachers are often too busy teaching science to actively help students increase their science reading

  4. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere. PMID:20307182

  5. "I have chosen to live life abundantly": perceptions of leisure by adults who use augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Dattilo, John; Estrella, Gus; Estrella, Laura J; Light, Janice; McNaughton, David; Seabury, Meagan

    2008-03-01

    An online focus group was used to investigate perceptions of eight adults with cerebral palsy who used AAC systems about their recreation activities and leisure experiences. Six themes emerged from discussions on benefits of leisure and community recreation: improved physical health, enjoyment, improved mental health, increased independence, enhanced social connections, and education of society. Nine barriers to leisure participation were identified including: personal, social, communication, technology, financial, accessibility, safety, transportation, and personal care attendants. Despite numerous barriers to leisure, participants described six supports that helped them overcome these barriers: personal, social, family, personal care attendants, AAC devices, and other assistive technologies. Participants provided recommendations for other individuals who use AAC, their families, and service providers. PMID:18938755

  6. 77 FR 23652 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D/B/A...EPA is proposing to approve into the Illinois State Implementation Plan (SIP) an...Crownline) at its West Frankfort, Illinois facility. On June 10, 2011, the...

  7. Does Leisure Time as a Stress Coping Resource Increase Affective Complexity? Applying the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA).

    PubMed

    Qian, Xinyi Lisa; Yarnal, Careen M; Almeida, David M

    2013-01-01

    Affective complexity, a manifestation of psychological well-being, refers to the relative independence between positive and negative affect (PA, NA). According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful situations lead to highly inverse PA-NA relationship, reducing affective complexity. Meanwhile, positive events can sustain affective complexity by restoring PA-NA independence. Leisure, a type of positive events, has been identified as a coping resource. This study used the DMA to assess whether leisure time helps restore affective complexity on stressful days. We found that on days with more leisure time than usual, an individual experienced less negative PA-NA relationship after daily stressful events. The finding demonstrates the value of leisure time as a coping resource and the DMA's contribution to coping research. PMID:24659826

  8. Personality and Leisure: How the NEO FFI personality domains influence free-time activity participation, motives and preferences 

    E-print Network

    Bassett, Kathryn S

    2009-07-03

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on the ways in which individuals spend their leisure time, focusing on television, Internet, and film. The personality variables of the NEO FFI (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness...

  9. Is leisure time availability associated with more or less severe daily stressors? An examination using eight-day diary data.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xinyi Lisa; Yarnal, Careen M; Almeida, David M

    2014-01-01

    The stress suppressing model proposes that sufficient resources reduce stress. The stress exposure model suggests that certain factors expose individuals to more stress. The current study tested these two models by assessing the within-person lagging effect of leisure time on perceived severity of daily stressors. Analyzing eight-day diary data (N=2,022), we found that having more leisure time than usual on a day reduced perceived severity of daily stressors the next day and that the decrease in severity became larger with further increase in leisure time. Additionally, the effect is much stronger among busy individuals who usually had little leisure time. The findings demonstrated an accelerated suppressing effect that differed between-person, and the lagging effect affords stronger implication for causality than correlational analysis. PMID:24563564

  10. Information systems - Issues in global habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. D.; Brass, J. A.; Jones, H.; Morse, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with fundamental issues, related to information considerations, which arise in an interdisciplinary approach to questions of global habitability. Information system problems and issues are illustrated with the aid of an example involving biochemical cycling and biochemical productivity. The estimation of net primary production (NPP) as an important consideration in the overall global habitability issue is discussed. The NPP model requires three types of data, related to meteorological information, a land surface inventory, and the vegetation structure. Approaches for obtaining and processing these data are discussed. Attention is given to user requirements, information system requirements, workstations, network communications, hardware/software access, and data management.

  11. Stellar Activity Masking and Mimicking Habitable Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John A.

    2014-06-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to attain a sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their host star's habitable zones. The RV semi-amplitude of such a planet can be significantly smaller than RV variations caused by stellar "jitter". Some RV variations, in particular those caused by starspots rotating in and out of view and those caused by magnetic activity cycles can be periodic in nature and can mimic planetary RV signals. We calculate and compare the relative timescales and amplitudes of RV variations due to activity and habitable planetary companions as a function of stellar mass, and discuss the ramifications for RV surveys.

  12. NIH study finds leisure-time physical activity extends life expectancy as much as 4.5 years

    Cancer.gov

    Leisure-time physical activity is associated with longer life expectancy, even at relatively low levels of activity and regardless of body weight, according to a study by a team of researchers led by the NCI. The study, which found that people who engaged in leisure-time physical activity had life expectancy gains of as much as 4.5 years, appeared Nov. 6, 2012, in PLoS Medicine.

  13. The role of leisure pursuits in adaptation processes among Afghan refugees who have immigrated to Winnipeg, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. C. Stack; Yoshitaka Iwasaki

    2009-01-01

    There is a gap in understanding the adaptation processes of minor, less established, immigrants, including the potential contribution of leisure pursuits to these processes. This study explored the role of leisure among Afghan refugees who have recently immigrated to a western Canadian city in adapting to their immigration processes. Using semi?structured one?on?one interviews with 11 Afghan immigrant women and men

  14. Some Work and Some Play: Microscopic and Macroscopic Approaches to Labor and Leisure

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Ritwik K.; Shizgal, Peter; Dayan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Given the option, humans and other animals elect to distribute their time between work and leisure, rather than choosing all of one and none of the other. Traditional accounts of partial allocation have characterised behavior on a macroscopic timescale, reporting and studying the mean times spent in work or leisure. However, averaging over the more microscopic processes that govern choices is known to pose tricky theoretical problems, and also eschews any possibility of direct contact with the neural computations involved. We develop a microscopic framework, formalized as a semi-Markov decision process with possibly stochastic choices, in which subjects approximately maximise their expected returns by making momentary commitments to one or other activity. We show macroscopic utilities that arise from microscopic ones, and demonstrate how facets such as imperfect substitutability can arise in a more straightforward microscopic manner. PMID:25474151

  15. Leisure motivation in relation to psychosocial adjustment and personality in young offender and high school samples.

    PubMed

    Reddon, J R; Pope, G A; Friel, J P; Sinha, B K

    1996-11-01

    The Jackson Personality Inventory (JPI), Holden Psychological Screening Inventory (HPSI), and the Leisure Motivation Scale (LMS) were administered to samples of 66 young offenders and 67 high school students. Significant between sample differences occurred for the HPSI Depression and Social Symptomatology scales, the JPI Responsibility and Risk Taking scales, but none of the 4 LMS scales. Statistically significant correlations were obtained for the LMS with 13 of the 15 JPI scales, with the HPSI Psychiatric, Social, and Depression Symptomatology scales, and with gender and sample. The canonical correlation redundancy index indicated that 40% of the variance in leisure motivation was accounted for by the HPSI and JPI measures. Sample and gender added 2% to the explained variance. PMID:8912111

  16. [Insomnia symptoms, daytime naps and physical leisure activities in the elderly: FIBRA Study Campinas].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Natália Tonon; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Coelim, Maria Filomena

    2014-04-01

    The practice of physical activities contributes to reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improves sleep patterns in the elderly. This research aimed to investigate the association between insomnia symptoms and daytime nap and the participation in physical leisure activities in elderly community residents. Data from the Studies Network of the Fragility in Brazilian Elderly (Campinas site), were used. Information from 689 elderly was analyzed, regarding sociodemographic characterization, physical leisure activity, occurrence of daytime napping and its duration, symptoms of insomnia and use of sleep medication. A significant association was found between the practice of walking and the daytime nap of short duration. Studies indicate that a short nap can benefit the quality of sleep and health of the elderly. Therefore, promoting the practice of walking can be a nursing intervention that favors the sleep patterns of the elderly. PMID:24918882

  17. Nature-based Leisure and Tourism in England’s Humberhead Levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian D. Rotherham; Simon Doncaster; Dave Egan

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation of nature-based leisure and tourism as drivers for change in the Humberhead Levels is part of ongoing research with the Countryside Agency (CoAg). The Agency wishes to facilitate objectives of the Value in Wetness (Land Management Initiative) to re-establish wetlands and wetter landscapes across much of the area. To achieve a more sustainable wetland landscape with a vibrant

  18. Emotional and cognitive health correlates of leisure activities in older Latino and Caucasian women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelica P. Herrera; Thomas W. Meeks; Sharron E. Dawes; Dominique M. Hernandez; Wesley K. Thompson; David H. Sommerfeld; Matthew A. Allison; Dilip V. Jeste

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in the frequency of leisure activity participation and relationships to depressive symptom burden and cognition in Latino and Caucasian women. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a demographically matched subsample of Latino and Caucasian (n = 113 each) postmenopausal women (age ?60 years), interviewed in 2004–2006 for a multiethnic cohort study of successful aging in San Diego County. Frequencies

  19. Contexts in tourism and leisure studies : a cross-cultural contribution to the production of knowledge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Platenkamp

    2007-01-01

    In this PhD an attempt has been made to deliver a cross-cultural contribution to the production of knowledge in tourism and leisure studies. The necessity of this attempt originates in: the<\\/span><\\/span>growing cultural complexity in a globalising world. From a cross-cultural perspective this implies that many interacting networks create a 'global ecumene'. Over the world many cultural contexts are influencing

  20. Exploring Self-Perceptions and Social Influences as Correlates of Adolescent Leisure-Time Physical Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine M. Sabiston; Peter R. E. Crocker

    2008-01-01

    This study examined adolescent leisure-time physical activity correlates using the expectancy-value (EV) model. Adolescents (N = 857) completed questionnaires to assess competence and value self-perceptions, social influences, and physical activity. Direct and indirect effects of self-perceptions and parent and best friend influences on physical activity were explored using structural equation modeling. Measurement models were a good fit to the data

  1. Intensity of leisure-time physical activity and cancer mortality in men

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A Laukkanen; R. Rauramaa; T. H Makikallio; A. T Toriola; S. Kurl

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveThere is a lack of evidence to show the role of exercise intensity in the prevention of cancer mortality because no previous studies have shown this relation. The relationship of leisure-time physical activity with cancer mortality was therefore assessed.MethodsParticipants were from a population-based sample of 2560 men from eastern Finland with no history of cancer at baseline. Physical activity was

  2. Changing American home life: trends in domestic leisure and storage among middle-class families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne E. Arnold; Ursula A. Lang

    2007-01-01

    This study of middle-class American families draws on ethnography and urban economic history, focusing on patterns of leisure\\u000a time and household consumption and clutter. We trace how residential life evolved historically from cramped urban quarters\\u000a into contemporary middle-class residences and examine how busy working families use house spaces. Our ethnographic sample\\u000a consists of 24 Los Angeles families in which both

  3. Social and Clinical Effects of a Leisure Program on Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Villamisar, Domingo; Dattilo, John

    2011-01-01

    Using a pre-test, post-test experimental design, effects of a 1-year group leisure program were examined on 31 participants (20 male and 11 female), ages 27-38 (M = 32.05 at start of program), with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis randomly assigned to the experimental condition and a group of 20 adults with ASD randomly assigned to the…

  4. Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chun Bun; McHale, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity from middle childhood through adolescence. On 5 occasions across 7 years, fathers, mothers, and children who were first- and second born from 201 European American, working- and middle-class families participated in home and multiple nightly phone interviews. Multilevel modeling revealed that, controlling for family socioeconomic status, neighborhood characteristics, and youth overweight status and physical health, leisure-time physical activity increased during middle childhood and declined across adolescence, and the decline was more pronounced for girls than for boys. Moreover, controlling for time-varying, parental work hours and youth interest in sports and outdoor activities, on occasions when fathers and mothers spent proportionally more time on these activities with youth than usual, youth also spent more total time on these activities than usual. The within-person association between mother-youth joint involvement and youth's total involvement in leisure-time physical activity reached statistical significance at the transition to adolescence, and became stronger over time. Findings highlight the importance of maintaining adolescents', especially girls', physical activity levels and targeting both fathers' and mothers' involvement to promote youth's physical activity. PMID:25485671

  5. Habit tic deformity secondary to guitar playing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jashin J

    2009-01-01

    A 29-year-old man exhibited linear ridges of the right thumbnail that had been present for ten years. After he stopped playing the guitar for three months, the proximal portion of the abnormality cleared. Nail changes similar to the habit tic deformity may be produced by guitar playing. PMID:19379660

  6. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

  7. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012

    E-print Network

    , F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly and A. Dewar Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt Approved for publication, C.J., Ly, V.E., and Dewar, A., 2013. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012. RL 04a/13

  8. CASH 2021: Commercial access and space habitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Aldrin; Adam Amara; Lodewijk Aris; Nida Baierl; Patrick Beatty; Catherine Beaulieu; Torsten Behnke; Roberta Castegini; Amitabh Chauhan; Philip Cojanis; Pelawa Dayawansa; Marie Diop; Kinya Eito; Steve Engle; Stefano Ferretti; Hamet Gassama; Bojana Genova; Colin Goulding; Jameel Janjua; Thidarat Jansaeng; Frédéric Jousset; Anatoly Kopik; Catherine Laurin; Jason Leggatt; Hengnian Li; Monica Mezzadri; Amane Miura; Simon Nolet; Satoshi Ogami; Johanne Patry; Laryssa Patten; Cyril Payerne; Guy Peer; Marco Prampolini; Caroline Rheaume; Joan Saary; Daniela Spehar; Atiya Sufi; Baosheng Sun; J. Barry Thompson; Ward Thomson; Roland Trautner; Murat Tursunmuratov; Vrata Venet; Elizabeth Wilems; Helen Wilson; Karl Wittwer; Frank Wokke; Yansheng Wu; Shaobin Zhou; Ilaria Zilioli

    2002-01-01

    Issues about commercialization of space have been a growing concern in the past decade for the space community. This paper focuses on the work from a team of 51 students attending the Summer Session Program of the International Space University in Bremen, Germany. CASH 2021 (Commercial Access and Space Habitation) documents a plan that identifies commercial opportunities for space utilization

  9. A normative study of family media habits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas A. Gentile; David A. Walsh

    2002-01-01

    The present study documents family media habits in six areas: electronic and print Media Use, parental Monitoring of children's media, parental Consistency regarding rules for children's media use, parents' reports of observable Media Effects on their children, parents' Knowledge about media and media effects, and how much children participate in Alternative Activities to electronic media. A random national sample of

  10. Newspaper Readership Habits in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, R. Arnold

    This is a report of a survey conducted to determine newspaper readership habits of persons living within the circulation of the "Amsterdam News," a black weekly published in New York City. The survey was conducted with the purpose of increasing advertising revenues and assisting the management of the "Amsterdam News" with changes in the…

  11. Doctors' Drinking Habits And Consumption Of Alcohol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juhani Juntunen; Sisko Asp; Martti Olkinuora; Markku Äärimaa; Leo Strid; Kyllikki Kauttu

    1988-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and drinking habits among Finnish doctors were studied as part of a survey of stress and burnout. A questionnaire containing 99 questions or groups of questions was sent to all 3496 practising doctors aged under 66 randomly selected from the registry of the Finnish Medical Association. Altogether 2671 doctors (76%) responded; this sample was representative of the Finnish

  12. Habitability of planets around red dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Heath, M J; Doyle, L R; Joshi, M M; Haberle, R M

    1999-08-01

    Recent models indicate that relatively moderate climates could exist on Earth-sized planets in synchronous rotation around red dwarf stars. Investigation of the global water cycle, availability of photosynthetically active radiation in red dwarf sunlight, and the biological implications of stellar flares, which can be frequent for red dwarfs, suggests that higher plant habitability of red dwarf planets may be possible. PMID:10472629

  13. Food habits of bobcats in eastern Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Story; W. J. Galbraith; J. T. Kitchings

    1982-01-01

    Food habits of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in eastern Tennessee were determined from analyzing 176 cat samples collected on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Remains of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were the most frequently occurring food item. White-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum) remains also were found frequently in samples. Data obtained from this study indicated

  14. FOOD HABITS OF BALD EAGLES WINTERING IN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NORTHERN ARIZONA

    We used pellets collected from roosts to supplement incidental foraging observations to iden- tify prey species of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and to evaluate spatial and temporal trends in their food habits while wintering in northern Arizona between 1994-96. We analyzed 1057 pellets collected from 14 roosts, and identified five mammal and 13 bird species. American Coot (Fulica americana, N

  15. Dietary Habits of Greek Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piperakis, S. M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Zafiropoulou, M.; Piperakis, A. S.; Zisis, P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Greek primary (1st to 6th grade) school children's dietary habits and the factors influencing them. Our results show that children know the value of different foods. The socio-economic status of father has no effect on the attitude of children towards choosing their diet, however, mothers' educational status…

  16. Listening Habits of iPod Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Michael; Marozeau, Jeremy; Cleveland, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate real-environment iPod listening levels for listeners in 4 environments to gain insight into whether average listeners receive dosages exceeding occupational noise exposure guidelines as a result of their listening habits. Method: The earbud outputs of iPods were connected directly into the inputs of a digital recorder to make…

  17. Contextual control of instrumental actions and habits.

    PubMed

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Bouton, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    After a relatively small amount of training, instrumental behavior is thought to be an action under the control of the motivational status of its goal or reinforcer. After more extended training, behavior can become habitual and insensitive to changes in reinforcer value. Recently, instrumental responding has been shown to weaken when tested outside of the training context. The present experiments compared the sensitivity of instrumental responding in rats with a context switch after training procedures that might differentially generate actions or habits. In Experiment 1, lever pressing was decremented in a new context after either short, medium, or long periods of training on either random-ratio or yoked random-interval reinforcement schedules. Experiment 2 found that more minimally trained responding was also sensitive to a context switch. Moreover, Experiment 3 showed that when the goal-directed component of responding was removed by devaluing the reinforcer, the residual responding that remained was still sensitive to the change of context. Goal-directed responding, in contrast, transferred across contexts. Experiment 4 then found that after extensive training, a habit that was insensitive to reinforcer devaluation was still decremented by a context switch. Overall, the results suggest that a context switch primarily influences instrumental habit rather than action. In addition, even a response that has received relatively minimal training may have a habit component that is insensitive to reinforcer devaluation but sensitive to the effects of a context switch. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25706547

  18. Habitable zones around exoplanets' host stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawqi Al Dallal; Walid Azzam; Waleed Azzam

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the discovery of an amazing range of planetary sized objects around nearby stars. The number of discovered planets exceeds 260 so far, and it is expected to grow exponentially as new planet detection missions are placed into orbit. The search for habitable planets stands as an important goal for the scientific community with far reaching

  19. Potential photosynthetic systems in extraterrestrial habitable zones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory Konesky

    2008-01-01

    A number of photosynthetic systems have evolved on Earth to harvest various portions of the available spectrum from its G2 star. Currently, the number of confirmed extrasolar planets approaches 300, although many are in orbits well outside their habitable zone. This largely results from an observational bias that tends to more easily spot these \\

  20. Astrophysical, Geochemical, Geophysical and Biological Limits on Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, C.

    2014-03-01

    For life forms like us, the most important feature of the Earth is its habitability. Understanding habitability and using that knowledge to locate the nearest habitable planet may be crucial for our survival as a species. Over the past decade, expectations that the universe could be filled with habitable planets have been bolstered by the increasingly large overlap between terrestrial environments known to harbor life and the variety of environments on newly detected rocky exoplanets. The inhabited and uninhabited regions on Earth tell us that temperature and the presence of water are the main constraints that can be used in a habitability classification scheme for rocky planets. Our compilation and review of recent exoplanet detections suggests that the fraction of stars with planets is ~ 100%, and that the fraction with rocky planets may be comparably large. We review extensions to the circumstellar habitable zone including an abiogenesis habitable zone and the galactic habitable zone.

  1. The Role of Tides in Planetary Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Rory; Heller, R.; Jackson, B.; Leconte, J.; Greenberg, R.; Mullins, K.; Raymond, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial planets in the classic "habitable zone" (Kasting et al. 1993) of stars may be influenced by tides. Tidal evolution is poorly constrained and multiple acceptable models exist which, although qualitatively similar, predict different rates of evolution. Using different models, we examine how tides may modify several key properties of planets in the habitable zone: semi-major axis, eccentricity, obliquity and rotation rate. Tides can lock the rotation rate and erode the obliquity (to 0 or 180 degrees) in 103-1010 years, depending on the stellar mass and eccentricity. Some tidal models even predict significant obliquity evolution for planets in the habitable zones of solar-mass stars. This evolution dissipates energy in the planet's interior (at the expense of the orbit) and leads to "tidal heating." In extreme cases of high eccentricity and very low mass stars, the heating may initiate a runaway greenhouse, and/or total evaporation of potential surface water, eliminating any hope of habitability. After the spin properties have equilibrated, the planet is said to be "tidally locked" and further evolution primarily changes the orbital angular momentum. For exoplanets, tides tend to reduce eccentricities and semi-major axes, and can also change the rotation period, eventually reaching synchroneity with the orbit when both eccentricity and obliquity reach zero. Orbital circularization requires millions to trillions of years, depending on the planet's initial conditions and the tidal model assumed. Tidal heating also occurs during circularization and planets may pass through a "super-Io" phase prior to reaching internal heating rates similar to the modern day Earth. Tides clearly have the potential to impact habitability and may lead to planets with evolutionary paths markedly different from the Earth. These issues are presented and discussed for the simple case of one planet orbiting one star.

  2. Habitable zone limits for dry planets.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Sleep, Norman H; Zahnle, Kevin J

    2011-06-01

    Most discussion of habitable planets has focused on Earth-like planets with globally abundant liquid water. For an "aqua planet" like Earth, the surface freezes if far from its sun, and the water vapor greenhouse effect runs away if too close. Here we show that "land planets" (desert worlds with limited surface water) have wider habitable zones than aqua planets. For planets at the inner edge of the habitable zone, a land planet has two advantages over an aqua planet: (i) the tropics can emit longwave radiation at rates above the traditional runaway limit because the air is unsaturated and (ii) the dry air creates a dry stratosphere that limits hydrogen escape. At the outer limits of the habitable zone, the land planet better resists global freezing because there is less water for clouds, snow, and ice. Here we describe a series of numerical experiments using a simple three-dimensional global climate model for Earth-sized planets. Other things (CO(2), rotation rate, surface pressure) unchanged, we found that liquid water remains stable at the poles of a low-obliquity land planet until net insolation exceeds 415 W/m(2) (170% that of modern Earth), compared to 330 W/m(2) (135%) for the aqua planet. At the outer limits, we found that a low-obliquity land planet freezes at 77%, while the aqua planet freezes at 90%. High-obliquity land and aqua planets freeze at 58% and 72%, respectively, with the poles offering the last refuge. We show that it is possible that, as the Sun brightens, an aqua planet like Earth can lose most of its hydrogen and become a land planet without first passing through a sterilizing runaway greenhouse. It is possible that Venus was a habitable land planet as recently as 1 billion years ago. PMID:21707386

  3. New and updated tests of print exposure and reading abilities in college students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Acheson; Justine B. Wells; Maryellen C. MacDonald

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between print exposure and measures of reading skill was examined in college students (N = 99, 58 female; mean age = 20.3 years). Print exposure was measured with several new self-reports of reading and writing\\u000a habits, as well as updated versions of the Author Recognition Test and the Magazine Recognition Test (Stanovich & West, 1989).\\u000a Participants completed a

  4. Radiological Habits Survey: Environment Report RL 03/13

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: 2013 Environment Report RL 03/13 Cefas contract report C2848 Radiological Habits Survey: Springfields, 2012 V.E. Ly, F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod and A. Dewar Peer reviewed by G.E., Clyne, F.J., Garrod, C.J. and Dewar, A., 2013. Radiological Habits Survey: Springfields, 2012. RL 03

  5. Summary of Radiological Habits Surveys in England and Wales,

    E-print Network

    Summary of Radiological Habits Surveys in England and Wales, 2013 Environment Report RL 11/13 Cefas RL 11/13 Final report Summary of Radiological Habits Surveys in England and Wales, 2002 to 2012 G of Radiological Habits Surveys in England and Wales, 2002 to 2012. RL 11/13. Cefas, Lowestoft A copy can

  6. Radiological Habits Survey: Environment Report RL 03/12

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: 2012 Environment Report RL 03/12 Cefas contract report C2848/12 Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Aldermaston and Burghfield, 2011 V.E. Ly, C.J. Garrod, F should be cited as: Ly, V.E., Garrod, C.J., Clyne, F.J. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey

  7. Radiological Habits Survey: Barrow and the south-west

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Barrow and the south-west 2013 Environment Report RL 01/13 Cefas Report RL 01/13 Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Barrow and the south-west Cumbrian coast, 2012 C.E., Rumney, P. and Papworth, G.P., 2013. Radiological Habits Survey: Barrow and the south-west Cumbrian coast

  8. The Habitability of Our Earth and Other Earths

    E-print Network

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    zone and the galactic habitable zone. 597 Annu.Rev.EarthPlanet.Sci.2012.40:597-623.DownloadedfromwwwThe Habitability of Our Earth and Other Earths: Astrophysical, Geochemical, Geophysical zones, circumstellar habitable zones, terrestrial planets, life, abiogenesis Abstract For life

  9. Factors Impacting Habitable Volume Requirements: Results from the 2011 Habitable Volume Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Whitmire, A.; Otto, C.; Neubek, D. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Habitable Volume Workshop held April 18-21, 2011 in Houston, TX at the Center for Advanced Space Studies-Universities Space Research Association. The workshop was convened by NASA to examine the factors that feed into understanding minimum habitable volume requirements for long duration space missions. While there have been confinement studies and analogs that have provided the basis for the guidance found in current habitability standards, determining the adequacy of the volume for future long duration exploration missions is a more complicated endeavor. It was determined that an improved understanding of the relationship between behavioral and psychosocial stressors, available habitable and net habitable volume, and interior layouts was needed to judge the adequacy of long duration habitat designs. The workshop brought together a multi-disciplinary group of experts from the medical and behavioral sciences, spaceflight, human habitability disciplines and design professionals. These subject matter experts identified the most salient design-related stressors anticipated for a long duration exploration mission. The selected stressors were based on scientific evidence, as well as personal experiences from spaceflight and analogs. They were organized into eight major categories: allocation of space; workspace; general and individual control of environment; sensory deprivation; social monotony; crew composition; physical and medical issues; and contingency readiness. Mitigation strategies for the identified stressors and their subsequent impact to habitat design were identified. Recommendations for future research to address the stressors and mitigating design impacts are presented.

  10. The Habitability of Our Earth and Other Earths: Astrophysical, Geochemical, Geophysical, and Biological Limits on Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Chopra, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    For life-forms like us, the most important feature of Earth is its habitability. Understanding habitability and using that knowledge to locate the nearest habitable planet may be crucial for our survival as a species. During the past decade, expectations that the universe could be filled with habitable planets have been bolstered by the increasingly large overlap between terrestrial environments known to harbor life and the variety of environments on newly detected rocky exoplanets. The inhabited and uninhabited regions on Earth tell us that temperature and the presence of water are the main constraints that can be used in a habitability classification scheme for rocky planets. Our compilation and review of recent exoplanet detections suggests that the fraction of stars with planets is ˜100%, and that the fraction with rocky planets may be comparably large. We review extensions to the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ), including an abiogenesis habitable zone and the galactic habitable zone.

  11. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome letters from…

  12. Deep Read: a reading comprehension system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynette Hirschman; Marc Light; Eric Breck; John D. Burger

    1999-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes initial work on Deep Read , an automated reading comprehension system that accepts arbitrary text input (a story) and answers questions about it We have acquired a corpus of 60 development and 60 test stories of 3 to 6th grade material; each story is followed by short - answer questions (an answer key was also provided)

  13. Measuring reading performance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Gary S

    2013-09-20

    Despite significant changes in the treatment of common eye conditions like cataract and age-related macular degeneration, reading difficulty remains the most common complaint of patients referred for low vision services. Clinical reading tests have been widely used since Jaeger introduced his test types in 1854. A brief review of the major developments in clinical reading tests is provided, followed by a discussion of some of the main controversies in clinical reading assessment. Data for the Salisbury Eye Evaluation (SEE) study demonstrate that standardised clinical reading tests are highly predictive of reading performance under natural, real world conditions, and that discrepancies between self-reported reading ability and measured reading performance may be indicative of people who are at a pre-clinical stage of disability, but are at risk for progression to clinical disability. If measured reading performance is to continue to increase in importance as a clinical outcome measure, there must be agreement on what should be measured (e.g. speed or comprehension) and how it should be measured (e.g. reading silently or aloud). Perhaps most important, the methods for assessing reading performance and the algorithms for scoring reading tests need to be optimised so that the reliability and responsiveness of reading tests can be improved. PMID:23506967

  14. Improving Science Reading Comprehension

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jill Caton Johnson

    2005-03-01

    Lend your struggling readers a helping hand with strategies that will enhance their comprehension of science reading materials. This article offers a few easy-to-implement strategies that teachers can use before, during, and after reading.

  15. Reading with the ears.

    PubMed

    Maier, J; Hartvig, N Vaever; Green, A C; Stodkilde-Jorgensen, H

    2004-07-01

    We studied the cortical networks of Morse code reading with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Four expert radio telegraphists performed two closely matched reading experiments, one in binaurally presented high speed Morse code and one in print. Performance was equal for both conditions. Reading single nouns in Morse code resulted in predominantly left-sided activation of the frontal and temporal perisylvian language areas, prefrontal cortex, and premotor cortex. In a within-subject comparison between reading Morse code and reading print, the activation pattern in the left temporoparietal association cortex was similar for both forms of reading, suggesting that reading Morse code shares part of its cortical networks with reading print. PMID:15196672

  16. National Reading Panel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    On April 13, 2000, the National Reading Panel (NRP) released the results of "the largest, most comprehensive evidenced-based review ever conducted of research on how children learn reading." Established in response to a 1997 congressional directive, the NRP is composed of "leading scientists in reading research, representatives of colleges of education, reading teachers, educational administrators, and parents." The NRP Homepage offers background information, additional documents, and related links.

  17. HABITABLE CLIMATES: THE INFLUENCE OF ECCENTRICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Spiegel, David S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Scharf, Caleb A. [Columbia Astrobiology Center, Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Menou, Kristen [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: courtney@astro.princeton.ed, E-mail: dsp@astro.princeton.ed, E-mail: kristen@astro.columbia.ed, E-mail: caleb@astro.columbia.ed, E-mail: raymond@obs.u-bordeaux1.f [Universite Bordeaux, Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2010-10-01

    In the outer regions of the habitable zone, the risk of transitioning into a globally frozen 'snowball' state poses a threat to the habitability of planets with the capacity to host water-based life. Here, we use a one-dimensional energy balance climate model (EBM) to examine how obliquity, spin rate, orbital eccentricity, and the fraction of the surface covered by ocean might influence the onset of such a snowball state. For an exoplanet, these parameters may be strikingly different from the values observed for Earth. Since, for a constant semimajor axis, the annual mean stellar irradiation scales with (1 - e {sup 2}){sup -1/2}, one might expect the greatest habitable semimajor axis (for fixed atmospheric composition) to scale as (1 - e {sup 2}){sup -1/4}. We find that this standard simple ansatz provides a reasonable lower bound on the outer boundary of the habitable zone, but the influence of both obliquity and ocean fraction can be profound in the context of planets on eccentric orbits. For planets with eccentricity 0.5, for instance, our EBM suggests that the greatest habitable semimajor axis can vary by more than 0.8 AU (78%) depending on obliquity, with higher obliquity worlds generally more stable against snowball transitions. One might also expect that the long winter at an eccentric planet's apoastron would render it more susceptible to global freezing. Our models suggest that this is not a significant risk for Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars, as considered here, since such planets are buffered by the thermal inertia provided by oceans covering at least 10% of their surface. Since planets on eccentric orbits spend much of their year particularly far from the star, such worlds might turnout to be especially good targets for direct observations with missions such as TPF-Darwin. Nevertheless, the extreme temperature variations achieved on highly eccentric exo-Earths raise questions about the adaptability of life to marginally or transiently habitable conditions.

  18. Assessment of Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Marion L.

    A statewide assessment study of reading programs in Rhode Island is described. Data concerning the history of the primary reading program of the 1965-66 fourth-grade class were gathered; a status study of the reading programs throughout the elementary grades for that year was conducted. Principals' and teachers' opinions on the requirements for a…

  19. Reading and Writing Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Margaret, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Drawing from both research and practice, the articles in this collection address a number of issues related to the reading and writing connection. The 24 articles are grouped into five sections: "Reading, Writing, and Thinking"; "The Parts and the Whole"; "Reading for Writing"; "Contexts for Literacy"; and "Some Pedagogical Concerns." Among the…

  20. Psycholinguistics and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank, (Ed.)

    Psycholinguistics has offered many new insights into the development of reading, e.g., only a small part of the information necessary for reading comprehension comes from the printed page, comprehension must precede the identification of individual words, and reading is not decoding to spoken language. These views are elaborated in this collection…

  1. Free Reading Is UTOPIA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCrone, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    In high school students get tied up in extracurricular activities and have little time for pleasure reading. It is true that with rigorous academic schedules they have little time for pleasure reading. Thus began a conversation with a sophomore English teacher at the author's high school. As they were discussing the plight of free reading he was…

  2. The Teaching of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiger, Ralph C., Ed.

    Designed as a sourcebook, this volume considers reading instruction as a complex, intellectual task rather than as just a matter of pronunciation of words. It is designed for both teachers and parents interested in developing the language and concepts of children. Contents include "Reading in Today's World" by Ralph C. Staiger, "Learning to Read"…

  3. Reading/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These seven projects comprise the reading and language arts section of a report on Elementary Secondary Education Act Title IV programs for the state of Illinois. Complete descriptions are furnished for the following: a multi-text, individualized reading skills program for grades four through eight; a reading program which stresses phonetic and…

  4. Reading Field Experience Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceaser, Lisbeth

    The lessons included in this collection were written by California Polytechnic State University Reading Specialist Credential candidates in the Salinas Cohort Project of 1992 as partial fulfillment for an education course titled "Bilingual Special Education Reading Problems." Each lesson is research-based. A rationale describes the reading

  5. PAWs for Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program at an Illinois middle school that was designed to increase reading achievement, vocabulary, and the enjoyment of reading. Highlights include the library's role; use of the Standardized Test for Assessment of Reading; the Accelerated Reader program; teacher training; teacher comments; and grant funds. Four appendices include:…

  6. Content Reading Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belk, Elizabeth Joann; Seed, Allen H.; Abdi, Wali

    2005-01-01

    Reading comprehension skills promote achievement in science, so how can teachers help students to develop these skills? Research indicates that students who read well are more likely to be successful in school and in life (Belk 1999). Furthermore, there is a direct link between science skills and reading skills (Carter and Simpson 1978). There are…

  7. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  8. Listening and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Moira; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Article explains series of programs by British Broadcasting Corporation, designed to help slow readers, by presenting exciting material, read aloud, while children read along in class, thereby enabling the children to make the connection between the characters on the page and the excitement of the story being read. (JB)

  9. Reading with the ears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Maier; N. Vaever Hartvig; A. C Green; H Stodkilde-Jorgensen

    2004-01-01

    We studied the cortical networks of Morse code reading with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Four expert radio telegraphists performed two closely matched reading experiments, one in binaurally presented high speed Morse code and one in print. Performance was equal for both conditions. Reading single nouns in Morse code resulted in predominantly left-sided activation of the frontal and temporal perisylvian

  10. Reading as a Whole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Constance

    Underlying virtually all of the basal reading series available in the United States today is the assumption that learning to read is a skill-by-skill and word-by-word process. This part-to-whole approach to teaching reading is based on principles of behavioral psychology and "scientific management" developed a half century ago and treats meaning…

  11. Current Issues in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael P., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Articles in this journal issue focus on reading acquisition and instruction. The titles and authors are as follows: (1) "10 Good Ways to Involve Parents in the Reading Program," by Nickolas Criscuolo; (2) "A Parent Guide for Helping the Child with A Reading Disability," by Frederick Duffelmeyer and Dale Baum; (3) "Promoting a Good Attitude toward…

  12. The Changes in Students' Self-Concepts as Readers and Values Placed on Reading from Sixth Grade to Eleventh Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, Alexis Fitzgerald

    2011-01-01

    This study extended the research of Aiken (2006), which originally examined the reading motivation, attitudes, and habits for a cohort of 6th grade readers from an affluent suburban community. The purpose of this research was to investigate if the students' self-concepts as readers and values of reading have changed from their 6th grade year…

  13. Research on Learners' Preferences for Reading from a Printed Text or from a Computer Screen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Carrie

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 254 Royal Roads University School of Business learners (graduates and undergraduates) were surveyed on their online course-related reading habits and choices. Based on their responses and anecdotal comments and the data from follow-up interviews with six of the participants, learners preferred print copies of text materials for…

  14. Lateral Biases and Reading Direction: A Dissociation between Aesthetic Preference and Line Bisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishii, Yukiko; Okubo, Matia; Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Imai, Hisato

    2011-01-01

    Perceptual asymmetries for tasks involving aesthetic preference or line bisection can be affected by asymmetrical neurological mechanisms or left/right reading habits. This study investigated the relative contribution of these mechanisms in 100 readers of Japanese and English. Participants made aesthetic judgments between pairs of mirror-reversed…

  15. Changes in Faculty Reading Behaviors: The Impact of Electronic Journals on the University of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erin T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study that explored the role electronic journals currently play in faculty's weekly scholarly reading habits at the University of Georgia. Discusses faculty choices for locating full-text articles and reports survey results that indicated that electronic access to journals, particularly library-funded access, is integral to research…

  16. Habitability Assessment at Gale Crater: Implications from Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Archer, D.; Atreya, S.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; delaTorre, M.; Edgett, K.; Eigenbrode, J.; Fisk, M.; Freissent, C.; Franz, H.; Glavin, D. P.; Gomez, F.; Haberle, R.; Hamilton, V.; Jones, J.; Kah, L.; Leshin, L.; Mchaffy, P. M.; McAdam, A.; McKay, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Steele, A.; Stern, J.; Treiman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory has made measurements that contribute to our assessment of habitability potential at Gale Crater. Campaign organization into a consistent set of measurable parameters allows us to rank the relative habitability potential of sites we study, ultimately laying a foundation for a global context inclusive of past and future Mars mission observations. Chemical, physical, geological and geographic attributes shape environments. Isolated measurements of these factors may be insufficient to deem an environment habitable, but the sum of measurements can help predict locations with greater or lesser habitability potential. Metrics for habitability assessment based on field work at sites sharing features analogous to Mars have previously been suggested. Grouping these metrics helps us to develop an index for their application to habitability assessment. The index is comprised of the weighted values for four groups of parameters, the habitability threshold for each is to be determined.

  17. Habitable zones around main sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.; Whitmire, Daniel P.; Reynolds, Ray T.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for stabilizing climate on the earth and other earthlike planets is described, and the physical processes that define the inner and outer boundaries of the habitable zone (HZ) around the sun and main sequence stars are discussed. Physical constraints on the HZ obtained from Venus and Mars are taken into account. A 1D climate model is used to estimate the width of the HZ and the continuously habitable zone around the sun, and the analysis is extended to other main sequence stars. Whether other stars have planets and where such planets might be located with respect to the HZ is addressed. The implications of the findings for NASA's SETI project are considered.

  18. Reading Logs: Integrating Extensive Reading with Writing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyutaya, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Extensive reading motivates learners to read a large number of texts on a wide range of topics because the students themselves select the reading material based upon its relevance to their interests, knowledge, and experience. Students read texts that match their language level, and they choose the time and place to read. Extensive reading "is…

  19. Letter Knowledge Predicts Grade 4 Reading Fluency and Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Ulla; Aunola, Kaisa; Niemi, Pekka; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the predictors of fourth graders' reading skills (reading comprehension, text reading and word chain reading). Reading skill antecedents of 158 children of 5-6 years of age were measured at the beginning of kindergarten; students' reading skills were measured in kindergarten and in Grades 1 and 4. The results showed that…

  20. Does the Benefit on Survival from Leisure Time Physical Activity Depend on Physical Activity at Work? A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn; Søgaard, Karen; Suadicani, Poul; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Prescott, Eva; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate if persons with high physical activity at work have the same benefits from leisure time physical activity as persons with sedentary work. Methods In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective cohort of 7,411 males and 8,916 females aged 25–66 years without known cardiovascular disease at entry in 1976–78, 1981–83, 1991–94, or 2001–03, the authors analyzed with sex-stratified multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression the association between leisure time physical activity and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among individuals with different levels of occupational physical activity. Results During a median follow-up of 22.4 years, 4,003 individuals died from cardiovascular disease and 8,935 from all-causes. Irrespective of level of occupational physical activity, a consistently lower risk with increasing leisure time physical activity was found for both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among both men and women. Compared to low leisure time physical activity, the survival benefit ranged from 1.5–3.6 years for moderate and 2.6–4.7 years for high leisure time physical activity among the different levels of occupational physical activity. Conclusion Public campaigns and initiatives for increasing physical activity in the working population should target everybody, irrespective of physical activity at work. PMID:23349926