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Sample records for leite materno leite

  1. Description of four new species of Hypaeus Simon and redescription of H. taczanowskii Mello-Leitão (Araneae: Salticidae: Amycinae).

    PubMed

    Araújo, Magda H S; Ruiz, Gustavo R S

    2015-01-01

    Four new species of Hypaeus Simon are described from the Brazilian Amazon, all based on both sexes: H. tridactylus sp. nov. and H. femoratus sp. nov. from Juruti, Pará, and H. poseidon sp. nov. and H. terraemediae sp. nov. from São Félix do Xingu, Pará. Additionally, Asaracus pauciaculeis Caporiacco, 1947 is transferred from Mago O.P.-Cambridge, resulting in Hypaeus pauciaculeis comb. nov. Both sexes of H. taczanowskii (Mello-Leitão, 1948), the type species of Hypaeus, are redescribed for comparisons. PMID:26249390

  2. Tadpole of Leptodactylus oreomantis Carvalho, Leite & Pezzuti 2013 (Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Mercs, Ednei De Almeida; Magalhes, Felipe De Medeiros; Amado, Talita Ferreira; Junc, Flora Acua; Garda, Adrian Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Leptodactylus oreomantis, a member of Leptodactylus fuscus species group (sensu Heyer 1978), is a leptodactylid frog endemic to the montane rocky fields of Chapada Diamantina (the northern portion of the Espinhao mountain range), Bahia State, Brazil (Carvalho et al. 2013). Although tadpole morphology provides relevant information for anuran taxonomy and systematics (see Langone & de S 2005; Miranda et al. 2014), only calls and adult morphology were evaluated in the description of this species. Herein, we describe and illustrate the external morphology and internal oral anatomy of L. oreomantis tadpoles and compare it with tadpoles of related species. PMID:25661633

  3. [Ballantyne syndrome caused by materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection: about two cases].

    PubMed

    Desvignes, F; Bourdel, N; Laurichesse-Delmas, H; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2011-05-01

    Ballantyne's syndrome also known as Mirror syndrome is the association of fetal hydrops and maternal hydric retention. The maternal condition is often misdiagnosed as preeclampsia. We report two cases of Ballantyne syndrome associated with materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection. In the first case, the syndrome occurred at 26GW in a context of premature rupture of membranes. Parents and medical staff opted for termination of pregnancy because of the poor fetal prognosis. Maternal symptoms regressed after delivery. In the second case, the patient presented a Ballantyne's syndrome at 25GW. Intrauterine transfusions reversed symptomatology. Fetal hydrops of any etiology can be associated with this syndrome. Specific treatment of the fetus can avoid maternal complication allowing continuation of the pregnancy. PMID:21273007

  4. [Self-medication behavior among pregnant women user of the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal, Peru 2011].

    PubMed

    Min, Elsy; Varas, Rocio; Vicua, Yuliana; Lvano, Mara; Rojas, Luis; Medina, Julio; Butron, Joece; Aranda, Renzo; Gutierrez, Ericson L

    2012-06-01

    We aim to determine the prevalence of self prescribing behaviour during pregnancy and its characteristics. For this purpose, we designed a cross sectional study and interviewed 400 pregnant women who had their prenatal care at Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal, Lima. We found that 10.5% of the patients (42 patients) had a self prescribing behavior during pregnancy, 64.5% think that self prescribing behavior can produce congenital malformations. The medications used were classified as type A and B according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Paracetamol was used more frequently (47.6%) followed by amoxicillin (16.7%). All the women who self-prescribed have had this behavior before pregnancy. According to these results, we conclude there is a low prevalence of self-prescribing behavior during pregnancy compared to the international literature. PMID:22858767

  5. Corticosterone alters materno-fetal glucose partitioning and insulin signalling in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, O R; Fisher, H M; Dionelis, K N; Jefferies, E C; Higgins, J S; Musial, B; Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Fowden, A L

    2015-03-01

    Glucocorticoids affect glucose metabolism in adults and fetuses, although their effects on materno-fetal glucose partitioning remain unknown. The present study measured maternal hepatic glucose handling and placental glucose transport together with insulin signalling in these tissues in mice drinking corticosterone either from day (D) 11 to D16 or D14 to D19 of pregnancy (term = D21). On the final day of administration, corticosterone-treated mice were hyperinsulinaemic (P < 0.05) but normoglycaemic compared to untreated controls. In maternal liver, there was no change in glycogen content or glucose 6-phosphatase activity but increased Slc2a2 glucose transporter expression in corticosterone-treated mice, on D16 only (P < 0.05). On D19, but not D16, transplacental (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was reduced by 33% in corticosterone-treated dams (P < 0.05). However, when corticosterone-treated animals were pair-fed to control intake, aiming to prevent the corticosterone-induced increase in food consumption, (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was similar to the controls. Depending upon gestational age, corticosterone treatment increased phosphorylation of the insulin-signalling proteins, protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase-kinase 3β, in maternal liver (P < 0.05) but not placenta (P > 0.05). Insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor abundance did not differ with treatment in either tissue. Corticosterone upregulated the stress-inducible mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) suppressor, Redd1, in liver (D16 and D19) and placenta (D19), in ad libitum fed animals (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hepatic protein content and placental weight were reduced on D19 (P < 0.05), in association with altered abundance and/or phosphorylation of signalling proteins downstream of mTOR. Taken together, the data indicate that maternal glucocorticoid excess reduces fetal growth partially by altering placental glucose transport and mTOR signalling. PMID:25625347

  6. 1H-NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling of Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood Indicates Altered Materno-Foetal Nutrient Exchange in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Alice; Guignard, Nadia; Alexandre–Gouabau, Marie-Cécile; Darmaun, Dominique; Robins, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adequate foetal growth is primarily determined by nutrient availability, which is dependent on placental nutrient transport and foetal metabolism. We have used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the metabolic adaptations associated with premature birth. Methodology The metabolic profile in 1H NMR spectra of plasma taken immediately after birth from umbilical vein, umbilical artery and maternal blood were recorded for mothers delivering very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) or normo-ponderal full-term (FT) neonates. Principal Findings Clear distinctions between maternal and cord plasma of all samples were observed by principal component analysis (PCA). Levels of amino acids, glucose, and albumin-lysyl in cord plasma exceeded those in maternal plasma, whereas lipoproteins (notably low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and lipid levels were lower in cord plasma from both VLBW and FT neonates. The metabolic signature of mothers delivering VLBW infants included decreased levels of acetate and increased levels of lipids, pyruvate, glutamine, valine and threonine. Decreased levels of lipoproteins glucose, pyruvate and albumin-lysyl and increased levels of glutamine were characteristic of cord blood (both arterial and venous) from VLBW infants, along with a decrease in levels of several amino acids in arterial cord blood. Conclusion These results show that, because of its characteristics and simple non-invasive mode of collection, cord plasma is particularly suited for metabolomic analysis even in VLBW infants and provides new insights into the materno-foetal nutrient exchange in preterm infants. PMID:22291897

  7. Fische und Fischerzeugnisse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlenschläger, Jörg

    Fische und Fischerzeugnisse lassen sich gemäß den "Leitsätzen für Fische, Krebs- und Weichtiere und Erzeugnisse daraus" des Deutschen Lebensmittelbuches einteilen. Tiefgefrorene Fische werden von den "Leitsätzen für tiefgefrorene Fische, Krebs- und Weichtiere und Erzeugnisse daraus" und Salate mit Fleisch von Fischen, Krebs- und/oder Weichtieren durch Abschnitt II.B. der "Leitsätze für Feinkostsalate" abgedeckt. Zu nennen sind: Frischfische, Getrocknete Fische, Räucherfische, Gesalzene Fische, Erzeugnisse aus gesalzenen Fischen, Anchosen, Marinaden, Bratfischwaren, Kochfischwaren, Fischerzeugnisse in Gelee, Pasteurisierte Fischerzeugnisse, Fischdauerkonserven, Erzeugnisse aus Surimi, Krebstiere und Krebstiererzeugnisse, Weichtiere und Weichtiererzeugnisse und tiefgekühlte Fischereierzeugnisse.

  8. Watershed modeling tools and data for prognostic and diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambel-Leitao, P.; Brito, D.; Neves, R.

    2009-04-01

    When eutrophication is considered an important process to control it can be accomplished reducing nitrogen and phosphorus losses from both point and nonpoint sources and helping to assess the effectiveness of the pollution reduction strategy. HARP-NUT guidelines (Guidelines on Harmonized Quantification and Reporting Procedures for Nutrients) (Borgvang & Selvik, 2000) are presented by OSPAR as the best common quantification and reporting procedures for calculating the reduction of nutrient inputs. In 2000, OSPAR HARP-NUT guidelines on a trial basis. They were intended to serve as a tool for OSPAR Contracting Parties to report, in a harmonized manner, their different commitments, present or future, with regard to nutrients under the OSPAR Convention, in particular the "Strategy to Combat Eutrophication". HARP-NUT Guidelines (Borgvang and Selvik, 2000; Schoumans, 2003) were developed to quantify and report on the individual sources of nitrogen and phosphorus discharges/losses to surface waters (Source Orientated Approach). These results can be compared to nitrogen and phosphorus figures with the total riverine loads measured at downstream monitoring points (Load Orientated Approach), as load reconciliation. Nitrogen and phosphorus retention in river systems represents the connecting link between the "Source Orientated Approach" and the "Load Orientated Approach". Both approaches are necessary for verification purposes and both may be needed for providing the information required for the various commitments. Guidelines 2,3,4,5 are mainly concerned with the sources estimation. They present a set of simple calculations that allow the estimation of the origin of loads. Guideline 6 is a particular case where the application of a model is advised, in order to estimate the sources of nutrients from diffuse sources associated with land use/land cover. The model chosen for this was SWAT (Arnold & Fohrer, 2005) model because it is suggested in the guideline 6 and because it's widely used in the world. Watershed models can be characterized by the high number of processes associated simulated. The estimation of these processes is also data intensive, requiring data on topography, land use / land cover, agriculture practices, soil type, precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, wind and radiation. Every year new data is being made available namely by satellite, that has allow to improve the quality of model input and also the calibration of the models (Galvão et. al, 2004b). Tools to cope with the vast amount of data have been developed: data formatting, data retrieving, data bases, metadata bases. The high number of processes simulated in watershed models makes them very wide in terms of output. The SWAT model outputs were modified to produce MOHID compliant result files (time series and HDF). These changes maintained the integrity of the original model, thus guarantying that results remain equal to the original version of SWAT. This allowed to output results in MOHID format, thus making it possible to immediately process it with MOHID visualization and data analysis tools (Chambel-Leitão et. al 2007; Trancoso et. al, 2009). Besides SWAT was modified to produce results files in HDF5 format, this allows the visualization of watershed properties (modeled by SWAT) in animated maps using MOHID GIS. The modified version of SWAT described here has been applied to various national and European projects. Results of the application of this modified version of SWAT to estimate hydrology and nutrients loads to estuaries and water bodies will be shown (Chambel-Leitão, 2008; Yarrow & Chambel-Leitão 2008; Chambel-Leitão et. al 2008; Yarrow & P. Chambel-Leitão, 2007; Yarrow & P. Chambel-Leitão, 2007; Coelho et. al., 2008). Keywords: Watershed models, SWAT, MOHID LAND, Hydrology, Nutrient Loads Arnold, J. G. and Fohrer, N. (2005). SWAT2000: current capabilities and research opportunities in applied watershed modeling. Hydrol. Process. 19, 563-572 Borgvang, S-A. & Selvik, J.S., 2000, eds. Development of HARP Guidelines - Harmonised Quantification and Reporting Procedure for Nutrients. SFT Report 1759/2000. ISBN 82-7655-401-6. 179 pp. Chambel-Leitão P. (2008) Load and flow estimation: HARP-NUT guidelines and SWAT model description. In Perspectives on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in South America R Neves, J Baretta & M Mateus (eds.). IST Press, Lisbon, Portugal. (ISBN: 978-972-8469-74-0) Chambel-Leitão P. Sampaio. A., Almeida, P. (2008) Load and flow estimation in Santos watersheds. In Perspectives on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in South America R Neves, J Baretta & M Mateus (eds.). IST Press, Lisbon, Portugal. (ISBN: 978-972-8469-74-0) Chambel-Leitão P., F. Braunschweig, L. Fernandes, R. Neves, P. Galvão. (2007) Integration of MOHID model and tools with SWAT model, submitted to the Proceedings of the, 4th International SWAT Conference, July 2-6 2007. Coelho H., Silva A., P. Chambel-Leitão, Obermann M. (2008) On The Origin Of Cyanobacteria Blooms In The Enxoé Reservoir. 13th World Water Congress, Montpellier, France Galvão P., Chambel-Leitão, P., P. Leitão, R. Neves. (2004a) A different approach to the modified Picard method for water flow in variably saturated media. Computational Methods in Water Resources. Chapel Hill, North Carolina USA Galvão P., Neves R., Silva A., Chambel-Leitão P. & F. Braunchweig (2004b) Integrated Watershed Modeling. Proceedings of MERIS User Workshop ESA-ESRIN, Frascati, Italy May 2004. Neves R., Galvao P., Braunschewig F.Chambel-Leitão P. (2007) New Approaches to Integrated Watershed Modeling. Proceedings of SPS (NFA) 5th Workshop on Sustainable Use And Development Of Watersheds For Human Security And Peace October 22-26, 2007 Istanbul, TURKEY Schoumans, O.F. & Silgram, M. (eds.), 2003. Review and literature evaluation of Quantification Tools for the assessment of nutrient losses at catchment scale. EUROHARP report 1-2003, NIVA report SNO 4739-2003, ISBN 82-557-4411-5 Trancoso, R., F. Braunschweig, Chambel-Leitão P., Neves, R., Obermann, M. (2009) An advanced modelling tool for simulating complex river systems. Accepted for publication in Journal of Total Environment. Yarrow M., Chambel-Leitão P. (2006) Calibration of the SWAT model to the Aysén basin of the Chilean Patagonia: Challenges and Lessons. Proceedings of the Watershed Management to Meet Water Quality Standards and TMDLS (Total Maximum Daily Load) 10-14 March 2007, San Antonio, Texas 701P0207. Yarrow M., Chambel-Leitão P.. (2007) Simulating Nothfagus forests in the Chilean Patagonia: a test and analysis of tree growth and nutrient cycling in swat. Submited to the Proceedings of the , 4th International SWAT Conference July 2-6 2007. Yarrow, M., Chambel-Leitão P. (2008) Estimation of loads in the Aysén Basin of the Chilean Patagonia: SWAT model and Harp-Nut guidelines. In Perspectives on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in South America R Neves, J Baretta & M Mateus (eds.). IST Press, Lisbon, Portugal. (ISBN: 978-972-8469-74-0)

  9. Conservation economics. Comment on "Using ecological thresholds to evaluate the costs and benefits of set-asides in a biodiversity hotspot".

    PubMed

    Finney, Christopher

    2015-02-13

    Banks-Leite et al. (Reports, 29 August 2014, p. 1041) conclude that a large-scale program to restore the Brazilian Atlantic Forest using payments for environmental services (PES) is economically feasible. They do not analyze transaction costs, which are quantified infrequently and incompletely in the literature. Transaction costs can exceed 20% of total project costs and should be included in future research. PMID:25678654

  10. Materno-infantilism, feminism and maternal health policy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Simone

    2012-06-01

    In the last days of 2011, President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff issued a provisional measure (or draft law) entitled "National Surveillance and Monitoring Registration System for the Prevention of Maternal Mortality" (MP 557), as part of a new maternal health programme. It was supposed to address the pressing issue of maternal morbidity and mortality in Brazil, but instead it caused an explosive controversy because it used terms such as nascituro (unborn child) and proposed the compulsory registration of every pregnancy. After intense protests by feminist and human rights groups that this law was unconstitutional, violated women's right to privacy and threatened our already limited reproductive rights, the measure was revised in January 2012, omitting "the unborn child" but not the mandatory registration of pregnancy. Unfortunately, neither version of the draft law addresses the two main problems with maternal health in Brazil: the over-medicalisation of childbirth and its adverse effects, and the need for safe, legal abortion. The content of this measure itself reflects the conflictive nature of public policies on reproductive health in Brazil and how they are shaped by close links between different levels of government and political parties, and religious and professional sectors. PMID:22789090

  11. A companion to Part 2 of the World Checklist of Opiliones species (Arachnida): Laniatores – Samooidea, Zalmoxoidea and Grassatores incertae sedis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, Abel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background A series of databases is being prepared to list the valid species of Opiliones worldwide. This paper containing nomenclatural acts is meant to accompany Part 2, which includes the members of the infraorder Grassatores of the superfamilies Samooidea and Zalmoxoidea plus the Grassatores currently not allocated to any family (i.e. Grassatores incertae sedis). New information The following 32 taxonomic changes are proposed here: (1-3) The Afrotropical genera Hovanoceros Lawrence, 1959, Malgaceros Lawrence, 1959 and Tetebius Roewer, 1949 (all currently in Samoidae) are all newly transferred to Biantidae. (4-5) Microminua soerenseni Soares & Soares, 1954, from Brazil is newly transferred to Tibangara (Gonyleptoidea: Cryptogeobiidae), newly combined as Tibangara soerenseni new comb., new familial allocation for the species. (6-7) The new genus Llaguenia Gen. nov is erected for the South American species Zamora peruviana Roewer, 1956, newly combined as Llaguenia peruviana new comb., and newly placed in Gonyleptoidea: Cranaidae (Prostygninae). (8) Bebedoura Roewer, 1949, known from a single Brazilian species, is transferred from Tricommatinae to Grassatores incertae sedis. (9) Microconomma Roewer, 1915, known from a single Cameroonian species, is transferred from Samoidae to Grassatores incertae sedis. (10) Stygnomimus Roewer, 1927, with two Indomalayan species and hitherto included in the Stygnommatidae, is here formally considered Grassatores incertae sedis. (11) Bichito González-Sponga, 1998, known from a single Venezuelan species, originally described in Phalangodidae: Phalangodinae, and currently in Grassatores incertae sedis is transferred to Samoidae. (12) The Neotropical genus Microminua Sørensen, 1932, currently with two species, is newly transferred from Kimulidae to Samoidae. (13-14) Cornigera González-Sponga, 1987 (currently in Samoidae), is newly considered a junior subjective synonym of Microminua, and its single species is combined under Microminua as Microminua flava (González-Sponga, 1987) new comb. (15) Niquitaia González-Sponga, 1999 (originally in Phalangodidae: Phalangodinae, currently in Zalmoxidae), monotypic from Venezuela, is newly transferred to Samoidae. (16) Heteroscotolemon Roewer, 1912 originally described in Phalangodidae: Phalangodinae, and currently in Grassatores incertae sedis is transferred to Zalmoxidae. (17) While the Australasian genus Zalmoxista Roewer, 1949 is currently in Samoidae and some of its former species have been transferred to Zalmoxis Sørensen, 1886, Zalmoxista americana Roewer, 1952 from Peru, is here newly transferred to Zalmoxidae into Minuides Sørensen, 1932, forming the combination Minuides americanus (Roewer, 1952) new comb. (specific name inflected to match the masculine gender). (18) Neobabrius Roewer, 1949 (currently in Phalangodidae), monotypic from Indonesia, is newly transferred to Zalmoxidae. (19) While Crosbyella Roewer, 1927, belongs to Phalangodidae, Crosbyella roraima Goodnight & Goodnight, 1943 (originally Phalangodinae, but currently Zalmoxidae without generic assignment) is here transferred to Soledadiella González-Sponga, 1987, as Soledadiella roraima new comb. (Zalmoxoidea: Zalmoxidae). (20) Zalmoxissus Roewer, 1949 is newly synonymized with Zalmoxis Sørensen, 1886 (Zalmoxidae). (21) The original spelling Zalmoxis sorenseni Simon, 1892 is restored from the unjustified emendation soerenseni. (22) The Neotropical genus Phalangodella Roewer, 1912 (originally in Phalangodidae: Tricommatinae, but currently in Grassatores incertae sedis) is newly transferred to Zalmoxoidea incertae sedis and (23-26) four other genera are newly synonymized with it: Phalangodella Roewer, 1912 = Exlineia Mello-Leitão, 1942 = Langodinus Mello-Leitão, 1949 = Cochirapha Roewer, 1949 = Phalpuna Roewer, 1949, generating the following new combinations (27-32): Phalangodella fulvescens (Mello-Leitão, 1943) new comb., Phalangodella milagroi (Mello-Leitão, 1942) new comb., Phalangodella rhinoceros (Mello-Leitão, 1945) new comb., Phalangodella flavipes (Mello-Leitão, 1949) new comb., Phalangodella rugipes (Roewer, 1949) new comb. and Phalangodella urarmata (Roewer, 1949) new comb. PMID:26752966

  12. Mário Schenberg: Physicist, politician and art critic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, M. M.; Reggiani, N.

    2015-12-01

    Mário Schenberg is considered one of the greatest theoretical physicists of Brazil. He worked in different fields of physics including thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, general relativity, astrophysics and mathematics. He was assistant of the Ukrainian naturalized Italian physicist Gleb Wataghin and worked with prestigious physicists like as the Brazilians José Leite Lopes and César Lattes, the Russian-born American George Gamow and the Indian astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. Besides, he was also an active politician and critic of art.

  13. Revision, cladistic analysis and biogeography of Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901 and Iridopelma Pocock, 1901 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae)

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Three aviculariine genera endemic to Brazil are revised. Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850 is resurrected, including five species; Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901 includes two species; and Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, six species. Nine species are newly described: Typhochlaena amma sp. n., Typhochlaena costae sp. n., Typhochlaena curumim sp. n., Typhochlaena paschoali sp. n., Pachistopelma bromelicola sp. n., Iridopelma katiae sp. n., Iridopelma marcoi sp. n., Iridopelma oliveirai sp. n. and Iridopelma vanini sp. n. Three new synonymies are established: Avicularia pulchra Mello-Leitão, 1933 and Avicularia recifiensis Struchen & Brändle, 1996 are junior synonyms of Pachistopelma rufonigrum Pocock, 1901 syn. n., and Avicularia palmicola Mello-Leitão, 1945 is a junior synonym of Iridopelma hirsutum Pocock, 1901 syn. n. Pachistopelma concolor Caporiacco, 1947 is transferred to Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, making the new combination Tapinauchenius concolor (Caporiacco, 1947) comb. n. Lectotypes are newly designed for Pachistopelma rufonigrum Pocock, 1901 , Iridopelma hirsutum Pocock, 1901 and Pachistopelma concolor Caporiacco, 1947. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix comprising 62 characters and 38 terminal taxa. The chosen cladogram found with X-Pee-Wee and concavity 6 suggests they are monophyletic. All species are keyed and mapped and information on species habitat and area cladograms are presented. Discussion on biogeography and conservation is provided. PMID:23166476

  14. A Multiple Degree of Freedom Lower Extremity Isometric Device to Simultaneously Quantify Hip, Knee and Ankle Torques

    PubMed Central

    Snchez, Natalia; Acosta, Ana Maria; Stienen, Arno H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the joint torque coupling strategies used in the lower extremity to generate maximal and submaximal levels of torque at either the hip, knee or ankle is lacking. Currently, there are no available isometric devices that quantify all concurrent joint torques in the hip, knee and ankle of a single leg during maximum voluntary torque generation. Thus, joint-torque coupling strategies in the hip, knee and concurrent torques at ankle and/or coupling patterns at the hip and knee driven by the ankle have yet to be quantified. This manuscript describes the design, implementation and validation of a multiple degree of freedom, lower extremity isometric device (the MultiLEIT) that accurately quantifies simultaneous torques at the hip, knee and ankle. The system was mechanically validated and then implemented with two healthy control individuals and two post-stroke individuals to test usability and patient acceptance. Data indicated different joint torque coupling strategies used by both healthy individuals. In contrast, data showed the same torque coupling patterns in both post-stroke individuals, comparable to those described in the clinic. Successful implementation of the MultiLEIT can contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for abnormal movement patterns and aid in the design of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25163064

  15. Materno-Fetal Transfer of Preproinsulin Through the Neonatal Fc Receptor Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Culina, Slobodan; Gupta, Nimesh; Boisgard, Raphael; Afonso, Georgia; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Dimitrov, Jordan; Østerbye, Thomas; Justesen, Sune; Luce, Sandrine; Attias, Mikhaël; Kyewski, Bruno; Buus, Søren; Wong, F Susan; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Mallone, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    The first signs of autoimmune activation leading to β-cell destruction in type 1 diabetes (T1D) appear during the first months of life. Thus, the perinatal period offers a suitable time window for disease prevention. Moreover, thymic selection of autoreactive T cells is most active during this period, providing a therapeutic opportunity not exploited to date. We therefore devised a strategy by which the T1D-triggering antigen preproinsulin fused with the immunoglobulin (Ig)G Fc fragment (PPI-Fc) is delivered to fetuses through the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) pathway, which physiologically transfers maternal IgGs through the placenta. PPI-Fc administered to pregnant PPIB15-23 T-cell receptor-transgenic mice efficiently accumulated in fetuses through the placental FcRn and protected them from subsequent diabetes development. Protection relied on ferrying of PPI-Fc to the thymus by migratory dendritic cells and resulted in a rise in thymic-derived CD4(+) regulatory T cells expressing transforming growth factor-β and in increased effector CD8(+) T cells displaying impaired cytotoxicity. Moreover, polyclonal splenocytes from nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice transplacentally treated with PPI-Fc were less diabetogenic upon transfer into NOD.scid recipients. Transplacental antigen vaccination provides a novel strategy for early T1D prevention and, further, is applicable to other immune-mediated conditions. PMID:25918233

  16. Association in ethylammonium nitrate-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures: First structural and dynamical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Russina, Olga; Macchiagodena, Marina; Kirchner, Barbara; Mariani, Alessandro; Aoun, Bachir; Russina, Margarita; Caminiti, Ruggero; Triolo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the first structural and dynamic investigation on ethylammonium nitrate, a representative protic Ionic liquid, and dimethylsulfoxide. By using joined x/ray and neutron diffraction, we exploit the EPSR approach to extract structural information at atomistic level. EAN/DMSO turns out to be homogeneous at microscopic scales and indications for the existence of a structural leit motiv with stoichiometric composition 2DMSO:1EAN are found. Dielectric spectroscopy is used to access the relaxation map of the DMSO:EAN = 60:40 mixture. No crystallisation is detected and three relaxation processes could be characterised. Overall this study provides new indications of strict analogies between water and ethylammonium nitrate. (c) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Matrix De Rham Complex and Quantum A-infinity algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikov, S.

    2014-04-01

    I establish the relation of the non-commutative BV-formalism with super-invariant matrix integration. In particular, the non-commutative BV-equation, defining the quantum A ∞-algebras, introduced in Barannikov (Modular operads and non-commutative Batalin-Vilkovisky geometry. IMRN, vol. 2007, rnm075. Max Planck Institute for Mathematics 2006-48, 2007), is represented via de Rham differential acting on the supermatrix spaces related with Bernstein-Leites simple associative algebras with odd trace q( N), and gl( N| N). I also show that the matrix Lagrangians from Barannikov (Noncommutative Batalin-Vilkovisky geometry and matrix integrals. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, 2006) are represented by equivariantly closed differential forms.

  18. ABO blood groups and fertility--with special reference to intrauterine selection due to materno-fetal incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, M; Vijayalakshmi, M; Rao, C S; Mathew, S

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study whether there is differential fertility between different mating types of ABO blood group system. Selective force which is operating through maternal-fetal incompatibility has been observed in the differential fertility between compatible and incompatible mating groups in the present sample of 183 families of Visakhapatnam town of Andhra Pradesh,India. The differences in the mean numbers of pregnancies as well as living children between the two major mating groups, compatible and incompatible are significant. The fertility rates of O fathers and O mothers were significantly higher than those in matings in which neither parents belongs to O. The selection is operating to reduce the gene ratio of A and to increase the gene ratios of O and B in this sample. PMID:736105

  19. Effects of gestational age and surface modification on materno-fetal transfer of nanoparticles in murine pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Cuiji; Fan, Zhenlin; Tian, Xin; Yan, Liang; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chunying; Liang, Xing-Jie; Anderson, Gregory J.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticle exposure in pregnancy may result in placental damage and fetotoxicity; however, the factors that determine fetal nanoparticle exposure are unclear. Here we have assessed the effect of gestational age and nanoparticle composition on fetal accumulation of maternally-administered nanomaterials in mice. We determined the placental and fetal uptake of 13 nm gold nanoparticles with different surface modifications (ferritin, PEG and citrate) following intravenous administration at E5.5-15.5. We showed that prior to E11.5, all tested nanoparticles could be visualized and detected in fetal tissues in significant amounts; however, fetal gold levels declined dramatically post-E11.5. In contrast, Au-nanoparticle accumulation in the extraembryonic tissues (EET) increased 6-15 fold with gestational age. Fetal and EET accumulation of ferritin- and PEG-modified nanoparticles was considerably greater than citrate-capped nanoparticles. No signs of toxicity were observed. Fetal exposure to nanoparticles in murine pregnancy is, therefore, influenced by both stage of embryonic/placental maturation and nanoparticle surface composition.

  20. Immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and immuno-electron microscopic identification of keratins in human materno-foetal interaction zone.

    PubMed

    Ahenkorah, J; Hottor, B; Byrne, S; Bosio, P; Ockleford, C D

    2009-04-01

    We show here that at least 5 keratin proteins are present in villous trophoblast and the same 5 in extravillous trophoblast. A further 14 tested were undetectable in these tissues. In contrast, 10 of the 19 keratins tested were present in amniotic epithelium. The marking of amniotic epithelium on the one hand, as distinct from villous and extravillous trophoblast on the other, can be achieved using 5 keratins (K4, 6, 13, 14 and 17) with a mixture of positive and negative discrimination that is expected, in combination, to be highly sensitive. All the specific keratins identified in trophoblast were apparently up-regulated on the pathway to extravillous trophoblast. Co-ordinated differentiation at the molecular expression level is indicated by this finding. The relevant keratins are K5, 7, 8, 18 and 19. Specific keratins have been identified that are down-regulated in villous trophoblast in pre-eclamptic pregnancy. This difference between healthy and pre-eclamptic chorionic villous trophoblast keratin expression was statistically significant in 4 out of the 5 keratins. This was not the case for the extravillous trophoblast at the immunofluorescence confocal level but significant differences were obtained using immunogold electron microscopy. We suggest that the villous trophoblast in pre-eclamptic placentae is cytoskeletally weaker with respect to the filaments made from these specific proteins and that this is one reason why, in pre-eclampsia, trophoblast is deported in greater quantity than in healthy placentae. PMID:18466353

  1. Modelling the oil spill track from Prestige-Nassau accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, P.; Leitao, P.; Penabad, E.; Balseiro, C. F.; Carracedo, P.; Braunschweig, F.; Fernandes, R.; Gomez, B.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Neves, R.

    2003-04-01

    On November 13th 2002, the tank ship Prestige-Nassau sent a SOS signal. The hull of the ship was damaged producing an oil spill in front of the Galician coast (NW Spain). The damaged ship took north direction spilling more fuel and affecting the western Galician coast. After this, it changed its track to south. At this first stage of the accident, the ship spilt around 10000 Tm in 19th at the Galician Bank, at 133 NM of Galician coast. From the very beginning, a monitoring and forecasting of the first slick was developed. Afterwards, since southwesternly winds are frequent in wintertime, the slick from the initial spill started to move towards the Galician coast. This drift movement was followed by overflights. With the aim of forecasting the place and arriving date to the coast, some simulations with two different models were developed. The first one was a very simple drift model forced with the surface winds generated by ARPS operational model (1) at MeteoGalicia (regional weather forecast service). The second one was a more complex hydrodynamic model, MOHID2000 (2,3), developed by MARETEC GROUP (Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa) in collaboration with GFNL (Grupo de Física Non Lineal, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela). On November 28th, some tarballs appeared at south of main slick. This observations could be explained taking into account the below surface water movement following Ekman dynamic. Some new simulations with the aim of understanding better the physic underlying these observations were performed. Agreed between observations and simulations was achieved. We performed simulations with and without slope current previously calculated by other authors, showing that this current can only introduce subtle differences in the slick's arriving point to the coast and introducing wind as the primary forcing. (1) A two-dimensional particle tracking model for pollution dispersion in A Coruña and Vigo Rias (NW Spain). M. Gómez-Gesteira, P. Montero, R. Prego, J.J. Taboada, P. Leitão, M. Ruiz-Villarreal, R. Neves and V. Pérez-Villar. Oceanologica Acta 22(2), p.167-177, (1999). (2) A model for ocean circulation on the Iberian Coast. H.S. Coelho, R.J.J. Neves, M. White, P.C. Leitão and A.J. Santos. Journal of Marine Systems 32, 153-179 (2002). (3) Impact of Cloud Analysis on Numerical Weather Prediction in the Galician Region of Spain. M.J. Souto, C.F. Balseiro, V. Pérez-Muñuzuri, M. Xue and K. Brewster, Journal of Applied Meteorology (2003)

  2. Evidence for elemental variation in the ejecta of the Tycho supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancura, O.; Gorenstein, P.; Hughes, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We present an X-ray study of the Tycho supernova remnant utilizing archival data from the high-resolution imagers (HRIs) on Einstein and ROSAT, the low-energy imaging telescopes (LEITs) on EXOSAT, and spectral data from the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT). We have made use of the differing HRI bandpasses to construct images of Tycho in two spectral bands, o.7-1.8 keV and 1.8-4.5 keV. We find that the two images differ, with the harder image showing enhanced emission along much of the south, west, and north periphery. There appears to be enhanced soft emission in the interior and in one particular knot of emission in the southeast. Besides continuum (which we model here as thermal bremsstrahlung emission), we believe the hard image shows primarily the distribution of high-ionization Si and S K-shell lines which lie in the 1.8-2.6 keV band, while the softer image has contributions from Si as well as Fe XVII to Fe XXIV L-shell lines in the 0.7-1.4 keV band. Guided by the results of nonequilibrium ionization modeling of the BBXRT spectral data, we interpret the observed contrast in hard and soft X-ray emission in terms of variations in abundance, ionization timescale, and temperature. The most likely explanation for the spectral differences are spatial variations of the relative abundances of Si, S, and Fe.

  3. Lateralization for speech predicts therapeutic response to cognitive behavioral therapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Kishon, Ronit; Abraham, Karen; Alschuler, Daniel M; Keilp, John G; Stewart, Jonathan W; McGrath, Patrick J; Bruder, Gerard E

    2015-08-30

    A prior study (Bruder, G.E., Stewart, J.W., Mercier, M.A., Agosti, V., Leite, P., Donovan, S., Quitkin, F.M., 1997. Outcome of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression: relation of hemispheric dominance for verbal processing. Journal of Abnormal Psychology 106, 138-144.) found left hemisphere advantage for verbal dichotic listening was predictive of clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. This study aimed to confirm this finding and to examine the value of neuropsychological tests, which have shown promise for predicting antidepressant response. Twenty depressed patients who subsequently completed 14 weeks of CBT and 74 healthy adults were tested on a Dichotic Fused Words Test (DFWT). Patients were also tested on the National Adult Reading Test to estimate IQ, and word fluency, choice RT, and Stroop neuropsychological tests. Left hemisphere advantage on the DFWT was more than twice as large in CBT responders as in non-responders, and was associated with improvement in depression following treatment. There was no difference between responders and non-responders on neuropsychological tests. The results support the hypothesis that the ability of individuals with strong left hemisphere dominance to recruit frontal and temporal cortical regions involved in verbal dichotic listening predicts CBT response. The large effect size, sensitivity and specificity of DFWT predictions suggest the potential value of this brief and inexpensive test as an indicator of whether a patient will benefit from CBT for depression. PMID:26162656

  4. Constraints imposed by the lower extremity extensor synergy in chronic hemiparetic stroke: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Natalia; Dewald, Julius P A

    2014-01-01

    In the present manuscript we implemented the MultiLEIT, a lower extremity isometric torque measurement device to quantify spontaneous joint torque coupling during maximal torque generation in the paretic leg of in chronic hemiparetic stroke. We quantified extension/adduction coupling (coincident with the clinical extension synergy) during the generation of hip extension and ankle plantarflexion maximum voluntary torques. Subjects were then instructed to generate torques outside the synergy by combining hip extension+ hip abduction or ankle plantarflexion + hip abduction. During the hip dual task, the paretic hip torques were significantly different from those measured in the non-paretic and control leg (F = 22.9719, p = 0) and resulted in the inability to generate torques outside the extensor synergy patters. During the dual ankle/ hip task, the paretic extremity generated significantly smaller hip abduction torques compared to controls and to the non-paretic extremity (F = 15.861, p = 0). During this task the paretic extremity was capable of neutralizing the spontaneous adduction torque and generate a net albeit small abduction torque. Results may indicate an increased descending drive from brain stem pathways, particularly during hip extension, responsible for constraints in generating hip abduction torques after stroke. PMID:25571315

  5. Action prediction modulates both neurophysiological and psychophysical indices of sensory attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Cedric; Hughes, Gethin; Waszak, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Sensory attenuation refers to the observation that stimuli that are predicted based on one’s action are attenuated. This phenomenon has primarily been observed as a neurophysiological phenomenon, with reduced Event-Related Potential (ERP) (e.g., Bäss et al., 2008) and BOLD (e.g., Blakemore et al., 1998). However, psychophysical investigations (e.g., Sato, 2008; Cardoso-Leite et al., 2010; Roussel et al., 2013) have confirmed that action prediction also influences the perception of sensory action effects. The present study recorded both neurophysiological and psychophysical measures in a single experiment, to confirm whether the two phenomena are related. In addition, by measuring the ERP modulations of both stimulus contrast and prediction congruency, we sought to directly relate the neurophysiological phenomenon to the magnitude of sensory processing in the brain. Participants performed left- and right-hand voluntary actions that were previously associated with the letters A and H. In the test phase, participants were presented with these same two letters, at one of two possible contrasts. Participants were required to report which of the two possible contrasts had been presented. We observed both reduced contrast discrimination (in line with Roussel et al., 2013) and a reduced ERP response for congruent action-effects. Furthermore, our congruency modulation was observed on the same component that differed as a function of stimulus contrast. Taken together these results strongly suggest that neurophysiological indices of sensory attenuation reflect reduced sensory processing of voluntary action effects. PMID:24616691

  6. Cytokine gene expression at the materno-foetal interface after experimental Neospora caninum infection of heifers at 110 days of gestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neospora caninum is a major cause of abortion in cattle but the reasons why some animals abort and not others remain unclear. The immunological control of the parasite in the placenta or by the foetus could be the key to determining the mechanism of abortion and/or transplacental transmission to the...

  7. A novel method for mapping open-circuit voltage in solar cells with nanoscale resolution (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Elizabeth; Garrett, Joseph; Frantz, Jesse A.; Myers, Jason D.; Bekele, Robel Y.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Munday, Jeremy N.; Leite, Marina S.

    2015-09-01

    The electrical characteristics of thin-film compound semiconductor solar cells have been successfully probed by scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, a direct relationship between the measured signals and the figures of merit that define the device performance is still missing. Here we present a novel method to image and spatially resolve the Voc of solar cells with truly nanoscale resolution (<100 nm), based on a variant of illuminated Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) [1]. We map the Voc by measuring the difference between the contact potential difference under illumination and in the dark, which is equal to the photo-generated voltage of the device (and is proportional to the Fermi level splitting). We complement our new metrology by applying scanning photocurrent microscopy using near-field scanning microscopy (NSOM) probes as a local source of excitation to image local variations in Jsc within the material, also with nanoscale resolution. Further, we spatially and spectrally resolve the external quantum efficiency (EQE) within the devices, also with nanoscale resolution, while mimicking the power density operation conditions of real devices [2]. Combined, these new tools provide a complete picture of the local optoelectric characteristics of PV devices, including an indirect measurement of the centers for non-radiative recombination, and a direct mapping of the local collection properties of the material, respectively. We apply our novel metrology to polycrystalline solar cells, where we find Voc local variations of >200 mV. [1] E.M. Tennyson et al., Nature Commun., in review; [2] M.S. Leite et al., ACS Nano. 11, 11883 (2014).

  8. Multivariate statistical analysis of wildfires in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Ricardo; Caramelo, Liliana; Pereira, Mrio

    2013-04-01

    Several studies demonstrate that wildfires in Portugal present high temporal and spatial variability as well as cluster behavior (Pereira et al., 2005, 2011). This study aims to contribute to the characterization of the fire regime in Portugal with the multivariate statistical analysis of the time series of number of fires and area burned in Portugal during the 1980 - 2009 period. The data used in the analysis is an extended version of the Rural Fire Portuguese Database (PRFD) (Pereira et al, 2011), provided by the National Forest Authority (Autoridade Florestal Nacional, AFN), the Portuguese Forest Service, which includes information for more than 500,000 fire records. There are many multiple advanced techniques for examining the relationships among multiple time series at the same time (e.g., canonical correlation analysis, principal components analysis, factor analysis, path analysis, multiple analyses of variance, clustering systems). This study compares and discusses the results obtained with these different techniques. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005: "Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal". Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. Pereira, M. G., Malamud, B. D., Trigo, R. M., and Alves, P. I.: The history and characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese rural fire database, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 3343-3358, doi:10.5194/nhess-11-3343-2011, 2011 This work is supported by European Union Funds (FEDER/COMPETE - Operational Competitiveness Programme) and by national funds (FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) under the project FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-022692, the project FLAIR (PTDC/AAC-AMB/104702/2008) and the EU 7th Framework Program through FUME (contract number 243888).

  9. Spatio-temporal clustering of wildfires in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, R.; Pereira, M. G.; Caramelo, L.; Vega Orozco, C.; Kanevski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have shown that wildfires in Portugal presenthigh temporal as well as high spatial variability (Pereira et al., 2005, 2011). The identification and characterization of spatio-temporal clusters contributes to a comprehensivecharacterization of the fire regime and to improve the efficiency of fire prevention and combat activities. The main goalsin this studyare: (i) to detect the spatio-temporal clusters of burned area; and, (ii) to characterize these clusters along with the role of human and environmental factors. The data were supplied by the National Forest Authority(AFN, 2011) and comprises: (a)the Portuguese Rural Fire Database, PRFD, (Pereira et al., 2011) for the 1980-2007period; and, (b) the national mapping burned areas between 1990 and 2009. In this work, in order to complement the more common cluster analysis algorithms, an alternative approach based onscan statistics and on the permutation modelwas used. This statistical methodallows the detection of local excess events and to test if such an excess can reasonably have occurred by chance.Results obtained for different simulations performed for different spatial and temporal windows are presented, compared and interpreted.The influence of several fire factors such as (climate, vegetation type, etc.) is also assessed. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005:"Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal".Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. Pereira, M. G., Malamud, B. D., Trigo, R. M., and Alves, P. I.: The history and characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese rural fire database, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 3343-3358, doi:10.5194/nhess-11-3343-2011, 2011 AFN, 2011: AutoridadeFlorestalNacional (National Forest Authority). Available at http://www.afn.min-agricultura.pt/portal.

  10. The management of turn transition in signed interaction through the lens of overlaps.

    PubMed

    Girard-Groeber, Simone

    2015-01-01

    There have been relatively few studies on sign language interaction carried out within the framework of conversation analysis (CA). Therefore, questions remain open about how the basic building blocks of social interaction such as turn, turn construction unit (TCU) and turn transition relevance place (TRP) can be understood and analyzed in sign language interaction. Recent studies have shown that signers regularly fine-tune their turn-beginnings to potential completion points of turns (Groeber, 2014; Groeber and Pochon-Berger, 2014; De Vos et al., 2015). Moreover, signers deploy practices for overlap resolution as in spoken interaction (McCleary and Leite, 2013). While these studies have highlighted the signers' orientation to the "one-at-a-time" principle described by Sacks et al. (1974), the present article adds to this line of research by investigating in more detail those sequential environments where overlaps occur. The contribution provides an overview of different types of overlap with a focus of the overlap's onset with regard to a current signer's turn. On the basis of a 33-min video-recording of a multi-party interaction between 4 female signers in Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS), the paper provides evidence for the orderliness of overlapping signing. Furthermore, the contribution demonstrates how participants collaborate in the situated construction of turns as a dynamic and emergent gestalt and how they interactionally achieve turn transition. Thereby the study adds to recent research in spoken and in signed interaction that proposes to rethink turn boundaries and turn transition as flexible and interactionally achieved. PMID:26150792

  11. Effect of flow and stretch on the [Ca2+]i response of principal and intercalated cells in cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Xu, Shiyun; Woda, Craig; Kim, Paul; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Satlin, Lisa M

    2003-11-01

    An acute increase in tubular fluid flow rate in the microperfused cortical collecting duct (CCD), associated with a approximately 20% increase in tubular diameter, leads to an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i)in both principal and intercalated cells (Woda CB, Leite M Jr, Rohatgi R, and Satlin LM. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 283: F437-F446, 2002). The apical cilium present in principal but not intercalated cells has been proposed to be a flow sensor. To determine whether flow across the cilium and/or epithelial stretch mediates the [Ca2+]i response, CCDs from New Zealand White rabbits were microperfused in vitro, split-open (to isolate the effect of flow across cilia), or occluded (to examine the effect of stretch and duration/magnitude of the flow impulse), and [Ca2+]i was measured using fura 2. In perfused and occluded CCDs, a rapid (<1 s) but not slow (>3 min) increase in luminal flow rate and/or circumferential stretch led to an approximately threefold increase in [Ca2+]i in both principal and intercalated cells within approximately 10 s. This response was mediated by external Ca2+ entry and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated release of cell Ca2+ stores. In split-open CCDs, an increase in superfusate flow led to an approximately twofold increase in [Ca2+]i in both cell types within approximately 30 s. These experimental findings are interpreted using mathematical models to predict the fluid stress on the apical membranes of the CCD and the forces and torques on and deformation of the cilia. We conclude that rapid increases in luminal flow rate and circumferential stretch, leading to shear or hydrodynamic impulses at the cilium or apical membrane, lead to increases in [Ca2+]i in both principal and intercalated cells. PMID:12837680

  12. The management of turn transition in signed interaction through the lens of overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Groeber, Simone

    2015-01-01

    There have been relatively few studies on sign language interaction carried out within the framework of conversation analysis (CA). Therefore, questions remain open about how the basic building blocks of social interaction such as turn, turn construction unit (TCU) and turn transition relevance place (TRP) can be understood and analyzed in sign language interaction. Recent studies have shown that signers regularly fine-tune their turn-beginnings to potential completion points of turns (Groeber, 2014; Groeber and Pochon-Berger, 2014; De Vos et al., 2015). Moreover, signers deploy practices for overlap resolution as in spoken interaction (McCleary and Leite, 2013). While these studies have highlighted the signers' orientation to the “one-at-a-time” principle described by Sacks et al. (1974), the present article adds to this line of research by investigating in more detail those sequential environments where overlaps occur. The contribution provides an overview of different types of overlap with a focus of the overlap's onset with regard to a current signer's turn. On the basis of a 33-min video-recording of a multi-party interaction between 4 female signers in Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS), the paper provides evidence for the orderliness of overlapping signing. Furthermore, the contribution demonstrates how participants collaborate in the situated construction of turns as a dynamic and emergent gestalt and how they interactionally achieve turn transition. Thereby the study adds to recent research in spoken and in signed interaction that proposes to rethink turn boundaries and turn transition as flexible and interactionally achieved. PMID:26150792

  13. Time-Varying Causal Inference From Phosphoproteomic Measurements in Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masnadi-Shirazi, Maryam; Maurya, Mano Ram; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular signaling circuitry in eukaryotes can be studied by analyzing the regulation of protein phosphorylation and its impact on downstream mechanisms leading to a pheno-type. A primary role of phosphorylation is to act as a switch to turn “on” or “off” a protein activity or a cellular pathway. Specifically, protein phosphorylation is a major leit motif for transducing molecular signals inside the cell. Errors in transferring cellular information can alter the normal function and may lead to diseases such as cancer; an accurate reconstruction of the “true” signaling network is essential for understanding the molecular machinery involved in normal and pathological function. In this study, we have developed a novel framework for time-dependent reconstruction of signaling networks involved in the activation of macrophage cells leading to an inflammatory response. Several signaling pathways have been identified in macrophage cells, but the time-varying causal relationship that can produce a dynamic directed graph of these molecules has not been explored in detail. Here, we use the notion of Granger causality, and apply a vector autoregressive model to phosphoprotein time-course data in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Through the reconstruction of the phosphoprotein network, we were able to estimate the directionality and the dynamics of information flow. Significant interactions were selected through statistical hypothesis testing (t-test) of the coefficients of a linear model and were used to reconstruct the phosphoprotein signaling network. Our approach results in a three-stage phosphoprotein network that represents the evolution of the causal interactions in the intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:24681921

  14. Utilisation de l'echographie doppler couleur dans la localisation de l'insertion du cordon ombilical et le devenir materno-foetal la maternit de l'hpital central de Yaound : une tude descriptive et analytique

    PubMed Central

    Fouedjio, Jeanne Hortence; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Deutcho, Maximilien; Njotang, Philip Nana; Enow, Robinson Mbu; Leke, Robert John Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction L'chographie doppler couleur permet d'tudier l'insertion du cordon ombilical sur le placenta. Les tudes amricaines et asiatiques montrent que les insertions anormales telles les insertions vlamenteuses et marginales sont associes une lvation de la morbidit et de la mortalit prinatales. En Afrique et plus particulirement au Cameroun, aucune tude n'a t publie sur le sujet. D'o notre motivation mener ce travail. Mthodes Il s'agissait d'une tude descriptive et analytique qui s'est droule sur une priode deux ans (2011-2012) la maternit principale de l'Hpital Central de Yaound. Cette tude a inclus 66 patientes qui ont subi chacune une chographie doppler couleur entre la 18ime et 30ime semaine de gestation, prcisant le type d'insertion du cordon ombilical sur le placenta. A l'accouchement, un examen macroscopique du placenta a t ralis afin de comparer le type d'insertion et raliser les tests statistiques. Rsultats Des 66 grossesses tudies, nous avons eu un pourcentage de visualisation du type d'insertion de 100%. Toutes les insertions taient normales l'chographie soit 20 centrales et 46 latrales. A l'examen macroscopique du placenta, nous avons obtenu 19 (28,8%) insertions centrales, 47(71,2%) insertions latrales ; aucune insertion anormale n'ayant t objective. Les tests statistiques nous permettent d'avoir une sensibilit de 95%, une spcificit de 97,8%, une exactitude de 98%, une valeur prdictive positive de 95% et une valeur prdictive ngative de 97,8%. Pour ces insertions, nous n'avons pas retrouv d'association entre le mode d'accouchement, le poids de naissance, et le Score d'apgar avec le type d'insertion du cordon ombilical. Conclusion Nous avons conclu que l'chographie doppler couleur a une haute sensibilit et spcificit dans la dtermination de l'insertion du cordon ombilical sur le placenta. Il n'y a pas d'association entre le type d'insertion et le devenir maternofoetal. PMID:25018816

  15. A Mathematical Physicist's Approach to Virology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twarock, Reidun

    2012-02-01

    The following talk has been given in a special session dedicated to Professor Heinz-Dietrich Doebner at QTS in Prague in August 2011 on the occasion of his 80th birthday. It documents my journey from being a PhD student in Mathematical Physics at the Arnold Sommerfeld Institute in Clausthal under his supervision, to becoming a Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of York in the UK. I am currently heading an interdisciplinary research group of eight PDRAs and PhDs, focussed on investigating the structures of viruses from a symmetry perspective and unravelling the implications of virus structure on how viruses form and infect their hosts. A central element in my research is my fascination with the development and application of symmetry techniques, which stems from my time in Clausthal when working with Professor Doebner and colleagues. I would like to thank Professor Doebner for these important formative years in Clausthal. Der folgende Vortrag war mein Beitrag zu einer Festsitzung fuer Herrn Professor Heinz-Dietrich Doebner auf der Tagung QTS im August 2011 anläßlich seines achzigsten Geburtstags. Dieser Beitrag dokumentiert, wie sich meine Forschungen aus der Zeit als Doktorandin von Herrn Professor Doebner in Mathematischer Physik am Arnold Sommerfeld Institut in Clausthal weiterentwickelt haben, und zu meiner Professur in Mathematischer Biologie an der Universität York geführt haben. Ich leite dort zur Zeit eine interdisziplinäre Forschungsgruppe von acht Postdocs und Doktoranden, die sich mit der Entwicklung und Anwendung von Symmetrie-Techniken in der Virologie beschäftigt, und insbesondere untersucht, wie sich die Symmetrie-Eigenschaften von Viren auf deren Entstehung und Funktionsweise auswirken. Eine wichtige Vorraussetzung für dieses Forschungsprogramm ist meine Faszination für die Modellierung von Symmetrie-Eigenschaften, die ich während meiner Zusammenarbeit mit Herrn Professor Doebner und Kollegen in Clausthal entwickelt habe. Ich möchte Herrn Professor Doebner für diese wichtigen formativen Jahre besonderen Dank aussprechen.

  16. Deforestation in Brazil: motivations, journeys and tendencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, J. C.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Esteves, T. C. J.; Bento, C. P. M.

    2012-04-01

    José Carlos Leite1; António José Dinis Ferreira2; Tanya Cristina de Jesus Esteves2; Célia Patrícia Martins Bento2 1Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Brazil; 2IPC - Escola Superior Agrária de Coimbra, Portugal Over the last three decades, deforestation in Brazil occurred systematically in the area known as the "arc of deforestation", an extensive geographical area located in the interface of the Cerrado and the Amazon biomes. This work encompasses the reasons, causes and/or motivations of that recent deforestation, focusing on the Central-West and Northern regions. A number of reasons will be presented, seeking to build an approach able to identify the deepest roots of deforestation of those regions. Our actions over the environment are framed by our cultural matrix that stream from a western philosophic attitude. This way, to understand the framework where the deforestation actions are justified requires a multidisciplinary approach to understand the deforestation of the Cerrado and Amazon biomes, since the motivations for forest destruction in Brazil are complex and not entirely understood within the domains of a single disciplinary area. To search for an isolated cause to understand the recent deforestation can only be plausible if we ignore information on what actually happens. The methodology used in this work is based on a bibliographical revision, analysis of georeferrenced information, participative processes implementation and observation of stakeholder behavior, and field research. It departs from a general vision on deforestation that initially occurred at the littoral region, by the Atlantic Rainforest, right after the arrival of the Europeans, and throughout the centuries penetrates towards the interior, hitting the Cerrado and Amazon biomes. In this last case, we focused on the Vale do Alto Guaporé region, near Bolivia, where the intensity of the deforestation was verified from 1970 to 1990. Ultimately, the final result is a mosaic of reasons for deforestation - that has been done by both large and small land owners - that incorporates other views that have been absent in the explanations given by so-called specialized literature of Brazil's deforestation.

  17. Suitability of the Visual Field Index according to Glaucoma Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Marina CC; Biteli, Luis G; Maslin, Jessica S; Leite, Mauro T; Prata, Tiago S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the suitability of the visual field index (VFI) in different degrees of disease severity in glaucoma patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we consecutively enrolled patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and glaucoma suspects (ocular hypertension). All eyes required a reliable standard automated perimetry (SAP) test to be included. Subjects were categorized into five groups based on glaucoma severity using SAP’s mean deviation (MD). To evaluate the correlation among VFI, MD and pattern standard deviation (PSD), a linear regression model was built. To evaluate the nature of the correlation (i.e. linear vs nonlinear), results were plotted in a scatterplot graph. Results: One hundred and twenty-two eyes of 81 patients (mean age, 59.8 ± 14.5 years) were included. A strong, positive association was found between MD and VFI values (R2 = 0.98, p < 0.001), showing a 3.2% reduction in the VFI for each dB loss in the MD index. It was noticed that 15% of eyes with mild glaucoma (average MD of -3.1 dB) had VFI > 99%. Considering only the eyes with mild and moderate damage in the regression, we found a weaker (nonlinear) correlation than the one we found using all eyes (R2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). There was also a significant, nonlinear correlation between VFI and PSD (R2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Although higher PSD values were found with increasing visual field damage, this initial trend was reversed when VFI became smaller than 50%, approximately. Conclusion: Visual field index had a strong correlation with MD; however, this correlation was weaker in mild disease, as some patients with early disease had very high VFI values (ceiling effect). Therefore, initial deterioration in visual field status (as assessed by MD values) in patients with early disease may not be detectable using the VFI alone. How to cite this article: Sousa MCC, Biteli LG, Dorairaj S, Maslin JS, Leite M, Prata TS. Suitability of the Visual Field Index according to Glaucoma Severity. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):65-68.

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions in the Brazilian semiarid region: environmental, climate and social constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Neto, Erclito; Ometto, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The process of removing a forest to open new agricultural lands, which has been very intensive in developing countries like Brazil during the last decades (Lapola et al, 2014), contributes to about 12% of the global anthropogenic emissions (Le Qur et al., 2009). Forest cover removal releases carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GEE) like methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as a result of burning trees, followed by gradual decomposition of the forest biomass left on the ground while pasture or crop plantations are being established (Ramankutty et al., 2007). In Brazil, the 2nd Brazilian National Communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), presents the mean annual net CO2 emissions caused by changes in land use in each Brazilian biome and the first place in the ranking is occupied by the Amazon Rainforest Biome (860,874 Gg), followed by Savannah (302,715 Gg), Atlantic Forest (79,109 Gg), Caatinga (37,628 Gg), Pantanal (16,172 Gg) and Pampa (-102 Gg) (MCT 2010). Despite these results, the estimates of CO2 emissions caused by land use changes in the Brazilian semiarid region (Caatinga) are very limited and scarce, and associated to uncertainties which are directly related to the estimated biomass in different types of vegetation which are spatially distributed within the biome, as well as the correct representation of the dynamics of the deforestation process itself, and the more accurate mapping use and land cover. Based on such facts, this project is estimating the emissions of the main greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O and CH4) caused by land use changes in an area of Caatinga biome in Pernambuco State through the model INPE-EM. So far, it is known that from decades of 1940 up to 1995, Caatinga biome has contributed with about 3.2 % to total land use change emissions in the country (Leite et al, 2012), and recently (1990-2005), the contributions of Caatinga are even higher (over 30%), according to the 2nd Brazilian National Communication (2010). By means means of the model INPE-EM (data still being acquired), we are trying to diminish the uncertainties and identify specific and integrated emissions of GHG, as well as the stocks and flows of C and N, in order to contribute to the current information about GEE dynamic in the Brazilian Northeast and also to enhance the Brazilian GHG inventory. Besides, the model will incorporate the temporal dynamics related to the deforestation process, and accounts for the biophysical and socioeconomic heterogeneity of the region in study.

  19. SEAC 2011 Stars and Stones: Voyages in Archaeoastronomy and Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, F.; Ribeiro, N.; Silva, F.; Campion, N.; Joaquinito, A.; Tirapicos, L.

    2015-05-01

    Since Prehistory the sky has always been integrated as part of the cosmovision of human societies. The sky played a fundamental role not only in the orientation in space, time organization, ritual practices or celestial divination but also as an element of power. Migrations and voyages are intrinsic to humankind, they opened the routes for cultural diffusion and trade, but also for power dominance. Following these routes is also to follow cultural diversity and how human societies met or clashed. The sky and astronomical phenomena provided the tools for time reckoning, calendar organization and celestial navigation that supported those voyages. Astronomy gives us today the capacity to reproduce the sky, opening a window through which we can glimpse how those societies perceived, integrated and manipulated the sky into their world-views and their myths and, ultimately, into their social organization. A voyage is always a meeting of different worlds and eventually a process to accept diversity and thus we challenged the participants of the 19th meeting of the European Society for Astronomy in Culture to present their papers in the form of a voyage or an encounter for the following topics: - Techniques of celestial navigation and orientation of the past. Astronomical navigation and nautical instruments in the XIVth, XVth and XVIth centuries; - Expressions of astronomical knowledge in architecture and monuments, rock art, archaeology and landscape. People migration, a meeting between different cultures; - History of astronomy. An encounter between different conceptions; - Astronomy and the Jesuits. A meeting between different worlds; - Astronomy in antiquity. A meeting between different knowledge; - Ethno-astronomy, Cultural Astronomy and myths, voyages in space and in time through different cultures; - To where is Archaeoastronomy voyaging? A round table about Archaeoastronomy, Cultural Astronomy and Education. The 19th meeting of the European Society for Astronomy in Culture was held in Évora, Portugal, from September 19th to 23th, 2011, and was attended by 85 participants from 29 countries. A total number of 71 talks and 4 posters were presented. Among them 20 invited lectures given by Michael Rappenglüück, José Manuel Malhão Pereira, Jarita Holbrook, Giulio Magli, Nicholas Campion, J. Kim Malville, David Pankenier, Alejandro Martín López, Ivan Sprajc, Mariusz Ziólkowski, Marciano da Silva, Lionel Sims, Emilia Pasztor, Frank Prendergast, Fernando Pimenta, A. César González-Garcia, Henrique Leitão, Shi Yunli and Stanislaw Iwaniszewski and 3 public lectures given by Luísa Pereira, Juan Belmonte Avilés and Clive Ruggles. Most of the contributions were submitted for publication and went through a peer-review process. The present volume is the result of this process, arranged in the same thematic sections as the Conference was organised.

  20. Position and Velocity Tracking in Cellular Networks Using the Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2009-01-01

    Access to the right information anytime, anywhere is becoming the new driving force for the information technology revolution. The 'right' information's relevance is based on the user's profile and his/her current geographical position and/or time. Location Based Service (LBS) is an innovative technology that provides information or makes information available based on the geographical location of the mobile user. Analysts predict that LBSs will lead to new applications, generating billions of US dollars worldwide (Leite, 2001; Searle, 2001). The need for an efficient and accurate mobile station (MS) positioning system is growing day by day. The ability to pinpoint the location of an individual has an obvious and vital value in the context of emergency services (Chan, 2003; Olama et al., 2008). Pinpointing the location of people and other valuable assets also opens the door to a new world of previously unimagined information services and m-commerce probabilities. For example, availability of services like 'Where is the nearest ATM?', 'Check traffic conditions on the highway on my route', 'Find a parking lot nearby', as well as answers to 'Where is my advisor?', and 'Where is my car?' will be an everyday rule in our lives (Charalambous & Panayiotou, 2004). A technology independent LBS architecture can be considered as comprised by three main parts (Girodon, 2002): A user requesting information, a mobile network operator and its partners, and several content providers (e.g. data, maps). The subscriber requests a personalized service dependant on his geographic location. The system will ask the Location Services Manager (which is in charge of handling requests, i.e., send/receive to the Location Calculator and the Content Providers) to pinpoint the location of the mobile. The Location Services Manager (LSM), using the Location Calculator, will ask the Content Provider (CP) to supply qualified information according to the mobile's geographical position. The LSM will eventually receive the answer from the CP and send it to the mobile, performing the essential data translations. Fig. 1 outlines the precedent concept. For effective provision of LBS, one has to provide an accurate location, as well as suitable information for users required by the corresponding service, with minimal expenditure. Thus, there are three main technology issues that have to be resolved for LBS: positioning technology, application technology, and location services (Dru & Saada, 2001). A very important technology is of course the positioning technology, the way to find out the location of a mobile device accurately. Due to the unique characteristics of the cellular environment, it is a great challenge to locate the user precisely. However, in many cases, application technology and location services are important consideration of LBS. Application technology manages the geographic information and delivers the customer requests to the appropriate service provider, thus it constitutes the communication system involved. LBS uses the geographic information to provide geographically sensitive information and services. Location-based applications and services are not sensitive to the type of location technology that is used - they merely rely on reasonably accurate geographic coordinates (Chan, 2003). This chapter is structured as follows: In Section 2, we describe the use and applications of LBSs. The current location determination technologies and standards are presented in Section 3. In Section 4 we describe the mathematical models used for the location and velocity estimation algorithms. An initial attempt for MS location estimation via received signal level using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach and triangulation is presented in Sections 5. Since the former approach lacks acceptable accuracy for demanding services as numerical results reveal, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach, which is the main topic in this chapter, is introduced in Sections 6. In Section 7 we present numerical results. Section 8 provides concluding remarks.

  1. Modelling wildfire activity in Iberia with different Atmospheric Circulation WTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, P. M.; Trigo, R.; Pereira, M. G.; Rasilla, D.; Gouveia, C.

    2012-04-01

    This work focuses on the spatial and temporal variability of burnt area (BA) for the entire Iberian Peninsula (IP) and on the construction of statistical models to reproduce the inter-annual variability, based on Weather Types Classification (WTC). A common BA dataset was assembled for the first time for the entire Iberian Peninsula, by merging BA records for the 66 administrative regions of Portugal and Spain. A normalization procedure was then applied to the various size regions before performing a k-means cluster analysis to identify large areas characterized by similar fire regimes. The most compelling results were obtained for 4 clusters (Northwestern, Northern, Southwestern and Eastern) whose spatial patterns and seasonal fire regimes are shown to be related with constraining factors such as topography, vegetation cover and climate conditions. The response of fire burnt surface at monthly time scales to both long-term climatic pre-conditions and short-term synoptic forcing was assessed through correlation and regression analysis using: (i) temperature and precipitation from 2 to 7 months in advance to fire peak season; (ii) synoptic weather patterns derived from 11 distinct classifications derived under the COSTaction-733. Different responses were obtained for each of the considered regions: (i) a relevant link between BA and short-term synoptic forcing (represented by monthly frequencies of WTC) was identified for all clusters; (ii) long-term climatic preconditioning was relevant for all but one cluster (Northern). Taking into account these links, we developed stepwise regression models with the aim of reproducing the observed BA series (i.e. in hindcast mode). These models were based on the best climatic and synoptic circulation predictors identified previously. All models were cross-validated and their performance varies between clusters, though models exclusively based on WTCs tend to better reproduce annual BA time series than those only based on pre-conditioning climatic information. Nevertheless, the best results are attained when both synoptic and climatic predictors are used simultaneously as predictors, in particular for the two western clusters, where correlation coefficient values are higher than 0.7. Finally, we have used WTC composite maps to characterize the typical synoptic configurations that favor high values of BA. These patterns correspond to dry and warm fluxes, associated with anticyclonic regimes, which foster fire ignition (Pereira et al., 2005). Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005: "Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal". Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. COST733, 2011: "COST 733 Wiki - Harmonisation and Applications of Weather Type Classifications for European regions or COST733 spatial domains for Europe". Available at http://geo21.geo.uni-augsburg.de/cost733wiki/Cost733_Wiki_Main [accessed 1 September 2011].

  2. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Helion

    2005-06-01

    The biennial International Conferences on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena (ICPPP) are widely recognized as the major venue for the dissemination of recent and significant research results in the traditional areas, as well as in new and exciting outgrowths of this interdisciplinary field. The ICPPP is concerned with the science, applications and technologies involving the optical, electron-beam or otherwise production, propagation and detection of acoustic, thermal and general diffusion-wave fields.

    In the 2004 edition the conference was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and involved 14 topics covered in the scientific programme. These are Spectroscopy, Analytical Chemistry and Photochemistry, PA and PT Imaging and Microscopy, Thermophysical Properties and Characterization of Materials, Laser Ultrasonics, Ultrafast PA and PT Phenomena, Electronic and Optical Materials, Thin Films and Devices, Non Linear Phenomena and Inverse Problem, Nanoscale Phenomena, Non Destructive Evaluation, Diffusion Waves and Applications, Industrial Applications, New Instruments and Methodology, Biological,Medical and Dental Applications, Agriculture, Food and Environmental Applications . More than 300 short abstracts contributions were received and refereed for acceptation, from 690 authors of 28 different countries.

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 13ICPPP including the 207 full papers accepted after a very careful peer review process. Their contents are very deep and modern and show the peculiar interdisciplinary nature of the area. It is provided a collection of papers which includes the traditional subjects of the area as well as new developments of th the fields. The characterization of materials is occupying a great interest in the papers and many studies involving nanoscale phenomena were developed exploring the photothermal methodology. As in the previous conferences thermal wave microscopy and non-linear photothermal phenomena keep a high interest. The application of the methodology to any diffusive wave, other than the thermal one, showed significant growth. In the applications field many expressive papers are analyzing environmental, dental and medical concerns besides those involving other industrial purposes.

    The Conference received financial support from various Brazilian institutions and agencies, specially the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq and Research and Projects Financing - Brazilian innovation Agency - FINEP, and from United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - UNESCO, to whom the conference organizers are very grateful.

    We would like to thank greatly the colleagues that helped much with the refereeing tasks and for the stimulating discussions and suggestions during the conference organization and proceedings preparation. Besides we wish to thank the authors for the high quality of their contributions. In special it should be acknowledge the essential help of the people from State University of the North of Rio de Janeiro (Fluminense)- UENF, State University of Campinas - UNICAMP and National Institute for Space Research - INPE, and colleagues that chaired previous conferences. Finally, we are all grateful evious for the precious work of the conference secretary Nelia F. Leite.

    Helion Vargas Chairman of the 13th International Conference on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena

  3. Assessing fire risk in Portugal during the summer fire season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacamara, C. C.; Pereira, M. G.; Trigo, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Since 1998, Instituto de Meteorologia, the Portuguese Weather Service has relied on the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) System (van Wagner, 1987) to produce daily forecasts of fire risk. The FWI System consists of six components that account for the effects of fuel moisture and wind on fire behavior. The first three components, i.e. the Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC), the Duff Moisture Code (DMC) and the Drought Code (DC) respectively rate the average moisture content of surface litter, decomposing litter, and organic (humus) layers of the soil. Wind effects are then added to FFMC leading to the Initial Spread Index (ISI) that rates fire spread. The remaining two fuel moisture codes (DMC and DC) are in turn combined to produce the Buildup Index (BUI) that is a rating of the total amount of fuel available for combustion. BUI is finally combined with ISI to produce the Fire Weather Index (FWI) that represents the rate of fire intensity. Classes of fire danger and levels of preparedness are commonly defined on an empirical way for a given region by calibrating the FWI System against wildfire activity as defined by the recorded number of events and by the observed burned area over a given period of time (Bovio and Camia, 1998). It is also a well established fact that distributions of burned areas are heavily skewed to the right and tend to follow distributions of the exponential-type (Cumming, 2001). Based on the described context, a new procedure is presented for calibrating the FWI System during the summer fire season in Portugal. Two datasets were used covering a 28-year period (1980-2007); i) the official Portuguese wildfire database which contains detailed information on fire events occurred in the 18 districts of Continental Portugal and ii) daily values of the six components of the FWI System as derived from reanalyses (Uppala et al., 2005) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Calibration of the FWI System is then performed in two steps; 1) a truncated Weibull distribution is fitted to the sample of burned areas and 2) the quality of the fitted statistical model is improved by incorporating components of the FWI System as covariates. Obtained model allows estimating on a daily basis the probability of occurrence of fires larger than a given threshold as well as producing maps of fire risk. Results as obtained from a prototype currently being developed will be presented and discussed. In particular, it will be shown that results provide additional evidence of the known fact that the extent of burned area in Portugal is controlled by two main atmospheric factors (Pereira et al. 2005): i) a long-term control related to the regime of temperature and precipitation in spring and ii) a short-term control exerted by the occurrence of very intense dry spells in days of extreme synoptic situations. Bovio, G., and A. Camia. 1998. An analysis of large forest fire danger conditions in Europe. In Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. on Forest Fire Research & 14th Conf. on Fire and Forest Meteorology, Viegas, D.X. (Ed.), Luso, 16-20 Nov., ADAI, 975-994. Cumming, S.G., 2001. Parametric models of the fire size distribution. Can J. For. Res., 31, 1297-1303. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C. and Leite, S.M., 2005. Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal. Agr. and For. Meteorol., 129 (1-2), 11-25. Uppala, S.M. et al., 2005: The ERA-40 re-analysis. Quart. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 131, 2961-3012. Van Wagner, C.E., 1987. Development and structure of the Canadian forest fire weather index system. Canadian Forestry Service, Forest Technical Report 35, Ottawa, 37 pp.

  4. Gitelman syndrome during pregnancy: a therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    de Arriba, Gabriel; Snchez-Heras, Marta; Basterrechea, Maria Angeles

    2009-11-01

    We report a female patient diagnosed of Gitelman disease who suffered from severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia during pregnancy. We discuss the therapeutic approach and materno-fetal outcome. PMID:19241082

  5. INTRODUCTION Introduction to the conference proceeding of the Workshop on Electromagnetic Inverse ProblemsThe University of Manchester, UK, 15-18 June, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Oliver; Lionheart, Bill

    2010-11-01

    This proceeding combines selected contributions from participants of the Workshop on Electromagnetic Inverse Problems which was hosted by the University of Manchester in June 2009. The workshop was organized by the two guest editors of this conference proceeding and ran in parallel to the 10th International Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography, which was guided by Bill Lionheart, Richard Bayford, and Eung Je Woo. Both events shared plenary talks and several selected sessions. One reason for combining these two events was the goal of bringing together scientists from various related disciplines who normally might not attend the same conferences, and to enhance discussions between these different groups. So, for example, one day of the workshop was dedicated to the broader area of geophysical inverse problems (including inverse problems in petroleum engineering), where participants from the EIT community and from the medical imaging community were also encouraged to participate, with great success. Other sessions concentrated on microwave medical imaging, on inverse scattering, or on eddy current imaging, with active feedback also from geophysically oriented scientists. Furthermore, several talks addressed such diverse topics as optical tomography, photoacoustic tomography, time reversal, or electrosensing fish. As a result of the workshop, speakers were invited to contribute extended papers to this conference proceeding. All submissions were thoroughly reviewed and, after a thoughtful revision by the authors, combined in this proceeding. The resulting set of six papers presenting the work of in total 22 authors from 5 different countries provides a very interesting overview of several of the themes which were represented at the workshop. These can be divided into two important categories, namely (i) modelling and (ii) data inversion. The first three papers of this selection, as outlined below, focus more on modelling aspects, being an essential component of any successful inversion, whereas the other three papers discuss novel inversion techniques for specific applications. In the first contribution, with the title A Novel Simplified Mathematical Model for Antennas used in Medical Imaging Applications, the authors M J Fernando, M Elsdon, K Busawon and D Smith discuss a new technique for modelling the current across a monopole antenna from which the radiation fields of the antenna can be calculated very efficiently in specific medical imaging applications. This new technique is then tested on two examples, a quarter wavelength and a three quarter wavelength monopole antenna. The next contribution, with the title An investigation into the use of a mixture model for simulating the electrical properties of soil with varying effective saturation levels for sub-soil imaging using ECT by R R Hayes, P A Newill, F J W Podd, T A York, B D Grieve and O Dorn, considers the development of a new visualization tool for monitoring soil moisture content surrounding certain seed breeder plants. An electrical capacitance tomography technique is employed for verifying how efficiently each plant utilises the water and nutrients available in the surrounding soil. The goal of this study is to help in developing and identifying new drought tolerant food crops. In the third contribution Combination of Maximin and Kriging Prediction Methods for Eddy-Current Testing Database Generation by S Bilicz, M Lambert, E Vazquez and S Gyimóthy, a novel database generation technique is proposed for its use in solving inverse eddy-current testing problems. For avoiding expensive repeated forward simulations during the creation of this database, a kriging interpolation technique is employed for filling uniformly the data output space with sample points. Mathematically this is achieved by using a maximin formalism. The paper 2.5D inversion of CSEM data in a vertically anisotropic earth by C Ramananjaona and L MacGregor considers controlled-source electromagnetic techniques for imaging the earth in a marine environment. It focuses in particular on taking into account anisotropy effects in the inversion. Results of this technique are demonstrated from simulated and from real field data. Furthermore, in the contribution Multiple level-sets for elliptic Cauchy problems in three-dimensional domains by A Leitão and M Marques Alves the authors consider a TV-H1regularization technique for multiple level-set inversion of elliptic Cauchy problems. Generalized minimizers are defined and convergence and stability results are provided for this method, in addition to several numerical experiments. Finally, in the paper Development of in-vivo fluorescence imaging with the matrix-free method, the authors A Zacharopoulos, A Garofalakis, J Ripoll and S Arridge address a recently developed non-contact fluorescence molecular tomography technique where the use of non-contact acquisition systems poses new challenges on computational efficiency during data processing. The matrix-free method is designed to reduce computational cost and memory requirements during the inversion. Reconstructions from a simulated mouse phantom are provided for demonstrating the performance of the proposed technique in realistic scenarios. We hope that this selection of strong and thought-provoking papers will help stimulating further cross-disciplinary research in the spirit of the workshop. We thank all authors for providing us with this excellent set of high-quality contributions. We also thank EPSRC for having provided funding for the workshop under grant EP/G065047/1. Oliver Dorn, Bill Lionheart School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Rd Manchester, M13 9PL, UK E-mail: oliver.dorn@manchester.ac.uk, bill.lionheart@manchester.ac.uk Guest Editors

  6. [Gestational diabetes: diagnosis, short and long term management].

    PubMed

    Vambergue, Anne

    2013-05-01

    Universal consensus on the diagnosis methods and thresholds has long been lacking. The recently published Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study has been used to confirm the link between hyperglycemia and materno-fetal complications. Consequently, in France, the Société francophone du diabète (SFD) and the Collège national des gynécologues et obstétriciens français (CNGOF) proposed an expert consensus on gestational diabetes mellitus for clinical practice. Fasting blood glucose should be measured at the first visit during early pregnancy for women with risk factors to identify the women with pregestational diabetes. It is proposed a selective screening on risk factors rather than universal screening. Specific treatment of gestational diabetes reduced materno-fetal complications compared to the absence of therapy. Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus are characterized by a high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23588192

  7. FOREWORD: Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Inverse problems can usually be modelled as operator equations in infinite-dimensional spaces with a forward operator acting between Hilbert or Banach spaces—a formulation which quite often also serves as the basis for defining and analyzing solution methods. The additional amount of structure and geometric interpretability provided by the concept of an inner product has rendered these methods amenable to a convergence analysis, a fact which has led to a rigorous and comprehensive study of regularization methods in Hilbert spaces over the last three decades. However, for numerous problems such as x-ray diffractometry, certain inverse scattering problems and a number of parameter identification problems in PDEs, the reasons for using a Hilbert space setting seem to be based on conventions rather than an appropriate and realistic model choice, so often a Banach space setting would be closer to reality. Furthermore, non-Hilbertian regularization and data fidelity terms incorporating a priori information on solution and noise, such as general Lp-norms, TV-type norms, or the Kullback-Leibler divergence, have recently become very popular. These facts have motivated intensive investigations on regularization methods in Banach spaces, a topic which has emerged as a highly active research field within the area of inverse problems. Meanwhile some of the most well-known regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov-type methods requiring the solution of extremal problems, and iterative ones like the Landweber method, the Gauss-Newton method, as well as the approximate inverse method, have been investigated for linear and nonlinear operator equations in Banach spaces. Convergence with rates has been proven and conditions on the solution smoothness and on the structure of nonlinearity have been formulated. Still, beyond the existing results a large number of challenging open questions have arisen, due to the more involved handling of general Banach spaces and the larger variety of concrete instances with special properties. The aim of this special section is to provide a forum for highly topical ongoing work in the area of regularization in Banach spaces, its numerics and its applications. Indeed, we have been lucky enough to obtain a number of excellent papers both from colleagues who have previously been contributing to this topic and from researchers entering the field due to its relevance in practical inverse problems. We would like to thank all contributers for enabling us to present a high quality collection of papers on topics ranging from various aspects of regularization via efficient numerical solution to applications in PDE models. We give a brief overview of the contributions included in this issue (here ordered alphabetically by first author). In their paper, Iterative regularization with general penalty term—theory and application to L1 and TV regularization, Radu Bot and Torsten Hein provide an extension of the Landweber iteration for linear operator equations in Banach space to general operators in place of the inverse duality mapping, which corresponds to the use of general regularization functionals in variational regularization. The L∞ topology in data space corresponds to the frequently occuring situation of uniformly distributed data noise. A numerically efficient solution of the resulting Tikhonov regularization problem via a Moreau-Yosida appriximation and a semismooth Newton method, along with a δ-free regularization parameter choice rule, is the topic of the paper L∞ fitting for inverse problems with uniform noise by Christian Clason. Extension of convergence rates results from classical source conditions to their generalization via variational inequalities with a priori and a posteriori stopping rules is the main contribution of the paper Regularization of linear ill-posed problems by the augmented Lagrangian method and variational inequalities by Klaus Frick and Markus Grasmair, again in the context of some iterative method. A powerful tool for proving convergence rates of Tikhonov type but also other regularization methods in Banach spaces are assumptions of the type of variational inequalities that combine conditions on solution smoothness (i.e., source conditions in the Hilbert space case) and nonlinearity of the forward operator. In Parameter choice in Banach space regularization under variational inequalities, Bernd Hofmann and Peter Mathé provide results with general error measures and especially study the question of regularization parameter choice. Daijun Jiang, Hui Feng, and Jun Zou consider an application of Banach space ideas in the context of an application problem in their paper Convergence rates of Tikhonov regularizations for parameter identifiation in a parabolic-elliptic system, namely the identification of a distributed diffusion coefficient in a coupled elliptic-parabolic system. In particular, they show convergence rates of Lp-H1 (variational) regularization for the application under consideration via the use and verification of certain source and nonlinearity conditions. In computational practice, the Lp norm with p close to one is often used as a substitute for the actually sparsity promoting L1 norm. In Norm sensitivity of sparsity regularization with respect to p, Kamil S Kazimierski, Peter Maass and Robin Strehlow consider the question of how sensitive the Tikhonov regularized solution is with respect to p. They do so by computing the derivative via the implicit function theorem, particularly at the crucial value, p=1. Another iterative regularization method in Banach space is considered by Qinian Jin and Linda Stals in Nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization for ill-posed problems in Banach spaces. Using a variational formulation and under some smoothness and convexity assumption on the preimage space, they extend the convergence analysis of the well-known iterative Tikhonov method for linear problems in Hilbert space to a more general Banach space framework. Systems of linear or nonlinear operators can be efficiently treated by cyclic iterations, thus several variants of gradient and Newton-type Kaczmarz methods have already been studied in the Hilbert space setting. Antonio Leitão and M Marques Alves in their paper On Landweber---Kaczmarz methods for regularizing systems of ill-posed equations in Banach spaces carry out an extension to Banach spaces for the fundamental Landweber version. The impact of perturbations in the evaluation of the forward operator and its derivative on the convergence behaviour of regularization methods is a practically and highly relevant issue. It is treated in the paper Convergence rates analysis of Tikhonov regularization for nonlinear ill-posed problems with noisy operators by Shuai Lu and Jens Flemming for variational regularization of nonlinear problems in Banach spaces. In The approximate inverse in action: IV. Semi-discrete equations in a Banach space setting, Thomas Schuster, Andreas Rieder and Frank Schöpfer extend the concept of approximate inverse to the practically and highly relevant situation of finitely many measurements and a general smooth and convex Banach space as preimage space. They devise two approaches for computing the reconstruction kernels required in the method and provide convergence and regularization results. Frank Werner and Thorsten Hohage in Convergence rates in expectation for Tikhonov-type regularization of inverse problems with Poisson data prove convergence rates results for variational regularization with general convex regularization term and the Kullback-Leibler distance as data fidelity term by combining a new result on Poisson distributed data with a deterministic rates analysis. Finally, we would like to thank the Inverse Problems team, especially Joanna Evangelides and Chris Wileman, for their extraordinary smooth and productive cooperation, as well as Alfred K Louis for his kind support of our initiative.

  8. PREFACE: Introduction to the proceedings of Dynamics Days South America 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pereira, Tiago; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.; Turci, Luiz F. R.; Winter, Othon C.

    2011-03-01

    This proceedings presents selected contributions from the participants of South America Dynamics Days 2011, which was hosted by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), Brazil, in July 2010. Dynamics Days was founded in 1980 and is the longest standing and most respected international series of meetings devoted to the field of dynamics and nonlinearity. Traditionally it has brought together researchers from a wide range of backgrounds - including physics, biology, engineering, chemistry and mathematics - for interdisciplinary research into nonlinear science. Dynamics Days South America 2010 marked the beginning of the South American branch of Dynamics Days. It brought together, for the first time in South America, researchers from a wide range of backgrounds who share a common interest in the theory and applications of nonlinear dynamics. Thus, South American researchers had a forum to promote regional as well as international scientific and technological exchange and collaboration especially, but not exclusively, on problems that are particularly relevant for the development of science and technology in the South American region. Furthermore, the conference also brought together prominent scientists from around the world to review recent developments in nonlinear science. This conference comprised plenary invited talks, minisymposia, contributed talks and poster sessions. The articles that are compiled here were chosen from among the works that were presented as contributed talks and posters. They represent a good selection which allows one to put issues that were discussed during the conference into perspective. It is possible to evaluate the success of an initiative by using several indices. In relation to attendees, the conference had 311 participants from 22 countries, who presented 341 works. About 86% of the participants came from South American countries. These figures allow one to classify this Dynamics Days conference as that with the greatest number of attendees ever. Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to all the participants for their presentations, discussions, and remarkable interactions with one another. The tireless work undertaken by all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Organizing Committee must also be recognized. We also wish to express our deep appreciation for the Scientific Societies and Research Support Agencies which supported the conference and provided all the resources which were necessary to make this idea of a South American Dynamics Days come true. Elbert E N Macau, Tiago Pereira, Antonio F B A Prado, Luiz F R Turci, and Othon C WinterEditors Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph International Advisory Committee Adilson E MotterNorthwestern UniversityEvanston - IL - USA Alfredo OzorioCentro Brasileiro de Pesquisas FísicasRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Celso Grebogi (Chair)University of AberdeenAberdeen - UK Ed OttUniversity of MarylandCollege Park - MD - USA Epaminondas Rosa JrIllinois State UniversityNormal - IL - USA Hans Ingo WeberPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Holger KantzMax Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex SystemsDresden - Germany Jason Gallas (Co-chair)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto Alegre - RS - Brazil José Roberto Rios LeiteUniv. Federal de PernanbucoRecife - PE - Brazil Jürgen KurthsPotsdam Institute for climate Impact ResearchHumboldt University, Berlin - Germany Kenneth ShowalterWest Virginia UniversityMorgantown - WV - USA Lou PecoraNaval Research LabWashington - DC - USA Luis Antonio AguirreUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo Horizonte - MG - Brazil Marcelo VianaIMPA - Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e AplicadaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Miguel A F SanjuánUniversidad Rey Juan CarlosMadrid - Spain Paulo Roberto de Souza MendesPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Roland KorbeleUniversidade de São PauloSão Carlos - SP - Brazil Rubens SampaioPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Ruedi StoopSwiss Federal Institute of TechnologyUZH/ETHZ Zurich - Switzerland Sylvio Ferraz MelloUniversidade de São PauloSão Paulo - SP - Brazil Takashi YoneyamaITA - Instituto Tecnológico de AeronáuticaSão José dos Campos - SP - Brazil Ying-Cheng LaiArizona State UniversityTempe - AZ - USA Organizing Committee Antonio Carlos Roque da SilvaUSP - Universidade de São PauloRibeirão Preto - SP - Brazil Antonio F Bertachini de Almeida Prado (Co-chair)INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas EspaciaisSão José dos Campos - SP - Brazil Arturo C MartiFacultad de CienciaMontevideo - Uruguai Carlos Leopoldo Pando LambruschiniBenemérita Universidad Autónoma de PueblaPuebla - Mexico Edson Denis LeonelUNESP - "Júlio de Mesquisa Filho"Rio Claro - SP - Brazil Elbert E N Macau (Chair)INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas EspaciaisSão José dos Campos - SP - Brazil Gerard Olivar TostUniversidad National de ColombiaManizales - Colombia Hamilton VarelaUSP - Universidade de São PauloSão Carlos - SP - Brazil Hilda Cerdeira (Co-chair)IFT - Instituto de Física TeóricaSão Paulo - SP - Brazil Iberê Luiz CaldasUSP - Universidade de São PauloSão Paulo - SP - Brazil José Manoel BalthazarUNESP - "Júlio de Mesquisa Filho"Rio Claro - SP - Brazil José Roberto Castilho PiqueiraUSP - Universidade de São PauloSão Paulo - SP - Brazil Luciano da Fontoura CostaUSP - Universidade de São PauloSão Carlos - SP - Brazil Luiz de Siqueira Martins FilhoUFABC - Universidade Federal do ABCSanto André - SP - Brazil Marcel G ClercUniversidad de ChileSantiago - Chile Miguel VizcardoUniversidad de ArequipaArequipa - Peru Gonzalo Marcelo Ramirez ÁvilaUniversidad Mayor de San AndrésLa Paz - Bolivia Marco Aurélio Pires IdiartUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto Alegre - RS - Brazil Marcus de AguiarUNICAMPCampinas - SP - Brazil Mario CosenzaUniversidad de Los AndesMerida - Venezuela Othon Cabo WinterUNESP - "Júlio de Mesquisa Filho"Guaratinguetá - SP - Brazil Ricardo Luiz VianaUniversidade Federal do ParanáCuritiba - PA - Brazil Silvina Ponce DawsonUniversidad de Buenos AiresBuenos Aires - Argentina Vivian M GomesINPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas EspaciaisSão José dos Campos - SP - Brazil Realization INPE logo Promotion ABCM logo   SBA logo SBF logo   SBMAC logo Sponsorship CAPES logo   CNPq logo FAPESP logo   ICTP logo Claf logo   SOARD AFOSR logo TAM logo

  9. INFEZIONI VIRALI CONGENITE, PERINATALI E NEONATALI VIRAL INFECTIONS OF THE FETUS AND NEWBORN INFANT

    PubMed Central

    Tremolada, Sara; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Riassunto Alcuni virus possono essere trasmessi verticalmente da madre a figlio in seguito allo sviluppo, da parte della madre, di un’infezione primaria, ricorrente o cronica. La trasmissione materno-fetale dei virus, che può avvenire in utero (infezione congenita), durante il travaglio del parto (infezione perinatale), oppure attraverso l’allattamento (infezione postnatale), può causare aborto spontaneo, morte fetale, ritardo di crescita intrauterino, anomalie congenite e patologie neonatali o postnatali di diversa entità. Alcuni fattori di rischio sembrano influenzare l’incidenza di trasmissione materno-fetale dei virus, come ad esempio la presenza di altre infezioni virali, la carica virale materna, il tipo di infezione (primaria o ricorrente), la durata della rottura delle membrane, la modalità con cui avviene il parto, le condizioni socio-economiche e l’allattamento. Oggi è possibile prevenire la trasmissione materno-fetale di molti virus grazie all’utilizzo di vaccini, immunizzazione passiva e farmaci antivirali. Il rischio di trasmissione delle infezioni perinatali e postnatali, inoltre, può essere diminuito evitando l’allattamento o ricorrendo ad un parto cesareo. PMID:19216201

  10. Twin Fetuses Papyraeci in a Spontaneous Triplet Pregnancy Presenting with Unexplained Preterm Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Bukar, M; Chama, CM; Bako, BG; Jonathan, BI

    2013-01-01

    Fetus papyracie in a triplet pregnancy is indeed rare and can pose serious management challenges. These challenges are more pronounced where facilities for monitoring are either inadequate or nonexistent. A 39-year-old, grand multipara multipara was referred to the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital at 27 weeks gestation with preterm contractions. Materno fetal monitoring did not reveal the cause of the preterm contractions. She was delivered via caesarean section, at 36 weeks of gestation, on account of decreased fetal movement and the products were a live female fetus weighing 2.3 kg and two male papyraceous fetuses weighing 150 g and 130 g, respectively. PMID:24349837

  11. A comparison of the histological structure of the placenta in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Satoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    The primary function of the placenta is to act as an interface between the dam and fetus. The anatomic structure of the chorioallantoic placenta in eutherian mammals varies between different animal species. The placental types in eutherian mammals are classified from various standpoints based on the gross shape, the histological structure of the materno-fetal interface, the type of materno-fetal interdigitation, etc. Particularly, the histological structure is generally considered one of the most useful and instructive classifications for functionally describing placental type. In this system, three main types are recognized according to the cell layers comprising the interhemal area: (1) epitheliochorial type (horses, pigs and ruminants), (2) endotheliochorial type (carnivores) and (3) hemochorial type (primates, rodents and rabbits). The number of cell layers in the interhemal area is considered to modify the transfer of nutrients between maternal and fetal blood and is one of the important factors with respect to the difference in placental permeability between animal species. Therefore, in reproductive and developmental toxicity studies, careful attention should be paid to the histological structure of the interhemal area when extrapolating information concerning placental transfer characteristics to different animal species. PMID:24791062

  12. Idiopathic Fetal Growth Restriction: Repercussion of Modulation in Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Nilesh; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Banerjee, B D; Guleria, K; Tripathi, A K

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the causes involved in idiopathic fetal growth restriction (IFGR). However, the exact relationship between oxidative stress and IFGR is not understood. This study aimed at understanding the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant status in IFGR materno-fetal dyads and matched controls. 75 materno-fetal dyads with IFGR were enrolled with equal number of normal low risk controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as marker of oxidative stress, while paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of serum were measured as markers of antioxidant status. MDA levels were increased in both maternal and cord blood of IFGR neonates as compared to controls (p<0.001). TAC of serum were found to be decreased in IFGR (both maternal and cord blood) as compared to controls (p<0.001; p<0.05, respectively). PON1 activity was found to be decreased in the IFGR mothers while it was found increased in IFGR cord blood (p<0.01; p<0.001)). IFGR is a state of increased oxidative stress. Decreased PON1 enzymatic activity in mothers is also associated with IFGR. PMID:26855485

  13. Microchimerism in endocrine pathology.

    PubMed

    Rust, Daniel W; Bianchi, Diana W

    2009-01-01

    Chimerism in an individual refers to the coexistence of cells arising from two distinct organisms. It can arise iatrogenically via transplant or blood transfusion, and physiologically via twin to twin transfer, or from trafficking between mother and fetus during pregnancy. Many of the diseases associated with microchimerism affect the endocrine system (e.g., autoimmune thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus type 1). Microchimerism is relevant to endocrine pathology because (a) it is associated with pregnancy, a condition of complex endocrine physiology; (b) materno-fetal and feto-maternal cellular migration must involve the placenta, itself an endocrine organ; and (c) in some species, chimerism results in states of intersexuality, a condition intimately involved with endocrine physiology. Studies of feto-maternal microchimerism in the thyroid have documented the presence of fetal cells in association with Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid adenoma, and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Studies of materno-fetal microchimerism have documented the presence of maternal cells in juvenile diabetes and other pediatric conditions. Microchimerism plays a potential role in the repair of diseased thyroid and pancreatic tissues. PMID:19214801

  14. Analytical and Theranostic Applications of Gold Nanoparticles and Multifunctional Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Bogatyrev, Vladimir; Dykman, Lev; Khlebtsov, Boris; Staroverov, Sergey; Shirokov, Alexander; Matora, Larisa; Khanadeev, Vitaly; Pylaev, Timofey; Tsyganova, Natalia; Terentyuk, Georgy

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and GNP-based multifunctional nanocomposites are the subject of intensive studies and biomedical applications. This minireview summarizes our recent efforts in analytical and theranostic applications of engineered GNPs and nanocomposites by using plasmonic properties of GNPs and various optical techniques. Specifically, we consider analytical biosensing; visualization and bioimaging of bacterial, mammalian, and plant cells; photodynamic treatment of pathogenic bacteria; and photothermal therapy of xenografted tumors. In addition to recently published reports, we discuss new data on dot immunoassay diagnostics of mycobacteria, multiplexed immunoelectron microscopy analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, materno-embryonic transfer of GNPs in pregnant rats, and combined photodynamic and photothermal treatment of rat xenografted tumors with gold nanorods covered by a mesoporous silica shell doped with hematoporphyrin. PMID:23471188

  15. Continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies in developmental toxicology: Report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity, 14-16 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Roland; Rauch, Martina; Gall, Andrea; Buschmann, Jochen; Clark, Ruth; Fuchs, Antje; Kan, Haidong; Heinrich, Verena; Kellner, Rupert; Knudsen, Thomas B; Li, Weihua; Makris, Susan L; Ooshima, Yojiro; Paumgartten, Francisco; Piersma, Aldert H; Schnfelder, Gilbert; Oelgeschlger, Michael; Schaefer, Christof; Shiota, Kohei; Ulbrich, Beate; Ding, Xuncheng; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article is a report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity held in May 2014. The main aim of the workshop was the continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies used in the assessment of embryo- and fetotoxic findings. The following main topics were discussed: harmonized categorization of external, skeletal, visceral and materno-fetal findings into malformations, variations and grey zone anomalies, aspects of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals, and innovations for new methodologies in developmental toxicology. The application of Version 2 terminology in the DevTox database was considered as a useful improvement in the categorization of developmental anomalies. Participants concluded that initiation of a project for comparative assessments of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals could support regulatory risk assessment and university-based training. Improvement of new methodological approaches for alternatives to animal testing should be triggered for a better understanding of developmental outcomes. PMID:26073002

  16. [Problems of distinction of normal, arteficial and pathological structures in mature human placental villi. III. Morphometric studies in rhesus incompatibility (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pilz, I; Schweikhart, G; Kaufmann, P

    1980-01-01

    Sections of human placental villi which were up to 80 micrometer in diameter were examined light microscopically and morphometrically. The villi were obtained by taking an aspiration biopsy of the attached placenta from 20 normal patients at term and from eight patients delivered at or before 37 weeks because of varying degrees of rhesus incompatibility. The distribution of three histological types of villi was determined. The intermediate villi from patients with erythroblastosis showed an increase in number and volume matching the severity of the disease. The intermediate villi also showed an increase in the amount of cytotrophoblasts, in the amount of materno-fetal diffusion surface area, in the thickness of syncytium, and in the number of Hofbauer cells. The terminal villi were not affected by erythroblastosis and the mature end villi showed a relative decrease in number. To obtain these results an optimal fixation technique was required. PMID:7369801

  17. Induction of controlled hypoxic pregnancy in large mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Brain, Kirsty L; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Cross, Christine M; Itani, Nozomi; Kane, Andrew D; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-12-01

    Progress in the study of pregnancy complicated by chronic hypoxia in large mammals has been held back by the inability to measure long-term significant reductions in fetal oxygenation at values similar to those measured in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. Here, we introduce a technique for physiological research able to maintain chronically instrumented maternal and fetal sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under significant and controlled isolated chronic hypoxia beyond levels that can be achieved by habitable high altitude. This model of chronic hypoxia permits measurement of materno-fetal blood gases as the challenge is actually occurring. Chronic hypoxia of this magnitude and duration using this model recapitulates the significant asymmetric growth restriction, the pronounced cardiomyopathy, and the loss of endothelial function measured in offspring of high-risk pregnancy in humans, opening a new window of therapeutic research. PMID:26660546

  18. Involvement of molecules related to angiogenesis, proteolysis and apoptosis in implantation in rhesus monkey and mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Xun; Gao, Fei; Wei, Peng; Chen, Xin-Lei; Gao, Hong-Juan; Zou, Ru-Jin; Siao, Li-Juan; Xu, Fu-Hua; Feng, Qing; Liu, Kui; Hu, Zhao-Yuan

    2005-04-01

    We have established the well-defined cycling, pseudo-pregnant and pregnant rhesus monkey models, and used these to analyze expression of the common molecules specifically related to angiogenesis, apoptosis or proteolysis, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors KDR, flt-1, flt-4 and flk-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and its receptors Flg, transforming growth factor-alpha and beta1 (TGF-a/beta1), and TGF-beta1 receptor type I (TbetaR-I) and type II (TbetaR-II), as well as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), tissue type plasminogen activator/urokinase plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (tPA/uPA/PAI-1) and matrix matalloproteinase type 1, -3/tissue inhibitor matalloproteinase type 1, -2, -3 (MMP-1, -3/TIMP-1, -2, -3), Fas/FasL, BcL-2/Bax, in the corpus luteum (CL), in the functional layer of the endometrium and in the materno-fetal boundary of the implantation site. We have demonstrated that: expression of these molecules in the monkey CL, endometrium and materno-fetal boundary of the implantation site is correlated well with CL functional and vascular development and with the processes involved in the establishment of the implantation window as well as with the early stages of placentation. A coordinated increase in tPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 expression in the monkey and rat CL may be instrumental in initiating luteal regression in both species, and correlated well with the timing of the closure of the implantation window, whereas high uPA activity in the CL is important for the early formation of the CL and for maintaining its function which is closely correlated to the period of establishment of the implantation window. Apoptosis, proteolysis and angiogenesis occur in the CL and in the endometrium during the time of establishment of the implantation window, as well as in the materno-fetal boundary of the implantation site at the early stages of placentation. It seems that these processes occur in these tissues in a coordinated and time- and cell-dependent manner, and are reliant on each other. Based on these observations, we have designed experiments to test the actions of some related available compounds on mouse implantation, used alone or in combination. The preliminary data showed that the compounds which could effectively affect apoptosis, angiogenesis or proteolysis in the implantation site were capable of effectively inhibiting implantation by acting on the endometrium and/or on the CL. Furthermore, the combined use of these compounds produced an obvious additive effect on inhibiting implantation. This finding suggested this may be a good approach for developing an anti-implantation agent. PMID:15792644

  19. Severe invasive listeriosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Teodor, Andra; Teodor, D; Miftode, Egidia; Pris?caru, D; Leca, Daniela; Petrovici, Cristina; Dorneanu, Olivia; Dorob?t, Carmen-Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Listeriosis is a rare food borne infection which, in the invasive form, presents as bloodstream infection, central nervous system infection, materno-fetal infection, or focal infection. Certain immunosuppressive conditions have been identified as risk factors for severe invasive disease. The invasive forms of listeriosis are associated with a high case fatality rate. We present the case of a 62-year-old male with an unremarkable medical history admitted to the Iasi Infectious Diseases Hospital for fever. headache, ataxia, and diplopia. Physical examination revealed high temperature, confusion, relative bradycardia, and signs of meningeal irritation. Laboratory test showed leukocyt osis with neutrophilia. pathological CSF findings (high WBC count with predominance of neutrophils, low glucose and high protein levels), increased liver enzymes (ALAT, ASAT, AP, gammaGT), and important renal impairment (normal levels at presentation). No abnormalities at chest x-ray, cranial CT and abdominal ultrasound. CSF and blood cultures were positive for Listeria monocytogenes. Under antibiotics (ampicillin and ciprofloxacin), the course was marked by respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, coma, hypotension, tachycardia. and death 12 days after admission. The particularity of this case consists in the association of the two classical forms of invasive listeriosis, meningitis and bacteriemia, with a focal infection. acute hepatitis, and a course marked by multiple organ dysfunction syndromes and exitus in a previously apparently healthy individual. PMID:23272533

  20. The Programming Power of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N; Camm, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Size at birth is a critical determinant of life expectancy, and is dependent primarily on the placental supply of nutrients. However, the placenta is not just a passive organ for the materno-fetal transfer of nutrients and oxygen. Studies show that the placenta can adapt morphologically and functionally to optimize substrate supply, and thus fetal growth, under adverse intrauterine conditions. These adaptations help meet the fetal drive for growth, and their effectiveness will determine the amount and relative proportions of specific metabolic substrates supplied to the fetus at different stages of development. This flow of nutrients will ultimately program physiological systems at the gene, cell, tissue, organ, and system levels, and inadequacies can cause permanent structural and functional changes that lead to overt disease, particularly with increasing age. This review examines the environmental regulation of the placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the impact of maternal nutritional challenges and oxygen scarcity in mice, rats and guinea pigs. It also focuses on the effects of such conditions on fetal growth and the developmental programming of disease postnatally. A challenge for future research is to link placental structure and function with clinical phenotypes in the offspring. PMID:27014074

  1. Nutritional programming of disease: unravelling the mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional programming is the process through which variation in the quality or quantity of nutrients consumed during pregnancy exerts permanent effects upon the developing fetus. Programming of fetal development is considered to be an important risk factor for non-communicable diseases of adulthood, including coronary heart disease and other disorders related to insulin resistance. The study of programming in relation to disease processes has been advanced by development of animal models, which have utilized restriction or over-feeding of specific nutrients in either rodents or sheep. These consistently demonstrate the biological plausibility of the nutritional programming hypothesis and, importantly, provide tools with which to examine the mechanisms through which programming may occur. Studies of animals subject to undernutrition in utero generally exhibit changes in the structure of key organs such as the kidney, heart and brain. These appear consistent with remodelling of development, associated with disruption of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Whilst the causal pathways which extend from this tissue remodelling to disease can be easily understood, the processes which lead to this disordered organ development are poorly defined. Even minor variation in maternal nutritional status is capable of producing important shifts in the fetal environment. It is suggested that these environmental changes are associated with altered expression of key genes, which are responsible for driving the tissue remodelling response and future disease risk. Nutrition-related factors may drive these processes by disturbing placental function, including control of materno-fetal endocrine exchanges, or the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:19175805

  2. Frequency of Maternal and Newborn Birth Outcomes, Lima, Peru, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Adriane; Cabeza, Jeanne; Adachi, Kristina; Needleman, Jack; Garcia, Patricia J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes the pregnancy and birth outcomes at two hospitals in Lima, Peru. The data collection and analysis is intended to inform patients, providers, and policy makers on Peru’s progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to help set priorities for action and further research. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from a sample of 237 women who delivered between December 2012 and September 2013 at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal or the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza. The outcomes were recorded by a trained mid-wife through telephone interviews with patients and by review of hospital records. Associations between participant demographic characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were tested with Chi-squared, Fisher’s exact, or Student’s t-test. Results Over 37% of women experienced at least one maternal or perinatal complication, and the most frequent were hypertension/preeclampsia and macrosomia. The women in our sample had a cesarean section rate of 50.2%. Conclusion Maternal and perinatal complications are not uncommon among women in the lower socioeconomic strata of Lima. Also, the high cesarean rate underpins the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the indications for cesarean section deliveries, which could help reduce the number of unnecessary procedures and preventable complications. PMID:25806522

  3. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  4. Essential role of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha in the development of the intraplacental yolk sac/sinus of Duval in mouse placenta.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Takakura, N; Yoshida, H; Nishikawa, S I

    1998-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) is expressed in multiple tissues and exerts its function throughout mouse embryogenesis. Upon screening the PDGFRalpha-expressing tissues in mouse embryos by immunohistochemistry using our established monoclonal antibody against murine PDGFRalpha, we found its expression in an epithelium lining a sinusoidal structure in placenta. This structure was proven to be the sinus of Duval, and the PDGFRalpha-positive epithelium to be the intraplacental yolk sac (IPY). The IPY has been postulated to be a derivative of primitive endoderm because of its morphology and its expression of vitamin D-dependent 9-kDa calcium-binding protein, and to play some roles in materno-fetal transport. In this study, we demonstrated that the IPY develops from primitive endoderm by its invagination into chorioallantoic placenta and continues to strongly express PDGFRalpha until the prenatal stage. Moreover, we found that the IPY is completely absent in PdgfraPh/PdgfraPh mutant embryos, which lack the Pdgfra gene, suggesting that the function of PDGFRalpha is essential to its formation. Hence, PDGFRalpha expressed in the IPY should be listed as a component of the cytokine network of murine placental development. PMID:9472924

  5. Does the thrifty phenotype result from chronic glutamate intoxication? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, Michael; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2003-01-01

    The thrifty phenotype hypothesis proposes that the epidemiological associations between poor fetal and infant growth and the subsequent development of the metabolic syndrome, result from the effects of poor nutrition in early life. The present review however, considers an opposite explanation. We hypothesize that fetal over-nutrition plays a major role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. We found evidence that the thrifty phenotype may be the consequence of fetal hyperglutamatemia. Maternal glutamate (GLU) reaches the fetal circulation, as part of the materno-fetal glutamine-glutamate exchange. Glutamine is absorbed from the maternal circulation, and deaminated for nitrogen utilization, resulting in a fetal production of GLU. GLU is extracted as it returns to the placenta. When the umbilical plasma flow is low, GLU may be trapped in the fetal circulation, and reaches neurotoxic levels. Administering GLU to newborn rodents completely destructs arcuate nucleus neurons, and results in permanently elevated plasma leptin levels that fail to adequately counter-regulate food intake. Chronic fetal exposure to elevated levels of GLU may be caused by chronic maternal over-nutrition or by reduced umbilical plasma flow. We strongly suggest abandoing the flavoring agent monosodium glutamate and reconsidering the recommended daily allowances of protein and amino acids during pregnancy. PMID:14711105

  6. Uteroplacental circulation and fetal vascular function and development.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Kent L; Louey, Samantha

    2013-09-01

    Although blood flow in the placental vasculature is governed by the same physiological forces of shear, pressure and resistance as in other organs, it is also uniquely specialized on the maternal and fetal sides. At the materno-fetal interface, the independent uteroplacental and umbilicoplacental circulations must coordinate sufficiently to supply the fetus with the nutrients and substrates it needs to grow and develop. Uterine arterial flow must increase dramatically to accommodate the growing fetus. Recent evidence delineates the hormonal and endothelial mechanisms by which maternal vessels dilate and remodel during pregnancy. The umbilical circulation is established de novo during embryonic development but blood does not flow through the placenta until late in the first trimester. The umbilical circulation operates in the interest of maintaining fetal oxygenation over the course of pregnancy, and is affected differently by mechanical and chemical regulators of vascular tone compared to other organs. The processes that match placental vascular growth and fetal tissue growth are not understood, but studies of compromised pregnancies provide clues. The subtle changes that cause the failure of the normally regulated vascular processes during pregnancy have not been thoroughly identified. Likewise, practical and effective therapeutic strategies to reverse detrimental placental perfusion patterns have yet to be investigated. PMID:24063386

  7. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in an HIV-serodiscordant couple carrier for sickle cell disease: lessons from a case report.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Merino, E; Zengbe, V; Vannin, A S; Place, I; Bostan, A; Emiliani, S; Liesnard, C; Goffard, J C; Abramowicz, M; Englert, Y

    2009-03-01

    Since 1999, the Erasme Hospital Fertility Clinic has carried a special programme for patients with HIV seropositivity. The philosophy of the programme is to give access to these patients in a secure environment to the same technological facilities available to any other patients. Many of these patients being native from sub-Saharan countries, they are often sickle cell disease (SCD) carriers, a common autosomal recessive disorder in these regions, and a severe affection in homozygotes. We hereby report, for the first time, the birth of a healthy sickle haemoglobin (HbS) heterozygous baby after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for SCD in an HIV-serodiscordant couple of HbS mutation carriers with longstanding infertility. The prospective mother was 35 years old and HIV positive with an undetectable viral load under highly active antiretroviral therapy. One carrier embryo was transferred and resulted in the birth of a healthy HbS carrier baby girl. Despite stimulation difficulties, sometimes described in HIV patients, PGD represents an interesting additional technology, especially in populations where the coexistence of both diseases is frequent. PGD could even be preferred to prenatal diagnosis for couples of HbS carriers if the woman is HIV positive, as invasive prenatal samplings carry a risk of materno-foetal viral transmission. PMID:19054017

  8. Milk is not just food but most likely a genetic transfection system activating mTORC1 signaling for postnatal growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Milk has been recognized to represent a functionally active nutrient system promoting neonatal growth of mammals. Cell growth is regulated by the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). There is still a lack of information on the mechanisms of mTORC1 up-regulation by milk consumption. This review presents milk as a materno-neonatal relay system functioning by transfer of preferential amino acids, which increase plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for mTORC1 activation. Importantly, milk exosomes, which regularly contain microRNA-21, most likely represent a genetic transfection system enhancing mTORC1-driven metabolic processes. Whereas human breast milk is the ideal food for infants allowing appropriate postnatal growth and species-specific metabolic programming, persistent high milk signaling during adolescence and adulthood by continued cow´s milk consumption may promote mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. PMID:23883112

  9. The Programming Power of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Camm, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Size at birth is a critical determinant of life expectancy, and is dependent primarily on the placental supply of nutrients. However, the placenta is not just a passive organ for the materno-fetal transfer of nutrients and oxygen. Studies show that the placenta can adapt morphologically and functionally to optimize substrate supply, and thus fetal growth, under adverse intrauterine conditions. These adaptations help meet the fetal drive for growth, and their effectiveness will determine the amount and relative proportions of specific metabolic substrates supplied to the fetus at different stages of development. This flow of nutrients will ultimately program physiological systems at the gene, cell, tissue, organ, and system levels, and inadequacies can cause permanent structural and functional changes that lead to overt disease, particularly with increasing age. This review examines the environmental regulation of the placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the impact of maternal nutritional challenges and oxygen scarcity in mice, rats and guinea pigs. It also focuses on the effects of such conditions on fetal growth and the developmental programming of disease postnatally. A challenge for future research is to link placental structure and function with clinical phenotypes in the offspring. PMID:27014074

  10. Retroviral envelope syncytin capture in an ancestrally diverged mammalian clade for placentation in the primitive Afrotherian tenrecs.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Ccile; Malicorne, Sbastien; Souquere, Sylvie; Tzika, Athanasia C; Goodman, Steven M; Catzeflis, Franois; Robinson, Terence J; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Pierron, Grard; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-10-14

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Syncytins have been identified in Euarchontoglires (primates, rodents, Leporidae) and Laurasiatheria (Carnivora, ruminants) placental mammals. Here, we searched for similar genes in species that retained characteristic features of primitive mammals, namely the Malagasy and mainland African Tenrecidae. They belong to the superorder Afrotheria, an early lineage that diverged from Euarchotonglires and Laurasiatheria 100 Mya, during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. An in silico search for env genes with full coding capacity within a Tenrecidae genome identified several candidates, with one displaying placenta-specific expression as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of Setifer setosus tissues. Cloning of this endogenous retroviral env gene demonstrated fusogenicity in an ex vivo cell-cell fusion assay on a panel of mammalian cells. Refined analysis of placental architecture and ultrastructure combined with in situ hybridization demonstrated specific expression of the gene in multinucleate cellular masses and layers at the materno-fetal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. This gene, which we named "syncytin-Ten1," is conserved among Tenrecidae, with evidence of purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. To our knowledge, it is the first syncytin identified to date within the ancestrally diverged Afrotheria superorder. PMID:25267646

  11. Is there a place for immunomodulation in assisted reproduction techniques?

    PubMed

    Chaouat, Gerard; Ledee-bataill, Natalie; Dubanchet, Sylvie

    2004-06-01

    We briefly review the history of the concepts of the materno foetal relationship, and the (various) rationales which have been used to justify lymphocyte alloimmunisation (LA) as a treatment for recurrent spontaneous abortion of putative immune origins. The effectiveness of the treatment is at best dubious and limited to a small number of women for which there is no real positive selection rationale, at worst it is not efficient. The rationales themselves are rather "evolutive". The present one is to use the Th1:Th2 paradigm and, thus, to propose to "dampen NK activity" in abortion prone women and this concept has been extended by some to implantation failure. We briefly review why the Th1:Th2 paradigms is no longer fully valid, describe briefly why it is inappropriate for implantation, and conclude that alloimmunisation should no longer be proposed for RSA, hence, more for implantation failure. We, however, do not reject immunotherapy, but we believe that molecular and cellular defects specific approaches should be used, tailored for the specific pathway whose disruption cause the clinical symptom. PMID:15288179

  12. Ultrastructure of the placenta in prolonged pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jones, C J; Fox, H

    1978-11-01

    An electron-microscopic study has shown that in placentae from prolonged pregnancies there is hyperplasia of the villous cytotrophoblastic cells, degeneration of occasional isolated cytotrophoblastic cells, a paucity of syncytial microvilli in some areas and microvillous proliferation in others, abnormalities of microvillous form, focal syncytial necrosis, dilatation of syncytial endoplasmic reticulum, decreased synctial pinocytic activity, a reduced size and number of syncytial mitochondira, thickening of the trophoblastic basement membrane and contraction, blebbing and vacuolation of endothelial cells of the stromal foetal villous capillaries. Many of these morphological changes indicate that there is, in prolonged pregnancy, a decline in trophoblastic functional activity but it is suggested that this is due, not to placental senescence, but to a relatively mild, sustained uteroplacental ischaemia. Although there is morphological evidence to suggest that compensatory mechanisms come into play to limit the effects on the placenta of uteroplacental ischaemia the changes in the foetal capillaries, which are of unknown pathogenesis, will result in decreased foetal perfusion of the placenta and thus restrict still further adequate materno-foetal transfer. PMID:745024

  13. The Long and the Short of it: Gene and Environment Interactions During Early Cortical Development and Consequences for Long-Term Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Helen; Neuhaus, Ain; Sundramoorthi, Rohan; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Cortical development is a complex amalgamation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and circuit formation. These processes follow defined timescales and are controlled by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. It is currently unclear how robust and flexible these processes are and whether the developing brain has the capacity to recover from disruptions. What is clear is that there are a number of cognitive disorders or conditions that are elicited as a result of disrupted cortical development, although it may take a long time for the full pathophysiology of the conditions to be realized clinically. The critical window for the manifestation of a neurodevelopmental disorder is prolonged, and there is the potential for a complex interplay between genes and environment. While there have been extended investigations into the genetic basis of a number of neurological and mental disorders, limited definitive associations have been discovered. Many environmental factors, including inflammation and stress, have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, and it may be that a better understanding of the interplay between genes and environment will speed progress in this field. In particular, the development of the brain needs to be considered in the context of the whole materno-fetal unit as the degree of the metabolic, endocrine, or inflammatory responses, for example, will greatly influence the environment in which the brain develops. This review will emphasize the importance of extending neurodevelopmental studies to the contribution of the placenta, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid, and to maternal and fetal immune response. These combined investigations are more likely to reveal genetic and environmental factors that influence the different stages of neuronal development and potentially lead to the better understanding of the etiology of neurological and mental disorders such as autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and schizophrenia. PMID:22701439

  14. The tissue bank at the national nuclear research institute in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Esther Martnez-Pardo, Mara; Lourdes Reyes-Fras, Ma

    2003-01-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ, The National Nuclear Research Institute) received during 1997-1998 strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to establish the first and only one tissue bank (BTR ININ tissue bank) in Mexico that uses ionising radiation as sterilising agent. In that time, the BTR staff was trained in different tissue banks in several countries. Basic equipment for tissue processing donated by the IAEA was received in 1998. In July, 1999 the Mexican Health Secretariat gave the Sanitary License No. 1062000001 to the BTR to operate as an official organ and tissue bank. In August, 2001 the ININ and the Hospital Materno Infantil (HMI-ISSEMYM) signed an agreement to collaborate in amnion processing. The hospital is responsible for donor selection, serology tests, tissue procurement and washing, since this hospital is the BTR amnion supplier. The tissues are collected by ININ weekly with complete documentation. The BTR is responsible for processing: cleaning, air drying, packaging, labelling, microbiological control and sterilisation by gamma irradiation. The sterilised tissue is kept under quarantine for 6 months to obtain the results of the donor second serology test. From March to June, 2002 the BTR has processed 347.86 units (50 cm(2) each), is say, 17,393 cm(2). In addition, the pig skin xenograft process has been implemented and a protocol for clinical applications of it is running at the Hospital Central Sur de Alta Especialidad (PEMEX). Also the ININ tissue bank present status and perspectives are described. PMID:15256855

  15. [Morphological variability and placental function].

    PubMed

    Malassiné, A

    2001-01-01

    In mammals, the blastocyst defines with the maternal organism, a structure which allows embryonic development during gestation: the placenta. The structure of this organ varies remarkably across species. In this review the different type of placentation have been described in a comparative manner using terms of classification such as: placental materno-fetal interdigitation, matemofetal blood flow interrelationships, layers of the placental interhemal barrier, trophoblast invasiveness and decidual cell reaction, formation of syncytiotrophoblast. The human hemomonochorial placenta is characterized by a strong decidualization of the uterus and a major invasiveness of the extravillous trophoblast. Furthermore, there is a spectrum of placental endocrine activities across species. In some mammals (e.g., mouse and rat) the placenta eclipses the pituitary in the maintenance of ovarian function. In the human and in the sheep, horse, cat and guinea pig, the placenta acquires the ability to substitute for the ovaries in the maintenance of gestation at various time during pregnancy. The human placenta is characterized by a high rate of steroïdogenesis (progesterone and estrogens) and by the production of a primate specific trophoblastic hormone: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Recently, it was demonstrated that mutation of many genes in mice results in embryonic mortality or fetal growth restriction, due to defects in placental development. Furthermore, distinct molecular pathways regulate the differentiation of various trophoblast cell subtype of the mouse placenta. An important question is whether or not placental differentiation in other mammals is regulated by the same molecular mechanisms. Due to the striking diversity in placental structure, endocrine function and gene expression, caution must be exercised in extrapolating findings regarding placental function and development from one species to another. PMID:11575143

  16. The effects of continuous drainage of fetal fluids on salt and water balance in fetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K J; Lumbers, E R

    1996-01-01

    1. In nine chronically catheterized fetuses in which all lung liquid was drained continuously from the time of surgery, the effects of continuous drainage of fetal urine for 1 week on fetal renal function, lung liquid production and salt and water balance were studied. Fetal wellbeing, as judged by fetal growth, urinary osmolality, blood gas status, arterial pressure and heart rate, was not adversely affected by urine drainage. The ewes, however, drank more water when fetal urine was drained. Thus. fetal plasma and urinary osmolalities declined (P < 0.25 and P < 0.05). 2. Fetal glomerular filtration rate fell from 75 +/- 4 ml kg-1 h-1 (+/- S.E.M., n = 9) before drainage to 54 +/- 7 ml kg-1 h-1 after drainage (n = 7; P < 0.005), and fetal renal sodium excretion also declined (P < 0.05). However, the excretion of sodium in lung liquid did not decrease and the fetal renin-angiotensin system was not activated. Fetal extracellular volume (561 +/- 44 ml kg-1, n = 7) and the calculated net sodium transfer (0.76 mmol kg-1 h-1, n = 6) and fluid transfer (15 +/- 2 ml kg-1 h-1, n = 8) to the fetus did not change. 3. It is concluded that overall fetal salt and water balance were maintained when all fetal urine and lung liquid were drained from fetal sheep in late gestation. Since drainage of urine and lung liquid considerably reduced the amniotic and allantoic fluids, transfer across the placenta and extraplacental membranes was able to compensate for the absence of these fluids. In response to the loss of sodium during drainage, fetal renal sodium conservation was about 11% of the total sodium conservation by the materno-fetal unit. PMID:8842003

  17. Molecular basis of reduced birth weight in smoking pregnant women: mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, Glria; Hernndez, Ana-Sandra; Cataln Garca, Marc; Morn, Constanza; Tobas, Ester; Crdoba, Sarai; Lpez, Marta; Figueras, Francesc; Grau, Josep M; Cardellach, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    In utero exposure of fetuses to tobacco is associated with reduced birth weight. We hypothesized that this may be due to the toxic effect of carbon monoxide (CO) from tobacco, which has previously been described to damage mitochondria in non-pregnant adult smokers. Maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), newborn cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) and placenta were collected from 30 smoking pregnant women and their newborns and classified as moderate and severe smoking groups, and compared to a cohort of 21 non-smoking controls. A biomarker for tobacco consumption (cotinine) was assessed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The following parameters were measured in all tissues: mitochondrial chain complex IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] activity by spectrophotometry, mitochondrial DNA levels by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, oxidative stress by spectrophotometric lipid peroxide quantification, mitochondrial mass through citrate synthase spectrophotometric activity and apoptosis by Western blot parallelly confirmed by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling) assay in placenta. Newborns from smoking pregnant women presented reduced birth weight by 10.75 percent. Materno-fetal mitochondrial and apoptotic PBMC and CBMC parameters showed altered and correlated values regarding COX activity, mitochondrial DNA, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Placenta partially compensated this dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial number; even so ratios of oxidative stress and apoptosis were increased. A CO-induced mitotoxic and apoptotic fingerprint is present in smoking pregnant women and their newborn, with a lack of filtering effect from the placenta. Tobacco consumption correlated with a reduction in birth weight and mitochondrial and apoptotic impairment, suggesting that both could be the cause of the reduced birth weight in smoking pregnant women. PMID:25186090

  18. Urinary podocalyxin as a marker of preeclampsia in a Hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    Palacios de Franco, Ylbe; Velazquez, Karina; Segovia, Natalia; Acosta, Carolina; Yanosky, Deborah; Franco Palacios, Ylbe V; Ramos, Amanda; Franco Palacios, Carlos R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is associated with significant materno-fetal morbidity and mortality. Podocyturia due to podocyte damage seems to be associated with the disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of urinary podocalyxin as a marker of preeclampsia in a Hispanic population. Methods: 63 patients were studied. 25 patients had preeclampsia/eclampsia (PE-E). 38 patients had normal pregnancies and served as control group. 24 hour proteinuria, urine protein/creatinine (UPC), urinary podocalyxin and perinatal outcomes were measured. A Podocalyxin ELISA test was used to detect podocyturia. Results: Mean age (years), mean±SD was 30.5±5.4 in normal patients vs 30.6±5.8 in PE-E, p=0.98. Median gestational age (weeks) was, 38 (range 21-42) for normal pregnancies and 36 (range 24-40) for patients with PE-E, <0.001. Urine podocalyxin/creatinine on admission (ng/mg), median [IQR] in normal patients was 55.9 [29.4, 74.9] vs 109.7 [63.8, 234.1] in PE-E, p=0.001. After adjusting for admission proteinuria, urinary podocalyxin remained independently associated with preeclampsia: OR=1.0040 (95% CI 1.0003-1.0078), p=0.03. There was low to moderate correlation between UPC and urinary podocalyxin, Spearman’s =0.31, p=0.01. In PE-E, post-partum urine podocalyxin was lower, median [IQR]: 69.7 [32.7, 184.8] p=0.19 vs admission. There was a trend towards more podocyturia and proteinuria in patients with eclampsia, comparing to those with preeclampsia. There was no association observed between podocyturia and neonatal mortality, IUGR or Apgar scores. Conclusions: Significantly higher levels of urinary podocalyxin are seen in preeclampsia/eclampsia. They tend to normalize after delivery. PMID:25057338

  19. Effects of estrogen coadministration on epoxiconazole toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Stefan; Schneider, Steffen; Fegert, Ivana; Rey Moreno, Maria Cecilia; Strauss, Volker; Grters, Sibylle; Fabian, Eric; Fussell, Karma C; Pigott, Geoffrey H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-06-01

    Epoxiconazole (EPX; CAS-No. 133855-98-8) is a triazole class-active substance of plant protection products. At a dose level of 50 mg/kg bw/day, it causes a significantly increased incidence of late fetal mortality when administered to pregnant rats throughout gestation (gestation day [GD] 7-18 or 21), as reported previously (Taxvig et al., 2007, 2008) and confirmed in these studies. Late fetal resorptions occurred in the presence of significant maternal toxicity such as clear reduction of corrected body weight gain, signs of anemia, and, critically, a marked reduction of maternal estradiol plasma levels. Furthermore, estradiol supplementation at dose levels of 0.5 or 1.0 ?g/animal/day of estradiol cyclopentylpropionate abolished the EPX-mediated late fetal resorptions. No increased incidences of external malformations were found in rats cotreated with 50 mg/kg bw/day EPX and estradiol cyclopentylpropionate, indicating that the occurrence of malformations was not masked by fetal mortality under the study conditions. Overall, the study data indicate that fetal mortality observed in rat studies with EPX is not the result of direct fetal toxicity but occurs indirectly via depletion of maternal estradiol levels. The clarification of the human relevance of the estrogen-related mechanism behind EPX-mediated late fetal resorptions in rats warrants further studies. In particular, this should involve investigation of the placenta (Rey Moreno et al., 2013), since it is the materno-fetal interface and crucial for fetal maintenance. The human relevance is best addressed in a species which is closer to humans with reference to placentation and hormonal regulation of pregnancy, such as the guinea pig (Schneider et al., 2013). PMID:23720304

  20. Adaptations in placental phenotype support fetal growth during undernutrition of pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Coan, P M; Vaughan, O R; Sekita, Y; Finn, S L; Burton, G J; Constancia, M; Fowden, A L

    2010-01-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy reduces birth weight and programmes adult phenotype with consequences for life expectancy, but its effects on the phenotype of the placenta, responsible for supplying nutrients for fetal growth, remain largely unknown. Using molecular, morphological and functional analyses, placental phenotype was examined in mice during restriction of dietary intake to 80% of control from day 3 of pregnancy. At day 16, undernutrition reduced placental, but not fetal, weight in association with decreased junctional zone volume and placental expression of glucose transporter Slc2a1. At day 19, both placental and fetal weights were reduced in undernourished mice (91% and 87% of control, respectively, P < 0.01), as were the volume and surface area of the labyrinthine zone responsible for placental nutrient transfer (85% and 86%, respectively, P < 0.03). However, unidirectional materno-fetal clearance of tracer glucose was maintained and methyl-aminoisobutyric acid increased 166% (P < 0.005) per gram of undernourished placenta, relative to controls. This was associated with an 18% and 27% increased placental expression of glucose and system A amino acid transporters Slc2a1 and Slc38a2, respectively, at day 19 (P < 0.04). At both ages, undernutrition decreased expression of the placental specific transcript of the Igf2 gene by 35% (P < 0.01), although methylation of its promoter was unaffected. The placenta, therefore, adapts to help maintain fetal growth when its own growth is compromised by maternal undernutrition. Consequently, placental phenotype is responsive to environmental conditions and may help predict the risk of adult disease programmed in utero. PMID:19948659

  1. The Long and the Short of it: Gene and Environment Interactions During Early Cortical Development and Consequences for Long-Term Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Helen; Neuhaus, Ain; Sundramoorthi, Rohan; Molnr, Zoltn

    2012-01-01

    Cortical development is a complex amalgamation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and circuit formation. These processes follow defined timescales and are controlled by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. It is currently unclear how robust and flexible these processes are and whether the developing brain has the capacity to recover from disruptions. What is clear is that there are a number of cognitive disorders or conditions that are elicited as a result of disrupted cortical development, although it may take a long time for the full pathophysiology of the conditions to be realized clinically. The critical window for the manifestation of a neurodevelopmental disorder is prolonged, and there is the potential for a complex interplay between genes and environment. While there have been extended investigations into the genetic basis of a number of neurological and mental disorders, limited definitive associations have been discovered. Many environmental factors, including inflammation and stress, have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, and it may be that a better understanding of the interplay between genes and environment will speed progress in this field. In particular, the development of the brain needs to be considered in the context of the whole materno-fetal unit as the degree of the metabolic, endocrine, or inflammatory responses, for example, will greatly influence the environment in which the brain develops. This review will emphasize the importance of extending neurodevelopmental studies to the contribution of the placenta, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid, and to maternal and fetal immune response. These combined investigations are more likely to reveal genetic and environmental factors that influence the different stages of neuronal development and potentially lead to the better understanding of the etiology of neurological and mental disorders such as autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and schizophrenia. PMID:22701439

  2. Burden and causes of foodborne disease in Australia: Annual report of the OzFoodNet network, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, OzFoodNet sites recorded 25,779 notifications of seven potentially foodborne diseases, which was 12.5 per cent higher than the mean for the previous five years. Diseases with significant increases in 2005, when compared to historical reports include: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, shigellosis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis. The most significant increases were those due to Salmonella (13.1%) and Campylobacter (5.1%) because of the frequency of these infections. Reports of listeriosis were lower than previous years and there were only four materno-foetal infections compared to seven in 2004. Sites reported 624 outbreaks of gastroenteritis and foodborne disease in 2005. One hundred and two of these were foodborne and affected 1,926 persons, hospitalised 187 and caused four deaths. Among foodborne outbreaks, Salmonella Typhimurium was the most common pathogen and restaurants were the most common place where food implicated in outbreaks was prepared. Outbreaks associated with fish, poultry meat, and mixed meat dishes were common. There were several large outbreaks of salmonellosis, including one associated with dips at a Turkish restaurant, one with alfalfa sprouts, and two due to egg-based dishes. In addition, there were several multi-state investigations of Salmonella infection during 2005, including one large outbreak of S. Typhimurium 135 implicating poultry meat from retail supermarkets. Sites identified a source of infection for 39 per cent (41/104) of investigations into clusters of salmonellosis. Overall, 97.4 per cent of Salmonella notifications on state and territory surveillance databases recorded complete information about serotype and phage type. This report highlights the considerable burden of disease from food sources in Australia and the need to continue to improve food safety. PMID:17120483

  3. La pancratite gravido-puerprale: propos de 6 cas

    PubMed Central

    Amourak, Sarah; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatimazahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    L'association pancratite aigue et grossesse est rare mais non exceptionnelle, le diagnostic de la pancratite au cours de la grossesse est difficile, vu la non spcificit de la symptomatologie et vu que trs souvent les douleurs et les vomissements peuvent tre rattachs la grossesse elle-mme pouvant ainsi tre responsable du retard diagnostic Lchographie abdominale, qui est certes anodine pour le ftus, ne permet pas de poser le diagnostic, par contre la TDM a une sensibilit, et une spcificit voisine de 100%, mais elle est irradiante elle n'est utilisable qu'au del de 36SA et en post partum, et par consquent l'IRM abdominale trouve tout son intrt au 1er et au 2me trimestre. Cependant la biologie reste plus spcifique et c'est essentiellement llvation de la lipasmie partir de 3fois la normale, qui peut redresser le diagnostic. Le traitement consiste au 1er trimestre a une abstention thrapeutique et cholcystectomie au 2metrimestre, au 2me trimestre: Cholcystectomie par clioscopie, au 3me trimestre: Sphinctrotomie, et en post partum, la cholcystectomie s'impose. A travers nos 6 cas et une revue de la littrature nous soulignons les caractristiques diagnostiques, thrapeutiques et pronostiques de cette affection et nous invitons les praticiens penser la pancratite chez toute femme enceinte avec douleur abdominales ce qui permettrait dviter les retards du diagnostic et d'amliorer le pronostic materno ftal. PMID:26430482

  4. Ethnicity and HIV risk behaviour, testing and knowledge in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tory M.; Hembling, John; Bertrand, Jane T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To describe levels of risky sexual behaviour, HIV testing and HIV knowledge among men and women in Guatemala by ethnic group and to identify adjusted associations between ethnicity and these outcomes. Design. Data on 16,205 women aged 1549 and 6822 men aged 1559 from the 20082009 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil were used to describe ethnic group differences in sexual behaviour, HIV knowledge and testing. We then controlled for age, education, wealth and other socio-demographic factors in a multivariate logistic regression model to examine the effects of ethnicity on outcomes related to age at sexual debut, number of lifetime sex partners, comprehensive HIV knowledge, HIV testing and lifetime sex worker patronage (men only). Results. The data show low levels of risky sexual behaviour and low levels of HIV knowledge among indigenous women and men, compared to other respondents. Controlling for demographic factors, indigenous women were more likely than other women never to have been tested for HIV and to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge. They were less likely to report early sexual debut and three or more lifetime sexual partners. Indigenous men were more likely than other men to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge and demonstrated lower odds of early sexual debut, 10 or more lifetime sexual partners and sex worker patronage. Conclusions. The Mayan indigenous population in Guatemala, while broadly socially vulnerable, does not appear to be at elevated risk for HIV based on this analysis of selected risk factors. Nonetheless, low rates of HIV knowledge and testing may be cause for concern. Programmes working in indigenous communities should focus on HIV education and reducing barriers to testing. Further research into the factors that underlie ethnic self-identity and perceived ethnicity could help clarify the relative significance of these measures for HIV risk and other health outcomes. PMID:24834462

  5. Analyse sérologique de la toxoplasmose pergravidique: évaluation des risques et perspectives du dépistage prénatal au centre hospitalier universitaire de Bobo Dioulasso au Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Bamba, Sanata; Some, Der Adolphe; Chemla, Cathy; Geers, Régine; Guiguemde, Tinga Robert; Villena, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La présente étude rapporte les données sérologiques de 306 sérums collectés chez des parturientes au CHU de Bobo Dioulasso et analysés rétrospectivement au CHU de Reims en 2011. Le but était de déterminer le statut sérologique de ces parturientes et d'en déduire la conduite à tenir. Méthodes La recherche des IgG et des IgM anti toxoplasmiques était systématique. Les techniques d'agglutination haute sensibilisée et celle d'Immunocapture M ont servi à la recherche respective des anticorps spécifiques IgG et des IgM. Résultats Sur 306 sérums analysés, 95 (31%) avaient des IgG positifs et aucun n'avait des IgM. Deux cent onze (211) sérums (69%) des sérums n'avaient ni IgG, ni IgM. Conclusion Nos résultats montrent que 31% des femmes en dehors d'une immunodépression sous jacente, possèdent une immunité résiduelle vis à vis de Toxoplasma gondii et n'ont pas la nécessité d'avoir une surveillance sérologique pendant la grossesse. Cependant, 69% (211) des parturientes sont à risque d'une séroconversion, et devraient bénéficier de conseils hygiéno diététiques, associés à une surveillance sérologique durant la grossesse. Ces résultats montrent l'intérêt de mettre en place des mesures de prévention contre la toxoplasmose congénitale, étant l'une des affections materno - foetales les plus fréquentes par la mise en place d'un diagnostic prénatal de la toxoplasmose en routine dans notre hôpital. PMID:22937183

  6. DUCHAS VAGINALES Y OTROS RIESGOS DE VAGINOSIS BACTERIANA

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Natividad; Molina, Helfer; Sánchez, Jorge; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginosis bacteriana (VB) es una infección caracterizada por el cambio en la microflora de la vagina, asociándose a resultados adversos del embarazo y a la adquisición de infecciones de transmisión sexual (ITS), incluyendo el VIH. En este estudio se buscó la asociación entre el uso de duchas vaginales y otros factores de riesgos con VB. Se usó un diseño observacional descriptivo transversal prospectivo, en 1,252 mujeres que asistieron al servicio de planificación familiar de tres hospitales nacionales (Dos de Mayo, Arzobispo Loayza, San Bartolomé) y el Instituto Materno Perinatal, durante el año 1997. Se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado donde se registraron variables socio demográficas y características del estilo de vida de las participantes. VB fue diagnosticada mediante el puntaje de Nugent. Se empleó análisis de regresión logística para calcular odds ratio (OR) e intervalos de confianza al 95%. La edad promedio de las participantes fue 25.1 ± 4,7 años, el 23.4% tenían más de 11 años de educación. La prevalencía de VB fue 20,1%. Las mujeres que practicaban duchas vaginales tuvieron 2.28 veces (OR = 2.28, IC 95% [1.0–5.0]) mayor probabilidad de tener VB comparado con aquellas que no lo practicaban. Tener dos o más parejas sexuales estuvo asociado con 2.0 veces (OR =2.0, IC 95% [1.2–3.5]) mayor probabilidad de adquirir VB comparado con aquellas que habían tenido solo una pareja sexual. Las participantes que iniciaron una relación sexual a una edad temprana tuvieron 1.4 veces (OR=1.4, IC 95% [1.0 –1.9]) mayor probabilidad de adquirir VB. El uso de duchas vaginales es un factor de riesgo de VB. Los programas destinados a la salud de la mujer deben abordar las repercusiones perjudiciales para la salud asociados con las duchas vaginales. PMID:21132048

  7. Profil épidémiologique des femmes enceintes cardiaques dans le centre de maternité de Tunis: expérience du service A

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Khaled; Jenayah, Amel Achour; Boudaya, Fethia; Hamdi, Asma; Meskhi, Souad; Sfar, Ezzeddine; Chelli, Dalenda

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons dans ce travail, le profil épidémiologique des femmes enceintes porteuses d'une cardiopathie ayant accouché dans le service «A» du centre de maternité de Tunis. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective descriptive sur 3 ans, de janvier 2010 à décembre 2012, portant sur les dossiers des parturientes cardiaques suivies et ayant accouché dans notre service, à l'exclusion des cardiopathies hypertensives. Les paramètres analysés étaient la gestité et parité des parturientes, le type de la cardiopathie, le mode d'accouchement et le pronostic foetal. Cinquante six cas sur 19655 accouchements avaient été recrutés, soit une incidence de 1 pour 351 accouchements (0,285%). L’âge moyen de nos parturientes était de 30,89±5,3 ans avec des extrêmes allant de 21 à 42 ans. 23 (41,07%) avaient une cardiopathie congénitale, 35 (62,5%) une valvulopathie, 6 (10,71%) un trouble du rythme, 3 (5,35%) un trouble de la conduction à type de bloc auriculo-ventriculaire et 3 (5,35%) une cardiopathie ischémique. Cinquante deux parturientes (92,85%) avaient accouché à un terme dépassant les 37 semaines d'aménorrhée (SA). L'accouchement s'est déroulé par les voies naturelles chez 22 (39,28%) patientes et par césarienne chez 34 (60,71%). Le poids moyen des nouveaux nés à la naissance était de 3341,25 grammes. 3 transferts néonataux en unité de réanimation étaient réalisés avec un seul cas de décès néonatal. La grossesse et l'accouchement chez la femme cardiaque constituent un haut risque materno-foetal dépendant du type, mais surtout du stade de la cardiopathie, nécessitant une prise en charge précoce et multidisciplinaire de la parturiente. PMID:26327977

  8. Hématome sous-capsulaire du foie rompu compliquant une stéatose hépatique aiguë gravidique

    PubMed Central

    Doumiri, Mouhssine; Elombila, Marie; Oudghiri, Nezha; Saoud, Anas Tazi

    2014-01-01

    L'hématome sous-capsulaire du foie est une complication rare de la grossesse, survenant le plus souvent dans le cadre d'une pré éclampsie ou d'un HELLP syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelets Syndrome). Rare sont les cas décris au cours d'une stéatose hépatique aiguë gravidique. Nous rapportons le cas d'une parturiente de 33 ans, multipare, sans antécédents, admise aux urgences au terme d'une grossesse à 37 semaines d'aménorrhées, pour pré éclampsie compliquée d'une stéatose hépatique aiguë gravidique. L’échographie hépatique réalisée à l'admission était sans anomalie. Une césarienne a été réalisée en urgence devant une souffrance fœtale aiguë, au cours de laquelle a été mise en évidence une rupture de l'hématome sous capsulaire du foie s'accompagnant d'un état de choc hémorragique. La prise en charge a consisté à une polytransfusion et packing perihépatique. Le retrait du packing n'a été réalisé qu'au quatrième jour, après stabilisation clinicobiologique et régression de l'encéphalopathie hépatique. L’évolution en réanimation a été favorable avec sortie de la patiente au vingtième jour. La rupture de l'hématome sous-capsulaire du foie est extrêmement dangereuse et à haut risque materno-fœtal. L'association à la stéatose hépatique aggrave le pronostic. PMID:25667700

  9. Foodborne disease investigation across Australia: annual report of the OzFoodNet network, 2003.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, OzFoodNet conducted enhanced surveillance of foodborne diseases across Australia, which covered all states and territories. During 2003, there were 23,250 notifications of eight potentially foodborne diseases, of which 67 per cent and 30 per cent were due to Campylobacter and Salmonella infections respectively. The most common Salmonella serotype was Typhimurium, as in previous years. Most S. Enteritidis were acquired overseas, except for Queensland where 52 per cent of infections were acquired locally. Locally acquired S. Enteritidis infections in Australia were predominantly due to phage type 26. The most common serotype of Shiga toxin producing E. coli was O157, although for 49 per cent of notified infections serotype was unknown due to the use of polymerase chain reaction based screening tests. There were 12 materno-foetal listeriosis infections in 2003, which was an increase compared to recent years. During 2003, there were 444 outbreaks of gastroenteritis and foodborne disease recorded. Ninety-nine of these were of foodborne origin affecting 1,686 persons, hospitalising 105 and causing six deaths. A wide range of agents and foods caused these outbreaks, with Salmonella Typhimurium being the most common pathogen. Outbreaks associated with fish and seafood dishes, poultry meat, and Asian style and imported foods were common. Four outbreaks with international implications were reported: an outbreak of Salmonella in Montevideo involving contaminated tahini from the Middle East and three outbreaks of norovirus infection associated with imported Japanese oysters. Outbreak data indicated a need to monitor food safety in aged care settings, restaurants and catering. Eighty-nine investigations into clusters of gastrointestinal illness where a source could not be identified were conducted, including multi-state outbreaks of salmonellosis. One multistate investigation of antibiotic resistant Salmonella Paratyphi b Java identified 18 cases who had recent exposure to tropical fish aquariums. Ninety-seven per cent of Salmonella notifications on state and territory surveillance databases have complete information on serotype and phage type. In 2003, OzFoodNet demonstrated the benefits of national collaboration to control food borne disease. PMID:15574061

  10. Significance of the differences in the prevalence of anti-HLA antibodies in matched pairs of mother's and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Jucaud, Vadim; Maehara, Curtis Y; Terasaki, Paul I

    2016-02-01

    The presence of IgG against pathogens in the cord blood (CB) of vaccinated mothers is attributed to transplacental transfer. However, previous studies using lymphocytotoxicity assay showed anti-HLA IgG in mother's blood (MB) but not in CB, perhaps due to non-transfer of anti-HLA IgG or assay limitations in detecting anti-HLA IgG. Anti-HLA IgG of native and purified sera of 16 MB and CB pairs were measured using an array of microbeads coated with HLA-I/-II molecules on a Luminex platform. Two cases showed no anti-HLA-I IgG in either MB or CB; four MB cases displayed polyallelic HLA-reactive IgG, with negligible or no reactivity by the corresponding CB sera. Notably, anti-HLA-I reactivity in cases 3-6/11/12 and anti-HLA-II reactivity in cases 1/3/4/6/8/11-13 were restricted to CB, with lower or no HLA-reactivity in MB. Mothers' HLA typing is done for HLA-A*, HLA-B* and DRB1* alleles. The mother in case 14 carried DRB1*11:01, the allele-reactive IgG is seen in both native and the purified fraction of sera of MB but not in CB. Also in cases 15 (DRB1*01:01) and 16 (B*49:01 and DBR1*07:01), the allele-reactive IgGs are seen in both native and purified fractions of MB but not in CB confirming the earlier reports on the absence of materno-fetal transfer of anti-HLA IgG. However, the mother of case 6 is homozygous for DRB1*03:01 and the allele-reactive IgG occurred in both MB and CB, confirming the presence of anti-HLA autoantibodies. In Case 13, the mother (HLA-A*24 and HLA-A*52) and CB carried allele-reactive IgG in both native and purified sera, indicating the possible occurrence of transplacental transfer of the IgG. Further confirmation is restricted by the paucity of detailed molecular HLA typing for both the parents and fetuses. While 37.5% of the native IgG in CB and 18.8% in MB showed DRB3*03:01 reactivity, 100% of purified IgG from both CB and MB showed anti-DRB3*03:01 and anti-DPA1*02:01\\ DPB1*23:01 antibodies. Several CB cases showed high-prevalence IgG reacting to a single allele of HLA-I and/or HLA-II with minimal or no cross-reactive IgG in CB or in the MB, suggesting the presence of de novo antibodies, possibly against non-inherited maternal HLA or inherited parental HLA haplotypes by the fetus. PMID:26721232

  11. Blood rheology at term in normal pregnancy and in patients with adverse outcome events.

    PubMed

    von Tempelhoff, Georg-Friedrich; Velten, Eva; Yilmaz, Asli; Hommel, Gerhard; Heilmann, Lothar; Koscielny, Jrgen

    2009-01-01

    Plasma volume expansion of more than 1.5 l and sustainable activation of the hemostatic system that results in a steady rise of the fibrinogen/fibrin turnover are contemporary physiological events during normal pregnancy. In contrast, adverse outcome of pregnancy i.e. pre-eclampsia commonly coincide with hemo concentration and over activation of blood coagulation both of which alter blood rheology. On the basis of 4,985 consecutively recorded singleton pregnancies values range of blood rheological parameters in women with normal and complicated outcome of pregnancy at the time of their delivery were compared. Plasma viscosity (pv) was determined using KSPV 1 Fresenius and RBC aggregation (stasis: E0 and low shear: E1) using MA1-Aggregometer; Myrenne. Seventy-nine point four percent (n=3,959) had normal pregnancy outcome and 1,026 with adverse outcome of pregnancy had pre-eclampsia (8.4%; n=423), had newborn with a birth-weight < 2,500 g (9.5%; n=473), had early-birth before week 37 (9.3%; n=464), and/or were diagnosed with intra uterine growth retardation (IUGR) (5.0%; n=250). In women with normal pregnancy outcome mean (+/-SD) of pv was 1.31+/-0.09 mPa s, of E0 was 21.6+/-5.3, and of E1 was 38.4+/-7.9 while in women with adverse outcome means for rheological parameters were statistically significantly different i.e. pv: 1.32+/-0.08 mPa s; p=0.006, E0: 22.1+/-5.5; p=0.002 and E1: 39.5+/-8.5; p=0.0006. Subgroup analysis revealed statistical significant lower pv in women who either had pre term delivery or a low birth-weight child (p<0.005) as compared to women who had normal pregnancy outcome while patients with pre-eclampsia had markedly higher low shear and stasis RBC aggregation (p<0.0001). None of the rheological results at term were correlated with either maternal age (r<0.04), BMI (r<0.09), maternal weight gain until delivery (r<0.04), or fetal outcome such as APGAR-score (r<0.09) art. pH in the umbilical cord (-0.05materno-fetal unit that is commonly traceable using vessel duplex ultra sound in pre-eclampsia. PMID:19433886

  12. Aspects épidémiologiques, pronostiques et thérapeutiques de l'hématome retro placentaire (HRP) dans une maternité de référence en zone rurale

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Ousmane; Mbaye, Magatte; Diouf, Abdou Aziz; Touré, Fode Baba; Gueye, Mamour; Niang, Mansour; Cissé, Mamadou Lamine; Dièye, Sidy; Moreau, Jean Charles

    2014-01-01

    Introduction IL s'agira ici d’ identifier les particularités diagnostiques et la prise en charge de l'HRP au Centre Hospitalier de Ndioum au Sénégal. Méthodes Etude rétrospective descriptive menée à l'hôpital régional de Ndioum, durant la période allant du 1er Janvier 2009 au 31 Décembre 2011. Toutes les patientes qui avaient présenté un HRP étaient incluses. Pour chaque patiente, nous avions étudié les paramètres socio-démographiques et cliniques, les données thérapeutiques et le pronostic materno-foetal. Résultats La fréquence était de 6,05%. L’âge moyen de nos patientes était compris entre 29 et 84 ans et la parité moyenne de 4,92. Aucune consultation prénatale n’était effectuée chez 16% des patientes. Les évacuations représentaient 66% de cas. L’âge gestationnel moyen était de 36 semaines d'aménorrhées et la majorité des patientes (86%) était en travail. La gravite du tableau clinique était appréciée selon la classification de Sher avec 63% (114 cas) au grade 3. Une coagulopathie était observée chez 27,2% des patientes. Nous avions retrouvé une relation statistiquement significative entre la gravite du tableau clinique et le pronostic maternel (p = 0,026) et foetal (p = 0,0000). Une direction du travail était effectuée chez 109 patientes (60% des cas). L'expulsion foetale était obtenue par voie basse dans 49% des cas et une césarienne était effectuée dans 51% des cas. La morbidité maternelle était dominée par l'anémie secondaire à une hémorragie aigue dans 17,8% des cas et à l'insuffisance rénale aigue dans 6,1% des cas. Les éléments de mauvais pronostic étaient représentés par la gravité du tableau clinique (p = 0,03) et le mode d'admission dominé par les évacuations (p = 0,01), la relation était statistiquement significative. La voie d'accouchement n’était pas retrouvée comme élément de mauvais pronostic (p = 0,09). Nous avions noté douze cas de décès maternels soit 6,6% des patientes. Conclusion La prévention de la mortalité maternelle et foetale liée à cette affection passe par une amélioration du suivi prénatal, une meilleure organisation du plan d'accouchement et une amélioration des conditions d’évacuation. La mise en place d'une banque de sang fonctionnel, d'une unité réanimation médicale ainsi qu'un service de prise en charge néonatale devient une nécessité pour améliorer le pronostic maternel et néonatal. PMID:24932322

  13. Tumores neonatales y malformaciones congénitas

    PubMed Central

    Tornero, O. Berbel; García, J.A. Ortega; Tortajada, J. Ferrís i; Castell, J. García; Colomer, J. Donat i; Soldin, O.P.; Soler, J.L. Fuster

    2013-01-01

    Introducción La asociación entre tumores y malformaciones congénitas está bien establecida, pero no existen datos exclusivos en el período neonatal y se desconocen los mecanismos subyacentes que generan dicha relación. Objetivos Este trabajo tiene dos objetivos: primero, analizar la frecuencia de los tumores neonatales asociados a malformaciones congénitas, y segundo, comentar las posibles hipótesis etiopatogénicas de la relación entre ambas entidades. Materiales y método Estudio retrospectivo de las historias clínicas de los tumores neonatales, en el Hospital Universitario Materno- Infantil La Fe de Valencia, desde enero de 1990 hasta diciembre de 1999. Selección y descripción de las variedades histológicas asociadas a malformaciones congénitas. Éstas se han agrupado siguiendo los criterios de la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades CIE-9, códigos 740.0–759.9. Revisión sistemática bibliográfica de los últimos 25 años, obtenida del Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science y Embase. El perfil de búsqueda utilizado fue la combinación de “neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms” y “congenital malformations/birth defects”. Resultados Se identificaron 72 tumores neonatales (2,8 % del total de tumores pediátricos diagnosticados en dichos años) y 15 de ellos (20,8 %) asociados a malformaciones congénitas, enfermedades o síndromes congénitos. Las asociaciones entre tumores neonatales y malformaciones congénitas fueron las siguientes: a) angioma en 3 pacientes: con dos cardiopatías congénitas y una atresia de coanas-laringomalacia; b) neuroblastoma en 2 pacientes: uno con riñón en herradura y anomalías vertebrales, y otro con cardiopatía congénita; c) teratoma en 2 pacientes: uno con fisura palatina y anomalías vertebrales, y otro con metatarso varo; d) tumor del sistema nervioso central en un paciente con hernia de Bochdaleck; e) tumor cardíaco en 4 pacientes con esclerosis tuberosa; f) leucemia aguda en un paciente con síndrome de Down y cardiopatía congénita; g) tumor renal en un caso con hidrocefalia triventricular, y h) tumor adrenal en un caso con hemihipertrofia. En la bibliografía específica, las publicaciones engloban tumores de diferentes épocas pediátricas y sin unanimidad de criterios para clasificar las malformaciones congénitas. Apenas existen datos en el período neonatal y la asociación entre ambas entidades se obtiene de registros de instituciones médicas. La prevalencia oscila entre el 15 y el 31,6 %. Las hipótesis etiopatogénicas que explican la asociación entre tumores neonatales y malformaciones congénitas están basadas en las exposiciones prenatales (preconcepcionales y transplacentarias) a factores de riesgo potencialmente mutagénicos y carcinogénicos. Conclusiones Probablemente, los tumores neonatales se asocian con mayor frecuencia a malformaciones congénitas que los tumores diagnosticados en épocas posteriores de la vida. Para conocer la prevalencia real de la asociación entre tumores neonatales y malformaciones congénitas, es necesario unificar los criterios de inclusión y definición de ambas entidades. La obtención de una minuciosa historia medioambiental en todos los tumores neonatales asociados a malformaciones congénitas, donde se detallen y registren todos los factores de riesgo constitucionales y ambientales, es fundamental para mejorar nuestros escasos conocimientos de los mecanismos prenatales subyacentes y avanzar en su prevención. PMID:18559198